The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
What a Dam Collapse Looks Like
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdOGPBnfoKE

The brand new earthen Teton Dam in Eastern Idaho collapsed on June 5, 1976 at 11:57 am. The entire reservoir of about 288,000 acre feet (or about one-twelfth of the Oroville Reservoir’s capacity), roared down upon two towns in the flood plain, demolishing them.

The human death toll was remarkably low, either 11 or 14 according to various sources, but about 13,000 cows were killed.

The Oroville reservoir is now down almost 48 feet below its brim to 853′ elevation. The goal is to lower the water level to 850′, which is what they were holding it at when it suddenly shot up earlier this month to 902′.

Outflow down the damaged main spillway has been cut from 100,000 cubic feet per second down to about 55,000 cfs, while the inflow from the moderate rains a few days ago is up to around 40,000 cfs. So the drop in the lake’s elevation is down to just over 1 inch per hour.

It hasn’t started raining again yet in Oroville, but a fairly big storm is expected from Sunday through Tuesday. The small town of Feather Falls up in the reservoir’s watershed is expecting about 6.5 inches of rain, which would be about 75 or 80 feet of incremental elevation, all other things being equal (which they never are). Fortunately, the week after this onrushing storm is expected have less than one inch of precipitation, with fairly cool temperatures to retard snowmelt.

The official reason for cutting the main spillway’s outflow so far back is to allow the power station to be restarted, which could add 13,000 cfs to outflow.

From the San Francisco Chronicle:

Interestingly, there’s a fourth outlet, the “river valves,” that used to have 5,400 cfs capacity, but were cut to 2,000 after an accident, and apparently haven’t been used in this emergency.

Here’s a curious headline:

5 Oroville Dam workers fired after posting pictures on social media
By Allison Weeks, KRON and Clemence Robineau, KRON
Published: February 18, 2017, 6:27 pm

So, it’s All Hands on Deck … except that managing our social media presence is, of course, the highest priority. We can’t let the 16,000 residents of Oroville, CA, 7 miles downriver, get their information unfiltered.

That would be inappropriate.

 
Hide 81 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Can we get by without building dams?

    • Replies: @pyrrhus
    @Opinionator

    Dams are a classic human activity that usually have some short term benefits but are a serious long term detriment/danger. They damage river life, alter the watershed, and eventually either collapse or silt up....Humans are very short term thinkers. The dam builders (politicians) always benefit, so who cares about the denouement?

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Opinionator

    Sure, but first we have to get rid of 98% of the people in the Southwest and maybe 30% of them in the rest of the country. After that minor adjustment, no problem!

    Replies: @Opinionator, @Stan Adams

  2. > 13,000 cows were killed.

    Well, you know: “XKCD: Land Mammals”

    https://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/1338:_Land_Mammals

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @El Dato

    El, If this had happened more recently, the message would have been..."Bush hates cows!"

  3. Among the earthen dams that collapse in my nightmares is Queensland Nickel’s toxic tailings pools next to the Great Barrier Reef.

    http://www.australianmanufacturing.com.au/15576/toxic-spill-closes-clive-parker-nickel-refinery

    http://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au/news/crucial-report-into-tailings-dams-at-yabulu-to-detail-risk-of-overflow/news-story/7b19267d6c9dcf9a21925216af067e8b

    Just one poster-child nightmare out of countless such tailings dam sites worldwide.

    Hard to believe the devastating bauxite red mud dam failure in Hungary is nearly 7 years ago. Nearly a million cubic yards of red mud at pH 13, with chrome, arsenic, and mercury in the mix.

    http://www.infomine.com/library/publications/docs/Hegedus2011.pdf

    It’s very hard to get a handle on this issue as an intelligent citizen. Most articles I’ve ever encountered (search or citation) on mineral processing technology, mine tailings dams, their design, failure, and remediation/impacts are behind stiff paywalls ($30 and up per PDF article online via Science Direct, e.g.). Many of the methods and processes applied are proprietary and closely held.

    Not generally the case with public works water projects, and this is one of the reasons I’m leery of privatizing these enterprises (as I expect Trump’s brain trust to push) while sneering at public sector involvement.

    Remember how thigh-tingly Reagan fanbois got about the idea of “drowining government in a bathtub”? Yep, leave it to our global corporate overlords and all will be well! No sunshine needed here, peons…move along. Extreme weather? What extreme weather?

    • Agree: (((Owen))), AndrewR
    • Replies: @JerryC
    @Olorin

    I don't think public sector management is really any guarantee against industrial accidents occurring. Remember the EPA's gold mine disaster from a few years ago?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2015_Gold_King_Mine_waste_water_spill

    Replies: @The Plutonium Kid, @Olorin

    , @Stan Adams
    @Olorin

    There are message boards where students - Asians, both East and South - trade passwords for databases like Science Direct.

    If you're an alum of a major university, you might be able to get a password to access them at home. Even some public libraries might let you have access.

    Replies: @Olorin

  4. but about 13,000 cows were killed

    Baby Face Nelson don’t care.

  5. Operation Chastise, 1943

    at least 1,650 people were killed: around 70 of these were in the Eder Valley, and at least 1,579 bodies were found along the Möhne and Ruhr rivers, with hundreds missing. 1,026 of the bodies found downriver of the Möhne Dam were foreign prisoners of war and forced labourers in different camps, mainly from the Soviet Union. Worst hit was the city of Neheim (now part of Neheim-Hüsten) at the confluence of the Möhne and Ruhr rivers, where over 800 people perished, among them at least 493 female forced labourers from the Soviet Union.

    The effect on food production was more significant, with many square kilometres of arable land being washed away and effectively unusable until the 1950s. There was also a great loss of farm animals bred for food.

    If I lived in Oroville I’d be booking the family vacation right now. From some hotel up a mountain nearby.

  6. “5 Oroville Dam workers fired after posting pictures on social media”: Oroville/Orwell – spooky similarity.

  7. Catastrophic failure of the Hoover Dam would be a disaster of epic proportions. The death toll downstream would be far into the thousands, vast amounts of agricultural lands would be ruined, and with Lake Mead drained Las Vegas would be nearly uninhabitable due to lack of water.
    The good news is that destroying the huge dam would be impossible without an atomic bomb.

    • Replies: @Cloudswrest
    @prosa123

    I've speculated on the effects of a small (Hiroshima sized) nuke on the Hoover Dam. I think such a bomb, on either side, would cause the dam to fail, but for different reasons. For a bomb on the dry side, the dam could ostensibly withstand the pressure, especially since it's backed by the water pressure on the other side. But the heat would cause the concrete to dehydrate, turning it back into portland cement. It addition the released internal steam would spall all the concrete. It would lose all its material strength and collapse. An underwater bomb on the water side would simply blow out the dam just by mechanical force. If such a bomb were detonated more than a 1000 yards away on the dry side the dam would just laugh at it.

  8. @Olorin
    Among the earthen dams that collapse in my nightmares is Queensland Nickel's toxic tailings pools next to the Great Barrier Reef.

    http://www.australianmanufacturing.com.au/15576/toxic-spill-closes-clive-parker-nickel-refinery

    http://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au/news/crucial-report-into-tailings-dams-at-yabulu-to-detail-risk-of-overflow/news-story/7b19267d6c9dcf9a21925216af067e8b

    Just one poster-child nightmare out of countless such tailings dam sites worldwide.

    Hard to believe the devastating bauxite red mud dam failure in Hungary is nearly 7 years ago. Nearly a million cubic yards of red mud at pH 13, with chrome, arsenic, and mercury in the mix.

    http://www.infomine.com/library/publications/docs/Hegedus2011.pdf

    It's very hard to get a handle on this issue as an intelligent citizen. Most articles I've ever encountered (search or citation) on mineral processing technology, mine tailings dams, their design, failure, and remediation/impacts are behind stiff paywalls ($30 and up per PDF article online via Science Direct, e.g.). Many of the methods and processes applied are proprietary and closely held.

    Not generally the case with public works water projects, and this is one of the reasons I'm leery of privatizing these enterprises (as I expect Trump's brain trust to push) while sneering at public sector involvement.

    Remember how thigh-tingly Reagan fanbois got about the idea of "drowining government in a bathtub"? Yep, leave it to our global corporate overlords and all will be well! No sunshine needed here, peons...move along. Extreme weather? What extreme weather?

    Replies: @JerryC, @Stan Adams

    I don’t think public sector management is really any guarantee against industrial accidents occurring. Remember the EPA’s gold mine disaster from a few years ago?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2015_Gold_King_Mine_waste_water_spill

    • Replies: @The Plutonium Kid
    @JerryC


    Remember the EPA’s gold mine disaster from a few years ago?
     
    So far as I'm aware, no one was ever led responsible for that. I guess the government works by different rules, right?

    Replies: @CAL

    , @Olorin
    @JerryC

    Take a look at this timeline...then come back and pin the blame on EPA.

    http://www.hcn.org/issues/48.7/silvertons-gold-king-reckoning/a-gold-king-mine-timeline

    Plutonium Kid is dead wrong--EPA took responsibility for the 2015 spill, and blame was even laid on the shoulders of one particular white working man.

    High Country News has covered this mine extensively. Many more public reports are available, many online.

    I'm not aware of any similar sunshine for Davis, Soule, and Co., American Mining & Tunnel Co., Anglo-Saxon Mining Co., Gold King Consolidated Mines Co., Otto Mears (the Russian Jewish railroad and toll road developer), US Smelting, Mining, and Refining, Gold King Extension Mines, Standard Metals, Washington Mining Company, Arava Natural Resources, Mueller Industries, Gerber Minerals, Gerber Energy International Inc., Echo Bay, Sunnyside Gold, Gold King Mines Corp., Gold King Consolidated, Silver King Mines Inc., Pacific Silver Corp., Taylor Rand (company), Pitchfork "M" Corp, Kinross, Hennis, Garpa, California Goldfields--all companies that oversaw operations, leased there, held various ownership, and made decisions--or the individuals who came along in the 1990s or later to do remediation, or try to build smaller more environmentally sustainable operations.

    Then there's the BLM, which woke up one day and realized it owned part of the mine thanks to it not having been patented many decades before.

    There were a good 125 years of mining at the site before local citizens called on EPA for help as polluted discharges into their watershed kept increasing in the early Aughts.

    In fact IME you pretty much have to have Ph.D.-level research skills and institutional or academic credentials to get access to and comprehend the massive logjam of documents.

    For any one such mine. And there are countless ones worldwide.

    Nothing is a guarantee against anything. But my experience with "public-private partnerships" in the public sector led me to conclude that by the time any remediation/reclamation/cleanup project gets to the public sector, all sorts of monied fingerprints are on it.

    White people excel at innovation and risk taking...but also, ostensibly, at forward and systems thinking. Blame is for lesser minds.

    Thanks, Jerry.

  9. Off-topic: and here we get to the nub of it, religious purity:

    An elite Upper East Side private school’s annual ice-skating party at Trump Wollman Rink in Central Park had to be canceled after parents refused to send their kids in protest of the president, sources said.

    The Parents Association at The Dalton School sent a letter Thursday announcing the “Dalton on Ice” event was scrapped, saying “it would not be financially prudent” because of “significantly lower attendance.”

    Dalton’s PA president, LaMae DeJongh, declined to comment — but sources said the low attendance was due to rampant anti-Trump sentiment at the elite prep school, which boasts alumni such as CNN’s Anderson Cooper.

    “I think it is completely insane,” said one Dalton parent who disagrees with the protest. “Like him or not, it feels like a strange place for New Yorkers to protest. And sad that kids now have no skating party.”

    Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years.

    http://nypost.com/2017/02/17/prep-school-cancels-party-at-trump-wollman-rink-over-parents-protests/

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @slumber_j

    Slumber, The last line of your comment says all you need to know about Trump...."Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years." The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Clyde, @Anonymous

    , @Pericles
    @slumber_j

    The parents in an alternative manifestation of solidarity against DRUMPF decided to cut off their childrens' noses to spite their faces.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @slumber_j

    Thanks.

    , @Olorin
    @slumber_j

    Alma mater of Emma Sulkowicz...

    ...Matt Yglesias,...

    ...and District Judge Ronnie Abrams--recommended by Gillibrand, appointed by Obama, and presider over two high-profile cases against...you guessed it...Donald J. Trump.

    Also her daddy, high powered lawyer Floyd Abrams, argued for the NYT in the Plame Affair grand jury investigation in the Aughts.

  10. @El Dato
    > 13,000 cows were killed.

    Well, you know: "XKCD: Land Mammals"

    https://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/1338:_Land_Mammals

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    El, If this had happened more recently, the message would have been…”Bush hates cows!”

  11. @slumber_j
    Off-topic: and here we get to the nub of it, religious purity:

    An elite Upper East Side private school’s annual ice-skating party at Trump Wollman Rink in Central Park had to be canceled after parents refused to send their kids in protest of the president, sources said.

    The Parents Association at The Dalton School sent a letter Thursday announcing the “Dalton on Ice” event was scrapped, saying “it would not be financially prudent” because of “significantly lower attendance.”

    Dalton’s PA president, LaMae DeJongh, declined to comment — but sources said the low attendance was due to rampant anti-Trump sentiment at the elite prep school, which boasts alumni such as CNN’s Anderson Cooper.

    “I think it is completely insane,” said one Dalton parent who disagrees with the protest. “Like him or not, it feels like a strange place for New Yorkers to protest. And sad that kids now have no skating party.”

    Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years.

     

    http://nypost.com/2017/02/17/prep-school-cancels-party-at-trump-wollman-rink-over-parents-protests/

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Pericles, @Steve Sailer, @Olorin

    Slumber, The last line of your comment says all you need to know about Trump….”Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years.” The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Buffalo Joe


    The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.
     
    Or not skate there, depending on just how crazy their parents are.

    But yeah: a combination of his contribution to the City and his enormous ego is why his name is emblazoned on the boards, the Zamboni and the labels on the bottled water at Wollman Rink. And at Lasker Rink up in Harlem, for that matter. The horror!

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @Clyde
    @Buffalo Joe


    Slumber, The last line of your comment says all you need to know about Trump….”Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years.” The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.
     
    Donald Trump did not rack his brains on how to get the Central Park Wollman skating rink up and running again. He simply went to the number one builder of ice skating rinks in Canada and told them, "We will buy the refrigeration equipment from you if you tell me exactly how the water pipes underneath the rink must be laid out"
    The water pipes and fittings must be specced out to circulate salt water because this is what the rink refrigeration system does to make the ice. Trump had to make sure his contractors laid pipe according to plan. So Trump obviously knew who to hire who would do a great plumbing job on the skating rink.
    Properly built rink + Canadian refrigeration equipment = success. A success that had eluded the NYC government for 6 years. Like these dopes and hacks and their "connected" contractors had the first clue about how to build an ice skating rink.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @Anonymous
    @Buffalo Joe

    Buff, Trump ripped off the city and Italian-American contractors like yourself building that rink:

    https://youtu.be/8oODGikbJ2g?t=36

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  12. OT – Have you discussed Sweden’s self-proclaimed “Feminist Government” dressing up like good little hijabi-clad servants in Iran?

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @biz

    If you're in country X, you have to follow their dress codes, at least as they relate to modesty and decency. I find nothing wrong with that. The women who do find something wrong with that should just refuse to go to that particular country. Women and men willing to conform to the demands of their job should go there to represent their country. End of story.

    Replies: @Pericles, @EriK, @biz

    , @Pericles
    @biz

    Wonderful. Well, might as well start practicing, eh, old girls?

    The same principles and the same governing party (though at a local level) also led to feminist snow clearing.

    http://heatst.com/world/feminist-snow-plowing-system-brings-stockholm-to-a-standstill/

  13. @Opinionator
    Can we get by without building dams?

    Replies: @pyrrhus, @Almost Missouri

    Dams are a classic human activity that usually have some short term benefits but are a serious long term detriment/danger. They damage river life, alter the watershed, and eventually either collapse or silt up….Humans are very short term thinkers. The dam builders (politicians) always benefit, so who cares about the denouement?

  14. Can we get by without building dams?

    You first. In all matters of dispensing with modernity in order to accommodate eco-enviro lunacy YOU FIRST.

  15. @Buffalo Joe
    @slumber_j

    Slumber, The last line of your comment says all you need to know about Trump...."Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years." The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Clyde, @Anonymous

    The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.

    Or not skate there, depending on just how crazy their parents are.

    But yeah: a combination of his contribution to the City and his enormous ego is why his name is emblazoned on the boards, the Zamboni and the labels on the bottled water at Wollman Rink. And at Lasker Rink up in Harlem, for that matter. The horror!

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @slumber_j

    slumber, The right to be recognized as a major donor is visible on every college campus building in the USA.

  16. “We can’t let the 16,000 residents of Oroville, CA, 7 miles downriver, get their information unfiltered. That would be inappropriate.”

    Bureaucultural Censortivity?

  17. Ice skating is a bastion of white privilege anyway . . .

  18. Oroville is one of the few California towns where there is a substantial and enduring level of white poverty. It is quite benighted and on par with Bakersfield and Stockton. Bless their hearts, but a significant percentage of the town are the decedents of the people who migrated up to the area to build the dam and just stayed on. Contrasted with Chico, the other population center in Butte county, which is a whitopia there is a real culture clash. There is a large number of rice and almond farmers in the area but they don’t employ that many people, particularly whites. Almonds only need workers for a few month out of the year so ‘migrants’ come and go and rice is almost entirely mechanized. Unemployment is high in the area and there is a real contrast with the farmers many of which are quite wealthy albeit they wear jeans and drive dirty trucks so you would never notice it if you weren’t looking.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Prof. Woland

    I run the Almond Bowl every year; Chico is pretty darned Mexican for a white-opia, but I suppose everything is relative....

  19. @slumber_j
    @Buffalo Joe


    The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.
     
    Or not skate there, depending on just how crazy their parents are.

    But yeah: a combination of his contribution to the City and his enormous ego is why his name is emblazoned on the boards, the Zamboni and the labels on the bottled water at Wollman Rink. And at Lasker Rink up in Harlem, for that matter. The horror!

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    slumber, The right to be recognized as a major donor is visible on every college campus building in the USA.

    • Agree: slumber_j
  20. From a few years ago, an account of the mishap that caused the damage to the river valves:

    http://www.orovillemr.com/general-news/20120912/dwr-planning-study-on-worrisome-river-valves-blamed-in-2009-oroville-dam-accident

    The accident happened around 7:30 a.m. July 22, 2009, after employees working in the river valve chamber, deep below the dam and Lake Oroville, began to test the valves.

    When the valves were opened to 85 percent, a break-away wall pulled away and swept downstream into the 35-foot river diversion tunnel, according to a 2010 California Division of Occupational Safety and Health report.

    Cal OSHA concluded opening the valves without an energy dispersion ring, which reportedly was absent, “created water flow with such great turbulence, that it blocked an air vent and created a vacuum.”

    “Cal OSHA was saying they believe that when water was coming out of these valves, it blocked air downstream,” creating local pressure in the river valve chamber that contributed to the wall failing, Torgerson said Friday.

    He said to an extent, DWR agrees, But because there are no measuring devices to determine that, he couldn’t say for certain.

    “Fundamentally, we felt the break-away wall should not have failed,” Torgerson said.

    In their own effort to find out what caused the incident, DWR officials hired engineering consultants and a corrosion specialist.

    Torgerson said the bolts securing the break-away wall were corroded, causing the original design to lose its strength.

    I think the river valves are used to maintain flow downstream if the reservoir level drops below that of the dam’s main gates.

    The river valve system and valves were installed in the early 1960s when Oroville Dam was built.

    “They were used to keep the flow going into the river,” he said. “They were intended to be used for filling and during emergency operations … and to keep the flow in the river while the dam was being built.”

    In the 1980s, the state required regulating water temperature to help aquatic life, and the river valves were also used for that purpose.

    Torgerson said the river valve system includes a circular valve 6-feet in diameter and 140-feet long, and a cone valve 4 1/2-feet in diameter.

    It sounds like the employees there might not be top-flight, and that the infrastructure has been deteriorating.

  21. @Buffalo Joe
    @slumber_j

    Slumber, The last line of your comment says all you need to know about Trump...."Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years." The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Clyde, @Anonymous

    Slumber, The last line of your comment says all you need to know about Trump….”Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years.” The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.

    Donald Trump did not rack his brains on how to get the Central Park Wollman skating rink up and running again. He simply went to the number one builder of ice skating rinks in Canada and told them, “We will buy the refrigeration equipment from you if you tell me exactly how the water pipes underneath the rink must be laid out”
    The water pipes and fittings must be specced out to circulate salt water because this is what the rink refrigeration system does to make the ice. Trump had to make sure his contractors laid pipe according to plan. So Trump obviously knew who to hire who would do a great plumbing job on the skating rink.
    Properly built rink + Canadian refrigeration equipment = success. A success that had eluded the NYC government for 6 years. Like these dopes and hacks and their “connected” contractors had the first clue about how to build an ice skating rink.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Clyde

    Clyde, A few years back the NHL and the Buffalo Sabres hosted the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game at the Bills' stadium. I actually operated a fork truck for the contractor installing the sound system. Amazing how quickly the main contractor laid out and installed the artificial ice surface. These guys really knew their business, having erected and disassembled the same rink in Japan a couple of weeks previous to the Buffalo game. Sad that a city like NYC couldn't handle the installation of a permanent rink, sad too for the kids whose parents are too fragile to see the name Trump.

  22. Watching the dam right now on Fox News and it looks like there’s chunks of exposed cement all over the place and the water going wherever it wants.

    Is this normal or are we watching this disaster ease towards the climax?

  23. some good footage on the building of the Oroville Dam…….video claims that it was completed one year ahead of schedule; power plant was named after Edward Hyatt a state power engineer.

    Mention is also made of the diversion tunnels

  24. Walls don’t work. We need to open our arms to the crumbling of all dams, because it is the moral thing to do. Yes, let the waves wash everything away – cows, people, towns, the whole thing. No fences. No barriers. No walls. No locks on doors. No borders. No dams.

    The water is level! The equality of the graveyard is the fulfillment of moral justice, comrades.

  25. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “OT – Have you discussed Sweden’s self-proclaimed “Feminist Government” dressing up like good little hijabi-clad servants in Iran?”

    While you have to feel sorry for what happened to Patty Hearst, she probably demonstrated that female mammals (etc.) have an evolved submission thing. Males probably do as well, but it probably kicks in for females earlier, because they often can’t run away from the group:

    “…At the time of her arrest, Patty Hearst weighed only 87 pounds and was described by Dr. Margaret Singer in October 1975 as “a low-IQ, low-affect zombie”…

    …her IQ was measured at 112 from 130 previously…”

  26. Dams are so repressive. Let mama nature come.

  27. > 5 Oroville Dam workers fired after posting pictures on social media

    Seriously, what the actual F***

    If they had posted pictures of the year’s end party with the director in a compromising position on the office printer, I would understand, but this is harebrained. Plus probably skills you DON’T want to lose right about now.

    Imagine this show at Fukushima. “Yes the guy who knows the in and outs of the pipe system down there has been let go.” Well, the Japs actually refrained from crying uncle quickly enough lest they lose face, so they just lost 4 reactors.

    Pretty sure there is good drone footage by now in any case.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @El Dato

    Apparently they were working for a contractor (Syblon Reid) who has a blanket rule in place that no employee puts stuff about their work on social media. I can sort of understand that, if as a company you rely on larger organisations for work.

    There's a shot of the current damage to the main spillway here.

    http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92598455/

    With reduced water flow, almost no water leaves by the bottom of the spillway, it nearly all heads down what's becoming quite a canyon on the right (east?) side of the spillway. There's a fracture in the spillway, below the existing hole, which might become yet another big hole in the future. Looks like the entire spillway downhill from the break is pretty shot.

    More pics here, mostly of the emergency spillway but one showing workers carrying buckets (!) up the left side of the main spillway - who knows what they're trying to patch?

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/02/19/oroville-dam-dramatic-photos-show-damage-to-dams-emergency-spillway/

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  28. @JerryC
    @Olorin

    I don't think public sector management is really any guarantee against industrial accidents occurring. Remember the EPA's gold mine disaster from a few years ago?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2015_Gold_King_Mine_waste_water_spill

    Replies: @The Plutonium Kid, @Olorin

    Remember the EPA’s gold mine disaster from a few years ago?

    So far as I’m aware, no one was ever led responsible for that. I guess the government works by different rules, right?

    • Replies: @CAL
    @The Plutonium Kid

    It was an EPA contractor who did the work that caused the breach. I don't think there is any doubt who caused the disaster.

  29. Oroville dam in Sept 2014 near its low of level at 25% capacity

  30. @biz
    OT - Have you discussed Sweden's self-proclaimed "Feminist Government" dressing up like good little hijabi-clad servants in Iran?

    Replies: @Romanian, @Pericles

    If you’re in country X, you have to follow their dress codes, at least as they relate to modesty and decency. I find nothing wrong with that. The women who do find something wrong with that should just refuse to go to that particular country. Women and men willing to conform to the demands of their job should go there to represent their country. End of story.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Romanian

    I would agree with you, as soon as we deport all muslims from Europe.

    Replies: @Romanian

    , @EriK
    @Romanian


    If you’re in country X, you have to follow their dress codes, at least as they relate to modesty and decency. I find nothing wrong with that.
     
    Somehow that dress code protocol only works one way.

    I find everything wrong with that.
    , @biz
    @Romanian

    Great. Then I'm sure both you and these 'feminists' are in agreement that all Islamic garments - niqabs, chadors, burkas, whatever - must be immediately removed upon setting foot in the West.

    Replies: @Romanian

  31. @biz
    OT - Have you discussed Sweden's self-proclaimed "Feminist Government" dressing up like good little hijabi-clad servants in Iran?

    Replies: @Romanian, @Pericles

    Wonderful. Well, might as well start practicing, eh, old girls?

    The same principles and the same governing party (though at a local level) also led to feminist snow clearing.

    http://heatst.com/world/feminist-snow-plowing-system-brings-stockholm-to-a-standstill/

  32. @Romanian
    @biz

    If you're in country X, you have to follow their dress codes, at least as they relate to modesty and decency. I find nothing wrong with that. The women who do find something wrong with that should just refuse to go to that particular country. Women and men willing to conform to the demands of their job should go there to represent their country. End of story.

    Replies: @Pericles, @EriK, @biz

    I would agree with you, as soon as we deport all muslims from Europe.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Pericles

    Of course. There is no reason we cannot do both. Shoring up our civilizational space is paramount. Unfortunately, Providence showed a sense of humor when it answered our calls for dikes to keep the third world tide at bay :)

  33. @slumber_j
    Off-topic: and here we get to the nub of it, religious purity:

    An elite Upper East Side private school’s annual ice-skating party at Trump Wollman Rink in Central Park had to be canceled after parents refused to send their kids in protest of the president, sources said.

    The Parents Association at The Dalton School sent a letter Thursday announcing the “Dalton on Ice” event was scrapped, saying “it would not be financially prudent” because of “significantly lower attendance.”

    Dalton’s PA president, LaMae DeJongh, declined to comment — but sources said the low attendance was due to rampant anti-Trump sentiment at the elite prep school, which boasts alumni such as CNN’s Anderson Cooper.

    “I think it is completely insane,” said one Dalton parent who disagrees with the protest. “Like him or not, it feels like a strange place for New Yorkers to protest. And sad that kids now have no skating party.”

    Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years.

     

    http://nypost.com/2017/02/17/prep-school-cancels-party-at-trump-wollman-rink-over-parents-protests/

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Pericles, @Steve Sailer, @Olorin

    The parents in an alternative manifestation of solidarity against DRUMPF decided to cut off their childrens’ noses to spite their faces.

  34. @Pericles
    @Romanian

    I would agree with you, as soon as we deport all muslims from Europe.

    Replies: @Romanian

    Of course. There is no reason we cannot do both. Shoring up our civilizational space is paramount. Unfortunately, Providence showed a sense of humor when it answered our calls for dikes to keep the third world tide at bay 🙂

  35. Technical proficiency is the most dangerous thing in the world. If, as most scientists suggest, our now deathly quiet universe must have once contained myriad planets attaining technology above our level, they went to their doom a la the Krell self extermination by singularity in Forbidden Planet (an adaptation of Shakespeare’s The Tempest). As the Bard put it-

    Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
    As I foretold you, were all spirits and
    Are melted into air, into thin air:
    And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
    The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
    The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
    Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve
    And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
    Leave not a rack behind.

  36. @Opinionator
    Can we get by without building dams?

    Replies: @pyrrhus, @Almost Missouri

    Sure, but first we have to get rid of 98% of the people in the Southwest and maybe 30% of them in the rest of the country. After that minor adjustment, no problem!

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Almost Missouri

    Hmm. So about 30 years ago, the country really didn't need dams and could have done without the cost, environmental destruction, and risk.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    , @Stan Adams
    @Almost Missouri

    Well, we already have the water. Now all we need is the Kool-Aid.

  37. @Clyde
    @Buffalo Joe


    Slumber, The last line of your comment says all you need to know about Trump….”Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years.” The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.
     
    Donald Trump did not rack his brains on how to get the Central Park Wollman skating rink up and running again. He simply went to the number one builder of ice skating rinks in Canada and told them, "We will buy the refrigeration equipment from you if you tell me exactly how the water pipes underneath the rink must be laid out"
    The water pipes and fittings must be specced out to circulate salt water because this is what the rink refrigeration system does to make the ice. Trump had to make sure his contractors laid pipe according to plan. So Trump obviously knew who to hire who would do a great plumbing job on the skating rink.
    Properly built rink + Canadian refrigeration equipment = success. A success that had eluded the NYC government for 6 years. Like these dopes and hacks and their "connected" contractors had the first clue about how to build an ice skating rink.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Clyde, A few years back the NHL and the Buffalo Sabres hosted the Winter Classic outdoor hockey game at the Bills’ stadium. I actually operated a fork truck for the contractor installing the sound system. Amazing how quickly the main contractor laid out and installed the artificial ice surface. These guys really knew their business, having erected and disassembled the same rink in Japan a couple of weeks previous to the Buffalo game. Sad that a city like NYC couldn’t handle the installation of a permanent rink, sad too for the kids whose parents are too fragile to see the name Trump.

  38. @Romanian
    @biz

    If you're in country X, you have to follow their dress codes, at least as they relate to modesty and decency. I find nothing wrong with that. The women who do find something wrong with that should just refuse to go to that particular country. Women and men willing to conform to the demands of their job should go there to represent their country. End of story.

    Replies: @Pericles, @EriK, @biz

    If you’re in country X, you have to follow their dress codes, at least as they relate to modesty and decency. I find nothing wrong with that.

    Somehow that dress code protocol only works one way.

    I find everything wrong with that.

  39. @Almost Missouri
    @Opinionator

    Sure, but first we have to get rid of 98% of the people in the Southwest and maybe 30% of them in the rest of the country. After that minor adjustment, no problem!

    Replies: @Opinionator, @Stan Adams

    Hmm. So about 30 years ago, the country really didn’t need dams and could have done without the cost, environmental destruction, and risk.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Opinionator

    Come back after you subtract the cost of flooding, the value of the electricity generated by the dams and economic activity generated by having dams in place. Then describe the percentage of how much you are willing to reduce your standard of living by raising the cost of ("carbon-free") power.

    BTW, your fellow travellers think everyone on the planet should get the same amount of power to live on as you do. So if your standard of living doesn't drop by 80%, whining about the "cost, environmental destruction, and risk" will ring hollow.

    Replies: @Opinionator

  40. @Buffalo Joe
    @slumber_j

    Slumber, The last line of your comment says all you need to know about Trump...."Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years." The rink belongs to the city, but Trump fixed it so kids can skate there.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Clyde, @Anonymous

    Buff, Trump ripped off the city and Italian-American contractors like yourself building that rink:

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous, Wow, that is a big ice rink. I was thinking NHL rink size. Thanks for the link. Construction contractors play by different rules than most other businesses.

  41. @The Plutonium Kid
    @JerryC


    Remember the EPA’s gold mine disaster from a few years ago?
     
    So far as I'm aware, no one was ever led responsible for that. I guess the government works by different rules, right?

    Replies: @CAL

    It was an EPA contractor who did the work that caused the breach. I don’t think there is any doubt who caused the disaster.

  42. @slumber_j
    Off-topic: and here we get to the nub of it, religious purity:

    An elite Upper East Side private school’s annual ice-skating party at Trump Wollman Rink in Central Park had to be canceled after parents refused to send their kids in protest of the president, sources said.

    The Parents Association at The Dalton School sent a letter Thursday announcing the “Dalton on Ice” event was scrapped, saying “it would not be financially prudent” because of “significantly lower attendance.”

    Dalton’s PA president, LaMae DeJongh, declined to comment — but sources said the low attendance was due to rampant anti-Trump sentiment at the elite prep school, which boasts alumni such as CNN’s Anderson Cooper.

    “I think it is completely insane,” said one Dalton parent who disagrees with the protest. “Like him or not, it feels like a strange place for New Yorkers to protest. And sad that kids now have no skating party.”

    Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years.

     

    http://nypost.com/2017/02/17/prep-school-cancels-party-at-trump-wollman-rink-over-parents-protests/

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Pericles, @Steve Sailer, @Olorin

    Thanks.

  43. I was inspired to write a Haiku.

    Saigon falls in 75,
    Grand Teton falls in 1976.
    Imperial overeach

  44. @Anonymous
    @Buffalo Joe

    Buff, Trump ripped off the city and Italian-American contractors like yourself building that rink:

    https://youtu.be/8oODGikbJ2g?t=36

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Anonymous, Wow, that is a big ice rink. I was thinking NHL rink size. Thanks for the link. Construction contractors play by different rules than most other businesses.

  45. @Olorin
    Among the earthen dams that collapse in my nightmares is Queensland Nickel's toxic tailings pools next to the Great Barrier Reef.

    http://www.australianmanufacturing.com.au/15576/toxic-spill-closes-clive-parker-nickel-refinery

    http://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au/news/crucial-report-into-tailings-dams-at-yabulu-to-detail-risk-of-overflow/news-story/7b19267d6c9dcf9a21925216af067e8b

    Just one poster-child nightmare out of countless such tailings dam sites worldwide.

    Hard to believe the devastating bauxite red mud dam failure in Hungary is nearly 7 years ago. Nearly a million cubic yards of red mud at pH 13, with chrome, arsenic, and mercury in the mix.

    http://www.infomine.com/library/publications/docs/Hegedus2011.pdf

    It's very hard to get a handle on this issue as an intelligent citizen. Most articles I've ever encountered (search or citation) on mineral processing technology, mine tailings dams, their design, failure, and remediation/impacts are behind stiff paywalls ($30 and up per PDF article online via Science Direct, e.g.). Many of the methods and processes applied are proprietary and closely held.

    Not generally the case with public works water projects, and this is one of the reasons I'm leery of privatizing these enterprises (as I expect Trump's brain trust to push) while sneering at public sector involvement.

    Remember how thigh-tingly Reagan fanbois got about the idea of "drowining government in a bathtub"? Yep, leave it to our global corporate overlords and all will be well! No sunshine needed here, peons...move along. Extreme weather? What extreme weather?

    Replies: @JerryC, @Stan Adams

    There are message boards where students – Asians, both East and South – trade passwords for databases like Science Direct.

    If you’re an alum of a major university, you might be able to get a password to access them at home. Even some public libraries might let you have access.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @Stan Adams

    Right you are.

    Our public library system focuses on day care for Latinas, baby sitting for yoga mommies, and providing sensitive bathroom facilities for the homeless, while holding book sales of classic titles to make shelf room for 30 copies of Fifty Shades of Grey (the DVD).

    I'm exaggerating only a little.

    I do have very good institutional access through a PNW academic library consortium, also my Ivy League alma mater.

    Many bright citizens don't have that access, or don't have the classical liberal arts type skills to make use of the mindboggling amount of information out there. I'm simply stunned by how much of even that information is behind paywalls now. It increasingly appears that public universities' tax dollars provide welfare streams for the (often corrupt) "peer reviewed journal" industry.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

  46. @Almost Missouri
    @Opinionator

    Sure, but first we have to get rid of 98% of the people in the Southwest and maybe 30% of them in the rest of the country. After that minor adjustment, no problem!

    Replies: @Opinionator, @Stan Adams

    Well, we already have the water. Now all we need is the Kool-Aid.

  47. This Teton Dam thing is just more evidence that the 70s were The Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @anonguy

    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    This is true. Electrical systems, cars, tires, clothing, cuisine, architecture, the tax code. All crap.

    Then came Ronald Reagan, and it was like everybody went from polyester to broadcloth overnight. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @anonguy, @Geschrei

    , @CrunchybutRealistCon
    @anonguy

    The impression you get for the 70s bein so gawd awful in public works & construction, architecture is that it was a time when some of the worst aspects of corruption in building material supply (eg Mob connections), trade union shenanigans, and poor oversight all combined. Another factor was that the worst aspects of 50s/60s reinforced concrete brutalism had not been contested in the marketplace of architectural ideas. These factors got further amplified by the energy crisis causing downgrades in steel durability as coatings were sacrificed for cost.

    Some of the worst examples of 70s design & construction fiascos would be the Houston Astrodome, the Minneapolis Metrodome (designed in 78), the Montreal Olympic Stadium, the Omni Coliseum(Atlanta), the New Haven Coliseum, and the Seattle Kingdome.

  48. Per wikipedia, this is pretty interesting what happened in one town downstream of the Teton Dam, the flood and the fire, not to mention the battering rams. Really amazing how few people died.

    One estimate placed damage to Hibbard and Rexburg area, with a population of about 10,000, at 80 percent of existing structures. The Teton River flows through the industrial, commercial and residential districts of north Rexburg. A significant reason for the massive damage in the community was the location of a lumber yard directly upstream. When the flood waters hit, thousands of logs were washed into town. Dozens of them hit a bulk gasoline storage tank a few hundred yards away. The gasoline ignited and sent flaming slicks adrift on the racing water.[12] The force of the logs and cut lumber, and the subsequent fires, practically destroyed the city.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anonguy

    The fires that were caused by the Teton flood were particularly striking.

  49. @Opinionator
    @Almost Missouri

    Hmm. So about 30 years ago, the country really didn't need dams and could have done without the cost, environmental destruction, and risk.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Come back after you subtract the cost of flooding, the value of the electricity generated by the dams and economic activity generated by having dams in place. Then describe the percentage of how much you are willing to reduce your standard of living by raising the cost of (“carbon-free”) power.

    BTW, your fellow travellers think everyone on the planet should get the same amount of power to live on as you do. So if your standard of living doesn’t drop by 80%, whining about the “cost, environmental destruction, and risk” will ring hollow.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    I think I would be okay with a 1950s, 60s standard of living.

    Replies: @HJH

  50. @prosa123
    Catastrophic failure of the Hoover Dam would be a disaster of epic proportions. The death toll downstream would be far into the thousands, vast amounts of agricultural lands would be ruined, and with Lake Mead drained Las Vegas would be nearly uninhabitable due to lack of water.
    The good news is that destroying the huge dam would be impossible without an atomic bomb.

    Replies: @Cloudswrest

    I’ve speculated on the effects of a small (Hiroshima sized) nuke on the Hoover Dam. I think such a bomb, on either side, would cause the dam to fail, but for different reasons. For a bomb on the dry side, the dam could ostensibly withstand the pressure, especially since it’s backed by the water pressure on the other side. But the heat would cause the concrete to dehydrate, turning it back into portland cement. It addition the released internal steam would spall all the concrete. It would lose all its material strength and collapse. An underwater bomb on the water side would simply blow out the dam just by mechanical force. If such a bomb were detonated more than a 1000 yards away on the dry side the dam would just laugh at it.

  51. In the past few years, I lived in a well-populated place that experienced a fairly severe “100-year” flood. Luckily my dwelling was at a local maximum of elevation, but it was still unsettling to see the water overflow from the nearby drainage ditch to my garage and front steps. Eerier still was the complete absence of people from normally crowded areas with flash flood warning sirens going off in the distance.

    It doesn’t take a flood of Oroville Dam proportions to seriously debilitate society or cause millions of dollars’ worth in damage. Here’s hoping that the dam stays strong.

  52. @JerryC
    @Olorin

    I don't think public sector management is really any guarantee against industrial accidents occurring. Remember the EPA's gold mine disaster from a few years ago?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2015_Gold_King_Mine_waste_water_spill

    Replies: @The Plutonium Kid, @Olorin

    Take a look at this timeline…then come back and pin the blame on EPA.

    http://www.hcn.org/issues/48.7/silvertons-gold-king-reckoning/a-gold-king-mine-timeline

    Plutonium Kid is dead wrong–EPA took responsibility for the 2015 spill, and blame was even laid on the shoulders of one particular white working man.

    High Country News has covered this mine extensively. Many more public reports are available, many online.

    I’m not aware of any similar sunshine for Davis, Soule, and Co., American Mining & Tunnel Co., Anglo-Saxon Mining Co., Gold King Consolidated Mines Co., Otto Mears (the Russian Jewish railroad and toll road developer), US Smelting, Mining, and Refining, Gold King Extension Mines, Standard Metals, Washington Mining Company, Arava Natural Resources, Mueller Industries, Gerber Minerals, Gerber Energy International Inc., Echo Bay, Sunnyside Gold, Gold King Mines Corp., Gold King Consolidated, Silver King Mines Inc., Pacific Silver Corp., Taylor Rand (company), Pitchfork “M” Corp, Kinross, Hennis, Garpa, California Goldfields–all companies that oversaw operations, leased there, held various ownership, and made decisions–or the individuals who came along in the 1990s or later to do remediation, or try to build smaller more environmentally sustainable operations.

    Then there’s the BLM, which woke up one day and realized it owned part of the mine thanks to it not having been patented many decades before.

    There were a good 125 years of mining at the site before local citizens called on EPA for help as polluted discharges into their watershed kept increasing in the early Aughts.

    In fact IME you pretty much have to have Ph.D.-level research skills and institutional or academic credentials to get access to and comprehend the massive logjam of documents.

    For any one such mine. And there are countless ones worldwide.

    Nothing is a guarantee against anything. But my experience with “public-private partnerships” in the public sector led me to conclude that by the time any remediation/reclamation/cleanup project gets to the public sector, all sorts of monied fingerprints are on it.

    White people excel at innovation and risk taking…but also, ostensibly, at forward and systems thinking. Blame is for lesser minds.

    Thanks, Jerry.

  53. @Stan Adams
    @Olorin

    There are message boards where students - Asians, both East and South - trade passwords for databases like Science Direct.

    If you're an alum of a major university, you might be able to get a password to access them at home. Even some public libraries might let you have access.

    Replies: @Olorin

    Right you are.

    Our public library system focuses on day care for Latinas, baby sitting for yoga mommies, and providing sensitive bathroom facilities for the homeless, while holding book sales of classic titles to make shelf room for 30 copies of Fifty Shades of Grey (the DVD).

    I’m exaggerating only a little.

    I do have very good institutional access through a PNW academic library consortium, also my Ivy League alma mater.

    Many bright citizens don’t have that access, or don’t have the classical liberal arts type skills to make use of the mindboggling amount of information out there. I’m simply stunned by how much of even that information is behind paywalls now. It increasingly appears that public universities’ tax dollars provide welfare streams for the (often corrupt) “peer reviewed journal” industry.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @Olorin


    It’s very hard to get a handle on this issue as an intelligent citizen. Most articles I’ve ever encountered (search or citation) on mineral processing technology, mine tailings dams, their design, failure, and remediation/impacts are behind stiff paywalls
     

    I’m simply stunned by how much of even that information is behind paywalls now.
     
    Sci-Hub - http://sci-hub.bz/

    Replies: @benjaminl

  54. @slumber_j
    Off-topic: and here we get to the nub of it, religious purity:

    An elite Upper East Side private school’s annual ice-skating party at Trump Wollman Rink in Central Park had to be canceled after parents refused to send their kids in protest of the president, sources said.

    The Parents Association at The Dalton School sent a letter Thursday announcing the “Dalton on Ice” event was scrapped, saying “it would not be financially prudent” because of “significantly lower attendance.”

    Dalton’s PA president, LaMae DeJongh, declined to comment — but sources said the low attendance was due to rampant anti-Trump sentiment at the elite prep school, which boasts alumni such as CNN’s Anderson Cooper.

    “I think it is completely insane,” said one Dalton parent who disagrees with the protest. “Like him or not, it feels like a strange place for New Yorkers to protest. And sad that kids now have no skating party.”

    Trump renovated the rink in 1986 after the city fumbled the job for six years.

     

    http://nypost.com/2017/02/17/prep-school-cancels-party-at-trump-wollman-rink-over-parents-protests/

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Pericles, @Steve Sailer, @Olorin

    Alma mater of Emma Sulkowicz…

    …Matt Yglesias,…

    …and District Judge Ronnie Abrams–recommended by Gillibrand, appointed by Obama, and presider over two high-profile cases against…you guessed it…Donald J. Trump.

    Also her daddy, high powered lawyer Floyd Abrams, argued for the NYT in the Plame Affair grand jury investigation in the Aughts.

  55. @anonguy
    Per wikipedia, this is pretty interesting what happened in one town downstream of the Teton Dam, the flood and the fire, not to mention the battering rams. Really amazing how few people died.

    One estimate placed damage to Hibbard and Rexburg area, with a population of about 10,000, at 80 percent of existing structures. The Teton River flows through the industrial, commercial and residential districts of north Rexburg. A significant reason for the massive damage in the community was the location of a lumber yard directly upstream. When the flood waters hit, thousands of logs were washed into town. Dozens of them hit a bulk gasoline storage tank a few hundred yards away. The gasoline ignited and sent flaming slicks adrift on the racing water.[12] The force of the logs and cut lumber, and the subsequent fires, practically destroyed the city.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The fires that were caused by the Teton flood were particularly striking.

  56. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Opinionator

    Come back after you subtract the cost of flooding, the value of the electricity generated by the dams and economic activity generated by having dams in place. Then describe the percentage of how much you are willing to reduce your standard of living by raising the cost of ("carbon-free") power.

    BTW, your fellow travellers think everyone on the planet should get the same amount of power to live on as you do. So if your standard of living doesn't drop by 80%, whining about the "cost, environmental destruction, and risk" will ring hollow.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    I think I would be okay with a 1950s, 60s standard of living.

    • Replies: @HJH
    @Opinionator

    Actually, I too think that I would be okay with a 1950s, 60s standard of living. (I suppose that I'll get some abuse for saying that. Oh, well.) It's not for me to say what others would be okay with, but you make a point worth pondering.

    One hopes that the dam does hold, though.

    Steve: As usual, your wit is insightful, but are you sure that the dam's managers don't deserve some slack for trying to manage information while managing the emergency? It's not easy to manage a crisis and a team in the full glare of maximum publicity. In fact, it's nigh impossible. (Some will assert otherwise, but have they tried it?)

    I have no idea whether the personnel in question deserved dismissal, but is it possible that those personnel were unhelpful in other ways, as well? You and I wouldn't know.

    Or maybe it really is a clumsy attempt to hide the evidence of corrupt management. One supposes that Californians will find out, eventually.

    Replies: @Autochthon

  57. What a First Dame Collapse Looks Like:

    Footing the bill for that pedicure treatment could pauperize even Sir Branson.

  58. @anonguy
    This Teton Dam thing is just more evidence that the 70s were The Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @CrunchybutRealistCon

    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    This is true. Electrical systems, cars, tires, clothing, cuisine, architecture, the tax code. All crap.

    Then came Ronald Reagan, and it was like everybody went from polyester to broadcloth overnight. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    I was just thinking about the arc of national life from the 70s through today, and guess who's been on stage for all of it? Real estate developer, billionaire and President Donald Trump. No second acts in American life? Trump is on his fourth.

    Astounding.

    , @anonguy
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    Then came Ronald Reagan, and it was like everybody went from polyester to broadcloth overnight. The 90s were pretty cool too.
     
    You are right. All of a sudden it was natural fibers everywhere, etc.

    I remember first seeing a 1982 Trans Am in late 1981, coolest thing ever after a decade of detroit dreck. That's when I knew the 70s were over and everything was going to be ok.
    , @Geschrei
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    This is true. Electrical systems, cars, tires, clothing, cuisine, architecture, the tax code. All crap.
     
    Not everything. There were some amazing high quality musical instruments made entirely in the continental US back then.

    I have a Rickenbacher 4001 manufactured in April 1973 in Santa Ana, California that is still a fantastic piece of workmanship.

    /brag

    Replies: @Coemgen, @Anonymous

  59. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @anonguy

    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    This is true. Electrical systems, cars, tires, clothing, cuisine, architecture, the tax code. All crap.

    Then came Ronald Reagan, and it was like everybody went from polyester to broadcloth overnight. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @anonguy, @Geschrei

    I was just thinking about the arc of national life from the 70s through today, and guess who’s been on stage for all of it? Real estate developer, billionaire and President Donald Trump. No second acts in American life? Trump is on his fourth.

    Astounding.

  60. @Romanian
    @biz

    If you're in country X, you have to follow their dress codes, at least as they relate to modesty and decency. I find nothing wrong with that. The women who do find something wrong with that should just refuse to go to that particular country. Women and men willing to conform to the demands of their job should go there to represent their country. End of story.

    Replies: @Pericles, @EriK, @biz

    Great. Then I’m sure both you and these ‘feminists’ are in agreement that all Islamic garments – niqabs, chadors, burkas, whatever – must be immediately removed upon setting foot in the West.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @biz

    I agree with that. I doubt the ersatz feminists do. After all, Islam is compatible with feminism, no?

  61. Anonymous [AKA "Friend of Bill\'s"] says:

    Perhaps a follow up post on the San Franciscito dam incident, Mr. Sailer?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    I'm mentioning it in a Taki's column that considers the movie "Chinatown."

  62. @biz
    @Romanian

    Great. Then I'm sure both you and these 'feminists' are in agreement that all Islamic garments - niqabs, chadors, burkas, whatever - must be immediately removed upon setting foot in the West.

    Replies: @Romanian

    I agree with that. I doubt the ersatz feminists do. After all, Islam is compatible with feminism, no?

  63. @Anonymous
    Perhaps a follow up post on the San Franciscito dam incident, Mr. Sailer?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I’m mentioning it in a Taki’s column that considers the movie “Chinatown.”

  64. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @anonguy

    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    This is true. Electrical systems, cars, tires, clothing, cuisine, architecture, the tax code. All crap.

    Then came Ronald Reagan, and it was like everybody went from polyester to broadcloth overnight. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @anonguy, @Geschrei

    Then came Ronald Reagan, and it was like everybody went from polyester to broadcloth overnight. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    You are right. All of a sudden it was natural fibers everywhere, etc.

    I remember first seeing a 1982 Trans Am in late 1981, coolest thing ever after a decade of detroit dreck. That’s when I knew the 70s were over and everything was going to be ok.

  65. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @anonguy

    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    This is true. Electrical systems, cars, tires, clothing, cuisine, architecture, the tax code. All crap.

    Then came Ronald Reagan, and it was like everybody went from polyester to broadcloth overnight. The 90s were pretty cool too.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @anonguy, @Geschrei

    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    This is true. Electrical systems, cars, tires, clothing, cuisine, architecture, the tax code. All crap.

    Not everything. There were some amazing high quality musical instruments made entirely in the continental US back then.

    I have a Rickenbacher 4001 manufactured in April 1973 in Santa Ana, California that is still a fantastic piece of workmanship.

    /brag

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Geschrei

    The 70s were so bad for Fender that they moved production to Japan in the early 80s. Gibson struggled during the decade too.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @Geschrei

    A lot of things made in the 70s were beautifully made, just not the same things as before.

    It was the start of the small custom guitar maker, for instance. A dozen small companies made guitars, basses, amplifiers, banjos, mandolins, et al, The workmanship was in fact better than anything previously available anywhere, in fact. Martin and Rickenbacker had mostly held their quality through that era and past, though Martin insisted on incorporating bad ideas like nonadjustable truss rods and pickguards acetate glued onto bare top wood well into the 80s. Gibsons and Fenders, except for the very high end Gibson jazz boxes and banjos, were often dog turds though. That's what made a market for a dozen small companies, though.

    Leica cameras were cheapened from the 1950s M3 model, in mechanics, but the optics were improved. Several companies made really good medium format cameras, often far smoother in operation than the awkward and clunky Hasselblad.

    JBL and Altec made some of their best drivers and components in the 70s, and professional audio saw the first good solid state amplifiers, EQs, and compressor/limiters. Audio Research had started building a new generation of tube hi-fi gear. flagging the idea that changes needed to be made in mainstream audio equipment.

    A lot of other things were to follow the same pattern: the mainstream units were not as good, but small specialist companies sprang up making even better ones. That trend continues today.

  66. @Opinionator
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    I think I would be okay with a 1950s, 60s standard of living.

    Replies: @HJH

    Actually, I too think that I would be okay with a 1950s, 60s standard of living. (I suppose that I’ll get some abuse for saying that. Oh, well.) It’s not for me to say what others would be okay with, but you make a point worth pondering.

    One hopes that the dam does hold, though.

    Steve: As usual, your wit is insightful, but are you sure that the dam’s managers don’t deserve some slack for trying to manage information while managing the emergency? It’s not easy to manage a crisis and a team in the full glare of maximum publicity. In fact, it’s nigh impossible. (Some will assert otherwise, but have they tried it?)

    I have no idea whether the personnel in question deserved dismissal, but is it possible that those personnel were unhelpful in other ways, as well? You and I wouldn’t know.

    Or maybe it really is a clumsy attempt to hide the evidence of corrupt management. One supposes that Californians will find out, eventually.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @HJH

    The suggestion seems to be that (American) standards of living in the 1950s and 1960s were lower than they are today.

    I don't know the statistics (I welcome them from those who may), but standards of living seem far lower now than they were then: realty is unaffordable, employment unstable, crime ubiquitous, social cohesion eroded, families sundered, traffic intolerable, and on and on – all, at base, because of the invasion, of course.

    Replies: @Opinionator

  67. @Prof. Woland
    Oroville is one of the few California towns where there is a substantial and enduring level of white poverty. It is quite benighted and on par with Bakersfield and Stockton. Bless their hearts, but a significant percentage of the town are the decedents of the people who migrated up to the area to build the dam and just stayed on. Contrasted with Chico, the other population center in Butte county, which is a whitopia there is a real culture clash. There is a large number of rice and almond farmers in the area but they don't employ that many people, particularly whites. Almonds only need workers for a few month out of the year so 'migrants' come and go and rice is almost entirely mechanized. Unemployment is high in the area and there is a real contrast with the farmers many of which are quite wealthy albeit they wear jeans and drive dirty trucks so you would never notice it if you weren't looking.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    I run the Almond Bowl every year; Chico is pretty darned Mexican for a white-opia, but I suppose everything is relative….

  68. @HJH
    @Opinionator

    Actually, I too think that I would be okay with a 1950s, 60s standard of living. (I suppose that I'll get some abuse for saying that. Oh, well.) It's not for me to say what others would be okay with, but you make a point worth pondering.

    One hopes that the dam does hold, though.

    Steve: As usual, your wit is insightful, but are you sure that the dam's managers don't deserve some slack for trying to manage information while managing the emergency? It's not easy to manage a crisis and a team in the full glare of maximum publicity. In fact, it's nigh impossible. (Some will assert otherwise, but have they tried it?)

    I have no idea whether the personnel in question deserved dismissal, but is it possible that those personnel were unhelpful in other ways, as well? You and I wouldn't know.

    Or maybe it really is a clumsy attempt to hide the evidence of corrupt management. One supposes that Californians will find out, eventually.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    The suggestion seems to be that (American) standards of living in the 1950s and 1960s were lower than they are today.

    I don’t know the statistics (I welcome them from those who may), but standards of living seem far lower now than they were then: realty is unaffordable, employment unstable, crime ubiquitous, social cohesion eroded, families sundered, traffic intolerable, and on and on – all, at base, because of the invasion, of course.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    @Autochthon

    Consider that these sort of economic boons like dams facilitate the invasion by (temporarily) lowering the cost of living, increasing Econ opportunity. They are enabling of invasion.

    There is perhaps an analogue in the dilemma faced by city planners when widening freeways. Supply of cars correspondingly increases, offsetting some of the benefits.

    Replies: @bomag

  69. The Earth can’t support its apex predator numbering in the billions. Not for long anyway. And even more billions are expected soon.

    Brilliant feats of engineering give us the illusion that ecological limits don’t apply to us.

    Our time horizons are so tiny that when the inevitable happens the refrain is always:

    “Who could have anticipated THAT!?”

    🙂

  70. @Geschrei
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    This is true. Electrical systems, cars, tires, clothing, cuisine, architecture, the tax code. All crap.
     
    Not everything. There were some amazing high quality musical instruments made entirely in the continental US back then.

    I have a Rickenbacher 4001 manufactured in April 1973 in Santa Ana, California that is still a fantastic piece of workmanship.

    /brag

    Replies: @Coemgen, @Anonymous

    The 70s were so bad for Fender that they moved production to Japan in the early 80s. Gibson struggled during the decade too.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Coemgen

    Fender was owned by CBS and they did not give two shits whether or not a Fender guitar was any good or not. Fender quality slowly deteriorated as the people Leo trained retired or quit or died off (the amazing thing was that so many stayed so long) and the original tooling wore out and was patched by inept clowns. By 78-79 Fender guitars typically needed one to two hours of skilled bench time to make them play okay and many needed neck rework or complete replacement. Sometimes you'd have to rout out the neck pocket and put in a steamed shim and rerout it or bed it in glass bedding compound so it would not wobble and shift.

    Yet, there are no shortage of people who were in diapers when these shitblocks were made who will pay 2-3 times what a new Fender costs for one of this vintage.

  71. In coastal South CA the weather is so nice it doesn’t matter what decade you’re in.

  72. @anonguy
    This Teton Dam thing is just more evidence that the 70s were The Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @CrunchybutRealistCon

    The impression you get for the 70s bein so gawd awful in public works & construction, architecture is that it was a time when some of the worst aspects of corruption in building material supply (eg Mob connections), trade union shenanigans, and poor oversight all combined. Another factor was that the worst aspects of 50s/60s reinforced concrete brutalism had not been contested in the marketplace of architectural ideas. These factors got further amplified by the energy crisis causing downgrades in steel durability as coatings were sacrificed for cost.

    Some of the worst examples of 70s design & construction fiascos would be the Houston Astrodome, the Minneapolis Metrodome (designed in 78), the Montreal Olympic Stadium, the Omni Coliseum(Atlanta), the New Haven Coliseum, and the Seattle Kingdome.

  73. @Autochthon
    @HJH

    The suggestion seems to be that (American) standards of living in the 1950s and 1960s were lower than they are today.

    I don't know the statistics (I welcome them from those who may), but standards of living seem far lower now than they were then: realty is unaffordable, employment unstable, crime ubiquitous, social cohesion eroded, families sundered, traffic intolerable, and on and on – all, at base, because of the invasion, of course.

    Replies: @Opinionator

    Consider that these sort of economic boons like dams facilitate the invasion by (temporarily) lowering the cost of living, increasing Econ opportunity. They are enabling of invasion.

    There is perhaps an analogue in the dilemma faced by city planners when widening freeways. Supply of cars correspondingly increases, offsetting some of the benefits.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Opinionator


    Consider that these sort of economic boons like dams facilitate the invasion by (temporarily) lowering the cost of living, increasing Econ opportunity. They are enabling of invasion.
     
    Yes, but the planners and builders surely imagined the benefits would accrue to their kinsman; they were willing to take chances and make sacrifices to leave something "better" for their children.

    We have to consider that part of our crumbling infrastructure is lack of enthusiasm for the future; if your country is being filled up with the Other, why bother to maintain the nice things? If the evidence mounts that things are just going to burn as a matter of course, why prolong the process?
  74. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Geschrei
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    Everything in the 70s was just one big awshit, from Vietnam to the Vega, nothing was made or worked well.

    This is true. Electrical systems, cars, tires, clothing, cuisine, architecture, the tax code. All crap.
     
    Not everything. There were some amazing high quality musical instruments made entirely in the continental US back then.

    I have a Rickenbacher 4001 manufactured in April 1973 in Santa Ana, California that is still a fantastic piece of workmanship.

    /brag

    Replies: @Coemgen, @Anonymous

    A lot of things made in the 70s were beautifully made, just not the same things as before.

    It was the start of the small custom guitar maker, for instance. A dozen small companies made guitars, basses, amplifiers, banjos, mandolins, et al, The workmanship was in fact better than anything previously available anywhere, in fact. Martin and Rickenbacker had mostly held their quality through that era and past, though Martin insisted on incorporating bad ideas like nonadjustable truss rods and pickguards acetate glued onto bare top wood well into the 80s. Gibsons and Fenders, except for the very high end Gibson jazz boxes and banjos, were often dog turds though. That’s what made a market for a dozen small companies, though.

    Leica cameras were cheapened from the 1950s M3 model, in mechanics, but the optics were improved. Several companies made really good medium format cameras, often far smoother in operation than the awkward and clunky Hasselblad.

    JBL and Altec made some of their best drivers and components in the 70s, and professional audio saw the first good solid state amplifiers, EQs, and compressor/limiters. Audio Research had started building a new generation of tube hi-fi gear. flagging the idea that changes needed to be made in mainstream audio equipment.

    A lot of other things were to follow the same pattern: the mainstream units were not as good, but small specialist companies sprang up making even better ones. That trend continues today.

  75. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Coemgen
    @Geschrei

    The 70s were so bad for Fender that they moved production to Japan in the early 80s. Gibson struggled during the decade too.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Fender was owned by CBS and they did not give two shits whether or not a Fender guitar was any good or not. Fender quality slowly deteriorated as the people Leo trained retired or quit or died off (the amazing thing was that so many stayed so long) and the original tooling wore out and was patched by inept clowns. By 78-79 Fender guitars typically needed one to two hours of skilled bench time to make them play okay and many needed neck rework or complete replacement. Sometimes you’d have to rout out the neck pocket and put in a steamed shim and rerout it or bed it in glass bedding compound so it would not wobble and shift.

    Yet, there are no shortage of people who were in diapers when these shitblocks were made who will pay 2-3 times what a new Fender costs for one of this vintage.

  76. @Opinionator
    @Autochthon

    Consider that these sort of economic boons like dams facilitate the invasion by (temporarily) lowering the cost of living, increasing Econ opportunity. They are enabling of invasion.

    There is perhaps an analogue in the dilemma faced by city planners when widening freeways. Supply of cars correspondingly increases, offsetting some of the benefits.

    Replies: @bomag

    Consider that these sort of economic boons like dams facilitate the invasion by (temporarily) lowering the cost of living, increasing Econ opportunity. They are enabling of invasion.

    Yes, but the planners and builders surely imagined the benefits would accrue to their kinsman; they were willing to take chances and make sacrifices to leave something “better” for their children.

    We have to consider that part of our crumbling infrastructure is lack of enthusiasm for the future; if your country is being filled up with the Other, why bother to maintain the nice things? If the evidence mounts that things are just going to burn as a matter of course, why prolong the process?

    • Agree: Opinionator
  77. @El Dato
    > 5 Oroville Dam workers fired after posting pictures on social media

    Seriously, what the actual F***

    If they had posted pictures of the year's end party with the director in a compromising position on the office printer, I would understand, but this is harebrained. Plus probably skills you DON'T want to lose right about now.

    Imagine this show at Fukushima. "Yes the guy who knows the in and outs of the pipe system down there has been let go." Well, the Japs actually refrained from crying uncle quickly enough lest they lose face, so they just lost 4 reactors.

    Pretty sure there is good drone footage by now in any case.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    Apparently they were working for a contractor (Syblon Reid) who has a blanket rule in place that no employee puts stuff about their work on social media. I can sort of understand that, if as a company you rely on larger organisations for work.

    There’s a shot of the current damage to the main spillway here.

    http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92598455/

    With reduced water flow, almost no water leaves by the bottom of the spillway, it nearly all heads down what’s becoming quite a canyon on the right (east?) side of the spillway. There’s a fracture in the spillway, below the existing hole, which might become yet another big hole in the future. Looks like the entire spillway downhill from the break is pretty shot.

    More pics here, mostly of the emergency spillway but one showing workers carrying buckets (!) up the left side of the main spillway – who knows what they’re trying to patch?

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/02/19/oroville-dam-dramatic-photos-show-damage-to-dams-emergency-spillway/

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Anonymous Nephew

    Here's a good panoramic view of the dam and now-destroyed main spillway. There seems to be plenty of dirt between the dam and the spillway, so I guess it's all good until the dry season starts again and they can do repairs. Lots of repairs.

    http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Oroville-Dam-emergency-spillway-in-use-for-first-10925628.php#photo-12356998

  78. @Olorin
    @Stan Adams

    Right you are.

    Our public library system focuses on day care for Latinas, baby sitting for yoga mommies, and providing sensitive bathroom facilities for the homeless, while holding book sales of classic titles to make shelf room for 30 copies of Fifty Shades of Grey (the DVD).

    I'm exaggerating only a little.

    I do have very good institutional access through a PNW academic library consortium, also my Ivy League alma mater.

    Many bright citizens don't have that access, or don't have the classical liberal arts type skills to make use of the mindboggling amount of information out there. I'm simply stunned by how much of even that information is behind paywalls now. It increasingly appears that public universities' tax dollars provide welfare streams for the (often corrupt) "peer reviewed journal" industry.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

    It’s very hard to get a handle on this issue as an intelligent citizen. Most articles I’ve ever encountered (search or citation) on mineral processing technology, mine tailings dams, their design, failure, and remediation/impacts are behind stiff paywalls

    I’m simply stunned by how much of even that information is behind paywalls now.

    Sci-Hub – http://sci-hub.bz/

    • Replies: @benjaminl
    @Anatoly Karlin

    The various web addresses are always going in and out -- I think that accessing the Sci-Hub service over Telegram is a lot easier.

    https://telegram.me/scihubbot


    I also think Google Scholar does a great job of scraping together obscurely located PDFs (i.e. from random course web sites) of various articles that are "officially" behind paywalls.

  79. @Anonymous Nephew
    @El Dato

    Apparently they were working for a contractor (Syblon Reid) who has a blanket rule in place that no employee puts stuff about their work on social media. I can sort of understand that, if as a company you rely on larger organisations for work.

    There's a shot of the current damage to the main spillway here.

    http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-92598455/

    With reduced water flow, almost no water leaves by the bottom of the spillway, it nearly all heads down what's becoming quite a canyon on the right (east?) side of the spillway. There's a fracture in the spillway, below the existing hole, which might become yet another big hole in the future. Looks like the entire spillway downhill from the break is pretty shot.

    More pics here, mostly of the emergency spillway but one showing workers carrying buckets (!) up the left side of the main spillway - who knows what they're trying to patch?

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/02/19/oroville-dam-dramatic-photos-show-damage-to-dams-emergency-spillway/

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Here’s a good panoramic view of the dam and now-destroyed main spillway. There seems to be plenty of dirt between the dam and the spillway, so I guess it’s all good until the dry season starts again and they can do repairs. Lots of repairs.

    http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Oroville-Dam-emergency-spillway-in-use-for-first-10925628.php#photo-12356998

  80. @Anatoly Karlin
    @Olorin


    It’s very hard to get a handle on this issue as an intelligent citizen. Most articles I’ve ever encountered (search or citation) on mineral processing technology, mine tailings dams, their design, failure, and remediation/impacts are behind stiff paywalls
     

    I’m simply stunned by how much of even that information is behind paywalls now.
     
    Sci-Hub - http://sci-hub.bz/

    Replies: @benjaminl

    The various web addresses are always going in and out — I think that accessing the Sci-Hub service over Telegram is a lot easier.

    https://telegram.me/scihubbot

    I also think Google Scholar does a great job of scraping together obscurely located PDFs (i.e. from random course web sites) of various articles that are “officially” behind paywalls.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS