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Or maybe Reeferations Now!?

An idea that first started popping up in the iSteve comments section five or ten years ago is now sweeping Respectable Opinion. From the New York Times:

Black Lawmakers to Block Legalized Marijuana in N.Y. if Their Communities Don’t Benefit

At a recent conference in Brooklyn on marijuana legalization, Jacob Plowden, left, spoke about the lack of diversity and inclusion in the cannabis industry.

Diversity and inclusion in the cannabis industry are all very well, but what about … belonging? Harvard now has a Department of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging, and if DIBs are good enough for Harvard, we also need to worry about who gets DIBs on dope.

By Vivian Wang and Jeffery C. Mays
March 11, 2019

Black lawmakers and activists are blocking a push to legalize recreational marijuana in New York, warning that Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s proposal could perpetuate the racial inequality that it purports to fight.

The lawmakers — including some of legalization’s most vocal supporters — say that unless people of color are guaranteed a share of the potentially $3 billion industry, in the form of job training, adult education and licenses in the industry itself, there may be no legalization this year.

Ten states and Washington, D.C., have legalized recreational marijuana, and as lawmakers elsewhere consider their own laws, they seem intent on not repeating what they see as the mistakes of some early adopters.

They say one misstep, in particular, stands out: None of the 10 states or Washington ensured that minority communities, which were often targeted for low-level drug possession, would share in any economic windfall of legalization.

In New York, the question of economic return for those communities has emerged as a defining, and perhaps pivotal, issue. …

Critics say marijuana legalization has fostered an inequitable system in which wealthy, white investors often reap the profits of the fledgling industry.

In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions. Black people make up just a handful of the thousands of cultivation or dispensary license holders there, and continue to be arrested on marijuana-related charges at almost three times the rate of white people.

In California, several cities introduced equity programs retroactively. Oakland now requires at least half of licenses to go to people with a cannabis-related conviction and who fell below an income threshold. …

The debate in New York is unfurling as at least three Democratic presidential candidates — Senators Kamala Harris of California and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, and Julian Castro — have said they support reparations for African-Americans. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez recently called for “affirmative action” licensing for entrepreneurs of color in the marijuana industry.

Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey, another presidential candidate, has introduced a bill to legalize marijuana nationwide. Co-sponsored by four other Democratic presidential hopefuls, including Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, it includes provisions for job investment in minority communities.

If reinvestment initiatives are not put in place alongside legalization, the underground market is likely to remain, said Dasheeda Dawson, the chief executive of MJM Strategy, a cannabis consulting and marketing firm.

“The industry right now reads as very white,” Ms. Dawson said. “If I’m in the hood and I’m hooking up my man with revenue by purchasing from him, I’m going to continue to buy black.”

I dream of a future in which all the legal marijuana shops are dingy storefronts run by black stoners between 10am to 3pm, while white people surreptitiously buy 10 kilos at a time of laboratory-grown British Columbian dope that fell off the back of a Costco truck.

 
• Tags: World War Weed 
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  1. I oppose entirely any further introductions of mind altering substances, including marijuana. But this,

    “In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions. Black people make up just a handful of the thousands of cultivation or dispensary license holders there, and continue to be arrested on marijuana-related charges at almost three times the rate of white people.”

    is funny on its face. barring the legal production, sale and use of a substance to those who were involved in the production, sale and use of the same when it was illegal — double jeopardy.

    That’s just too funny.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @EliteCommInc.

    QB Peyton Manning responded to marijuana legalization in Colorado by buying a dozen Taco Bell fast food restaurants.

    Replies: @EliteCommInc., @AnotherDad

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @EliteCommInc.


    In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions.
     
    It's like being disqualified at a track meet because you "jumped the gun." These ex-cons were just "premature entrepreneurs."

    On a serious note -- what should happens to people who are actually still doing time for something that becomes legal after their conviction?

    Sure, they still violated the law as it existed at the time. But it seems a tad unfair to be behind bars for doing something that everyone on the outside is now allowed to do.

    Replies: @WowJustWow, @Anonymous

    , @Lot
    @EliteCommInc.

    The next frontier for cognitive liberty!

    https://files.shroomery.org/files/12-13/290425782-851392316-post-21-1057426484.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/66/2b/ce/662bce42a3406435a099436a5f3e97a8.jpg

    Replies: @captflee, @EliteCommInc., @Redneck farmer

    , @passive-aggressivist
    @EliteCommInc.


    is funny on its face. barring the legal production, sale and use of a substance to those who were involved in the production, sale and use of the same when it was illegal — double jeopardy.
     
    What are the odds that "marijuana-related offenses" includes burglary, extortion, fraud, assault and all kinds of other crimes only tangentially related to distribution or possession of weed?
    , @J.Ross
    @EliteCommInc.

    The Canadian experiment failed utterly because of naked socialist greed on the Francois Holande level: the only legal vendors were politically connected government people, often cops. Mysteriously, illegal trade increased after Trudeau Deux asked Canuck potheads to pursue a tiny supply at the homes of police officers.

    , @Alden
    @EliteCommInc.

    Insane, can’t get a weed sales permit because they sold weed 5 years ago.

    That’s like pulling a plumbers license because he did plumbing work 5 years ago.

  2. So do I read this right? Their claim is that black people need to be taught how to sell weed? If they don’t know what’s going on in the less prosperous areas of the city, fair enough. But have they ever been to Washington Square Park?

  3. “The industry right now reads as very white,” Ms. Dawson said. “If I’m in the hood and I’m hooking up my man with revenue by purchasing from him, I’m going to continue to buy black.”

    “Das it maaan!”

    From Urban Dictionary:

    Its probably reasonable and pretty safe to assume that most teenagers have never smoked this before – but mention Afghan Black to experienced cannabis smokers aged around 40 and their little beady eyes just light up. Its considered by some to be more valuable than gold as it gives a stone like no other. Afghan Black is very soft and very playable.

    (It’s probably raciss to call an Afghan a Black tho, you will get both shot and drilled with a khanjali, possibly after enrapement. After that the gentlemen will turn on each other and the Black will lose but you will be dead.)

  4. “The industry right now reads as very white,”

    Industry, in general, reads white, or at the least nonblack.

    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    @Anonymous

    This is perfectly example of racism and white evil

    Think about your stupid flippant remark and really think about it

    This is why we NEED affirmative action and other social justice programs

    I take great pleasure in the fact of demographic change and the fact that white girls CRAVE Men of Color

    Replies: @fish

  5. As I enter middle age, I do sympathize with old people who may occasionally be out of touch, so I say this with total love, Steve, but calling cannabis “dope” is a rather square thing to do. I reserve that word for opioids.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @AndrewR

    At Iowa State University circa 1972-76 we spoke of "smoking dope." It was a square thing to do even then, and we were proudly square.

    , @Bubba
    @AndrewR

    "What’s in a name? that which we call dope
    By any other name would smell just as awful;"

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    , @Kratoklastes
    @AndrewR

    Same here: back in the 70s on Starsky and Hutch, I'm pretty sure that if Huggy Bear told S&H that someone was a dope dealer, what he meant was heroin dealer... and it would be hard to square the term "dope fiend" with weed.

    But the Historical Dictionary of American Slang tells me that 'dope' started to be used for weed in about 1950; nowadays it seems to be reverting to the pre-WWII usage (i.e., opiates).

    Anyhow... legal weed will be totally dope (and I've never smoked anything in my life: edibles and tincture FTW).

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

  6. Just giving out licenses doesn’t mean success – like any business, you have to offer actual value to have an advantage over competitors, and automatic handouts don’t encourage the right people. I have personal experience with having to hire ‘disadvantaged’ businesses as contractors, and although I have had some good experiences, I have more in which the contractor or vendor expected way more money then the job was worth, or the actual product or service provided was crap.

    Anyway, kinda funny these NY lawmakers think job training and adult education provided by the government or its proxies is going to work – we’ve been trying that with Trade Adjustment Assistance for 20 years and it’s a goose egg.

    • Replies: @Moral Stone
    @Arclight

    Considering the (legal) supply and demand mismatch in play the licenses which are being lotteried out could be extremely valuable even to an incompetent would-be businessman.

    , @bomag
    @Arclight


    ...we’ve been trying that with Trade Adjustment Assistance for 20 years and it’s a goose egg.
     
    Oh, the Feds have been doing this since forever. Wagner Peyser Act of 1933 morphed into the Manpower Development Training Act of 1962 which morphed into the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of 1973 into the Job Training and Partnership Act of 1982 into the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 into the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

    Bleh.

    Here's one report on such stuff:

    In 1993, the Labor Department released a study that showed that in a study of low-income male out-of-school youth, males in the JTPA program actually had 10 percent lower earnings than males from a similar demographic who never participated in the program. Prior to the study's release, the Labor Department's inspector general stated that young trainees were twice as likely to rely on food stamps after JTPA involvement due to the fact that the training showed the individuals how to apply for food stamps[from wiki on the 1982 version]

  7. Weedparations would certainly give blacks a reason to support Trump in closing the border. I’m also looking forward to President Kamala Harris signing legislation requiring Amazon to use the USPS to deliver all packages in the US so 500,000 additional black postal clerks will need to be hired.

  8. While trying to think of a way to ridicule this affirmative action economic grab, I inadvertently thought of a good idea.

    Big cites should issue licenses to sell “loosies”, that is, individual cigarettes, to black residents only. No bodegas, no newsstands – just black guys on street corners.

    Just think – low investment cost (six bucks for a pack), no need for physical plant, no need for elaborate security (only tough black guys need apply), etc.

  9. @EliteCommInc.
    I oppose entirely any further introductions of mind altering substances, including marijuana. But this,

    "In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions. Black people make up just a handful of the thousands of cultivation or dispensary license holders there, and continue to be arrested on marijuana-related charges at almost three times the rate of white people."

    is funny on its face. barring the legal production, sale and use of a substance to those who were involved in the production, sale and use of the same when it was illegal --- double jeopardy.

    That's just too funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Lot, @passive-aggressivist, @J.Ross, @Alden

    QB Peyton Manning responded to marijuana legalization in Colorado by buying a dozen Taco Bell fast food restaurants.

    • Replies: @EliteCommInc.
    @Steve Sailer

    laughing . . .

    , @AnotherDad
    @Steve Sailer


    QB Peyton Manning responded to marijuana legalization in Colorado by buying a dozen Taco Bell fast food restaurants.
     
    Beefy fritos burrito for a buck--hard to beat that. (And that's stone cold sober--i haven't smoked any marijuana since the 70s.)

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Anonymous

  10. Anonymous[299] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Outrageous scenes from communist Venezuela…

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6793585/Venezuelans-turn-looting-Caracas-fourth-day-power-outages.html

    Trump proclaims we will never be socialist while doing exactly nothing to prevent a future socialist revolution in the USA.

    We are 10 years away from a demographically fueled Chavista era of chaos and meltdown. All of our traitor elites will abscond.

    Check the Daily Mail photos to see a glimpse of our idiotic socialist future.

  11. Lesbian moonbat Cynthia Nixon, from Sex and the City, started all of this when she ran for governor of New York last year:

    https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/386561-cynthia-nixon-marijuana-industry-could-be-a-form-of-reparations

  12. Jeffery C. Mays has some pretty dilated pupils here:

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    Jeffery C. Mays has some pretty dilated pupils here:
     
    We are all sanpaku.

    JAPAN'S SANPAKU EYE SUPERSTITION


    https://i.imgur.com/8ywakaR.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross

  13. minority communities, which were often targeted for low-level drug possession

    Citation needed.

    I haven’t looked too much into this, but it seems likely that “disparities” in American drug sentencing would disappear if possession and possession with intent were clearly differentiated.

    • Replies: @Bill P
    @Roderick Spode

    Anyone who has ever lived around blacks knows why there are disparities in arrests for possession. Blacks will use drugs openly, without any attempt to conceal what they are doing. It is common to see them smoking weed while driving a convertible with the top down, while standing on the streetcorner, or even while riding the bus. They'll even do it with hard drugs. I used to see blacks openly smoking crack on a regular basis when I was a kid.

    Whites tend to keep it inside.

    So the only way to stop this "disparity" is to either A) stop requiring search warrants to go after white users, or B) stop arresting blacks who flout the law in public. Neither option is going to go down well with urban white progressives, no matter what they say. I mean, when you're paying over $3,000 for some apartment in a trendy neighborhood and some blacks are sitting down and getting high on the sidewalk under your window, you're probably going to want the cops to remove them. But when you're discreetly getting high on X with your progressive friends at a private place, you're not going to want the cops to bust down the door over some unsubstantiated rumor that a bunch of weirdos dressed in animal costumes are getting high and doing obscene things to each other.

  14. It makes more sense to address the 20 – 30 year old wrongs of the drug war now rather than address the 200 year old wrongs of slavery now.

    • Replies: @brioche
    @Paul Rise

    But were wrongs committed 20-30 years ago?

    Enforcing laws that prohibit sale & distribution of dangerous substances is wrong? Arresting gangsters indulging in violent crimes is wrong?

    I don't think delegitimizing law enforcement is any wiser than addressing 200 years old wrongs of slavery.

  15. Next terms up…”Weed desert.” And will they have shopping carts so the customer can take their stash home and then run a scraping business on the side.

  16. Do the would be entrepreneurs understand that legal businesses pay taxes?
    How many users realize most jobs that pay decent require a drug test? And that you probably won’t be hired even if weed is legal? Because potheads are lousy employees.

    • Troll: AndrewR
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Redneck farmer

    Weed certainly sucks out whatever ambition you might have, as well as making you stupid. We are are also beginning to see the dire effects it has on mental health.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Alden
    @Redneck farmer

    You know who smoke a lot of weed on the job? Iron workers. They love to be up there stoned and swinging around the high iron. It’s a macho challenge.

  17. So this will make sure Blacks also have a chance to lose money in the legalized dopijuana industry? The rumblings here in California are that the legal shops are having disappointing sales and profits because Stoners can get non regulated street weed cheaper than from the heavily taxed and
    and regulated licensed boutiques.
    It’s almost as if no one noticed that, although cigarettes are legal in New York City, a big proportion of sales is of bootlegged smokes because of the oppressive taxes.
    Are these legalization laws being pushed by legislators showing the deterioration in brain function from being dopers?

  18. They should totally give the retail licenses to blacks. There’s no way they could compete with all the Asian dealers if it’s legal without affirmative action, and there isn’t all that much money in it anyway. With cultivated strains of weed these days a gram is enough to get someone stoned every day for over a week, and it isn’t a difficult plant to grow. If there’s any real money in it, it’s in the farming.

    So if blacks want the retail licenses, let them have them. I guarantee they’ll keep the best for themselves, overcharge, come up with all sorts of under-the-table hare-brained schemes, and generally make the business as overcomplicated and inefficient as possible, which is good. We don’t need highly efficient weed distribution centers in every neighborhood.

    Also, the idea of white urban stoners having to purchase their weed from surly blacks makes me smile.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Bill P


    So if blacks want the retail licenses, let them have them. I guarantee they’ll keep the best for themselves . . . .
     
    How long until the AA license recipients smoke all their own inventory (i.e., "get high on their own supply"), and demand a second set of reparations because the government supposedly set them up to fail by "targeting" them with weed that they couldn't resist.

    It's exactly like the mortgage bubble, in which evil lenders supposedly hatched a scheme to get rich by giving non-recourse loans to minorities which the banks knew they would never collect on . . . or something like that.
    , @Alden
    @Bill P

    That’s what the stoner White medical marijuana store owners are like. Growing weed isn’t the problem. The problem is dealing with the out of it store owners. I assume weed improved blacks by lessening their aggressive tendencies.

  19. So because blacks made poor life choices, they want to get paid? Did bootleggers in the 1920s demand stuff when the 21st Amendment passed? Sure, expunge their records, it’s only right and correct. But this idea that “imma get paid” is laughable. Anyway, there aren’t enough blacks in the NYS legislature to stop this momentum.

    • Replies: @Dr. X
    @Bragadocious


    Anyway, there aren’t enough blacks in the NYS legislature to stop this momentum.
     
    To the contrary... the Speaker of the Assembly, the Assembly Majority Leader, and the Senate Majority Leader/President Pro Temp are ALL blacks...
    , @Nicholas Stix
    @Bragadocious

    "Sure, expunge their records..."

    Nothing sure about why we should do that. Repealing just laws is a big fad, because blacks violate them at astronomical rates. Expunging blacks' criminal records will mean armies of black criminals being able to say that they have been law-abiding citizens their whole lives.

    Then again, employers are no longer permitted to ask black applicants if they were ever convicted of felonies, so their crimes have already been expunged, as a practical matter.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  20. In California, several cities introduced equity programs retroactively. Oakland now requires at least half of licenses to go to people with a cannabis-related conviction and who fell below an income threshold. …

    In order to become a politician, you will be required to have a prostitution-related conviction…

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    Man, they're going to have some seriously high-class shops there in Oakland.

    How long before we're inundated with cries of racism because all the pot is sold to blacks? You know, the guns were sold to blacks, the liquor, the crummy mortgages, the crack, and now the pot. You evil white people are trying to destroy the black man!

    Replies: @res

  21. @AndrewR
    As I enter middle age, I do sympathize with old people who may occasionally be out of touch, so I say this with total love, Steve, but calling cannabis "dope" is a rather square thing to do. I reserve that word for opioids.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Bubba, @Kratoklastes

    At Iowa State University circa 1972-76 we spoke of “smoking dope.” It was a square thing to do even then, and we were proudly square.

  22. @EliteCommInc.
    I oppose entirely any further introductions of mind altering substances, including marijuana. But this,

    "In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions. Black people make up just a handful of the thousands of cultivation or dispensary license holders there, and continue to be arrested on marijuana-related charges at almost three times the rate of white people."

    is funny on its face. barring the legal production, sale and use of a substance to those who were involved in the production, sale and use of the same when it was illegal --- double jeopardy.

    That's just too funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Lot, @passive-aggressivist, @J.Ross, @Alden

    In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions.

    It’s like being disqualified at a track meet because you “jumped the gun.” These ex-cons were just “premature entrepreneurs.”

    On a serious note — what should happens to people who are actually still doing time for something that becomes legal after their conviction?

    Sure, they still violated the law as it existed at the time. But it seems a tad unfair to be behind bars for doing something that everyone on the outside is now allowed to do.

    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    @Hypnotoad666


    Sure, they still violated the law as it existed at the time. But it seems a tad unfair to be behind bars for doing something that everyone on the outside is now allowed to do.
     
    A lot of them are behind bars for real, often violent crimes, but it was just easier to put them away on a drug charge for which there was clear incontrovertible evidence. Or they were set to go to trial on major charges which would have taken a lot of the state's time and resources regardless of their obvious guilt, but were allowed to plead out to just the drug charges. You can't know how the process would have played out if the prosecution didn't have that option.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Anonymous
    @Hypnotoad666


    Sure, they still violated the law as it existed at the time. But it seems a tad unfair to be behind bars for doing something that everyone on the outside is now allowed to do.
     
    I knew a mob guy who did time for melting US silver coins down. It was illegal then, but they changed the law. I asked him why didn't they just do it overseas where it was legal, and he said, "That wouldn't have been no fun."

    I think he was in for several years after they abolished the idiotic law, and he's still a felon, which doesn't keep him from having a lot of guns in his house. He just can't go to the range and shoot them lest some agent see him and run him for felonies.

    Another felon I know sticks to muzzle loading guns, which are federally OK but a state beef for felons where he lives. Hey. it's their time they will do if busted. They know the rules. If the guy moved 5 miles out of state the state law there says nothing about muzzleloaders for criminals.

    Some people are just dense. I remember watching a guy in a pickup drinking a beer at a Sonic drive in. In Kansas that's a open container beef. But if he tossed his keys in the bed, thus not being able to drive with the Open Container, no beef. I tried to tell him, he told me to fuck off. As I pulled out, a Trooper pulled in and he got an Open Container ticket, which was big money back then. Dumbass probably thinks I ratted him out. I didn't: this was pre-cellphone days.
  23. @MikeatMikedotMike
    Jeffery C. Mays has some pretty dilated pupils here:

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2018/07/18/multimedia/author-jeffery-c-mays/author-jeffery-c-mays-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600.png

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Jeffery C. Mays has some pretty dilated pupils here:

    We are all sanpaku.

    JAPAN’S SANPAKU EYE SUPERSTITION

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Reg Cæsar

    I read that book in the 70s!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    , @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    You can't look at Adam Schiff and tell me all is well with that man, but Mike's pic is a pretty chill customer who just happens to have sanpaku. Schiff has whole-body-sanpaku, and in a still image you get the impression that he's probably shaking.

    Replies: @Alfa158

  24. @Roderick Spode

    minority communities, which were often targeted for low-level drug possession
     
    Citation needed.

    I haven’t looked too much into this, but it seems likely that “disparities” in American drug sentencing would disappear if possession and possession with intent were clearly differentiated.

    Replies: @Bill P

    Anyone who has ever lived around blacks knows why there are disparities in arrests for possession. Blacks will use drugs openly, without any attempt to conceal what they are doing. It is common to see them smoking weed while driving a convertible with the top down, while standing on the streetcorner, or even while riding the bus. They’ll even do it with hard drugs. I used to see blacks openly smoking crack on a regular basis when I was a kid.

    Whites tend to keep it inside.

    So the only way to stop this “disparity” is to either A) stop requiring search warrants to go after white users, or B) stop arresting blacks who flout the law in public. Neither option is going to go down well with urban white progressives, no matter what they say. I mean, when you’re paying over $3,000 for some apartment in a trendy neighborhood and some blacks are sitting down and getting high on the sidewalk under your window, you’re probably going to want the cops to remove them. But when you’re discreetly getting high on X with your progressive friends at a private place, you’re not going to want the cops to bust down the door over some unsubstantiated rumor that a bunch of weirdos dressed in animal costumes are getting high and doing obscene things to each other.

  25. @AndrewR
    As I enter middle age, I do sympathize with old people who may occasionally be out of touch, so I say this with total love, Steve, but calling cannabis "dope" is a rather square thing to do. I reserve that word for opioids.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Bubba, @Kratoklastes

    “What’s in a name? that which we call dope
    By any other name would smell just as awful;”

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    @Bubba

    Ain't that the truth. Weed back in the seventies had a distinctive, sweet aroma. Today's stuff (admittedly 10x stronger) literally smells like burning shit--not that I really know what that smells like. An acquaintance of mine still smokes. I can't stand to even sit in the same room when he lights one up.

    Amazingly, the people I know who still smoke are reasonably good at what they do. What they do today, however, is the same thing they were doing at the age of 20. Their careers don't require a lot of novel thinking. Some people can function--on familiar ground--when under the spell of weed and some can't.

  26. @Bill P
    They should totally give the retail licenses to blacks. There's no way they could compete with all the Asian dealers if it's legal without affirmative action, and there isn't all that much money in it anyway. With cultivated strains of weed these days a gram is enough to get someone stoned every day for over a week, and it isn't a difficult plant to grow. If there's any real money in it, it's in the farming.

    So if blacks want the retail licenses, let them have them. I guarantee they'll keep the best for themselves, overcharge, come up with all sorts of under-the-table hare-brained schemes, and generally make the business as overcomplicated and inefficient as possible, which is good. We don't need highly efficient weed distribution centers in every neighborhood.

    Also, the idea of white urban stoners having to purchase their weed from surly blacks makes me smile.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Alden

    So if blacks want the retail licenses, let them have them. I guarantee they’ll keep the best for themselves . . . .

    How long until the AA license recipients smoke all their own inventory (i.e., “get high on their own supply”), and demand a second set of reparations because the government supposedly set them up to fail by “targeting” them with weed that they couldn’t resist.

    It’s exactly like the mortgage bubble, in which evil lenders supposedly hatched a scheme to get rich by giving non-recourse loans to minorities which the banks knew they would never collect on . . . or something like that.

  27. Or maybe Reeferations Now!?

    Repar madness.

    This whole thing has the aroma of “But I didn’t inhale.”

    (Of course he didn’t. A manipulative bastard wouldn’t.)

    • Agree: Bubba
  28. If it’s made legal why can’t people just grow their own?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Dtbb

    For the same reason people don't grow, thresh, and mill their own wheat.

    , @Gordo
    @Dtbb


    If it’s made legal why can’t people just grow their own?
     
    Requires work, forethought, diligence, planning. These are stoners we're talking about here.
    , @Redneck farmer
    @Dtbb

    Because then the state couldn't get the taxes. Also, diversion. California found a certain % of people "growing for their own use" where selling it black market. One plant a month would make the car payment.

    , @Brutusale
    @Dtbb

    In Massachusetts, individuals can have 6 plants and households can have 12 plants for "personal use".

  29. @Reg Cæsar
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    Jeffery C. Mays has some pretty dilated pupils here:
     
    We are all sanpaku.

    JAPAN'S SANPAKU EYE SUPERSTITION


    https://i.imgur.com/8ywakaR.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross

    I read that book in the 70s!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jim Don Bob


    I read that book in the 70s!
     
    Why did you try to eat the cover, though?

    Oh... not that particular copy.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jim Don Bob

    I was attracted by the simplicity of the macrobiotic diet, until I found out it banned all my favorite foods-- eggplants, sweet potatoes, and the like. Basically, no Thanksgiving dinner.

    Around that time, David Reuben, the sex guru, was shocked by his father's gruesome death from modern consumption habits. He wrote a couple of very good common-sense nutritional books. I read both, and have been able to ignore everybody else ever since. Cream and eggs? Fine!

  30. OT: Tucker Carlson said some naughty things 10 years ago.

    https://heartiste.wordpress.com/2019/03/11/tucker-takes-the-crimson-pill/

    He told the shriekers to go pound sand.

  31. Judging by the special I saw on TV, there are a lot of Beckys at the top of the weed market. Wait until the black gibsmedats find out.

  32. Anonymous [AKA "Marley\'s ghost"] says:

    Allowing blacks to control the market to their own neighborhoods isn’t a bad idea. Knowing a bit about the California legal market (which is currently a cluster because of overregulation), blacks would likely struggle to produce high end cannabis for uptown users anyway.

    I once had a conversation with a Humboldt County grower who had been at it for 30 years. I asked him if he would go into the legal market, and he said “nah, I got buyers lined up in New York for all my grows.” Good luck with the legal market, CA and NY.

    • Replies: @Disordered (with a bad memory)
    @Anonymous

    Agreed; however such relief to small dealers could simply be set aside with quotas for those under a certain income, instead of giving it all away to minorities that do not exist on all neighborhoods (or worse, the Oakland proposal to give them to felons on purpose - bet that will attract much investment huh). And at any rate, I bet the black growers who do go legal will be the ones with money anyway; blacks which may even be cultural "oreos", since whites pay better, and CA/NY overregulation is biased against small-scale business regardless of race.

  33. @Anonymous

    “The industry right now reads as very white,”
     
    Industry, in general, reads white, or at the least nonblack.

    Replies: @Tiny Duck

    This is perfectly example of racism and white evil

    Think about your stupid flippant remark and really think about it

    This is why we NEED affirmative action and other social justice programs

    I take great pleasure in the fact of demographic change and the fact that white girls CRAVE Men of Color

    • Replies: @fish
    @Tiny Duck

    Oh Tinys…..


    What I be telllen yous bout that talk…….


    Lendert Muthafuckin Pits

  34. I have no problem with black getting a cut of the retail pot storefronts in their areas as long as the Asians get a healthy cut of the prostitution trade when it’s legalized in a year or two. I suppose the Italians should get numbers running or protection rackets, but we’d have to start letting Europeans immigrate again, and that’s rayciss.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Neuday

    Only hire lottery managers of Italian descent. Problem solved!

    , @Disordered (with a bad memory)
    @Neuday

    Eh wouldn't be so hopeful about prostitution being run by Asians, (((they))) have the pornstars all dolled up and ready for long shifts at the "tolerance establishments" for when that happens.

    (And no, I doubt that legal whorehouses will drive the cost of sex down, at least not if the culture simultaneously continues to teach that both corporate women and "sex workers" are equal and valuable but mothers and housewives are below them...).

    At any rate, I find the Asian massage parlors overrated, if probably just as popular in the American wasteland as cheap black-sold weed.

  35. @Bragadocious
    So because blacks made poor life choices, they want to get paid? Did bootleggers in the 1920s demand stuff when the 21st Amendment passed? Sure, expunge their records, it's only right and correct. But this idea that "imma get paid" is laughable. Anyway, there aren't enough blacks in the NYS legislature to stop this momentum.

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Nicholas Stix

    Anyway, there aren’t enough blacks in the NYS legislature to stop this momentum.

    To the contrary… the Speaker of the Assembly, the Assembly Majority Leader, and the Senate Majority Leader/President Pro Temp are ALL blacks…

  36. Man, the Left even manages to fuck up legalized pot.

  37. Legal reefer doesn’t mean illegal pot sales go away. Interestingly, the retail price of legal Mary Jane is about what it was for illegal smoke before states went looking for a taste of that sweet Sinsemilla tax money.

    Apparently the Chinese are big in the weed business now. They get the whole family involved. Once they figured out that prosecutors aren’t going to lock up their aunts and uncles for trimming plants and so forth, they went all in.

    So very good luck to the ‘Community’ competing with that. A black family weed business might be good for a sitcom, though.

  38. @EliteCommInc.
    I oppose entirely any further introductions of mind altering substances, including marijuana. But this,

    "In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions. Black people make up just a handful of the thousands of cultivation or dispensary license holders there, and continue to be arrested on marijuana-related charges at almost three times the rate of white people."

    is funny on its face. barring the legal production, sale and use of a substance to those who were involved in the production, sale and use of the same when it was illegal --- double jeopardy.

    That's just too funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Lot, @passive-aggressivist, @J.Ross, @Alden

    The next frontier for cognitive liberty!

    • Replies: @captflee
    @Lot

    Psilocybe cubensis? Amanita muscaria?

    I had roommates in PR who delighted in flying hang gliders down the cow patty strewn eastern facing slopes around El Yunque, extensively self medicated. Granted, the trade winds allowed flight at very low ground speeds, but I could never see my way to giving that combination a whirl, being cursed with an excessively vivid imagination as regards my well being. The roomies were both Texian and radiomen anyway, so certifiable.

    As for the amanita, whilst visiting some of my more uninhibited acquaintances at a north GA quasi-commune, I was offered one, with the all time best sales pitch, " Try one of these; after you stop vomiting, you'll really get off!"

    Suffice it to say that, lit as things are with weed becoming legal, "shrooms" would be...interesting.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Lot, @Lot

    , @EliteCommInc.
    @Lot

    I oppose entirely any further introductions of mind altering substances, including marijuana, mushrooms . . .

    , @Redneck farmer
    @Lot

    Where do we contribute!

    Replies: @Lot

  39. AOC is pushing for affirmative action in marijuana distribution on the federal level.

  40. …adult education and licenses in the industry itself…

    Black applicants are likely to ace the final, without so much as cracking the textbook, for Introduction to Blunts 101.

  41. @Arclight
    Just giving out licenses doesn't mean success - like any business, you have to offer actual value to have an advantage over competitors, and automatic handouts don't encourage the right people. I have personal experience with having to hire 'disadvantaged' businesses as contractors, and although I have had some good experiences, I have more in which the contractor or vendor expected way more money then the job was worth, or the actual product or service provided was crap.

    Anyway, kinda funny these NY lawmakers think job training and adult education provided by the government or its proxies is going to work - we've been trying that with Trade Adjustment Assistance for 20 years and it's a goose egg.

    Replies: @Moral Stone, @bomag

    Considering the (legal) supply and demand mismatch in play the licenses which are being lotteried out could be extremely valuable even to an incompetent would-be businessman.

  42. Personally, I think it would be a good thing if young black and Hispanic men had more access to cheap, high quality marijuana (to be smoked in their own domiciles.) Staying inside and playing video games while mellowed out from marijuana sure beats a lot of the other things they like to do for fun in terms of the nuisance it poses to civil society as a whole.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Stolen Valor Detective

    Weed became strongly associated with urban culture, such as it is, around the time the Crack Wars calmed down. What I mean is they thought of it that way, were proud of it. Some have made a connection.

  43. @Hypnotoad666
    @EliteCommInc.


    In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions.
     
    It's like being disqualified at a track meet because you "jumped the gun." These ex-cons were just "premature entrepreneurs."

    On a serious note -- what should happens to people who are actually still doing time for something that becomes legal after their conviction?

    Sure, they still violated the law as it existed at the time. But it seems a tad unfair to be behind bars for doing something that everyone on the outside is now allowed to do.

    Replies: @WowJustWow, @Anonymous

    Sure, they still violated the law as it existed at the time. But it seems a tad unfair to be behind bars for doing something that everyone on the outside is now allowed to do.

    A lot of them are behind bars for real, often violent crimes, but it was just easier to put them away on a drug charge for which there was clear incontrovertible evidence. Or they were set to go to trial on major charges which would have taken a lot of the state’s time and resources regardless of their obvious guilt, but were allowed to plead out to just the drug charges. You can’t know how the process would have played out if the prosecution didn’t have that option.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @WowJustWow


    A lot of them are behind bars for real, often violent crimes, but it was just easier to put them away on a drug charge for which there was clear incontrovertible evidence.
     
    Right. The meme that there are thousands of non-violent pot heads doing serious time for an ounce of weed is laughable. Right up there with the Gun Show Loophole.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anonymous, @International Jew

  44. @WowJustWow
    @Hypnotoad666


    Sure, they still violated the law as it existed at the time. But it seems a tad unfair to be behind bars for doing something that everyone on the outside is now allowed to do.
     
    A lot of them are behind bars for real, often violent crimes, but it was just easier to put them away on a drug charge for which there was clear incontrovertible evidence. Or they were set to go to trial on major charges which would have taken a lot of the state's time and resources regardless of their obvious guilt, but were allowed to plead out to just the drug charges. You can't know how the process would have played out if the prosecution didn't have that option.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    A lot of them are behind bars for real, often violent crimes, but it was just easier to put them away on a drug charge for which there was clear incontrovertible evidence.

    Right. The meme that there are thousands of non-violent pot heads doing serious time for an ounce of weed is laughable. Right up there with the Gun Show Loophole.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jim Don Bob

    A fair number of guys doing time for marijuana possession are guys who couldn't be convicted on homicide because all witnesses were terrified of their gangs, so the cops busted them instead on possession charges.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Stolen Valor Detective
    @Jim Don Bob

    Rolling Stone on the myth of mass marijuana incarceration:


    About 750,000 people are arrested every year for marijuana offenses in the U.S. There's a lot of variation across states in what happens next. Not all arrests lead to prosecutions, and relatively few people prosecuted and convicted of simple possession end up in jail. Most are fined or are placed into community supervision. About 40,000 inmates of state and federal prison have a current conviction involving marijuana, and about half of them are in for marijuana offenses alone; most of these were involved in distribution. Less than one percent are in for possession alone.
     
    https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-lists/top-10-marijuana-myths-and-facts-159385/myth-prisons-are-full-of-people-in-for-marijuana-possession-169672/


    Like Steve said, a lot of people nominally incarcerated for drug offenses are actually guilty of something else, but there isn't enough evidence to convict on the more serious charge so a plea bargain is reached on a drug charge.

    Replies: @res

    , @Anonymous
    @Jim Don Bob

    There aren't many but there are a couple here and there. I lived in a small town where one of my co-workers kids got, and did, 2 years for a nickel bag. The kid pissed off the DA and the judge. He was a screwup but not violent or dangerous.

    , @International Jew
    @Jim Don Bob

    Drug offenders make up only some 20% of the prison population anyway. They're 50% of federal prisoners but only 16% of the much larger state prison system.

    See Table 12 here: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/p13.pdf


    The meme that there are thousands of non-violent pot heads doing serious time for an ounce of weed is laughable.
     
    Well, thousands there are; a thousand isn't much in a population of two million. But as a percent, users are small — just 2% according to the source I cited.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

  45. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666
    @EliteCommInc.


    In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions.
     
    It's like being disqualified at a track meet because you "jumped the gun." These ex-cons were just "premature entrepreneurs."

    On a serious note -- what should happens to people who are actually still doing time for something that becomes legal after their conviction?

    Sure, they still violated the law as it existed at the time. But it seems a tad unfair to be behind bars for doing something that everyone on the outside is now allowed to do.

    Replies: @WowJustWow, @Anonymous

    Sure, they still violated the law as it existed at the time. But it seems a tad unfair to be behind bars for doing something that everyone on the outside is now allowed to do.

    I knew a mob guy who did time for melting US silver coins down. It was illegal then, but they changed the law. I asked him why didn’t they just do it overseas where it was legal, and he said, “That wouldn’t have been no fun.”

    I think he was in for several years after they abolished the idiotic law, and he’s still a felon, which doesn’t keep him from having a lot of guns in his house. He just can’t go to the range and shoot them lest some agent see him and run him for felonies.

    Another felon I know sticks to muzzle loading guns, which are federally OK but a state beef for felons where he lives. Hey. it’s their time they will do if busted. They know the rules. If the guy moved 5 miles out of state the state law there says nothing about muzzleloaders for criminals.

    Some people are just dense. I remember watching a guy in a pickup drinking a beer at a Sonic drive in. In Kansas that’s a open container beef. But if he tossed his keys in the bed, thus not being able to drive with the Open Container, no beef. I tried to tell him, he told me to fuck off. As I pulled out, a Trooper pulled in and he got an Open Container ticket, which was big money back then. Dumbass probably thinks I ratted him out. I didn’t: this was pre-cellphone days.

  46. @Jim Don Bob
    @WowJustWow


    A lot of them are behind bars for real, often violent crimes, but it was just easier to put them away on a drug charge for which there was clear incontrovertible evidence.
     
    Right. The meme that there are thousands of non-violent pot heads doing serious time for an ounce of weed is laughable. Right up there with the Gun Show Loophole.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anonymous, @International Jew

    A fair number of guys doing time for marijuana possession are guys who couldn’t be convicted on homicide because all witnesses were terrified of their gangs, so the cops busted them instead on possession charges.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    You can admit that American law is incompatible with certain traditions and create some emergency exception, or you can not admit it, in which case there is no good test-surviving reasoning for punishing people with an adjacent charge. If we had more external credibility we could use this to create pressure. Instead we will get the worst of both worlds: the gangbangers free and the law still yanked over like a shared bedsheet.
    There is already an example of law talkers recognizing that public safety demands a technical injustice: the life imprisonmemt facility Louis Theroux visits for his show on pedophiles. They can file as many appeals as they care to fill out but they all know they're not leaving the complex. We could create a similar perception and pressure, not for all black criminals but specifically for organized thugs who defeat the system by intimidating witnesses. If our cities were not owned by Democrats, a more cleaned-up policy resembling this woud already be in effect.

  47. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    The Achilles heel of black weed distribution is that blacks can’t run any kind of business, except a few talented tenth types that prefer government or academic jobs that pay more with less stress, so the “Black Entrepreneurs” will be fronts for Middle Easterners of one or another flavor, or some other middle man minority, and they will make it profitable, available, and not pay taxes. They will use the money to bring more of their congeners over and cause trouble.

    Ixnay on weedparations.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  48. @Jim Don Bob
    @WowJustWow


    A lot of them are behind bars for real, often violent crimes, but it was just easier to put them away on a drug charge for which there was clear incontrovertible evidence.
     
    Right. The meme that there are thousands of non-violent pot heads doing serious time for an ounce of weed is laughable. Right up there with the Gun Show Loophole.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anonymous, @International Jew

    Rolling Stone on the myth of mass marijuana incarceration:

    About 750,000 people are arrested every year for marijuana offenses in the U.S. There’s a lot of variation across states in what happens next. Not all arrests lead to prosecutions, and relatively few people prosecuted and convicted of simple possession end up in jail. Most are fined or are placed into community supervision. About 40,000 inmates of state and federal prison have a current conviction involving marijuana, and about half of them are in for marijuana offenses alone; most of these were involved in distribution. Less than one percent are in for possession alone.

    https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-lists/top-10-marijuana-myths-and-facts-159385/myth-prisons-are-full-of-people-in-for-marijuana-possession-169672/

    Like Steve said, a lot of people nominally incarcerated for drug offenses are actually guilty of something else, but there isn’t enough evidence to convict on the more serious charge so a plea bargain is reached on a drug charge.

    • Replies: @res
    @Stolen Valor Detective


    Like Steve said, a lot of people nominally incarcerated for drug offenses are actually guilty of something else, but there isn’t enough evidence to convict on the more serious charge so a plea bargain is reached on a drug charge.
     
    I wish someone would do a study on this to get real data.

    Replies: @al-Gharaniq

  49. @EliteCommInc.
    I oppose entirely any further introductions of mind altering substances, including marijuana. But this,

    "In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions. Black people make up just a handful of the thousands of cultivation or dispensary license holders there, and continue to be arrested on marijuana-related charges at almost three times the rate of white people."

    is funny on its face. barring the legal production, sale and use of a substance to those who were involved in the production, sale and use of the same when it was illegal --- double jeopardy.

    That's just too funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Lot, @passive-aggressivist, @J.Ross, @Alden

    is funny on its face. barring the legal production, sale and use of a substance to those who were involved in the production, sale and use of the same when it was illegal — double jeopardy.

    What are the odds that “marijuana-related offenses” includes burglary, extortion, fraud, assault and all kinds of other crimes only tangentially related to distribution or possession of weed?

  50. @Lot
    @EliteCommInc.

    The next frontier for cognitive liberty!

    https://files.shroomery.org/files/12-13/290425782-851392316-post-21-1057426484.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/66/2b/ce/662bce42a3406435a099436a5f3e97a8.jpg

    Replies: @captflee, @EliteCommInc., @Redneck farmer

    Psilocybe cubensis? Amanita muscaria?

    I had roommates in PR who delighted in flying hang gliders down the cow patty strewn eastern facing slopes around El Yunque, extensively self medicated. Granted, the trade winds allowed flight at very low ground speeds, but I could never see my way to giving that combination a whirl, being cursed with an excessively vivid imagination as regards my well being. The roomies were both Texian and radiomen anyway, so certifiable.

    As for the amanita, whilst visiting some of my more uninhibited acquaintances at a north GA quasi-commune, I was offered one, with the all time best sales pitch, ” Try one of these; after you stop vomiting, you’ll really get off!”

    Suffice it to say that, lit as things are with weed becoming legal, “shrooms” would be…interesting.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @captflee

    A couple of paragliders at Torrey Pines in La Jolla just collided and both were killed.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    , @Lot
    @captflee

    amanita mushrooms have a completely different chemical and should never be consumed. strong side effects and potentially deadly.

    The active ingredient in them isn’t even illegal and is found in lots of plants.

    , @Lot
    @captflee

    Muscaria have also always been legal. They look so cool they have ornamental value.

  51. @Bragadocious
    So because blacks made poor life choices, they want to get paid? Did bootleggers in the 1920s demand stuff when the 21st Amendment passed? Sure, expunge their records, it's only right and correct. But this idea that "imma get paid" is laughable. Anyway, there aren't enough blacks in the NYS legislature to stop this momentum.

    Replies: @Dr. X, @Nicholas Stix

    “Sure, expunge their records…”

    Nothing sure about why we should do that. Repealing just laws is a big fad, because blacks violate them at astronomical rates. Expunging blacks’ criminal records will mean armies of black criminals being able to say that they have been law-abiding citizens their whole lives.

    Then again, employers are no longer permitted to ask black applicants if they were ever convicted of felonies, so their crimes have already been expunged, as a practical matter.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Nicholas Stix

    There is a difference between that slimeball judge in Ferguson demanding that laws no longer apply because of back criminality and somebody asking the state to follow through on its own reasoning when it finally admits that pot is not heroin.

  52. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    @WowJustWow


    A lot of them are behind bars for real, often violent crimes, but it was just easier to put them away on a drug charge for which there was clear incontrovertible evidence.
     
    Right. The meme that there are thousands of non-violent pot heads doing serious time for an ounce of weed is laughable. Right up there with the Gun Show Loophole.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anonymous, @International Jew

    There aren’t many but there are a couple here and there. I lived in a small town where one of my co-workers kids got, and did, 2 years for a nickel bag. The kid pissed off the DA and the judge. He was a screwup but not violent or dangerous.

  53. @Tiny Duck
    @Anonymous

    This is perfectly example of racism and white evil

    Think about your stupid flippant remark and really think about it

    This is why we NEED affirmative action and other social justice programs

    I take great pleasure in the fact of demographic change and the fact that white girls CRAVE Men of Color

    Replies: @fish

    Oh Tinys…..

    What I be telllen yous bout that talk…….

    Lendert Muthafuckin Pits

  54. @Steve Sailer
    @EliteCommInc.

    QB Peyton Manning responded to marijuana legalization in Colorado by buying a dozen Taco Bell fast food restaurants.

    Replies: @EliteCommInc., @AnotherDad

    laughing . . .

  55. @Lot
    @EliteCommInc.

    The next frontier for cognitive liberty!

    https://files.shroomery.org/files/12-13/290425782-851392316-post-21-1057426484.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/66/2b/ce/662bce42a3406435a099436a5f3e97a8.jpg

    Replies: @captflee, @EliteCommInc., @Redneck farmer

    I oppose entirely any further introductions of mind altering substances, including marijuana, mushrooms . . .

  56. Sailor gap in action again. How about this for an idea, let’s give 100% of weed business to AA’s as advance payment on reparations, and ask them to police the illegal market for weed themselves. Be a hell of a way to wean off future White and Asian addicts.

  57. @EliteCommInc.
    I oppose entirely any further introductions of mind altering substances, including marijuana. But this,

    "In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions. Black people make up just a handful of the thousands of cultivation or dispensary license holders there, and continue to be arrested on marijuana-related charges at almost three times the rate of white people."

    is funny on its face. barring the legal production, sale and use of a substance to those who were involved in the production, sale and use of the same when it was illegal --- double jeopardy.

    That's just too funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Lot, @passive-aggressivist, @J.Ross, @Alden

    The Canadian experiment failed utterly because of naked socialist greed on the Francois Holande level: the only legal vendors were politically connected government people, often cops. Mysteriously, illegal trade increased after Trudeau Deux asked Canuck potheads to pursue a tiny supply at the homes of police officers.

  58. @Arclight
    Just giving out licenses doesn't mean success - like any business, you have to offer actual value to have an advantage over competitors, and automatic handouts don't encourage the right people. I have personal experience with having to hire 'disadvantaged' businesses as contractors, and although I have had some good experiences, I have more in which the contractor or vendor expected way more money then the job was worth, or the actual product or service provided was crap.

    Anyway, kinda funny these NY lawmakers think job training and adult education provided by the government or its proxies is going to work - we've been trying that with Trade Adjustment Assistance for 20 years and it's a goose egg.

    Replies: @Moral Stone, @bomag

    …we’ve been trying that with Trade Adjustment Assistance for 20 years and it’s a goose egg.

    Oh, the Feds have been doing this since forever. Wagner Peyser Act of 1933 morphed into the Manpower Development Training Act of 1962 which morphed into the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of 1973 into the Job Training and Partnership Act of 1982 into the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 into the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

    Bleh.

    Here’s one report on such stuff:

    In 1993, the Labor Department released a study that showed that in a study of low-income male out-of-school youth, males in the JTPA program actually had 10 percent lower earnings than males from a similar demographic who never participated in the program. Prior to the study’s release, the Labor Department’s inspector general stated that young trainees were twice as likely to rely on food stamps after JTPA involvement due to the fact that the training showed the individuals how to apply for food stamps[from wiki on the 1982 version]

  59. @Nicholas Stix
    @Bragadocious

    "Sure, expunge their records..."

    Nothing sure about why we should do that. Repealing just laws is a big fad, because blacks violate them at astronomical rates. Expunging blacks' criminal records will mean armies of black criminals being able to say that they have been law-abiding citizens their whole lives.

    Then again, employers are no longer permitted to ask black applicants if they were ever convicted of felonies, so their crimes have already been expunged, as a practical matter.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    There is a difference between that slimeball judge in Ferguson demanding that laws no longer apply because of back criminality and somebody asking the state to follow through on its own reasoning when it finally admits that pot is not heroin.

  60. @Reg Cæsar
    @MikeatMikedotMike


    Jeffery C. Mays has some pretty dilated pupils here:
     
    We are all sanpaku.

    JAPAN'S SANPAKU EYE SUPERSTITION


    https://i.imgur.com/8ywakaR.jpg

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @J.Ross

    You can’t look at Adam Schiff and tell me all is well with that man, but Mike’s pic is a pretty chill customer who just happens to have sanpaku. Schiff has whole-body-sanpaku, and in a still image you get the impression that he’s probably shaking.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @J.Ross

    Schiff looks like he’s shaking in real life as well, and that is because of the tightly controlled rage and frustration he operates under. He is basically somewhere to the left of Leon Trotsky and you can tell his ideal job would have been as a Chekist in post revolutionary Russia taking crimethinkers and schkotzim down to the basement to give them one to the back of the head. In our society he would have been an anti-fa whamming people like us over the head with a bike lock, but to get into congress he had to cut his hair, shave, and trade the black hoodie and face bandana for a suit. That barely controlled, shaved cat look he has is from the stress of that dissonance. His neighboring congressman Ted, Red Guard, Lieu is politically similar and they are both protégés of the money and organization of the Santa Monica/West Los Angeles political trust.
    In my little South Bay town, we just had a city council election and we were flooded with operatives working the neighborhood for their Chosen candidate. They knew by name who was a registered Democrat in each home and made repeated visits trying to catch them at home and talk to them personally to make sure they turned out and knew who to vote for.

  61. Black people make up just a handful of thousands

    Now there’s a statistic–is that a big handful or small among (how many) thousands?

    Here is a statistic

    AA are 3.9% of the total population of Colorado

  62. @Steve Sailer
    @EliteCommInc.

    QB Peyton Manning responded to marijuana legalization in Colorado by buying a dozen Taco Bell fast food restaurants.

    Replies: @EliteCommInc., @AnotherDad

    QB Peyton Manning responded to marijuana legalization in Colorado by buying a dozen Taco Bell fast food restaurants.

    Beefy fritos burrito for a buck–hard to beat that. (And that’s stone cold sober–i haven’t smoked any marijuana since the 70s.)

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @AnotherDad

    Sounds like an effective alternative to buggery for a body not wanting to maintain control of his movements.

    They call it "beefy" because it ain't beef, mate.

    https://youtu.be/JsNTzUkRmaY

    , @Anonymous
    @AnotherDad

    I'd go to Taco Bueno or Taco John's way before Taco Smell. They're as bad as Jack In The Box.

  63. I read this–deja vu all over again! Same reality, same whining about it.

    While i really appreciate what Steve does–a great public service–the bottom line here in most all these posts:
    — stereotypes are true
    — the excuse making is lame
    — the whining is utterly predictable

    The only thing that seems to change is the excuse making gets more and more baroque and the whining and hectoring gets louder and angrier.

  64. @Jim Don Bob
    @Reg Cæsar

    I read that book in the 70s!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    I read that book in the 70s!

    Why did you try to eat the cover, though?

    Oh… not that particular copy.

  65. @Stolen Valor Detective
    Personally, I think it would be a good thing if young black and Hispanic men had more access to cheap, high quality marijuana (to be smoked in their own domiciles.) Staying inside and playing video games while mellowed out from marijuana sure beats a lot of the other things they like to do for fun in terms of the nuisance it poses to civil society as a whole.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Weed became strongly associated with urban culture, such as it is, around the time the Crack Wars calmed down. What I mean is they thought of it that way, were proud of it. Some have made a connection.

  66. @Steve Sailer
    @Jim Don Bob

    A fair number of guys doing time for marijuana possession are guys who couldn't be convicted on homicide because all witnesses were terrified of their gangs, so the cops busted them instead on possession charges.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    You can admit that American law is incompatible with certain traditions and create some emergency exception, or you can not admit it, in which case there is no good test-surviving reasoning for punishing people with an adjacent charge. If we had more external credibility we could use this to create pressure. Instead we will get the worst of both worlds: the gangbangers free and the law still yanked over like a shared bedsheet.
    There is already an example of law talkers recognizing that public safety demands a technical injustice: the life imprisonmemt facility Louis Theroux visits for his show on pedophiles. They can file as many appeals as they care to fill out but they all know they’re not leaving the complex. We could create a similar perception and pressure, not for all black criminals but specifically for organized thugs who defeat the system by intimidating witnesses. If our cities were not owned by Democrats, a more cleaned-up policy resembling this woud already be in effect.

  67. Anon[224] • Disclaimer says:

    One of the reasons why whites voted for legal weed was so whites could buy it without having to get it from scary and dangerous Mexican and black gang members and thugs. Plenty of white drug users have died as the hands of the latter two. Of course whites want to keep blacks out of the business. Black are deliberately being kept out of the business because everyone knows black-owned weed shops will degenerate into black-gang owned, and white-owned weed shops will start being targeted for hits by black gangs because whites will be competition.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Anon

    They’re mostly cash only too, no credit cards. Big target for robberies.

  68. @AndrewR
    As I enter middle age, I do sympathize with old people who may occasionally be out of touch, so I say this with total love, Steve, but calling cannabis "dope" is a rather square thing to do. I reserve that word for opioids.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Bubba, @Kratoklastes

    Same here: back in the 70s on Starsky and Hutch, I’m pretty sure that if Huggy Bear told S&H that someone was a dope dealer, what he meant was heroin dealer… and it would be hard to square the term “dope fiend” with weed.

    But the Historical Dictionary of American Slang tells me that ‘dope’ started to be used for weed in about 1950; nowadays it seems to be reverting to the pre-WWII usage (i.e., opiates).

    Anyhow… legal weed will be totally dope (and I’ve never smoked anything in my life: edibles and tincture FTW).

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Kratoklastes

    You're an Australian, isn't it illegal for you to use anything but Foster's?

    Replies: @Captain Tripps

  69. Anonymous[396] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dtbb
    If it's made legal why can't people just grow their own?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Gordo, @Redneck farmer, @Brutusale

    For the same reason people don’t grow, thresh, and mill their own wheat.

  70. @AnotherDad
    @Steve Sailer


    QB Peyton Manning responded to marijuana legalization in Colorado by buying a dozen Taco Bell fast food restaurants.
     
    Beefy fritos burrito for a buck--hard to beat that. (And that's stone cold sober--i haven't smoked any marijuana since the 70s.)

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Anonymous

    Sounds like an effective alternative to buggery for a body not wanting to maintain control of his movements.

    They call it “beefy” because it ain’t beef, mate.

  71. @Bill P
    They should totally give the retail licenses to blacks. There's no way they could compete with all the Asian dealers if it's legal without affirmative action, and there isn't all that much money in it anyway. With cultivated strains of weed these days a gram is enough to get someone stoned every day for over a week, and it isn't a difficult plant to grow. If there's any real money in it, it's in the farming.

    So if blacks want the retail licenses, let them have them. I guarantee they'll keep the best for themselves, overcharge, come up with all sorts of under-the-table hare-brained schemes, and generally make the business as overcomplicated and inefficient as possible, which is good. We don't need highly efficient weed distribution centers in every neighborhood.

    Also, the idea of white urban stoners having to purchase their weed from surly blacks makes me smile.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Alden

    That’s what the stoner White medical marijuana store owners are like. Growing weed isn’t the problem. The problem is dealing with the out of it store owners. I assume weed improved blacks by lessening their aggressive tendencies.

  72. @Anon
    One of the reasons why whites voted for legal weed was so whites could buy it without having to get it from scary and dangerous Mexican and black gang members and thugs. Plenty of white drug users have died as the hands of the latter two. Of course whites want to keep blacks out of the business. Black are deliberately being kept out of the business because everyone knows black-owned weed shops will degenerate into black-gang owned, and white-owned weed shops will start being targeted for hits by black gangs because whites will be competition.

    Replies: @Alden

    They’re mostly cash only too, no credit cards. Big target for robberies.

  73. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad
    @Steve Sailer


    QB Peyton Manning responded to marijuana legalization in Colorado by buying a dozen Taco Bell fast food restaurants.
     
    Beefy fritos burrito for a buck--hard to beat that. (And that's stone cold sober--i haven't smoked any marijuana since the 70s.)

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Anonymous

    I’d go to Taco Bueno or Taco John’s way before Taco Smell. They’re as bad as Jack In The Box.

  74. @Paul Rise
    It makes more sense to address the 20 - 30 year old wrongs of the drug war now rather than address the 200 year old wrongs of slavery now.

    Replies: @brioche

    But were wrongs committed 20-30 years ago?

    Enforcing laws that prohibit sale & distribution of dangerous substances is wrong? Arresting gangsters indulging in violent crimes is wrong?

    I don’t think delegitimizing law enforcement is any wiser than addressing 200 years old wrongs of slavery.

  75. In related news, notice how progressive activists have been conspicuously quiet on Trump’s legalisation of the hemp industry. I guess this is like prominent Democrats supporting Trump’s protectionist trade policies. It just isn’t something you’re supposed to talk about among the progressive chattering classes.

  76. @Jim Don Bob
    @Reg Cæsar

    I read that book in the 70s!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    I was attracted by the simplicity of the macrobiotic diet, until I found out it banned all my favorite foods– eggplants, sweet potatoes, and the like. Basically, no Thanksgiving dinner.

    Around that time, David Reuben, the sex guru, was shocked by his father’s gruesome death from modern consumption habits. He wrote a couple of very good common-sense nutritional books. I read both, and have been able to ignore everybody else ever since. Cream and eggs? Fine!

  77. @Dtbb
    If it's made legal why can't people just grow their own?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Gordo, @Redneck farmer, @Brutusale

    If it’s made legal why can’t people just grow their own?

    Requires work, forethought, diligence, planning. These are stoners we’re talking about here.

  78. Sure, they can have a piece of the weed action as soon as they let whitey have some of the crack action. Word!

  79. @Dtbb
    If it's made legal why can't people just grow their own?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Gordo, @Redneck farmer, @Brutusale

    Because then the state couldn’t get the taxes. Also, diversion. California found a certain % of people “growing for their own use” where selling it black market. One plant a month would make the car payment.

  80. @Neuday
    I have no problem with black getting a cut of the retail pot storefronts in their areas as long as the Asians get a healthy cut of the prostitution trade when it's legalized in a year or two. I suppose the Italians should get numbers running or protection rackets, but we'd have to start letting Europeans immigrate again, and that's rayciss.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Disordered (with a bad memory)

    Only hire lottery managers of Italian descent. Problem solved!

    • LOL: Bruce County
  81. @Lot
    @EliteCommInc.

    The next frontier for cognitive liberty!

    https://files.shroomery.org/files/12-13/290425782-851392316-post-21-1057426484.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/66/2b/ce/662bce42a3406435a099436a5f3e97a8.jpg

    Replies: @captflee, @EliteCommInc., @Redneck farmer

    Where do we contribute!

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Redneck farmer

    There is an organization called MAPS that helps scientists deal with the legalities of psychedelic clinical research.

    It was endowed by Bob Wallace, an early Microsoft employee.

    You can also join the church that has argued it should get a religious exemption for shrooms like Indians and peyote.

  82. @Kratoklastes
    @AndrewR

    Same here: back in the 70s on Starsky and Hutch, I'm pretty sure that if Huggy Bear told S&H that someone was a dope dealer, what he meant was heroin dealer... and it would be hard to square the term "dope fiend" with weed.

    But the Historical Dictionary of American Slang tells me that 'dope' started to be used for weed in about 1950; nowadays it seems to be reverting to the pre-WWII usage (i.e., opiates).

    Anyhow... legal weed will be totally dope (and I've never smoked anything in my life: edibles and tincture FTW).

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    You’re an Australian, isn’t it illegal for you to use anything but Foster’s?

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    @Redneck farmer

    Foster's?!?! Crocodile Dundee called from the '80's and says:

    Nah, Mate, that's 'Roo piss. We sell that for easy money to you dumb Yank hicks who want something exotic from Oz when you're drunk at the bar. These days the blokes go for either VB (that stands for Victoria Bitter for you Yanks), XXXX Gold or Tooheys.

    https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/the-10-best-australian-beer-brands/

  83. @Redneck farmer
    Do the would be entrepreneurs understand that legal businesses pay taxes?
    How many users realize most jobs that pay decent require a drug test? And that you probably won't be hired even if weed is legal? Because potheads are lousy employees.

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Alden

    Weed certainly sucks out whatever ambition you might have, as well as making you stupid. We are are also beginning to see the dire effects it has on mental health.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @LondonBob

    Now do alcohol, big guy.

  84. Looks like air pollution reparations will also soon be in order. Through dilligent scientific research, the USA Today has miraculously managed to connect each and every particle of pollution to the race that produced it. And then they were able to ascertain the race of each individual affected by said pollution. In what can only be called a mighty white move, USA Today then went on to assign pollution produced by Asian and Native Americans to the white column. For some unexplained reason USA Today has so far refused to assign a percentage of pollution to Jews.

    https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/11/air-pollution-inequality-minorities-breathe-air-polluted-whites/3130783002/

    • Replies: @Bubba
    @Rocks Off

    Wow! I thought you were just kidding until I went to the USA Today site! Unbelievable!

  85. @LondonBob
    @Redneck farmer

    Weed certainly sucks out whatever ambition you might have, as well as making you stupid. We are are also beginning to see the dire effects it has on mental health.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Now do alcohol, big guy.

  86. @Dtbb
    If it's made legal why can't people just grow their own?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Gordo, @Redneck farmer, @Brutusale

    In Massachusetts, individuals can have 6 plants and households can have 12 plants for “personal use”.

  87. All the hoops one has to jump through to open legal dispensary cut into the profit margin. Add exorbitant taxes and it doesn’t make a lot of sense to go into the legal side of dealing marijuana if you can clear bigger profit on illegal side. Moreover: 1) the potential down side, i.e. jail time has been minimized to the point that it’s not much of a deterrent; 2) pot nerds are of the same ilk as comic book nerds – annoying as hell, and; 3) bucking the system and fighting authority is fun, there’s a certain rush to it – there’s no fun in selling legally through a marijuana dispensary. Even the term “marijuana dispensary” is sterilized to the point it’s off putting.

    Say what you want about black dudes slinging herb but you better believe they understand the above a hell of a lot better than the dipsh*ts writing the articles about it.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Walsh2

    Those are all good points. On the other hand...

    1. If you operate legally, you have police protection (to the extent other legal businesses do anyway).

    2. Customers will pay more for your product, knowing it's certified safe.

    Replies: @Lars Porsena

  88. Tying this in to another one of your recent posts, I’d like to point out that the Cannabis plant is not native to the US.

  89. @Walsh2
    All the hoops one has to jump through to open legal dispensary cut into the profit margin. Add exorbitant taxes and it doesn't make a lot of sense to go into the legal side of dealing marijuana if you can clear bigger profit on illegal side. Moreover: 1) the potential down side, i.e. jail time has been minimized to the point that it's not much of a deterrent; 2) pot nerds are of the same ilk as comic book nerds - annoying as hell, and; 3) bucking the system and fighting authority is fun, there's a certain rush to it - there's no fun in selling legally through a marijuana dispensary. Even the term "marijuana dispensary" is sterilized to the point it's off putting.

    Say what you want about black dudes slinging herb but you better believe they understand the above a hell of a lot better than the dipsh*ts writing the articles about it.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Those are all good points. On the other hand…

    1. If you operate legally, you have police protection (to the extent other legal businesses do anyway).

    2. Customers will pay more for your product, knowing it’s certified safe.

    • Replies: @Lars Porsena
    @International Jew

    That's like saying you'll pay more for carrots if they are certified safe carrots.

    Weed is produce... it's as hard to fake as carrots are because the customers know what it's suppose to look like.

    I know there are urban legends about drug dealers lacing the pot with other, more expensive drugs at no extra charge and not even telling people, but with weed that is just urban legends. It would be like worrying some carrot farmer might have laced your carrots ($1.50/lb) with real italian parmigiano reggiano cheese ($20/lb) and didn't tell you, didn't charge you extra, and hoped you didn't notice.

    Now trying to lace or adulterate the product with something cheaper is a real concern, especially with all the drugs that are basically just white powder, they can be cut with things like laxative or baby powder, or other cheaper white powder drugs. Most of the parmesan in the supermarket says it is full of artificially parmesan flavored plant cellulose (sawdust?). But trying to cut your marijuana with sawdust or baby powder would be like trying to cut carrots with baby powder or mix in some cheaper parsnips spray-painted orange or something. Not sure if parsnips are actually cheaper than carrots but you get what I mean. What would you try to pass off as weed, broccoli and patchouli oil?

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @RationalExpressions

  90. @Jim Don Bob
    @WowJustWow


    A lot of them are behind bars for real, often violent crimes, but it was just easier to put them away on a drug charge for which there was clear incontrovertible evidence.
     
    Right. The meme that there are thousands of non-violent pot heads doing serious time for an ounce of weed is laughable. Right up there with the Gun Show Loophole.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Stolen Valor Detective, @Anonymous, @International Jew

    Drug offenders make up only some 20% of the prison population anyway. They’re 50% of federal prisoners but only 16% of the much larger state prison system.

    See Table 12 here: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/p13.pdf

    The meme that there are thousands of non-violent pot heads doing serious time for an ounce of weed is laughable.

    Well, thousands there are; a thousand isn’t much in a population of two million. But as a percent, users are small — just 2% according to the source I cited.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @International Jew

    According to my distraught neighbor with the druggie/criminal son: The cops will arrest you a million times, but they won't lock you away until you kill someone.

    Hooked on heroin, ineducable, unemployable, stealing from everyone he can, lying to all, mostly homeless, selling drugs if he doesn't take them all himself, and making society in general worse off all around. but no, locking him up would violate all sorts of civil rights and be a horrible example of the War on Drugs.

  91. Tokemon Points

    Joint Stock Company

  92. @captflee
    @Lot

    Psilocybe cubensis? Amanita muscaria?

    I had roommates in PR who delighted in flying hang gliders down the cow patty strewn eastern facing slopes around El Yunque, extensively self medicated. Granted, the trade winds allowed flight at very low ground speeds, but I could never see my way to giving that combination a whirl, being cursed with an excessively vivid imagination as regards my well being. The roomies were both Texian and radiomen anyway, so certifiable.

    As for the amanita, whilst visiting some of my more uninhibited acquaintances at a north GA quasi-commune, I was offered one, with the all time best sales pitch, " Try one of these; after you stop vomiting, you'll really get off!"

    Suffice it to say that, lit as things are with weed becoming legal, "shrooms" would be...interesting.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Lot, @Lot

    A couple of paragliders at Torrey Pines in La Jolla just collided and both were killed.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Steve Sailer

    I always thought that many hang gliders at Torrey seemed to be doing pretty risky maneuvers at close quarters, considering that a lot of the flying is done at a pretty good height off the cliffs. I’ve seen hangliders going off heights of thousands of feet but those were fairly straightforward glides. Doing aerobatic maneuvers and colliding with another flyer or losing lift a hundred feet over a rock beach is a different thing from coming in too hot on a meadow landing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  93. @J.Ross
    @Reg Cæsar

    You can't look at Adam Schiff and tell me all is well with that man, but Mike's pic is a pretty chill customer who just happens to have sanpaku. Schiff has whole-body-sanpaku, and in a still image you get the impression that he's probably shaking.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    Schiff looks like he’s shaking in real life as well, and that is because of the tightly controlled rage and frustration he operates under. He is basically somewhere to the left of Leon Trotsky and you can tell his ideal job would have been as a Chekist in post revolutionary Russia taking crimethinkers and schkotzim down to the basement to give them one to the back of the head. In our society he would have been an anti-fa whamming people like us over the head with a bike lock, but to get into congress he had to cut his hair, shave, and trade the black hoodie and face bandana for a suit. That barely controlled, shaved cat look he has is from the stress of that dissonance. His neighboring congressman Ted, Red Guard, Lieu is politically similar and they are both protégés of the money and organization of the Santa Monica/West Los Angeles political trust.
    In my little South Bay town, we just had a city council election and we were flooded with operatives working the neighborhood for their Chosen candidate. They knew by name who was a registered Democrat in each home and made repeated visits trying to catch them at home and talk to them personally to make sure they turned out and knew who to vote for.

  94. @Bubba
    @AndrewR

    "What’s in a name? that which we call dope
    By any other name would smell just as awful;"

    Replies: @ThreeCranes

    Ain’t that the truth. Weed back in the seventies had a distinctive, sweet aroma. Today’s stuff (admittedly 10x stronger) literally smells like burning shit–not that I really know what that smells like. An acquaintance of mine still smokes. I can’t stand to even sit in the same room when he lights one up.

    Amazingly, the people I know who still smoke are reasonably good at what they do. What they do today, however, is the same thing they were doing at the age of 20. Their careers don’t require a lot of novel thinking. Some people can function–on familiar ground–when under the spell of weed and some can’t.

  95. @International Jew
    @Walsh2

    Those are all good points. On the other hand...

    1. If you operate legally, you have police protection (to the extent other legal businesses do anyway).

    2. Customers will pay more for your product, knowing it's certified safe.

    Replies: @Lars Porsena

    That’s like saying you’ll pay more for carrots if they are certified safe carrots.

    Weed is produce… it’s as hard to fake as carrots are because the customers know what it’s suppose to look like.

    I know there are urban legends about drug dealers lacing the pot with other, more expensive drugs at no extra charge and not even telling people, but with weed that is just urban legends. It would be like worrying some carrot farmer might have laced your carrots ($1.50/lb) with real italian parmigiano reggiano cheese ($20/lb) and didn’t tell you, didn’t charge you extra, and hoped you didn’t notice.

    Now trying to lace or adulterate the product with something cheaper is a real concern, especially with all the drugs that are basically just white powder, they can be cut with things like laxative or baby powder, or other cheaper white powder drugs. Most of the parmesan in the supermarket says it is full of artificially parmesan flavored plant cellulose (sawdust?). But trying to cut your marijuana with sawdust or baby powder would be like trying to cut carrots with baby powder or mix in some cheaper parsnips spray-painted orange or something. Not sure if parsnips are actually cheaper than carrots but you get what I mean. What would you try to pass off as weed, broccoli and patchouli oil?

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Lars Porsena

    When we rented a house to a group of outlaw bikers, who eventually went to prison on drug and weapons charges, we noticed the alfalfa was really thin by their house.

    , @RationalExpressions
    @Lars Porsena

    Bought a baggy from some black guy in a 7-11 parking lot back in the 80s. I have no idea what it was, but it sure wasn’t weed. Looked like it though. Very disappointing.

  96. @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    In California, several cities introduced equity programs retroactively. Oakland now requires at least half of licenses to go to people with a cannabis-related conviction and who fell below an income threshold. …
     
    In order to become a politician, you will be required to have a prostitution-related conviction...

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    Man, they’re going to have some seriously high-class shops there in Oakland.

    How long before we’re inundated with cries of racism because all the pot is sold to blacks? You know, the guns were sold to blacks, the liquor, the crummy mortgages, the crack, and now the pot. You evil white people are trying to destroy the black man!

    • Replies: @res
    @stillCARealist


    How long before we’re inundated with cries of racism because all the pot is sold to blacks?
     
    Or else it will be cries of racism because pot is too expensive and blacks can't afford it. One thing you can be sure about--there will be cries of racism. Two constants in all of this.

    1. Blacks are always worse off.
    2. It is always YT's fault.
  97. @International Jew
    @Jim Don Bob

    Drug offenders make up only some 20% of the prison population anyway. They're 50% of federal prisoners but only 16% of the much larger state prison system.

    See Table 12 here: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/p13.pdf


    The meme that there are thousands of non-violent pot heads doing serious time for an ounce of weed is laughable.
     
    Well, thousands there are; a thousand isn't much in a population of two million. But as a percent, users are small — just 2% according to the source I cited.

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    According to my distraught neighbor with the druggie/criminal son: The cops will arrest you a million times, but they won’t lock you away until you kill someone.

    Hooked on heroin, ineducable, unemployable, stealing from everyone he can, lying to all, mostly homeless, selling drugs if he doesn’t take them all himself, and making society in general worse off all around. but no, locking him up would violate all sorts of civil rights and be a horrible example of the War on Drugs.

  98. @Redneck farmer
    @Kratoklastes

    You're an Australian, isn't it illegal for you to use anything but Foster's?

    Replies: @Captain Tripps

    Foster’s?!?! Crocodile Dundee called from the ’80’s and says:

    Nah, Mate, that’s ‘Roo piss. We sell that for easy money to you dumb Yank hicks who want something exotic from Oz when you’re drunk at the bar. These days the blokes go for either VB (that stands for Victoria Bitter for you Yanks), XXXX Gold or Tooheys.

    https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/the-10-best-australian-beer-brands/

  99. @Stolen Valor Detective
    @Jim Don Bob

    Rolling Stone on the myth of mass marijuana incarceration:


    About 750,000 people are arrested every year for marijuana offenses in the U.S. There's a lot of variation across states in what happens next. Not all arrests lead to prosecutions, and relatively few people prosecuted and convicted of simple possession end up in jail. Most are fined or are placed into community supervision. About 40,000 inmates of state and federal prison have a current conviction involving marijuana, and about half of them are in for marijuana offenses alone; most of these were involved in distribution. Less than one percent are in for possession alone.
     
    https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-lists/top-10-marijuana-myths-and-facts-159385/myth-prisons-are-full-of-people-in-for-marijuana-possession-169672/


    Like Steve said, a lot of people nominally incarcerated for drug offenses are actually guilty of something else, but there isn't enough evidence to convict on the more serious charge so a plea bargain is reached on a drug charge.

    Replies: @res

    Like Steve said, a lot of people nominally incarcerated for drug offenses are actually guilty of something else, but there isn’t enough evidence to convict on the more serious charge so a plea bargain is reached on a drug charge.

    I wish someone would do a study on this to get real data.

    • Replies: @al-Gharaniq
    @res

    That would be fairly difficult—if they're not charged with other crimes, then (under the presumption of innocence) the only crime they've been proven guilty of is just petty drug possession. You would have to survey thousands of cops and DA's country-wide to get a definitive answer on this. Reviewing court records alone wouldn't be enough, I would guess, since if the prosecution doesn't think they have enough evidence to convict they wouldn't bring up the charge.

    Replies: @res

  100. @stillCARealist
    @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    Man, they're going to have some seriously high-class shops there in Oakland.

    How long before we're inundated with cries of racism because all the pot is sold to blacks? You know, the guns were sold to blacks, the liquor, the crummy mortgages, the crack, and now the pot. You evil white people are trying to destroy the black man!

    Replies: @res

    How long before we’re inundated with cries of racism because all the pot is sold to blacks?

    Or else it will be cries of racism because pot is too expensive and blacks can’t afford it. One thing you can be sure about–there will be cries of racism. Two constants in all of this.

    1. Blacks are always worse off.
    2. It is always YT’s fault.

    • Agree: RationalExpressions
  101. @captflee
    @Lot

    Psilocybe cubensis? Amanita muscaria?

    I had roommates in PR who delighted in flying hang gliders down the cow patty strewn eastern facing slopes around El Yunque, extensively self medicated. Granted, the trade winds allowed flight at very low ground speeds, but I could never see my way to giving that combination a whirl, being cursed with an excessively vivid imagination as regards my well being. The roomies were both Texian and radiomen anyway, so certifiable.

    As for the amanita, whilst visiting some of my more uninhibited acquaintances at a north GA quasi-commune, I was offered one, with the all time best sales pitch, " Try one of these; after you stop vomiting, you'll really get off!"

    Suffice it to say that, lit as things are with weed becoming legal, "shrooms" would be...interesting.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Lot, @Lot

    amanita mushrooms have a completely different chemical and should never be consumed. strong side effects and potentially deadly.

    The active ingredient in them isn’t even illegal and is found in lots of plants.

  102. How the Booming Israeli Weed Industry Is Changing American Pot
    https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-features/how-the-booming-israeli-weed-industry-is-changing-american-pot-197414/

    ISRAEL CAN RIDE COLORADO’S WAVE OF POT REVENUE, SAYS GOVERNOR
    https://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/Politics-And-Diplomacy/Israel-can-ride-Colorados-wave-of-pot-revenue-says-governor-427528

    Former Israeli prime minister joins cannabis company board
    https://mjbizdaily.com/former-israeli-prime-minister-joins-marijuana-company-board/

    The Holy Land of Medical Marijuana
    How a country the size of New Jersey became the epicenter of medicinal marijuana.
    https://www.usnews.com/news/best-countries/articles/2017-04-11/israel-is-a-global-leader-in-marijuana-research

  103. @Redneck farmer
    @Lot

    Where do we contribute!

    Replies: @Lot

    There is an organization called MAPS that helps scientists deal with the legalities of psychedelic clinical research.

    It was endowed by Bob Wallace, an early Microsoft employee.

    You can also join the church that has argued it should get a religious exemption for shrooms like Indians and peyote.

  104. @captflee
    @Lot

    Psilocybe cubensis? Amanita muscaria?

    I had roommates in PR who delighted in flying hang gliders down the cow patty strewn eastern facing slopes around El Yunque, extensively self medicated. Granted, the trade winds allowed flight at very low ground speeds, but I could never see my way to giving that combination a whirl, being cursed with an excessively vivid imagination as regards my well being. The roomies were both Texian and radiomen anyway, so certifiable.

    As for the amanita, whilst visiting some of my more uninhibited acquaintances at a north GA quasi-commune, I was offered one, with the all time best sales pitch, " Try one of these; after you stop vomiting, you'll really get off!"

    Suffice it to say that, lit as things are with weed becoming legal, "shrooms" would be...interesting.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Lot, @Lot

    Muscaria have also always been legal. They look so cool they have ornamental value.

  105. The WA experience with legalized pot may give NY an idea what may happen in the future.

    I don’t think there’s much future for any small-scale producers or distributers, much less a large number of small black-owned operations. Any effective redistribution to minority communities would have to occur at the revenue/taxation side, This articke was quite illuminating:

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/legal-weed-isnt-the-boon-small-businesses-thought-it-would-be/

    There appears to already be an oversupply of product that has driven the market price much lower than expected.

    I didn’t see any mention of the viewpoint of the NY medical pot industry – they will likely see a decline of selling price and total numbers of ssales if recreational sales are legalized.

  106. @Steve Sailer
    @captflee

    A couple of paragliders at Torrey Pines in La Jolla just collided and both were killed.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    I always thought that many hang gliders at Torrey seemed to be doing pretty risky maneuvers at close quarters, considering that a lot of the flying is done at a pretty good height off the cliffs. I’ve seen hangliders going off heights of thousands of feet but those were fairly straightforward glides. Doing aerobatic maneuvers and colliding with another flyer or losing lift a hundred feet over a rock beach is a different thing from coming in too hot on a meadow landing.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Alfa158

    How high are the cliffs at Torrey Pines in San Diego County? 800 feet? The golf course there is notoriously reluctant to get close to the cliffs because they are terrifyingly tall.

  107. Totally agree with that. And you reminded me that the best and most talented technician I had the pleasure to work with was a non-stop pot smoker. One could tell he was a unique character when you met him. No ego to contend with either. He quit when the company we worked for started drug random testing (many moons ago). He became a contractor and to this day only works at places that do not require drug testing. He’s a brilliant guy and still does extremely well in spite of smoking that annoying and smelly pot every day. However, he would be completely helpless and probably end up homeless if he had to change from the tiny niche he built for himself long ago. He’s kind of stuck in his early 20’s though he is pushing into his mid-40’s now.

  108. @Rocks Off
    Looks like air pollution reparations will also soon be in order. Through dilligent scientific research, the USA Today has miraculously managed to connect each and every particle of pollution to the race that produced it. And then they were able to ascertain the race of each individual affected by said pollution. In what can only be called a mighty white move, USA Today then went on to assign pollution produced by Asian and Native Americans to the white column. For some unexplained reason USA Today has so far refused to assign a percentage of pollution to Jews.

    https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/03/11/air-pollution-inequality-minorities-breathe-air-polluted-whites/3130783002/

    Replies: @Bubba

    Wow! I thought you were just kidding until I went to the USA Today site! Unbelievable!

  109. @res
    @Stolen Valor Detective


    Like Steve said, a lot of people nominally incarcerated for drug offenses are actually guilty of something else, but there isn’t enough evidence to convict on the more serious charge so a plea bargain is reached on a drug charge.
     
    I wish someone would do a study on this to get real data.

    Replies: @al-Gharaniq

    That would be fairly difficult—if they’re not charged with other crimes, then (under the presumption of innocence) the only crime they’ve been proven guilty of is just petty drug possession. You would have to survey thousands of cops and DA’s country-wide to get a definitive answer on this. Reviewing court records alone wouldn’t be enough, I would guess, since if the prosecution doesn’t think they have enough evidence to convict they wouldn’t bring up the charge.

    • Replies: @res
    @al-Gharaniq

    Agreed. One way to do it would be to take a statistical approach and closely review samples from a number of major metro areas for a limited period of time. But that would still be difficult and time consuming and would have representativeness issues.

    In any case, I don't think the powers that be really want an answer. They just want a cudgel to beat whites with.

    Replies: @Alden

  110. @Lars Porsena
    @International Jew

    That's like saying you'll pay more for carrots if they are certified safe carrots.

    Weed is produce... it's as hard to fake as carrots are because the customers know what it's suppose to look like.

    I know there are urban legends about drug dealers lacing the pot with other, more expensive drugs at no extra charge and not even telling people, but with weed that is just urban legends. It would be like worrying some carrot farmer might have laced your carrots ($1.50/lb) with real italian parmigiano reggiano cheese ($20/lb) and didn't tell you, didn't charge you extra, and hoped you didn't notice.

    Now trying to lace or adulterate the product with something cheaper is a real concern, especially with all the drugs that are basically just white powder, they can be cut with things like laxative or baby powder, or other cheaper white powder drugs. Most of the parmesan in the supermarket says it is full of artificially parmesan flavored plant cellulose (sawdust?). But trying to cut your marijuana with sawdust or baby powder would be like trying to cut carrots with baby powder or mix in some cheaper parsnips spray-painted orange or something. Not sure if parsnips are actually cheaper than carrots but you get what I mean. What would you try to pass off as weed, broccoli and patchouli oil?

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @RationalExpressions

    When we rented a house to a group of outlaw bikers, who eventually went to prison on drug and weapons charges, we noticed the alfalfa was really thin by their house.

  111. @Anonymous
    Allowing blacks to control the market to their own neighborhoods isn't a bad idea. Knowing a bit about the California legal market (which is currently a cluster because of overregulation), blacks would likely struggle to produce high end cannabis for uptown users anyway.

    I once had a conversation with a Humboldt County grower who had been at it for 30 years. I asked him if he would go into the legal market, and he said "nah, I got buyers lined up in New York for all my grows." Good luck with the legal market, CA and NY.

    Replies: @Disordered (with a bad memory)

    Agreed; however such relief to small dealers could simply be set aside with quotas for those under a certain income, instead of giving it all away to minorities that do not exist on all neighborhoods (or worse, the Oakland proposal to give them to felons on purpose – bet that will attract much investment huh). And at any rate, I bet the black growers who do go legal will be the ones with money anyway; blacks which may even be cultural “oreos”, since whites pay better, and CA/NY overregulation is biased against small-scale business regardless of race.

  112. @Neuday
    I have no problem with black getting a cut of the retail pot storefronts in their areas as long as the Asians get a healthy cut of the prostitution trade when it's legalized in a year or two. I suppose the Italians should get numbers running or protection rackets, but we'd have to start letting Europeans immigrate again, and that's rayciss.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Disordered (with a bad memory)

    Eh wouldn’t be so hopeful about prostitution being run by Asians, (((they))) have the pornstars all dolled up and ready for long shifts at the “tolerance establishments” for when that happens.

    (And no, I doubt that legal whorehouses will drive the cost of sex down, at least not if the culture simultaneously continues to teach that both corporate women and “sex workers” are equal and valuable but mothers and housewives are below them…).

    At any rate, I find the Asian massage parlors overrated, if probably just as popular in the American wasteland as cheap black-sold weed.

  113. It took me a bit to figure this one out, but now I get it. Blacks lost their monopoly on ‘the numbers’ back in ’67 when New York started the Lotto. Numbers was a large but de-centralized business, with lots of ‘numbers runners’ getting a slice of the big money on a daily basis. Giving blacks a new vice monopoly is restitution.

    • Replies: @Disordered (with a bad memory)
    @Woodsie

    Maybe so, but if that's the case I'd rather give them the numbers game back (hey it worked for the Seminole tribe... well the chiefs rather lol) and keep the growth and production of cannabis to the smarter people.

  114. @al-Gharaniq
    @res

    That would be fairly difficult—if they're not charged with other crimes, then (under the presumption of innocence) the only crime they've been proven guilty of is just petty drug possession. You would have to survey thousands of cops and DA's country-wide to get a definitive answer on this. Reviewing court records alone wouldn't be enough, I would guess, since if the prosecution doesn't think they have enough evidence to convict they wouldn't bring up the charge.

    Replies: @res

    Agreed. One way to do it would be to take a statistical approach and closely review samples from a number of major metro areas for a limited period of time. But that would still be difficult and time consuming and would have representativeness issues.

    In any case, I don’t think the powers that be really want an answer. They just want a cudgel to beat whites with.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @res

    Diversity and inclusion compliance officers for the weed industry. Most compliance critters are attorneys, not cheap. And FDA inspectors

  115. @Lars Porsena
    @International Jew

    That's like saying you'll pay more for carrots if they are certified safe carrots.

    Weed is produce... it's as hard to fake as carrots are because the customers know what it's suppose to look like.

    I know there are urban legends about drug dealers lacing the pot with other, more expensive drugs at no extra charge and not even telling people, but with weed that is just urban legends. It would be like worrying some carrot farmer might have laced your carrots ($1.50/lb) with real italian parmigiano reggiano cheese ($20/lb) and didn't tell you, didn't charge you extra, and hoped you didn't notice.

    Now trying to lace or adulterate the product with something cheaper is a real concern, especially with all the drugs that are basically just white powder, they can be cut with things like laxative or baby powder, or other cheaper white powder drugs. Most of the parmesan in the supermarket says it is full of artificially parmesan flavored plant cellulose (sawdust?). But trying to cut your marijuana with sawdust or baby powder would be like trying to cut carrots with baby powder or mix in some cheaper parsnips spray-painted orange or something. Not sure if parsnips are actually cheaper than carrots but you get what I mean. What would you try to pass off as weed, broccoli and patchouli oil?

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @RationalExpressions

    Bought a baggy from some black guy in a 7-11 parking lot back in the 80s. I have no idea what it was, but it sure wasn’t weed. Looked like it though. Very disappointing.

  116. @Alfa158
    @Steve Sailer

    I always thought that many hang gliders at Torrey seemed to be doing pretty risky maneuvers at close quarters, considering that a lot of the flying is done at a pretty good height off the cliffs. I’ve seen hangliders going off heights of thousands of feet but those were fairly straightforward glides. Doing aerobatic maneuvers and colliding with another flyer or losing lift a hundred feet over a rock beach is a different thing from coming in too hot on a meadow landing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    How high are the cliffs at Torrey Pines in San Diego County? 800 feet? The golf course there is notoriously reluctant to get close to the cliffs because they are terrifyingly tall.

  117. @Woodsie
    It took me a bit to figure this one out, but now I get it. Blacks lost their monopoly on 'the numbers' back in '67 when New York started the Lotto. Numbers was a large but de-centralized business, with lots of 'numbers runners' getting a slice of the big money on a daily basis. Giving blacks a new vice monopoly is restitution.

    Replies: @Disordered (with a bad memory)

    Maybe so, but if that’s the case I’d rather give them the numbers game back (hey it worked for the Seminole tribe… well the chiefs rather lol) and keep the growth and production of cannabis to the smarter people.

  118. How about lifetime free fried chicken and malt liquor for blacks as reparation?

  119. @EliteCommInc.
    I oppose entirely any further introductions of mind altering substances, including marijuana. But this,

    "In Colorado, black entrepreneurs said they were banned from winning licenses because of marijuana-related convictions. Black people make up just a handful of the thousands of cultivation or dispensary license holders there, and continue to be arrested on marijuana-related charges at almost three times the rate of white people."

    is funny on its face. barring the legal production, sale and use of a substance to those who were involved in the production, sale and use of the same when it was illegal --- double jeopardy.

    That's just too funny.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Hypnotoad666, @Lot, @passive-aggressivist, @J.Ross, @Alden

    Insane, can’t get a weed sales permit because they sold weed 5 years ago.

    That’s like pulling a plumbers license because he did plumbing work 5 years ago.

  120. @Redneck farmer
    Do the would be entrepreneurs understand that legal businesses pay taxes?
    How many users realize most jobs that pay decent require a drug test? And that you probably won't be hired even if weed is legal? Because potheads are lousy employees.

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Alden

    You know who smoke a lot of weed on the job? Iron workers. They love to be up there stoned and swinging around the high iron. It’s a macho challenge.

  121. @res
    @al-Gharaniq

    Agreed. One way to do it would be to take a statistical approach and closely review samples from a number of major metro areas for a limited period of time. But that would still be difficult and time consuming and would have representativeness issues.

    In any case, I don't think the powers that be really want an answer. They just want a cudgel to beat whites with.

    Replies: @Alden

    Diversity and inclusion compliance officers for the weed industry. Most compliance critters are attorneys, not cheap. And FDA inspectors

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