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Thugs actually hate classical music.

From the L.A. Review of Books:

Bach at the Burger King
By Theodore Gioia

From Theodore Gioia’s website: “Hailing from a line of writers, Theodore has the dubious distinction of being the second best-known writer named Ted Gioia in his family.” The Gioias are like the Therouxs of the 21st Century.

MAY 17, 2018

AT THE CORNER of 8th and Market in San Francisco, by a shuttered subway escalator outside a Burger King, an unusual soundtrack plays. A beige speaker, mounted atop a tall window, blasts Baroque harpsichord at deafening volumes. The music never stops. Night and day, Bach, Mozart, and Vivaldi rain down from Burger King rooftops onto empty streets.

Empty streets, however, are the target audience for this concert. The playlist has been selected to repel sidewalk listeners — specifically, the mid-Market homeless who once congregated outside the restaurant doors that served as a neighborhood hub for the indigent. Outside the BART escalator, an encampment of grocery carts, sleeping bags, and plastic tarmacs had evolved into a sidewalk shantytown attracting throngs of squatters and street denizens. “There used to be a mob that would hang out there,” remarked local resident David Allen, “and now there may be just one or two people.” When I passed the corner, the only sign of life I found was a trembling woman crouched on the pavement, head in hand, as classical harpsichord besieged her ears.

… Experts trace the practice’s origins back to a drowsy 7-Eleven in British Columbia in 1985, where some clever Canadian manager played Mozart outside the store to repel parking-lot loiterers. Mozart-in-the-Parking-Lot was so successful at discouraging teenage reprobates that 7-Eleven implemented the program at over 150 stores, becoming the first company to battle vandalism with the viola. Then the idea spread to West Palm Beach, Florida, where in 2001 the police confronted a drug-ridden street corner by installing a loudspeaker booming Beethoven and Mozart. “The officers were amazed when at 10 o’clock at night there was not a soul on the corner,” remarked Detective Dena Kimberlin. Soon other police departments “started calling.” From that point, the tactic — now codified as an official maneuver in the Polite Policeman’s Handbook — exploded in popularity for both private companies and public institutions. Over the last decade, symphonic security has swept across the globe as a standard procedure from Australia to Alaska.

Today, deterrence through classical music is de rigueur for American transit systems. …

Baroque music seems to make the most potent repellant. “[D]espite a few assertive, late-Romantic exceptions like Mussorgsky and Rachmaninoff,” notes critic Scott Timberg, “the music used to scatter hoodlums is pre-Romantic, by Baroque or Classical-era composers such as Vivaldi or Mozart.”

Bach, more than anybody else, is the composer of civilization.

… In a strange mutation, classical music devolves from a “universal language of mankind” reminding all people of their common humanity into a sonic border fence protecting privileged areas from common crowds, telling the plebes in auditory code that “you’re not welcome here.”

.. Thus music returns to its oldest evolutionary function: claiming territory. Zoological research suggests that the original function of birdsong was not only attracting mates (as Darwin argued) but also asserting territorial rights. Experiments have demonstrated that birds usually refrain from entering regions where they hear recorded birdsong playing. These aggressive aspects of avian song extended to early humans. Primatologist Thomas Geissman speculates: “[E]arly hominid music may also have served functions resembling those of ape loud calls […] including territorial advertisement; intergroup intimidation and spacing.” The songs have changed, but the melody is the same — Warning: Private Property. Music carves public space into private territory, signaling certain areas are off limits to certain groups through orchestral “intimidation.” And no genre carries more intimidating upper-class associations than classical music.

And so forth and so on.

Anyway, it’s interesting why the better the music the more that lowlifes hate it. My guess is that it’s more than just class markers. I suspect that poor honest workmen don’t mind classical music playing in the background as much as punks loitering with criminal intent can’t stand it.

 
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  1. J.Ross says: • Website

    Akshuallllllly it does clarify in the novel and film that Alex is unique: none of his friends dig it, but they mostly know not to interrupt him (viz Dim in the milkbar scene).
    —–
    Anonymous advice on 4chan from a while back on how to repulse black customers at a store without attracting Eric Holder’s attention: “play classical music. Seriously, they can’t be in the same room.”
    —–
    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach. The interviewed affects shock and asks why, and the jazz man’s reasons are redolent of Wagner’s complaints about Mendelssohn: it’s like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood. “Ditta ditta da, up here, and then it goes ditta ditta da down there. Why do I need to go up here and then down there?”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @J.Ross

    Mathematicians famously love Bach. It would be interesting to see where on the Asperger's scale is the optimum for loving Bach.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @J.Ross

    "it’s like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood"

    There's an iota of truth in that, which is why I prefer Handel, and why Romantic composers became popular. But there's some great Bach. The opening of this (esp at 26s) is like sunlight breaking through clouds and flooding everything.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YC4oV-lamk

    Replies: @Anon

    , @PhysicistDave
    @J.Ross

    J Ross wrote:


    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach.
     
    My kids took piano lessons for eight years from a retired professor of Baroque keyboard (different from the person I mentioned in my previous post).

    One day, one of my kids went in to lesson and announced that she wanted to learn "Rhapsody in Blue." The professor let out a long "Well..." and we waited for him to explain why she should focus on real music like Bach rather than Gershwin.

    Instead, he proceeded to tell us of all the different versions of the Rhapsody that he himself had performed: solo, duet, and with a full orchestra.

    He ended up trying to encourage our kids to get more exposure to jazz, in order to widen their horizons, to learn improvisation, etc. So, at least in my experience, the Baroque experts actually respect jazz.

    Replies: @Anon, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    , @slumber_j
    @J.Ross

    I have to say that I agree with the jazz musician on NPR...and there's one of the strangest sentences I've ever written. My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    It's pretty: I'll give it that.

    Replies: @Barnard, @Sunbeam, @Mark Eugenikos, @ThreeCranes

    , @Pat Boyle
    @J.Ross

    My personal intellectual and physical ontogeny story may be relevant. When I was in Junior High I was small, stupid and liked the crudest rock and roll music. I was also sickly. I didn't expect much of myself. Then seemingly overnight I transformed. I had been a soft little guy in grade school who struggled with the classwork. Then in just one year I grew to six three and was scoring in the 99th percentile on a series of aptitude tests. I went from being in danger of being held back a grade in high school to being the smartest guy in the college.

    At this same time I stopped listening to Fats Domino and Little Richard and explored Bach and Mozart.

    Thinking about the subject of this blog - why thugs hate Mozart - has helped me with my self understanding. I always have explained why I know nothing of pop music with the story of how I decided to takes personal responsibility for the music I listened to. That's true in a way. I had made a conscious decision to learn the operas of Weber, and Verdi after I knew those of Mozart. This took effort. After Cosi fan Tutte. I found it hard to accept Rigoletto. But I persevered. I left Wagner and Strauss for later. I planned out my entire life in music when I was nineteen. But it seems likely that my turn towards serious music was just another manifestation of my other life changes. Whatever made me so much smarter as a late teen than I had been as a young teen also seems to have bent me towards Mozart.

    When I was a kid in the Army I planned my music listening for life. Plotting out my life's goals in music was probably not something I did, so much as something that happened to me.

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan

    , @Rosamond Vincy
    @J.Ross

    “Whuffo I want to read no Tale
    of Two Cities? Whuffo?"

    Kurt Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions

    , @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @J.Ross

    Doesn't music soothe a savage breast? Hey, how about the soundtrack to "Deliverance" on continuous loop? Actually, that might attract 'em, being subliminally suggestive of forcible sodomy in isolation . . .

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @J.Ross


    . . . how to repulse black customers . . .
     
    That's why classical music is on at my house 16 hours a day. Cheaper than ADT.
  2. Somewhere years ago, somebody did a study that showed Baroque music to be the only kind conducive to study. Every other type, played in the background, caused students to do poorly.

    For driving away punks, in extreme cases, maybe someone could try an operatic approach and play Wagner, thus:

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I don't think Wagner would be effective in driving away punks. Too visceral.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Chrisnonymous, @unpc downunder

    , @El Dato
    @Buzz Mohawk

    A good read on the specific version of Da Ride used in Apocalypse Now:

    http://nautil.us/issue/30/identity/how-i-tried-to-transplant-the-musical-heart-of-apocalypse-now

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @MEH 0910

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Marlon Brando as Colonel Walter E. Kurtz:


    We train young men to drop fire on people, but their commanders won't allow them to write "fuck" on their airplanes because it's obscene!

     

    New Hampshire is under attack from White Wiggers of the worst sort who enjoy playing Black Rap Music at high volumes in their cars. Phuck in every line of the lyrics sung by a petulant Black boob bothered by this or that.

    I have noticed the Wiggers usually are not in trucks.

    I have seen and heard exactly why Trumpy won the GOP New Hampshire presidential primary. Trumpy won NH by going Implicit Whitey; Explicit Whitey is on the way.

    Racial issues are boiling away in New Hampshire, and the GOP politician whores are completely and totally controlled by anti-White donor scum such as the Koch boys and Paul Singer. The New Hampshire GOP as a whole is weak and feckless, and the native White voters are getting restless as they see cities such as Nashua, Manchester and Concord go Third World.

    Replies: @Flip, @The True and Original David

    , @anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I like Wagner but...not a good choice. Too loud...and too martial. Better the "Siegfried Idyll" or, possibly, the prelude to "Lohengrin."

  3. Anonymous[428] • Disclaimer says:

    …and of course the converse is the worse the music is the more the thugs like it, and the more the aesthetes hate it.

    • Agree: dwb
    • Replies: @Sue D.Nim
    @Anonymous

    Rule of thumb: "The louder the stereo, the worse the music."

    , @Dissident
    @Anonymous


    …and of course the converse is the worse the music is the more the thugs like it, and the more the aesthetes hate it.
     
    At a certain point, it starts to become increasingly questionable whether the cacophony-in-question can even be called 'music', no?
  4. Steve,

    Yobs can’t stand classical music because it presents structure to the unstructed and order to the unordered.

    It’s like flashing a crucifix before Count Dracula!

    • Agree: Simon in London
  5. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    Baroque music seems to make the most potent repellant. “[D]espite a few assertive, late-Romantic exceptions like Mussorgsky and Rachmaninoff,” notes critic Scott Timberg, “the music used to scatter hoodlums is pre-Romantic, by Baroque or Classical-era composers such as Vivaldi or Mozart.”

    I wonder if this is because of the heavy use of the harpsichord and organ in Baroque music. The harpsichord and organ are kind of unsettling and have an eerie quality to them. They tend to make you uncomfortable unlike the more mellifluous piano of later Classical and Romantic music. Much more solemn. Makes you think of church, funerals, vampires, etc.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Harpsichords have a more robotic aspect to them since they don't vary in volume. They fit the Enlightenment's mood of cheerful optimism pretty well. The pianoforte helped usher in the Romantic Era because they were more humanly expressive.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @YetAnotherAnon, @Muse

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous[400] write:


    I wonder if this is because of the heavy use of the harpsichord and organ in Baroque music. The harpsichord and organ are kind of unsettling and have an eerie quality to them.
     
    I know the harpsichord professor at our local state university (yes, the university has multiple harpsichords!). I mentioned once that, while the harpsichord was pretty cool, I would not want to listen to it all day long.

    I'm afraid she was offended.

    Replies: @unit472

  6. Anonymous[886] • Disclaimer says:

    In Kansas City, it was considered scandalous that in certain Westport discos, when too many blacks were seen in the place, they’d play Aerosmith or REO Speedwagon , which was apparently negro repellent, and the blacks would leave as it was considered hokey and undanceable. This made the national news and it was a couple of months after that Aerosmith collaborated with Run-DMC.

    Coincidence? Probably.

  7. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?

    They used a lot of contemporary pop songs and other genres like metal at Guantanamo. I wonder if they’d work at deterring loiterers as well:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/sesame-street-songs-heavy-metal-blasted-torture-guantanamo-detainees-report-article-1.1088762

    “Sesame Street” songwriter Christopher Cerf spearheaded the film after discovering songs he wrote to teach kids how to read and write were being used as weapons of war. The report has launched the controversial interrogation method back into the spotlight.

    According to the documentary, prisoners were strapped to chairs and played music — Metallica, AC/DC, Eminem, Barney and others — at loud volumes for hours or days on end.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Anonymous

    I recall country music being used to deal with particularly obnoxious interlopers:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GSbigjiKLoU

    , @Jon
    @Anonymous


    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?
     
    There used to be a fast food place in Seattle, near Pikes Market, that would play really old country and western and bluegrass. I'm talking Hank Sr., Bill Monroe and a bunch of stuff that you would only recognize from old black and white westerns. Worked great from what I saw, but his choice of music made it a little more obvious what he was up to.
    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Anonymous

    This here music will work like a box of diamondback rattlesnakes:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xOxHyTP91c

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MBlanc46

    , @Crawfurdmuir
    @Anonymous


    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?
     
    I'd guess that either one would be a successful negro repellent. Both are strongly associated with Southern white culture, and probably carry unfavorable implications to blacks.

    Moreover, bluegrass is about as strongly British/European as any genre of popular music in this country. Unlike other popular genres it owes almost nothing to black musical contributions. The bluegrass band is a lineal descendant of the "broken consort" of Thomas Morley's time, with its mixture of plucked and bowed instruments. Country fiddling derives from English and Scottish fiddle tunes like those collected by Playford in the seventeenth century.

    Somehow the Austro-Italian practice of scordatura (tuning the fiddle in non-standard ways, rather than the usual G3, D4, A4, E5, to take advantage of the sonority of open strings) made it into the American South, perhaps via the Salzburgers who settled in Ebenezer, Georgia, in 1734. Among the greatest exponents of the scordatura violin had been H.I.F. Biber von Bibern (1644-1704), lord high steward to the archbishop of Salzburg, whose Rosary Sonatas of 1676 used fourteen different tunings, almost all known to country fiddlers. Here's the fifth one, "The Twelve-Year Old Jesus in the Temple" -

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvQHSwg2dt0

    Listen to the two movements from 1:15 - 4:06 in particular, with their double-stopping and cross-fingering. With a little more speed and different backup instruments they'd sound very like country fiddle tunes. Tuning is A3, E4, A4, C#5, the "Calico" or "Black Mountain Rag" tuning.

    Replies: @Joe Schmoe

  8. “My guess is that it’s more than just class markers.”

    It’s a marker of “tuffness”. Hoods don’t like people thinking they are sissies (or gay) by association with the music.

  9. @Buzz Mohawk
    Somewhere years ago, somebody did a study that showed Baroque music to be the only kind conducive to study. Every other type, played in the background, caused students to do poorly.

    For driving away punks, in extreme cases, maybe someone could try an operatic approach and play Wagner, thus:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30QzJKCUekQ

    Replies: @Kylie, @El Dato, @Charles Pewitt, @anonymous

    I don’t think Wagner would be effective in driving away punks. Too visceral.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Kylie

    It has to be paired with attack helicopters.

    Replies: @Simon Tugmutton

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Kylie

    I don't know. I think Siegfried's funeral march from Gotterdammerung would drive me crazy if it were just playing in the background. It demands your attention too much.

    Replies: @Kylie

    , @unpc downunder
    @Kylie

    No, they would hate loud or gentle classical music. It wouldn't matter if you played Bach or Prokofiev, the effect would be the same. People who hate classical music hate it because it's refined and complicated. Hence, people who are simple and unrefined hate it. The heaviness level doesn't make much difference.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  10. @Buzz Mohawk
    Somewhere years ago, somebody did a study that showed Baroque music to be the only kind conducive to study. Every other type, played in the background, caused students to do poorly.

    For driving away punks, in extreme cases, maybe someone could try an operatic approach and play Wagner, thus:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30QzJKCUekQ

    Replies: @Kylie, @El Dato, @Charles Pewitt, @anonymous

    A good read on the specific version of Da Ride used in Apocalypse Now:

    http://nautil.us/issue/30/identity/how-i-tried-to-transplant-the-musical-heart-of-apocalypse-now

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @El Dato

    Thanks for the interesting read. I note that the specific version came from Vienna, and that what sets it apart is an organic rhythm.

    I don't know much about music, but I was told by a very nice Austrian man that waltzes played by Viennese orchestras are the best for that same reason. (He overheard me happily remarking that Austrian Airlines was playing The Blue Danube as my wife and I boarded a plane there. That is a wonderful country with nice people to go with the music.)

    Replies: @jim jones, @wren, @wren, @MBlanc46

    , @MEH 0910
    @El Dato


    A good read on the specific version of Da Ride used in Apocalypse Now:
     
    Written by the great Walter Murch himself!
  11. Now that Starbucks has chosen to rebrand itself as America’s public toilet, overtly, they will covertly turn to tactics such as this to remain a safe space for their paying customers.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @wren

    A Hispanic man is offended that he found the word beaner on his cup. Starbucks already groveled.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @peterike, @BenKenobi

    , @bomag
    @wren


    they will covertly turn to tactics such as this...
     
    The Other Side will then start dictating music and decor.

    The Slope beckons; the degree of slippery-ness determines how nice of things we can have.
    , @Barnard
    @wren

    I think their employees would be able to handle it. Hours of listening to hipster alt-rock is the only thing keeping them from snapping now.

    , @Forbes
    @wren

    Gives Starbucks waaay too much credit for understanding what works, as opposed to what the PC/SJW prog-lefty rule book demands. The minute it was learned that the tactic is used for keeping low-lifes and the homeless at a distance, there'd be protests--as not sufficiently inclusive, or whatever the latest outrage.

  12. Making babies smarter, helping you study and getting rid of the “benefits” of diversity.

    What can’t Mozart do? Amadeus you magnificent bastard.

    Rock me Amadeus! To the Stars!

  13. Anon[422] • Disclaimer says:

    OT/

    From Leftist Current Affairs on a pretty old iSteve theme:

    FEBRUARY 14, 2018
    THE U.S. MEDIA’S FAILURE TO REPORT ON VIOLENCE IN MEXICO IS INEXCUSABLE

    by BRIANNA RENNIX & NATHAN J. ROBINSON

    …A cartel taking over a city? The kidnapping of federal police officers? A state mayor’s drug-laden tractor trailer being seized? If these occurred a few miles further north, in California or Texas, they would be national news. If they happened in London, they would be news here. But they are happening in Mexico, and Mexico does not matter very much to the U.S. media. …

    Funny how that works…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The NYT covers Mexico somewhat, but I suspect they lose money on it. NYT subscribers would likely rather read more about Israel than more about Mexico.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    , @Alden
    @Anon

    Los Angeles and San Diego papers cover Mexico a little. I don’t read them.

    , @Saxon
    @Anon

    The US media is of course not going to cover the reality of Mexico when it is engaged in a propaganda program aimed at telling Americans how wonderful it is to become a colony of Mexico and similar countries. If they were honest about what Mexico is actually like, the public might have some misgivings about what's being done.

    , @Cloudbuster
    @Anon

    Are they saying the criminal Muslim "cartel" hasn't taken over London?

    , @Forbes
    @Anon

    Didn't give the media any suggestions--they'll turn it into another reason for open borders.

  14. Anon[209] • Disclaimer says:

    A Japanese researcher has published two papers that conclude that Java sparrows, a popular pet in Japan, prefers Bach and Vivaldi to Schoenberg and Carter. Perches were set up with mini-speakers and the birds tended to congregate on the baroque perches, in preference to the modern perches or the silent perches.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/daily-dish/archive/2007/10/sparrows-prefer-classical-music/224597/

    http://www.therestisnoise.com/2007/10/sparrow-playlis.html

    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/317/5846/1864.2.long

    By the way, what is the deal with the L.A. Review of books? It seems to be thriving, most of the content has nothing to do with books, and it’s extremely left-wing. Who is underwriting it? It’s a 502(c)(3). How can those be investigated?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    A lot of rich people in L.A.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    @Anon

    Did you mention birds?

    The majesty of Hatebeak ( A Death Metal Band Whose Lead Vocalist Was a Parrot)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVlrGJouvQ4

    Replies: @Anon, @tim s, @Johnny Rico

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Anon


    the birds tended to congregate on the baroque perches, in preference to the modern perches
     
    Okay, but if you were a bird, wouldn't you rather sit on a perch designed by Charles Le Brun than by Walter Gropius?
  15. @Anonymous

    Baroque music seems to make the most potent repellant. “[D]espite a few assertive, late-Romantic exceptions like Mussorgsky and Rachmaninoff,” notes critic Scott Timberg, “the music used to scatter hoodlums is pre-Romantic, by Baroque or Classical-era composers such as Vivaldi or Mozart.”
     
    I wonder if this is because of the heavy use of the harpsichord and organ in Baroque music. The harpsichord and organ are kind of unsettling and have an eerie quality to them. They tend to make you uncomfortable unlike the more mellifluous piano of later Classical and Romantic music. Much more solemn. Makes you think of church, funerals, vampires, etc.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave

    Harpsichords have a more robotic aspect to them since they don’t vary in volume. They fit the Enlightenment’s mood of cheerful optimism pretty well. The pianoforte helped usher in the Romantic Era because they were more humanly expressive.

    • Replies: @StAugustine
    @Steve Sailer

    Exactly that, and more - you can't adjust the length of any note played. A harpsichord is like a giant ukelele.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve - listen to a short romantic harpsichord piece (harpsichord plus small string orchestra), written by a guy killed at Tobruk in WW2. The second movement (around 3:35) is exquisite.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnkPIeeWexA

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian

    , @Muse
    @Steve Sailer

    A few thoughts:

    Afro-centric music is generally highly syncopated and there is an emphasis on the off beat, which would be in the style of swing. There is probably more than just cultural preferences here. There is also the aspect of improvisation versus performing a piece precisely as written, with improvisation clearly being a hallmark of African influenced music such as jazz.....and God knows the bagpipes are played to make the guy over the hill miserable.

    In reading the book “The Evolution of Beauty” by Richard Prum, he examines birds with respect to song, dance and visual asthetics as part of mating. These behaviors seem hard wired and not learned. It would be quite interesting to monitor brain waves of individuals using the sensors in a typical neuro-feedback machine to see different brain wave responses. I believe these waves are influenced by the level of synchrony between major structures of he brain. Many sensory and other types of neurological issues are characterized by this disregulation betweeen structural parts of the brain. In fact, managing synchronization was one of the major hurdles in making internet nodes function.

    If I had to guess, I would expect to see different ratios of activity in the visual, auditory and prefrontal cortex depending on the music being listened to and the person doing the listening. Certain music makes some people’s brains hurt.

    I suppose some people dislike Vivaldi instinctively just as much as I dislike brutalist architecture. I know this is not a good rule of thumb in Miami, but on the South side of Chicago or in Detroit, you can infer much about a neighborhood. when the houses are painted pink or purple - purple houses just hurt my head.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  16. @Kylie
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I don't think Wagner would be effective in driving away punks. Too visceral.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Chrisnonymous, @unpc downunder

    It has to be paired with attack helicopters.

    • Replies: @Simon Tugmutton
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz, you jest, but that's how they winkled General Noriega out.


    The soldiers surrounding the embassy used psychological warfare, attempting to force the defeated ruler out using the continuous noise from a low flying helicopter while playing hard rock music and The Howard Stern Show outside the embassy.
     
    https://ivarfjeld.com/2010/04/30/when-heavy-rock-was-used-to-get-general-noriega-out-of-vatican-protection/
  17. @J.Ross
    Akshuallllllly it does clarify in the novel and film that Alex is unique: none of his friends dig it, but they mostly know not to interrupt him (viz Dim in the milkbar scene).
    -----
    Anonymous advice on 4chan from a while back on how to repulse black customers at a store without attracting Eric Holder's attention: "play classical music. Seriously, they can't be in the same room."
    -----
    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach. The interviewed affects shock and asks why, and the jazz man's reasons are redolent of Wagner's complaints about Mendelssohn: it's like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood. "Ditta ditta da, up here, and then it goes ditta ditta da down there. Why do I need to go up here and then down there?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @PhysicistDave, @slumber_j, @Pat Boyle, @Rosamond Vincy, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Jim Don Bob

    Mathematicians famously love Bach. It would be interesting to see where on the Asperger’s scale is the optimum for loving Bach.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @Steve Sailer


    Mathematicians famously love Bach.
     
    No, they don't. Modern pseudo-mathematicians like to pretend that mathematicians have always loved Bach because the fact that the structure of a Bach concerto is morphologically related to the seminal analytical techniques of Western mathematics allows these charlatans to engage in multiple acts of cultural appropriation at once. First, in the name of mathematics, they appropriate to themselves the title of "genius," which in their mind elevates them to the ranks of the peerage. Then, by employing mathematics in a musicological vein vis-a-vis Bach, they attempt to lay claim to the realm of aesthetics as well. By this route they endeavor to show that "beauty" (by which they understand only physical, sensuous excellence) is as it were "nothing but analysis" (i.e. the very subject they just happen to be masters of); and this they do not so much to enhance their own sexual market value (as if by proclaiming thus they could convince the women of the world that in loving sensuous excellence they were really only loving them, the mathematicians) but more so merely to defend the jejune notion that analysis is "a thing," indeed the very thing itself, the secret substrate of all religious and aesthetical experience.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  18. I suspect that poor honest workmen don’t mind classical music playing in the background as much as punks loitering with criminal intent can’t stand it.

    Father Calvinist, who grew up on a farm and is a blue-collar guy through and through, as an adult developed a taste for classical music, including some opera. He loved Luciano Pavarotti.

    I used to do house painting as a summer job. I would take along a radio to my jobs, and sometimes play classical music from the South Dakota public radio station. I recall that on one job, the guy I worked for (who was another true-blue kind of guy) turned up to do some work, and he ribbed me about listening to that fancy-pants music — but when I moved to change the station, he told me to just leave it on.

  19. @Anon
    OT/

    From Leftist Current Affairs on a pretty old iSteve theme:


    FEBRUARY 14, 2018
    THE U.S. MEDIA’S FAILURE TO REPORT ON VIOLENCE IN MEXICO IS INEXCUSABLE


    by BRIANNA RENNIX & NATHAN J. ROBINSON


    ...A cartel taking over a city? The kidnapping of federal police officers? A state mayor’s drug-laden tractor trailer being seized? If these occurred a few miles further north, in California or Texas, they would be national news. If they happened in London, they would be news here. But they are happening in Mexico, and Mexico does not matter very much to the U.S. media. ...


     

    Funny how that works...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alden, @Saxon, @Cloudbuster, @Forbes

    The NYT covers Mexico somewhat, but I suspect they lose money on it. NYT subscribers would likely rather read more about Israel than more about Mexico.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Steve Sailer

    If The New York Times were to cover the out of control violence in Mexico it would correctly confirm Donald Trump's belief that Mexico is a shithole country.

  20. Classical music has been employed with success for many years around Hamburg’s main train station to deter junkies. Based on anecdotal evidence, the lowlifes do not seem to mind that much, though.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @narrenspeise

    Pre-migrant invasion, I would expect that what qualifies as a low-life German was considerably different than what qualifies as a low-life in browner nations.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @narrenspeise

    Well, they are German lowlifes after all...

  21. @Anon
    A Japanese researcher has published two papers that conclude that Java sparrows, a popular pet in Japan, prefers Bach and Vivaldi to Schoenberg and Carter. Perches were set up with mini-speakers and the birds tended to congregate on the baroque perches, in preference to the modern perches or the silent perches.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/daily-dish/archive/2007/10/sparrows-prefer-classical-music/224597/

    http://www.therestisnoise.com/2007/10/sparrow-playlis.html

    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/317/5846/1864.2.long

    By the way, what is the deal with the L.A. Review of books? It seems to be thriving, most of the content has nothing to do with books, and it's extremely left-wing. Who is underwriting it? It's a 502(c)(3). How can those be investigated?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Cloud of Probable Matricide, @Chrisnonymous

    A lot of rich people in L.A.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Full disclosure page here, all the contributors, individual and corporate:

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/about/supporters/

    Wow, lots of people! The only name I recognized was David Rensin, a great writer for the old California Magazine and the biographer of SoCal Nazi surfer Miki Dora. He's also the father of hereditarily gifted writer Emmett Rensin, unpersoned from his perch at Vox when he outed himself as ... it's not really clear, but he seemed to go off the reservation a bit, with this piece, after which Ezra Klein came up with a lame excuse to fire him:

    The smug style in American liberalism
    https://www.vox.com/2016/4/21/11451378/smug-american-liberalism


    There is a smug style in American liberalism. It has been growing these past decades. It is a way of conducting politics, predicated on the belief that American life is not divided by moral difference or policy divergence — not really — but by the failure of half the country to know what's good for them.
     

    The trouble is that stupid hicks don't know what's good for them. They're getting conned by right-wingers and tent revivalists until they believe all the lies that've made them so wrong. They don't know any better. That's why they're voting against their own self-interest.
     

    Today, a liberal who finds himself troubled by the currents of contemporary political life need look no further than his Facebook newsfeed to find the explanation:

    Study finds Daily Show viewers more informed than viewers of Fox News.

    They're beating CNN watchers too.

    NPR listeners are best informed of all. He likes that.

    You're better off watching nothing than watching Fox. He likes that even more.

    The good news doesn't stop.

    Liberals aren't just better informed. They're smarter.

    They've got better grammar. They know more words.

    Smart kids grow up to be liberals, while conservatives reason like drunks.

    Liberals are better able to process new information; they're less biased like that. They've got different brains. Better ones. Why? Evolution. They've got better brains, top-notch amygdalae, science finds.
     


    In November of last year, during the week when it became temporarily fashionable for American governors to declare that Syrian refugees would not be welcome in their state, Hamilton Nolan wrote an essay for Gawker called "Dumb Hicks Are America's Greatest Threat."

    If there has ever been a tirade so dedicated to the smug style, to the proposition that it is neither malice, nor capital, nor ideological difference, but rather the backward stupidity of poor people that has ruined the state of American policy, then it is hidden beyond our view, in some uncool place, far from the front page of Gawker.

    "Many of America's political leaders are warning of the dangers posed by Syrian refugees. They are underestimating, though, the much greater danger: dumbass hicks, in charge of things," Nolan wrote. "...You, our elected officials, are embarrassing us. All of us, except your fellow dumb hicks, who voted for you in large numbers. You — our racist, xenophobic, knuckle-dragging ignorant leaders — are making us look bad in front of the guests (the whole world). You are the bad cousin in the family who always ruins Thanksgiving. Go in the back room and drink a can of beer alone please."
     

    Ezra Klein's You're Fired letter:

    Statement on Emmett Rensin

    By Ezra Klein

    On Thursday night, Emmett Rensin, the deputy editor of Vox’s first person section, sent a series of tweets that, among other things, urged people to riot if Donald Trump comes to their town.

    We at Vox do not take institutional positions on most questions, and we encourage our writers to debate and disagree. But direct encouragement of riots crosses a line between expressing a contrary opinion and directly encouraging dangerous, illegal activity. We welcome a variety of viewpoints, but we do not condone writing that could put others in danger.

    In this case, Emmett’s tweets violated Vox’s standards and Emmett has been suspended as a consequence.
     

    The tweets in question were in response to people attacking him for his Vox piece, and were of the general form, "If you seriously believe that Donald Trump is Hitler, literally, if that is what you believe, then you should be taking any and all action, up to an including violence, to make sure he doesn't take power, and if you don't, well then you don't really believe he is Hitler. (And you don't. And neither do I.)"

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @ic1000

  22. “Now we see the violins inherent in the system!”
    Anarcho-syndicalist peasant

    • Replies: @Bill B.
    @EH

    Ha ha. But context matters. A lot of ordinary folk think of classical music as dead people gavotting around in absurd costumes. It is of course much more.

    Pavane, Op.50 – Gabriel Fauré sounds quite sinister as "Giulio Andreotti" walks down a Roman street, pre-dawn in Il Divo. (A terrific film.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1PF9L6ry-I&t=33s

    At about 1' 20"

    Replies: @Bill B.

  23. @El Dato
    @Buzz Mohawk

    A good read on the specific version of Da Ride used in Apocalypse Now:

    http://nautil.us/issue/30/identity/how-i-tried-to-transplant-the-musical-heart-of-apocalypse-now

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @MEH 0910

    Thanks for the interesting read. I note that the specific version came from Vienna, and that what sets it apart is an organic rhythm.

    I don’t know much about music, but I was told by a very nice Austrian man that waltzes played by Viennese orchestras are the best for that same reason. (He overheard me happily remarking that Austrian Airlines was playing The Blue Danube as my wife and I boarded a plane there. That is a wonderful country with nice people to go with the music.)

    • Replies: @jim jones
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Vienna is the best city in the World:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-5520671/Vienna-unbeatable-worlds-liveable-city-Baghdad-worst.html

    Replies: @Saxon

    , @wren
    @Buzz Mohawk

    For the past 10 years or so, a family tradition has been to watch the Vienna New Year's concert.

    Now that the ballerinas in my family outnumber the violinists, we usually skip right to the dancing scenes, which are often very beautiful.

    Here is the 2018 concert. Skip to about the two hour mark for some nice dancing, but the whole thing is lovely, as it is almost every year.

    https://youtu.be/klzvht1doRI

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @AnotherDad, @Lisa

    , @wren
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I'm sorry, but I can't resist sharing. Blue Danube music with dancing, costumes, architecture, sculpture and art.

    2012

    https://youtu.be/j1WYKFpDn1s

    2008

    https://youtu.be/LmsIGxYHelQ

    2011?

    https://youtu.be/D6t318FgFdc

    Compilation

    https://youtu.be/sgfs5xajw9A

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_New_Year%27s_Concert

    , @MBlanc46
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Haven’t been to Austria for forty years, but I remember it having the most Old World charm of all the Western European countries.

  24. Anonymous[282] • Disclaimer says:

    Someone should develop a computerized A/B testing system to optimize this. Have an artificial intelligence system watching CCTV video of storefronts and parking lots and changing music based on various factors.

    Me, I think that the effectiveness of baroque music may have something to do with the trills. You notice these when you’re studying piano. Trills, idems, mordents. To a street tough trills must sound faggy. Who wants to be around when fag music is playing?

    Have they tried Chopin? Hard-core romantiic stuff might be even more faggy sounding to thugs. The 7-against-13 rhythms might be more of an assault on the ears, or on the other hand, they might like it. A/B testing! Try different types of music at different volumes. You might find a style that works well at low sound volumes. Try microaggressive narration between songs.

    For the homeless, try television preachers, two or three overdubbed so you can tell what it is, but not what they’re saying. Or a Spanish program over an English televangelist over periodic dog barks. Then switch to a slowed-down version of Music Box Dancer on the accordion overdubbed with someone hacking up phlem.

    I think you could get a Defense Department or DARPA grant to work on this stuff.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTUcoR8_pyE

  25. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Harpsichords have a more robotic aspect to them since they don't vary in volume. They fit the Enlightenment's mood of cheerful optimism pretty well. The pianoforte helped usher in the Romantic Era because they were more humanly expressive.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @YetAnotherAnon, @Muse

    Exactly that, and more – you can’t adjust the length of any note played. A harpsichord is like a giant ukelele.

  26. On his pocast, Adam Carolla has mentioned, that when he supervised construction, mistakes plummeted when he switched from blaring rock music to classical at a site.

    When focused on coding, I find classical hit and miss. The DotNetRocks podcast actually sells a set of tracks geared toward coders – it’s more incense and massage studio than classical.

    • Replies: @bjondo
    @mikeInThe716

    Probably because Carolla was put to sleep therefore kept out of the way.

  27. Anon[312] • Disclaimer says:

    “they will covertly turn to tactics such as this to remain a safe space for their paying customers”

    Companies have all kinds of subtle tricks to scare away troublesome yuffs.

    Starbucks: bathrooms locked and only accessible to paying customers + sell expensive products lower class proles consider “gay” and don’t want to be associated with

    Chick-fil-a: locate restaurants in middle-class areas so they can recruit “the right people”; demand servers be extra cheery so as to scare away bad attitude “wrong people.”

    Pizza joints: take-out, so they don’t have to bother with it

    Chinese restaurants: goofy, low-volume Chinese music and televisions tuned to CNN

    Wal Mart: “security, scan all aisles” …yeah, those cameras are on all the time, so it’s just a reminder to yuffs that they are being watched…they even have cameras that show you your image at eye-level at the automated register.

    + promote breast cancer awareness, women’s this and that, play classical music, and do all manner of other things that tuff guys consider sissy or gay and don’t want to be associated with (low-class progressives aren’t really that socially progressive, they’re just racists who vote democrat because they hate whitey).

    • Replies: @Sid
    @Anon

    "(low-class progressives aren’t really that socially progressive, they’re just racists who vote democrat because they hate whitey)"

    That's true even for the ones who are white, such as the low lives who make up antifa. Low IQ, selfish, lazy, often addicted to drugs, etc.

    Replies: @Jake

  28. @Anon
    A Japanese researcher has published two papers that conclude that Java sparrows, a popular pet in Japan, prefers Bach and Vivaldi to Schoenberg and Carter. Perches were set up with mini-speakers and the birds tended to congregate on the baroque perches, in preference to the modern perches or the silent perches.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/daily-dish/archive/2007/10/sparrows-prefer-classical-music/224597/

    http://www.therestisnoise.com/2007/10/sparrow-playlis.html

    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/317/5846/1864.2.long

    By the way, what is the deal with the L.A. Review of books? It seems to be thriving, most of the content has nothing to do with books, and it's extremely left-wing. Who is underwriting it? It's a 502(c)(3). How can those be investigated?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Cloud of Probable Matricide, @Chrisnonymous

    Did you mention birds?

    The majesty of Hatebeak ( A Death Metal Band Whose Lead Vocalist Was a Parrot)

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide

    The vaguely fascist German folk singer Heino, who is a dead ringer for Karl Lagerfeld, revived his career singing death metal. Here's a sample:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMw1Ta4bsAg

    And here he is singing "Roll out the Barrel":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOE0ISnLXR4

    Heino is not to be confused with Die Twinnies:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4OzX8QOUW8

    Replies: @Anonymous, @MBlanc46

    , @tim s
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide

    There aren't enough LOLs to do that justice.

    , @Johnny Rico
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide

    Haha. If it's not Sabbath, it's crap.

  29. @Buzz Mohawk
    @El Dato

    Thanks for the interesting read. I note that the specific version came from Vienna, and that what sets it apart is an organic rhythm.

    I don't know much about music, but I was told by a very nice Austrian man that waltzes played by Viennese orchestras are the best for that same reason. (He overheard me happily remarking that Austrian Airlines was playing The Blue Danube as my wife and I boarded a plane there. That is a wonderful country with nice people to go with the music.)

    Replies: @jim jones, @wren, @wren, @MBlanc46

    • Replies: @Saxon
    @jim jones

    All of these "most livable cities" articles are based on bugman metrics and feelings. Vienna is going to have the demography of Baghdad sooner or later on the current trajectory. Do they really think it'll be that great then? I suppose by that time the overwhelming majority of the populace will be illiterate savages so it doesn't really much matter what the chattering writers (if any exist at such a point) think.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

  30. wren says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @El Dato

    Thanks for the interesting read. I note that the specific version came from Vienna, and that what sets it apart is an organic rhythm.

    I don't know much about music, but I was told by a very nice Austrian man that waltzes played by Viennese orchestras are the best for that same reason. (He overheard me happily remarking that Austrian Airlines was playing The Blue Danube as my wife and I boarded a plane there. That is a wonderful country with nice people to go with the music.)

    Replies: @jim jones, @wren, @wren, @MBlanc46

    For the past 10 years or so, a family tradition has been to watch the Vienna New Year’s concert.

    Now that the ballerinas in my family outnumber the violinists, we usually skip right to the dancing scenes, which are often very beautiful.

    Here is the 2018 concert. Skip to about the two hour mark for some nice dancing, but the whole thing is lovely, as it is almost every year.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @wren

    I love this annual concert. Thanks for posting it.

    , @AnotherDad
    @wren

    Western Civ is pretty darn impressive.

    Too bad western "elites" decided to throw it away to virtue signal by importing muzzies and Africans.

    , @Lisa
    @wren

    I like the Vienna Boys Choir for Christmas carols and I believe it might even have repellant potential. This might be the start of a white renaissance with books, classical sculpture, painting and music demarcating groups.

  31. ……and when you need the really big guns, Chinese music!

    • Replies: @Rohirrimborn
    @Thirdeye

    And if you want to go nuclear try Japanese. Is Yoko considered japanese?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdZ9weP5i68

    Replies: @fish, @RadicalCenter, @Bliss

    , @jim jones
    @Thirdeye

    That`s another thing the Chinese failed to invent, decent music.

  32. @J.Ross
    Akshuallllllly it does clarify in the novel and film that Alex is unique: none of his friends dig it, but they mostly know not to interrupt him (viz Dim in the milkbar scene).
    -----
    Anonymous advice on 4chan from a while back on how to repulse black customers at a store without attracting Eric Holder's attention: "play classical music. Seriously, they can't be in the same room."
    -----
    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach. The interviewed affects shock and asks why, and the jazz man's reasons are redolent of Wagner's complaints about Mendelssohn: it's like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood. "Ditta ditta da, up here, and then it goes ditta ditta da down there. Why do I need to go up here and then down there?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @PhysicistDave, @slumber_j, @Pat Boyle, @Rosamond Vincy, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Jim Don Bob

    “it’s like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood”

    There’s an iota of truth in that, which is why I prefer Handel, and why Romantic composers became popular. But there’s some great Bach. The opening of this (esp at 26s) is like sunlight breaking through clouds and flooding everything.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    We have a huge pipe organ in our local concert hall, and they have cheap or free concerts for it all the time. It's all Bach, except this one professor from the local music conservatory who plays offbeat stuff, like this piece from recently passed English composer Derek Bourgeois:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mAuBkOixzqo

    The time signature is rare and assymetrical, and it changes to an even weirder time signature midway, I believe 11/8 and 13/8. So the song is happy ... but unsettling.

  33. Anon[384] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    A lot of rich people in L.A.

    Replies: @Anon

    Full disclosure page here, all the contributors, individual and corporate:

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/about/supporters/

    Wow, lots of people! The only name I recognized was David Rensin, a great writer for the old California Magazine and the biographer of SoCal Nazi surfer Miki Dora. He’s also the father of hereditarily gifted writer Emmett Rensin, unpersoned from his perch at Vox when he outed himself as … it’s not really clear, but he seemed to go off the reservation a bit, with this piece, after which Ezra Klein came up with a lame excuse to fire him:

    The smug style in American liberalism
    https://www.vox.com/2016/4/21/11451378/smug-american-liberalism

    There is a smug style in American liberalism. It has been growing these past decades. It is a way of conducting politics, predicated on the belief that American life is not divided by moral difference or policy divergence — not really — but by the failure of half the country to know what’s good for them.

    The trouble is that stupid hicks don’t know what’s good for them. They’re getting conned by right-wingers and tent revivalists until they believe all the lies that’ve made them so wrong. They don’t know any better. That’s why they’re voting against their own self-interest.

    Today, a liberal who finds himself troubled by the currents of contemporary political life need look no further than his Facebook newsfeed to find the explanation:

    Study finds Daily Show viewers more informed than viewers of Fox News.

    They’re beating CNN watchers too.

    NPR listeners are best informed of all. He likes that.

    You’re better off watching nothing than watching Fox. He likes that even more.

    The good news doesn’t stop.

    Liberals aren’t just better informed. They’re smarter.

    They’ve got better grammar. They know more words.

    Smart kids grow up to be liberals, while conservatives reason like drunks.

    Liberals are better able to process new information; they’re less biased like that. They’ve got different brains. Better ones. Why? Evolution. They’ve got better brains, top-notch amygdalae, science finds.

    In November of last year, during the week when it became temporarily fashionable for American governors to declare that Syrian refugees would not be welcome in their state, Hamilton Nolan wrote an essay for Gawker called “Dumb Hicks Are America’s Greatest Threat.”

    If there has ever been a tirade so dedicated to the smug style, to the proposition that it is neither malice, nor capital, nor ideological difference, but rather the backward stupidity of poor people that has ruined the state of American policy, then it is hidden beyond our view, in some uncool place, far from the front page of Gawker.

    “Many of America’s political leaders are warning of the dangers posed by Syrian refugees. They are underestimating, though, the much greater danger: dumbass hicks, in charge of things,” Nolan wrote. “…You, our elected officials, are embarrassing us. All of us, except your fellow dumb hicks, who voted for you in large numbers. You — our racist, xenophobic, knuckle-dragging ignorant leaders — are making us look bad in front of the guests (the whole world). You are the bad cousin in the family who always ruins Thanksgiving. Go in the back room and drink a can of beer alone please.”

    Ezra Klein’s You’re Fired letter:

    Statement on Emmett Rensin

    By Ezra Klein

    On Thursday night, Emmett Rensin, the deputy editor of Vox’s first person section, sent a series of tweets that, among other things, urged people to riot if Donald Trump comes to their town.

    We at Vox do not take institutional positions on most questions, and we encourage our writers to debate and disagree. But direct encouragement of riots crosses a line between expressing a contrary opinion and directly encouraging dangerous, illegal activity. We welcome a variety of viewpoints, but we do not condone writing that could put others in danger.

    In this case, Emmett’s tweets violated Vox’s standards and Emmett has been suspended as a consequence.

    The tweets in question were in response to people attacking him for his Vox piece, and were of the general form, “If you seriously believe that Donald Trump is Hitler, literally, if that is what you believe, then you should be taking any and all action, up to an including violence, to make sure he doesn’t take power, and if you don’t, well then you don’t really believe he is Hitler. (And you don’t. And neither do I.)”

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    Hmm, so Emmett was right twice: liberals are smug, and no one really believes Trump is Hitler.

    So of course he must be deplatformed.

    Liberalism's Prime Directive is anti-truth.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    , @ic1000
    @Anon

    Re: The smug style in American liberalism:

    Sailer quotes Theodore Gioia,

    "In a strange mutation, classical music devolves from a 'universal language of mankind' reminding all people of their common humanity into a sonic border fence protecting privileged areas from common crowds, telling the plebes in auditory code that 'you’re not welcome here.'”

    Plebian: Of, belonging to, or characteristic of commoners.

    Privilege: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

    Mr. Gioia, an eques -- or perhaps he sees a Senator when he mirror-gazes -- sustains the stereotype of the upper classes jealously guarding their privileges. If the mass of plebians becomes accustomed to coffee shops where petty criminals and the (literally) unwashed are "not welcome," imagine the demands that will follow.

    The right to beachcomb up to the Spring high-tide line in East Hampton and Malibu?
    The right to have their vote for the least-bad candidate honored?
    Stop-and-frisk of dangerous-looking young men in downscale neighborhoods of flyover cities?

    The Dallas-based critic's Wikipedia page relates an amusing anecdote from his past. "When Gioia worked amidst Silicon Valley's venture capital community on Sand Hill Road, he was known as the 'guy with the piano in his office.'"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  34. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Kylie

    It has to be paired with attack helicopters.

    Replies: @Simon Tugmutton

    Buzz, you jest, but that’s how they winkled General Noriega out.

    The soldiers surrounding the embassy used psychological warfare, attempting to force the defeated ruler out using the continuous noise from a low flying helicopter while playing hard rock music and The Howard Stern Show outside the embassy.

    https://ivarfjeld.com/2010/04/30/when-heavy-rock-was-used-to-get-general-noriega-out-of-vatican-protection/

  35. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Harpsichords have a more robotic aspect to them since they don't vary in volume. They fit the Enlightenment's mood of cheerful optimism pretty well. The pianoforte helped usher in the Romantic Era because they were more humanly expressive.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @YetAnotherAnon, @Muse

    Steve – listen to a short romantic harpsichord piece (harpsichord plus small string orchestra), written by a guy killed at Tobruk in WW2. The second movement (around 3:35) is exquisite.

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Thanks, YetAnother, that is a lovely work. A life cut short, unfortunately.

  36. Belconnen Mall used to play “Swing on a star” to discourage kids from hanging out around the entrances and smoking.

    • Replies: @Another Canadian
    @Dave from Oz

    I remember last summer the city of Toronto played Vivaldi through the speaker system at Dundas Square every morning. As I walked to work I noticed a sharp drop in the number of hoodlums hanging out there. Classical music is an effective way to make certain public spaces tolerable again.

  37. @wren
    Now that Starbucks has chosen to rebrand itself as America's public toilet, overtly, they will covertly turn to tactics such as this to remain a safe space for their paying customers.

    Replies: @Alden, @bomag, @Barnard, @Forbes

    A Hispanic man is offended that he found the word beaner on his cup. Starbucks already groveled.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Alden

    Starbucks near me has a different problem.

    https://www.fox25boston.com/news/man-accused-of-inappropriately-touching-several-women-girls-in-melrose/751707801

    , @peterike
    @Alden


    A Hispanic man is offended that he found the word beaner on his cup. Starbucks already groveled.

     

    I found this one amusing. Seems the "offended" man can't even speak English, since I only see quotes from his "friend." And the friend said the "violated" guys name was Peter.

    My guess is the guy came in and when asked his name said "Peter" in a very heavy accent, like "beee-tah," and the hapless Starbucks person in good faith thought he said "Beaner." I'd even bet the barista didn't know Beaner was a forbidden word.

    I haven't tried to find too much on this story, but from what I saw nobody seem to bother asking the Starbucks employee about it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @BenKenobi
    @Alden

    For those of the Unzitariat unfamiliar with Starbucks: in my experience you only get a label like that when making an order off the app. Mr. Beaner chose that name. It was a set-up.

  38. @Anon
    OT/

    From Leftist Current Affairs on a pretty old iSteve theme:


    FEBRUARY 14, 2018
    THE U.S. MEDIA’S FAILURE TO REPORT ON VIOLENCE IN MEXICO IS INEXCUSABLE


    by BRIANNA RENNIX & NATHAN J. ROBINSON


    ...A cartel taking over a city? The kidnapping of federal police officers? A state mayor’s drug-laden tractor trailer being seized? If these occurred a few miles further north, in California or Texas, they would be national news. If they happened in London, they would be news here. But they are happening in Mexico, and Mexico does not matter very much to the U.S. media. ...


     

    Funny how that works...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alden, @Saxon, @Cloudbuster, @Forbes

    Los Angeles and San Diego papers cover Mexico a little. I don’t read them.

  39. Anonymous[278] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: we’ve got some 4D chess checkmates going on before our very eyes. #winning

    EU Will Block US Sanctions Against Iran Starting Friday

    https://news.antiwar.com/2018/05/17/eu-will-block-us-sanctions-against-iran-starting-friday/

    The ‘Bolton Effect’: From Breakthrough To Breakdown With North Korea

    https://www.antiwar.com/blog/2018/05/16/the-bolton-effect-from-breakthrough-to-breakdown-with-north-korea/

    Crazy Iraqi Terrorist Cleric Who Blew Up US Soldiers in Iraq Wins Elections

    http://dailycaller.com/2018/05/15/al-sadr-wins-iraq-election-us-troops/

    Violence Engulfs Gaza as US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem
    https://www.voanews.com/a/israel-reacts-to-us-emabssy-move/4392733.html

    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.

    • Replies: @James Braxton
    @Anonymous

    Patience, Rain Man.

  40. Anon[278] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: we’ve got some 4D chess checkmates going on before our very eyes. #winning

    EU Will Block US Sanctions Against Iran Starting Friday

    https://news.antiwar.com/2018/05/17/eu-will-block-us-sanctions-against-iran-starting-friday/

    The ‘Bolton Effect’: From Breakthrough To Breakdown With North Korea

    https://www.antiwar.com/blog/2018/05/16/the-bolton-effect-from-breakthrough-to-breakdown-with-north-korea/

    Crazy Iraqi Terrorist Cleric Who Blew Up US Soldiers in Iraq Wins Elections

    http://dailycaller.com/2018/05/15/al-sadr-wins-iraq-election-us-troops/

    Violence Engulfs Gaza as US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem
    https://www.voanews.com/a/israel-reacts-to-us-emabssy-move/4392733.html

    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.

    • Troll: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.
     
    Only the first two--Iran and North Korea--are really relevant to Trump.

    Iraq is just playing out what was launched by "W". And more generally, another confirmation of "diversity creates conflict". The US invasion moved it from having a tribal clique from the Sunni minority running the joint, to having--somewhat more fairly--an election that brings in a big man from the Shia majority. That's essentially the default scenario.

    Gaza, is just ... Gaza. No one is stopping Gazans from having a decent place to live but Gazans themselves. They simply didn't have the social "wherewithall" to keep their Hamas faction--the guys with guns and will--from running the joint. Since Hamas is less interested in their peoples' welfare than in islamic warfare, both Israel and Egypt have closed their borders. (Though Egypt has it open now for Ramadan doing their careful screening for all the Hamas bad actors on their watch list.)

    The tragedy here is that there's probably a majority of Gazans who just want to go about their lives. And if "in charge", Gaza could be whatever the Gazan IQ allows it to be. But as we all know civilization is not about what people want, it is about what the men of a community create--and the ability to create decent place is a product of their IQ, ability to cooperate, culture of trust all playing out in history.

    Replies: @NOTA, @RudyM

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Anon

    278 is new code for turd in the punchbowl.

    , @Tex
    @Anon

    Are we supposed to be shocked that the Norks are trying to improve their bargaining position?

    Despite the references to Trump as God Emperor, there is not a whole he or anyone else can do about the Shi'ite rump of Iraq becoming an Iranian client. That was set in motion when Bush toppled the Baathists.

    As far as the embassy goes, it does seem that Trump often gives Israel what it wants. I wonder if this tendency might be the only really anti-semitic feature of the Trump presidency.

  41. @wren
    @Buzz Mohawk

    For the past 10 years or so, a family tradition has been to watch the Vienna New Year's concert.

    Now that the ballerinas in my family outnumber the violinists, we usually skip right to the dancing scenes, which are often very beautiful.

    Here is the 2018 concert. Skip to about the two hour mark for some nice dancing, but the whole thing is lovely, as it is almost every year.

    https://youtu.be/klzvht1doRI

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @AnotherDad, @Lisa

    I love this annual concert. Thanks for posting it.

    • Agree: ic1000
  42. Sometimes I’m driving and listening to BBC Radio 4, and I hear something particularly objectionable to do with gender, diversity, inclusivity, or how awful white people are, in particular middle-aged English white people like me, and it all gets too much, and I change the station to Radio 3, the classical music channel. All at once I am in a different and much better world of beauty, intricate order and structure combined with ever-changing discovery, and (it seems to me) cheerful tolerance, good humour and magnanimity.

    • Replies: @Simon Tugmutton
    @Graham

    I must disagree, to wit: Sean Rafferty's (e.g.) hagiographic fawning over the death of Nelson Mandela or the relentless right-on-ery of the guests on 'Essential Classics'. Indeed the whole editorial tone is a perfect reflection of BBC Groupthink. The only output of R3 I can endure now is 'Through the Night' (assorted classical pieces, some of them very good, concisely introduced), but since I prefer to sleep at night I listen to it only via timed recordings.

    It's sad. The Third Programme (as was) used to be a true jewel in the cultural crown.

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Graham

    I gave up Radio Four recently after being a listener from age 19. I now wonder just how many lies I swallowed over the years.

    Classic Radio Four prog features middle-aged, privately educated women either discussing the problems of some dysfunctional person/people or praising the work of some minority actor or writer.

    , @CJ
    @Graham

    I sometimes listen to classical music on CBC FM, which between 10 am and 2 pm has well-selected classical music with fairly minimal commentary that avoids politics. Unfortunately, every 60 minutes the music stops for a "news" broadcast that is the Two Minute Hate of Orwell's 1984 come to life, with Donald Trump in the role of Emmanuel Goldstein. I'm not exaggerating -- sometimes every one of the four or five news items denounces Trump.

    A typical broadcast will go something like, "This is CBC News. Today Donald Trump threatens North American trade agreements. Next, Donald Trump attacks defenceless refugees, causing them to flee to Canada. Moving on, here's an oppressed African-American talking about the emotional devastation Trump has wrought on her community. In environmental news, the survival clock of the planet is now at one minute to midnight because of Trump's pandering to primitive coal interests. And lastly, Trump's boorish behavior has offended sensitive people so badly they're forming emotional support groups. And that's the CBC News." It's nearly the same thing in French on Radio-Canada Ici Musique from 5 am to 7 am (although not on their really excellent classical program from 8 pm to 10 pm, which doesn't have news).

  43. Classical @music” is soulless and replaces artistic expression and vitality sterility and technical noodling

    People of Color don’t like it because it doesn’t breathe life

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    @Tiny Duck

    Tiny says, "People of Color don’t like it [classical music] because it doesn’t breathe life..."

    They don't like it because they can't fock to it.

    , @unit472
    @Tiny Duck

    It also requires one to be able to read musical notation ( unless you are an idiot savant).

    , @Larry, San Francisco
    @Tiny Duck

    Well there is this great version of cultural appropriation

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGDZc9bdUZM

    I guess we should ban this.

    Replies: @Thirdeye

    , @fish
    @Tiny Duck

    Oh Tinys......


    Now'n we talked bout dis.....how teh klassikal music ain't right fo us bekause it rekwires thot, praktis (I'm talkin praktis, praktis ) an mo praktis! An todays urban dweller has the tension span ob a German Shepard puppy! Now yo typcal "Peoples o Color" kan xpress artikstik vytalitys wit an ol turntable and a overturned 55 gallon drum dat'n lows him to beat out his gressions and still feel liken an artist.

    I be seein youse tonite fo another ride on my Wakanda Stik!

    You be sayin hi to the borthas!

    Lendsnerb "Merikas Leedin Musik Kritik" Pittz

    , @tyrone
    @Tiny Duck

    people in China and Japan like it just fine,maybe it takes a certain IQ population to appreciate the acme of musical creation that is classical music.

  44. .. Thus music returns to its oldest evolutionary function: claiming territory

    Mexicans working in the USA like to play their Mexican music wherever they work—nice and loud, and the more the gringos get annoyed, the better they like it.

    Some Mexican music is pretty good, though. When I was working with Mexicans, I became a Lupillo Rivera fan.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @the one they call Desanex

    I’m not sure where you live, but the workers in the part of California where I live, all seem to come from the part of Mexico that favors horrible, horrible, tinny, polka music. I once heard the name for that particular style and the part of Mexico it comes from, but can’t remember what it was. I’ve never heard anything that sounds like “La Golondrina” coming from their combination boom box/tool battery rechargers.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    , @YourBunnyWrote
    @the one they call Desanex

    That is pretty good, only one problem, it makes me hungry....

  45. @Anon
    "they will covertly turn to tactics such as this to remain a safe space for their paying customers"

    Companies have all kinds of subtle tricks to scare away troublesome yuffs.

    Starbucks: bathrooms locked and only accessible to paying customers + sell expensive products lower class proles consider "gay" and don't want to be associated with

    Chick-fil-a: locate restaurants in middle-class areas so they can recruit "the right people"; demand servers be extra cheery so as to scare away bad attitude "wrong people."

    Pizza joints: take-out, so they don't have to bother with it

    Chinese restaurants: goofy, low-volume Chinese music and televisions tuned to CNN

    Wal Mart: "security, scan all aisles" ...yeah, those cameras are on all the time, so it's just a reminder to yuffs that they are being watched...they even have cameras that show you your image at eye-level at the automated register.

    + promote breast cancer awareness, women's this and that, play classical music, and do all manner of other things that tuff guys consider sissy or gay and don't want to be associated with (low-class progressives aren't really that socially progressive, they're just racists who vote democrat because they hate whitey).

    Replies: @Sid

    “(low-class progressives aren’t really that socially progressive, they’re just racists who vote democrat because they hate whitey)”

    That’s true even for the ones who are white, such as the low lives who make up antifa. Low IQ, selfish, lazy, often addicted to drugs, etc.

    • Replies: @Jake
    @Sid

    "Bach, more than anybody else, is the composer of civilization."

    Steve,

    I assume you refer to poor P.D.Q. Bach.

  46. @Anonymous

    Baroque music seems to make the most potent repellant. “[D]espite a few assertive, late-Romantic exceptions like Mussorgsky and Rachmaninoff,” notes critic Scott Timberg, “the music used to scatter hoodlums is pre-Romantic, by Baroque or Classical-era composers such as Vivaldi or Mozart.”
     
    I wonder if this is because of the heavy use of the harpsichord and organ in Baroque music. The harpsichord and organ are kind of unsettling and have an eerie quality to them. They tend to make you uncomfortable unlike the more mellifluous piano of later Classical and Romantic music. Much more solemn. Makes you think of church, funerals, vampires, etc.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave

    Anonymous[400] write:

    I wonder if this is because of the heavy use of the harpsichord and organ in Baroque music. The harpsichord and organ are kind of unsettling and have an eerie quality to them.

    I know the harpsichord professor at our local state university (yes, the university has multiple harpsichords!). I mentioned once that, while the harpsichord was pretty cool, I would not want to listen to it all day long.

    I’m afraid she was offended.

    • Replies: @unit472
    @PhysicistDave

    I've always thought of the harpsichord as a 12 string piano.

  47. Anon[175] • Disclaimer says:
    @YetAnotherAnon
    @J.Ross

    "it’s like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood"

    There's an iota of truth in that, which is why I prefer Handel, and why Romantic composers became popular. But there's some great Bach. The opening of this (esp at 26s) is like sunlight breaking through clouds and flooding everything.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YC4oV-lamk

    Replies: @Anon

    We have a huge pipe organ in our local concert hall, and they have cheap or free concerts for it all the time. It’s all Bach, except this one professor from the local music conservatory who plays offbeat stuff, like this piece from recently passed English composer Derek Bourgeois:

    The time signature is rare and assymetrical, and it changes to an even weirder time signature midway, I believe 11/8 and 13/8. So the song is happy … but unsettling.

  48. @J.Ross
    Akshuallllllly it does clarify in the novel and film that Alex is unique: none of his friends dig it, but they mostly know not to interrupt him (viz Dim in the milkbar scene).
    -----
    Anonymous advice on 4chan from a while back on how to repulse black customers at a store without attracting Eric Holder's attention: "play classical music. Seriously, they can't be in the same room."
    -----
    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach. The interviewed affects shock and asks why, and the jazz man's reasons are redolent of Wagner's complaints about Mendelssohn: it's like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood. "Ditta ditta da, up here, and then it goes ditta ditta da down there. Why do I need to go up here and then down there?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @PhysicistDave, @slumber_j, @Pat Boyle, @Rosamond Vincy, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Jim Don Bob

    J Ross wrote:

    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach.

    My kids took piano lessons for eight years from a retired professor of Baroque keyboard (different from the person I mentioned in my previous post).

    One day, one of my kids went in to lesson and announced that she wanted to learn “Rhapsody in Blue.” The professor let out a long “Well…” and we waited for him to explain why she should focus on real music like Bach rather than Gershwin.

    Instead, he proceeded to tell us of all the different versions of the Rhapsody that he himself had performed: solo, duet, and with a full orchestra.

    He ended up trying to encourage our kids to get more exposure to jazz, in order to widen their horizons, to learn improvisation, etc. So, at least in my experience, the Baroque experts actually respect jazz.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    When you look at Jazz from a music theory standpoint, it's a superset of classical. Classical uses triads and seventh chords. Jazz takes it up to thirteenths, which are impossible to play on the piano unless you omit notes, which makes it even jazzier.

    , @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @PhysicistDave


    He ended up trying to encourage our kids to get more exposure to jazz, in order to widen their horizons, to learn improvisation, etc. So, at least in my experience, the Baroque experts actually respect jazz
     
    Technical proficiency is a pre-requisite for effective improvisation. A good teacher could find a passage that provides some trouble and demonstrate some classical piece or training to help the student get over the hump. It is effective because it solves a problem the student recognizes as a problem.

    To the modern ear, much of the baroque and classical style improv sounds mechanical, but as Steve has alluded to, the instruments at the time were more limiting. Many of the idioms are now functionally obsolete because they have been superseded by the modern ability to vary volume, achieve greater ranges of pitch, and so forth.

  49. Anonymous[283] • Disclaimer says:

    I loved Walter Carlos’s score for Clockwork Orange as a kid, and his older Switched on Bach stuff. Sorry for the deadnaming, Wendy.

    Ms. Wendy Carlos has been a hermit cat lady nutcase for quite a while and will not allow the old stuff to be released, except in really expensive remastered CD sets she sells from her website, when the stuff in in stock. Her website is full of all kinds of geeky stuff that only a classic autogynephlic translady could think to gather up.

    • Replies: @willieskull68
    @Anonymous

    I have my word of the day; "autogynephilic"

  50. Some say I have a propensity for violins. Sometimes I like electric guitars. You can take out a Stradivarius case and listen to the staccato of a Thompson Submachine Gun. Valentine’s Day isn’t romantic sometimes. If you really want to make kids grow up antisocial, break their social bonds, make them tolerate bullies and tell them the law made you do it. Those homosexual mutants in Mad Max do not subscribe to women’s rights or bow to emotional appeals. You can run from the future, but there is No Sanctuary. The Sandman knows what The Big Sleep can do. You’ll be lucky to make it past thirty. You can try to live forever, but it might make you so impotent that Barbarians take your women. That Big Giant Head may be like stone, but a crystal heart is cold all the time.

    Who knows what evil lies in the hearts of women? Do you really want to know what they want?
    I don’t think you do. It’ll make you stay too long with your mother.

    You can devote your life to love or logic. Only a doctor can sort it out.
    To seek out a new life, you should look for civilization.
    Woman like the bad boys better. Big guns, a boat. Gunboats and lies about peace.
    You get your ass on Mars, and its Barzoom City. Maybe even three at a time.

    Some people don’t support the Space Program. Fools. Everybody needs their own space.
    Geography is a zero sum game. In space, even the big boobs do not sag.

    Am I rambling? Maybe. But when you string it together and parse it right.
    It sounds poetic and sometimes seems profound.
    Do not expound it too much. Everything seems simple on explanation…

    • LOL: MBlanc46
  51. @El Dato
    @Buzz Mohawk

    A good read on the specific version of Da Ride used in Apocalypse Now:

    http://nautil.us/issue/30/identity/how-i-tried-to-transplant-the-musical-heart-of-apocalypse-now

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @MEH 0910

    A good read on the specific version of Da Ride used in Apocalypse Now:

    Written by the great Walter Murch himself!

  52. Seems like we could construct some sort of Ortho style repellent guide where you would look up a group you would like to repel and it would correspond to sounds.

    Lowlifes Classical Music
    Elitist Liberals Country and Western
    Most Wypipo Hip Hop
    Etc…

  53. @PhysicistDave
    @J.Ross

    J Ross wrote:


    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach.
     
    My kids took piano lessons for eight years from a retired professor of Baroque keyboard (different from the person I mentioned in my previous post).

    One day, one of my kids went in to lesson and announced that she wanted to learn "Rhapsody in Blue." The professor let out a long "Well..." and we waited for him to explain why she should focus on real music like Bach rather than Gershwin.

    Instead, he proceeded to tell us of all the different versions of the Rhapsody that he himself had performed: solo, duet, and with a full orchestra.

    He ended up trying to encourage our kids to get more exposure to jazz, in order to widen their horizons, to learn improvisation, etc. So, at least in my experience, the Baroque experts actually respect jazz.

    Replies: @Anon, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    When you look at Jazz from a music theory standpoint, it’s a superset of classical. Classical uses triads and seventh chords. Jazz takes it up to thirteenths, which are impossible to play on the piano unless you omit notes, which makes it even jazzier.

  54. Oh, no. Disco duck claims he got soul. Classical Music is the rhythm of the spheres.
    The cargo cult never gets off the ground. What is that soul you got?
    It tastes like pepper and runs to the bathroom.
    Do you run a lot do you?

    The bongos beat the war drums and the meat wagons bag the nightly vibrancy.
    That life don’t get too far. Faster than a speeding bullet its not.

    The dog that bit the hand that feeds it. The Dark Night and the Final Curtain.
    You don’t need drapes in the hood. They got no shame and its curtains anyway…

  55. Anon[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    @Anon

    Did you mention birds?

    The majesty of Hatebeak ( A Death Metal Band Whose Lead Vocalist Was a Parrot)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVlrGJouvQ4

    Replies: @Anon, @tim s, @Johnny Rico

    The vaguely fascist German folk singer Heino, who is a dead ringer for Karl Lagerfeld, revived his career singing death metal. Here’s a sample:

    And here he is singing “Roll out the Barrel”:

    Heino is not to be confused with Die Twinnies:

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anon

    Heino is not fascist. He is an old “schlager” music singer, who has an ironic cult following with a few US hipsters. He is the German equivalent of some guy in Branson who was on Lawrence Welk.

    Replies: @flyingtiger

    , @MBlanc46
    @Anon

    Thanks for those.

  56. @Anon
    OT/

    From Leftist Current Affairs on a pretty old iSteve theme:


    FEBRUARY 14, 2018
    THE U.S. MEDIA’S FAILURE TO REPORT ON VIOLENCE IN MEXICO IS INEXCUSABLE


    by BRIANNA RENNIX & NATHAN J. ROBINSON


    ...A cartel taking over a city? The kidnapping of federal police officers? A state mayor’s drug-laden tractor trailer being seized? If these occurred a few miles further north, in California or Texas, they would be national news. If they happened in London, they would be news here. But they are happening in Mexico, and Mexico does not matter very much to the U.S. media. ...


     

    Funny how that works...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alden, @Saxon, @Cloudbuster, @Forbes

    The US media is of course not going to cover the reality of Mexico when it is engaged in a propaganda program aimed at telling Americans how wonderful it is to become a colony of Mexico and similar countries. If they were honest about what Mexico is actually like, the public might have some misgivings about what’s being done.

  57. @Anonymous
    OT: we've got some 4D chess checkmates going on before our very eyes. #winning


    EU Will Block US Sanctions Against Iran Starting Friday

    https://news.antiwar.com/2018/05/17/eu-will-block-us-sanctions-against-iran-starting-friday/


    The ‘Bolton Effect’: From Breakthrough To Breakdown With North Korea

    https://www.antiwar.com/blog/2018/05/16/the-bolton-effect-from-breakthrough-to-breakdown-with-north-korea/


    Crazy Iraqi Terrorist Cleric Who Blew Up US Soldiers in Iraq Wins Elections

    http://dailycaller.com/2018/05/15/al-sadr-wins-iraq-election-us-troops/


    Violence Engulfs Gaza as US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem
    https://www.voanews.com/a/israel-reacts-to-us-emabssy-move/4392733.html


    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.

    Replies: @James Braxton

    Patience, Rain Man.

  58. @Graham
    Sometimes I'm driving and listening to BBC Radio 4, and I hear something particularly objectionable to do with gender, diversity, inclusivity, or how awful white people are, in particular middle-aged English white people like me, and it all gets too much, and I change the station to Radio 3, the classical music channel. All at once I am in a different and much better world of beauty, intricate order and structure combined with ever-changing discovery, and (it seems to me) cheerful tolerance, good humour and magnanimity.

    Replies: @Simon Tugmutton, @YetAnotherAnon, @CJ

    I must disagree, to wit: Sean Rafferty’s (e.g.) hagiographic fawning over the death of Nelson Mandela or the relentless right-on-ery of the guests on ‘Essential Classics’. Indeed the whole editorial tone is a perfect reflection of BBC Groupthink. The only output of R3 I can endure now is ‘Through the Night’ (assorted classical pieces, some of them very good, concisely introduced), but since I prefer to sleep at night I listen to it only via timed recordings.

    It’s sad. The Third Programme (as was) used to be a true jewel in the cultural crown.

  59. What? Forty-some replies and no baroque puns or play on words? They are not going to write tbemselves.

    Bach baroque the grip of hoodlums at the local EZ mart.

    Pachabel saves Taco Bell from the minions of Reverend Al.

    Vivaldi protects Aldis from thugees all four seasons of tbe year.

  60. @J.Ross
    Akshuallllllly it does clarify in the novel and film that Alex is unique: none of his friends dig it, but they mostly know not to interrupt him (viz Dim in the milkbar scene).
    -----
    Anonymous advice on 4chan from a while back on how to repulse black customers at a store without attracting Eric Holder's attention: "play classical music. Seriously, they can't be in the same room."
    -----
    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach. The interviewed affects shock and asks why, and the jazz man's reasons are redolent of Wagner's complaints about Mendelssohn: it's like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood. "Ditta ditta da, up here, and then it goes ditta ditta da down there. Why do I need to go up here and then down there?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @PhysicistDave, @slumber_j, @Pat Boyle, @Rosamond Vincy, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Jim Don Bob

    I have to say that I agree with the jazz musician on NPR…and there’s one of the strangest sentences I’ve ever written. My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    It’s pretty: I’ll give it that.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @slumber_j

    According to Bach himself:

    “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”

    That is what it is for.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    , @Sunbeam
    @slumber_j

    "I have to say that I agree with the jazz musician on NPR…and there’s one of the strangest sentences I’ve ever written. My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    It’s pretty: I’ll give it that."

    This site has a very minor fetish for classical music (nothing compared to the IQ obsession though).

    I 100% agree with you and that jazz guy (though I also hate jazz).

    As they say in discussions about the Perl programming language, "There's more than one way to do it." I think they need to run an additional experiment where they play Hank Williams (the real one, not his son), or Jimmy Rogers singing "T for Texas."

    Hank Williams Sr... "Angel of Death" (the best version with lyrics) - YouTube
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4ssDcq2f3U

    Jimmie Rodgers - Blue Yodel No 1 (T For Texas) - YouTube
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qEIBmGZxAhg

    Anyway, more than one way to do it. I love Celtic music and derivatives. Classical leaves me cold. All kinds of things I've heard that I like, but not classical.

    And by right of being me, my personal tastes supercede that of anyone who likes that "Lovely, Lovely Ludwig Van." Since I do not care for it, the sentiment that "Nature's Noblemen" like classical music is the notion of a syphilitic moron.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    , @Mark Eugenikos
    @slumber_j


    My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.
     
    "The Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach wrote the initials "S. D. G." at the end of all his church compositions and also applied it to some, but not all, his secular works."

    S.D.G. - Soli Deo Gloria
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soli_Deo_gloria
    , @ThreeCranes
    @slumber_j

    How can anyone listen to this and not be transported by Bach's famous "walking beat"? The heights achieved by European civilization are unsurpassed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lz0FmmNrTck

    Replies: @slumber_j

  61. @jim jones
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Vienna is the best city in the World:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-5520671/Vienna-unbeatable-worlds-liveable-city-Baghdad-worst.html

    Replies: @Saxon

    All of these “most livable cities” articles are based on bugman metrics and feelings. Vienna is going to have the demography of Baghdad sooner or later on the current trajectory. Do they really think it’ll be that great then? I suppose by that time the overwhelming majority of the populace will be illiterate savages so it doesn’t really much matter what the chattering writers (if any exist at such a point) think.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Saxon

    You're right. I'd suggest "visit Vienna soon, before it's gone":

    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/4229/austria-muslims-vienna-schools

    Yet another of my ancestors' lands simply surrendered to savages.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  62. The NJ Transit platforms at Newark Penn Station play fairly loud music, with an emphasis on 80s new wave (think Morrissey) and classic rock. It took me a few years to figure out what they were trying to do.

  63. Let us hope the better-known and also worse-known Gioias are all smart enough not to write “tarmac” when they mean “tarpaulin,” and if they misspell “repellent,” they do so stylishly, with two r’s, not any a’s.

  64. I wonder what would be their reactions to 20th C music, something like Schoenberg or Bartok….

    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I had the same thought. Has it been tried/

  65. @Anon
    OT/

    From Leftist Current Affairs on a pretty old iSteve theme:


    FEBRUARY 14, 2018
    THE U.S. MEDIA’S FAILURE TO REPORT ON VIOLENCE IN MEXICO IS INEXCUSABLE


    by BRIANNA RENNIX & NATHAN J. ROBINSON


    ...A cartel taking over a city? The kidnapping of federal police officers? A state mayor’s drug-laden tractor trailer being seized? If these occurred a few miles further north, in California or Texas, they would be national news. If they happened in London, they would be news here. But they are happening in Mexico, and Mexico does not matter very much to the U.S. media. ...


     

    Funny how that works...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alden, @Saxon, @Cloudbuster, @Forbes

    Are they saying the criminal Muslim “cartel” hasn’t taken over London?

  66. When Burger King and Seven Eleven are the “privileged areas” protected from “common crowds” by Bach and Mozart, maybe it is time to concede that this whole civilization thing has run its course?

    • Agree: TheBoom
    • Replies: @Jake
    @Almost Missouri

    The meaning is that we all need to surround ourselves with the best of Western Civilization, from Homer through . Civilization did not run its course; civilization was betrayed by those warring against it from within.

    , @International Jew
    @Almost Missouri

    Well, it's not about just Burger King and Taco Bell. That corner is where you emerge from the Bay Area subway system if you're headed for the symphony or the opera in San Francisco.

  67. Steve, why do you think that Bach more the composer of civilization than anybody else? I would have said Mozart.

    • Agree: slumber_j
    • Replies: @roo_ster
    @Almost Missouri

    Because music is all downhill after Bach.

    , @Sparkon
    @Almost Missouri

    And I would have said Haydn.

    Sheesh! 58 comments, and I'm the first to mention the Father of Classical Music, and probably the greatest composer ever. I think Bach is great, also Vivaldi, and geez, anything is better than talking about 9/11, but Mozart was a Freemason tirelessly promoted even from the moment of his death.

    How anyone can listen to Mozart and Haydn, and think that Mozart was the greater composer is entirely beyond me.


    ABSTRACT; Three standard measures of creativity, the Holtzman Inkblot Test, the Barron-Welsh Art Scale, and the Alternate Uses Test, were administered to 142 undergraduate male and female subjects. The subjects were divided into 16 groups according to sex, four types of musical stimuli (MUZAK, classical, modern, and no music), and two types of recruitment for the study (volunteer and coerced). Analysis of variance of the main effects of music, recruitment, and sex on the three measures of creativity indicated no significant differences. However, volunteer subjects did score higher on all three tests. Pearson product moment coefficients of correlation among the test measures showed little reliability.
     
    Personally, I find Classical -- especially Haydn -- easy-listening, elevator, muzak-type mood music the best for study and concentration, or no music at all.
    , @Steve Sailer
    @Almost Missouri

    Mozart was starting to move toward Romanticism, which Beethoven took further.

  68. @Dave from Oz
    Belconnen Mall used to play "Swing on a star" to discourage kids from hanging out around the entrances and smoking.

    Replies: @Another Canadian

    I remember last summer the city of Toronto played Vivaldi through the speaker system at Dundas Square every morning. As I walked to work I noticed a sharp drop in the number of hoodlums hanging out there. Classical music is an effective way to make certain public spaces tolerable again.

  69. @narrenspeise
    Classical music has been employed with success for many years around Hamburg's main train station to deter junkies. Based on anecdotal evidence, the lowlifes do not seem to mind that much, though.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Chrisnonymous

    Pre-migrant invasion, I would expect that what qualifies as a low-life German was considerably different than what qualifies as a low-life in browner nations.

  70. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Full disclosure page here, all the contributors, individual and corporate:

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/about/supporters/

    Wow, lots of people! The only name I recognized was David Rensin, a great writer for the old California Magazine and the biographer of SoCal Nazi surfer Miki Dora. He's also the father of hereditarily gifted writer Emmett Rensin, unpersoned from his perch at Vox when he outed himself as ... it's not really clear, but he seemed to go off the reservation a bit, with this piece, after which Ezra Klein came up with a lame excuse to fire him:

    The smug style in American liberalism
    https://www.vox.com/2016/4/21/11451378/smug-american-liberalism


    There is a smug style in American liberalism. It has been growing these past decades. It is a way of conducting politics, predicated on the belief that American life is not divided by moral difference or policy divergence — not really — but by the failure of half the country to know what's good for them.
     

    The trouble is that stupid hicks don't know what's good for them. They're getting conned by right-wingers and tent revivalists until they believe all the lies that've made them so wrong. They don't know any better. That's why they're voting against their own self-interest.
     

    Today, a liberal who finds himself troubled by the currents of contemporary political life need look no further than his Facebook newsfeed to find the explanation:

    Study finds Daily Show viewers more informed than viewers of Fox News.

    They're beating CNN watchers too.

    NPR listeners are best informed of all. He likes that.

    You're better off watching nothing than watching Fox. He likes that even more.

    The good news doesn't stop.

    Liberals aren't just better informed. They're smarter.

    They've got better grammar. They know more words.

    Smart kids grow up to be liberals, while conservatives reason like drunks.

    Liberals are better able to process new information; they're less biased like that. They've got different brains. Better ones. Why? Evolution. They've got better brains, top-notch amygdalae, science finds.
     


    In November of last year, during the week when it became temporarily fashionable for American governors to declare that Syrian refugees would not be welcome in their state, Hamilton Nolan wrote an essay for Gawker called "Dumb Hicks Are America's Greatest Threat."

    If there has ever been a tirade so dedicated to the smug style, to the proposition that it is neither malice, nor capital, nor ideological difference, but rather the backward stupidity of poor people that has ruined the state of American policy, then it is hidden beyond our view, in some uncool place, far from the front page of Gawker.

    "Many of America's political leaders are warning of the dangers posed by Syrian refugees. They are underestimating, though, the much greater danger: dumbass hicks, in charge of things," Nolan wrote. "...You, our elected officials, are embarrassing us. All of us, except your fellow dumb hicks, who voted for you in large numbers. You — our racist, xenophobic, knuckle-dragging ignorant leaders — are making us look bad in front of the guests (the whole world). You are the bad cousin in the family who always ruins Thanksgiving. Go in the back room and drink a can of beer alone please."
     

    Ezra Klein's You're Fired letter:

    Statement on Emmett Rensin

    By Ezra Klein

    On Thursday night, Emmett Rensin, the deputy editor of Vox’s first person section, sent a series of tweets that, among other things, urged people to riot if Donald Trump comes to their town.

    We at Vox do not take institutional positions on most questions, and we encourage our writers to debate and disagree. But direct encouragement of riots crosses a line between expressing a contrary opinion and directly encouraging dangerous, illegal activity. We welcome a variety of viewpoints, but we do not condone writing that could put others in danger.

    In this case, Emmett’s tweets violated Vox’s standards and Emmett has been suspended as a consequence.
     

    The tweets in question were in response to people attacking him for his Vox piece, and were of the general form, "If you seriously believe that Donald Trump is Hitler, literally, if that is what you believe, then you should be taking any and all action, up to an including violence, to make sure he doesn't take power, and if you don't, well then you don't really believe he is Hitler. (And you don't. And neither do I.)"

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @ic1000

    Hmm, so Emmett was right twice: liberals are smug, and no one really believes Trump is Hitler.

    So of course he must be deplatformed.

    Liberalism’s Prime Directive is anti-truth.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Almost Missouri

    "and no one really believes Trump is Hitler."

    Low information voters really do believe Donald Trump is Literally Adolf Hitler, even though they can not cite a single example of a Hitlerian thing that Donald Trump has done.

    Every Republican president since Richard Milhous Nixon has been compared to Adolf Hitler at some point in their political careers.

  71. @Alden
    @wren

    A Hispanic man is offended that he found the word beaner on his cup. Starbucks already groveled.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @peterike, @BenKenobi

  72. @Steve Sailer
    @J.Ross

    Mathematicians famously love Bach. It would be interesting to see where on the Asperger's scale is the optimum for loving Bach.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    Mathematicians famously love Bach.

    No, they don’t. Modern pseudo-mathematicians like to pretend that mathematicians have always loved Bach because the fact that the structure of a Bach concerto is morphologically related to the seminal analytical techniques of Western mathematics allows these charlatans to engage in multiple acts of cultural appropriation at once. First, in the name of mathematics, they appropriate to themselves the title of “genius,” which in their mind elevates them to the ranks of the peerage. Then, by employing mathematics in a musicological vein vis-a-vis Bach, they attempt to lay claim to the realm of aesthetics as well. By this route they endeavor to show that “beauty” (by which they understand only physical, sensuous excellence) is as it were “nothing but analysis” (i.e. the very subject they just happen to be masters of); and this they do not so much to enhance their own sexual market value (as if by proclaiming thus they could convince the women of the world that in loving sensuous excellence they were really only loving them, the mathematicians) but more so merely to defend the jejune notion that analysis is “a thing,” indeed the very thing itself, the secret substrate of all religious and aesthetical experience.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Like I said: "Mathematicians famously love Bach."

  73. @Graham
    Sometimes I'm driving and listening to BBC Radio 4, and I hear something particularly objectionable to do with gender, diversity, inclusivity, or how awful white people are, in particular middle-aged English white people like me, and it all gets too much, and I change the station to Radio 3, the classical music channel. All at once I am in a different and much better world of beauty, intricate order and structure combined with ever-changing discovery, and (it seems to me) cheerful tolerance, good humour and magnanimity.

    Replies: @Simon Tugmutton, @YetAnotherAnon, @CJ

    I gave up Radio Four recently after being a listener from age 19. I now wonder just how many lies I swallowed over the years.

    Classic Radio Four prog features middle-aged, privately educated women either discussing the problems of some dysfunctional person/people or praising the work of some minority actor or writer.

  74. “Anyway, it’s interesting why the better the music the more that lowlifes hate it. My guess is that it’s more than just class markers. I suspect that poor honest workmen don’t mind classical music playing in the background as much as punks loitering with criminal intent can’t stand it.”

    I think you are correct. My grandmother never attended a day of college, and came from a farming family in hill country – that means anything but opulence. She loved what she called classical music, her favorites being Tchaikovsky, Brahms. and Chopin. She would alternate that with performers such as The Carter Family, Gene Autry, and Bing Crosby.

    I have 2 cousins who became potheads and part time coke snorters, each selling some dope over the years, each stealing from family members and friends to buy dope, each involved in low scale drug culture violence. And each one always hated our grandmother’s musical tastes, old time Country and Bing Crosby as well as Tchaikovsky and Chopin. And I do mean hate.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jake

    I am not aware of a stereotype of, say, maids or male servants being actively repulsed by classical music being played on a wealthy employer's stereo. It could be that it is torture to them and they just suck it up for the sake of their jobs. This is not to say that they like it, but I wouldn't be surprised if people of criminal dispositions are more likely to be actively repelled by, say, Handel's Water Music. Could you use it during the hiring process to see who flees the waiting room? That would make for a funny EEOC discrimination suit.

  75. @Anonymous
    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?

    They used a lot of contemporary pop songs and other genres like metal at Guantanamo. I wonder if they'd work at deterring loiterers as well:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/sesame-street-songs-heavy-metal-blasted-torture-guantanamo-detainees-report-article-1.1088762



    "Sesame Street" songwriter Christopher Cerf spearheaded the film after discovering songs he wrote to teach kids how to read and write were being used as weapons of war. The report has launched the controversial interrogation method back into the spotlight.

    According to the documentary, prisoners were strapped to chairs and played music — Metallica, AC/DC, Eminem, Barney and others — at loud volumes for hours or days on end.

     

    Replies: @Cortes, @Jon, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Crawfurdmuir

    I recall country music being used to deal with particularly obnoxious interlopers:

  76. Jon says:
    @Anonymous
    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?

    They used a lot of contemporary pop songs and other genres like metal at Guantanamo. I wonder if they'd work at deterring loiterers as well:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/sesame-street-songs-heavy-metal-blasted-torture-guantanamo-detainees-report-article-1.1088762



    "Sesame Street" songwriter Christopher Cerf spearheaded the film after discovering songs he wrote to teach kids how to read and write were being used as weapons of war. The report has launched the controversial interrogation method back into the spotlight.

    According to the documentary, prisoners were strapped to chairs and played music — Metallica, AC/DC, Eminem, Barney and others — at loud volumes for hours or days on end.

     

    Replies: @Cortes, @Jon, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Crawfurdmuir

    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?

    There used to be a fast food place in Seattle, near Pikes Market, that would play really old country and western and bluegrass. I’m talking Hank Sr., Bill Monroe and a bunch of stuff that you would only recognize from old black and white westerns. Worked great from what I saw, but his choice of music made it a little more obvious what he was up to.

  77. @Almost Missouri
    When Burger King and Seven Eleven are the "privileged areas" protected from "common crowds" by Bach and Mozart, maybe it is time to concede that this whole civilization thing has run its course?

    Replies: @Jake, @International Jew

    The meaning is that we all need to surround ourselves with the best of Western Civilization, from Homer through . Civilization did not run its course; civilization was betrayed by those warring against it from within.

  78. There is something demonic about hating Beauty

  79. If it’s blacks you’re trying to keep away, and let’s face it, that’s who it is most of the time, heavy metal works quite well too.

  80. @Tiny Duck
    Classical @music" is soulless and replaces artistic expression and vitality sterility and technical noodling

    People of Color don't like it because it doesn't breathe life

    Replies: @ThreeCranes, @unit472, @Larry, San Francisco, @fish, @tyrone

    Tiny says, “People of Color don’t like it [classical music] because it doesn’t breathe life…”

    They don’t like it because they can’t fock to it.

  81. @Alden
    @wren

    A Hispanic man is offended that he found the word beaner on his cup. Starbucks already groveled.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @peterike, @BenKenobi

    A Hispanic man is offended that he found the word beaner on his cup. Starbucks already groveled.

    I found this one amusing. Seems the “offended” man can’t even speak English, since I only see quotes from his “friend.” And the friend said the “violated” guys name was Peter.

    My guess is the guy came in and when asked his name said “Peter” in a very heavy accent, like “beee-tah,” and the hapless Starbucks person in good faith thought he said “Beaner.” I’d even bet the barista didn’t know Beaner was a forbidden word.

    I haven’t tried to find too much on this story, but from what I saw nobody seem to bother asking the Starbucks employee about it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @peterike

    The barista was Latino too.

    Hate Hypochondria rather than a Hate Hoax.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

  82. @Thirdeye
    ......and when you need the really big guns, Chinese music!

    Replies: @Rohirrimborn, @jim jones

    And if you want to go nuclear try Japanese. Is Yoko considered japanese?

    • LOL: Bliss
    • Replies: @fish
    @Rohirrimborn

    Hey there’s a difference between “Area Denial” and “Crimes against Humanity “!

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Rohirrimborn

    She's half Japanese on her Dad's side, and half crazy Communist wench on her mother's side.

    , @Bliss
    @Rohirrimborn

    Since the japanese are usually accused of being imitators instead of innovators, which western avant-garde idiot was Yoko Ono imitating here?

    That she actually was applauded instead of laughed at shows what a silly circle jerk the art scene often is. On the other hand, the commenters at Youtube feel free to tell it like it is:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HdZ9weP5i68

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

  83. @Sid
    @Anon

    "(low-class progressives aren’t really that socially progressive, they’re just racists who vote democrat because they hate whitey)"

    That's true even for the ones who are white, such as the low lives who make up antifa. Low IQ, selfish, lazy, often addicted to drugs, etc.

    Replies: @Jake

    “Bach, more than anybody else, is the composer of civilization.”

    Steve,

    I assume you refer to poor P.D.Q. Bach.

  84. @Alden
    @wren

    A Hispanic man is offended that he found the word beaner on his cup. Starbucks already groveled.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @peterike, @BenKenobi

    For those of the Unzitariat unfamiliar with Starbucks: in my experience you only get a label like that when making an order off the app. Mr. Beaner chose that name. It was a set-up.

  85. Any chance we can set up speakers and play harpsichord music along the Mexican border?

  86. Because it is music written for the glory of God.

    Evil detests God’s Glory.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    @Alice

    Amen.

    I've been scrolling down hoping for somebody to write that, so that I wouldn't need to.

    Replies: @Kylie

    , @Svigor
    @Alice

    Pretty much.

    It's not a socioeconomic thing. It's a shitbird thing.

  87. We got off an underground train in Berlin to hear a busker playing Bach organ music on the accordion. It worked pretty well; we joined an appreciative small crowd. Similarly we stopped to listen to a string quartet playing Bach outside a big department store. (KDW?) Again there was an appreciative audience.

  88. @wren
    Now that Starbucks has chosen to rebrand itself as America's public toilet, overtly, they will covertly turn to tactics such as this to remain a safe space for their paying customers.

    Replies: @Alden, @bomag, @Barnard, @Forbes

    they will covertly turn to tactics such as this…

    The Other Side will then start dictating music and decor.

    The Slope beckons; the degree of slippery-ness determines how nice of things we can have.

  89. I recall reading that dairy cows enjoy classical music. Be interesting if some dairy farmer cum psychologist would do a study of cow milk production after being exposed to Vivaldi, AC/DC and James Brown!

    • Replies: @Alden
    @unit472

    It’s true light classical type like waltzes. My brothers a dairy farmer. Farmers have experimented. Cows seem to get depressed by sad country western of the dog died wife left me truck broke down type

    , @Thirdeye
    @unit472

    You said cum! heh-heh-heh-heh-heh

  90. Anon[167] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    I’m watching a television show that is saying that Sweden has become a largely cash-free society, for “safety” reasons. Single women are common in society, and they are frequently robbed. People pay with various e-cash and card systems. Stores and even churches do not accept cash.

    This may be exaggerated BS, since the show is a little dodgey. And the host is shown riding the train and paying with an implanted microchip, which I doubt that many Swdes have.

    But if any of this is true, it may be Swedes saying, We don’t want to be robbed by immigrants. Raped, OK, but not robbed.

  91. Theodore Dalrymple wrote a good piece on this phenomenon in 2009. He even used the Dracula/holy-water analogy that someone in this comment thread appropriated.

    https://www.city-journal.org/html/when-hooligans-bach-down-10523.html

    Oh, and:

    “Steve, why do you think that Bach more the composer of civilization than anybody else? I would have said Mozart.”

    No.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  92. @Anonymous
    ...and of course the converse is the worse the music is the more the thugs like it, and the more the aesthetes hate it.

    Replies: @Sue D.Nim, @Dissident

    Rule of thumb: “The louder the stereo, the worse the music.

  93. anonymous[115] • Disclaimer says:

    I have heard that Chik-fil-a has a preferential policy for hiring homeschooled kids.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @anonymous

    Wait for the "disparate impact" lawsuit. Because, presumably, Africans and Mexicans don't homeschool as often as white parents do.

    Replies: @Joe Schmoe

  94. @PhysicistDave
    @Anonymous

    Anonymous[400] write:


    I wonder if this is because of the heavy use of the harpsichord and organ in Baroque music. The harpsichord and organ are kind of unsettling and have an eerie quality to them.
     
    I know the harpsichord professor at our local state university (yes, the university has multiple harpsichords!). I mentioned once that, while the harpsichord was pretty cool, I would not want to listen to it all day long.

    I'm afraid she was offended.

    Replies: @unit472

    I’ve always thought of the harpsichord as a 12 string piano.

  95. And you want to get rid of a pretensious SWPL SJW hipster, one word:

    Nickelback.

    It’s like Kryptonite, the ebola virus, and Deep-Woods Off all rolled into one.

  96. “The harpsichord and organ are kind of unsettling and have an eerie quality to them. ”

    One of my favorite quotes, that has stuck with me for decades:

    “Harpsichords have the sound of two skeletons copulating on a tin roof.”

    I can’t hear a harpsichord, or read the word harpsichord, without thinking of that sentence.

    joe

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @joeyjoejoe

    So you had to share it with the rest of us.


    Hmmmph.

  97. @Tiny Duck
    Classical @music" is soulless and replaces artistic expression and vitality sterility and technical noodling

    People of Color don't like it because it doesn't breathe life

    Replies: @ThreeCranes, @unit472, @Larry, San Francisco, @fish, @tyrone

    It also requires one to be able to read musical notation ( unless you are an idiot savant).

  98. @slumber_j
    @J.Ross

    I have to say that I agree with the jazz musician on NPR...and there's one of the strangest sentences I've ever written. My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    It's pretty: I'll give it that.

    Replies: @Barnard, @Sunbeam, @Mark Eugenikos, @ThreeCranes

    According to Bach himself:

    “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”

    That is what it is for.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Barnard


    According to Bach himself:

    “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”
     
    Right. But presumably Handel wrote Messiah for the same reason, for example, and it doesn't leave me feeling trapped in an endless skein of pretty noodling. It gets somewhere.

    Replies: @John Gruskos, @Jim Don Bob

  99. anonymous[478] • Disclaimer says:

    This is almost too good to be true, classical music having some mystical, magical powers of banishing the riff-raff much like a crucifix wards off vampires. I’m looking in the closet for the old boombox. Comin’ at ya with some Bach, baby.

  100. @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Full disclosure page here, all the contributors, individual and corporate:

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/about/supporters/

    Wow, lots of people! The only name I recognized was David Rensin, a great writer for the old California Magazine and the biographer of SoCal Nazi surfer Miki Dora. He's also the father of hereditarily gifted writer Emmett Rensin, unpersoned from his perch at Vox when he outed himself as ... it's not really clear, but he seemed to go off the reservation a bit, with this piece, after which Ezra Klein came up with a lame excuse to fire him:

    The smug style in American liberalism
    https://www.vox.com/2016/4/21/11451378/smug-american-liberalism


    There is a smug style in American liberalism. It has been growing these past decades. It is a way of conducting politics, predicated on the belief that American life is not divided by moral difference or policy divergence — not really — but by the failure of half the country to know what's good for them.
     

    The trouble is that stupid hicks don't know what's good for them. They're getting conned by right-wingers and tent revivalists until they believe all the lies that've made them so wrong. They don't know any better. That's why they're voting against their own self-interest.
     

    Today, a liberal who finds himself troubled by the currents of contemporary political life need look no further than his Facebook newsfeed to find the explanation:

    Study finds Daily Show viewers more informed than viewers of Fox News.

    They're beating CNN watchers too.

    NPR listeners are best informed of all. He likes that.

    You're better off watching nothing than watching Fox. He likes that even more.

    The good news doesn't stop.

    Liberals aren't just better informed. They're smarter.

    They've got better grammar. They know more words.

    Smart kids grow up to be liberals, while conservatives reason like drunks.

    Liberals are better able to process new information; they're less biased like that. They've got different brains. Better ones. Why? Evolution. They've got better brains, top-notch amygdalae, science finds.
     


    In November of last year, during the week when it became temporarily fashionable for American governors to declare that Syrian refugees would not be welcome in their state, Hamilton Nolan wrote an essay for Gawker called "Dumb Hicks Are America's Greatest Threat."

    If there has ever been a tirade so dedicated to the smug style, to the proposition that it is neither malice, nor capital, nor ideological difference, but rather the backward stupidity of poor people that has ruined the state of American policy, then it is hidden beyond our view, in some uncool place, far from the front page of Gawker.

    "Many of America's political leaders are warning of the dangers posed by Syrian refugees. They are underestimating, though, the much greater danger: dumbass hicks, in charge of things," Nolan wrote. "...You, our elected officials, are embarrassing us. All of us, except your fellow dumb hicks, who voted for you in large numbers. You — our racist, xenophobic, knuckle-dragging ignorant leaders — are making us look bad in front of the guests (the whole world). You are the bad cousin in the family who always ruins Thanksgiving. Go in the back room and drink a can of beer alone please."
     

    Ezra Klein's You're Fired letter:

    Statement on Emmett Rensin

    By Ezra Klein

    On Thursday night, Emmett Rensin, the deputy editor of Vox’s first person section, sent a series of tweets that, among other things, urged people to riot if Donald Trump comes to their town.

    We at Vox do not take institutional positions on most questions, and we encourage our writers to debate and disagree. But direct encouragement of riots crosses a line between expressing a contrary opinion and directly encouraging dangerous, illegal activity. We welcome a variety of viewpoints, but we do not condone writing that could put others in danger.

    In this case, Emmett’s tweets violated Vox’s standards and Emmett has been suspended as a consequence.
     

    The tweets in question were in response to people attacking him for his Vox piece, and were of the general form, "If you seriously believe that Donald Trump is Hitler, literally, if that is what you believe, then you should be taking any and all action, up to an including violence, to make sure he doesn't take power, and if you don't, well then you don't really believe he is Hitler. (And you don't. And neither do I.)"

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @ic1000

    Re: The smug style in American liberalism:

    Sailer quotes Theodore Gioia,

    “In a strange mutation, classical music devolves from a ‘universal language of mankind’ reminding all people of their common humanity into a sonic border fence protecting privileged areas from common crowds, telling the plebes in auditory code that ‘you’re not welcome here.’”

    Plebian: Of, belonging to, or characteristic of commoners.

    Privilege: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

    Mr. Gioia, an eques — or perhaps he sees a Senator when he mirror-gazes — sustains the stereotype of the upper classes jealously guarding their privileges. If the mass of plebians becomes accustomed to coffee shops where petty criminals and the (literally) unwashed are “not welcome,” imagine the demands that will follow.

    The right to beachcomb up to the Spring high-tide line in East Hampton and Malibu?
    The right to have their vote for the least-bad candidate honored?
    Stop-and-frisk of dangerous-looking young men in downscale neighborhoods of flyover cities?

    The Dallas-based critic’s Wikipedia page relates an amusing anecdote from his past. “When Gioia worked amidst Silicon Valley’s venture capital community on Sand Hill Road, he was known as the ‘guy with the piano in his office.’”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @ic1000

    A different but related Gioia.

  101. Another odd thing about A Clockwork Orange: Alex is from an intact two-parent family. And no Pakistanis!

    Blade Runner lied to me about future LA being populated by Chinese doing genetic engineering in sidewalk bazaars.

    The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people.

    There are some minor conceptual problems in BR 2049 but I still found it deeply affecting, like the first.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people."

    Whoever The U.S president is in Blade Runner 2049 he or she must have brought back Operation Wetback because the Los Angeles portrayed in the Blade Runner films looks about as Mexican as Idaho.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

    , @Sunbeam
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "Blade Runner lied to me about future LA being populated by Chinese doing genetic engineering in sidewalk bazaars.

    The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people."

    Which version of LA circa 2049 would you put your money on being more likely?

    , @Alfa158
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    I haven’t seen BR 2049 yet, but I’ve come to enjoy the original and also find it affecting. I first saw it in theaters when it was released and was annoyed because of the utterly absurd plot, and the realization that it was sort of Goddard’s Alphaville, but with a budget for things like sets and special effects. The ending that was tacked onto the original release against Scott’s wishes was even ripped off from Alphaville.
    Over time I came to see from Scott’s other works, that he is basically incapable of creating any kind of rational story lines or credible characters, so I came to enjoy it for what it was, a TV adman’s exercise is stunning visuals and atmospherics, and I now even have the Blu-Ray director’s cut.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    In Blade Runner 2049 the Swiss actress playing an important character is great.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @MEH 0910

  102. Alex’s enthusiasm for Beethoven was a plot device to show that he wasn’t a run-of-the-mill thug, as were his non-enthusiast Droogies.

  103. @PhysicistDave
    @J.Ross

    J Ross wrote:


    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach.
     
    My kids took piano lessons for eight years from a retired professor of Baroque keyboard (different from the person I mentioned in my previous post).

    One day, one of my kids went in to lesson and announced that she wanted to learn "Rhapsody in Blue." The professor let out a long "Well..." and we waited for him to explain why she should focus on real music like Bach rather than Gershwin.

    Instead, he proceeded to tell us of all the different versions of the Rhapsody that he himself had performed: solo, duet, and with a full orchestra.

    He ended up trying to encourage our kids to get more exposure to jazz, in order to widen their horizons, to learn improvisation, etc. So, at least in my experience, the Baroque experts actually respect jazz.

    Replies: @Anon, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    He ended up trying to encourage our kids to get more exposure to jazz, in order to widen their horizons, to learn improvisation, etc. So, at least in my experience, the Baroque experts actually respect jazz

    Technical proficiency is a pre-requisite for effective improvisation. A good teacher could find a passage that provides some trouble and demonstrate some classical piece or training to help the student get over the hump. It is effective because it solves a problem the student recognizes as a problem.

    To the modern ear, much of the baroque and classical style improv sounds mechanical, but as Steve has alluded to, the instruments at the time were more limiting. Many of the idioms are now functionally obsolete because they have been superseded by the modern ability to vary volume, achieve greater ranges of pitch, and so forth.

  104. Thinking of it as a device to mark territory makes hip-hop more comprehensible to me than it has been before. It’s a slender reed, but I’ll cling to it.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Sammler

    "Thinking of it as a device to mark territory makes hip-hop more comprehensible to me than it has been before."

    Yes, it marks territory much like a male dog's urine.

  105. @Buzz Mohawk
    Somewhere years ago, somebody did a study that showed Baroque music to be the only kind conducive to study. Every other type, played in the background, caused students to do poorly.

    For driving away punks, in extreme cases, maybe someone could try an operatic approach and play Wagner, thus:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30QzJKCUekQ

    Replies: @Kylie, @El Dato, @Charles Pewitt, @anonymous

    Marlon Brando as Colonel Walter E. Kurtz:

    We train young men to drop fire on people, but their commanders won’t allow them to write “fuck” on their airplanes because it’s obscene!

    New Hampshire is under attack from White Wiggers of the worst sort who enjoy playing Black Rap Music at high volumes in their cars. Phuck in every line of the lyrics sung by a petulant Black boob bothered by this or that.

    I have noticed the Wiggers usually are not in trucks.

    I have seen and heard exactly why Trumpy won the GOP New Hampshire presidential primary. Trumpy won NH by going Implicit Whitey; Explicit Whitey is on the way.

    Racial issues are boiling away in New Hampshire, and the GOP politician whores are completely and totally controlled by anti-White donor scum such as the Koch boys and Paul Singer. The New Hampshire GOP as a whole is weak and feckless, and the native White voters are getting restless as they see cities such as Nashua, Manchester and Concord go Third World.

    • Replies: @Flip
    @Charles Pewitt

    The Free Staters haven't taken over NH yet?

    Replies: @Charles Pewitt

    , @The True and Original David
    @Charles Pewitt

    Sure they're not Fellow Whites? (Neither blacks nor wiggers invented hip-hop....)

  106. @wren
    Now that Starbucks has chosen to rebrand itself as America's public toilet, overtly, they will covertly turn to tactics such as this to remain a safe space for their paying customers.

    Replies: @Alden, @bomag, @Barnard, @Forbes

    I think their employees would be able to handle it. Hours of listening to hipster alt-rock is the only thing keeping them from snapping now.

  107. @Thirdeye
    ......and when you need the really big guns, Chinese music!

    Replies: @Rohirrimborn, @jim jones

    That`s another thing the Chinese failed to invent, decent music.

  108. @wren
    @Buzz Mohawk

    For the past 10 years or so, a family tradition has been to watch the Vienna New Year's concert.

    Now that the ballerinas in my family outnumber the violinists, we usually skip right to the dancing scenes, which are often very beautiful.

    Here is the 2018 concert. Skip to about the two hour mark for some nice dancing, but the whole thing is lovely, as it is almost every year.

    https://youtu.be/klzvht1doRI

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @AnotherDad, @Lisa

    Western Civ is pretty darn impressive.

    Too bad western “elites” decided to throw it away to virtue signal by importing muzzies and Africans.

  109. @Tiny Duck
    Classical @music" is soulless and replaces artistic expression and vitality sterility and technical noodling

    People of Color don't like it because it doesn't breathe life

    Replies: @ThreeCranes, @unit472, @Larry, San Francisco, @fish, @tyrone

    Well there is this great version of cultural appropriation

    I guess we should ban this.

    • Replies: @Thirdeye
    @Larry, San Francisco

    Here's the killer version:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqlX88H4_Cg

  110. @Anon
    OT: we've got some 4D chess checkmates going on before our very eyes. #winning


    EU Will Block US Sanctions Against Iran Starting Friday

    https://news.antiwar.com/2018/05/17/eu-will-block-us-sanctions-against-iran-starting-friday/


    The ‘Bolton Effect’: From Breakthrough To Breakdown With North Korea

    https://www.antiwar.com/blog/2018/05/16/the-bolton-effect-from-breakthrough-to-breakdown-with-north-korea/


    Crazy Iraqi Terrorist Cleric Who Blew Up US Soldiers in Iraq Wins Elections

    http://dailycaller.com/2018/05/15/al-sadr-wins-iraq-election-us-troops/


    Violence Engulfs Gaza as US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem
    https://www.voanews.com/a/israel-reacts-to-us-emabssy-move/4392733.html


    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Chrisnonymous, @Tex

    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.

    Only the first two–Iran and North Korea–are really relevant to Trump.

    Iraq is just playing out what was launched by “W”. And more generally, another confirmation of “diversity creates conflict”. The US invasion moved it from having a tribal clique from the Sunni minority running the joint, to having–somewhat more fairly–an election that brings in a big man from the Shia majority. That’s essentially the default scenario.

    Gaza, is just … Gaza. No one is stopping Gazans from having a decent place to live but Gazans themselves. They simply didn’t have the social “wherewithall” to keep their Hamas faction–the guys with guns and will–from running the joint. Since Hamas is less interested in their peoples’ welfare than in islamic warfare, both Israel and Egypt have closed their borders. (Though Egypt has it open now for Ramadan doing their careful screening for all the Hamas bad actors on their watch list.)

    The tragedy here is that there’s probably a majority of Gazans who just want to go about their lives. And if “in charge”, Gaza could be whatever the Gazan IQ allows it to be. But as we all know civilization is not about what people want, it is about what the men of a community create–and the ability to create decent place is a product of their IQ, ability to cooperate, culture of trust all playing out in history.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @AnotherDad

    Armed insurgent groups tend to transform into gangsters sooner or later. The insurgent ideology provides some support from gullible radical-chic types and provides a justification for their actions. My guess is that Fatah has already undergone this transition, and Hamas is in the middle of it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @RudyM
    @AnotherDad


    No one is stopping Gazans from having a decent place to live but Gazans themselves.
     
    There are numerous ways that Israel has made it nearly impossible for Palestinians in Gaza (they are Palestinians, not just "Gazans") to have a decent place to live. Preventing crucial supplies from getting through (after key infrastructure has been destroyed) and preventing Palestinians from fishing a reasonable distance from their own coast are just two examples.

    A lot of the Palestinians in Gaza had a decent place to live before they were forcibly removed from it by Jews.

    To the extent the nationalist right glosses over oppression and pretends that victims' suffering is only due to their own inadequacy, it is genuinely odious.

    If "the west" destroys an existing society and the indigenous population has difficulty recovering, it's just more proof that the natives were backwards, of course.

    Replies: @anon

  111. Anonymous [AKA "Medium Sized Hands"] says:

    Linda Gottfredson: it’s all a matter of IQ.

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2011/02/classical-music-and-iq.html?m=1

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    @Anonymous

    And here's a test:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgEdln2KSlA

  112. We Were Lied to by “A Clockwork Orange”

    If you can’t trust writers of fiction, who can you trust?

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Dr. DoomNGloom

    Not writers of fiction posing as newspaper "reporters."

  113. @Kylie
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I don't think Wagner would be effective in driving away punks. Too visceral.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Chrisnonymous, @unpc downunder

    I don’t know. I think Siegfried’s funeral march from Gotterdammerung would drive me crazy if it were just playing in the background. It demands your attention too much.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Chrisnonymous

    "I don’t know. I think Siegfried’s funeral march from Gotterdammerung would drive me crazy if it were just playing in the background. It demands your attention too much."

    I'm always willing to give in to the demands of Siegfried's Funeral March. Indeed, I'm unable to refuse them. The ecstasy of total surrender.

  114. I worked in a big country western club in Dallas that was located near the Oak Cliffs ghetto. Monday was Blues Night but the rest of the week was hardcore Texas country.

    One night two blacks wandered in by mistake and after they did a quick exit the (black) bar manager told me “the fiddles hurt they ears.”

    So maybe violins are key here.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @Carol

    Yet banjos and fiddles were central to Southern 19th-century music, both black and white.
    Maybe the association with "slave music" is the real objection.

    , @RadicalCenter
    @Carol

    More violins, less violence?

  115. @Anon
    OT: we've got some 4D chess checkmates going on before our very eyes. #winning


    EU Will Block US Sanctions Against Iran Starting Friday

    https://news.antiwar.com/2018/05/17/eu-will-block-us-sanctions-against-iran-starting-friday/


    The ‘Bolton Effect’: From Breakthrough To Breakdown With North Korea

    https://www.antiwar.com/blog/2018/05/16/the-bolton-effect-from-breakthrough-to-breakdown-with-north-korea/


    Crazy Iraqi Terrorist Cleric Who Blew Up US Soldiers in Iraq Wins Elections

    http://dailycaller.com/2018/05/15/al-sadr-wins-iraq-election-us-troops/


    Violence Engulfs Gaza as US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem
    https://www.voanews.com/a/israel-reacts-to-us-emabssy-move/4392733.html


    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Chrisnonymous, @Tex

    278 is new code for turd in the punchbowl.

  116. @narrenspeise
    Classical music has been employed with success for many years around Hamburg's main train station to deter junkies. Based on anecdotal evidence, the lowlifes do not seem to mind that much, though.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster, @Chrisnonymous

    Well, they are German lowlifes after all…

  117. Western Civilization is a vague term.

    European Christendom is a more definite description of the civilization being destroyed by the evil globalizers.

    Israel is proudly and defiantly anti-Christian and anti-European.

    Russia has re-asserted its European Christian heritage after the Jew Bolsheviks went out of their way to attack European Christendom in Russia.

    https://twitter.com/AbyadHind/status/972737007863713792

  118. @Anon
    A Japanese researcher has published two papers that conclude that Java sparrows, a popular pet in Japan, prefers Bach and Vivaldi to Schoenberg and Carter. Perches were set up with mini-speakers and the birds tended to congregate on the baroque perches, in preference to the modern perches or the silent perches.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/daily-dish/archive/2007/10/sparrows-prefer-classical-music/224597/

    http://www.therestisnoise.com/2007/10/sparrow-playlis.html

    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/317/5846/1864.2.long

    By the way, what is the deal with the L.A. Review of books? It seems to be thriving, most of the content has nothing to do with books, and it's extremely left-wing. Who is underwriting it? It's a 502(c)(3). How can those be investigated?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Cloud of Probable Matricide, @Chrisnonymous

    the birds tended to congregate on the baroque perches, in preference to the modern perches

    Okay, but if you were a bird, wouldn’t you rather sit on a perch designed by Charles Le Brun than by Walter Gropius?

  119. @EH
    "Now we see the violins inherent in the system!"
    -Anarcho-syndicalist peasant

    Replies: @Bill B.

    Ha ha. But context matters. A lot of ordinary folk think of classical music as dead people gavotting around in absurd costumes. It is of course much more.

    Pavane, Op.50 – Gabriel Fauré sounds quite sinister as “Giulio Andreotti” walks down a Roman street, pre-dawn in Il Divo. (A terrific film.)

    At about 1′ 20″

    • Replies: @Bill B.
    @Bill B.

    I don't think "sinister" is the word.

  120. @Steve Sailer
    @Anon

    The NYT covers Mexico somewhat, but I suspect they lose money on it. NYT subscribers would likely rather read more about Israel than more about Mexico.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    If The New York Times were to cover the out of control violence in Mexico it would correctly confirm Donald Trump’s belief that Mexico is a shithole country.

  121. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Another odd thing about A Clockwork Orange: Alex is from an intact two-parent family. And no Pakistanis!

    Blade Runner lied to me about future LA being populated by Chinese doing genetic engineering in sidewalk bazaars.

    The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people.

    There are some minor conceptual problems in BR 2049 but I still found it deeply affecting, like the first.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Sunbeam, @Alfa158, @Steve Sailer

    “The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people.”

    Whoever The U.S president is in Blade Runner 2049 he or she must have brought back Operation Wetback because the Los Angeles portrayed in the Blade Runner films looks about as Mexican as Idaho.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @Jefferson

    Whoever The U.S president is in Blade Runner 2049 he or she must have brought back Operation Wetback because the Los Angeles portrayed in the Blade Runner films looks about as Mexican as Idaho.

    Hollywood is run by leftists, and leftists don't want the public to notice the invasion.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

  122. If you record a bird-singing with a high fidelity recording and play it back the bird thinks his territory is being invaded and he swoops down to drive off the invader. Put up a mist net – something hard for the bird to see – and it is very easy to capture him. This is what people who study birds do all the time. I did it once in college.

  123. @the one they call Desanex

    .. Thus music returns to its oldest evolutionary function: claiming territory
     
    Mexicans working in the USA like to play their Mexican music wherever they work—nice and loud, and the more the gringos get annoyed, the better they like it.

    Some Mexican music is pretty good, though. When I was working with Mexicans, I became a Lupillo Rivera fan.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfSP1YniK2U

    Replies: @Alfa158, @YourBunnyWrote

    I’m not sure where you live, but the workers in the part of California where I live, all seem to come from the part of Mexico that favors horrible, horrible, tinny, polka music. I once heard the name for that particular style and the part of Mexico it comes from, but can’t remember what it was. I’ve never heard anything that sounds like “La Golondrina” coming from their combination boom box/tool battery rechargers.

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @Alfa158

    No doubt most Mexican music is junk. From about 2000 to about 2009, we had a local radio station in Birmingham, Alabama that played a nice variety of Spanish-language music. Some of my favorite songs:
    *Aserejé, sung by a group of three sisters from Spain calling themselves Las Ketchup.
    *No Me Conoces Aún by the Mexican group Palomo.
    *Rata de Dos Patas (Two-Legged Rat) by the Mexican singer Paquita la del Barrio.
    *La Negra Tiene Tumbao by the great Cuban-American singer Celia Cruz.

    I don’t want to clutter up this thread with a bunch of videos, but the video of La Negra ... is pretty wild:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imeXSRNRMeg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @wren

  124. CJ says:
    @Graham
    Sometimes I'm driving and listening to BBC Radio 4, and I hear something particularly objectionable to do with gender, diversity, inclusivity, or how awful white people are, in particular middle-aged English white people like me, and it all gets too much, and I change the station to Radio 3, the classical music channel. All at once I am in a different and much better world of beauty, intricate order and structure combined with ever-changing discovery, and (it seems to me) cheerful tolerance, good humour and magnanimity.

    Replies: @Simon Tugmutton, @YetAnotherAnon, @CJ

    I sometimes listen to classical music on CBC FM, which between 10 am and 2 pm has well-selected classical music with fairly minimal commentary that avoids politics. Unfortunately, every 60 minutes the music stops for a “news” broadcast that is the Two Minute Hate of Orwell’s 1984 come to life, with Donald Trump in the role of Emmanuel Goldstein. I’m not exaggerating — sometimes every one of the four or five news items denounces Trump.

    A typical broadcast will go something like, “This is CBC News. Today Donald Trump threatens North American trade agreements. Next, Donald Trump attacks defenceless refugees, causing them to flee to Canada. Moving on, here’s an oppressed African-American talking about the emotional devastation Trump has wrought on her community. In environmental news, the survival clock of the planet is now at one minute to midnight because of Trump’s pandering to primitive coal interests. And lastly, Trump’s boorish behavior has offended sensitive people so badly they’re forming emotional support groups. And that’s the CBC News.” It’s nearly the same thing in French on Radio-Canada Ici Musique from 5 am to 7 am (although not on their really excellent classical program from 8 pm to 10 pm, which doesn’t have news).

  125. anon[358] • Disclaimer says:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2006/04/10/the-soundtrack-of-your-life

    How many times do we need to rediscover stuff?

    Starbucks is the penultimate SWPL.

    They will figure out how to monetize their politics, imho.

    They have tapes now that drive out the wrong people.

    Plus, when people bought music, they sold mix tape style cd’s under the label ‘Here Music’.

    Bach, hell. Watch the reaction to Joni Mitchel.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @anon

    I wonder if some of these new groups are putting out songs specifically with the hope that they can get played at places like Starbucks and Whole Foods. Outside of the people who decide what gets played in these stores, no one else actually has to like their music and they still make a killing.

    Replies: @CJ

    , @anon
    @anon

    More explicitly:


    Collis was doing an engineering job for Muzak. He told me, “I walked into a store and understood: this is just like a movie. The company has built a set, and they’ve hired actors and given them costumes and taught them their lines, and every day they open their doors and say, ‘Let’s put on a show.’ It was retail theatre. And I realized then that Muzak’s business wasn’t really about selling music. It was about selling emotion—about finding the soundtrack that would make this store or that restaurant feel like something, rather than being just an intellectual proposition.”
     
    Music has been an essential part of marketing for years. We will have to wait and see how the Starbucks thing plays out. I have a feeling that wheverver Starbucks has to restrict its bathroom use may be marginally profitable stores. The only blacks I have seen in in suburban Starbucks were the typical demographic. Starbucks has a well defined brand --

    To inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one $2-$4 cup and one neighborhood at a time. It makes even more sense if you truly understand its corporate values: 1) Creating a culture of warmth and belonging, where everyone is welcome; 2) Acting with courage, challenging the status quo and finding new ways to grow our company and each other; 3) Being present, connecting with transparency, dignity and respect; and 4) Delivering our very best in all we do, holding ourselves accountable for results.
     
    No one is taking about coffee shop deserts -- yet, anyway.

    But McDonalds...yea.


    When many lower-income Americans are feeling isolated by the deadening uniformity of things, by the emptiness of many jobs, by the media, they still yearn for physical social networks. They are not doing this by going to government-run community service centers. They are not always doing this by utilizing the endless array of well-intentioned not-for-profit outreach programs. They are doing this on their own, organically across the country, in McDonald’s.

     

    while

    Last year, a public-interest law group at Johns Hopkins outlined the rationale: "Given the significance of the obesity epidemic in the United States and the scientific evidence and legal basis supporting the zoning of fast food outlets, municipalities have an effective, yet untried, tool to address obesity in their communities."
     
    From the woke Guardian and uber woke Slate.

    Overall...a Starbucks doesn't belong in a gritty urban neighborhood. I would argue that McDonalds is getting blasted for providing a useful service. Not to mention the youtube videos of fights are disturbing. Its a large world and Starbucks would be well served by not diluting their brand with ghetto stores.

    Replies: @anon, @Steve Sailer, @RadicalCenter

  126. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Another odd thing about A Clockwork Orange: Alex is from an intact two-parent family. And no Pakistanis!

    Blade Runner lied to me about future LA being populated by Chinese doing genetic engineering in sidewalk bazaars.

    The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people.

    There are some minor conceptual problems in BR 2049 but I still found it deeply affecting, like the first.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Sunbeam, @Alfa158, @Steve Sailer

    “Blade Runner lied to me about future LA being populated by Chinese doing genetic engineering in sidewalk bazaars.

    The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people.”

    Which version of LA circa 2049 would you put your money on being more likely?

  127. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Another odd thing about A Clockwork Orange: Alex is from an intact two-parent family. And no Pakistanis!

    Blade Runner lied to me about future LA being populated by Chinese doing genetic engineering in sidewalk bazaars.

    The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people.

    There are some minor conceptual problems in BR 2049 but I still found it deeply affecting, like the first.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Sunbeam, @Alfa158, @Steve Sailer

    I haven’t seen BR 2049 yet, but I’ve come to enjoy the original and also find it affecting. I first saw it in theaters when it was released and was annoyed because of the utterly absurd plot, and the realization that it was sort of Goddard’s Alphaville, but with a budget for things like sets and special effects. The ending that was tacked onto the original release against Scott’s wishes was even ripped off from Alphaville.
    Over time I came to see from Scott’s other works, that he is basically incapable of creating any kind of rational story lines or credible characters, so I came to enjoy it for what it was, a TV adman’s exercise is stunning visuals and atmospherics, and I now even have the Blu-Ray director’s cut.

  128. @slumber_j
    @J.Ross

    I have to say that I agree with the jazz musician on NPR...and there's one of the strangest sentences I've ever written. My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    It's pretty: I'll give it that.

    Replies: @Barnard, @Sunbeam, @Mark Eugenikos, @ThreeCranes

    “I have to say that I agree with the jazz musician on NPR…and there’s one of the strangest sentences I’ve ever written. My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    It’s pretty: I’ll give it that.”

    This site has a very minor fetish for classical music (nothing compared to the IQ obsession though).

    I 100% agree with you and that jazz guy (though I also hate jazz).

    As they say in discussions about the Perl programming language, “There’s more than one way to do it.” I think they need to run an additional experiment where they play Hank Williams (the real one, not his son), or Jimmy Rogers singing “T for Texas.”

    Hank Williams Sr… “Angel of Death” (the best version with lyrics) – YouTube

    Jimmie Rodgers – Blue Yodel No 1 (T For Texas) – YouTube

    Anyway, more than one way to do it. I love Celtic music and derivatives. Classical leaves me cold. All kinds of things I’ve heard that I like, but not classical.

    And by right of being me, my personal tastes supercede that of anyone who likes that “Lovely, Lovely Ludwig Van.” Since I do not care for it, the sentiment that “Nature’s Noblemen” like classical music is the notion of a syphilitic moron.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @Sunbeam

    Well, I like a lot of that sort of thing too. But I also like a lot of Classical music, or whatever one wants to call it. It's Bach that leaves me cold.

    And mostly I don't love it when it gets too Romantic. Nevertheless there are exceptions. This for example is a recent favorite of mine:

    https://youtu.be/ihx5LCF1yJY

    Replies: @36 ulster

  129. fish says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Classical @music" is soulless and replaces artistic expression and vitality sterility and technical noodling

    People of Color don't like it because it doesn't breathe life

    Replies: @ThreeCranes, @unit472, @Larry, San Francisco, @fish, @tyrone

    Oh Tinys……

    Now’n we talked bout dis…..how teh klassikal music ain’t right fo us bekause it rekwires thot, praktis (I’m talkin praktis, praktis ) an mo praktis! An todays urban dweller has the tension span ob a German Shepard puppy! Now yo typcal “Peoples o Color” kan xpress artikstik vytalitys wit an ol turntable and a overturned 55 gallon drum dat’n lows him to beat out his gressions and still feel liken an artist.

    I be seein youse tonite fo another ride on my Wakanda Stik!

    You be sayin hi to the borthas!

    Lendsnerb “Merikas Leedin Musik Kritik” Pittz

  130. @J.Ross
    Akshuallllllly it does clarify in the novel and film that Alex is unique: none of his friends dig it, but they mostly know not to interrupt him (viz Dim in the milkbar scene).
    -----
    Anonymous advice on 4chan from a while back on how to repulse black customers at a store without attracting Eric Holder's attention: "play classical music. Seriously, they can't be in the same room."
    -----
    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach. The interviewed affects shock and asks why, and the jazz man's reasons are redolent of Wagner's complaints about Mendelssohn: it's like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood. "Ditta ditta da, up here, and then it goes ditta ditta da down there. Why do I need to go up here and then down there?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @PhysicistDave, @slumber_j, @Pat Boyle, @Rosamond Vincy, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Jim Don Bob

    My personal intellectual and physical ontogeny story may be relevant. When I was in Junior High I was small, stupid and liked the crudest rock and roll music. I was also sickly. I didn’t expect much of myself. Then seemingly overnight I transformed. I had been a soft little guy in grade school who struggled with the classwork. Then in just one year I grew to six three and was scoring in the 99th percentile on a series of aptitude tests. I went from being in danger of being held back a grade in high school to being the smartest guy in the college.

    At this same time I stopped listening to Fats Domino and Little Richard and explored Bach and Mozart.

    Thinking about the subject of this blog – why thugs hate Mozart – has helped me with my self understanding. I always have explained why I know nothing of pop music with the story of how I decided to takes personal responsibility for the music I listened to. That’s true in a way. I had made a conscious decision to learn the operas of Weber, and Verdi after I knew those of Mozart. This took effort. After Cosi fan Tutte. I found it hard to accept Rigoletto. But I persevered. I left Wagner and Strauss for later. I planned out my entire life in music when I was nineteen. But it seems likely that my turn towards serious music was just another manifestation of my other life changes. Whatever made me so much smarter as a late teen than I had been as a young teen also seems to have bent me towards Mozart.

    When I was a kid in the Army I planned my music listening for life. Plotting out my life’s goals in music was probably not something I did, so much as something that happened to me.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    @Pat Boyle

    How quickly did you notice this transformation, and what did you make of it?

  131. @Almost Missouri
    @Anon

    Hmm, so Emmett was right twice: liberals are smug, and no one really believes Trump is Hitler.

    So of course he must be deplatformed.

    Liberalism's Prime Directive is anti-truth.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “and no one really believes Trump is Hitler.”

    Low information voters really do believe Donald Trump is Literally Adolf Hitler, even though they can not cite a single example of a Hitlerian thing that Donald Trump has done.

    Every Republican president since Richard Milhous Nixon has been compared to Adolf Hitler at some point in their political careers.

  132. Vivaldi is my favorite. Odd that it’s so effective though, I would not have thought it. I wonder if anyone has ever tried neoclassical or folk death metal. That I could easily see working, although it would probably drive off too many of the normal customers too.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Lars Porsena

    "I wonder if anyone has tried neoclassical or folk death metal"

    Like Apocalyptica? Finnish heavy metal cellos? It's certainly both very white and very aggressive.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zf2aIVKp1OY

    Replies: @Lars Porsena

  133. Jean Sibelius, Claude Debussy, Ludwig van Beethoven, Ralph Vaughan Williams. Bringing beauty and wonder to our lives while acting as an aural weapon against the Africans. Classical music is a gift from Odin.

  134. @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    @Anon

    Did you mention birds?

    The majesty of Hatebeak ( A Death Metal Band Whose Lead Vocalist Was a Parrot)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVlrGJouvQ4

    Replies: @Anon, @tim s, @Johnny Rico

    There aren’t enough LOLs to do that justice.

  135. @Almost Missouri
    Steve, why do you think that Bach more the composer of civilization than anybody else? I would have said Mozart.

    Replies: @roo_ster, @Sparkon, @Steve Sailer

    Because music is all downhill after Bach.

  136. @Almost Missouri
    Steve, why do you think that Bach more the composer of civilization than anybody else? I would have said Mozart.

    Replies: @roo_ster, @Sparkon, @Steve Sailer

    And I would have said Haydn.

    Sheesh! 58 comments, and I’m the first to mention the Father of Classical Music, and probably the greatest composer ever. I think Bach is great, also Vivaldi, and geez, anything is better than talking about 9/11, but Mozart was a Freemason tirelessly promoted even from the moment of his death.

    How anyone can listen to Mozart and Haydn, and think that Mozart was the greater composer is entirely beyond me.

    ABSTRACT; Three standard measures of creativity, the Holtzman Inkblot Test, the Barron-Welsh Art Scale, and the Alternate Uses Test, were administered to 142 undergraduate male and female subjects. The subjects were divided into 16 groups according to sex, four types of musical stimuli (MUZAK, classical, modern, and no music), and two types of recruitment for the study (volunteer and coerced). Analysis of variance of the main effects of music, recruitment, and sex on the three measures of creativity indicated no significant differences. However, volunteer subjects did score higher on all three tests. Pearson product moment coefficients of correlation among the test measures showed little reliability.

    Personally, I find Classical — especially Haydn — easy-listening, elevator, muzak-type mood music the best for study and concentration, or no music at all.

  137. “All things are clean to the clean: but to them that are defiled, and to unbelievers, nothing is clean: but both their mind and their conscience are defiled.”

    “Beauty is truth, truth beauty,” – that is all
    Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.

    A soul possessed by evil is repulsed by things good, true, and beautiful. (Look at how often toxic political beliefs correlate with self-mutilation by hideous tattoos, piercings, and slovenly clothing). Thugs hate Bach for the same reason Cain hated his brother Abel.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    @Rapparee

    Purest distilled wisdom.

    Thank you.

    , @anonymous
    @Rapparee

    "Grecian Urn"--like Rembrandt's "Aristotle Contemplating The Bust of Homer" and Beethoven's Ninth Symphony--are works of art that are impossible to describe prosaically, meant only to be read, seen or heard.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  138. • Replies: @Lars Porsena
    @Highlander

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMHguvZPcqQ

    And here's proof Vivaldi was metal centuries before metal was a thing. All you have to do is plug in distortion and play it normal on guitar....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWx_GyTLGmQ

    Oh the tremolo. And the cello shreds... the neck is on fire!

    For a bonus, here's a cover of the Moonlight Sonata meets Hans Zimmer.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbgInLJ81eY

    And a great remix of Tchaikovsky's piano #1 in B minor:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwA25yJOQFY

    Replies: @Gringo

  139. Tex says:
    @Anon
    OT: we've got some 4D chess checkmates going on before our very eyes. #winning


    EU Will Block US Sanctions Against Iran Starting Friday

    https://news.antiwar.com/2018/05/17/eu-will-block-us-sanctions-against-iran-starting-friday/


    The ‘Bolton Effect’: From Breakthrough To Breakdown With North Korea

    https://www.antiwar.com/blog/2018/05/16/the-bolton-effect-from-breakthrough-to-breakdown-with-north-korea/


    Crazy Iraqi Terrorist Cleric Who Blew Up US Soldiers in Iraq Wins Elections

    http://dailycaller.com/2018/05/15/al-sadr-wins-iraq-election-us-troops/


    Violence Engulfs Gaza as US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem
    https://www.voanews.com/a/israel-reacts-to-us-emabssy-move/4392733.html


    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Chrisnonymous, @Tex

    Are we supposed to be shocked that the Norks are trying to improve their bargaining position?

    Despite the references to Trump as God Emperor, there is not a whole he or anyone else can do about the Shi’ite rump of Iraq becoming an Iranian client. That was set in motion when Bush toppled the Baathists.

    As far as the embassy goes, it does seem that Trump often gives Israel what it wants. I wonder if this tendency might be the only really anti-semitic feature of the Trump presidency.

  140. @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    @Anon

    Did you mention birds?

    The majesty of Hatebeak ( A Death Metal Band Whose Lead Vocalist Was a Parrot)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVlrGJouvQ4

    Replies: @Anon, @tim s, @Johnny Rico

    Haha. If it’s not Sabbath, it’s crap.

  141. @the one they call Desanex

    .. Thus music returns to its oldest evolutionary function: claiming territory
     
    Mexicans working in the USA like to play their Mexican music wherever they work—nice and loud, and the more the gringos get annoyed, the better they like it.

    Some Mexican music is pretty good, though. When I was working with Mexicans, I became a Lupillo Rivera fan.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfSP1YniK2U

    Replies: @Alfa158, @YourBunnyWrote

    That is pretty good, only one problem, it makes me hungry….

  142. @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.
     
    Only the first two--Iran and North Korea--are really relevant to Trump.

    Iraq is just playing out what was launched by "W". And more generally, another confirmation of "diversity creates conflict". The US invasion moved it from having a tribal clique from the Sunni minority running the joint, to having--somewhat more fairly--an election that brings in a big man from the Shia majority. That's essentially the default scenario.

    Gaza, is just ... Gaza. No one is stopping Gazans from having a decent place to live but Gazans themselves. They simply didn't have the social "wherewithall" to keep their Hamas faction--the guys with guns and will--from running the joint. Since Hamas is less interested in their peoples' welfare than in islamic warfare, both Israel and Egypt have closed their borders. (Though Egypt has it open now for Ramadan doing their careful screening for all the Hamas bad actors on their watch list.)

    The tragedy here is that there's probably a majority of Gazans who just want to go about their lives. And if "in charge", Gaza could be whatever the Gazan IQ allows it to be. But as we all know civilization is not about what people want, it is about what the men of a community create--and the ability to create decent place is a product of their IQ, ability to cooperate, culture of trust all playing out in history.

    Replies: @NOTA, @RudyM

    Armed insurgent groups tend to transform into gangsters sooner or later. The insurgent ideology provides some support from gullible radical-chic types and provides a justification for their actions. My guess is that Fatah has already undergone this transition, and Hamas is in the middle of it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @NOTA

    Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shi'ite organization, was part way to being something of a real state with an army that could fight the Israeli army and welfare programs for its people. I don't know about lately, but Hezbollah was one of the more impressive Arab political entities: a bunch of backwoods nobodies who got themselves organized.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Karl

  143. @slumber_j
    @J.Ross

    I have to say that I agree with the jazz musician on NPR...and there's one of the strangest sentences I've ever written. My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    It's pretty: I'll give it that.

    Replies: @Barnard, @Sunbeam, @Mark Eugenikos, @ThreeCranes

    My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    “The Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach wrote the initials “S. D. G.” at the end of all his church compositions and also applied it to some, but not all, his secular works.”

    S.D.G. – Soli Deo Gloria
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soli_Deo_gloria

  144. I suspect that the so-called “Celtic” music would have a similar effect on thuggish minds.

  145. @Sammler
    Thinking of it as a device to mark territory makes hip-hop more comprehensible to me than it has been before. It’s a slender reed, but I’ll cling to it.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “Thinking of it as a device to mark territory makes hip-hop more comprehensible to me than it has been before.”

    Yes, it marks territory much like a male dog’s urine.

  146. “Anyway, it’s interesting why the better the music the more that lowlifes hate it. My guess is that it’s more than just class markers. ”

    Race. And IQ. But especially Race. After all, which race commits the most violent and property crimes in the US? Classical music is perceived as white (and technically it is, since 99.99% of all Western composers from ca.1650-1900 were whites).

    All we’d have to do is switch out Bach and Mozart for Gangsta Rap and at high decibel levels. Then sit back and watch what happens. Goth Rock as well might do the trick but especially underground rap. Pulsating levels, and uncensored.

    Play it real loud, at night in convenience stores and throughout urban areas, and watch what happens.

    During Furguson, they weren’t blaring Mozart or blasting Bach through their speakers.

  147. @Charles Pewitt
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Marlon Brando as Colonel Walter E. Kurtz:


    We train young men to drop fire on people, but their commanders won't allow them to write "fuck" on their airplanes because it's obscene!

     

    New Hampshire is under attack from White Wiggers of the worst sort who enjoy playing Black Rap Music at high volumes in their cars. Phuck in every line of the lyrics sung by a petulant Black boob bothered by this or that.

    I have noticed the Wiggers usually are not in trucks.

    I have seen and heard exactly why Trumpy won the GOP New Hampshire presidential primary. Trumpy won NH by going Implicit Whitey; Explicit Whitey is on the way.

    Racial issues are boiling away in New Hampshire, and the GOP politician whores are completely and totally controlled by anti-White donor scum such as the Koch boys and Paul Singer. The New Hampshire GOP as a whole is weak and feckless, and the native White voters are getting restless as they see cities such as Nashua, Manchester and Concord go Third World.

    Replies: @Flip, @The True and Original David

    The Free Staters haven’t taken over NH yet?

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    @Flip


    The Free Staters haven’t taken over NH yet?

     

    The Free Staters moved to New Hampshire to avoid having to live around Blacks and other non-Whites. They won't admit that because they have no integrity nor honor.

    Free Staters agree strongly with Hillary Clinton that it's better to be a self-righteous arsehole hypocrite than have to live around Blacks or other non-Whites.
  148. • Replies: @The True and Original David
    @Tiny Duck

    You are--and you know it.

  149. @Chrisnonymous
    @Kylie

    I don't know. I think Siegfried's funeral march from Gotterdammerung would drive me crazy if it were just playing in the background. It demands your attention too much.

    Replies: @Kylie

    “I don’t know. I think Siegfried’s funeral march from Gotterdammerung would drive me crazy if it were just playing in the background. It demands your attention too much.”

    I’m always willing to give in to the demands of Siegfried’s Funeral March. Indeed, I’m unable to refuse them. The ecstasy of total surrender.

  150. Will playing Wagner loudly drive out the pestilence ?

  151. @Highlander
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPdk5GaIDjo

    Replies: @Lars Porsena

    And here’s proof Vivaldi was metal centuries before metal was a thing. All you have to do is plug in distortion and play it normal on guitar….

    Oh the tremolo. And the cello shreds… the neck is on fire!

    For a bonus, here’s a cover of the Moonlight Sonata meets Hans Zimmer.

    And a great remix of Tchaikovsky’s piano #1 in B minor:

    • Replies: @Gringo
    @Lars Porsena

    And here’s proof Vivaldi was metal centuries before metal was a thing. All you have to do is plug in distortion and play it normal on guitar….

    Also proof that those heavy metal people playing Vivaldi are rather skilled musicians.

  152. @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    Maybe we should just admit that Trump got really lucky in having such odious political opponents while otherwise being somewhat not up to the job.
     
    Only the first two--Iran and North Korea--are really relevant to Trump.

    Iraq is just playing out what was launched by "W". And more generally, another confirmation of "diversity creates conflict". The US invasion moved it from having a tribal clique from the Sunni minority running the joint, to having--somewhat more fairly--an election that brings in a big man from the Shia majority. That's essentially the default scenario.

    Gaza, is just ... Gaza. No one is stopping Gazans from having a decent place to live but Gazans themselves. They simply didn't have the social "wherewithall" to keep their Hamas faction--the guys with guns and will--from running the joint. Since Hamas is less interested in their peoples' welfare than in islamic warfare, both Israel and Egypt have closed their borders. (Though Egypt has it open now for Ramadan doing their careful screening for all the Hamas bad actors on their watch list.)

    The tragedy here is that there's probably a majority of Gazans who just want to go about their lives. And if "in charge", Gaza could be whatever the Gazan IQ allows it to be. But as we all know civilization is not about what people want, it is about what the men of a community create--and the ability to create decent place is a product of their IQ, ability to cooperate, culture of trust all playing out in history.

    Replies: @NOTA, @RudyM

    No one is stopping Gazans from having a decent place to live but Gazans themselves.

    There are numerous ways that Israel has made it nearly impossible for Palestinians in Gaza (they are Palestinians, not just “Gazans”) to have a decent place to live. Preventing crucial supplies from getting through (after key infrastructure has been destroyed) and preventing Palestinians from fishing a reasonable distance from their own coast are just two examples.

    A lot of the Palestinians in Gaza had a decent place to live before they were forcibly removed from it by Jews.

    To the extent the nationalist right glosses over oppression and pretends that victims’ suffering is only due to their own inadequacy, it is genuinely odious.

    If “the west” destroys an existing society and the indigenous population has difficulty recovering, it’s just more proof that the natives were backwards, of course.

    • Replies: @anon
    @RudyM

    Ridiculous. I'm no Semite, but I've been to Israel and have seen the Muslim neighborhoods behind the walls or barbed wire. It's not poverty that's holding them back, but rather attitude and religious values (and perhaps IQ). I used to believe that the poor, suffering, backward Gazans were persecuted by Israelis. No longer. After driving around the country (no bigger then New Jersey, by the way), I began to understand why they have barriers.

    One minor anecdote. In Jerusalem, auto theft was a real problem UNTIL they put barbed wire around the Muslim areas of Jerusalem with checkpoints that prohibited cars from getting through unnoticed. Suddenly, auto theft was non-existent, or nearly so. Insurance rates plummeted. Ditto with crime, bombers, etc. Barriers work, or the Jews wouldn't bother.

    Now, Jerusalem isn't Gaza, but you have to admit that the images -- burning tires, tunneling, throwing make-shift bombs, faking their own deaths, putting babies and kids in the line of fire -- don't exact warm Western heart to their "cause." I was in a restaurant picking up an order when I saw a brief clip of Gaza/Israel on their television: The soldiers were standing in little groups, near their vehicles or tanks; Gazans were running, screaming, milling around, throwing things, starting fires, etc. Other people were waiting and watching, too, but no one voiced sympathy for the Gazans. The universal sentiment was scorn.

  153. @Anonymous
    ...and of course the converse is the worse the music is the more the thugs like it, and the more the aesthetes hate it.

    Replies: @Sue D.Nim, @Dissident

    …and of course the converse is the worse the music is the more the thugs like it, and the more the aesthetes hate it.

    At a certain point, it starts to become increasingly questionable whether the cacophony-in-question can even be called ‘music’, no?

  154. ‘Mid-market homeless’ sounds like an important constituency in Kamala Harris’ future America represented by California.

  155. @Alice
    Because it is music written for the glory of God.

    Evil detests God's Glory.

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan, @Svigor

    Amen.

    I’ve been scrolling down hoping for somebody to write that, so that I wouldn’t need to.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Old Palo Altan

    I thought it would be taken as a given here. Apparently not.

    A.M.D.G.

  156. @anon
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2006/04/10/the-soundtrack-of-your-life

    How many times do we need to rediscover stuff?

    Starbucks is the penultimate SWPL.

    They will figure out how to monetize their politics, imho.

    They have tapes now that drive out the wrong people.

    Plus, when people bought music, they sold mix tape style cd's under the label 'Here Music'.

    Bach, hell. Watch the reaction to Joni Mitchel.

    https://open.spotify.com/user/starbucks/playlist/0LPsYH4hIRjLUKXuZd2vAt

    Replies: @Barnard, @anon

    I wonder if some of these new groups are putting out songs specifically with the hope that they can get played at places like Starbucks and Whole Foods. Outside of the people who decide what gets played in these stores, no one else actually has to like their music and they still make a killing.

    • Replies: @CJ
    @Barnard


    I wonder if some of these new groups are putting out songs specifically with the hope that they can get played at places like Starbucks and Whole Foods.
     
    Whole Foods actually plays a lot of black pop music, most of it from the 1970s and 80s. The last time I was there I heard Break Up to Make Up by The Stylistics, which I hadn't heard for about 40 years.
  157. @wren
    Now that Starbucks has chosen to rebrand itself as America's public toilet, overtly, they will covertly turn to tactics such as this to remain a safe space for their paying customers.

    Replies: @Alden, @bomag, @Barnard, @Forbes

    Gives Starbucks waaay too much credit for understanding what works, as opposed to what the PC/SJW prog-lefty rule book demands. The minute it was learned that the tactic is used for keeping low-lifes and the homeless at a distance, there’d be protests–as not sufficiently inclusive, or whatever the latest outrage.

  158. @Anon
    OT/

    From Leftist Current Affairs on a pretty old iSteve theme:


    FEBRUARY 14, 2018
    THE U.S. MEDIA’S FAILURE TO REPORT ON VIOLENCE IN MEXICO IS INEXCUSABLE


    by BRIANNA RENNIX & NATHAN J. ROBINSON


    ...A cartel taking over a city? The kidnapping of federal police officers? A state mayor’s drug-laden tractor trailer being seized? If these occurred a few miles further north, in California or Texas, they would be national news. If they happened in London, they would be news here. But they are happening in Mexico, and Mexico does not matter very much to the U.S. media. ...


     

    Funny how that works...

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alden, @Saxon, @Cloudbuster, @Forbes

    Didn’t give the media any suggestions–they’ll turn it into another reason for open borders.

  159. @Rapparee

    "All things are clean to the clean: but to them that are defiled, and to unbelievers, nothing is clean: but both their mind and their conscience are defiled."

    "Beauty is truth, truth beauty," – that is all
    Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.
     
    A soul possessed by evil is repulsed by things good, true, and beautiful. (Look at how often toxic political beliefs correlate with self-mutilation by hideous tattoos, piercings, and slovenly clothing). Thugs hate Bach for the same reason Cain hated his brother Abel.

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan, @anonymous

    Purest distilled wisdom.

    Thank you.

  160. I went on a Bach pilgrimage in 2007 in a rented Mercedes A-class. The highlight of course was Thomaskirche in Leipzig, where I viewed the burial site of the man himself, listened to the Thomanerchor and one of Bach’s violin concertos, and (this part wasn’t so great) took the Eucharist following a ridiculously vague sermon on loving people. My German isn’t great, but I distinctly remember the pastor praising Obama. The Bach House museum in Eisenach was also a lovely stop.

    There were a lot of East Asians at all the Bach sites, as well as at many of the Luther sites.

  161. @Jefferson
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people."

    Whoever The U.S president is in Blade Runner 2049 he or she must have brought back Operation Wetback because the Los Angeles portrayed in the Blade Runner films looks about as Mexican as Idaho.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

    Whoever The U.S president is in Blade Runner 2049 he or she must have brought back Operation Wetback because the Los Angeles portrayed in the Blade Runner films looks about as Mexican as Idaho.

    Hollywood is run by leftists, and leftists don’t want the public to notice the invasion.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Cloudbuster

    Exactly right. When friends and family visit us in Los Angeles from the East Coast and Midwest, they are literally in disbelief over the utter Mexicanization of this whole area -- not just LA City or even LA County.

  162. wren says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @El Dato

    Thanks for the interesting read. I note that the specific version came from Vienna, and that what sets it apart is an organic rhythm.

    I don't know much about music, but I was told by a very nice Austrian man that waltzes played by Viennese orchestras are the best for that same reason. (He overheard me happily remarking that Austrian Airlines was playing The Blue Danube as my wife and I boarded a plane there. That is a wonderful country with nice people to go with the music.)

    Replies: @jim jones, @wren, @wren, @MBlanc46

    I’m sorry, but I can’t resist sharing. Blue Danube music with dancing, costumes, architecture, sculpture and art.

    2012

    2008

    2011?

    Compilation

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_New_Year%27s_Concert

  163. Bach has always been my favorite composer

  164. @Alfa158
    @the one they call Desanex

    I’m not sure where you live, but the workers in the part of California where I live, all seem to come from the part of Mexico that favors horrible, horrible, tinny, polka music. I once heard the name for that particular style and the part of Mexico it comes from, but can’t remember what it was. I’ve never heard anything that sounds like “La Golondrina” coming from their combination boom box/tool battery rechargers.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    No doubt most Mexican music is junk. From about 2000 to about 2009, we had a local radio station in Birmingham, Alabama that played a nice variety of Spanish-language music. Some of my favorite songs:
    *Aserejé, sung by a group of three sisters from Spain calling themselves Las Ketchup.
    *No Me Conoces Aún by the Mexican group Palomo.
    *Rata de Dos Patas (Two-Legged Rat) by the Mexican singer Paquita la del Barrio.
    *La Negra Tiene Tumbao by the great Cuban-American singer Celia Cruz.

    I don’t want to clutter up this thread with a bunch of videos, but the video of La Negra … is pretty wild:

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @the one they call Desanex

    The recent Pixar movie "Coco" has a nice selection of Mexican pop hits from about 1940-1955, kind of in the Mexican equivalent of the Crosby-Sinatra mode, picked with the usual Pixar attention to quality. The movie has been a big hit around the world and the soundtrack apparently has proven agreeable to audiences in a lot of places that you wouldn't expect, like China.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @J.Ross

    , @wren
    @the one they call Desanex

    A few years ago I was searching YouTube for the old 2 tone second wave ska that I enjoyed when I was younger, and was surprised to see that it was so popular with Mexican kids. Even the Japanese ska band videos were filled with Spanish comments that I think were from Mexico and not Spain.

    Or maybe Mexican kids living in LA? The videos of kids dancing to ska seemed to fit that profile.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @Rosamond Vincy, @LondonBob

  165. @peterike
    @Alden


    A Hispanic man is offended that he found the word beaner on his cup. Starbucks already groveled.

     

    I found this one amusing. Seems the "offended" man can't even speak English, since I only see quotes from his "friend." And the friend said the "violated" guys name was Peter.

    My guess is the guy came in and when asked his name said "Peter" in a very heavy accent, like "beee-tah," and the hapless Starbucks person in good faith thought he said "Beaner." I'd even bet the barista didn't know Beaner was a forbidden word.

    I haven't tried to find too much on this story, but from what I saw nobody seem to bother asking the Starbucks employee about it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The barista was Latino too.

    Hate Hypochondria rather than a Hate Hoax.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve, don't you mean LatinA? Or better yet, LatinX? ;)

  166. @Old Palo Altan
    @Alice

    Amen.

    I've been scrolling down hoping for somebody to write that, so that I wouldn't need to.

    Replies: @Kylie

    I thought it would be taken as a given here. Apparently not.

    A.M.D.G.

  167. @the one they call Desanex
    @Alfa158

    No doubt most Mexican music is junk. From about 2000 to about 2009, we had a local radio station in Birmingham, Alabama that played a nice variety of Spanish-language music. Some of my favorite songs:
    *Aserejé, sung by a group of three sisters from Spain calling themselves Las Ketchup.
    *No Me Conoces Aún by the Mexican group Palomo.
    *Rata de Dos Patas (Two-Legged Rat) by the Mexican singer Paquita la del Barrio.
    *La Negra Tiene Tumbao by the great Cuban-American singer Celia Cruz.

    I don’t want to clutter up this thread with a bunch of videos, but the video of La Negra ... is pretty wild:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imeXSRNRMeg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @wren

    The recent Pixar movie “Coco” has a nice selection of Mexican pop hits from about 1940-1955, kind of in the Mexican equivalent of the Crosby-Sinatra mode, picked with the usual Pixar attention to quality. The movie has been a big hit around the world and the soundtrack apparently has proven agreeable to audiences in a lot of places that you wouldn’t expect, like China.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Steve Sailer

    ca.1947

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k78HwgLeq8g


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32rWfaPPz9Y

    , @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    My first reaction to kpop was "fifties larping." They're recreating an idealized image of American midcentury prosperity and style. The Chinese will do the same thing.

  168. @Flip
    @Charles Pewitt

    The Free Staters haven't taken over NH yet?

    Replies: @Charles Pewitt

    The Free Staters haven’t taken over NH yet?

    The Free Staters moved to New Hampshire to avoid having to live around Blacks and other non-Whites. They won’t admit that because they have no integrity nor honor.

    Free Staters agree strongly with Hillary Clinton that it’s better to be a self-righteous arsehole hypocrite than have to live around Blacks or other non-Whites.

  169. @J.Ross
    Akshuallllllly it does clarify in the novel and film that Alex is unique: none of his friends dig it, but they mostly know not to interrupt him (viz Dim in the milkbar scene).
    -----
    Anonymous advice on 4chan from a while back on how to repulse black customers at a store without attracting Eric Holder's attention: "play classical music. Seriously, they can't be in the same room."
    -----
    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach. The interviewed affects shock and asks why, and the jazz man's reasons are redolent of Wagner's complaints about Mendelssohn: it's like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood. "Ditta ditta da, up here, and then it goes ditta ditta da down there. Why do I need to go up here and then down there?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @PhysicistDave, @slumber_j, @Pat Boyle, @Rosamond Vincy, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Jim Don Bob

    “Whuffo I want to read no Tale
    of Two Cities? Whuffo?”

    Kurt Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions

  170. @Jake
    "Anyway, it’s interesting why the better the music the more that lowlifes hate it. My guess is that it’s more than just class markers. I suspect that poor honest workmen don’t mind classical music playing in the background as much as punks loitering with criminal intent can’t stand it."

    I think you are correct. My grandmother never attended a day of college, and came from a farming family in hill country - that means anything but opulence. She loved what she called classical music, her favorites being Tchaikovsky, Brahms. and Chopin. She would alternate that with performers such as The Carter Family, Gene Autry, and Bing Crosby.

    I have 2 cousins who became potheads and part time coke snorters, each selling some dope over the years, each stealing from family members and friends to buy dope, each involved in low scale drug culture violence. And each one always hated our grandmother's musical tastes, old time Country and Bing Crosby as well as Tchaikovsky and Chopin. And I do mean hate.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I am not aware of a stereotype of, say, maids or male servants being actively repulsed by classical music being played on a wealthy employer’s stereo. It could be that it is torture to them and they just suck it up for the sake of their jobs. This is not to say that they like it, but I wouldn’t be surprised if people of criminal dispositions are more likely to be actively repelled by, say, Handel’s Water Music. Could you use it during the hiring process to see who flees the waiting room? That would make for a funny EEOC discrimination suit.

  171. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Steve Sailer


    Mathematicians famously love Bach.
     
    No, they don't. Modern pseudo-mathematicians like to pretend that mathematicians have always loved Bach because the fact that the structure of a Bach concerto is morphologically related to the seminal analytical techniques of Western mathematics allows these charlatans to engage in multiple acts of cultural appropriation at once. First, in the name of mathematics, they appropriate to themselves the title of "genius," which in their mind elevates them to the ranks of the peerage. Then, by employing mathematics in a musicological vein vis-a-vis Bach, they attempt to lay claim to the realm of aesthetics as well. By this route they endeavor to show that "beauty" (by which they understand only physical, sensuous excellence) is as it were "nothing but analysis" (i.e. the very subject they just happen to be masters of); and this they do not so much to enhance their own sexual market value (as if by proclaiming thus they could convince the women of the world that in loving sensuous excellence they were really only loving them, the mathematicians) but more so merely to defend the jejune notion that analysis is "a thing," indeed the very thing itself, the secret substrate of all religious and aesthetical experience.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Like I said: “Mathematicians famously love Bach.”

  172. @Tiny Duck
    Classical @music" is soulless and replaces artistic expression and vitality sterility and technical noodling

    People of Color don't like it because it doesn't breathe life

    Replies: @ThreeCranes, @unit472, @Larry, San Francisco, @fish, @tyrone

    people in China and Japan like it just fine,maybe it takes a certain IQ population to appreciate the acme of musical creation that is classical music.

  173. @Anonymous
    Linda Gottfredson: it’s all a matter of IQ.

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2011/02/classical-music-and-iq.html?m=1

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan

    And here’s a test:

  174. anonymous[207] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Somewhere years ago, somebody did a study that showed Baroque music to be the only kind conducive to study. Every other type, played in the background, caused students to do poorly.

    For driving away punks, in extreme cases, maybe someone could try an operatic approach and play Wagner, thus:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30QzJKCUekQ

    Replies: @Kylie, @El Dato, @Charles Pewitt, @anonymous

    I like Wagner but…not a good choice. Too loud…and too martial. Better the “Siegfried Idyll” or, possibly, the prelude to “Lohengrin.”

  175. @Steve Sailer
    @the one they call Desanex

    The recent Pixar movie "Coco" has a nice selection of Mexican pop hits from about 1940-1955, kind of in the Mexican equivalent of the Crosby-Sinatra mode, picked with the usual Pixar attention to quality. The movie has been a big hit around the world and the soundtrack apparently has proven agreeable to audiences in a lot of places that you wouldn't expect, like China.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @J.Ross

    ca.1947

  176. @mikeInThe716
    On his pocast, Adam Carolla has mentioned, that when he supervised construction, mistakes plummeted when he switched from blaring rock music to classical at a site.

    When focused on coding, I find classical hit and miss. The DotNetRocks podcast actually sells a set of tracks geared toward coders - it's more incense and massage studio than classical.

    Replies: @bjondo

    Probably because Carolla was put to sleep therefore kept out of the way.

  177. anon[382] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2006/04/10/the-soundtrack-of-your-life

    How many times do we need to rediscover stuff?

    Starbucks is the penultimate SWPL.

    They will figure out how to monetize their politics, imho.

    They have tapes now that drive out the wrong people.

    Plus, when people bought music, they sold mix tape style cd's under the label 'Here Music'.

    Bach, hell. Watch the reaction to Joni Mitchel.

    https://open.spotify.com/user/starbucks/playlist/0LPsYH4hIRjLUKXuZd2vAt

    Replies: @Barnard, @anon

    More explicitly:

    Collis was doing an engineering job for Muzak. He told me, “I walked into a store and understood: this is just like a movie. The company has built a set, and they’ve hired actors and given them costumes and taught them their lines, and every day they open their doors and say, ‘Let’s put on a show.’ It was retail theatre. And I realized then that Muzak’s business wasn’t really about selling music. It was about selling emotion—about finding the soundtrack that would make this store or that restaurant feel like something, rather than being just an intellectual proposition.”

    Music has been an essential part of marketing for years. We will have to wait and see how the Starbucks thing plays out. I have a feeling that wheverver Starbucks has to restrict its bathroom use may be marginally profitable stores. The only blacks I have seen in in suburban Starbucks were the typical demographic. Starbucks has a well defined brand —

    To inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one $2-$4 cup and one neighborhood at a time. It makes even more sense if you truly understand its corporate values: 1) Creating a culture of warmth and belonging, where everyone is welcome; 2) Acting with courage, challenging the status quo and finding new ways to grow our company and each other; 3) Being present, connecting with transparency, dignity and respect; and 4) Delivering our very best in all we do, holding ourselves accountable for results.

    No one is taking about coffee shop deserts — yet, anyway.

    But McDonalds…yea.

    When many lower-income Americans are feeling isolated by the deadening uniformity of things, by the emptiness of many jobs, by the media, they still yearn for physical social networks. They are not doing this by going to government-run community service centers. They are not always doing this by utilizing the endless array of well-intentioned not-for-profit outreach programs. They are doing this on their own, organically across the country, in McDonald’s.

    while

    Last year, a public-interest law group at Johns Hopkins outlined the rationale: “Given the significance of the obesity epidemic in the United States and the scientific evidence and legal basis supporting the zoning of fast food outlets, municipalities have an effective, yet untried, tool to address obesity in their communities.”

    From the woke Guardian and uber woke Slate.

    Overall…a Starbucks doesn’t belong in a gritty urban neighborhood. I would argue that McDonalds is getting blasted for providing a useful service. Not to mention the youtube videos of fights are disturbing. Its a large world and Starbucks would be well served by not diluting their brand with ghetto stores.

    • Replies: @anon
    @anon

    I would never underestimate Howard Schultz's instinct to go after 'share of wallet'.

    Watch him turn it around and set a policy of not opening locations that need to restrict bathroom use.

    He can expand anywhere in the world.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Magic Johnson made a lot of money in the 1990s as a real estate developer by showing Starbucks and other national brands which black neighborhoods are better than other black neighborhoods.

    Blacks really appreciated having their own Starbucks and their own new movie theaters and spent a lot at them. It was pretty common in black romantic comedy movies of 15 years ago for the buppie stars to meet cute at the Magic Johnson Starbucks near Baldwin Hills and go on a first date at the Magic Johnson megaplex nearby.

    , @RadicalCenter
    @anon

    Here in Los Angeles there are constantly busy, MASSIVELY profitable Starbucks branches downtown and elsewhere that have a problem with rude and/or stinky and/or mentally ill people, most of whom seem to be African. So I wouldn't say that any branch that needs to employ anti-Dindu measures like classical music must be a marginal branch.

    These are not ghetto stores, but stores in higher-income neighborhoods.

  178. @joeyjoejoe
    "The harpsichord and organ are kind of unsettling and have an eerie quality to them. "

    One of my favorite quotes, that has stuck with me for decades:

    "Harpsichords have the sound of two skeletons copulating on a tin roof."


    I can't hear a harpsichord, or read the word harpsichord, without thinking of that sentence.

    joe

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    So you had to share it with the rest of us.

    Hmmmph.

  179. @Carol
    I worked in a big country western club in Dallas that was located near the Oak Cliffs ghetto. Monday was Blues Night but the rest of the week was hardcore Texas country.

    One night two blacks wandered in by mistake and after they did a quick exit the (black) bar manager told me "the fiddles hurt they ears."

    So maybe violins are key here.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy, @RadicalCenter

    Yet banjos and fiddles were central to Southern 19th-century music, both black and white.
    Maybe the association with “slave music” is the real objection.

  180. anonymous[207] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rapparee

    "All things are clean to the clean: but to them that are defiled, and to unbelievers, nothing is clean: but both their mind and their conscience are defiled."

    "Beauty is truth, truth beauty," – that is all
    Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.
     
    A soul possessed by evil is repulsed by things good, true, and beautiful. (Look at how often toxic political beliefs correlate with self-mutilation by hideous tattoos, piercings, and slovenly clothing). Thugs hate Bach for the same reason Cain hated his brother Abel.

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan, @anonymous

    “Grecian Urn”–like Rembrandt’s “Aristotle Contemplating The Bust of Homer” and Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony–are works of art that are impossible to describe prosaically, meant only to be read, seen or heard.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @anonymous

    https://quoteinvestigator.com/2010/11/08/writing-about-music/


    Dear Quote Investigator: I have a difficult riddle for you. A mailing list I belong to has discussed the following quotation several times during the past ten years, and the question of its origin has never been satisfactorily resolved.

    Writing about music is like dancing about architecture.
     
    Laurie Anderson, Steve Martin, Frank Zappa, Martin Mull, Elvis Costello, Thelonius Monk, Clara Schumann, Miles Davis, George Carlin and several other people have been credited with concocting this extraordinarily popular and enigmatic simile. There is another common version of the quote: “Talking about music is like dancing about architecture.” Is there any chance that you could attempt to trace this famous saying?
     
    https://quoteinvestigator.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/mullcostellomonk3.jpg

    Replies: @wren

  181. @Pat Boyle
    @J.Ross

    My personal intellectual and physical ontogeny story may be relevant. When I was in Junior High I was small, stupid and liked the crudest rock and roll music. I was also sickly. I didn't expect much of myself. Then seemingly overnight I transformed. I had been a soft little guy in grade school who struggled with the classwork. Then in just one year I grew to six three and was scoring in the 99th percentile on a series of aptitude tests. I went from being in danger of being held back a grade in high school to being the smartest guy in the college.

    At this same time I stopped listening to Fats Domino and Little Richard and explored Bach and Mozart.

    Thinking about the subject of this blog - why thugs hate Mozart - has helped me with my self understanding. I always have explained why I know nothing of pop music with the story of how I decided to takes personal responsibility for the music I listened to. That's true in a way. I had made a conscious decision to learn the operas of Weber, and Verdi after I knew those of Mozart. This took effort. After Cosi fan Tutte. I found it hard to accept Rigoletto. But I persevered. I left Wagner and Strauss for later. I planned out my entire life in music when I was nineteen. But it seems likely that my turn towards serious music was just another manifestation of my other life changes. Whatever made me so much smarter as a late teen than I had been as a young teen also seems to have bent me towards Mozart.

    When I was a kid in the Army I planned my music listening for life. Plotting out my life's goals in music was probably not something I did, so much as something that happened to me.

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan

    How quickly did you notice this transformation, and what did you make of it?

  182. wren says:
    @the one they call Desanex
    @Alfa158

    No doubt most Mexican music is junk. From about 2000 to about 2009, we had a local radio station in Birmingham, Alabama that played a nice variety of Spanish-language music. Some of my favorite songs:
    *Aserejé, sung by a group of three sisters from Spain calling themselves Las Ketchup.
    *No Me Conoces Aún by the Mexican group Palomo.
    *Rata de Dos Patas (Two-Legged Rat) by the Mexican singer Paquita la del Barrio.
    *La Negra Tiene Tumbao by the great Cuban-American singer Celia Cruz.

    I don’t want to clutter up this thread with a bunch of videos, but the video of La Negra ... is pretty wild:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imeXSRNRMeg

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @wren

    A few years ago I was searching YouTube for the old 2 tone second wave ska that I enjoyed when I was younger, and was surprised to see that it was so popular with Mexican kids. Even the Japanese ska band videos were filled with Spanish comments that I think were from Mexico and not Spain.

    Or maybe Mexican kids living in LA? The videos of kids dancing to ska seemed to fit that profile.

    • Replies: @wren
    @wren

    http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/ask-a-mexican-on-ska-music-in-mexico-6456520

    Is this the same guy who was on Unz?

    , @Steve Sailer
    @wren

    I saw the English Beat opening for Talking Heads in Pasadena in 1980.

    Replies: @wren

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @wren

    Morrissey, also a purveyor of very white music, is huge in Mexico and with LA Mexicans, massive crowd reaction for a guy of 58. Here he sings Elvis in an adobe hacienda style.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UAO1ipiyUc

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @Rosamond Vincy
    @wren

    Mexicans are interesting. I went to see Status Quo (Psychedelic 60s band who were pretty much a joke until Nickelback took that spot) in the 90s. They played everything except "Matchstick Men" and the Mexicans took over the pit and beat the $#1+ out of everybody. I talked to a guy later and asked him if the band was really big in Mexico, and apparently they were. I don't get the connection between Brit Invasion and Mexican slam-dancing, but apparently, there is one.

    , @LondonBob
    @wren

    https://youtu.be/1IYQznBD8oI

    Ska defines me as a person and I will never turn my back on ska.

  183. @anon
    @anon

    More explicitly:


    Collis was doing an engineering job for Muzak. He told me, “I walked into a store and understood: this is just like a movie. The company has built a set, and they’ve hired actors and given them costumes and taught them their lines, and every day they open their doors and say, ‘Let’s put on a show.’ It was retail theatre. And I realized then that Muzak’s business wasn’t really about selling music. It was about selling emotion—about finding the soundtrack that would make this store or that restaurant feel like something, rather than being just an intellectual proposition.”
     
    Music has been an essential part of marketing for years. We will have to wait and see how the Starbucks thing plays out. I have a feeling that wheverver Starbucks has to restrict its bathroom use may be marginally profitable stores. The only blacks I have seen in in suburban Starbucks were the typical demographic. Starbucks has a well defined brand --

    To inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one $2-$4 cup and one neighborhood at a time. It makes even more sense if you truly understand its corporate values: 1) Creating a culture of warmth and belonging, where everyone is welcome; 2) Acting with courage, challenging the status quo and finding new ways to grow our company and each other; 3) Being present, connecting with transparency, dignity and respect; and 4) Delivering our very best in all we do, holding ourselves accountable for results.
     
    No one is taking about coffee shop deserts -- yet, anyway.

    But McDonalds...yea.


    When many lower-income Americans are feeling isolated by the deadening uniformity of things, by the emptiness of many jobs, by the media, they still yearn for physical social networks. They are not doing this by going to government-run community service centers. They are not always doing this by utilizing the endless array of well-intentioned not-for-profit outreach programs. They are doing this on their own, organically across the country, in McDonald’s.

     

    while

    Last year, a public-interest law group at Johns Hopkins outlined the rationale: "Given the significance of the obesity epidemic in the United States and the scientific evidence and legal basis supporting the zoning of fast food outlets, municipalities have an effective, yet untried, tool to address obesity in their communities."
     
    From the woke Guardian and uber woke Slate.

    Overall...a Starbucks doesn't belong in a gritty urban neighborhood. I would argue that McDonalds is getting blasted for providing a useful service. Not to mention the youtube videos of fights are disturbing. Its a large world and Starbucks would be well served by not diluting their brand with ghetto stores.

    Replies: @anon, @Steve Sailer, @RadicalCenter

    I would never underestimate Howard Schultz’s instinct to go after ‘share of wallet’.

    Watch him turn it around and set a policy of not opening locations that need to restrict bathroom use.

    He can expand anywhere in the world.

  184. “I suspect that poor honest workmen don’t mind classical music playing in the background as much as punks loitering with criminal intent can’t stand it.”

    it’s used in ads a lot so there must be something to that idea

    symbol of authority? triggers a guilty conscience? creating either a positive or negative reaction?

  185. Here in suburbia there are two species of birds which produce our ambient music: two-stroke and four-stroke.

  186. @wren
    @the one they call Desanex

    A few years ago I was searching YouTube for the old 2 tone second wave ska that I enjoyed when I was younger, and was surprised to see that it was so popular with Mexican kids. Even the Japanese ska band videos were filled with Spanish comments that I think were from Mexico and not Spain.

    Or maybe Mexican kids living in LA? The videos of kids dancing to ska seemed to fit that profile.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @Rosamond Vincy, @LondonBob

  187. CJ says:
    @Barnard
    @anon

    I wonder if some of these new groups are putting out songs specifically with the hope that they can get played at places like Starbucks and Whole Foods. Outside of the people who decide what gets played in these stores, no one else actually has to like their music and they still make a killing.

    Replies: @CJ

    I wonder if some of these new groups are putting out songs specifically with the hope that they can get played at places like Starbucks and Whole Foods.

    Whole Foods actually plays a lot of black pop music, most of it from the 1970s and 80s. The last time I was there I heard Break Up to Make Up by The Stylistics, which I hadn’t heard for about 40 years.

  188. When I worked in a music store, we’d sometimes see shady young punks coming in to “look” at the rap section. Our response was typically to play not classical, but bluegrass. They never stuck around long.

  189. @wren
    @the one they call Desanex

    A few years ago I was searching YouTube for the old 2 tone second wave ska that I enjoyed when I was younger, and was surprised to see that it was so popular with Mexican kids. Even the Japanese ska band videos were filled with Spanish comments that I think were from Mexico and not Spain.

    Or maybe Mexican kids living in LA? The videos of kids dancing to ska seemed to fit that profile.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @Rosamond Vincy, @LondonBob

    I saw the English Beat opening for Talking Heads in Pasadena in 1980.

    • Replies: @wren
    @Steve Sailer

    Oh yeah, before you were constantly struggling to see what is in front of your nose, you were Skankin Steve Sailer.

    We all were, back in the day, I suppose.

    For better or for worse, the English Beat (and Madness and The Specials, etc. I think) are still touring off and on. Beer bellies, balding and all.

    Somewhere, at some time in the eighties I saw the Untouchables play, maybe with Fishbone. Great show! Iirc...

    I now learn that they were the scooter gang in Repo Man.

  190. @Charles Pewitt
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Marlon Brando as Colonel Walter E. Kurtz:


    We train young men to drop fire on people, but their commanders won't allow them to write "fuck" on their airplanes because it's obscene!

     

    New Hampshire is under attack from White Wiggers of the worst sort who enjoy playing Black Rap Music at high volumes in their cars. Phuck in every line of the lyrics sung by a petulant Black boob bothered by this or that.

    I have noticed the Wiggers usually are not in trucks.

    I have seen and heard exactly why Trumpy won the GOP New Hampshire presidential primary. Trumpy won NH by going Implicit Whitey; Explicit Whitey is on the way.

    Racial issues are boiling away in New Hampshire, and the GOP politician whores are completely and totally controlled by anti-White donor scum such as the Koch boys and Paul Singer. The New Hampshire GOP as a whole is weak and feckless, and the native White voters are getting restless as they see cities such as Nashua, Manchester and Concord go Third World.

    Replies: @Flip, @The True and Original David

    Sure they’re not Fellow Whites? (Neither blacks nor wiggers invented hip-hop….)

  191. @anon
    @anon

    More explicitly:


    Collis was doing an engineering job for Muzak. He told me, “I walked into a store and understood: this is just like a movie. The company has built a set, and they’ve hired actors and given them costumes and taught them their lines, and every day they open their doors and say, ‘Let’s put on a show.’ It was retail theatre. And I realized then that Muzak’s business wasn’t really about selling music. It was about selling emotion—about finding the soundtrack that would make this store or that restaurant feel like something, rather than being just an intellectual proposition.”
     
    Music has been an essential part of marketing for years. We will have to wait and see how the Starbucks thing plays out. I have a feeling that wheverver Starbucks has to restrict its bathroom use may be marginally profitable stores. The only blacks I have seen in in suburban Starbucks were the typical demographic. Starbucks has a well defined brand --

    To inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one $2-$4 cup and one neighborhood at a time. It makes even more sense if you truly understand its corporate values: 1) Creating a culture of warmth and belonging, where everyone is welcome; 2) Acting with courage, challenging the status quo and finding new ways to grow our company and each other; 3) Being present, connecting with transparency, dignity and respect; and 4) Delivering our very best in all we do, holding ourselves accountable for results.
     
    No one is taking about coffee shop deserts -- yet, anyway.

    But McDonalds...yea.


    When many lower-income Americans are feeling isolated by the deadening uniformity of things, by the emptiness of many jobs, by the media, they still yearn for physical social networks. They are not doing this by going to government-run community service centers. They are not always doing this by utilizing the endless array of well-intentioned not-for-profit outreach programs. They are doing this on their own, organically across the country, in McDonald’s.

     

    while

    Last year, a public-interest law group at Johns Hopkins outlined the rationale: "Given the significance of the obesity epidemic in the United States and the scientific evidence and legal basis supporting the zoning of fast food outlets, municipalities have an effective, yet untried, tool to address obesity in their communities."
     
    From the woke Guardian and uber woke Slate.

    Overall...a Starbucks doesn't belong in a gritty urban neighborhood. I would argue that McDonalds is getting blasted for providing a useful service. Not to mention the youtube videos of fights are disturbing. Its a large world and Starbucks would be well served by not diluting their brand with ghetto stores.

    Replies: @anon, @Steve Sailer, @RadicalCenter

    Magic Johnson made a lot of money in the 1990s as a real estate developer by showing Starbucks and other national brands which black neighborhoods are better than other black neighborhoods.

    Blacks really appreciated having their own Starbucks and their own new movie theaters and spent a lot at them. It was pretty common in black romantic comedy movies of 15 years ago for the buppie stars to meet cute at the Magic Johnson Starbucks near Baldwin Hills and go on a first date at the Magic Johnson megaplex nearby.

  192. @Tiny Duck
    http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-santa-fe-school-shooting-20180518-story.html

    What the HELL is wrong with white boys?!

    Replies: @The True and Original David

    You are–and you know it.

  193. anon[115] • Disclaimer says:
    @RudyM
    @AnotherDad


    No one is stopping Gazans from having a decent place to live but Gazans themselves.
     
    There are numerous ways that Israel has made it nearly impossible for Palestinians in Gaza (they are Palestinians, not just "Gazans") to have a decent place to live. Preventing crucial supplies from getting through (after key infrastructure has been destroyed) and preventing Palestinians from fishing a reasonable distance from their own coast are just two examples.

    A lot of the Palestinians in Gaza had a decent place to live before they were forcibly removed from it by Jews.

    To the extent the nationalist right glosses over oppression and pretends that victims' suffering is only due to their own inadequacy, it is genuinely odious.

    If "the west" destroys an existing society and the indigenous population has difficulty recovering, it's just more proof that the natives were backwards, of course.

    Replies: @anon

    Ridiculous. I’m no Semite, but I’ve been to Israel and have seen the Muslim neighborhoods behind the walls or barbed wire. It’s not poverty that’s holding them back, but rather attitude and religious values (and perhaps IQ). I used to believe that the poor, suffering, backward Gazans were persecuted by Israelis. No longer. After driving around the country (no bigger then New Jersey, by the way), I began to understand why they have barriers.

    One minor anecdote. In Jerusalem, auto theft was a real problem UNTIL they put barbed wire around the Muslim areas of Jerusalem with checkpoints that prohibited cars from getting through unnoticed. Suddenly, auto theft was non-existent, or nearly so. Insurance rates plummeted. Ditto with crime, bombers, etc. Barriers work, or the Jews wouldn’t bother.

    Now, Jerusalem isn’t Gaza, but you have to admit that the images — burning tires, tunneling, throwing make-shift bombs, faking their own deaths, putting babies and kids in the line of fire — don’t exact warm Western heart to their “cause.” I was in a restaurant picking up an order when I saw a brief clip of Gaza/Israel on their television: The soldiers were standing in little groups, near their vehicles or tanks; Gazans were running, screaming, milling around, throwing things, starting fires, etc. Other people were waiting and watching, too, but no one voiced sympathy for the Gazans. The universal sentiment was scorn.

  194. Anon[277] • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t think it’s classical as such (though I’m open to research on this). Country western would do the same — perhaps it reminds them of lynching? But even their own, older (better) music would drive them out: blues (Robert Johnson), jazz (Charlie Parker), R&B (Louis Jordan), even (esp.) gospel (Mahalia Jackson).

    No, the problem is that like children, they only want to hear one thing: their own current favorite, eg. [c]rap or rap[e] music.

    Frankly, you could say the same about white kids into metal.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Anon

    No you can't. White kids aren't burning down cities, raping women wholesale, carjacking in record numbers all to the strains of goth metal. Metal to Rap is apples to oranges comparison.

    Come on. Google the FBI's report on crime stats, by racial group, etc.

    At least metal, unlike rap, still actually requires musical technical skill with guitars, bass, and drums and not simply having a microphone and a synthesizer.

  195. @Lars Porsena
    Vivaldi is my favorite. Odd that it's so effective though, I would not have thought it. I wonder if anyone has ever tried neoclassical or folk death metal. That I could easily see working, although it would probably drive off too many of the normal customers too.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    “I wonder if anyone has tried neoclassical or folk death metal”

    Like Apocalyptica? Finnish heavy metal cellos? It’s certainly both very white and very aggressive.

    • Replies: @Lars Porsena
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Hmmm. I have heard Apocalyptica but I did not know they are also Finnish.

    Why are all the good metal bands Finnish? I should be Finnish. I was born musically transracial, I need corrective surgery to give me a last name I can't pronounce.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  196. San Francisco spent $304 million dollars on their homeless problem last year, so the music doesn’t drive them too far away. I wonder if any blacks would recognize Pachelbel’s Canon in D as the wedding song. Suppose you need to have a wedding to hear it.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Buffalo Joe

    LOL ;) But seriously, many African-"Americans" can go their whole lives without getting married or even having a sibling or close friend get married.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @willieskull68
    @Buffalo Joe

    And the politicians (except perhaps London Breed) fall all over themselves promising more enabling programs and even small facility housing in what must be every neighborhood.

    The most powerful person in town would be one who made a show of registering the homeless to vote. Can you imagine the controversy? Twisting of pearls.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

  197. wren says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @wren

    I saw the English Beat opening for Talking Heads in Pasadena in 1980.

    Replies: @wren

    Oh yeah, before you were constantly struggling to see what is in front of your nose, you were Skankin Steve Sailer.

    We all were, back in the day, I suppose.

    For better or for worse, the English Beat (and Madness and The Specials, etc. I think) are still touring off and on. Beer bellies, balding and all.

    Somewhere, at some time in the eighties I saw the Untouchables play, maybe with Fishbone. Great show! Iirc…

    I now learn that they were the scooter gang in Repo Man.

  198. @Anonymous
    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?

    They used a lot of contemporary pop songs and other genres like metal at Guantanamo. I wonder if they'd work at deterring loiterers as well:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/sesame-street-songs-heavy-metal-blasted-torture-guantanamo-detainees-report-article-1.1088762



    "Sesame Street" songwriter Christopher Cerf spearheaded the film after discovering songs he wrote to teach kids how to read and write were being used as weapons of war. The report has launched the controversial interrogation method back into the spotlight.

    According to the documentary, prisoners were strapped to chairs and played music — Metallica, AC/DC, Eminem, Barney and others — at loud volumes for hours or days on end.

     

    Replies: @Cortes, @Jon, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Crawfurdmuir

    This here music will work like a box of diamondback rattlesnakes:

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Is there a Southern equivalent of Starbucks? They could hire these cornpone black musicians to record an entire soundtrack that would keep undesirables from using the bathrooms.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    , @MBlanc46
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Thanks. Proof that American blacks are not without hope.

  199. the fact that the structure of a Bach concerto is morphologically related to the seminal analytical techniques of Western mathematics

    Can you expand on this claim?

  200. @Rohirrimborn
    @Thirdeye

    And if you want to go nuclear try Japanese. Is Yoko considered japanese?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdZ9weP5i68

    Replies: @fish, @RadicalCenter, @Bliss

    Hey there’s a difference between “Area Denial” and “Crimes against Humanity “!

  201. @wren
    @the one they call Desanex

    A few years ago I was searching YouTube for the old 2 tone second wave ska that I enjoyed when I was younger, and was surprised to see that it was so popular with Mexican kids. Even the Japanese ska band videos were filled with Spanish comments that I think were from Mexico and not Spain.

    Or maybe Mexican kids living in LA? The videos of kids dancing to ska seemed to fit that profile.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @Rosamond Vincy, @LondonBob

    Morrissey, also a purveyor of very white music, is huge in Mexico and with LA Mexicans, massive crowd reaction for a guy of 58. Here he sings Elvis in an adobe hacienda style.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Mexicans love guitars and nobody who loves guitars can fail to be impressed by Bigmouth Strikes Again.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQqFtgIQjaw

  202. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Anonymous

    This here music will work like a box of diamondback rattlesnakes:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xOxHyTP91c

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MBlanc46

    Is there a Southern equivalent of Starbucks? They could hire these cornpone black musicians to record an entire soundtrack that would keep undesirables from using the bathrooms.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Steve Sailer


    They could hire these cornpone black musicians to record an entire soundtrack that would keep undesirables from using the bathrooms.
     
    Huh, not quite...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhiannon_Giddens#Personal_life

    Giddens is biracial in ancestry. [35] Giddens’ father was white and her mother was African-American and Native American. [36] She married Irish musician Michael Laffan in 2007.[37] The couple have a daughter, Aoife, and a son, Caoimhín.[38] Giddens has homes in Greensboro, North Carolina, and Limerick, Ireland

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEqBw2N8L7A
    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Steve Sailer

    I believe the short answer is there is no hipster or pseudo-hipster Southern version of Starbucks. There are plenty of single and maybe 2 to 3 locations hipster coffee shops in the South (mostly in college towns and Yankee trash retirement enclaves). Then there are the Krispy Kreme donuts chain (they're only short one "K" to perfection) , Waffle House and Dunkin' Donuts (Andrew Anglin's favorite) .

    Notwithstanding all of that Starbucks is like a massive boll weevil infection in the South.

  203. Drive the devils out .

  204. Psychopaths like Justin Bieber

    Do you like Justin Bieber? You may be a psychopath, study says

    A recent study out of New York University examined the link between people’s musical preferences and their psychopathic tendencies.

    According to the Washington Post, NYU researchers had students take a test that is used to measure levels of psychopathy in individuals, wherein participants were asked to agree or disagree with statements such as, “For me what’s right is whatever I can get away with” and “Love is overrated.”

    Then — once the researchers had accrued a group of suitably psychopathic guinea pigs — they turned up the volume. Subjects were asked to listen to songs ranging from classical sonatas to top-100 hits, and then rated each tune on a seven-point scale.

    Their conclusions: Psychopaths definitely have musical preferences. Ranking among their favorites: Eminem’s “Lose Yourself,” Blackstreet’s “No Diggity” and Justin Bieber’s “What Do You Mean?”

    https://nypost.com/2017/11/15/do-you-like-justin-bieber-you-may-be-a-psychopath-study-says/

  205. Anonymous[109] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide

    The vaguely fascist German folk singer Heino, who is a dead ringer for Karl Lagerfeld, revived his career singing death metal. Here's a sample:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMw1Ta4bsAg

    And here he is singing "Roll out the Barrel":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOE0ISnLXR4

    Heino is not to be confused with Die Twinnies:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4OzX8QOUW8

    Replies: @Anonymous, @MBlanc46

    Heino is not fascist. He is an old “schlager” music singer, who has an ironic cult following with a few US hipsters. He is the German equivalent of some guy in Branson who was on Lawrence Welk.

    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    @Anonymous

    Reminds me of that Pat Boone album of heavy metal music, which I strangely liked.

  206. Baroque music really is the best:

    It’s a shame that we don’t have castrati anymore so the operas can’t be performed properly. Their power, range, and clarity were truly unsurpassable as we can see in this head to head comparison:

    • Replies: @Amasius
    @Amasius


    It’s a shame that we don’t have castrati anymore so the operas can’t be performed properly.
     
    I meant besides Dido and Aeneas of course. Looks like you can get by without one there.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Amasius

    What I think tends to get lost regarding opera is that a full century and a half ago, the arias were often the equivalent of the hit parade among not just Italian-American immigrants but also among solidly WASP upper and middle classes. They had a fairly broad range and people tended to listen to the music much more so than they do today. At one time, opera was "hip" or "cool" because during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries it was current. The youth will always gravitate toward musical styles that are current since that's perceived as hip and cool. Unfortunately, rap has been current for nearly thirty years and counting.

    Will there ever be a new musical style or form that replaces rap in the minds of the young? A bit depressing to think that this is it, and that the US won't move on and find a new style that's totally different and yet current and thus hip.

  207. Anonymous [AKA "rebbebrod"] says:
    @Anonymous
    Someone should develop a computerized A/B testing system to optimize this. Have an artificial intelligence system watching CCTV video of storefronts and parking lots and changing music based on various factors.

    Me, I think that the effectiveness of baroque music may have something to do with the trills. You notice these when you're studying piano. Trills, idems, mordents. To a street tough trills must sound faggy. Who wants to be around when fag music is playing?

    Have they tried Chopin? Hard-core romantiic stuff might be even more faggy sounding to thugs. The 7-against-13 rhythms might be more of an assault on the ears, or on the other hand, they might like it. A/B testing! Try different types of music at different volumes. You might find a style that works well at low sound volumes. Try microaggressive narration between songs.

    For the homeless, try television preachers, two or three overdubbed so you can tell what it is, but not what they're saying. Or a Spanish program over an English televangelist over periodic dog barks. Then switch to a slowed-down version of Music Box Dancer on the accordion overdubbed with someone hacking up phlem.

    I think you could get a Defense Department or DARPA grant to work on this stuff.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  208. Has anyone seen “Images” ? I saw it in the 70’s and it made an impression .

  209. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Lars Porsena

    "I wonder if anyone has tried neoclassical or folk death metal"

    Like Apocalyptica? Finnish heavy metal cellos? It's certainly both very white and very aggressive.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zf2aIVKp1OY

    Replies: @Lars Porsena

    Hmmm. I have heard Apocalyptica but I did not know they are also Finnish.

    Why are all the good metal bands Finnish? I should be Finnish. I was born musically transracial, I need corrective surgery to give me a last name I can’t pronounce.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Lars Porsena

    Scandinavia generally seems a pretty metallic place. Maybe all that Nordic niceness gets tiring and it's a socially acceptable way to go Full Pagan Viking.

    (Finnish is such an odd language, I think you have to learn the pronounciation. Fortunately Swedish is also an official language so road signs and lots of other things are also in Swedish - which bears a whole heap more relation to English than Finnish does. I think it's related only to Hungarian and Estonian).

  210. @NOTA
    @AnotherDad

    Armed insurgent groups tend to transform into gangsters sooner or later. The insurgent ideology provides some support from gullible radical-chic types and provides a justification for their actions. My guess is that Fatah has already undergone this transition, and Hamas is in the middle of it.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shi’ite organization, was part way to being something of a real state with an army that could fight the Israeli army and welfare programs for its people. I don’t know about lately, but Hezbollah was one of the more impressive Arab political entities: a bunch of backwoods nobodies who got themselves organized.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Steve Sailer

    Sounds like the Zetas.

    , @Karl
    @Steve Sailer

    209 Steve Sailer > one of the more impressive Arab political entities


    Yes, study Hezhollah, and learn that Arabs can be effectively orchestrated into a functioning society by Iranian military "advisers", eh?

  211. Muse says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    Harpsichords have a more robotic aspect to them since they don't vary in volume. They fit the Enlightenment's mood of cheerful optimism pretty well. The pianoforte helped usher in the Romantic Era because they were more humanly expressive.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @YetAnotherAnon, @Muse

    A few thoughts:

    Afro-centric music is generally highly syncopated and there is an emphasis on the off beat, which would be in the style of swing. There is probably more than just cultural preferences here. There is also the aspect of improvisation versus performing a piece precisely as written, with improvisation clearly being a hallmark of African influenced music such as jazz…..and God knows the bagpipes are played to make the guy over the hill miserable.

    In reading the book “The Evolution of Beauty” by Richard Prum, he examines birds with respect to song, dance and visual asthetics as part of mating. These behaviors seem hard wired and not learned. It would be quite interesting to monitor brain waves of individuals using the sensors in a typical neuro-feedback machine to see different brain wave responses. I believe these waves are influenced by the level of synchrony between major structures of he brain. Many sensory and other types of neurological issues are characterized by this disregulation betweeen structural parts of the brain. In fact, managing synchronization was one of the major hurdles in making internet nodes function.

    If I had to guess, I would expect to see different ratios of activity in the visual, auditory and prefrontal cortex depending on the music being listened to and the person doing the listening. Certain music makes some people’s brains hurt.

    I suppose some people dislike Vivaldi instinctively just as much as I dislike brutalist architecture. I know this is not a good rule of thumb in Miami, but on the South side of Chicago or in Detroit, you can infer much about a neighborhood. when the houses are painted pink or purple – purple houses just hurt my head.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Muse

    Here is a sort of African classical music, which was played on a "white" (nominally European) classical music station. These two artists work separately and extensively with reconstructing folk music and playing specialized instruments.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9Na0mk4a4g

  212. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Another odd thing about A Clockwork Orange: Alex is from an intact two-parent family. And no Pakistanis!

    Blade Runner lied to me about future LA being populated by Chinese doing genetic engineering in sidewalk bazaars.

    The LA of Blade Runner 2049 is still dominated by intelligent, flawed white people.

    There are some minor conceptual problems in BR 2049 but I still found it deeply affecting, like the first.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Sunbeam, @Alfa158, @Steve Sailer

    In Blade Runner 2049 the Swiss actress playing an important character is great.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Steve Sailer

    In 2049 there will be almost nobody in the entire State of California, let alone LA, who looks like a Swiss person. Heck, that's true now in many parts of Cali now.

    The sickos making these movies certainly want to have the frogs out there in the rest of the country think "the water's not too hot, we can stay right in this pot" ................

    , @MEH 0910
    @Steve Sailer

    Perusing her filmography, I was surprised to read that actress Carla Juri played such a weird character in the German film Wetlands.

  213. @ic1000
    @Anon

    Re: The smug style in American liberalism:

    Sailer quotes Theodore Gioia,

    "In a strange mutation, classical music devolves from a 'universal language of mankind' reminding all people of their common humanity into a sonic border fence protecting privileged areas from common crowds, telling the plebes in auditory code that 'you’re not welcome here.'”

    Plebian: Of, belonging to, or characteristic of commoners.

    Privilege: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

    Mr. Gioia, an eques -- or perhaps he sees a Senator when he mirror-gazes -- sustains the stereotype of the upper classes jealously guarding their privileges. If the mass of plebians becomes accustomed to coffee shops where petty criminals and the (literally) unwashed are "not welcome," imagine the demands that will follow.

    The right to beachcomb up to the Spring high-tide line in East Hampton and Malibu?
    The right to have their vote for the least-bad candidate honored?
    Stop-and-frisk of dangerous-looking young men in downscale neighborhoods of flyover cities?

    The Dallas-based critic's Wikipedia page relates an amusing anecdote from his past. "When Gioia worked amidst Silicon Valley's venture capital community on Sand Hill Road, he was known as the 'guy with the piano in his office.'"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    A different but related Gioia.

  214. @Almost Missouri
    Steve, why do you think that Bach more the composer of civilization than anybody else? I would have said Mozart.

    Replies: @roo_ster, @Sparkon, @Steve Sailer

    Mozart was starting to move toward Romanticism, which Beethoven took further.

  215. @Amasius
    Baroque music really is the best:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYPv7Zc7EVE&start_radio=1&list=RDGMEM8h-ASY4B42jYeBhBnqb3-wVMRYPv7Zc7EVE

    It's a shame that we don't have castrati anymore so the operas can't be performed properly. Their power, range, and clarity were truly unsurpassable as we can see in this head to head comparison:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=al6yn4xHOuY

    Replies: @Amasius, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    It’s a shame that we don’t have castrati anymore so the operas can’t be performed properly.

    I meant besides Dido and Aeneas of course. Looks like you can get by without one there.

  216. Anonymous [AKA "bowtieguru"] says:

    OT – there’s something brewing over at DailyKos – Jason D. Hill wrote a nasty little screed, it’s quite fun. The feathers are flying in the comments.

    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2018/5/18/1765322/-The-Black-Nihilism-of-Ta-Nehesi-Cotes-and-his-Racial-Pessimism

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Anonymous


    Reading Coates, one gets the impression that the psychology of fear he attributes to black people is a projection of his own personal psychological make-up: he is deathly afraid of his own race, but, out of a sense of racial shame, finds it easier to blame white people for the endemic black-on-black violence to which he was systemically subjected to as a child, beginning with the beating inflicted on him by his own father. This is a rather unfair burden for white people in general to have to bear on behalf of a man who fetishises his personal demons.
     
  217. @wren
    @Buzz Mohawk

    For the past 10 years or so, a family tradition has been to watch the Vienna New Year's concert.

    Now that the ballerinas in my family outnumber the violinists, we usually skip right to the dancing scenes, which are often very beautiful.

    Here is the 2018 concert. Skip to about the two hour mark for some nice dancing, but the whole thing is lovely, as it is almost every year.

    https://youtu.be/klzvht1doRI

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist, @AnotherDad, @Lisa

    I like the Vienna Boys Choir for Christmas carols and I believe it might even have repellant potential. This might be the start of a white renaissance with books, classical sculpture, painting and music demarcating groups.

  218. @Saxon
    @jim jones

    All of these "most livable cities" articles are based on bugman metrics and feelings. Vienna is going to have the demography of Baghdad sooner or later on the current trajectory. Do they really think it'll be that great then? I suppose by that time the overwhelming majority of the populace will be illiterate savages so it doesn't really much matter what the chattering writers (if any exist at such a point) think.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    You’re right. I’d suggest “visit Vienna soon, before it’s gone”:

    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/4229/austria-muslims-vienna-schools

    Yet another of my ancestors’ lands simply surrendered to savages.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @RadicalCenter

    Muslims aren't savages.

    Replies: @Anon

  219. @Rohirrimborn
    @Thirdeye

    And if you want to go nuclear try Japanese. Is Yoko considered japanese?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdZ9weP5i68

    Replies: @fish, @RadicalCenter, @Bliss

    She’s half Japanese on her Dad’s side, and half crazy Communist wench on her mother’s side.

  220. @Barnard
    @slumber_j

    According to Bach himself:

    “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”

    That is what it is for.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    According to Bach himself:

    “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”

    Right. But presumably Handel wrote Messiah for the same reason, for example, and it doesn’t leave me feeling trapped in an endless skein of pretty noodling. It gets somewhere.

    • Replies: @John Gruskos
    @slumber_j

    Listen to the Brandenburg Concertos. They get somewhere.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @slumber_j

    I was driving through Buffalo yesterday and heard Van Cliburn play the finale of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata. Truly an astonishing piece of music played by a master. I would put it and others like it on a continuous loop if I owned a business.

    I like rock and roll but classical is the only thing I can listen to while working.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  221. @anonymous
    I have heard that Chik-fil-a has a preferential policy for hiring homeschooled kids.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    Wait for the “disparate impact” lawsuit. Because, presumably, Africans and Mexicans don’t homeschool as often as white parents do.

    • Replies: @Joe Schmoe
    @RadicalCenter

    I know a lot of homeschooled kids, some of them black, who worked or work at Chick fil A. In hiring, you can only hire from among those who apply. Since a lot of homeschooled students apply to chick fil A because the business is friendly to conservative Christians, Chick fil A can then hire them. They can also fire them. I know a sweet homeschooled girl who was fired the first day she worked there. I don't know any homeschooled kids working at any other fast food chains, nor any who even applied. Surely some are, but I don't know them. I think it just comes down to self selection. Home schooled students are more likely to apply, so Chick fil A ends up hiring more of them.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Joe Joe

  222. @Dr. DoomNGloom

    We Were Lied to by "A Clockwork Orange"
     
    If you can't trust writers of fiction, who can you trust?

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    Not writers of fiction posing as newspaper “reporters.”

  223. @Carol
    I worked in a big country western club in Dallas that was located near the Oak Cliffs ghetto. Monday was Blues Night but the rest of the week was hardcore Texas country.

    One night two blacks wandered in by mistake and after they did a quick exit the (black) bar manager told me "the fiddles hurt they ears."

    So maybe violins are key here.

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy, @RadicalCenter

    More violins, less violence?

  224. @Cloudbuster
    @Jefferson

    Whoever The U.S president is in Blade Runner 2049 he or she must have brought back Operation Wetback because the Los Angeles portrayed in the Blade Runner films looks about as Mexican as Idaho.

    Hollywood is run by leftists, and leftists don't want the public to notice the invasion.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    Exactly right. When friends and family visit us in Los Angeles from the East Coast and Midwest, they are literally in disbelief over the utter Mexicanization of this whole area — not just LA City or even LA County.

  225. @Steve Sailer
    @peterike

    The barista was Latino too.

    Hate Hypochondria rather than a Hate Hoax.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    Steve, don’t you mean LatinA? Or better yet, LatinX? 😉

  226. @Steve Sailer
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Is there a Southern equivalent of Starbucks? They could hire these cornpone black musicians to record an entire soundtrack that would keep undesirables from using the bathrooms.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    They could hire these cornpone black musicians to record an entire soundtrack that would keep undesirables from using the bathrooms.

    Huh, not quite…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhiannon_Giddens#Personal_life

    Giddens is biracial in ancestry. [35] Giddens’ father was white and her mother was African-American and Native American. [36] She married Irish musician Michael Laffan in 2007.[37] The couple have a daughter, Aoife, and a son, Caoimhín.[38] Giddens has homes in Greensboro, North Carolina, and Limerick, Ireland

  227. @anon
    @anon

    More explicitly:


    Collis was doing an engineering job for Muzak. He told me, “I walked into a store and understood: this is just like a movie. The company has built a set, and they’ve hired actors and given them costumes and taught them their lines, and every day they open their doors and say, ‘Let’s put on a show.’ It was retail theatre. And I realized then that Muzak’s business wasn’t really about selling music. It was about selling emotion—about finding the soundtrack that would make this store or that restaurant feel like something, rather than being just an intellectual proposition.”
     
    Music has been an essential part of marketing for years. We will have to wait and see how the Starbucks thing plays out. I have a feeling that wheverver Starbucks has to restrict its bathroom use may be marginally profitable stores. The only blacks I have seen in in suburban Starbucks were the typical demographic. Starbucks has a well defined brand --

    To inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one $2-$4 cup and one neighborhood at a time. It makes even more sense if you truly understand its corporate values: 1) Creating a culture of warmth and belonging, where everyone is welcome; 2) Acting with courage, challenging the status quo and finding new ways to grow our company and each other; 3) Being present, connecting with transparency, dignity and respect; and 4) Delivering our very best in all we do, holding ourselves accountable for results.
     
    No one is taking about coffee shop deserts -- yet, anyway.

    But McDonalds...yea.


    When many lower-income Americans are feeling isolated by the deadening uniformity of things, by the emptiness of many jobs, by the media, they still yearn for physical social networks. They are not doing this by going to government-run community service centers. They are not always doing this by utilizing the endless array of well-intentioned not-for-profit outreach programs. They are doing this on their own, organically across the country, in McDonald’s.

     

    while

    Last year, a public-interest law group at Johns Hopkins outlined the rationale: "Given the significance of the obesity epidemic in the United States and the scientific evidence and legal basis supporting the zoning of fast food outlets, municipalities have an effective, yet untried, tool to address obesity in their communities."
     
    From the woke Guardian and uber woke Slate.

    Overall...a Starbucks doesn't belong in a gritty urban neighborhood. I would argue that McDonalds is getting blasted for providing a useful service. Not to mention the youtube videos of fights are disturbing. Its a large world and Starbucks would be well served by not diluting their brand with ghetto stores.

    Replies: @anon, @Steve Sailer, @RadicalCenter

    Here in Los Angeles there are constantly busy, MASSIVELY profitable Starbucks branches downtown and elsewhere that have a problem with rude and/or stinky and/or mentally ill people, most of whom seem to be African. So I wouldn’t say that any branch that needs to employ anti-Dindu measures like classical music must be a marginal branch.

    These are not ghetto stores, but stores in higher-income neighborhoods.

  228. @Buffalo Joe
    San Francisco spent $304 million dollars on their homeless problem last year, so the music doesn't drive them too far away. I wonder if any blacks would recognize Pachelbel's Canon in D as the wedding song. Suppose you need to have a wedding to hear it.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @willieskull68

    LOL 😉 But seriously, many African-“Americans” can go their whole lives without getting married or even having a sibling or close friend get married.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @RadicalCenter

    RC, you know that is probably and sadly true.

  229. @Steve Sailer
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    In Blade Runner 2049 the Swiss actress playing an important character is great.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @MEH 0910

    In 2049 there will be almost nobody in the entire State of California, let alone LA, who looks like a Swiss person. Heck, that’s true now in many parts of Cali now.

    The sickos making these movies certainly want to have the frogs out there in the rest of the country think “the water’s not too hot, we can stay right in this pot” …………….

  230. @Bill B.
    @EH

    Ha ha. But context matters. A lot of ordinary folk think of classical music as dead people gavotting around in absurd costumes. It is of course much more.

    Pavane, Op.50 – Gabriel Fauré sounds quite sinister as "Giulio Andreotti" walks down a Roman street, pre-dawn in Il Divo. (A terrific film.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1PF9L6ry-I&t=33s

    At about 1' 20"

    Replies: @Bill B.

    I don’t think “sinister” is the word.

  231. @Anonymous
    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?

    They used a lot of contemporary pop songs and other genres like metal at Guantanamo. I wonder if they'd work at deterring loiterers as well:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/sesame-street-songs-heavy-metal-blasted-torture-guantanamo-detainees-report-article-1.1088762



    "Sesame Street" songwriter Christopher Cerf spearheaded the film after discovering songs he wrote to teach kids how to read and write were being used as weapons of war. The report has launched the controversial interrogation method back into the spotlight.

    According to the documentary, prisoners were strapped to chairs and played music — Metallica, AC/DC, Eminem, Barney and others — at loud volumes for hours or days on end.

     

    Replies: @Cortes, @Jon, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Crawfurdmuir

    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?

    I’d guess that either one would be a successful negro repellent. Both are strongly associated with Southern white culture, and probably carry unfavorable implications to blacks.

    Moreover, bluegrass is about as strongly British/European as any genre of popular music in this country. Unlike other popular genres it owes almost nothing to black musical contributions. The bluegrass band is a lineal descendant of the “broken consort” of Thomas Morley’s time, with its mixture of plucked and bowed instruments. Country fiddling derives from English and Scottish fiddle tunes like those collected by Playford in the seventeenth century.

    Somehow the Austro-Italian practice of scordatura (tuning the fiddle in non-standard ways, rather than the usual G3, D4, A4, E5, to take advantage of the sonority of open strings) made it into the American South, perhaps via the Salzburgers who settled in Ebenezer, Georgia, in 1734. Among the greatest exponents of the scordatura violin had been H.I.F. Biber von Bibern (1644-1704), lord high steward to the archbishop of Salzburg, whose Rosary Sonatas of 1676 used fourteen different tunings, almost all known to country fiddlers. Here’s the fifth one, “The Twelve-Year Old Jesus in the Temple” –

    Listen to the two movements from 1:15 – 4:06 in particular, with their double-stopping and cross-fingering. With a little more speed and different backup instruments they’d sound very like country fiddle tunes. Tuning is A3, E4, A4, C#5, the “Calico” or “Black Mountain Rag” tuning.

    • Replies: @Joe Schmoe
    @Crawfurdmuir



    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?

     

    Both are strongly associated with Southern white culture, and probably carry unfavorable implications to blacks.
     
    But would younger people even know that? I remember that some study Steve posted showed people would like any art they had seen more often. Perhaps they don't like the classical music solely because of unfamiliarity. I mean, how long could you listen to Chinese or Japanese music before you tired of it? Yet those are highly developed musical forms. They have countless operas, etc. But it is unfamiliar, so it is less enjoyable to westerners.
  232. @RadicalCenter
    @anonymous

    Wait for the "disparate impact" lawsuit. Because, presumably, Africans and Mexicans don't homeschool as often as white parents do.

    Replies: @Joe Schmoe

    I know a lot of homeschooled kids, some of them black, who worked or work at Chick fil A. In hiring, you can only hire from among those who apply. Since a lot of homeschooled students apply to chick fil A because the business is friendly to conservative Christians, Chick fil A can then hire them. They can also fire them. I know a sweet homeschooled girl who was fired the first day she worked there. I don’t know any homeschooled kids working at any other fast food chains, nor any who even applied. Surely some are, but I don’t know them. I think it just comes down to self selection. Home schooled students are more likely to apply, so Chick fil A ends up hiring more of them.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Joe Schmoe

    The only Chick-Fil-A I've been to is the one in the A+ prime location on Westwood Blvd right across the street from UCLA, but it's a pleasure to go: the food is delicious and the service charming.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Joe Joe
    @Joe Schmoe

    What did she do that would cause her to be fired on her first day?

  233. @Steve Sailer
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Is there a Southern equivalent of Starbucks? They could hire these cornpone black musicians to record an entire soundtrack that would keep undesirables from using the bathrooms.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    I believe the short answer is there is no hipster or pseudo-hipster Southern version of Starbucks. There are plenty of single and maybe 2 to 3 locations hipster coffee shops in the South (mostly in college towns and Yankee trash retirement enclaves). Then there are the Krispy Kreme donuts chain (they’re only short one “K” to perfection) , Waffle House and Dunkin’ Donuts (Andrew Anglin’s favorite) .

    Notwithstanding all of that Starbucks is like a massive boll weevil infection in the South.

  234. @Crawfurdmuir
    @Anonymous


    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?
     
    I'd guess that either one would be a successful negro repellent. Both are strongly associated with Southern white culture, and probably carry unfavorable implications to blacks.

    Moreover, bluegrass is about as strongly British/European as any genre of popular music in this country. Unlike other popular genres it owes almost nothing to black musical contributions. The bluegrass band is a lineal descendant of the "broken consort" of Thomas Morley's time, with its mixture of plucked and bowed instruments. Country fiddling derives from English and Scottish fiddle tunes like those collected by Playford in the seventeenth century.

    Somehow the Austro-Italian practice of scordatura (tuning the fiddle in non-standard ways, rather than the usual G3, D4, A4, E5, to take advantage of the sonority of open strings) made it into the American South, perhaps via the Salzburgers who settled in Ebenezer, Georgia, in 1734. Among the greatest exponents of the scordatura violin had been H.I.F. Biber von Bibern (1644-1704), lord high steward to the archbishop of Salzburg, whose Rosary Sonatas of 1676 used fourteen different tunings, almost all known to country fiddlers. Here's the fifth one, "The Twelve-Year Old Jesus in the Temple" -

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvQHSwg2dt0

    Listen to the two movements from 1:15 - 4:06 in particular, with their double-stopping and cross-fingering. With a little more speed and different backup instruments they'd sound very like country fiddle tunes. Tuning is A3, E4, A4, C#5, the "Calico" or "Black Mountain Rag" tuning.

    Replies: @Joe Schmoe

    Have they experimented with other genres, like country or bluegrass?

    Both are strongly associated with Southern white culture, and probably carry unfavorable implications to blacks.

    But would younger people even know that? I remember that some study Steve posted showed people would like any art they had seen more often. Perhaps they don’t like the classical music solely because of unfamiliarity. I mean, how long could you listen to Chinese or Japanese music before you tired of it? Yet those are highly developed musical forms. They have countless operas, etc. But it is unfamiliar, so it is less enjoyable to westerners.

  235. @Kylie
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I don't think Wagner would be effective in driving away punks. Too visceral.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Chrisnonymous, @unpc downunder

    No, they would hate loud or gentle classical music. It wouldn’t matter if you played Bach or Prokofiev, the effect would be the same. People who hate classical music hate it because it’s refined and complicated. Hence, people who are simple and unrefined hate it. The heaviness level doesn’t make much difference.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @unpc downunder

    Few white people HATE classical music, most of us just find that while snippets here and there are cool, most of any given orchestral piece is boring.

    I tried listening to classical radio for a solid month back in the nineties. I was in Kansas City and the station was KXTR. I had a really good stereo rig-Altec 604s with Doug Sax Mastering Labs x/o in Onken style cabs, homebrew tube amps running ultralinear 807s with Sowter transformers, and a Mac MR71 tuner aligned to a BCH with a HP8640 from a big attic Yagi. By the end of the month I was actively avoiding coming to the house because it was driving me nuts. The shitty selection of music didn't help-every other selection was by Sir Neville Marriner of St. Martin-In-The-Field or some such, and he was mediocre, but basically, I couldn't handle it after awhile.

    I was never so glad to hook up the CD player and start listening to rock again.

    Replies: @Gringo

  236. @Sunbeam
    @slumber_j

    "I have to say that I agree with the jazz musician on NPR…and there’s one of the strangest sentences I’ve ever written. My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    It’s pretty: I’ll give it that."

    This site has a very minor fetish for classical music (nothing compared to the IQ obsession though).

    I 100% agree with you and that jazz guy (though I also hate jazz).

    As they say in discussions about the Perl programming language, "There's more than one way to do it." I think they need to run an additional experiment where they play Hank Williams (the real one, not his son), or Jimmy Rogers singing "T for Texas."

    Hank Williams Sr... "Angel of Death" (the best version with lyrics) - YouTube
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4ssDcq2f3U

    Jimmie Rodgers - Blue Yodel No 1 (T For Texas) - YouTube
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qEIBmGZxAhg

    Anyway, more than one way to do it. I love Celtic music and derivatives. Classical leaves me cold. All kinds of things I've heard that I like, but not classical.

    And by right of being me, my personal tastes supercede that of anyone who likes that "Lovely, Lovely Ludwig Van." Since I do not care for it, the sentiment that "Nature's Noblemen" like classical music is the notion of a syphilitic moron.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    Well, I like a lot of that sort of thing too. But I also like a lot of Classical music, or whatever one wants to call it. It’s Bach that leaves me cold.

    And mostly I don’t love it when it gets too Romantic. Nevertheless there are exceptions. This for example is a recent favorite of mine:

    • Replies: @36 ulster
    @slumber_j

    One of my favorite music videos. Lovely music, beautiful venue.

  237. @Joe Schmoe
    @RadicalCenter

    I know a lot of homeschooled kids, some of them black, who worked or work at Chick fil A. In hiring, you can only hire from among those who apply. Since a lot of homeschooled students apply to chick fil A because the business is friendly to conservative Christians, Chick fil A can then hire them. They can also fire them. I know a sweet homeschooled girl who was fired the first day she worked there. I don't know any homeschooled kids working at any other fast food chains, nor any who even applied. Surely some are, but I don't know them. I think it just comes down to self selection. Home schooled students are more likely to apply, so Chick fil A ends up hiring more of them.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Joe Joe

    The only Chick-Fil-A I’ve been to is the one in the A+ prime location on Westwood Blvd right across the street from UCLA, but it’s a pleasure to go: the food is delicious and the service charming.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I eat at CFA about twice a month. I always like to banter with the managers. I ask them stuff like could a Seventh Day Adventist own a CFA, insult Darby and Scofield as gratuitously as possible, riff on the Book of Mormon (the play or the book itself depending) and of course, ask any Hispanophone female employees if they know why the huge wooden pepper grinder they always have on the condiment table is called a Rubirosa. It's more fun than pulling out a cell phone at the front row of a Pretenders concert!

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Jim Bob Lassiter

  238. Can’t wait for the inevitable civil-rights suit, courtesy of the ACLU.

  239. @slumber_j
    @Sunbeam

    Well, I like a lot of that sort of thing too. But I also like a lot of Classical music, or whatever one wants to call it. It's Bach that leaves me cold.

    And mostly I don't love it when it gets too Romantic. Nevertheless there are exceptions. This for example is a recent favorite of mine:

    https://youtu.be/ihx5LCF1yJY

    Replies: @36 ulster

    One of my favorite music videos. Lovely music, beautiful venue.

  240. @slumber_j
    @Barnard


    According to Bach himself:

    “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”
     
    Right. But presumably Handel wrote Messiah for the same reason, for example, and it doesn't leave me feeling trapped in an endless skein of pretty noodling. It gets somewhere.

    Replies: @John Gruskos, @Jim Don Bob

    Listen to the Brandenburg Concertos. They get somewhere.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @John Gruskos

    Yeah, I like those more than most of Bach.

  241. I enjoy Steve’s music threads, but I sort of dread the videos being posted by the commentators. It comes across like everyone who posts on this site has an age of around 70, and a taste nowhere near as good as that of my very square parents.

  242. @Steve Sailer
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    In Blade Runner 2049 the Swiss actress playing an important character is great.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @MEH 0910

    Perusing her filmography, I was surprised to read that actress Carla Juri played such a weird character in the German film Wetlands.

  243. @Muse
    @Steve Sailer

    A few thoughts:

    Afro-centric music is generally highly syncopated and there is an emphasis on the off beat, which would be in the style of swing. There is probably more than just cultural preferences here. There is also the aspect of improvisation versus performing a piece precisely as written, with improvisation clearly being a hallmark of African influenced music such as jazz.....and God knows the bagpipes are played to make the guy over the hill miserable.

    In reading the book “The Evolution of Beauty” by Richard Prum, he examines birds with respect to song, dance and visual asthetics as part of mating. These behaviors seem hard wired and not learned. It would be quite interesting to monitor brain waves of individuals using the sensors in a typical neuro-feedback machine to see different brain wave responses. I believe these waves are influenced by the level of synchrony between major structures of he brain. Many sensory and other types of neurological issues are characterized by this disregulation betweeen structural parts of the brain. In fact, managing synchronization was one of the major hurdles in making internet nodes function.

    If I had to guess, I would expect to see different ratios of activity in the visual, auditory and prefrontal cortex depending on the music being listened to and the person doing the listening. Certain music makes some people’s brains hurt.

    I suppose some people dislike Vivaldi instinctively just as much as I dislike brutalist architecture. I know this is not a good rule of thumb in Miami, but on the South side of Chicago or in Detroit, you can infer much about a neighborhood. when the houses are painted pink or purple - purple houses just hurt my head.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Here is a sort of African classical music, which was played on a “white” (nominally European) classical music station. These two artists work separately and extensively with reconstructing folk music and playing specialized instruments.

  244. In one of the two Anthony Burgess autobiographies (there was a two-volume series, I think), he described his first exposure to The Beatles. He wrote that after seeing/hearing them on television, he “rushed to the restroom to vomit” (paraphrasing here; I ain’t got the source materials before me).

    I like both Prokofiev and Van Halen, though 🙂

  245. @Anonymous
    I loved Walter Carlos's score for Clockwork Orange as a kid, and his older Switched on Bach stuff. Sorry for the deadnaming, Wendy.

    Ms. Wendy Carlos has been a hermit cat lady nutcase for quite a while and will not allow the old stuff to be released, except in really expensive remastered CD sets she sells from her website, when the stuff in in stock. Her website is full of all kinds of geeky stuff that only a classic autogynephlic translady could think to gather up.

    Replies: @willieskull68

    I have my word of the day; “autogynephilic”

  246. HA says:

    … In a strange mutation, classical music devolves from a “universal language of mankind”…into a sonic border fence… Thus music returns to its oldest evolutionary function: claiming territory. Zoological research suggests that the original function of birdsong was not only attracting mates (as Darwin argued) but also asserting territorial rights.

    Yeah, sure — NOW music returns to its oldest evolutionary functions. As if the last 50 years of funk, soul, rap, and hip-hop were completely innocent in the matter of trying to attract mates and blasting away enemies from said potential mates and anything else that could be considered home turf.

    The ’89 movies”Say Anything” and “Do the Right Thing” both prominently featured boom boxes in the furtherance of music’s oldest evolutionary functions. Which one would you say is guiltier of using music as a sonic fence?

    Look around, people. This ain’t no disco.

    • Replies: @willieskull68
    @HA

    and we ain't just foolin around

  247. @Steve Sailer
    @the one they call Desanex

    The recent Pixar movie "Coco" has a nice selection of Mexican pop hits from about 1940-1955, kind of in the Mexican equivalent of the Crosby-Sinatra mode, picked with the usual Pixar attention to quality. The movie has been a big hit around the world and the soundtrack apparently has proven agreeable to audiences in a lot of places that you wouldn't expect, like China.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @J.Ross

    My first reaction to kpop was “fifties larping.” They’re recreating an idealized image of American midcentury prosperity and style. The Chinese will do the same thing.

  248. @wren
    @the one they call Desanex

    A few years ago I was searching YouTube for the old 2 tone second wave ska that I enjoyed when I was younger, and was surprised to see that it was so popular with Mexican kids. Even the Japanese ska band videos were filled with Spanish comments that I think were from Mexico and not Spain.

    Or maybe Mexican kids living in LA? The videos of kids dancing to ska seemed to fit that profile.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @Rosamond Vincy, @LondonBob

    Mexicans are interesting. I went to see Status Quo (Psychedelic 60s band who were pretty much a joke until Nickelback took that spot) in the 90s. They played everything except “Matchstick Men” and the Mexicans took over the pit and beat the $#1+ out of everybody. I talked to a guy later and asked him if the band was really big in Mexico, and apparently they were. I don’t get the connection between Brit Invasion and Mexican slam-dancing, but apparently, there is one.

  249. @YetAnotherAnon
    @wren

    Morrissey, also a purveyor of very white music, is huge in Mexico and with LA Mexicans, massive crowd reaction for a guy of 58. Here he sings Elvis in an adobe hacienda style.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UAO1ipiyUc

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Mexicans love guitars and nobody who loves guitars can fail to be impressed by Bigmouth Strikes Again.

  250. @anonymous
    @Rapparee

    "Grecian Urn"--like Rembrandt's "Aristotle Contemplating The Bust of Homer" and Beethoven's Ninth Symphony--are works of art that are impossible to describe prosaically, meant only to be read, seen or heard.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    https://quoteinvestigator.com/2010/11/08/writing-about-music/

    Dear Quote Investigator: I have a difficult riddle for you. A mailing list I belong to has discussed the following quotation several times during the past ten years, and the question of its origin has never been satisfactorily resolved.

    Writing about music is like dancing about architecture.

    Laurie Anderson, Steve Martin, Frank Zappa, Martin Mull, Elvis Costello, Thelonius Monk, Clara Schumann, Miles Davis, George Carlin and several other people have been credited with concocting this extraordinarily popular and enigmatic simile. There is another common version of the quote: “Talking about music is like dancing about architecture.” Is there any chance that you could attempt to trace this famous saying?

    • Replies: @wren
    @MEH 0910

    Someone was complaining about old squares posting videos, but this thread is old enough so please indulge me since your comment reminded me..

    Que es mas macho? Staircase o smoke rings?

    https://youtu.be/S7XgTm-vosA

  251. @Buffalo Joe
    San Francisco spent $304 million dollars on their homeless problem last year, so the music doesn't drive them too far away. I wonder if any blacks would recognize Pachelbel's Canon in D as the wedding song. Suppose you need to have a wedding to hear it.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter, @willieskull68

    And the politicians (except perhaps London Breed) fall all over themselves promising more enabling programs and even small facility housing in what must be every neighborhood.

    The most powerful person in town would be one who made a show of registering the homeless to vote. Can you imagine the controversy? Twisting of pearls.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @willieskull68

    willie, the homeless and their care are an industry in California. State Senate proposal to spend an extra $1 Billion on them next year.

  252. @HA

    … In a strange mutation, classical music devolves from a “universal language of mankind”...into a sonic border fence... Thus music returns to its oldest evolutionary function: claiming territory. Zoological research suggests that the original function of birdsong was not only attracting mates (as Darwin argued) but also asserting territorial rights.
     
    Yeah, sure -- NOW music returns to its oldest evolutionary functions. As if the last 50 years of funk, soul, rap, and hip-hop were completely innocent in the matter of trying to attract mates and blasting away enemies from said potential mates and anything else that could be considered home turf.

    The '89 movies"Say Anything" and "Do the Right Thing" both prominently featured boom boxes in the furtherance of music's oldest evolutionary functions. Which one would you say is guiltier of using music as a sonic fence?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5Y8tFQ01OY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMNvYJ6O_Ks

    Look around, people. This ain't no disco.

    Replies: @willieskull68

    and we ain’t just foolin around

  253. @Lars Porsena
    @Highlander

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMHguvZPcqQ

    And here's proof Vivaldi was metal centuries before metal was a thing. All you have to do is plug in distortion and play it normal on guitar....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWx_GyTLGmQ

    Oh the tremolo. And the cello shreds... the neck is on fire!

    For a bonus, here's a cover of the Moonlight Sonata meets Hans Zimmer.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbgInLJ81eY

    And a great remix of Tchaikovsky's piano #1 in B minor:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwA25yJOQFY

    Replies: @Gringo

    And here’s proof Vivaldi was metal centuries before metal was a thing. All you have to do is plug in distortion and play it normal on guitar….

    Also proof that those heavy metal people playing Vivaldi are rather skilled musicians.

  254. @Anonymous
    OT - there's something brewing over at DailyKos - Jason D. Hill wrote a nasty little screed, it's quite fun. The feathers are flying in the comments.

    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2018/5/18/1765322/-The-Black-Nihilism-of-Ta-Nehesi-Cotes-and-his-Racial-Pessimism

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Reading Coates, one gets the impression that the psychology of fear he attributes to black people is a projection of his own personal psychological make-up: he is deathly afraid of his own race, but, out of a sense of racial shame, finds it easier to blame white people for the endemic black-on-black violence to which he was systemically subjected to as a child, beginning with the beating inflicted on him by his own father. This is a rather unfair burden for white people in general to have to bear on behalf of a man who fetishises his personal demons.

  255. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Joe Schmoe

    The only Chick-Fil-A I've been to is the one in the A+ prime location on Westwood Blvd right across the street from UCLA, but it's a pleasure to go: the food is delicious and the service charming.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I eat at CFA about twice a month. I always like to banter with the managers. I ask them stuff like could a Seventh Day Adventist own a CFA, insult Darby and Scofield as gratuitously as possible, riff on the Book of Mormon (the play or the book itself depending) and of course, ask any Hispanophone female employees if they know why the huge wooden pepper grinder they always have on the condiment table is called a Rubirosa. It’s more fun than pulling out a cell phone at the front row of a Pretenders concert!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Anonymous

    Well, we can't all be creeps.

    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Anonymous

    Frequently a "learning made fun" experience to go back for a review of commenters a few days later. J. Ross seems to be (is he feigning??) about as humorless as your typical fifty year old lesbian Feminist Studies professor at Vassar.

    I really do appreciate your rounding out my Latinx Studies education about big pepper grinders.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porfirio_Rubirosa

    'His reputedly larger than average penis size inspired Parisian waiters to name gigantic pepper mills “Rubirosas”.'

  256. @John Gruskos
    @slumber_j

    Listen to the Brandenburg Concertos. They get somewhere.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    Yeah, I like those more than most of Bach.

  257. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @unpc downunder
    @Kylie

    No, they would hate loud or gentle classical music. It wouldn't matter if you played Bach or Prokofiev, the effect would be the same. People who hate classical music hate it because it's refined and complicated. Hence, people who are simple and unrefined hate it. The heaviness level doesn't make much difference.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Few white people HATE classical music, most of us just find that while snippets here and there are cool, most of any given orchestral piece is boring.

    I tried listening to classical radio for a solid month back in the nineties. I was in Kansas City and the station was KXTR. I had a really good stereo rig-Altec 604s with Doug Sax Mastering Labs x/o in Onken style cabs, homebrew tube amps running ultralinear 807s with Sowter transformers, and a Mac MR71 tuner aligned to a BCH with a HP8640 from a big attic Yagi. By the end of the month I was actively avoiding coming to the house because it was driving me nuts. The shitty selection of music didn’t help-every other selection was by Sir Neville Marriner of St. Martin-In-The-Field or some such, and he was mediocre, but basically, I couldn’t handle it after awhile.

    I was never so glad to hook up the CD player and start listening to rock again.

    • Replies: @Gringo
    @Anonymous

    Few white people HATE classical music, most of us just find that while snippets here and there are cool, most of any given orchestral piece is boring.
    I tried listening to classical radio for a solid month back in the nineties. I was in Kansas City and the station was KXTR.

    An objection I have to classical music stations is that they play EVERYTHING, which may not always be the best. Some obscure piano sonata from some obscure student of Czerny. Better to listen to the best, such as Bach or Mozart- or perhaps better said what you like. After I acquired a comprehensive classical CD collection, picked up for ~$2/CD in box sets, I stopped listening to classical radio. I know what I like on my CDs. What the classical music station plays, in an attempt to fill all its hours, is often more comprehensive than excellent. Though in the car I have often been pleasantly surprised.

    BTW, there is some great vocal and choral music out there. Not just orchestras.

    Everyone has different tastes. I like choral music. I prefer Bach to most Romantic or 20th century music. To each their own.

  258. @slumber_j
    @J.Ross

    I have to say that I agree with the jazz musician on NPR...and there's one of the strangest sentences I've ever written. My father was a huge Bach fan, but I never could understand what it was for, exactly.

    It's pretty: I'll give it that.

    Replies: @Barnard, @Sunbeam, @Mark Eugenikos, @ThreeCranes

    How can anyone listen to this and not be transported by Bach’s famous “walking beat”? The heights achieved by European civilization are unsurpassed.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @ThreeCranes


    How can anyone listen to this and not be transported by Bach’s famous “walking beat”? The heights achieved by European civilization are unsurpassed.
     
    As I've outlined above, I for one can listen to it and not be transported because of its failure to get anywhere: The Wall of Sound avant la lettre. I do dig the valveless horn though.

    I agree about European civilization, but that's not what we're discussing here. And I know it's pointless and maybe even a little rude to voice my objections to Bach in the face of those who love his work, just as it's pointless and maybe rude to object to The Grateful Dead to their admirers. (I object to both for many of the same reasons, although at least Bach was actually really good at what he did.)

    But I've already made that mistake, and evidently I'm gonna keep digging.
  259. @MEH 0910
    @anonymous

    https://quoteinvestigator.com/2010/11/08/writing-about-music/


    Dear Quote Investigator: I have a difficult riddle for you. A mailing list I belong to has discussed the following quotation several times during the past ten years, and the question of its origin has never been satisfactorily resolved.

    Writing about music is like dancing about architecture.
     
    Laurie Anderson, Steve Martin, Frank Zappa, Martin Mull, Elvis Costello, Thelonius Monk, Clara Schumann, Miles Davis, George Carlin and several other people have been credited with concocting this extraordinarily popular and enigmatic simile. There is another common version of the quote: “Talking about music is like dancing about architecture.” Is there any chance that you could attempt to trace this famous saying?
     
    https://quoteinvestigator.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/mullcostellomonk3.jpg

    Replies: @wren

    Someone was complaining about old squares posting videos, but this thread is old enough so please indulge me since your comment reminded me..

    Que es mas macho? Staircase o smoke rings?

  260. Haydn’s 39th Symphony (“Tempesta di mare”) is associated with his Sturm und Drang period, although:

    out of the approximately 106 symphonies we know from Haydn (some have been lost) only 11 are in minor keys. Most of these are concentrated in that brief period around 1771/72 when he is supposed to have explored what is called a “Sturm und Drang” style. The term is taken from the literary movement, though, oddly enough, Haydn’s music came first!

    http://themusicsalon.blogspot.com/2013/10/haydn-symphony-no-39-in-g-minor.html

    Symphony No. 39 is a good introduction to Franz Josef Haydn, and an excellent example of his creative genius with melodic themes. This is an enjoyable and very spirited performance and presentation here by what is probably the Oregon Symphony Orechestra under Carlos Kalmar:

    Haydn’s Symphony No. 39 in G Minor
    Carlos Kalmar at the RTVE (Radio Televisión Española) the Spanish Radio TV Hall

  261. @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I eat at CFA about twice a month. I always like to banter with the managers. I ask them stuff like could a Seventh Day Adventist own a CFA, insult Darby and Scofield as gratuitously as possible, riff on the Book of Mormon (the play or the book itself depending) and of course, ask any Hispanophone female employees if they know why the huge wooden pepper grinder they always have on the condiment table is called a Rubirosa. It's more fun than pulling out a cell phone at the front row of a Pretenders concert!

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Well, we can’t all be creeps.

  262. @Anonymous
    @unpc downunder

    Few white people HATE classical music, most of us just find that while snippets here and there are cool, most of any given orchestral piece is boring.

    I tried listening to classical radio for a solid month back in the nineties. I was in Kansas City and the station was KXTR. I had a really good stereo rig-Altec 604s with Doug Sax Mastering Labs x/o in Onken style cabs, homebrew tube amps running ultralinear 807s with Sowter transformers, and a Mac MR71 tuner aligned to a BCH with a HP8640 from a big attic Yagi. By the end of the month I was actively avoiding coming to the house because it was driving me nuts. The shitty selection of music didn't help-every other selection was by Sir Neville Marriner of St. Martin-In-The-Field or some such, and he was mediocre, but basically, I couldn't handle it after awhile.

    I was never so glad to hook up the CD player and start listening to rock again.

    Replies: @Gringo

    Few white people HATE classical music, most of us just find that while snippets here and there are cool, most of any given orchestral piece is boring.
    I tried listening to classical radio for a solid month back in the nineties. I was in Kansas City and the station was KXTR.

    An objection I have to classical music stations is that they play EVERYTHING, which may not always be the best. Some obscure piano sonata from some obscure student of Czerny. Better to listen to the best, such as Bach or Mozart- or perhaps better said what you like. After I acquired a comprehensive classical CD collection, picked up for ~$2/CD in box sets, I stopped listening to classical radio. I know what I like on my CDs. What the classical music station plays, in an attempt to fill all its hours, is often more comprehensive than excellent. Though in the car I have often been pleasantly surprised.

    BTW, there is some great vocal and choral music out there. Not just orchestras.

    Everyone has different tastes. I like choral music. I prefer Bach to most Romantic or 20th century music. To each their own.

  263. @Steve Sailer
    @NOTA

    Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shi'ite organization, was part way to being something of a real state with an army that could fight the Israeli army and welfare programs for its people. I don't know about lately, but Hezbollah was one of the more impressive Arab political entities: a bunch of backwoods nobodies who got themselves organized.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Karl

    Sounds like the Zetas.

  264. #ThugLife
    Warren G performs Borodin’s Prince Igor

  265. @J.Ross
    Akshuallllllly it does clarify in the novel and film that Alex is unique: none of his friends dig it, but they mostly know not to interrupt him (viz Dim in the milkbar scene).
    -----
    Anonymous advice on 4chan from a while back on how to repulse black customers at a store without attracting Eric Holder's attention: "play classical music. Seriously, they can't be in the same room."
    -----
    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach. The interviewed affects shock and asks why, and the jazz man's reasons are redolent of Wagner's complaints about Mendelssohn: it's like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood. "Ditta ditta da, up here, and then it goes ditta ditta da down there. Why do I need to go up here and then down there?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @PhysicistDave, @slumber_j, @Pat Boyle, @Rosamond Vincy, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Jim Don Bob

    Doesn’t music soothe a savage breast? Hey, how about the soundtrack to “Deliverance” on continuous loop? Actually, that might attract ’em, being subliminally suggestive of forcible sodomy in isolation . . .

  266. @wren
    @the one they call Desanex

    A few years ago I was searching YouTube for the old 2 tone second wave ska that I enjoyed when I was younger, and was surprised to see that it was so popular with Mexican kids. Even the Japanese ska band videos were filled with Spanish comments that I think were from Mexico and not Spain.

    Or maybe Mexican kids living in LA? The videos of kids dancing to ska seemed to fit that profile.

    Replies: @wren, @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @Rosamond Vincy, @LondonBob

    Ska defines me as a person and I will never turn my back on ska.

  267. @Lars Porsena
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Hmmm. I have heard Apocalyptica but I did not know they are also Finnish.

    Why are all the good metal bands Finnish? I should be Finnish. I was born musically transracial, I need corrective surgery to give me a last name I can't pronounce.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Scandinavia generally seems a pretty metallic place. Maybe all that Nordic niceness gets tiring and it’s a socially acceptable way to go Full Pagan Viking.

    (Finnish is such an odd language, I think you have to learn the pronounciation. Fortunately Swedish is also an official language so road signs and lots of other things are also in Swedish – which bears a whole heap more relation to English than Finnish does. I think it’s related only to Hungarian and Estonian).

  268. @ThreeCranes
    @slumber_j

    How can anyone listen to this and not be transported by Bach's famous "walking beat"? The heights achieved by European civilization are unsurpassed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lz0FmmNrTck

    Replies: @slumber_j

    How can anyone listen to this and not be transported by Bach’s famous “walking beat”? The heights achieved by European civilization are unsurpassed.

    As I’ve outlined above, I for one can listen to it and not be transported because of its failure to get anywhere: The Wall of Sound avant la lettre. I do dig the valveless horn though.

    I agree about European civilization, but that’s not what we’re discussing here. And I know it’s pointless and maybe even a little rude to voice my objections to Bach in the face of those who love his work, just as it’s pointless and maybe rude to object to The Grateful Dead to their admirers. (I object to both for many of the same reasons, although at least Bach was actually really good at what he did.)

    But I’ve already made that mistake, and evidently I’m gonna keep digging.

  269. @Almost Missouri
    When Burger King and Seven Eleven are the "privileged areas" protected from "common crowds" by Bach and Mozart, maybe it is time to concede that this whole civilization thing has run its course?

    Replies: @Jake, @International Jew

    Well, it’s not about just Burger King and Taco Bell. That corner is where you emerge from the Bay Area subway system if you’re headed for the symphony or the opera in San Francisco.

  270. Remember what Amy “battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother” Chua said about her reason for pushing her daughters into classical music? It was in the middle of a discourse on “generational decline”, Amy’s greatest fear. And she said that the discipline and order of classical music were the opposite of generational decline.

  271. @Anonymous
    @Anon

    Heino is not fascist. He is an old “schlager” music singer, who has an ironic cult following with a few US hipsters. He is the German equivalent of some guy in Branson who was on Lawrence Welk.

    Replies: @flyingtiger

    Reminds me of that Pat Boone album of heavy metal music, which I strangely liked.

  272. @Joe Schmoe
    @RadicalCenter

    I know a lot of homeschooled kids, some of them black, who worked or work at Chick fil A. In hiring, you can only hire from among those who apply. Since a lot of homeschooled students apply to chick fil A because the business is friendly to conservative Christians, Chick fil A can then hire them. They can also fire them. I know a sweet homeschooled girl who was fired the first day she worked there. I don't know any homeschooled kids working at any other fast food chains, nor any who even applied. Surely some are, but I don't know them. I think it just comes down to self selection. Home schooled students are more likely to apply, so Chick fil A ends up hiring more of them.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Joe Joe

    What did she do that would cause her to be fired on her first day?

  273. @Bardon Kaldian
    I wonder what would be their reactions to 20th C music, something like Schoenberg or Bartok....

    Replies: @flyingtiger

    I had the same thought. Has it been tried/

  274. @Anon
    I don't think it's classical as such (though I'm open to research on this). Country western would do the same -- perhaps it reminds them of lynching? But even their own, older (better) music would drive them out: blues (Robert Johnson), jazz (Charlie Parker), R&B (Louis Jordan), even (esp.) gospel (Mahalia Jackson).

    No, the problem is that like children, they only want to hear one thing: their own current favorite, eg. [c]rap or rap[e] music.

    Frankly, you could say the same about white kids into metal.

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    No you can’t. White kids aren’t burning down cities, raping women wholesale, carjacking in record numbers all to the strains of goth metal. Metal to Rap is apples to oranges comparison.

    Come on. Google the FBI’s report on crime stats, by racial group, etc.

    At least metal, unlike rap, still actually requires musical technical skill with guitars, bass, and drums and not simply having a microphone and a synthesizer.

  275. @Amasius
    Baroque music really is the best:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYPv7Zc7EVE&start_radio=1&list=RDGMEM8h-ASY4B42jYeBhBnqb3-wVMRYPv7Zc7EVE

    It's a shame that we don't have castrati anymore so the operas can't be performed properly. Their power, range, and clarity were truly unsurpassable as we can see in this head to head comparison:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=al6yn4xHOuY

    Replies: @Amasius, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    What I think tends to get lost regarding opera is that a full century and a half ago, the arias were often the equivalent of the hit parade among not just Italian-American immigrants but also among solidly WASP upper and middle classes. They had a fairly broad range and people tended to listen to the music much more so than they do today. At one time, opera was “hip” or “cool” because during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries it was current. The youth will always gravitate toward musical styles that are current since that’s perceived as hip and cool. Unfortunately, rap has been current for nearly thirty years and counting.

    Will there ever be a new musical style or form that replaces rap in the minds of the young? A bit depressing to think that this is it, and that the US won’t move on and find a new style that’s totally different and yet current and thus hip.

  276. @Rohirrimborn
    @Thirdeye

    And if you want to go nuclear try Japanese. Is Yoko considered japanese?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdZ9weP5i68

    Replies: @fish, @RadicalCenter, @Bliss

    Since the japanese are usually accused of being imitators instead of innovators, which western avant-garde idiot was Yoko Ono imitating here?

    That she actually was applauded instead of laughed at shows what a silly circle jerk the art scene often is. On the other hand, the commenters at Youtube feel free to tell it like it is:

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    @Bliss

    I once saw her and Sean perform with Cibo Matto. She may not have realized it, but she was laughed at, at least by everyone in my vicinity. Even the applause was sarcastic.

  277. @RadicalCenter
    @Buffalo Joe

    LOL ;) But seriously, many African-"Americans" can go their whole lives without getting married or even having a sibling or close friend get married.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    RC, you know that is probably and sadly true.

  278. @willieskull68
    @Buffalo Joe

    And the politicians (except perhaps London Breed) fall all over themselves promising more enabling programs and even small facility housing in what must be every neighborhood.

    The most powerful person in town would be one who made a show of registering the homeless to vote. Can you imagine the controversy? Twisting of pearls.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    willie, the homeless and their care are an industry in California. State Senate proposal to spend an extra $1 Billion on them next year.

  279. Here are some examples of stuff I think would be interesting to test. It would be sure to drive off more than just the target audience, or whether it would even work on them. In my experience even regular people who hate metal, they’re not going to regularly listen to this stuff but they don’t hate it, much like their attitude to classical music it’s interesting and OK when they come across it sometimes.

    It helps the most for accessibility to strip the vocals or do clean ones. The first band is instrumental, I think it is a couple of teenagers that put a garage album on youtube but it’s awesome. The second is a mix of all kinds of vocals and choruses, almost kind of operatic in the peasant sense. I was never a fan of opera myself but I can appreciate how they sing a story in various styles. It’s another Finnish (now defunct) band.

    I would love if anyone could tell me what language they’re singing in though or where the music they’re drawing inspiration from comes from. Some kind of gypsy/balkan/russian kick dance reel thing I’d love to hear more of.

    They are both drawing on traditional/folk instrument inspirations so they maybe fit in with this folk metal phenomenon which is actually a thing now. To the extent all sorts of bands globally are drawing on traditional instruments and music to make folk metal type stuff, the instruments and style vary everywhere depending on where you are, from scottish bagpipes, bombardon, accordion polka, flamenco or dueling banjos. As a consequence of this metal as a genera has really matured in the last decade or so, there is now just an insane amount of diversity and range of metal bands drawing on every other type of music in addition to the good old standard metal types.

    These guys I think are Swiss, they are named after the Helvetti tribe of celtics that lived in the alps in roman times. They’ve also done I think whole albums worth with clean female vocals but this one is straight death metal, albeit melodic. Brutality, check. Bagpipe, check. Flute, check. Bombardon, check. Pyrotechnics, check.

  280. Used this to get the kids out of the school..in the inner city, where I taught, they liked to stay and hang out on the stairs by my classroom, playing loud music and jivin’…administration would not act. But I really hit gold when I started playing Hank Williams. The great Hank cleared em out and kept ’em out.

  281. @J.Ross
    Akshuallllllly it does clarify in the novel and film that Alex is unique: none of his friends dig it, but they mostly know not to interrupt him (viz Dim in the milkbar scene).
    -----
    Anonymous advice on 4chan from a while back on how to repulse black customers at a store without attracting Eric Holder's attention: "play classical music. Seriously, they can't be in the same room."
    -----
    A jazz musician being interviewed on NPR mentioned that he hated Bach. The interviewed affects shock and asks why, and the jazz man's reasons are redolent of Wagner's complaints about Mendelssohn: it's like a tuning-up exercise that goes on for too long, technical specificity without blood. "Ditta ditta da, up here, and then it goes ditta ditta da down there. Why do I need to go up here and then down there?"

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @YetAnotherAnon, @PhysicistDave, @slumber_j, @Pat Boyle, @Rosamond Vincy, @Bard of Bumperstickers, @Jim Don Bob

    . . . how to repulse black customers . . .

    That’s why classical music is on at my house 16 hours a day. Cheaper than ADT.

    • LOL: Kylie
  282. @slumber_j
    @Barnard


    According to Bach himself:

    “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.”
     
    Right. But presumably Handel wrote Messiah for the same reason, for example, and it doesn't leave me feeling trapped in an endless skein of pretty noodling. It gets somewhere.

    Replies: @John Gruskos, @Jim Don Bob

    I was driving through Buffalo yesterday and heard Van Cliburn play the finale of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. Truly an astonishing piece of music played by a master. I would put it and others like it on a continuous loop if I owned a business.

    I like rock and roll but classical is the only thing I can listen to while working.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jim Don Bob

    Van Cliburn was a case.

    I was in St. Louis one weekend and he was appearing at a piano store right off I-70 coming in from St. Charles. A female friend of mine said she was at the store and they had a sign specifically warning people not to bring up the movie, "Let's Make Love", in which Van Cliburn is, along with Elvis and Maria Callas, lambasted. This was in the late 1990s-apparently Mr. VC was disturbed by this after close to forty years.

    Replies: @Kylie

  283. @Bliss
    @Rohirrimborn

    Since the japanese are usually accused of being imitators instead of innovators, which western avant-garde idiot was Yoko Ono imitating here?

    That she actually was applauded instead of laughed at shows what a silly circle jerk the art scene often is. On the other hand, the commenters at Youtube feel free to tell it like it is:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HdZ9weP5i68

    Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    I once saw her and Sean perform with Cibo Matto. She may not have realized it, but she was laughed at, at least by everyone in my vicinity. Even the applause was sarcastic.

  284. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    @slumber_j

    I was driving through Buffalo yesterday and heard Van Cliburn play the finale of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata. Truly an astonishing piece of music played by a master. I would put it and others like it on a continuous loop if I owned a business.

    I like rock and roll but classical is the only thing I can listen to while working.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Van Cliburn was a case.

    I was in St. Louis one weekend and he was appearing at a piano store right off I-70 coming in from St. Charles. A female friend of mine said she was at the store and they had a sign specifically warning people not to bring up the movie, “Let’s Make Love”, in which Van Cliburn is, along with Elvis and Maria Callas, lambasted. This was in the late 1990s-apparently Mr. VC was disturbed by this after close to forty years.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Anonymous

    I heard Van Cliburn play Rach 2 in 1973. He had no stage presence to speak of, he seemed uncomfortable though not uncongenial. He played as if he were alone, shifting about on the bench. It was a dreamy, romantic interpretation.

  285. @unit472
    I recall reading that dairy cows enjoy classical music. Be interesting if some dairy farmer cum psychologist would do a study of cow milk production after being exposed to Vivaldi, AC/DC and James Brown!

    Replies: @Alden, @Thirdeye

    It’s true light classical type like waltzes. My brothers a dairy farmer. Farmers have experimented. Cows seem to get depressed by sad country western of the dog died wife left me truck broke down type

  286. @Alice
    Because it is music written for the glory of God.

    Evil detests God's Glory.

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan, @Svigor

    Pretty much.

    It’s not a socioeconomic thing. It’s a shitbird thing.

  287. @Anonymous
    @Jim Don Bob

    Van Cliburn was a case.

    I was in St. Louis one weekend and he was appearing at a piano store right off I-70 coming in from St. Charles. A female friend of mine said she was at the store and they had a sign specifically warning people not to bring up the movie, "Let's Make Love", in which Van Cliburn is, along with Elvis and Maria Callas, lambasted. This was in the late 1990s-apparently Mr. VC was disturbed by this after close to forty years.

    Replies: @Kylie

    I heard Van Cliburn play Rach 2 in 1973. He had no stage presence to speak of, he seemed uncomfortable though not uncongenial. He played as if he were alone, shifting about on the bench. It was a dreamy, romantic interpretation.

  288. One thing is that the music of composers such as Vivaldi, Mozart and Handel imakes you feel happy and optimistic. Emotions that are incompatible with adopting an anti-social stance.

    BTW, it would be interesting to see the reaction to playing Gregorian chant. But you couldn’t do it in a Starbucks: it would feel blasphemous to drink coffee to that .

    Two personal notes. My father always had classical music playing at home. But, when I was a moody adolescent of about 14, I listened to rock for a few years. And then no longer felt a need for it.

    Recently I met some friends. Their son was 23 and plays in a string quartet (he’s a physics student). He was also remarkably polite. Coincidence? I think not.

  289. @unit472
    I recall reading that dairy cows enjoy classical music. Be interesting if some dairy farmer cum psychologist would do a study of cow milk production after being exposed to Vivaldi, AC/DC and James Brown!

    Replies: @Alden, @Thirdeye

    You said cum! heh-heh-heh-heh-heh

  290. @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I eat at CFA about twice a month. I always like to banter with the managers. I ask them stuff like could a Seventh Day Adventist own a CFA, insult Darby and Scofield as gratuitously as possible, riff on the Book of Mormon (the play or the book itself depending) and of course, ask any Hispanophone female employees if they know why the huge wooden pepper grinder they always have on the condiment table is called a Rubirosa. It's more fun than pulling out a cell phone at the front row of a Pretenders concert!

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Frequently a “learning made fun” experience to go back for a review of commenters a few days later. J. Ross seems to be (is he feigning??) about as humorless as your typical fifty year old lesbian Feminist Studies professor at Vassar.

    I really do appreciate your rounding out my Latinx Studies education about big pepper grinders.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porfirio_Rubirosa

    ‘His reputedly larger than average penis size inspired Parisian waiters to name gigantic pepper mills “Rubirosas”.’

  291. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve - listen to a short romantic harpsichord piece (harpsichord plus small string orchestra), written by a guy killed at Tobruk in WW2. The second movement (around 3:35) is exquisite.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnkPIeeWexA

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian

    Thanks, YetAnother, that is a lovely work. A life cut short, unfortunately.

  292. @Larry, San Francisco
    @Tiny Duck

    Well there is this great version of cultural appropriation

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGDZc9bdUZM

    I guess we should ban this.

    Replies: @Thirdeye

    Here’s the killer version:

  293. @RadicalCenter
    @Saxon

    You're right. I'd suggest "visit Vienna soon, before it's gone":

    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/4229/austria-muslims-vienna-schools

    Yet another of my ancestors' lands simply surrendered to savages.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Muslims aren’t savages.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Corvinus

    But you might be: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Cd3Mt2SDCw

    Replies: @Corvinus

  294. @Corvinus
    @RadicalCenter

    Muslims aren't savages.

    Replies: @Anon

    But you might be:

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Anon

    You have a weird definition of what constitutes a troll.

    Regardless, Muslims aren't savages.

    Replies: @Anon

  295. @Buzz Mohawk
    @El Dato

    Thanks for the interesting read. I note that the specific version came from Vienna, and that what sets it apart is an organic rhythm.

    I don't know much about music, but I was told by a very nice Austrian man that waltzes played by Viennese orchestras are the best for that same reason. (He overheard me happily remarking that Austrian Airlines was playing The Blue Danube as my wife and I boarded a plane there. That is a wonderful country with nice people to go with the music.)

    Replies: @jim jones, @wren, @wren, @MBlanc46

    Haven’t been to Austria for forty years, but I remember it having the most Old World charm of all the Western European countries.

  296. @Anon
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide

    The vaguely fascist German folk singer Heino, who is a dead ringer for Karl Lagerfeld, revived his career singing death metal. Here's a sample:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMw1Ta4bsAg

    And here he is singing "Roll out the Barrel":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOE0ISnLXR4

    Heino is not to be confused with Die Twinnies:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4OzX8QOUW8

    Replies: @Anonymous, @MBlanc46

    Thanks for those.

  297. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Anonymous

    This here music will work like a box of diamondback rattlesnakes:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xOxHyTP91c

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @MBlanc46

    Thanks. Proof that American blacks are not without hope.

  298. There is also a predictable opposite to this. In one nice but fairly boring downtown that the city elders were trying to pep up, a Hooters-like bar opened up. From the street, you could see the many large screens and the scantily clad women, and hear loud the thump of hip-hop. The place was distasteful to me, which is why I always grinned when I saw the vagrants gather nearby to leer at the women, watch the TVs and listen to the beats. Best bench a guy could find to lie down on downtown I think. Neither the patrons, the workers, nor the owners seemed happy with the situation, but I guess they didn’t try classical. Thankfully, the place closed down.

  299. @Steve Sailer
    @NOTA

    Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shi'ite organization, was part way to being something of a real state with an army that could fight the Israeli army and welfare programs for its people. I don't know about lately, but Hezbollah was one of the more impressive Arab political entities: a bunch of backwoods nobodies who got themselves organized.

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose, @Karl

    209 Steve Sailer > one of the more impressive Arab political entities

    Yes, study Hezhollah, and learn that Arabs can be effectively orchestrated into a functioning society by Iranian military “advisers”, eh?

  300. @Anon
    @Corvinus

    But you might be: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Cd3Mt2SDCw

    Replies: @Corvinus

    You have a weird definition of what constitutes a troll.

    Regardless, Muslims aren’t savages.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Corvinus


    You have a weird definition of what constitutes a troll.
     
    Name three commenters here who consider you anything else.

    Regardless, Muslims aren’t savages.
     
    Irrelevant, but you are.
  301. @Corvinus
    @Anon

    You have a weird definition of what constitutes a troll.

    Regardless, Muslims aren't savages.

    Replies: @Anon

    You have a weird definition of what constitutes a troll.

    Name three commenters here who consider you anything else.

    Regardless, Muslims aren’t savages.

    Irrelevant, but you are.

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