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Here’s the lead story in the Washington Post news section:

Trump’s push to amplify racism unnerves Republicans who have long enabled him

By Robert Costa and Philip Rucker
July 4, 2020 at 9:24 a.m. PDT

President Trump’s unyielding push to preserve Confederate symbols

Huh?

and the legacy of white domination, crystallized by his harsh denunciation of the racial justice movement Friday night at Mount Rushmore, has unnerved Republicans who have long enabled him but now fear losing power and forever associating their party with his racial animus.

Although amplifying racism and stoking culture wars have been mainstays of Trump’s public identity for decades, they have been particularly pronounced this summer as the president has reacted to the national reckoning over systemic discrimination by seeking to weaponize the anger and resentment of some white Americans for his own political gain.

Trump has left little doubt through his utterances the past few weeks that he sees himself not only as the Republican standard-bearer but as leader of a modern grievance movement animated by civic strife and marked by calls for “white power,” the phrase chanted by one of his supporters in a video the president shared last weekend on Twitter. He later deleted the video but did not disavow its message.

Trump put his strategy to resuscitate his troubled reelection campaign by galvanizing white supporters on display Friday night under the chiseled granite gaze of four past presidents memorialized in the Black Hills of South Dakota. He celebrated Independence Day with a dystopian speech in which he excoriated racial justice protesters as “evil” representatives of a “new far-left fascism” whose ultimate goal is “the end of America.”

“Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values, and indoctrinate our children,” Trump said to boos from a packed crowd of supporters. “Angry mobs are trying to tear down statues of our founders, deface our most sacred memorials, and unleash a wave of violent crime in our cities.”

Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role in paying for this kind of rhetoric.

Assume for the moment that Trump, like Lincoln in 1860s wins the Electoral College with a minority of the popular vote, which is becoming more plausible as anti-Trump forces become more crazed with their anti-white racial hate. Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.

I actually think that Bezos would prefer not to go down in history as the man who paid for blowing up the Constitutional republic.

Come on, Jeff, you are the richest man in the world. Did you work that hard to make $166 billion in order to be held hostage in fear that some 20-something interns would be peeved if you cleaned house?

 
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  1. Costa ia former NRO reporter. He’s gone full Oliver Darcy.

    • Agree: dcthrowback
    • Replies: @Barnard
    @IHTG

    I don't think Costa was ever a conservative he mostly did reporting, not commentary at National Review. They have a number of former reporters who have gone left after leaving, not to mention the opinion writers who have done so.

    His name on the byline does speak to Steve's point about Bezos needing to stand up to 20 something interns in the Washington Post newsroom. Costa is 34 and Philip Rucker looks like he is in his 40s. Both have a lot of experience covering politics in Washington. This absurd rhetoric is the norm in newsrooms now. Age and experience don't seem to be moderating factors in the press. Costa was on the board of Notre Dame for three years and his dad was an attorney for Bristol Myers Squibb. These aren't people who should be lefty kooks. It gives a good example of how thoroughly this derangement has spread among the elites.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon

    , @SMK
    @IHTG

    It doesn't surprise me that Costa is a "former NRO reporter." Trump-hating "cucks" and neocons are just as deranged and psychotic as Trump-hating leftists. David From has gone mad since Trump was elected president, as have Bill Kristol, who's joined the democratic party, and Max Boot, who said he'd voted for Stalin if he was running against Trump, and he wasn't joking, apparently. And Rick Wilson, the most deranged and execrable of all the deranged and execrable Trump-haters.

    Sam Harris has also gone mad since Trump was elected President, and has had Frum as a guest on four 2-hour podcasts, 8-hours of deranged and psychotic Trump hatred from two deranged and psychotic Trump-haters. One of the topics they discuss is "the prospect that Trump will refuse to leave office." So Frum and Harris are so deranged and psychotic that they believe Trump will "refuse to leave office" if he loses to Joe Biden or at the end of his second term if re-elected. Harris believes that Trump is an "existential threat to democracy. In response to this lunacy and psychosis I sent him an email which I'm sure he didn't read. To quote:

    Exactly how is Trump an "existential threat to democracy"? Exactly how is Trump, if he loses to Biden or is re-elected, going to abolish democracy, assuming that's his intention (which no sane person believes), when he'd be opposed, hypothetically, by all democrats, all republican, many if not most of whom detest him, all of the media, including Fox News and talk radio, the FBI and Justice Dept, which join the CIA in a conspiracy and witch-hunt and attempted coup, unprecedented in all of American history, to subvert democracy and the will of 60 million voters by to impeaching Trump and removing him from office with not a scintilla of evidence that he "colluded" with Putin and Russians to deny the evil witch he divine right to be the first woman president; and the military, which has always been neutral, politically, albeit some general have violated that history and tradition of neutrality by denouncing Trump. No president could abolish democracy, and impose a dictatorship, without the support of the police and military. Anyone wo believes that Trump has even thought of doing this for even a moment is psychotic and guilty of paranoia induced by "Trump derangement syndrome."

    The Trump-haters are guilty of "projection," as Tucker Carlson observes, of doing and wanting exactly what they accuse Trump of doing and wanting. But they see their goal as a crusade, idealistic and noble and imperative, to save democracy by abolishing democracy.

    Replies: @Neuday

    , @Stan
    @IHTG

    Costa and Rucker. Where do you think most of the anti-white hatred originates if a Hispanic and Jew are the authors?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Mr. XYZ
    @IHTG

    Is Oliver Darcy even Oliver Darcy's real name? He is Iranian-American, after all.

    , @Richard B
    @IHTG


    Costa ia former NRO reporter. He’s gone full Oliver Darcy.
     

    calls for “white power,” the phrase chanted by one of his supporters
     
    10 to 1 it was either Costa or Rucker in disguise.

    Or some paid protester masquerading as a Trump supporter.
  2. The Broken Overton Window fallacy: When you are sitting pretty in your plantation and your politicial fanzines move the Overton Window so much that it splinters and you actually think all you need to do is to place a call to the recently immigrated window repairmen to get it fixed.

    • Replies: @Hockamaw
    @El Dato

    Excellent comment

    , @Fluesterwitz
    @El Dato

    I'm going to appropriate that.

  3. Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role in paying for this kind of rhetoric.

    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Alexander Turok

    You talk like a fag and your shit’s all retarded.

    , @J.Ross
    @Alexander Turok

    Turok has cracked it. All the commenters are actually Steve sockpuppetting. Which means that Turok is also Steve.

    Replies: @No Recent Commenting History

    , @Corvinus
    @Alexander Turok

    "And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section."

    Dude, it's tin cup month. He can't afford to upset the applecart. Hence, Mr. Sailer's over the top post replete with false premises and confirmation bias and his kid gloves approach to Covid-19 deniers and continued Trump malfeasance.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Alan Mercer, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Alexander Turok


    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.
     
    There is no "corona-denying" crackpot rhetoric here. Some people merely pointed out that the country is having a massive freakout over a pandemic that is no worse than The Asian Flu of 1957. It is not our fault that bed-wetting hysterics like you can't keep your sh*t together.
    , @anon
    @Alexander Turok


    corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.
     
    The comments section of a random blog or the Washington Post. Which of these is more significant?
    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Alexander Turok

    "And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section."

    I checked my venerable 'Bedwetters' text file. You are toppity-top because alphabet.

    Get Out Live Life! faggot!

    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    @Alexander Turok

    I know it's been 11 days, but I just want you to know that you are the single most consistently stupid poster on this site.

  4. At this point I’m 100% behind the gubmint taking a sword through the Gordian Knot of Systemic Racism by expropriating Amazon and dividing its assets among all the country’s blacks as reparations.

    The black guy who slammed his car into two non-binary white chick BLM protestors in Seattle, throwing them into the air like ragdolls resulting in one of them dying and the other in a coma in the ICU, is identified as a 27 year old Ethiopian named Dawit Kelete. Incidentally 80 people have died in Oromo protests in Ethiopia, and the Ethiopian prime minister Abiy Ahmed has a known record of demeaning African-Americans and BLM. Aren’t we all thrilled to be continually enrolled in the inscrutable racial contests of the Old Country?

    https://borkena.com/2020/06/06/black-lives-matter-politics-in-ethiopia/

    • Agree: 216
    • Replies: @Dmon
    @Coag

    Time to start a campaign demanding that all merchandise on Amazon be free to black people.

    , @Jack D
    @Coag

    Thank god Kelete was black. If he had been white, all of the remaining statues in America would have been torn down and maybe they would have moved on to living humans too.

    Will the trial of Kelete get as much publicity as that of James Fields Jr. (the Charlotte car attacker) or will he be quickly memory holed because he does not fit the Narrative?

    I think that Kelete didn't own any mirrors and mistakenly believed that he was a white person. In all of his online photos he is hanging out exclusively with whites, especially young white blonde females:

    https://heavy.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/2014-11-09-20.46.35-850302645005345469_20441943_censored.jpg

    https://heavy.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/2014-11-08-16.37.44-849452618548667138_20441943_censored.jpg

    This would explain why he attacked a BLM Peaceful Protest.

    Before this "accident", the Seattle State Police were helpless, helpless I tell you to prevent marchers from blocking traffic on their main transportation artery every day:

    BEFORE:


    “In a time that requires care and flexibility, we are exercising the safest means possible to avoid injuries or worse to motorists, protesters, WSDOT personnel and our troopers by closing the roadway as needed and separating protestors from vehicular traffic. With no effective way of stopping large crowds from entering its lengthy borders, temporarily shutting the roadway is our best measure to avoid the dangerous mixture of freeway speed, vehicles, and pedestrians and to end the disruptions as quickly as possible.”
     
    After the tragedy, the State Patrol announced it wasn’t letting protesters on the freeway:

    AFTER:


    “The @wastatepatrol will not be allowing protesters to enter I-5. For the safety of all citizens including protesters and motorists, pedestrians walking on the freeway will be arrested.”

     

    This apparently never occurred to them before. Who knew that marching on the freeway was a crime? In Philly when the Peaceful Protesters tried this, they just teargassed them and arrested as many as they could grab.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Bill P

    , @S. Anonyia
    @Coag

    Well, honestly, why did they refuse to move once they saw him barreling towards them? The driver shouldn’t keep going but that’s just being exceptionally stupid/naive to not get out of the way. Darwin Award level stupidity.

    Falls back on administration of the city, too. In my (majority black) city, when the majority white (and very young, as in dumb 17 year olds from the suburbs) protestors started marching towards a section of the interstate that is an infamous bottleneck, they were dispersed immediately with tear gas before they could even get on the exit ramps.

  5. “blowing up the Constitutional Republic”. Should read “blowing up the Constitutional Democracy”.

    The Republic ended with the direct election of Senators in 1913, 17th amendment. Monetary policy was transfered to experts at the Fed. WWI’s kick off in 1914 was just a coincidence.

    • Agree: sayless
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @George

    Thank you, George!

    Amendment XVII was no minor administrative housekeeping rule change, as many Americans figure. I'm really getting the impression that other than XXI (repealing XVIII), America was at Peak Constitutional Amendment way back in 1791, when the first 10 were incorporated into the document.

    , @Chris Mallory
    @George

    The Republic ended in 1865 with the victory of the Yankee forces turning These United States into The Untied States and making the country an empire.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Sam Malone

    , @Corvinus
    @George

    Actually, the Republic has flourished as a result of that amendment, as it reigned in corruption at the state level and enabled the people to hold elected representatives accountable.

  6. A newspaper is a reasonable group of people and thus structurally brighter and more insightful as a single man – no matter how rich (or bright, yes) he might be.

    The thing is: Monasteries and the universities which sprang from them in the middle ages together with the crafts propelled the success of Europe and later the USA. This institutionalized rationality, reason, practical knowledge and taste (music/the arts…) was (and still is) a package which for a historical period of a few centuries, was unbeatable (and unsurpassed).

    To make this dynamic in its complexity maybe even better clear: Freedom and reason and rationality and practical knowledge and taste rest upon one another (engineers and craftspersons are the closest of these relatives).

    To be successful with a modern paper as an institution that lives up to the western heritage and it’s manyfold accomplishments would imply to publish controversial ideas. and that – here is a true paradox at work – might diminish – or at least endanger – the commercial success of an enterprise like the WaPo from time to time. Sucess for a news medium is not commercial success alone.

    The commercial risk-part would be no problem for Jezz Bezos. Whether he is rooted enough in the Western tradition to understand how vital it is for a modern paper to cultivate contradiction/ opposing viewpoints, open debate (=heterodoxy) I don’t know.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Dieter Kief

    I agree the lack of free expression runs the risk of leading to long-term decay in the fashion of post-Ghazali Islamic society, Imperial China, etc.

    But that's a long-term problem, and Bezos is most likely concerned with staying rich now. Long-term cultural decline isn't likely to be a major concern for him.

    By the time China's genetically engineered superscientists have leaped ahead of us, Bezos will be old enough not to care.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    , @Alfa158
    @Dieter Kief

    “ A newspaper is a reasonable group of people ”

    Are you referring to The Daily Planet? That is a fictional newspaper. There are no reasonable people running the NYT, Washington Post or other newspapers that actually exist.

    “ Whether he is rooted enough in the Western tradition to understand how vital it is for a modern paper to cultivate contradiction/ opposing viewpoints, open debate (=heterodoxy)”

    No one at those papers has shown the faintest interest in cultivating open debate and will fire anyone who tries.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Prester John

  7. @El Dato
    The Broken Overton Window fallacy: When you are sitting pretty in your plantation and your politicial fanzines move the Overton Window so much that it splinters and you actually think all you need to do is to place a call to the recently immigrated window repairmen to get it fixed.

    Replies: @Hockamaw, @Fluesterwitz

    Excellent comment

  8. Back in the Stone Age, I used to teach a master class where the primary texts were both by George Bernard Shaw: “Arms and the Man” and “How He Lied To Her Husband.” The purpose of the class was to analyze how someone becomes self-deceived, and then how or if they can become un-deceived, by an outside party, by themselves, or maybe by themselves using a second or third party, or maybe never (the Shirley Jackson gambit).

    In recent times, I’ve switched the main texts to using Disney’s “Frozen” and the Dreamworks movie “How To Train Your Dragon.” I used to think that “Frozen” was a great study of individual psychopathology, a tragedy of enormous inflicted self-hatred which is finally overcome by its counterpart, something to be used in twelve-step programs; but now I’m starting to think it has political dimensions. It takes a bit of thinking, but then again “Frozen” is the single greatest art-work of our era, so contemplation should come slowly.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    You may find this Pygmalion-themed piece on Jeffrey Epstein to be of interest:

    https://airmail.news/issues/2020-7-4/my-tea-with-jeffrey-epstein-1?utm_campaign=2020-7-4-2&utm_medium=email&utm_source=delivery

    , @Dumbo
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    It takes a bit of thinking, but then again “Frozen” is the single greatest art-work of our era
     
    Well, I know current art mostly sucks, but really...? I mean, it's well-done, but... Come on...
    Now, if you want to examine it more intellectually, I think "Frozen" is really "about assimilating the shadow", in Jungian terms. Maybe Jordan Peterson likes it too. Plus, of course, some cheap Neo-Disneyan feminist themes thrown in.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  9. Anon[175] • Disclaimer says:

    One crazy part of this is the byline. Robert Costa used to work for National Review and got his big break when Larry Kudlow had him on his old CNBC show regularly. That’s how he came to the attention of the Post. As some of you may remember, he repaid Kudlow by reporting/tattling that Larry had Peter Brimelow at his house as a guest for his birthday party. Costa knew because he was also an invited guest to the party.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-adviser-larry-kudlow-hosted-publisher-of-white-nationalists-at-his-home/2018/08/21/f418a76c-a55e-11e8-8fac-12e98c13528d_story.html%3foutputType=amp

    Now Costa makes big bucks hosting the unwatched and unwatchable Washington Week on PBS and appearing on MSNBC. And he also writes garbage like this for the Post. The disloyalty and abject bootlicking genuinely makes me nauseous.

    • Agree: Percy Gryce
    • Thanks: Dieter Kief, Ed
    • Replies: @Prester John
    @Anon

    WaPo, PMSNBC evidently showed him the money. He sounds like a mercenary.

    , @Ed
    @Anon

    What a scummy guy. Curious as to why Trump folks would talk to hostile reporters? I wouldn’t feed this guy info if I worked at the WH.

    Replies: @Forbes

  10. He is a very smart man so he must see some sort of gain in tearing the country down. Maybe that ugly woman he whacked up with is pushing this?

    • Agree: botazefa
  11. I actually think that Bezos would prefer not to go down in history as the man who paid for blowing up the Constitutional republic.

    The Constitution is already dead.

    If the Constitution still meant anything, we wouldn’t have police searches without warrants, gay marriage, gun control, abortion, affirmative action, the surveillance state, an imperial army, undeclared wars, an undefended border, illegal aliens on welfare, the COVID “lockdown,” or a federal Leviathan that’s $26 trillion in debt and printing fiat money to pay for it…

    • Thanks: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Dr. X

    The lockdowns in some states have amply demonstrated that the constitution is no longer worth the paper it's printed on

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

  12. Anon[111] • Disclaimer says:

    Ann Althouse had two wonderful posts about Trump’s speech. She didn’t watch it (past her bedtime), but she posted on her reading of the entire transcript the next morning, fisking it in detail and reproducing the most salient parts and critiquing them.

    For the next post she went online and reproduced the headlines from major newspaper websites, news show websites, and political websites that adorned their stories about the speech, and she explained how she felt they completely mischaracterized it.

    This sort of do-the-work, fact-based blog post really appeals to me, especially for something so subject to spin.

    https://althouse.blogspot.com/2020/07/trumps-mount-rushmore-speech-came-on.html

    https://althouse.blogspot.com/2020/07/having-carefully-read-trumps-mount.html

    • Thanks: Joseph Doaks, ic1000
    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    @Anon

    Thanks. It's been a decade since I was a regular at the Althouse blog, but good for her for sticking with it and doing the good work you describe.

  13. Perhaps a better antebellum analog for today’s violent leftist rhetoric, might be that of the abolitionists. After all, the current leftward rachet is merely a continuation of that 19th century initiative to thoroughly deracinate American culture.

    • Replies: @Ris_Eruwaedhiel
    @Steve in Greensboro

    The anti-white rhetoric and glorification of blacks originated with radical abolitionists before the War for Soithern Independence

    , @Giancarlo M. Kumquat
    @Steve in Greensboro

    Ironic that,back then,the Jews were on the side of the South.

  14. A characteristically American misapprehension to imagine that a man must be extremely smart just because he is extremely rich. Consider how Mr Bezos managed his marriage. There is more than one kind of intelligence.

  15. I was grilling & blasting the Washington post on my loud speakers last night while every other house in the neighborhood was setting off pretty impressive fireworks simultaneously. It was epic.

  16. Anonymous[166] • Disclaimer says:

    Costa should know better

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    Costa should know better

    Trump Derangement Syndrome induced insanity.

    or

    Costa "knows" what he's paid to 'know".

    Or both! The power of "and"....Bob Costa = Trump-Deranged-press-whore.

  17. I wish Trump was actually racist, maybe then he would have dealt with immigration and wars for Israel right away

  18. The new division is good for the long term fate of White people are concerned.

    The country isn’t going anywhere. And if there is to be a big political firestorm, better to have it soone rather than later.

    Added bonus: BLM is makes it clear RACE matters. If Blacks, Latinos, Arabs, and Asians are to be in “safe spaces”, doesn’t that imply Whites must be excluded? And therefore, Whites will find out in their own spaces, a kind of resegregation brought about by groovy liberal hipsters and various race hustlers.

    Hard feeling, distrust across racial line, deepening distrust by Whites over why we fight modern wars.

    It’s all sunshine, The Big Cuck won’t last forever.

  19. The idea that Bezos or nearly anyone else in the elite class has much affinity or regard for what happens to America seems pretty optimistic. To the extent that such affinity exists, it only does so in a manner that’s so self-centered and megalomaniacal as to be beyond comprehension for most of us. We are not billionaires, after all.

    The actions of the Bezoses and much of the current hysteria and destruction we see in America probably have a lot to do with the UN Population Projection for this century, Steve’s Most Important Graph in the World. With artificial intelligence taking over an increasing number of previously human-driven functions, the need for workers in the traditional sense will diminish. What’s needed now are consumers and Bodies to generate data. The traditional conceptions of economy are falling by the wayside, and this trend will continue to accelerate.

    America has no real sense of place to these people. It is an idea firmly planted as a stepping stone, and it can therefore be simultaneously used and derided because it is not The Next Big Idea. Stepping stones are things to be left behind, the thinking goes.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Black-hole creator
    @CajunSmiff


    The idea that Bezos or nearly anyone else in the elite class has much affinity or regard for what happens to America seems pretty optimistic. To the extent that such affinity exists, it only does so in a manner that’s so self-centered and megalomaniacal as to be beyond comprehension for most of us.
     
    I have to agree. Bezos specifically will go down in history as one of the largest slaveholders of our time. If there will be any human history left that is. His role in promoting the new type of "cyborg" jobs that completely dehumanize his workforce cannot be overstated. And that applies not only to the horrible warehouse jobs but also to white-collar jobs at Amazon - meet your quota and worship the company or else. Not many people want to work for Bezos unless they absolutely have to.

    Quite a few years back I was considering moving to one of the FAANG companies and I was weighing my options - back when I was young, smart and in some demand. Even then Amazon had a rep for creating a pretty unpleasant office culture. Read e.g. this
    https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2015/08/amazons-white-collar-salary-slaves.html

    However, Bezos has been extremely successful in shaping the narrative about Amazon and sustaining its cult following. So far he has managed to preserve Amazon's image as a tech rebel and community benefactor. I presume buying the second largest newspaper helps.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

  20. Yeah, I don’t think that’s happening…

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/07/04/both-namesakes-washington-lee-university-perpetrated-racial-terror-school-should-be-renamed/

    …now that Washington is a terrorist. You don’t support terrorists. Do you?

    Most ‘normal’ liberal people I know don’t seem to have a problem with the current nuttiness.

    • Replies: @neutral
    @cam

    Begs the question why the Washington Post is not calling for itself to be renamed.

  21. Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.

    I actually made a wager with a Hillary-voting colleague in 2016 that if Trump won there would be riots. I won, of course.

    Combine that already combustible atmosphere with four years of the left stoking the fire, the recent BLM riots, and the possibility that lots of people will still be out of work and/or school come November and…I don’t want to imagine. It won’t be good.

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically – though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will be riots. Massive riots. If Biden wins – and especially if Dems win control of the Senate – there will probably be some form of gun control. I want to be able to defend myself if/when shit hits the fan.

    It’s incredibly stupid that it’s come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    • Agree: Morris Applebaum IV
    • Replies: @fnn
    @Wilkey

    If you don't already have one, build a tall Latin American-style fence around your property.

    , @Anonymous
    @Wilkey


    It’s incredibly stupid that it’s come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.
     
    Maybe we should refer to it as the "Bezos Jewish Reality Distortion Field."

    Specifically intended for the simple, and the weak minded, it can easily convince fat lesbian Shiksa’s that an open freeway is equivalent to a public park.

    https://youtu.be/1OYdJqMC0Kc

    Replies: @MarkinLA, @Just another serf

    , @jsm
    @Wilkey


    I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will
     
    You're very late. I recommend you do all this today.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Wilkey


    But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen.
     
    JSM already warned you regarding the guns, but as a more general thing, being a prepper is something you are well before the SHTF. Please change "if" to "before", meaning this year, for your own good. Just my advice to a good commenter.
    , @Anonymous
    @Wilkey


    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically – though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen.
     
    One of the few gifts I’m thankful for receiving from BLM is a ready, inarguable response to the favorite Marxist query, "in what possible context would you ever need a semi-automatic weapon?"

    They’ll never be able to seriously ask that question again.

    Another BLM gift is the number of "anti-gun" Marxists who are destined to switch to gun-wielding conservators, as BLM protesters become bolder, and more brazen.

    As they say, "a Marxist is just a gun-wielding conservative who hasn’t been home-invaded and gang-raped for hours in front of his wife and kid yet."

    Everything you need to know about police deference to mob rule can be found in "A Clockwork Orange.," a story based on an incident involving American black soldiers running roughshod in parts of England after the war.

    Replies: @black sea

    , @Chris Mallory
    @Wilkey


    But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies
     
    Be prepared to pay and have limited selection on firearms. Brick and Mortar stores are mostly empty. Online retailers are out of stock. Ammo, especially the "survival rounds" is getting scarce. Guns that were selling for $650 3 months ago are in the $900 range now. And prices will only go up as we get closer to the election. If you can buy face to face in your state, check local online marketplaces. You might find a deal.

    A semi auto rifle is nice, but if all you can buy is a lever action grab it. With a little practice you will be quite able to defend yourself. Same with a pistol, a quality revolver will do almost every thing you will need and it is basically idiot proof.

    On youtube, watch Paul Harrell. He is a former military man. He has a sense of humor but he is a serious man. He is not a tactitard with a full beard and sleeve tatts. He will give you his opinion and why he holds it, but for the most part he does not degrade or belittle those who might disagree with him.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6QH13V2o68zynSa0hZy9uQ

    Replies: @usNthem

    , @Charlotte
    @Wilkey

    Don’t delay too long. There’s already shortages of various types of ammo, and you’ll want some to use for practice.

    , @MarkinLA
    @Wilkey

    Buy an AR-15 lower receiver and build your own gun from the available parts kits. Buy the fully assembled upper since assembling that requires tools you may not want to buy. You will learn more about the gun that way. A short barrel AR is ideal - light, easy to maneuver, and packs enough punch with expansive hunting ammo. A good backup would be a used double action revolver in .357.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  22. “It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.”

    Isn’t that what the last four years has been about? Drumpf has been an obvious Jared-led disappointment, but short of John F. Kennedy & William McKinley, no soul has paid more for his sins going against the establishment.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @dcthrowback

    What about Garfield?

    Replies: @dcthrowback, @James Braxton

    , @Kronos
    @dcthrowback

    Do you think Nixon deserves an honorable mention?

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Charles Erwin Wilson

  23. @dcthrowback
    "It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative."

    Isn't that what the last four years has been about? Drumpf has been an obvious Jared-led disappointment, but short of John F. Kennedy & William McKinley, no soul has paid more for his sins going against the establishment.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Kronos

    What about Garfield?

    • Replies: @dcthrowback
    @Hibernian

    that his monument is still standing is a testament to the fundamental decency of our neighbors to the north

    https://bit.ly/2ZGy8FY

    , @James Braxton
    @Hibernian

    Not to mention Huey Long.

    Replies: @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

  24. Idiot Steve,

    Stop your babbling. Bezos is NOT the richest man in the world. One

    of the elite bankers is. You are an embarrassment to your race and

    country.

    • Troll: FPD72
    • Replies: @onetwothree
    @gary

    You are an embarrassment to Microsoft Notepad which you used to format that comment.

  25. @Wilkey

    Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.
     
    I actually made a wager with a Hillary-voting colleague in 2016 that if Trump won there would be riots. I won, of course.

    Combine that already combustible atmosphere with four years of the left stoking the fire, the recent BLM riots, and the possibility that lots of people will still be out of work and/or school come November and...I don't want to imagine. It won't be good.

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically - though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will be riots. Massive riots. If Biden wins - and especially if Dems win control of the Senate - there will probably be some form of gun control. I want to be able to defend myself if/when shit hits the fan.

    It's incredibly stupid that it's come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    Replies: @fnn, @Anonymous, @jsm, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @Charlotte, @MarkinLA

    If you don’t already have one, build a tall Latin American-style fence around your property.

  26. Authors Costa and Rucker call them “racial justice protesters”.

    There’s the fallacy, right there.

    The people destroying irreplaceable statues don’t give a hoot about justice.

    Justice is not a robe you put on. You don’t become “just” by simply describing yourself as such, any more than you become a mathematician, pianist or pole vaulter by adopting the label. Life isn’t that easy. Would that it were. Wouldn’t it be great if we could all be anything we desired simply by labeling ourselves as such?

    The protesters destroy that which they are incapable of creating themselves. Whereas the statue is one of a kind, irreplaceable, they themselves are fungible, easily replaced. Worthless, and they suspect as much.

  27. @Hibernian
    @dcthrowback

    What about Garfield?

    Replies: @dcthrowback, @James Braxton

    that his monument is still standing is a testament to the fundamental decency of our neighbors to the north

    https://bit.ly/2ZGy8FY

  28. @Hibernian
    @dcthrowback

    What about Garfield?

    Replies: @dcthrowback, @James Braxton

    Not to mention Huey Long.

    • Replies: @Giancarlo M. Kumquat
    @James Braxton

    George Wallace?

  29. The past 4 years have been a coup in slow motion. The Left was wrong-footed by the election result and they’ve spent the last four years trying to undo it.

    This time it will be like nothing we’ve seen in our lifetimes. As the content of this “news” item makes plain: They just make stuff up. If they can’t rig the voting and the counting of votes sufficiently, they’ll just claim there were “irregularities” and we therefore need a do-over and anyone who opposes this maneuver is trying to cancel democracy.

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
  30. Thomas Jefferson portrait recreated with distant descendant

    The recreation was based on the famous portrait of Jefferson by American painter Rembrandt Peale, and Gardner shot his portrait using a Fujifilm GFX 50S and a Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 lens. LaNier, a black man who descended from Jefferson and his slave Sally Hemings, tells Smithsonian that he has complex feelings about being a Jefferson descendant, and he chose to not wear a wig to more faithfully recreate his great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather’s portrait.

    “He was a brilliant man who preached equality, but he didn’t practice it,” LaNier tells the magazine. “He owned people. And now I’m here because of it.”

  31. “They” want you to burn small american nylon flags with a handheld gas torcher (at absolutely no danger to your skin) while looking like a bunch Goodyear Bibendum mascots in M&M colors keeping one arm occupied holding cameras.

    DON’T GIVE IN TO THEM.

    “This is what they want, don’t give it to them,” someone says.

  32. Isn’t our color flag revolution about corporations and their one world? Seems to me Bezos would be just fine and dandy with this editorial.

  33. @IHTG
    Costa ia former NRO reporter. He's gone full Oliver Darcy.

    Replies: @Barnard, @SMK, @Stan, @Mr. XYZ, @Richard B

    I don’t think Costa was ever a conservative he mostly did reporting, not commentary at National Review. They have a number of former reporters who have gone left after leaving, not to mention the opinion writers who have done so.

    His name on the byline does speak to Steve’s point about Bezos needing to stand up to 20 something interns in the Washington Post newsroom. Costa is 34 and Philip Rucker looks like he is in his 40s. Both have a lot of experience covering politics in Washington. This absurd rhetoric is the norm in newsrooms now. Age and experience don’t seem to be moderating factors in the press. Costa was on the board of Notre Dame for three years and his dad was an attorney for Bristol Myers Squibb. These aren’t people who should be lefty kooks. It gives a good example of how thoroughly this derangement has spread among the elites.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Barnard

    Bezos, being an ugly guy, just does what any female around him tells him to do so he can win their approval.

    , @Anon
    @Barnard

    The main problem is that in a liberal-run newsroom, you can't even be a moderate these days or you won't have a job. These reporters know that, so they toe the party line.

  34. California is one of the few places on the planet with a Mediterranean climate. It would be a shame to lose it in secession, but the irony of having modern Progressives agree with Confederates would be worth it. Plus, the rest of the country could control it by threatening to cut off Colorado River water.

  35. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey

    Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.
     
    I actually made a wager with a Hillary-voting colleague in 2016 that if Trump won there would be riots. I won, of course.

    Combine that already combustible atmosphere with four years of the left stoking the fire, the recent BLM riots, and the possibility that lots of people will still be out of work and/or school come November and...I don't want to imagine. It won't be good.

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically - though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will be riots. Massive riots. If Biden wins - and especially if Dems win control of the Senate - there will probably be some form of gun control. I want to be able to defend myself if/when shit hits the fan.

    It's incredibly stupid that it's come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    Replies: @fnn, @Anonymous, @jsm, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @Charlotte, @MarkinLA

    It’s incredibly stupid that it’s come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    Maybe we should refer to it as the “Bezos Jewish Reality Distortion Field.”

    Specifically intended for the simple, and the weak minded, it can easily convince fat lesbian Shiksa’s that an open freeway is equivalent to a public park.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    @Anonymous

    I hope the car wasn't damaged.

    , @Just another serf
    @Anonymous

    I’m looking forward with great anticipation to the trial of the (possibly Eritrean) driver Dawit Kelete.

    Will we see 400 years on the murder count and 250 years for the assault causing great bodily harm charge?

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

  36. @Wilkey

    Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.
     
    I actually made a wager with a Hillary-voting colleague in 2016 that if Trump won there would be riots. I won, of course.

    Combine that already combustible atmosphere with four years of the left stoking the fire, the recent BLM riots, and the possibility that lots of people will still be out of work and/or school come November and...I don't want to imagine. It won't be good.

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically - though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will be riots. Massive riots. If Biden wins - and especially if Dems win control of the Senate - there will probably be some form of gun control. I want to be able to defend myself if/when shit hits the fan.

    It's incredibly stupid that it's come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    Replies: @fnn, @Anonymous, @jsm, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @Charlotte, @MarkinLA

    I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will

    You’re very late. I recommend you do all this today.

  37. OTish but do these people know they are lying or are the actually deluded:

    Social inequality matters, too. In the United States, Black people are far more likely than white people to become severely ill from the coronavirus, for example, most likely due in part to the country’s history of systemic racism. It has left Black people with a high rate of chronic diseases such as diabetes, as well as living conditions and jobs that may increase exposure to the virus.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/04/health/coronavirus-neanderthals.html

    I mean as if diabetes had no link whatsoever to stuffing your face with sugary crap every waking hour.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Gordo

    Lying or deluded? It's possibly somewhere in between. If you hold an overarching conspiracy theory -- in this case, "systemic racism" -- every little thing can and must be fit into the pattern. Fat sick white people? Stupid white people! Fat sick black people? Evil white people!

  38. So, now it’s Confederate Symbols Hysteria.

    What became of the Nazi Swastika Hysteria?

    Has Sarah Silverman tweeted a photo of Confederate symbols spray-painted on the sidewalk yet?

    https://freebeacon.com/culture/sarah-silverman-mistakes-construction-markers-swastikas/

  39. Does Bezos have anything like the time or the disposition to rethink his basic political beliefs?

    In his business, he seems to just bull ahead with his long held goals. It happens to work great for him there. The conflicts between his business goals and his “liberal” politics — such as the underclass of Amazonians he is creating — seem to trouble him little. Maybe even his broader identity politics allow him to feel good morally while he shanks his workers’ economic well being.

    And he will always have his boosters, because money talks.

    Even Bill Gates has proved a more reflective man.

  40. Just another c-p with a few mistakes. Who wants to read it, do it ….

    [MORE]

    Archaic Hominin Introgression in Africa
    Oxford Academic: Molecular Biology and Evolution
    Published: 21 July 2017

    ABSTRACT: A divergent MUC7 haplotype likely originated in an unknown African hominin population and introgressed into ancestors of modern Africans.

    Blacks have “wildly different” genes than modern man because they are mixed with literal NON-HUMANS!

    https://academic.oup.com/mbe/article/doi/10.1093/molbev/msx206/3988100/Archaic-hominin-introgression-in-Africa

    Blacks are proto-humans; modern man evolved from Blacks by hybridizing with the large-brain Neanderthals:

    [MORE]

    • Blacks = 2% Archaic admixture and 7.9% non-human DNA
    • Whites = 3% Neanderthal
    • Asians = 3% Neanderthal + Denisovan

    Modern man evolved from Blacks when they cross-breed with the large-brain Neanderthals (literally a different species). Blacks are the only race with no Neanderthal DNA. Civilizations didn’t begin until the Neanderthal hybridization created the larger brains in modern man.

    Genetic distance is a measure of the genetic divergence between populations. Blacks have a genetic distance of 0.23 from modern man, but only 0.17 from archaic man (believed to be Erectus, but no DNA has been recovered to test). That means Blacks are more genetically proximate to archaic man than to modern man.

    In fact, 7.9% of sub-Saharan African DNA is non-human:
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2018/03/21/285734.full.pdf

    The genetic distance between the races of man is also much greater than that between the breeds of dog, and anyone who has experience with dogs knows what a huge difference breed makes, not only in physical appearance but also in behavior and intelligence.

    We share 98.4 percent of our genes with chimpanzees, 95 percent with dogs, and 74 percent with microscopic roundworms. Only one chromosome determines if one is born male or female. There is no discernible difference in the DNA of a wolf and a Labrador Retriever, yet their inbred behavioral differences are immense. Clearly, what’s meaningful is which genes differ and how they are patterned, not the percent of genes. A tiny number of genes can translate into huge functional differences.

    So, to be consistent and objective with taxonomic classification systems, Blacks and modern man should be classified into separate species, or at least into different subspecies.

    Modern man average 3% Neanderthal DNA, which would be an F4 (4th filial generation from full purebred Neanderthal). That is about the same as most claiming Cherokee ancestors today.

    It is equivalent to having one Neanderthal great-great-great-grandparent. Blacks also coexisted and interbred with archaic hominids (heidelbergensis) for longer than those who left Africa.

    The DRD4 7R gene is associated with risk-taking, sensation-seeking, novelty-seeking, and extraverted behavior, and is correlated with openness to new experiences, intolerance to monotony, and exploratory behavior. It is highly variant among races and can be traced to Neanderthal hybridization, which is why it is not present in sub-Saharan Africans. This “wanderlust gene” explains Whites’ disproportionate amount of innovations, discoveries, and achievements.

    Anyone can get their DNA tested (services such as 23andMe charge about $100). Non-Blacks will show about 3% Neanderthal DNA, but no sub-Saharan African ancestry.

    Hanabiko “Koko” (July 4, 1971 – June 19, 2018) is a female western lowland gorilla who is known for having learned a large number of hand signs from a modified version of American Sign Language.

    She has learned to use over 1,000 signs and understands approximately 2,000 spoken English words. Further, she understands these signs sufficiently well to adapt them or combine them to express new meanings that she wants to convey.

    Koko was tested on the Cattell Infant Intelligence Scale, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ravens Progressive Matrices, Wechsler Preschool, Primary Scale of Intelligence, and several administrations of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale and in spite of the human cultural bias of the tests her scores ranged from 85-95, which is a standard deviation higher than African Blacks score on the same tests.

    IQ 85 = Koko
    IQ 85 = American Blacks (24% White admixture)
    IQ 67 = African Blacks

    “From September 1972, when we administered the Cattell Infant Intelligence Scale, through May 1977, when I administered form B of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, she has scored consistently in the 70 to 90 range on different IQ scales. These scores reflect her mental age divided by her chronological age, the result of which is then multiplied by 100. Such scores in human infants would suggest the subject is slow, but not mentally retarded.”

    *********************************************************************

    Put Whites on an island and you get England; put Asians on an island and you get Japan; put Blacks on an island and you get Haiti.

    Eighty percent of Haiti’s population live on less than two dollars a day and the country’s Gross Domestic Product per inhabitant is six times less than that of neighboring Dominican Republic.

    The Island of Hispaniola:

    Dominican Republic
    Per capita GDP = $7,052 (2017 USD)

    Haiti
    Per capita GDP $765 (2017 USD)

    The capital of Haiti, Port-au-Prince, is one of the largest cities in the world without a central sewage system. Most of the more than three million people in the metro area use outhouses. There’s just one sewage treatment plant in the entire country (built by Whites).

    Nowhere Blacks live are they considered achievers. Blacks are universally viewed as unproductive and disruptive to society.

    If the races are equally intelligent, then there should be evidence that they are; absence of such evidence is itself evidence that the races are not equal.

    Blacks can only achieve because they have White admixture or because they reside in White societies. Too few of them are smart enough to even build sufficient infrastructure in Africa to allow the Black intellectual elite to achieve.

    The entire continent of Africa produces a mere 1.5% of the world’s manufactured goods. The 41 countries of sub-Saharan Africa produce no more wealth than the tiny country of Belgium, which has only 1/45 the population. Of all of the region’s economic production, White-run South Africa accounts for three-quarters of it. That Whites are only 8% of South Africa’s population demonstrates how productive and industrious Whites are that so relative few can carry the load for so many unproductive Blacks.

    Blacks became an out-of-control invasive species after Whites domesticated them.

    Today there are 738 million Europeans and 1.2 billion Africans. In 2050, according to the latest U.N. projections, Europe’s population will have dipped to 707 million, while Africa’s population will be 2.4 billion. By 2100, half of all children on earth will be African. On current trends, within 35 years, 1 in every 4 people will be sub-Saharan African. By 2100, there will be 4.4 billion Africans – two of every five human beings overall — and Europe’s population will be just 646 million.

    • Young projected to rise 400 million and peak around 2090.

    • Childbearing population projected to grow nearly 1 billion through 2100.

    • Since 1980, Africa has grown from 11% to 17% of the worlds total population.

    • Since 1980, Africa has grown from 17% to 30% of annual global births.

    • In 1989, annual global births (excluding Africa) peaked and have declined 15% since (and still falling).

    • The three decade decline in global births (excluding Africa) has nearly been offset by increasing births in Africa.

    • By 2023, the world’s childbearing population (excluding Africa) will be in indefinite decline, and only Africa’s childbearing population will continue growing.

    Over the past five decades, African income per capita has risen just 240% compared to upper middle income nations (China, Brazil, Russia, etc.) rising 950% and high income nations 410%. Africa is losing ground.

    By the best proxy for true economic activity, energy consumption, suggests Africa has grown from just 2.4% to 3.6% of global energy consumption and the future there is not brightening. Africa’s economic growth is dependent on global growth (excluding Africa), but with declining global markets for exports and significant overcapacity, Africa’s export driven growth potential is very low.

    Lastly, Africa (particularly Sub-Saharan Africa where most of the population growth is occurring) has one of the lowest immigration rates of any poor region.

    By 2030, Africa will be 22% of the worlds population, 200% of annual growth among the childbearing population, and responsible for 38% of global births. but will still be just 4.6% of global energy consumption.

    There is essentially no transfer mechanism from the First World wealth to the poor of the Third World, nor is there a strong avenue for immigration. The global economy will impact Africa, but Africa is very unlikely to impact the global economy.

    https://www.koko.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/teok_book.pdf

    • Thanks: BB753
  41. anon[372] • Disclaimer says:

    The Left are the abolitionists, not the fire-eaters. And just like last time, they are starting the war.
    Also the Left won’t secede if they lose the election. They will try again, more forcefully, to stage a coup. Civil War II will start with coups at the top combined with insurrection from the bottom, the same techniques they’ve been practicing the past four years.

    • Replies: @Ris_Eruwaedhiel
    @anon

    The overclass and the underclass versus the middle class.

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost

  42. A beloved step father who was a Cuban immigrant escaping communism should create some balance : a love for Latinos migrants and a fear of communism.

  43. We keep California and get rid of the rebels.

  44. SFG says:
    @Dieter Kief
    A newspaper is a reasonable group of people and thus structurally brighter and more insightful as a single man - no matter how rich (or bright, yes) he might be.

    The thing is: Monasteries and the universities which sprang from them in the middle ages together with the crafts propelled the success of Europe and later the USA. This institutionalized rationality, reason, practical knowledge and taste (music/the arts...) was (and still is) a package which for a historical period of a few centuries, was unbeatable (and unsurpassed).

    To make this dynamic in its complexity maybe even better clear: Freedom and reason and rationality and practical knowledge and taste rest upon one another (engineers and craftspersons are the closest of these relatives).

    To be successful with a modern paper as an institution that lives up to the western heritage and it's manyfold accomplishments would imply to publish controversial ideas. and that - here is a true paradox at work - might diminish - or at least endanger - the commercial success of an enterprise like the WaPo from time to time. Sucess for a news medium is not commercial success alone.

    The commercial risk-part would be no problem for Jezz Bezos. Whether he is rooted enough in the Western tradition to understand how vital it is for a modern paper to cultivate contradiction/ opposing viewpoints, open debate (=heterodoxy) I don't know.

    Replies: @SFG, @Alfa158

    I agree the lack of free expression runs the risk of leading to long-term decay in the fashion of post-Ghazali Islamic society, Imperial China, etc.

    But that’s a long-term problem, and Bezos is most likely concerned with staying rich now. Long-term cultural decline isn’t likely to be a major concern for him.

    By the time China’s genetically engineered superscientists have leaped ahead of us, Bezos will be old enough not to care.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @SFG

    I beg to differ a bit - especially about the post-Ghazali part of your comment. Hassan Hassan has a little essay about Al Ghazali's philosophy which I think is quite right:

    https://en.qantara.de/content/the-decline-of-islamic-scientific-thought-dont-blame-it-on-al-ghazali

  45. This is in the news section, not opinion??
    Yeah, I guess so. Newspapers don’t differentiate any more.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @SF

    And notice that their side is fighting for "justice" while our side is fighting for "power"

  46. By the way- will this be the future for Africa, engineered by the Chinese who lack Western sentimentalism?

    https://apnews.com/269b3de1af34e17c1941a514f78d764c

    China cuts Uighur births with IUDs, abortion, sterilization
    ………………….

    Birth rates in the mostly Uighur regions of Hotan and Kashgar plunged by more than 60% from 2015 to 2018, the latest year available in government statistics. Across the Xinjiang region, birth rates continue to plummet, falling nearly 24% last year alone — compared to just 4.2% nationwide, statistics show.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/07/01/china-documents-uighur-genocidal-sterilization-xinjiang/

    China’s Own Documents Show Potentially Genocidal Sterilization Plans in Xinjiang
    ………………….
    Starting in 2018, a growing number of female former internment camp detainees testified that they were given injections that coincided with changes in or cessation of their menstrual cycles. Others reported that they were forcibly fitted with IUDs prior to internment or subjected to sterilization surgeries.

    That same year, published natural population growth rates (calculated as birth minus deaths, and excluding migration) in Xinjiang plummeted. In Kashgar and Hotan, two of the prefectures that make up the Uighur heartland, combined natural population growth rates fell by 84 percent between 2015 and 2018, from 1.6 percent to 0.26 percent. In some Uighur counties, 2018 saw more deaths than births. In 2019, Xinjiang’s birth rates declined by a further 24 percent, with ethnic minority regions seeing stronger declines between 30 and 56 percent. In contrast, birth rates across the whole country fell by only 4.2 percent between 2018 and 2019.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The Chinese bots assure me this isn't true!

  47. Bezos was raised in Texas and we have the idea that we can do whatever we please without consequences. Sometimes it doesn’t work out so well but we keep doing it.

  48. @Dieter Kief
    A newspaper is a reasonable group of people and thus structurally brighter and more insightful as a single man - no matter how rich (or bright, yes) he might be.

    The thing is: Monasteries and the universities which sprang from them in the middle ages together with the crafts propelled the success of Europe and later the USA. This institutionalized rationality, reason, practical knowledge and taste (music/the arts...) was (and still is) a package which for a historical period of a few centuries, was unbeatable (and unsurpassed).

    To make this dynamic in its complexity maybe even better clear: Freedom and reason and rationality and practical knowledge and taste rest upon one another (engineers and craftspersons are the closest of these relatives).

    To be successful with a modern paper as an institution that lives up to the western heritage and it's manyfold accomplishments would imply to publish controversial ideas. and that - here is a true paradox at work - might diminish - or at least endanger - the commercial success of an enterprise like the WaPo from time to time. Sucess for a news medium is not commercial success alone.

    The commercial risk-part would be no problem for Jezz Bezos. Whether he is rooted enough in the Western tradition to understand how vital it is for a modern paper to cultivate contradiction/ opposing viewpoints, open debate (=heterodoxy) I don't know.

    Replies: @SFG, @Alfa158

    “ A newspaper is a reasonable group of people ”

    Are you referring to The Daily Planet? That is a fictional newspaper. There are no reasonable people running the NYT, Washington Post or other newspapers that actually exist.

    “ Whether he is rooted enough in the Western tradition to understand how vital it is for a modern paper to cultivate contradiction/ opposing viewpoints, open debate (=heterodoxy)”

    No one at those papers has shown the faintest interest in cultivating open debate and will fire anyone who tries.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Alfa158

    The West is a success story based upon (functioning) techniques and (institutionalized) heterodoxy**** - and newspapers were an integral part of this development, as were (and still are) books. Some newspapers still are (the Swiss NZZ (and the German Die weLT and FAZ - to a lesser degree though, as is the weekly Zürich Weltwoche and the German weekly Die Zeit. None of them is completely woke).


    ***** That started in Northern Europe medieval times - cf. Arno Borsts books - or Johannes Hirschberger - The History of Philosophy Pt. I

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @Prester John
    @Alfa158

    One of the reasons why the WaRag and the Gray Hag have gone full Frankfurt School is because after the onset of the Information Age and the emergence of numerous news outlets on cable tv, satellite radio and the myriad number of websites (such as Unz for instance), blogs etc., most people can get their news elsewhere. Thus, the WaRag and the Gray Hag can now afford to drop all pretense to objectivity, concentrating instead upon preaching to the choir. I think they call it "niche marketing."

  49. @Alfa158
    @Dieter Kief

    “ A newspaper is a reasonable group of people ”

    Are you referring to The Daily Planet? That is a fictional newspaper. There are no reasonable people running the NYT, Washington Post or other newspapers that actually exist.

    “ Whether he is rooted enough in the Western tradition to understand how vital it is for a modern paper to cultivate contradiction/ opposing viewpoints, open debate (=heterodoxy)”

    No one at those papers has shown the faintest interest in cultivating open debate and will fire anyone who tries.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Prester John

    The West is a success story based upon (functioning) techniques and (institutionalized) heterodoxy**** – and newspapers were an integral part of this development, as were (and still are) books. Some newspapers still are (the Swiss NZZ (and the German Die weLT and FAZ – to a lesser degree though, as is the weekly Zürich Weltwoche and the German weekly Die Zeit. None of them is completely woke).

    ***** That started in Northern Europe medieval times – cf. Arno Borsts books – or Johannes Hirschberger – The History of Philosophy Pt. I

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Dieter Kief

    Die Weltwoche is certainly a fine publication but it has a circulation of 45,000 German speaking readers. It is, pardon my French, a mere pimple on the ass of the NY Times or the Washington Post. I would wager that 99% of Americans have never even heard of it. Meanwhile CNN blasts full time (or at least it used to when people still flew) from every airport waiting area like Stalin's loudspeakers.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Pericles

  50. SMK says: • Website
    @IHTG
    Costa ia former NRO reporter. He's gone full Oliver Darcy.

    Replies: @Barnard, @SMK, @Stan, @Mr. XYZ, @Richard B

    It doesn’t surprise me that Costa is a “former NRO reporter.” Trump-hating “cucks” and neocons are just as deranged and psychotic as Trump-hating leftists. David From has gone mad since Trump was elected president, as have Bill Kristol, who’s joined the democratic party, and Max Boot, who said he’d voted for Stalin if he was running against Trump, and he wasn’t joking, apparently. And Rick Wilson, the most deranged and execrable of all the deranged and execrable Trump-haters.

    Sam Harris has also gone mad since Trump was elected President, and has had Frum as a guest on four 2-hour podcasts, 8-hours of deranged and psychotic Trump hatred from two deranged and psychotic Trump-haters. One of the topics they discuss is “the prospect that Trump will refuse to leave office.” So Frum and Harris are so deranged and psychotic that they believe Trump will “refuse to leave office” if he loses to Joe Biden or at the end of his second term if re-elected. Harris believes that Trump is an “existential threat to democracy. In response to this lunacy and psychosis I sent him an email which I’m sure he didn’t read. To quote:

    Exactly how is Trump an “existential threat to democracy”? Exactly how is Trump, if he loses to Biden or is re-elected, going to abolish democracy, assuming that’s his intention (which no sane person believes), when he’d be opposed, hypothetically, by all democrats, all republican, many if not most of whom detest him, all of the media, including Fox News and talk radio, the FBI and Justice Dept, which join the CIA in a conspiracy and witch-hunt and attempted coup, unprecedented in all of American history, to subvert democracy and the will of 60 million voters by to impeaching Trump and removing him from office with not a scintilla of evidence that he “colluded” with Putin and Russians to deny the evil witch he divine right to be the first woman president; and the military, which has always been neutral, politically, albeit some general have violated that history and tradition of neutrality by denouncing Trump. No president could abolish democracy, and impose a dictatorship, without the support of the police and military. Anyone wo believes that Trump has even thought of doing this for even a moment is psychotic and guilty of paranoia induced by “Trump derangement syndrome.”

    The Trump-haters are guilty of “projection,” as Tucker Carlson observes, of doing and wanting exactly what they accuse Trump of doing and wanting. But they see their goal as a crusade, idealistic and noble and imperative, to save democracy by abolishing democracy.

    • Replies: @Neuday
    @SMK

    To save the village from Nazis, you have to burn down the village.

  51. @Anon
    One crazy part of this is the byline. Robert Costa used to work for National Review and got his big break when Larry Kudlow had him on his old CNBC show regularly. That's how he came to the attention of the Post. As some of you may remember, he repaid Kudlow by reporting/tattling that Larry had Peter Brimelow at his house as a guest for his birthday party. Costa knew because he was also an invited guest to the party.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-adviser-larry-kudlow-hosted-publisher-of-white-nationalists-at-his-home/2018/08/21/f418a76c-a55e-11e8-8fac-12e98c13528d_story.html%3foutputType=amp

    Now Costa makes big bucks hosting the unwatched and unwatchable Washington Week on PBS and appearing on MSNBC. And he also writes garbage like this for the Post. The disloyalty and abject bootlicking genuinely makes me nauseous.

    Replies: @Prester John, @Ed

    WaPo, PMSNBC evidently showed him the money. He sounds like a mercenary.

  52. @Alfa158
    @Dieter Kief

    “ A newspaper is a reasonable group of people ”

    Are you referring to The Daily Planet? That is a fictional newspaper. There are no reasonable people running the NYT, Washington Post or other newspapers that actually exist.

    “ Whether he is rooted enough in the Western tradition to understand how vital it is for a modern paper to cultivate contradiction/ opposing viewpoints, open debate (=heterodoxy)”

    No one at those papers has shown the faintest interest in cultivating open debate and will fire anyone who tries.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Prester John

    One of the reasons why the WaRag and the Gray Hag have gone full Frankfurt School is because after the onset of the Information Age and the emergence of numerous news outlets on cable tv, satellite radio and the myriad number of websites (such as Unz for instance), blogs etc., most people can get their news elsewhere. Thus, the WaRag and the Gray Hag can now afford to drop all pretense to objectivity, concentrating instead upon preaching to the choir. I think they call it “niche marketing.”

  53. @IHTG
    Costa ia former NRO reporter. He's gone full Oliver Darcy.

    Replies: @Barnard, @SMK, @Stan, @Mr. XYZ, @Richard B

    Costa and Rucker. Where do you think most of the anti-white hatred originates if a Hispanic and Jew are the authors?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Stan


    Costa and Rucker. Where do you think most of the anti-white hatred originates if a Hispanic and Jew are the authors?
     
    Is Rucker of Jewish descent? His bio states that he grew up in Savannah, Georgia. Is that a Christian school he attended for high school?
  54. Meanwhile, in Hollywood, Emmy-winning bluetick (Who has a profile picture of himself with said Emmy and a banner showing him giving a talk to NATO) pronounces his support for the emergence of ethnic militias in the USA.

    Although, in truth, anyone who calls themselves the ‘Not Fucking Around Coalition’ is most assuredly just LARPing (Look at that fool in the gas mask), but given how fast things have accelerated the last few months, maybe they’ll be superseded by those who aren’t.

    • Replies: @gutta percha
    @Altai

    "most assuredly just LARPing"

    We need to avoid this tendency to dismiss the enemy as untrained clownish pussies. Any purple-haired anarchist twerp who never fired his gun before can still kill you and your family, if he gets just slightly lucky. Gun sales have skyrocketed from already-high levels. Do you think all these weapons are being bought only by patriots?

    This sh!t's real, guys. Don't underestimate these evil f*cks.

    , @Chris Mallory
    @Altai


    Although, in truth, anyone who calls themselves the ‘Not Fucking Around Coalition’ is most assuredly just LARPing
     
    Notice, quite a few of the rifles did not have any kind of sight. No optics or iron sights. I guess you could volley fire like they used to do with muskets. But as a rifleman, you need sights.

    I watched one video from that gathering where one of the HNIC was on a loud speaker asking where the White boys were. I wonder if he realizes that Whites out number blacks 5 to 1. Plus the Hispanics aren't that friendly with the black tribes either.
  55. @George
    "blowing up the Constitutional Republic". Should read "blowing up the Constitutional Democracy".

    The Republic ended with the direct election of Senators in 1913, 17th amendment. Monetary policy was transfered to experts at the Fed. WWI's kick off in 1914 was just a coincidence.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Chris Mallory, @Corvinus

    Thank you, George!

    Amendment XVII was no minor administrative housekeeping rule change, as many Americans figure. I’m really getting the impression that other than XXI (repealing XVIII), America was at Peak Constitutional Amendment way back in 1791, when the first 10 were incorporated into the document.

  56. @Wilkey

    Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.
     
    I actually made a wager with a Hillary-voting colleague in 2016 that if Trump won there would be riots. I won, of course.

    Combine that already combustible atmosphere with four years of the left stoking the fire, the recent BLM riots, and the possibility that lots of people will still be out of work and/or school come November and...I don't want to imagine. It won't be good.

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically - though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will be riots. Massive riots. If Biden wins - and especially if Dems win control of the Senate - there will probably be some form of gun control. I want to be able to defend myself if/when shit hits the fan.

    It's incredibly stupid that it's come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    Replies: @fnn, @Anonymous, @jsm, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @Charlotte, @MarkinLA

    But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen.

    JSM already warned you regarding the guns, but as a more general thing, being a prepper is something you are well before the SHTF. Please change “if” to “before”, meaning this year, for your own good. Just my advice to a good commenter.

  57. Costa and Rucker’s exaggerations and lies fill that entire column. Its literally fake news. They’d desctibe a gullywasher deluge as a light, gentle, rain and a scortching hot Sahara day as simply a warm afternoon. Just a bunch of liars.

  58. Did you work that hard to make $166 billion in order to be held hostage in fear that some 20-something interns would be peeved if you cleaned house?

    Well. Did he work that hard?

  59. @CajunSmiff
    The idea that Bezos or nearly anyone else in the elite class has much affinity or regard for what happens to America seems pretty optimistic. To the extent that such affinity exists, it only does so in a manner that's so self-centered and megalomaniacal as to be beyond comprehension for most of us. We are not billionaires, after all.

    The actions of the Bezoses and much of the current hysteria and destruction we see in America probably have a lot to do with the UN Population Projection for this century, Steve's Most Important Graph in the World. With artificial intelligence taking over an increasing number of previously human-driven functions, the need for workers in the traditional sense will diminish. What's needed now are consumers and Bodies to generate data. The traditional conceptions of economy are falling by the wayside, and this trend will continue to accelerate.

    America has no real sense of place to these people. It is an idea firmly planted as a stepping stone, and it can therefore be simultaneously used and derided because it is not The Next Big Idea. Stepping stones are things to be left behind, the thinking goes.

    Replies: @Black-hole creator

    The idea that Bezos or nearly anyone else in the elite class has much affinity or regard for what happens to America seems pretty optimistic. To the extent that such affinity exists, it only does so in a manner that’s so self-centered and megalomaniacal as to be beyond comprehension for most of us.

    I have to agree. Bezos specifically will go down in history as one of the largest slaveholders of our time. If there will be any human history left that is. His role in promoting the new type of “cyborg” jobs that completely dehumanize his workforce cannot be overstated. And that applies not only to the horrible warehouse jobs but also to white-collar jobs at Amazon – meet your quota and worship the company or else. Not many people want to work for Bezos unless they absolutely have to.

    Quite a few years back I was considering moving to one of the FAANG companies and I was weighing my options – back when I was young, smart and in some demand. Even then Amazon had a rep for creating a pretty unpleasant office culture. Read e.g. this
    https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2015/08/amazons-white-collar-salary-slaves.html

    However, Bezos has been extremely successful in shaping the narrative about Amazon and sustaining its cult following. So far he has managed to preserve Amazon’s image as a tech rebel and community benefactor. I presume buying the second largest newspaper helps.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @Black-hole creator

    IMO, the reputation is built on sand. A lot of people hate Amazon. It's just so damned easy.

  60. @Alexander Turok

    Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role in paying for this kind of rhetoric.
     
    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @J.Ross, @Corvinus, @Mr. Anon, @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    You talk like a fag and your shit’s all retarded.

  61. @El Dato
    The Broken Overton Window fallacy: When you are sitting pretty in your plantation and your politicial fanzines move the Overton Window so much that it splinters and you actually think all you need to do is to place a call to the recently immigrated window repairmen to get it fixed.

    Replies: @Hockamaw, @Fluesterwitz

    I’m going to appropriate that.

  62. @cam
    Yeah, I don't think that's happening...

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/07/04/both-namesakes-washington-lee-university-perpetrated-racial-terror-school-should-be-renamed/

    ...now that Washington is a terrorist. You don't support terrorists. Do you?

    Most 'normal' liberal people I know don't seem to have a problem with the current nuttiness.

    Replies: @neutral

    Begs the question why the Washington Post is not calling for itself to be renamed.

  63. @Anonymous
    @Wilkey


    It’s incredibly stupid that it’s come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.
     
    Maybe we should refer to it as the "Bezos Jewish Reality Distortion Field."

    Specifically intended for the simple, and the weak minded, it can easily convince fat lesbian Shiksa’s that an open freeway is equivalent to a public park.

    https://youtu.be/1OYdJqMC0Kc

    Replies: @MarkinLA, @Just another serf

    I hope the car wasn’t damaged.

    • Agree: anonymous1963
  64. To this point, black disatisfaction with BLM:

    Also check out Terry Crews, showing principle and backbone no Republican politician is capable of.

    • Replies: @Thea
    @J.Ross

    They’ve simply switched allegiance from one black nationalist group to another. The end effect is still hostility and violence directed at you know who.

  65. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey

    Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.
     
    I actually made a wager with a Hillary-voting colleague in 2016 that if Trump won there would be riots. I won, of course.

    Combine that already combustible atmosphere with four years of the left stoking the fire, the recent BLM riots, and the possibility that lots of people will still be out of work and/or school come November and...I don't want to imagine. It won't be good.

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically - though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will be riots. Massive riots. If Biden wins - and especially if Dems win control of the Senate - there will probably be some form of gun control. I want to be able to defend myself if/when shit hits the fan.

    It's incredibly stupid that it's come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    Replies: @fnn, @Anonymous, @jsm, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @Charlotte, @MarkinLA

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically – though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen.

    One of the few gifts I’m thankful for receiving from BLM is a ready, inarguable response to the favorite Marxist query, “in what possible context would you ever need a semi-automatic weapon?”

    They’ll never be able to seriously ask that question again.

    Another BLM gift is the number of “anti-gun” Marxists who are destined to switch to gun-wielding conservators, as BLM protesters become bolder, and more brazen.

    As they say, “a Marxist is just a gun-wielding conservative who hasn’t been home-invaded and gang-raped for hours in front of his wife and kid yet.”

    Everything you need to know about police deference to mob rule can be found in “A Clockwork Orange.,” a story based on an incident involving American black soldiers running roughshod in parts of England after the war.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @Anonymous

    A Clockwork Orange:

    The author's wife -- pregnant at that time -- had been gang raped under these circumstances.

  66. These people are always going on about “white domination” as if it’s a bad thing. Why don’t they report on the Edenic conditions in black-dominated countries? (Of course we know the answer, this whole scam is about grabbing money and jobs from whites).

  67. @Alexander Turok

    Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role in paying for this kind of rhetoric.
     
    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @J.Ross, @Corvinus, @Mr. Anon, @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Turok has cracked it. All the commenters are actually Steve sockpuppetting. Which means that Turok is also Steve.

    • LOL: Mark G.
    • Replies: @No Recent Commenting History
    @J.Ross

    All the commenters are actually Steve sockpuppetting.

    It's true. Even Tinny Duk. All iSteve, all of us.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  68. @Steve in Greensboro
    Perhaps a better antebellum analog for today's violent leftist rhetoric, might be that of the abolitionists. After all, the current leftward rachet is merely a continuation of that 19th century initiative to thoroughly deracinate American culture.

    Replies: @Ris_Eruwaedhiel, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    The anti-white rhetoric and glorification of blacks originated with radical abolitionists before the War for Soithern Independence

  69. @Coag
    At this point I’m 100% behind the gubmint taking a sword through the Gordian Knot of Systemic Racism by expropriating Amazon and dividing its assets among all the country’s blacks as reparations.

    The black guy who slammed his car into two non-binary white chick BLM protestors in Seattle, throwing them into the air like ragdolls resulting in one of them dying and the other in a coma in the ICU, is identified as a 27 year old Ethiopian named Dawit Kelete. Incidentally 80 people have died in Oromo protests in Ethiopia, and the Ethiopian prime minister Abiy Ahmed has a known record of demeaning African-Americans and BLM. Aren’t we all thrilled to be continually enrolled in the inscrutable racial contests of the Old Country?

    https://borkena.com/2020/06/06/black-lives-matter-politics-in-ethiopia/

    Replies: @Dmon, @Jack D, @S. Anonyia

    Time to start a campaign demanding that all merchandise on Amazon be free to black people.

  70. ‘We’re in your house’: Armed black protesters march through Georgia Confederate park

    Looking for aggro and “interrogating motorists”?

    What’s the worst that could happen?

    cowardly white supremacist groups who like to sneak around doing ambush attacks on protesters

    Who are those?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @El Dato


    Looking for aggro and “interrogating motorists”?

    What’s the worst that could happen?
     
    Uhhhhh... this?

    https://youtu.be/hdtADxP90ec
    , @Patrick in SC
    @El Dato


    Who are those?
     
    He's just making that up. It dates back to the early days of the Fentanyl Floyd Fest when a couple of guys in Hawaiian shirts got arrested for brawling with Antifa goons. Or something like that. Even the liberal media dropped it pretty quickly but Wakandans don't heed the white man's racist "truth."
  71. In the wapo story, substitute Al Sharpton’s name and it would be the same story, except, AS is a MSM/DNC pet.

  72. 1. Trump cannot win. Mail on voting due to WuFlu and every White woman in the blm train means a massive defeat.

    2. The Joint Chiefs hate Trump and his peace mongering. They are likely to remove him and appoint Hillary.

    Trump is toast. It’s all over for him and us. What is still in play is Hillary vs Abrams. The monstrous Hillary machine vs lean and hungry non Whites. Bet the latter and prepare. Run if you can. Some place like Chile that might need you and offer some protection. Hide if you cannot run. Pass for non White. Decide if you will die in your feet or on your knees in a blm run camp.

    Besos loves China and wants a final solution to Whitey here the way China solved their Uighur problem.

    • Replies: @A boxful of black pills
    @Whiskey

    Despite Trump being as incompetent as he is in all matters outside of twitting and conning, he may actually win thanks to the Tide of Madness sweeping the Left. The masks have slipped, literally and figuratively.

    Take a look at the election odds, betting agencies wised up this time around.

  73. @George
    "blowing up the Constitutional Republic". Should read "blowing up the Constitutional Democracy".

    The Republic ended with the direct election of Senators in 1913, 17th amendment. Monetary policy was transfered to experts at the Fed. WWI's kick off in 1914 was just a coincidence.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Chris Mallory, @Corvinus

    The Republic ended in 1865 with the victory of the Yankee forces turning These United States into The Untied States and making the country an empire.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Chris Mallory


    The Republic ended in 1865 with the victory of the Yankee forces turning These United States into The Untied States and making the country an empire.

     

    No, the fugitive slave laws were a precedent, spitting on the free states' sovereignty. Did the coonhunters invade Windsor, Chatham, Fort Erie, and Halifax?

    My ancestors lived along the escape routes, and thus were subject to such laws. As was I, 125 years later. I worked a couple of summers in Finland, which had an unequal treaty with the USSR which mirrored Article IV, Section 2, Clause 3 of the US Constitution:


    No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.
     
    "States rights"? Ha!!

    As for "empire", which states' leaders* argued for the annexation of Cuba? Cuba! We were already an empire. If a multiethnic country is one by definition, a multiracial one is even more so.


    Anyone with a NYT subscription to read their 1860 piece which contains this sentence?


    For, as soon as the American Government pays for the island, and it is admitted into the Union as an independent State, it can immediately secede, and "reannex" itself to the crown of Spain.
     
    *One of those leaders, John A Quitman, shares an alma mater with Scott Adams.

    Replies: @Chris Mallory

    , @Sam Malone
    @Chris Mallory

    I would say that the Constitution was rescinded and the Republic terminated in 1861, upon the failure of the Congress to immediately impeach and convict the President for making war on the States which had determined lawfully, democratically and overwhelmingly to exit the Union.

  74. Anonymous[239] • Disclaimer says:

    Black militia on the march in Georgia.

  75. @Wilkey

    Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.
     
    I actually made a wager with a Hillary-voting colleague in 2016 that if Trump won there would be riots. I won, of course.

    Combine that already combustible atmosphere with four years of the left stoking the fire, the recent BLM riots, and the possibility that lots of people will still be out of work and/or school come November and...I don't want to imagine. It won't be good.

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically - though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will be riots. Massive riots. If Biden wins - and especially if Dems win control of the Senate - there will probably be some form of gun control. I want to be able to defend myself if/when shit hits the fan.

    It's incredibly stupid that it's come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    Replies: @fnn, @Anonymous, @jsm, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @Charlotte, @MarkinLA

    But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies

    Be prepared to pay and have limited selection on firearms. Brick and Mortar stores are mostly empty. Online retailers are out of stock. Ammo, especially the “survival rounds” is getting scarce. Guns that were selling for $650 3 months ago are in the $900 range now. And prices will only go up as we get closer to the election. If you can buy face to face in your state, check local online marketplaces. You might find a deal.

    A semi auto rifle is nice, but if all you can buy is a lever action grab it. With a little practice you will be quite able to defend yourself. Same with a pistol, a quality revolver will do almost every thing you will need and it is basically idiot proof.

    On youtube, watch Paul Harrell. He is a former military man. He has a sense of humor but he is a serious man. He is not a tactitard with a full beard and sleeve tatts. He will give you his opinion and why he holds it, but for the most part he does not degrade or belittle those who might disagree with him.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6QH13V2o68zynSa0hZy9uQ

    • Agree: Kronos
    • Replies: @usNthem
    @Chris Mallory

    Another good guy is Hickok45

    Replies: @Chris Mallory

  76. Tangentially related to this topic:

    Does anyone remember that Ted Turner, the founder of CNN, funded a Civil War movie celebrating the Lost Cause only 17 years ago? Turner’s Wikipedia entry does not contain the words “Civil War” or “Gods and Generals.”

  77. The Washington Post evidently sides with a modern grievance movement that’s on the right side of History. Whatever that means.

    Tomorrow will hate us honky peasants unenchanted by watching our cities burn. Jeff be knowin’ that.

  78. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Back in the Stone Age, I used to teach a master class where the primary texts were both by George Bernard Shaw: "Arms and the Man" and "How He Lied To Her Husband." The purpose of the class was to analyze how someone becomes self-deceived, and then how or if they can become un-deceived, by an outside party, by themselves, or maybe by themselves using a second or third party, or maybe never (the Shirley Jackson gambit).

    In recent times, I've switched the main texts to using Disney's "Frozen" and the Dreamworks movie "How To Train Your Dragon." I used to think that "Frozen" was a great study of individual psychopathology, a tragedy of enormous inflicted self-hatred which is finally overcome by its counterpart, something to be used in twelve-step programs; but now I'm starting to think it has political dimensions. It takes a bit of thinking, but then again "Frozen" is the single greatest art-work of our era, so contemplation should come slowly.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Dumbo

  79. @Alexander Turok

    Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role in paying for this kind of rhetoric.
     
    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @J.Ross, @Corvinus, @Mr. Anon, @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    “And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.”

    Dude, it’s tin cup month. He can’t afford to upset the applecart. Hence, Mr. Sailer’s over the top post replete with false premises and confirmation bias and his kid gloves approach to Covid-19 deniers and continued Trump malfeasance.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Corvinus

    Right. we really need someone to point out "continued Trump malfeasance" because the MSM are not doing a good enough job. Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL. Apparently blaring this message 24/7 in virtually every story in the news and editorial sections of all major newspapers and all TV networks has not been enough. If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard.

    While he is at it, perhaps he could let us know that Black Lives Matter because we haven't been hearing that message enough lately either. Until Steve gets with the program, the Gleichschaltung of America will not be complete.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Alexander Turok, @nebulafox, @Peripatetic Commenter

    , @Alan Mercer
    @Corvinus

    Yes, because Steve's salient feature is his tendency to say whatever he thinks people want to hear.

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Corvinus

    You are so close to getting the hot civil war you have worked long for, and so earnestly desired. A couple of harmless incidents and then we will all kneel before you as the representative of God, the Great Prophet. Except we will not kneel before you and the image of the Beast. And the ten million dead Americans will be just part of the omelette-making process you have doggedly defended.

    You think the carnage will not include you.

    We know otherwise.

  80. @Anonymous
    Costa should know better

    Replies: @anon

    Costa should know better

    Trump Derangement Syndrome induced insanity.

    or

    Costa “knows” what he’s paid to ‘know”.

    Or both! The power of “and”….Bob Costa = Trump-Deranged-press-whore.

  81. @Barnard
    @IHTG

    I don't think Costa was ever a conservative he mostly did reporting, not commentary at National Review. They have a number of former reporters who have gone left after leaving, not to mention the opinion writers who have done so.

    His name on the byline does speak to Steve's point about Bezos needing to stand up to 20 something interns in the Washington Post newsroom. Costa is 34 and Philip Rucker looks like he is in his 40s. Both have a lot of experience covering politics in Washington. This absurd rhetoric is the norm in newsrooms now. Age and experience don't seem to be moderating factors in the press. Costa was on the board of Notre Dame for three years and his dad was an attorney for Bristol Myers Squibb. These aren't people who should be lefty kooks. It gives a good example of how thoroughly this derangement has spread among the elites.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon

    Bezos, being an ugly guy, just does what any female around him tells him to do so he can win their approval.

  82. @Anonymous
    @Wilkey


    It’s incredibly stupid that it’s come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.
     
    Maybe we should refer to it as the "Bezos Jewish Reality Distortion Field."

    Specifically intended for the simple, and the weak minded, it can easily convince fat lesbian Shiksa’s that an open freeway is equivalent to a public park.

    https://youtu.be/1OYdJqMC0Kc

    Replies: @MarkinLA, @Just another serf

    I’m looking forward with great anticipation to the trial of the (possibly Eritrean) driver Dawit Kelete.

    Will we see 400 years on the murder count and 250 years for the assault causing great bodily harm charge?

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Just another serf


    Will we see 400 years on the murder count and 250 years for the assault causing great bodily harm charge?
     
    No, he must be lauded, because Black Lives Matter even if BLM lives don't.
  83. On the subject of “fire eaters”, there are those two NY attorneys who were arrested for setting fire to an NYC police car. Mugshot photos of the duo are all over the Web, but one picture shows the woman in a vehicle holding an unlit Molotov cocktail.

    Is this “Photoshopped”? The container used for this improvised explosive/incendiary device is a bottle for Bud Light.

    If the photo is fake, is it meant as an joke on the original ad campaign? The beer-like product was “Lite Beer from Miller. Everything you ever wanted in a beer. And less.” The Anheuser Busch product was the copycat, which was originally advertised with a bar patron demanding, “Give me a light!” followed by someone taking him literally and setting fire to something, followed by the rejoinder, “I meant, a Bud Light.”

    If the photo is real, it displays truly scandalous behavior. What is an NYC hipster like Urooj Rahman doing with a bottle from an Anheuser Busch product?

  84. OT: Girls just wanna, desperately not be ostracised.

    Now, do I think the pretty rich girl daughter of Kellyanne is terribly, when it comes down to it, concerned with people she considered below her? No. That’s what makes this so interesting.

    https://nypost.com/2020/07/05/kellyanne-conways-anti-trump-daughter-keeps-trolling-mom-on-tiktok/

    It’s not Jeff Bezos tier who destroyed America, not on their own, it’s the upper-middle classes desperately concerned with status who keep kicking things up a gear.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  85. @anon
    The Left are the abolitionists, not the fire-eaters. And just like last time, they are starting the war.
    Also the Left won't secede if they lose the election. They will try again, more forcefully, to stage a coup. Civil War II will start with coups at the top combined with insurrection from the bottom, the same techniques they've been practicing the past four years.

    Replies: @Ris_Eruwaedhiel

    The overclass and the underclass versus the middle class.

    • Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost
    @Ris_Eruwaedhiel

    The late Sam Francis called it "Anarcho-tyranny".

  86. @gary
    Idiot Steve,

    Stop your babbling. Bezos is NOT the richest man in the world. One

    of the elite bankers is. You are an embarrassment to your race and

    country.

    Replies: @onetwothree

    You are an embarrassment to Microsoft Notepad which you used to format that comment.

    • LOL: Dissident
  87. @IHTG
    Costa ia former NRO reporter. He's gone full Oliver Darcy.

    Replies: @Barnard, @SMK, @Stan, @Mr. XYZ, @Richard B

    Is Oliver Darcy even Oliver Darcy’s real name? He is Iranian-American, after all.

  88. @dcthrowback
    "It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative."

    Isn't that what the last four years has been about? Drumpf has been an obvious Jared-led disappointment, but short of John F. Kennedy & William McKinley, no soul has paid more for his sins going against the establishment.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Kronos

    Do you think Nixon deserves an honorable mention?

    • Replies: @Jay Fink
    @Kronos

    Other than being from the wrong party did Nixon do or say anything that was anti-establishment? It seemed he was doing what the globalists wanted him to do...take the dollar off the gold standard, open up relations with China etc.

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Kronos


    Do you think Nixon deserves an honorable mention?
     
    Nixon implemented the Left's agenda. Nixon is no better than Mittens Romney. Both were happy to sell out the middle class to gain favor with the dishonest media.

    To Hell with Nixon and Romney. Nixon has seats on both sides of him in the abyss. One for Romney, and the other for Dubya. Oh, and they all have swimming suits suitable for the nearest body of "water."

    Nixon, Romney, and George What-the-f\/ck-happened Bush, all traitors to America.
  89. @SFG
    @Dieter Kief

    I agree the lack of free expression runs the risk of leading to long-term decay in the fashion of post-Ghazali Islamic society, Imperial China, etc.

    But that's a long-term problem, and Bezos is most likely concerned with staying rich now. Long-term cultural decline isn't likely to be a major concern for him.

    By the time China's genetically engineered superscientists have leaped ahead of us, Bezos will be old enough not to care.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    I beg to differ a bit – especially about the post-Ghazali part of your comment. Hassan Hassan has a little essay about Al Ghazali’s philosophy which I think is quite right:

    https://en.qantara.de/content/the-decline-of-islamic-scientific-thought-dont-blame-it-on-al-ghazali

  90. @SF
    This is in the news section, not opinion??
    Yeah, I guess so. Newspapers don't differentiate any more.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    And notice that their side is fighting for “justice” while our side is fighting for “power”

  91. @Wilkey

    Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.
     
    I actually made a wager with a Hillary-voting colleague in 2016 that if Trump won there would be riots. I won, of course.

    Combine that already combustible atmosphere with four years of the left stoking the fire, the recent BLM riots, and the possibility that lots of people will still be out of work and/or school come November and...I don't want to imagine. It won't be good.

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically - though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will be riots. Massive riots. If Biden wins - and especially if Dems win control of the Senate - there will probably be some form of gun control. I want to be able to defend myself if/when shit hits the fan.

    It's incredibly stupid that it's come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    Replies: @fnn, @Anonymous, @jsm, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @Charlotte, @MarkinLA

    Don’t delay too long. There’s already shortages of various types of ammo, and you’ll want some to use for practice.

  92. Anonymous[239] • Disclaimer says:

    https://www.twitter.com/CityBureaucrat/status/1279847491115065352

    https://www.twitter.com/CityBureaucrat/status/1279851779426078721

  93. Come on, Jeff, you are the richest man in the world. Did you work that hard to make $166 billion in order to be held hostage in fear that some 20-something interns would be peeved if you cleaned house?

    I’d imagine many finance and industrial leaders fear a return to pre-1980 tax brackets, unions, and to general protectionist/socialist policies. Certainly the younger generations have no financial stake in the current economic arrangement.

    Therefore, they keep doubling down on these culture wars based on race and gender/sexuality. It’s very much akin to how the German elites backed Hitler in response to communist agitation. BLM and LGBT+/Feminism are their respective SS and SA. Eventually, US elites will lose control of their rabid pets and they’ll feast upon their former masters.

    • Agree: BB753
  94. steve’s snobism is sad.

    bezos is 1. autistic, 2. a nerd, and 3. not that sophisticated.

    such traits are common among the very rich. feel no guilt in expropriating them.

    • Agree: Clyde
  95. @Gordo
    OTish but do these people know they are lying or are the actually deluded:

    Social inequality matters, too. In the United States, Black people are far more likely than white people to become severely ill from the coronavirus, for example, most likely due in part to the country’s history of systemic racism. It has left Black people with a high rate of chronic diseases such as diabetes, as well as living conditions and jobs that may increase exposure to the virus.
     
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/04/health/coronavirus-neanderthals.html

    I mean as if diabetes had no link whatsoever to stuffing your face with sugary crap every waking hour.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    Lying or deluded? It’s possibly somewhere in between. If you hold an overarching conspiracy theory — in this case, “systemic racism” — every little thing can and must be fit into the pattern. Fat sick white people? Stupid white people! Fat sick black people? Evil white people!

    • Agree: Gordo
  96. Asked if it is “a good idea” to remove statues of George Washington, Duckworth says: “I think we should listen to everybody. I think we should listen to the argument there. But remember, the President at Mt. Rushmore was standing on ground that was stolen from Native Americans.”

    And the Lakota were not the original owners of the Black Hills…..They entered into that area after 1600, and seized control of the Black Hills from the Cheyenne…..

    On the Missouri River, the Cheyenne came into contact with the neighboring Mandan, Hidatsa (Tsé-heše’émâheónese, “people who have soil houses”), and Arikara people (Ónoneo’o), and they adopted many of their cultural characteristics. They were first of the later Plains tribes into the Black Hills and Powder River Country. About 1730, they introduced the horse to Lakota bands (Ho’óhomo’eo’o – “the invited ones (to Cheyenne lands i.e. the Black Hills)”). Conflict with migrating Lakota and Ojibwe people forced the Cheyenne further west, and they, in turn, pushed the Kiowa to the south.[14]

    By 1776, the Lakota had overwhelmed the Cheyenne and taken over much of their territory near the Black Hills. In 1804, Lewis and Clark visited a surviving Cheyenne village in what is now North Dakota. Such European explorers learned many different names for the Cheyenne, and did not realize how the different sections were forming a unified tribe.[14]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheyenne#Expansion_on_the_Plains

    • Replies: @syonredux
    @syonredux

    From the Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee miniseries:


    Sitting Bull: You must take them out of our lands.

    Col. Nelson Miles: What precisely are your lands?

    Sitting Bull: These are the where my people lived before you whites first came.

    Col. Nelson Miles: I don't understand. We whites were not your first enemies. Why don't you demand back the land in Minnesota where the Chippewa and others forced you from years before?

    Sitting Bull: The Black Hills are a sacred given to my people by Wakan Tanka.

    Col. Nelson Miles: How very convenient to cloak your claims in spiritualism. And what would you say to the Mormons and others who believe that their God has given to them Indian lands in the West?

    Sitting Bull: I would say they should listen to Wakan Tanka.

    Col. Nelson Miles: No matter what your legends say, you didn't sprout from the plains like the spring grasses. And you didn't coalesce out of the ether. You came out of the Minnesota woodlands armed to the teeth and set upon your fellow man. You massacred the Kiowa, the Omaha, the Ponca, the Oto and the Pawnee without mercy. And yet you claim the Black Hills as a private preserve bequeathed to you by the Great Spirit.

    Sitting Bull: And who gave us the guns and powder to kill our enemies? And who traded weapons to the Chippewa and others who drove us from our home?

    Col. Nelson Miles: Chief Sitting Bull, the proposition that you were a peaceable people before the appearance of the white man is the most fanciful legend of all. You were killing each other for hundreds of moons before the first white stepped foot on this continent. You conquered those tribes, lusting for their game and their lands, just as we have now conquered you for no less noble a cause.

    Sitting Bull: This is your story of my people!

    Col. Nelson Miles: This is the truth, not legend.



    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0821638/quotes/?tab=qt&ref_=tt_trv_qu

    Replies: @Anon7

    , @Pericles
    @syonredux

    Dear SJWs, should the Caribbean be given back to the native indians?

  97. Trump: “Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values, and indoctrinate our children…Angry mobs are trying to tear down statues of our founders, deface our most sacred memorials, and unleash a wave of violent crime in our cities.”

    Now I’m not the biggest fan of Trump. I voted for Cruz in the caucuses four years ago, and never thought Trump had any shot at winning, but…this may literally be the most coherent and unquestionably accurate thing he has ever said in his entire life.

    By the way, while the mob is tearing down statues, is there any chance we could get them to tear down the Statue of Liberty?

    AFTER ALL, IT’S A STATUE OF A WHITE WOMAN WITH BROKEN CHAINS AT HER FEET!!! IS THIS TO IMPLY THAT THIS WHITE WOMAN WAS EVER A SLAVE??? OR MAYBE IT’S YET ANOTHER WHITE SAVIOR MYTH IMPLYING THAT THIS WHITE WOMAN FREED THE SLAVES, AS IF THE SLAVES NEEDED ANY HELP??? EITHER WAY, WHY IS THIS STATUE STILL STANDING???

    TEAR IT DOWN! TEAR IT DOWN! TEAR IT DOWN!

    At the very least, after all they’ve torn down, maybe we could at least tear down that stupid Emma Lazarus poem. If they’re tearing down a few objectionable parts of history we certainly should, too.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Wilkey

    I'm a bit disappointed that a lot of leftist landmarks are still standing around at this point.

  98. @syonredux

    Asked if it is "a good idea" to remove statues of George Washington, Duckworth says: "I think we should listen to everybody. I think we should listen to the argument there. But remember, the President at Mt. Rushmore was standing on ground that was stolen from Native Americans."
     
    https://twitter.com/aaronsibarium/status/1279797773760684032



    And the Lakota were not the original owners of the Black Hills.....They entered into that area after 1600, and seized control of the Black Hills from the Cheyenne.....

    On the Missouri River, the Cheyenne came into contact with the neighboring Mandan, Hidatsa (Tsé-heše'émâheónese, "people who have soil houses"), and Arikara people (Ónoneo'o), and they adopted many of their cultural characteristics. They were first of the later Plains tribes into the Black Hills and Powder River Country. About 1730, they introduced the horse to Lakota bands (Ho'óhomo'eo'o – "the invited ones (to Cheyenne lands i.e. the Black Hills)"). Conflict with migrating Lakota and Ojibwe people forced the Cheyenne further west, and they, in turn, pushed the Kiowa to the south.[14]

     


    By 1776, the Lakota had overwhelmed the Cheyenne and taken over much of their territory near the Black Hills. In 1804, Lewis and Clark visited a surviving Cheyenne village in what is now North Dakota. Such European explorers learned many different names for the Cheyenne, and did not realize how the different sections were forming a unified tribe.[14]

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheyenne#Expansion_on_the_Plains


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iehPf1n_5pQ

    Replies: @syonredux, @Pericles

    From the Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee miniseries:

    Sitting Bull: You must take them out of our lands.

    Col. Nelson Miles: What precisely are your lands?

    Sitting Bull: These are the where my people lived before you whites first came.

    Col. Nelson Miles: I don’t understand. We whites were not your first enemies. Why don’t you demand back the land in Minnesota where the Chippewa and others forced you from years before?

    Sitting Bull: The Black Hills are a sacred given to my people by Wakan Tanka.

    Col. Nelson Miles: How very convenient to cloak your claims in spiritualism. And what would you say to the Mormons and others who believe that their God has given to them Indian lands in the West?

    Sitting Bull: I would say they should listen to Wakan Tanka.

    Col. Nelson Miles: No matter what your legends say, you didn’t sprout from the plains like the spring grasses. And you didn’t coalesce out of the ether. You came out of the Minnesota woodlands armed to the teeth and set upon your fellow man. You massacred the Kiowa, the Omaha, the Ponca, the Oto and the Pawnee without mercy. And yet you claim the Black Hills as a private preserve bequeathed to you by the Great Spirit.

    Sitting Bull: And who gave us the guns and powder to kill our enemies? And who traded weapons to the Chippewa and others who drove us from our home?

    Col. Nelson Miles: Chief Sitting Bull, the proposition that you were a peaceable people before the appearance of the white man is the most fanciful legend of all. You were killing each other for hundreds of moons before the first white stepped foot on this continent. You conquered those tribes, lusting for their game and their lands, just as we have now conquered you for no less noble a cause.

    Sitting Bull: This is your story of my people!

    Col. Nelson Miles: This is the truth, not legend.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0821638/quotes/?tab=qt&ref_=tt_trv_qu

    • Thanks: vhrm, HA, restless94110
    • Replies: @Anon7
    @syonredux

    Thanks.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1y_0NfhF9c

  99. President Trump’s unyielding push to preserve Confederate symbols and the legacy of white domination, crystallizedby his harsh denunciation of the racial justice movement Friday night at Mount Rushmore…with his racial animus.

    The subtext of this statement is that there is no legitimate critique of the so-called racial justice movement, only “denunciation,” an idea that’s often seen in articles like this. It’s often more overtly stated than it is here, but it’s still present in this piece. Of course (as many have pointed out over the the last several years) this is religious thinking as applied to politics. It’s beyond religious thinking, actually. Religious people can be – and often are – prone to self-examination as to the impact that one deeply held value has on other concepts or ideas within their network of values.

    Puritans, by contrast, aren’t concerned so much with that. To Puritans, the precepts that occupy their holy-of-holy psychological spaces are contaminated by other legitimate values, not informed by them. As a result, they come to the conclusion that there can never be a corruption of the ideals or people within their movement – no pretext or ulterior motives, no quest for political power over principle, no desire to dominate or silence opposing voices. None of the failings that have accompanied (though not necessarily defined) nearly every other quest for good throughout history. So there’s never a legitimate excuse to criticize their movement, and any attempt to do so only reveals evil on your part, which the quoted statement above preaches.

    There’s a separation of state and religion in the US, but no separation of state and religiosity. That means a radical movement can extract the explicit deity from a puritanical mindset and still rely on the pathos, sacralism, moral privilege and blind obedience to a dictatorial priestly class that the puritanical mindset embraces – exactly the sort of things that the founders were trying to avoid.

  100. OT: One letter makes a big difference in today’s conflict:

    MAGA Hatter

    MAGA Hater

  101. @syonredux
    @syonredux

    From the Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee miniseries:


    Sitting Bull: You must take them out of our lands.

    Col. Nelson Miles: What precisely are your lands?

    Sitting Bull: These are the where my people lived before you whites first came.

    Col. Nelson Miles: I don't understand. We whites were not your first enemies. Why don't you demand back the land in Minnesota where the Chippewa and others forced you from years before?

    Sitting Bull: The Black Hills are a sacred given to my people by Wakan Tanka.

    Col. Nelson Miles: How very convenient to cloak your claims in spiritualism. And what would you say to the Mormons and others who believe that their God has given to them Indian lands in the West?

    Sitting Bull: I would say they should listen to Wakan Tanka.

    Col. Nelson Miles: No matter what your legends say, you didn't sprout from the plains like the spring grasses. And you didn't coalesce out of the ether. You came out of the Minnesota woodlands armed to the teeth and set upon your fellow man. You massacred the Kiowa, the Omaha, the Ponca, the Oto and the Pawnee without mercy. And yet you claim the Black Hills as a private preserve bequeathed to you by the Great Spirit.

    Sitting Bull: And who gave us the guns and powder to kill our enemies? And who traded weapons to the Chippewa and others who drove us from our home?

    Col. Nelson Miles: Chief Sitting Bull, the proposition that you were a peaceable people before the appearance of the white man is the most fanciful legend of all. You were killing each other for hundreds of moons before the first white stepped foot on this continent. You conquered those tribes, lusting for their game and their lands, just as we have now conquered you for no less noble a cause.

    Sitting Bull: This is your story of my people!

    Col. Nelson Miles: This is the truth, not legend.



    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0821638/quotes/?tab=qt&ref_=tt_trv_qu

    Replies: @Anon7

    Thanks.

    • Thanks: Chris Mallory
  102. Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role

    Is there any evidence that Bezos ( or AMZN ) exercises any editorial control over WP? (Beyond telling them, this is how much I can spend on this fancy of mine). WP has been in this rebel mode even before Watergate days (when Bezos was still in his diaper).

    Same with Carlos Slim. Any appearance of sudden lurch (of NYT) to the left is zeitgeist and not Slim. NYT printed Pentagon Papers in 1971; far more consequential than modern day iconoclasm.

  103. Balderdash! Trump has said nothing about confederate statues(sadly), it’s the founding fathers where he draws the line .The Rushmore speech one of his best!

  104. did ya ever consider the possibility that the elite media is trying to re-elect trump?

    • LOL: Muggles
  105. He celebrated Independence Day with a dystopian speech….

    The original talking points used ‘dark’ rather than ‘dystopian.’ I guess somebody gave that more thought.

  106. @Corvinus
    @Alexander Turok

    "And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section."

    Dude, it's tin cup month. He can't afford to upset the applecart. Hence, Mr. Sailer's over the top post replete with false premises and confirmation bias and his kid gloves approach to Covid-19 deniers and continued Trump malfeasance.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Alan Mercer, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Right. we really need someone to point out “continued Trump malfeasance” because the MSM are not doing a good enough job. Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL. Apparently blaring this message 24/7 in virtually every story in the news and editorial sections of all major newspapers and all TV networks has not been enough. If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard.

    While he is at it, perhaps he could let us know that Black Lives Matter because we haven’t been hearing that message enough lately either. Until Steve gets with the program, the Gleichschaltung of America will not be complete.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Jack D

    "Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL."

    Not hysteria, just facts and reasoned analysis.

    "If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard."

    Exactly. Rather than be cagey, he should be NOTICING.

    Replies: @Your verdict

    , @Alexander Turok
    @Jack D


    Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL. Apparently blaring this message 24/7 in virtually every story in the news and editorial sections of all major newspapers and all TV networks has not been enough. If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard.
     
    What caused the hysteria was not the media, nor the volunteer auxiliary TDS machine. They would have been happy to create hysteria over "OMG Trump commented on a woman's looks," but it turns out ordinary people didn't give a d***. Ordinary people do care about their lives. At least some of them do. But go ahead and drink that kool-aid. The convulsions are just hysteria.

    As to the general tone that Trump is somehow invincible, apparently you share a delusion in common with the media. They think the negative press coverage is capable of removing him from office. You see that he is still there and think it's some great victory. Just wait until November. But no doubt the polls are fake, and the election results will be fake too, right?

    While he is at it, perhaps he could let us know that Black Lives Matter because we haven’t been hearing that message enough lately either. Until Steve gets with the program, the Gleichschaltung of America will not be complete.
     
    "Everyone is criticizing the Soviet Union, so I'm gonna go on and on about what wonders will exist in my proposed socialist society and never address what actually happened in the USSR."

    That's really how Steve sounds to some of us. He's comparable to the people you could call "classical modern liberals," people who believe in fairness, free speech, open debate, and who are marching alongside these crazy woke people and have decided to just ignore them, pretend they don't exist. It seems like special pleading for him to attack this but behave as they do when confronted with the crazies in his own comment section.
    , @nebulafox
    @Jack D

    He does not need to be viewed as evil to lose: he needs to be viewed as grossly incompetent and unfit for the office. And an increasing amount of Americans think that.

    No amount of leftist misbehavior can make up for Trump's response to COVID now that six-digit numbers of Americans are dead.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

    , @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Jack D

    I wouldn't bother replying to Corvinus. I think syphilis has destroyed his brain.

    That's the only credible explanation.

  107. Bezos was a nerd who got lucky. He’s got a huge chip on his shoulder, like Bill Gates, the “philanthropist” who wants to genocide 90 % of humanity, after making their lives miserable for 30 years with Windows.

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @BB753


    Bezos was a nerd who got lucky. He’s got a huge chip on his shoulder
     
    It's been known to happen.

    “philanthropist” who wants to genocide 90 % of humanity
     
    Oh noes, what a horrid tragedy for humanity if Congans no longer have 6 kids per woman...

    after making their lives miserable for 30 years with Windows
     
    If you're complaining about Windows, you're either a macbook [email protected] or a Linuxer i.e. fellow nerd.

    Replies: @BB753

    , @nebulafox
    @BB753

    >Bezos was a nerd who got lucky.

    No. Bezos is not a nerd. He's an soulless MBA hack at heart.

    Paul Allen, God bless his soul, was a nerd. And I mean the real, get your hands dirty with math and computers kind, not what "nerd" has been made to mean.

  108. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Back in the Stone Age, I used to teach a master class where the primary texts were both by George Bernard Shaw: "Arms and the Man" and "How He Lied To Her Husband." The purpose of the class was to analyze how someone becomes self-deceived, and then how or if they can become un-deceived, by an outside party, by themselves, or maybe by themselves using a second or third party, or maybe never (the Shirley Jackson gambit).

    In recent times, I've switched the main texts to using Disney's "Frozen" and the Dreamworks movie "How To Train Your Dragon." I used to think that "Frozen" was a great study of individual psychopathology, a tragedy of enormous inflicted self-hatred which is finally overcome by its counterpart, something to be used in twelve-step programs; but now I'm starting to think it has political dimensions. It takes a bit of thinking, but then again "Frozen" is the single greatest art-work of our era, so contemplation should come slowly.

    Replies: @slumber_j, @Dumbo

    It takes a bit of thinking, but then again “Frozen” is the single greatest art-work of our era

    Well, I know current art mostly sucks, but really…? I mean, it’s well-done, but… Come on…
    Now, if you want to examine it more intellectually, I think “Frozen” is really “about assimilating the shadow”, in Jungian terms. Maybe Jordan Peterson likes it too. Plus, of course, some cheap Neo-Disneyan feminist themes thrown in.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Dumbo

    Nope, you're just mistaken. "Frozen" is grand, high art, we're talking Mozart and Wagner and Talking Heads levels, and if you can't or don't or won't understand why, then you can start at the beginning, I'm happy to help you grasp it: I'm not here to be snotty with you, I want you to understand what great art really is, and get uplifted by the understanding.

    "The window is open! So's that door!
    I didn't know they did that any more!
    Who knew we owned eight thousand salad plates?"

    Adventure time: come on and grab your friends.
    We'll go to very... distant lands.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Dumbo, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  109. @Dieter Kief
    @Alfa158

    The West is a success story based upon (functioning) techniques and (institutionalized) heterodoxy**** - and newspapers were an integral part of this development, as were (and still are) books. Some newspapers still are (the Swiss NZZ (and the German Die weLT and FAZ - to a lesser degree though, as is the weekly Zürich Weltwoche and the German weekly Die Zeit. None of them is completely woke).


    ***** That started in Northern Europe medieval times - cf. Arno Borsts books - or Johannes Hirschberger - The History of Philosophy Pt. I

    Replies: @Jack D

    Die Weltwoche is certainly a fine publication but it has a circulation of 45,000 German speaking readers. It is, pardon my French, a mere pimple on the ass of the NY Times or the Washington Post. I would wager that 99% of Americans have never even heard of it. Meanwhile CNN blasts full time (or at least it used to when people still flew) from every airport waiting area like Stalin’s loudspeakers.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Jack D


    Die Weltwoche is certainly a fine publication but it has a circulation of 45,000 German speaking readers.
     
    There are other parts of the world, and they have their nice things too, alright. - The NZZ - selling 120 000 copies 7x/week is even better than Die Weltwoche. Compared to the eight and a half million Swiss inhabitants, the NZZ circulation is huge. And it has a liberal counterpart which is not bad at all (Der Tages-Anzeiger) - and sells even more copies. - And about half a dozen regional papers that aren't bad at all. The Swiss still read books and newspapers like nowhere else in the world as far as I know.

    (I made a systematical point too, though, in the beginning (comment No. 6) and tried to defend this systematically relevant point with my Swiss (and - to a lesser degree - German examples). And this point is what kept me going here: That civilized heterodoxy is the core of the Western success story - and that Jeff Bezos might fall prey to the sin of the half-hearted modernization (as Jürgen Habermas addressed this problem every now and then over decades now, for example).

    What's interesting is, that the rot in/of the Washington Post for example seems to come from the left side of the western tradition as well as from big money. - And - excuse me if I mention this here: This reminds me of Weimar because that is the most overlooked aspect of the Weimar-tragedy: That the left did a lot to make the anti-parliamentarian Weimarian catastrophe happen. - It was the openly declared goal of the left's heroes from the often misleadingly nicely portrayed Rosa Luxemburg to such first-rate intellectuals as Kurt Tucholsky and ... Bert Brecht and Kurt Weill and - so many others - including Thomas Mann (on the right, of course) to get rid of the democratic consensus - and of the open debate in the parliament as well as in the press.

    PS
    Rolling Stone's Matt Taibbi is one of the American leftists willing to admit, that this will not end too well if journalism should continue to ignore its basic role, which is to inform people and not to lead them to the new pastures of the greening wokeness.

    Replies: @Muggles

    , @Pericles
    @Jack D

    I wonder how many Americans, as a percentage, would correctly answer a multiple choice quiz about the NY Times.

    a. A news show on CNN
    b. New Year's Clock on Times Square in New York City
    c. Wedding magazine
    d. One of the boroughs of New York City
    e. A famous Gentlemen's Club in the Meat-Packing District with a free buffet

    (The same of course goes for WaPo.)

  110. @Alexander Turok

    Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role in paying for this kind of rhetoric.
     
    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @J.Ross, @Corvinus, @Mr. Anon, @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    There is no “corona-denying” crackpot rhetoric here. Some people merely pointed out that the country is having a massive freakout over a pandemic that is no worse than The Asian Flu of 1957. It is not our fault that bed-wetting hysterics like you can’t keep your sh*t together.

  111. Meanwhile, the New York Review of Books thinks Joe Biden is moving in a positive direction.:

    The New York Review of Books
    June 25 at 4:30 PM ·
    “One of the oldest truisms of presidential politics is that candidates run to the left or right (respectively) during the primary and to the center in the general election. But since he became the presumptive nominee, Joe Biden has moved left,” writes Michael Tomasky. “Biden’s moves have been more than the usual placating of the constituency whose support he needs—they suggest that his very thinking has changed, and in major part thanks to Covid-19.”

    I would agree Biden’s very thinking has changed, but I wouldn’t attribute it to Covid-19. Do Democrats recognize signs of dementia in their candidate or think he’s just fine?

  112. @Coag
    At this point I’m 100% behind the gubmint taking a sword through the Gordian Knot of Systemic Racism by expropriating Amazon and dividing its assets among all the country’s blacks as reparations.

    The black guy who slammed his car into two non-binary white chick BLM protestors in Seattle, throwing them into the air like ragdolls resulting in one of them dying and the other in a coma in the ICU, is identified as a 27 year old Ethiopian named Dawit Kelete. Incidentally 80 people have died in Oromo protests in Ethiopia, and the Ethiopian prime minister Abiy Ahmed has a known record of demeaning African-Americans and BLM. Aren’t we all thrilled to be continually enrolled in the inscrutable racial contests of the Old Country?

    https://borkena.com/2020/06/06/black-lives-matter-politics-in-ethiopia/

    Replies: @Dmon, @Jack D, @S. Anonyia

    Thank god Kelete was black. If he had been white, all of the remaining statues in America would have been torn down and maybe they would have moved on to living humans too.

    Will the trial of Kelete get as much publicity as that of James Fields Jr. (the Charlotte car attacker) or will he be quickly memory holed because he does not fit the Narrative?

    I think that Kelete didn’t own any mirrors and mistakenly believed that he was a white person. In all of his online photos he is hanging out exclusively with whites, especially young white blonde females:

    This would explain why he attacked a BLM Peaceful Protest.

    Before this “accident”, the Seattle State Police were helpless, helpless I tell you to prevent marchers from blocking traffic on their main transportation artery every day:

    BEFORE:

    “In a time that requires care and flexibility, we are exercising the safest means possible to avoid injuries or worse to motorists, protesters, WSDOT personnel and our troopers by closing the roadway as needed and separating protestors from vehicular traffic. With no effective way of stopping large crowds from entering its lengthy borders, temporarily shutting the roadway is our best measure to avoid the dangerous mixture of freeway speed, vehicles, and pedestrians and to end the disruptions as quickly as possible.”

    After the tragedy, the State Patrol announced it wasn’t letting protesters on the freeway:

    AFTER:

    “The @wastatepatrol will not be allowing protesters to enter I-5. For the safety of all citizens including protesters and motorists, pedestrians walking on the freeway will be arrested.”

    This apparently never occurred to them before. Who knew that marching on the freeway was a crime? In Philly when the Peaceful Protesters tried this, they just teargassed them and arrested as many as they could grab.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D


    After the tragedy, the State Patrol announced it wasn’t letting protesters on the freeway:

    This apparently never occurred to them before. Who knew that marching on the freeway was a crime? In Philly when the Peaceful Protesters tried this, they just teargassed them and arrested as many as they could grab.
     
    BLM had been holding these late-night freeway protests for 19 days before this accident. 19 days! During that whole time the City, WDOT, and Washington State Troopers let the protesters get away with shutting down a major traffic artery. I've seen some speculation that BLM may have been hoping for a result like this, so as to get a couple of martyrs. I would not say that's impossible. Somebody happened to be on the overpass to record some pretty good video of the whole gruesome spectacle. Of course, they were hoping it would be another James Fields, not The Fresh Prince of Asmara.

    The perp must be the son of some Eritrean bigshot. He was driving a Jaguar.

    Replies: @Muggles

    , @Bill P
    @Jack D

    It was mayor Durkan's call to let the girls have their feminist dance party on Interstate 5 in the middle of the night -- for three weeks. She also ordered the police to abandon the east precinct so that the anarchists could create CHAZ.

    I wonder what other idiot decisions she made when she was a federal prosecutor, before she became Seattle's mayor.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @anon

  113. @Kronos
    @dcthrowback

    Do you think Nixon deserves an honorable mention?

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Other than being from the wrong party did Nixon do or say anything that was anti-establishment? It seemed he was doing what the globalists wanted him to do…take the dollar off the gold standard, open up relations with China etc.

  114. I actually think that Bezos would prefer not to go down in history as the man who paid for blowing up the Constitutional republic.

    Well, he won’t. Not according to The Post, anyway. Or any other liberal media outlet, which is to say, pretty much every media outlet.

    Bezos doesn’t consider himself an American. None of those guys do (Gates, Soros, etc.). They are citizens of the World. But it’s their World. They consider themselves to be a new aristocracy, and we are just their serfs and retainers. “Villeins ye are, and Villeins ye shall remain” could as well be the Post’s motto.

    • Agree: Kylie
  115. @Jack D
    @Coag

    Thank god Kelete was black. If he had been white, all of the remaining statues in America would have been torn down and maybe they would have moved on to living humans too.

    Will the trial of Kelete get as much publicity as that of James Fields Jr. (the Charlotte car attacker) or will he be quickly memory holed because he does not fit the Narrative?

    I think that Kelete didn't own any mirrors and mistakenly believed that he was a white person. In all of his online photos he is hanging out exclusively with whites, especially young white blonde females:

    https://heavy.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/2014-11-09-20.46.35-850302645005345469_20441943_censored.jpg

    https://heavy.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/2014-11-08-16.37.44-849452618548667138_20441943_censored.jpg

    This would explain why he attacked a BLM Peaceful Protest.

    Before this "accident", the Seattle State Police were helpless, helpless I tell you to prevent marchers from blocking traffic on their main transportation artery every day:

    BEFORE:


    “In a time that requires care and flexibility, we are exercising the safest means possible to avoid injuries or worse to motorists, protesters, WSDOT personnel and our troopers by closing the roadway as needed and separating protestors from vehicular traffic. With no effective way of stopping large crowds from entering its lengthy borders, temporarily shutting the roadway is our best measure to avoid the dangerous mixture of freeway speed, vehicles, and pedestrians and to end the disruptions as quickly as possible.”
     
    After the tragedy, the State Patrol announced it wasn’t letting protesters on the freeway:

    AFTER:


    “The @wastatepatrol will not be allowing protesters to enter I-5. For the safety of all citizens including protesters and motorists, pedestrians walking on the freeway will be arrested.”

     

    This apparently never occurred to them before. Who knew that marching on the freeway was a crime? In Philly when the Peaceful Protesters tried this, they just teargassed them and arrested as many as they could grab.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Bill P

    After the tragedy, the State Patrol announced it wasn’t letting protesters on the freeway:

    This apparently never occurred to them before. Who knew that marching on the freeway was a crime? In Philly when the Peaceful Protesters tried this, they just teargassed them and arrested as many as they could grab.

    BLM had been holding these late-night freeway protests for 19 days before this accident. 19 days! During that whole time the City, WDOT, and Washington State Troopers let the protesters get away with shutting down a major traffic artery. I’ve seen some speculation that BLM may have been hoping for a result like this, so as to get a couple of martyrs. I would not say that’s impossible. Somebody happened to be on the overpass to record some pretty good video of the whole gruesome spectacle. Of course, they were hoping it would be another James Fields, not The Fresh Prince of Asmara.

    The perp must be the son of some Eritrean bigshot. He was driving a Jaguar.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Mr. Anon

    Before going to this blog comment section I had no idea who the Jag driver was or his race.

    Odd that.

    Facts inconvenient to the Narrative don't get printed or mentioned. I guess I should have assumed he was a POC since he wasn't named & shamed as "some rich white dude."

    I need to brush up on my Soviet style news reading/interpretation skills.

  116. @Jack D
    @Dieter Kief

    Die Weltwoche is certainly a fine publication but it has a circulation of 45,000 German speaking readers. It is, pardon my French, a mere pimple on the ass of the NY Times or the Washington Post. I would wager that 99% of Americans have never even heard of it. Meanwhile CNN blasts full time (or at least it used to when people still flew) from every airport waiting area like Stalin's loudspeakers.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Pericles

    Die Weltwoche is certainly a fine publication but it has a circulation of 45,000 German speaking readers.

    There are other parts of the world, and they have their nice things too, alright. – The NZZ – selling 120 000 copies 7x/week is even better than Die Weltwoche. Compared to the eight and a half million Swiss inhabitants, the NZZ circulation is huge. And it has a liberal counterpart which is not bad at all (Der Tages-Anzeiger) – and sells even more copies. – And about half a dozen regional papers that aren’t bad at all. The Swiss still read books and newspapers like nowhere else in the world as far as I know.

    (I made a systematical point too, though, in the beginning (comment No. 6) and tried to defend this systematically relevant point with my Swiss (and – to a lesser degree – German examples). And this point is what kept me going here: That civilized heterodoxy is the core of the Western success story – and that Jeff Bezos might fall prey to the sin of the half-hearted modernization (as Jürgen Habermas addressed this problem every now and then over decades now, for example).

    What’s interesting is, that the rot in/of the Washington Post for example seems to come from the left side of the western tradition as well as from big money. – And – excuse me if I mention this here: This reminds me of Weimar because that is the most overlooked aspect of the Weimar-tragedy: That the left did a lot to make the anti-parliamentarian Weimarian catastrophe happen. – It was the openly declared goal of the left’s heroes from the often misleadingly nicely portrayed Rosa Luxemburg to such first-rate intellectuals as Kurt Tucholsky and … Bert Brecht and Kurt Weill and – so many others – including Thomas Mann (on the right, of course) to get rid of the democratic consensus – and of the open debate in the parliament as well as in the press.

    PS
    Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi is one of the American leftists willing to admit, that this will not end too well if journalism should continue to ignore its basic role, which is to inform people and not to lead them to the new pastures of the greening wokeness.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Dieter Kief

    >>Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi is one of the American leftists willing to admit, that this will not end too well if journalism should continue to ignore its basic role, which is to inform people and not to lead them to the new pastures of the greening wokeness.<<

    I doubt Taibbi is still doing regular writing for RS. Now has his own website and does freelancing.

    Yes, he's a real honest leftist, old school. Not a Trump admirer, but not a some fascist cheerleader for the SJW mob like most "leftists" are now.

    These guys (and gals, a few) should be cherished. They swing more opinions than thousands of alleged conservatives who all sing from the same hymnal.

    Old leftists, for all of their bad ideas, didn't usually Hate America or buy into the idea that race or ethnicity is the New Marxist Class system. Plus they appreciated free speech and hated purges, banning, censorship, blacklisting, etc. Not necessarily fans of coercive government either. The Pandemic has revealed the true nature of soft headed "liberals" and that ilk. They love controlling hte mass in all ways large and small. "Put on that mask!" or else.

    There are real journalists and investigative reporters from all backgrounds. Greenwald and the Intercept group also are of this background. Not mere mouthpiece stooges for the Oligarch MSM.

  117. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Make sure you don’t miss the new documentary,

    “Does Southern California Have Enough Unassimilated Latino’s Yet?”

  118. @Jack D
    @Coag

    Thank god Kelete was black. If he had been white, all of the remaining statues in America would have been torn down and maybe they would have moved on to living humans too.

    Will the trial of Kelete get as much publicity as that of James Fields Jr. (the Charlotte car attacker) or will he be quickly memory holed because he does not fit the Narrative?

    I think that Kelete didn't own any mirrors and mistakenly believed that he was a white person. In all of his online photos he is hanging out exclusively with whites, especially young white blonde females:

    https://heavy.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/2014-11-09-20.46.35-850302645005345469_20441943_censored.jpg

    https://heavy.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/2014-11-08-16.37.44-849452618548667138_20441943_censored.jpg

    This would explain why he attacked a BLM Peaceful Protest.

    Before this "accident", the Seattle State Police were helpless, helpless I tell you to prevent marchers from blocking traffic on their main transportation artery every day:

    BEFORE:


    “In a time that requires care and flexibility, we are exercising the safest means possible to avoid injuries or worse to motorists, protesters, WSDOT personnel and our troopers by closing the roadway as needed and separating protestors from vehicular traffic. With no effective way of stopping large crowds from entering its lengthy borders, temporarily shutting the roadway is our best measure to avoid the dangerous mixture of freeway speed, vehicles, and pedestrians and to end the disruptions as quickly as possible.”
     
    After the tragedy, the State Patrol announced it wasn’t letting protesters on the freeway:

    AFTER:


    “The @wastatepatrol will not be allowing protesters to enter I-5. For the safety of all citizens including protesters and motorists, pedestrians walking on the freeway will be arrested.”

     

    This apparently never occurred to them before. Who knew that marching on the freeway was a crime? In Philly when the Peaceful Protesters tried this, they just teargassed them and arrested as many as they could grab.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Bill P

    It was mayor Durkan’s call to let the girls have their feminist dance party on Interstate 5 in the middle of the night — for three weeks. She also ordered the police to abandon the east precinct so that the anarchists could create CHAZ.

    I wonder what other idiot decisions she made when she was a federal prosecutor, before she became Seattle’s mayor.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bill P


    It was mayor Durkan’s call to let the girls have their feminist dance party on Interstate 5 in the middle of the night — for three weeks.
     
    With social distancing, of course. Self-enforced, equally of course.
    , @anon
    @Bill P

    It was mayor Durkan’s call to let the girls have their feminist dance party on Interstate 5 in the middle of the night — for three weeks. She also ordered the police to abandon the east precinct so that the anarchists could create CHAZ.

    When a black city council member led a mob to party outside of Durkan's $5,000,000 mansion and a class action suit was filed against the city by people who had been financially hurt by the SPAZ, she changed her mind -or what passes for it- in hours.

    I wonder what a good liability trial ambulance chaser can make of the city's cession of I-5?

    It'd be a real shame if Seattle wound up paying a whole bunch of money to certain citizens and groups because of the actions of one mayor. Yep, that'd be a real shame!

  119. Washington Post Ratcheting Up to 1860 South Carolina Fire Eater Rhetoric

    The Palmetto State was 60% African in 1860. Just saying…

    She had twice as many districts as did Vermont, even though the two states’ white populations were very close in number. But those excess electors didn’t help any in that year’s election, did they?

    By the way, South Carolina’s legislature, not her voters, chose those electors. Was any other state still doing it that way in 1860?

  120. @J.Ross
    @Alexander Turok

    Turok has cracked it. All the commenters are actually Steve sockpuppetting. Which means that Turok is also Steve.

    Replies: @No Recent Commenting History

    All the commenters are actually Steve sockpuppetting.

    It’s true. Even Tinny Duk. All iSteve, all of us.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @No Recent Commenting History

    As I've often explained, I have lots of Unexpressed Opinions

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

  121. @Bill P
    @Jack D

    It was mayor Durkan's call to let the girls have their feminist dance party on Interstate 5 in the middle of the night -- for three weeks. She also ordered the police to abandon the east precinct so that the anarchists could create CHAZ.

    I wonder what other idiot decisions she made when she was a federal prosecutor, before she became Seattle's mayor.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @anon

    It was mayor Durkan’s call to let the girls have their feminist dance party on Interstate 5 in the middle of the night — for three weeks.

    With social distancing, of course. Self-enforced, equally of course.

  122. anon[382] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P
    @Jack D

    It was mayor Durkan's call to let the girls have their feminist dance party on Interstate 5 in the middle of the night -- for three weeks. She also ordered the police to abandon the east precinct so that the anarchists could create CHAZ.

    I wonder what other idiot decisions she made when she was a federal prosecutor, before she became Seattle's mayor.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @anon

    It was mayor Durkan’s call to let the girls have their feminist dance party on Interstate 5 in the middle of the night — for three weeks. She also ordered the police to abandon the east precinct so that the anarchists could create CHAZ.

    When a black city council member led a mob to party outside of Durkan’s $5,000,000 mansion and a class action suit was filed against the city by people who had been financially hurt by the SPAZ, she changed her mind -or what passes for it- in hours.

    I wonder what a good liability trial ambulance chaser can make of the city’s cession of I-5?

    It’d be a real shame if Seattle wound up paying a whole bunch of money to certain citizens and groups because of the actions of one mayor. Yep, that’d be a real shame!

  123. @Chris Mallory
    @George

    The Republic ended in 1865 with the victory of the Yankee forces turning These United States into The Untied States and making the country an empire.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Sam Malone

    The Republic ended in 1865 with the victory of the Yankee forces turning These United States into The Untied States and making the country an empire.

    No, the fugitive slave laws were a precedent, spitting on the free states’ sovereignty. Did the coonhunters invade Windsor, Chatham, Fort Erie, and Halifax?

    My ancestors lived along the escape routes, and thus were subject to such laws. As was I, 125 years later. I worked a couple of summers in Finland, which had an unequal treaty with the USSR which mirrored Article IV, Section 2, Clause 3 of the US Constitution:

    No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.

    “States rights”? Ha!!

    As for “empire”, which states’ leaders* argued for the annexation of Cuba? Cuba! We were already an empire. If a multiethnic country is one by definition, a multiracial one is even more so.

    Anyone with a NYT subscription to read their 1860 piece which contains this sentence?

    For, as soon as the American Government pays for the island, and it is admitted into the Union as an independent State, it can immediately secede, and “reannex” itself to the crown of Spain.

    *One of those leaders, John A Quitman, shares an alma mater with Scott Adams.

    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    @Reg Cæsar

    We know, you hate the Southern nation and free men who refused to bow down to Lincoln. I would ship every one of your african pets up north to live with you.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  124. @Steve in Greensboro
    Perhaps a better antebellum analog for today's violent leftist rhetoric, might be that of the abolitionists. After all, the current leftward rachet is merely a continuation of that 19th century initiative to thoroughly deracinate American culture.

    Replies: @Ris_Eruwaedhiel, @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    Ironic that,back then,the Jews were on the side of the South.

  125. The “divider” line of attack is rich. The crazed leftists say we must be united in hating America. So if you disagree with them and love America, you are being “divisive.”

    I go back and forth as to whether these people really believe their own B.S. For example, how can they believe America is oppressively racist to blacks when every single institution in America bends over backwards to give them massive preferences in admissions, hiring, contracting, etc.

    Likewise, simple statistics show there is no pattern of anti-black police brutality.

    How can you reason with people who are delusional.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Hypnotoad666


    How can you reason with people who are delusional.


    https://infogalactic.com/info/Cognitive_dissonance

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Hypnotoad666


    How can you reason with people who are delusional.
     
    Delusional people might be reachable. Pathological liars, not so much.
  126. Anonymous[239] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan
    @IHTG

    Costa and Rucker. Where do you think most of the anti-white hatred originates if a Hispanic and Jew are the authors?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Costa and Rucker. Where do you think most of the anti-white hatred originates if a Hispanic and Jew are the authors?

    Is Rucker of Jewish descent? His bio states that he grew up in Savannah, Georgia. Is that a Christian school he attended for high school?

  127. @Mr. Anon
    @Jack D


    After the tragedy, the State Patrol announced it wasn’t letting protesters on the freeway:

    This apparently never occurred to them before. Who knew that marching on the freeway was a crime? In Philly when the Peaceful Protesters tried this, they just teargassed them and arrested as many as they could grab.
     
    BLM had been holding these late-night freeway protests for 19 days before this accident. 19 days! During that whole time the City, WDOT, and Washington State Troopers let the protesters get away with shutting down a major traffic artery. I've seen some speculation that BLM may have been hoping for a result like this, so as to get a couple of martyrs. I would not say that's impossible. Somebody happened to be on the overpass to record some pretty good video of the whole gruesome spectacle. Of course, they were hoping it would be another James Fields, not The Fresh Prince of Asmara.

    The perp must be the son of some Eritrean bigshot. He was driving a Jaguar.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Before going to this blog comment section I had no idea who the Jag driver was or his race.

    Odd that.

    Facts inconvenient to the Narrative don’t get printed or mentioned. I guess I should have assumed he was a POC since he wasn’t named & shamed as “some rich white dude.”

    I need to brush up on my Soviet style news reading/interpretation skills.

  128. @Dieter Kief
    @Jack D


    Die Weltwoche is certainly a fine publication but it has a circulation of 45,000 German speaking readers.
     
    There are other parts of the world, and they have their nice things too, alright. - The NZZ - selling 120 000 copies 7x/week is even better than Die Weltwoche. Compared to the eight and a half million Swiss inhabitants, the NZZ circulation is huge. And it has a liberal counterpart which is not bad at all (Der Tages-Anzeiger) - and sells even more copies. - And about half a dozen regional papers that aren't bad at all. The Swiss still read books and newspapers like nowhere else in the world as far as I know.

    (I made a systematical point too, though, in the beginning (comment No. 6) and tried to defend this systematically relevant point with my Swiss (and - to a lesser degree - German examples). And this point is what kept me going here: That civilized heterodoxy is the core of the Western success story - and that Jeff Bezos might fall prey to the sin of the half-hearted modernization (as Jürgen Habermas addressed this problem every now and then over decades now, for example).

    What's interesting is, that the rot in/of the Washington Post for example seems to come from the left side of the western tradition as well as from big money. - And - excuse me if I mention this here: This reminds me of Weimar because that is the most overlooked aspect of the Weimar-tragedy: That the left did a lot to make the anti-parliamentarian Weimarian catastrophe happen. - It was the openly declared goal of the left's heroes from the often misleadingly nicely portrayed Rosa Luxemburg to such first-rate intellectuals as Kurt Tucholsky and ... Bert Brecht and Kurt Weill and - so many others - including Thomas Mann (on the right, of course) to get rid of the democratic consensus - and of the open debate in the parliament as well as in the press.

    PS
    Rolling Stone's Matt Taibbi is one of the American leftists willing to admit, that this will not end too well if journalism should continue to ignore its basic role, which is to inform people and not to lead them to the new pastures of the greening wokeness.

    Replies: @Muggles

    >>Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi is one of the American leftists willing to admit, that this will not end too well if journalism should continue to ignore its basic role, which is to inform people and not to lead them to the new pastures of the greening wokeness.<<

    I doubt Taibbi is still doing regular writing for RS. Now has his own website and does freelancing.

    Yes, he's a real honest leftist, old school. Not a Trump admirer, but not a some fascist cheerleader for the SJW mob like most "leftists" are now.

    These guys (and gals, a few) should be cherished. They swing more opinions than thousands of alleged conservatives who all sing from the same hymnal.

    Old leftists, for all of their bad ideas, didn't usually Hate America or buy into the idea that race or ethnicity is the New Marxist Class system. Plus they appreciated free speech and hated purges, banning, censorship, blacklisting, etc. Not necessarily fans of coercive government either. The Pandemic has revealed the true nature of soft headed "liberals" and that ilk. They love controlling hte mass in all ways large and small. "Put on that mask!" or else.

    There are real journalists and investigative reporters from all backgrounds. Greenwald and the Intercept group also are of this background. Not mere mouthpiece stooges for the Oligarch MSM.

    • Disagree: Hibernian, botazefa
  129. @Coag
    At this point I’m 100% behind the gubmint taking a sword through the Gordian Knot of Systemic Racism by expropriating Amazon and dividing its assets among all the country’s blacks as reparations.

    The black guy who slammed his car into two non-binary white chick BLM protestors in Seattle, throwing them into the air like ragdolls resulting in one of them dying and the other in a coma in the ICU, is identified as a 27 year old Ethiopian named Dawit Kelete. Incidentally 80 people have died in Oromo protests in Ethiopia, and the Ethiopian prime minister Abiy Ahmed has a known record of demeaning African-Americans and BLM. Aren’t we all thrilled to be continually enrolled in the inscrutable racial contests of the Old Country?

    https://borkena.com/2020/06/06/black-lives-matter-politics-in-ethiopia/

    Replies: @Dmon, @Jack D, @S. Anonyia

    Well, honestly, why did they refuse to move once they saw him barreling towards them? The driver shouldn’t keep going but that’s just being exceptionally stupid/naive to not get out of the way. Darwin Award level stupidity.

    Falls back on administration of the city, too. In my (majority black) city, when the majority white (and very young, as in dumb 17 year olds from the suburbs) protestors started marching towards a section of the interstate that is an infamous bottleneck, they were dispersed immediately with tear gas before they could even get on the exit ramps.

  130. @Barnard
    @IHTG

    I don't think Costa was ever a conservative he mostly did reporting, not commentary at National Review. They have a number of former reporters who have gone left after leaving, not to mention the opinion writers who have done so.

    His name on the byline does speak to Steve's point about Bezos needing to stand up to 20 something interns in the Washington Post newsroom. Costa is 34 and Philip Rucker looks like he is in his 40s. Both have a lot of experience covering politics in Washington. This absurd rhetoric is the norm in newsrooms now. Age and experience don't seem to be moderating factors in the press. Costa was on the board of Notre Dame for three years and his dad was an attorney for Bristol Myers Squibb. These aren't people who should be lefty kooks. It gives a good example of how thoroughly this derangement has spread among the elites.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon

    The main problem is that in a liberal-run newsroom, you can’t even be a moderate these days or you won’t have a job. These reporters know that, so they toe the party line.

  131. Media cover-ups these day are amazing.

    Black woman beats white woman with the white woman’s own leashed dog. Black swings the dog like a club. Newspapers aren’t talking about this:

    https://twitter.com/AltPost/status/1279505594936897537

  132. @Hypnotoad666
    The "divider" line of attack is rich. The crazed leftists say we must be united in hating America. So if you disagree with them and love America, you are being "divisive."

    I go back and forth as to whether these people really believe their own B.S. For example, how can they believe America is oppressively racist to blacks when every single institution in America bends over backwards to give them massive preferences in admissions, hiring, contracting, etc.

    Likewise, simple statistics show there is no pattern of anti-black police brutality.

    How can you reason with people who are delusional.

    Replies: @anon, @Johann Ricke


    How can you reason with people who are delusional.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Cognitive_dissonance

  133. @Altai
    Meanwhile, in Hollywood, Emmy-winning bluetick (Who has a profile picture of himself with said Emmy and a banner showing him giving a talk to NATO) pronounces his support for the emergence of ethnic militias in the USA.

    https://twitter.com/ryan_a_bell/status/1279568958354526209

    Although, in truth, anyone who calls themselves the 'Not Fucking Around Coalition' is most assuredly just LARPing (Look at that fool in the gas mask), but given how fast things have accelerated the last few months, maybe they'll be superseded by those who aren't.

    Replies: @gutta percha, @Chris Mallory

    “most assuredly just LARPing”

    We need to avoid this tendency to dismiss the enemy as untrained clownish pussies. Any purple-haired anarchist twerp who never fired his gun before can still kill you and your family, if he gets just slightly lucky. Gun sales have skyrocketed from already-high levels. Do you think all these weapons are being bought only by patriots?

    This sh!t’s real, guys. Don’t underestimate these evil f*cks.

  134. @Bardon Kaldian
    By the way- will this be the future for Africa, engineered by the Chinese who lack Western sentimentalism?

    https://apnews.com/269b3de1af34e17c1941a514f78d764c

    China cuts Uighur births with IUDs, abortion, sterilization
    ......................

    Birth rates in the mostly Uighur regions of Hotan and Kashgar plunged by more than 60% from 2015 to 2018, the latest year available in government statistics. Across the Xinjiang region, birth rates continue to plummet, falling nearly 24% last year alone — compared to just 4.2% nationwide, statistics show.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/07/01/china-documents-uighur-genocidal-sterilization-xinjiang/

    China’s Own Documents Show Potentially Genocidal Sterilization Plans in Xinjiang
    ......................
    Starting in 2018, a growing number of female former internment camp detainees testified that they were given injections that coincided with changes in or cessation of their menstrual cycles. Others reported that they were forcibly fitted with IUDs prior to internment or subjected to sterilization surgeries.

    That same year, published natural population growth rates (calculated as birth minus deaths, and excluding migration) in Xinjiang plummeted. In Kashgar and Hotan, two of the prefectures that make up the Uighur heartland, combined natural population growth rates fell by 84 percent between 2015 and 2018, from 1.6 percent to 0.26 percent. In some Uighur counties, 2018 saw more deaths than births. In 2019, Xinjiang’s birth rates declined by a further 24 percent, with ethnic minority regions seeing stronger declines between 30 and 56 percent. In contrast, birth rates across the whole country fell by only 4.2 percent between 2018 and 2019.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer

    The Chinese bots assure me this isn’t true!

  135. @J.Ross
    To this point, black disatisfaction with BLM:

    https://twitter.com/Anthonyinsd/status/1279679805428862981?s=19

    Also check out Terry Crews, showing principle and backbone no Republican politician is capable of.

    Replies: @Thea

    They’ve simply switched allegiance from one black nationalist group to another. The end effect is still hostility and violence directed at you know who.

  136. @Jack D
    @Corvinus

    Right. we really need someone to point out "continued Trump malfeasance" because the MSM are not doing a good enough job. Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL. Apparently blaring this message 24/7 in virtually every story in the news and editorial sections of all major newspapers and all TV networks has not been enough. If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard.

    While he is at it, perhaps he could let us know that Black Lives Matter because we haven't been hearing that message enough lately either. Until Steve gets with the program, the Gleichschaltung of America will not be complete.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Alexander Turok, @nebulafox, @Peripatetic Commenter

    “Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL.”

    Not hysteria, just facts and reasoned analysis.

    “If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard.”

    Exactly. Rather than be cagey, he should be NOTICING.

    • LOL: ic1000
    • Replies: @Your verdict
    @Corvinus

    Based on hard facts and reasoned analysis, Trump is crass and unfit for office, elected by Hillary Clinton and her army of clinically insane mouthpieces, who is the epitome of evil, and you are a privileged useful idiot with a lot of time in your hands.

  137. @George
    "blowing up the Constitutional Republic". Should read "blowing up the Constitutional Democracy".

    The Republic ended with the direct election of Senators in 1913, 17th amendment. Monetary policy was transfered to experts at the Fed. WWI's kick off in 1914 was just a coincidence.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Chris Mallory, @Corvinus

    Actually, the Republic has flourished as a result of that amendment, as it reigned in corruption at the state level and enabled the people to hold elected representatives accountable.

  138. @Jack D
    @Corvinus

    Right. we really need someone to point out "continued Trump malfeasance" because the MSM are not doing a good enough job. Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL. Apparently blaring this message 24/7 in virtually every story in the news and editorial sections of all major newspapers and all TV networks has not been enough. If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard.

    While he is at it, perhaps he could let us know that Black Lives Matter because we haven't been hearing that message enough lately either. Until Steve gets with the program, the Gleichschaltung of America will not be complete.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Alexander Turok, @nebulafox, @Peripatetic Commenter

    Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL. Apparently blaring this message 24/7 in virtually every story in the news and editorial sections of all major newspapers and all TV networks has not been enough. If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard.

    What caused the hysteria was not the media, nor the volunteer auxiliary TDS machine. They would have been happy to create hysteria over “OMG Trump commented on a woman’s looks,” but it turns out ordinary people didn’t give a d***. Ordinary people do care about their lives. At least some of them do. But go ahead and drink that kool-aid. The convulsions are just hysteria.

    As to the general tone that Trump is somehow invincible, apparently you share a delusion in common with the media. They think the negative press coverage is capable of removing him from office. You see that he is still there and think it’s some great victory. Just wait until November. But no doubt the polls are fake, and the election results will be fake too, right?

    While he is at it, perhaps he could let us know that Black Lives Matter because we haven’t been hearing that message enough lately either. Until Steve gets with the program, the Gleichschaltung of America will not be complete.

    “Everyone is criticizing the Soviet Union, so I’m gonna go on and on about what wonders will exist in my proposed socialist society and never address what actually happened in the USSR.”

    That’s really how Steve sounds to some of us. He’s comparable to the people you could call “classical modern liberals,” people who believe in fairness, free speech, open debate, and who are marching alongside these crazy woke people and have decided to just ignore them, pretend they don’t exist. It seems like special pleading for him to attack this but behave as they do when confronted with the crazies in his own comment section.

  139. It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.

    This is the key point.

    If the Cathedral is out of control now, think how it will react if Trump wins a second term. Think how crazy things will get after another four years.

    In any four-year period there will be at least one unarmed African-American man who is filmed being killed by a cop. This will provide the excuse for riots that will lead to a coup. The real reason might be something completely different, such as the imminent indictments of staff of the three-letter agencies and Obama administration.

    • Replies: @Gordo
    @James N. Kennett


    The real reason might be something completely different, such as the imminent indictments of staff of the three-letter agencies and Obama administration.
     
    You hit the nail on the head there, better if he offered them amnesty to go away quietly to their dachas.
  140. @Chris Mallory
    @Wilkey


    But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies
     
    Be prepared to pay and have limited selection on firearms. Brick and Mortar stores are mostly empty. Online retailers are out of stock. Ammo, especially the "survival rounds" is getting scarce. Guns that were selling for $650 3 months ago are in the $900 range now. And prices will only go up as we get closer to the election. If you can buy face to face in your state, check local online marketplaces. You might find a deal.

    A semi auto rifle is nice, but if all you can buy is a lever action grab it. With a little practice you will be quite able to defend yourself. Same with a pistol, a quality revolver will do almost every thing you will need and it is basically idiot proof.

    On youtube, watch Paul Harrell. He is a former military man. He has a sense of humor but he is a serious man. He is not a tactitard with a full beard and sleeve tatts. He will give you his opinion and why he holds it, but for the most part he does not degrade or belittle those who might disagree with him.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6QH13V2o68zynSa0hZy9uQ

    Replies: @usNthem

    Another good guy is Hickok45

    • Agree: Kronos
    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    @usNthem

    I thought about adding Hickok. He is a go to source for reviews before you buy. Harrell gets into nuts and bolts between calibers, practical shooting, and other esoteric topics more than Hickok. Can't go wrong with either.

  141. @BB753
    Bezos was a nerd who got lucky. He's got a huge chip on his shoulder, like Bill Gates, the "philanthropist" who wants to genocide 90 % of humanity, after making their lives miserable for 30 years with Windows.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @nebulafox

    Bezos was a nerd who got lucky. He’s got a huge chip on his shoulder

    It’s been known to happen.

    “philanthropist” who wants to genocide 90 % of humanity

    Oh noes, what a horrid tragedy for humanity if Congans no longer have 6 kids per woman…

    after making their lives miserable for 30 years with Windows

    If you’re complaining about Windows, you’re either a macbook [email protected] or a Linuxer i.e. fellow nerd.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @BB753
    @Alexander Turok

    "Oh noes, what a horrid tragedy for humanity if Congans no longer have 6 kids per woman"

    Congans (or is it Congolese) are next, but Whites are the first target.

  142. Take the oath.

  143. Speaking of Fire-Eaters, Sean Wilentz has a pretty good article in The Atlantic about the absurdities of the #1619 nonsense:

    To sustain its particular take on an immense subject while also informing a wide readership is a remarkably ambitious goal, imposing, among other responsibilities, a scrupulous regard for factual accuracy. Readers expect nothing less from The New York Times, the project’s sponsor, and they deserve nothing less from an effort as profound in its intentions as the 1619 Project. During the weeks and months after the 1619 Project first appeared, however, historians, publicly and privately, began expressing alarm over serious inaccuracies.

    On December 20, the Times Magazine published a letter that I signed with four other historians—Victoria Bynum, James McPherson, James Oakes, and Gordon Wood. Our letter applauded the project’s stated aim to raise public awareness and understanding of slavery’s central importance in our history. Although the project is not a conventional work of history and cannot be judged as such, the letter intended to help ensure that its efforts did not come at the expense of basic accuracy. Offering practical support to that end, it pointed out specific statements that, if allowed to stand, would misinform the public and give ammunition to those who might be opposed to the mission of grappling with the legacy of slavery. The letter requested that the Times print corrections of the errors that had already appeared, and that it keep those errors from appearing in any future materials published with the Times’ imprimatur, including the school curricula the newspaper announced it was developing in conjunction with the project.

    In the newspaper’s lengthy formal response, the New York Times Magazine editor in chief, Jake Silverstein, flatly denied that the project “contains significant factual errors” and said that our request for corrections was not “warranted.” Silverstein then offered new evidence to support claims that our letter had described as groundless. In the interest of historical accuracy, it is worth examining his denials and new claims in detail.

    The project’s lead essay, written by the Times staff writer Nikole Hannah-Jones, includes early on a discussion of the Revolution. Although that discussion is brief, its conclusions are central to the essay’s overarching contention that slavery and racism are the foundations of American history. The essay argues that “one of the primary reasons the colonists decided to declare their independence from Britain was because they wanted to protect the institution of slavery.” That is a striking claim built on three false assertions.

    By 1776, Britain had grown deeply conflicted over its role in the barbaric institution that had reshaped the Western Hemisphere,” Hannah-Jones wrote. But apart from the activity of the pioneering abolitionist Granville Sharp, Britain was hardly conflicted at all in 1776 over its involvement in the slave system. Sharp played a key role in securing the 1772 Somerset v. Stewart ruling, which declared that chattel slavery was not recognized in English common law. That ruling did little, however, to reverse Britain’s devotion to human bondage, which lay almost entirely in its colonial slavery and its heavy involvement in the Atlantic slave trade. Nor did it generate a movement inside Britain in opposition to either slavery or the slave trade. As the historian Christopher Leslie Brown writes in his authoritative study of British abolitionism, Moral Capital, Sharp “worked tirelessly against the institution of slavery everywhere within the British Empire after 1772, but for many years in England he would stand nearly alone.” What Hannah-Jones described as a perceptible British threat to American slavery in 1776 in fact did not exist.

    In London, there were growing calls to abolish the slave trade,” Hannah-Jones continued. But the movement in London to abolish the slave trade formed only in 1787, largely inspired, as Brown demonstrates in great detail, by American antislavery opinion that had arisen in the 1760s and ’70s. There were no “growing calls” in London to abolish the trade as early as 1776.

    This would have upended the economy of the colonies, in both the North and the South,” Hannah-Jones wrote. But the colonists had themselves taken decisive steps to end the Atlantic slave trade from 1769 to 1774. During that time, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Rhode Island either outlawed the trade or imposed prohibitive duties on it. Measures to abolish the trade also won approval in Massachusetts, Delaware, New York, and Virginia, but were denied by royal officials. The colonials’ motives were not always humanitarian: Virginia, for example, had more enslaved black people than it needed to sustain its economy and saw the further importation of Africans as a threat to social order. But the Americans who attempted to end the trade did not believe that they were committing economic suicide.

    In his reply to our letter, though, Silverstein ignored the errors we had specified and then imputed to the essay a very different claim. In place of Hannah-Jones’s statement that “the colonists decided to declare their independence from Britain … because they wanted to protect the institution of slavery,” Silverstein substituted “that uneasiness among slaveholders in the colonies about growing antislavery sentiment in Britain and increasing imperial regulation helped motivate the Revolution.” Silverstein makes a large concession here about the errors in Hannah-Jones’s essay without acknowledging that he has done so. There is a notable gap between the claim that the defense of slavery was a chief reason behind the colonists’ drive for independence and the claim that concerns about slavery among a particular group, the slaveholders, “helped motivate the Revolution.”

    But even the evidence proffered in support of this more restricted claim—which implicitly cedes the problem with the original assertion—fails to hold up to scrutiny. Silverstein pointed to the Somerset case, in which, as I’ve noted, a British high court ruled that English common law did not support chattel slavery. Even though the decision did not legally threaten slavery in the colonies, Silverstein wrote, it caused a “sensation” when reported in colonial newspapers and “slavery joined other issues in helping to gradually drive apart the patriots and their colonial governments.”

    In fact, the Somerset ruling caused no such sensation. In the entire slaveholding South, a total of six newspapers—one in Maryland, two in Virginia, and three in South Carolina—published only 15 reports about Somerset, virtually all of them very brief. Coverage was spotty: The two South Carolina newspapers that devoted the most space to the case didn’t even report its outcome. American newspaper readers learned far more about the doings of the queen of Denmark, George III’s sister Caroline, whom Danish rebels had charged with having an affair with the court physician and plotting the death of her husband. A pair of Boston newspapers gave the Somerset decision prominent play; otherwise, most of the coverage appeared in the tiny-font foreign dispatches placed on the second or third page of a four- or six-page issue.

    Above all, the reportage was almost entirely matter-of-fact, betraying no fear of incipient tyranny. A London correspondent for one New York newspaper did predict, months in advance of the actual ruling, that the case “will occasion a greater ferment in America (particularly in the islands) than the Stamp Act,” but that forecast fell flat. Some recent studies have conjectured that the Somerset ruling must have intensely riled southern slaveholders, and word of the decision may well have encouraged enslaved Virginians about the prospects of their gaining freedom, which could have added to slaveholders’ constant fears of insurrection. Actual evidence, however, that the Somerset decision jolted the slaveholders into fearing an abolitionist Britain—let alone to the extent that it can be considered a leading impetus to declaring independence—is less than scant.

    Slaveholders and their defenders in the West Indies, to be sure, were more exercised, producing a few proslavery pamphlets that strongly denounced the decision. Even so, as Trevor Burnard’s comprehensive study of Jamaica in the age of the American Revolution observes, “Somerset had less impact in the West Indies than might have been expected.” Which is not to say that the Somerset ruling had no effect at all in the British colonies, including those that would become the United States. In the South, it may have contributed, over time, to amplifying the slaveholders’ mistrust of overweening imperial power, although the mistrust dated back to the Stamp Act crisis in 1765. In the North, meanwhile, where newspaper coverage of Somerset was far more plentiful than in the South, the ruling’s principles became a reference point for antislavery lawyers and lawmakers, an important development in the history of early antislavery politics.

    In addition to the Somerset ruling, Silverstein referred to a proclamation from 1775 by John Murray, the fourth earl of Dunmore and royal governor of Virginia, as further evidence that fears about British antislavery sentiment pushed the slaveholders to support independence. Unfortunately, his reference was inaccurate: Dunmore’s proclamation pointedly did not offer freedom “to any enslaved person who fled his plantation,” as Silverstein claimed. In declaring martial law in Virginia, the proclamation offered freedom only to those held by rebel slaveholders. Tory slaveholders could keep their enslaved people. This was a cold and calculated political move. The proclamation, far from fomenting an American rebellion, presumed a rebellion had already begun. Dunmore, himself an unapologetic slaveholder—he would end his career as the royal governor of the Bahamas, overseeing an attempt to establish a cotton slavery regime on the islands—aimed to alarm and disrupt the patriots, free their human property to bolster his army, and incite fears of a wider uprising by enslaved people. His proclamation was intended as an act of war, not a blow against the institution of slavery, and everyone understood it as such.

    The spectacle likely stiffened the resolve for independence among the rebel patriots whom Dunmore singled out, but they were already rebels. The proclamation may conceivably have persuaded some Tory slaveholders to switch sides, or some who remained on the fence. It would have done so, however, because Dunmore, exploiting the Achilles’ heel of any slaveholding society, posed a direct and immediate threat to lives and property (which included, under Virginia law, enslaved persons), not because he affirmed slaveholders’ fears of “growing antislavery sentiment in Britain.” The offer of freedom in a single colony to persons enslaved by men who had already joined the patriots’ ranks—after a decade of mounting sentiment for independence, and after the American rebellion had commenced—cannot be held up as evidence that the slaveholder colonists wanted to separate from Britain to protect the institution of slavery.

    To back up his argument that Dunmore’s proclamation, against the backdrop of a supposed British antislavery outpouring, was a catalyst for the Revolution, Silverstein seized upon a quotation not from a Virginian, but from a South Carolinian, Edward Rutledge, who was observing the events at a distance, from Philadelphia. “A member of South Carolina’s delegation to the Continental Congress wrote that this act did more to sever the ties between Britain and its colonies ‘than any other expedient which could possibly have been thought of,’” Silverstein wrote.

    Although he would become the youngest signer of the Declaration of Independence, Rutledge, a hyper-cautious patriot, was torn, late in 1775, about whether the time was yet ripe to move forward with a formal separation from Britain. By early December, while serving his state in the Continental Congress, he had moved toward finally declaring independence, in response to various events that had expanded the Americans’ rebellion, including the American invasion of Canada; news of George III’s refusal to consider the Continental Congress’s petition for reconciliation; the British burning of the town of Falmouth, Maine; and, most recently, Dunmore’s proclamation, full news of which was only just reaching Philadelphia.

    In a private letter explaining his evolving thoughts, Rutledge described the proclamation as “tending in my judgment, more effectively to work an eternal separation” between Britain and America “than any other expedient which could possibly have been thought of.” By quoting only the second half of that statement, Silverstein altered its meaning, turning Rutledge’s personal and speculative observation into conclusive proof of a sweeping claim.

    This is not the only flaw in Silverstein’s discussion. He seems unaware that, in the end, Rutledge himself was not sufficiently moved by Dunmore’s proclamation to support independence, and he rather notoriously led the opposition inside the Congress before switching at the last minute on July 1, 1776. Moreover, a man whom John Adams had earlier described as “a Swallow—a Sparrow—a Peacock; excessively vain, excessively weak, and excessively variable and unsteady—jejune, inane, & puerile” may not be the most reliable source.

    To buttress his case, Silverstein also quoted the historian Jill Lepore: “Not the taxes and the tea, not the shots at Lexington and Concord, not the siege of Boston: rather, it was this act, Dunmore’s offer of freedom to slaves, that tipped the scales in favor of American independence.” But Silverstein’s claim about Dunmore’s proclamation and the coming of independence is no more convincing when it turns up, almost identically, in a book by a distinguished authority; Lepore also relies on a foreshortened version of the Rutledge quote, presenting it as evidence of what the proclamation actually did, rather than as one man’s expectation as to what it would do. As for Silverstein’s main contention, meanwhile, neither Lepore nor Rutledge said anything about the colonists’ fear of growing antislavery sentiment in Britain.

    https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:4-7735EkBD4J:https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/01/1619-project-new-york-times-wilentz/605152/+&cd=2

    • Replies: @No Recent Commenting History
    @syonredux

    Please learn to use this tag



    It's basic politeness. We're trying to have a civilization here!

  144. @Altai
    Meanwhile, in Hollywood, Emmy-winning bluetick (Who has a profile picture of himself with said Emmy and a banner showing him giving a talk to NATO) pronounces his support for the emergence of ethnic militias in the USA.

    https://twitter.com/ryan_a_bell/status/1279568958354526209

    Although, in truth, anyone who calls themselves the 'Not Fucking Around Coalition' is most assuredly just LARPing (Look at that fool in the gas mask), but given how fast things have accelerated the last few months, maybe they'll be superseded by those who aren't.

    Replies: @gutta percha, @Chris Mallory

    Although, in truth, anyone who calls themselves the ‘Not Fucking Around Coalition’ is most assuredly just LARPing

    Notice, quite a few of the rifles did not have any kind of sight. No optics or iron sights. I guess you could volley fire like they used to do with muskets. But as a rifleman, you need sights.

    I watched one video from that gathering where one of the HNIC was on a loud speaker asking where the White boys were. I wonder if he realizes that Whites out number blacks 5 to 1. Plus the Hispanics aren’t that friendly with the black tribes either.

  145. Anon[112] • Disclaimer says:

    Bolt-head Bolton claims he briefed Trump on Russian bounties. Now Bolton is clamming up about that. Interesting possibility is that Bolton is the one who planted the Russian bounty story in the NY Times in the first place. The bounty story emerged just after Bolton started touting his book. The timing is extremely suspicious. Bolton looks like he’s the guilty culprit. If he’s making up crap to frame the president, he’s in big trouble.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/bolton-changes-tune-now-refuses-answer-russian-bounties-questions-after-vocally-pushing

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    @Anon

    Bolton looks like he’s the guilty culprit. If he’s making up crap to frame the president, he’s in big trouble.

    You mean like Brennan, Stzrok, Page, Obama, Rice, Comey, and all the rest?

  146. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:
    @El Dato
    ‘We’re in your house’: Armed black protesters march through Georgia Confederate park

    https://twitter.com/tariqnasheed/status/1279587471915810816

    Looking for aggro and "interrogating motorists"?

    What's the worst that could happen?

    cowardly white supremacist groups who like to sneak around doing ambush attacks on protesters
     
    Who are those?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Patrick in SC

    Looking for aggro and “interrogating motorists”?

    What’s the worst that could happen?

    Uhhhhh… this?

  147. @Alexander Turok

    Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role in paying for this kind of rhetoric.
     
    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @J.Ross, @Corvinus, @Mr. Anon, @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    The comments section of a random blog or the Washington Post. Which of these is more significant?

  148. @Ris_Eruwaedhiel
    @anon

    The overclass and the underclass versus the middle class.

    Replies: @Hamlet's Ghost

    The late Sam Francis called it “Anarcho-tyranny”.

  149. @Dr. X

    I actually think that Bezos would prefer not to go down in history as the man who paid for blowing up the Constitutional republic.
     
    The Constitution is already dead.

    If the Constitution still meant anything, we wouldn't have police searches without warrants, gay marriage, gun control, abortion, affirmative action, the surveillance state, an imperial army, undeclared wars, an undefended border, illegal aliens on welfare, the COVID "lockdown," or a federal Leviathan that's $26 trillion in debt and printing fiat money to pay for it...

    Replies: @Known Fact

    The lockdowns in some states have amply demonstrated that the constitution is no longer worth the paper it’s printed on

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @Known Fact

    "The lockdowns in some states have amply demonstrated that the constitution is no longer worth the paper it’s printed on"

    No. Democratic lockdowns amply demonstrate the populace is cowardly.

    Assert your constitutional rights. Open your church and business, force the state to arrest you for exercising your human rights. Video-record churchgoers getting arrested by pigs. Tell the pigs to leave you alone until they return with a warrant signed by a judge citing the statute supposedly violated.

    Fight, you fucking faggots! And take the diaper off your face - it is undignified and Science proves it is unhealthful.

  150. @syonredux
    Speaking of Fire-Eaters, Sean Wilentz has a pretty good article in The Atlantic about the absurdities of the #1619 nonsense:

    To sustain its particular take on an immense subject while also informing a wide readership is a remarkably ambitious goal, imposing, among other responsibilities, a scrupulous regard for factual accuracy. Readers expect nothing less from The New York Times, the project’s sponsor, and they deserve nothing less from an effort as profound in its intentions as the 1619 Project. During the weeks and months after the 1619 Project first appeared, however, historians, publicly and privately, began expressing alarm over serious inaccuracies.
     

    On December 20, the Times Magazine published a letter that I signed with four other historians—Victoria Bynum, James McPherson, James Oakes, and Gordon Wood. Our letter applauded the project’s stated aim to raise public awareness and understanding of slavery’s central importance in our history. Although the project is not a conventional work of history and cannot be judged as such, the letter intended to help ensure that its efforts did not come at the expense of basic accuracy. Offering practical support to that end, it pointed out specific statements that, if allowed to stand, would misinform the public and give ammunition to those who might be opposed to the mission of grappling with the legacy of slavery. The letter requested that the Times print corrections of the errors that had already appeared, and that it keep those errors from appearing in any future materials published with the Times’ imprimatur, including the school curricula the newspaper announced it was developing in conjunction with the project.
     

    In the newspaper’s lengthy formal response, the New York Times Magazine editor in chief, Jake Silverstein, flatly denied that the project “contains significant factual errors” and said that our request for corrections was not “warranted.” Silverstein then offered new evidence to support claims that our letter had described as groundless. In the interest of historical accuracy, it is worth examining his denials and new claims in detail.
     

    The project’s lead essay, written by the Times staff writer Nikole Hannah-Jones, includes early on a discussion of the Revolution. Although that discussion is brief, its conclusions are central to the essay’s overarching contention that slavery and racism are the foundations of American history. The essay argues that “one of the primary reasons the colonists decided to declare their independence from Britain was because they wanted to protect the institution of slavery.” That is a striking claim built on three false assertions.

     


    By 1776, Britain had grown deeply conflicted over its role in the barbaric institution that had reshaped the Western Hemisphere,” Hannah-Jones wrote. But apart from the activity of the pioneering abolitionist Granville Sharp, Britain was hardly conflicted at all in 1776 over its involvement in the slave system. Sharp played a key role in securing the 1772 Somerset v. Stewart ruling, which declared that chattel slavery was not recognized in English common law. That ruling did little, however, to reverse Britain’s devotion to human bondage, which lay almost entirely in its colonial slavery and its heavy involvement in the Atlantic slave trade. Nor did it generate a movement inside Britain in opposition to either slavery or the slave trade. As the historian Christopher Leslie Brown writes in his authoritative study of British abolitionism, Moral Capital, Sharp “worked tirelessly against the institution of slavery everywhere within the British Empire after 1772, but for many years in England he would stand nearly alone.” What Hannah-Jones described as a perceptible British threat to American slavery in 1776 in fact did not exist.

     


    In London, there were growing calls to abolish the slave trade,” Hannah-Jones continued. But the movement in London to abolish the slave trade formed only in 1787, largely inspired, as Brown demonstrates in great detail, by American antislavery opinion that had arisen in the 1760s and ’70s. There were no “growing calls” in London to abolish the trade as early as 1776.

     


    This would have upended the economy of the colonies, in both the North and the South,” Hannah-Jones wrote. But the colonists had themselves taken decisive steps to end the Atlantic slave trade from 1769 to 1774. During that time, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Rhode Island either outlawed the trade or imposed prohibitive duties on it. Measures to abolish the trade also won approval in Massachusetts, Delaware, New York, and Virginia, but were denied by royal officials. The colonials’ motives were not always humanitarian: Virginia, for example, had more enslaved black people than it needed to sustain its economy and saw the further importation of Africans as a threat to social order. But the Americans who attempted to end the trade did not believe that they were committing economic suicide.
     

    In his reply to our letter, though, Silverstein ignored the errors we had specified and then imputed to the essay a very different claim. In place of Hannah-Jones’s statement that “the colonists decided to declare their independence from Britain … because they wanted to protect the institution of slavery,” Silverstein substituted “that uneasiness among slaveholders in the colonies about growing antislavery sentiment in Britain and increasing imperial regulation helped motivate the Revolution.” Silverstein makes a large concession here about the errors in Hannah-Jones’s essay without acknowledging that he has done so. There is a notable gap between the claim that the defense of slavery was a chief reason behind the colonists’ drive for independence and the claim that concerns about slavery among a particular group, the slaveholders, “helped motivate the Revolution.”

     


    But even the evidence proffered in support of this more restricted claim—which implicitly cedes the problem with the original assertion—fails to hold up to scrutiny. Silverstein pointed to the Somerset case, in which, as I’ve noted, a British high court ruled that English common law did not support chattel slavery. Even though the decision did not legally threaten slavery in the colonies, Silverstein wrote, it caused a “sensation” when reported in colonial newspapers and “slavery joined other issues in helping to gradually drive apart the patriots and their colonial governments.”
     

    In fact, the Somerset ruling caused no such sensation. In the entire slaveholding South, a total of six newspapers—one in Maryland, two in Virginia, and three in South Carolina—published only 15 reports about Somerset, virtually all of them very brief. Coverage was spotty: The two South Carolina newspapers that devoted the most space to the case didn’t even report its outcome. American newspaper readers learned far more about the doings of the queen of Denmark, George III’s sister Caroline, whom Danish rebels had charged with having an affair with the court physician and plotting the death of her husband. A pair of Boston newspapers gave the Somerset decision prominent play; otherwise, most of the coverage appeared in the tiny-font foreign dispatches placed on the second or third page of a four- or six-page issue.

     


    Above all, the reportage was almost entirely matter-of-fact, betraying no fear of incipient tyranny. A London correspondent for one New York newspaper did predict, months in advance of the actual ruling, that the case “will occasion a greater ferment in America (particularly in the islands) than the Stamp Act,” but that forecast fell flat. Some recent studies have conjectured that the Somerset ruling must have intensely riled southern slaveholders, and word of the decision may well have encouraged enslaved Virginians about the prospects of their gaining freedom, which could have added to slaveholders’ constant fears of insurrection. Actual evidence, however, that the Somerset decision jolted the slaveholders into fearing an abolitionist Britain—let alone to the extent that it can be considered a leading impetus to declaring independence—is less than scant.

     


    Slaveholders and their defenders in the West Indies, to be sure, were more exercised, producing a few proslavery pamphlets that strongly denounced the decision. Even so, as Trevor Burnard’s comprehensive study of Jamaica in the age of the American Revolution observes, “Somerset had less impact in the West Indies than might have been expected.” Which is not to say that the Somerset ruling had no effect at all in the British colonies, including those that would become the United States. In the South, it may have contributed, over time, to amplifying the slaveholders’ mistrust of overweening imperial power, although the mistrust dated back to the Stamp Act crisis in 1765. In the North, meanwhile, where newspaper coverage of Somerset was far more plentiful than in the South, the ruling’s principles became a reference point for antislavery lawyers and lawmakers, an important development in the history of early antislavery politics.

     


    In addition to the Somerset ruling, Silverstein referred to a proclamation from 1775 by John Murray, the fourth earl of Dunmore and royal governor of Virginia, as further evidence that fears about British antislavery sentiment pushed the slaveholders to support independence. Unfortunately, his reference was inaccurate: Dunmore’s proclamation pointedly did not offer freedom “to any enslaved person who fled his plantation,” as Silverstein claimed. In declaring martial law in Virginia, the proclamation offered freedom only to those held by rebel slaveholders. Tory slaveholders could keep their enslaved people. This was a cold and calculated political move. The proclamation, far from fomenting an American rebellion, presumed a rebellion had already begun. Dunmore, himself an unapologetic slaveholder—he would end his career as the royal governor of the Bahamas, overseeing an attempt to establish a cotton slavery regime on the islands—aimed to alarm and disrupt the patriots, free their human property to bolster his army, and incite fears of a wider uprising by enslaved people. His proclamation was intended as an act of war, not a blow against the institution of slavery, and everyone understood it as such.

     


    The spectacle likely stiffened the resolve for independence among the rebel patriots whom Dunmore singled out, but they were already rebels. The proclamation may conceivably have persuaded some Tory slaveholders to switch sides, or some who remained on the fence. It would have done so, however, because Dunmore, exploiting the Achilles’ heel of any slaveholding society, posed a direct and immediate threat to lives and property (which included, under Virginia law, enslaved persons), not because he affirmed slaveholders’ fears of “growing antislavery sentiment in Britain.” The offer of freedom in a single colony to persons enslaved by men who had already joined the patriots’ ranks—after a decade of mounting sentiment for independence, and after the American rebellion had commenced—cannot be held up as evidence that the slaveholder colonists wanted to separate from Britain to protect the institution of slavery.

     


    To back up his argument that Dunmore’s proclamation, against the backdrop of a supposed British antislavery outpouring, was a catalyst for the Revolution, Silverstein seized upon a quotation not from a Virginian, but from a South Carolinian, Edward Rutledge, who was observing the events at a distance, from Philadelphia. “A member of South Carolina’s delegation to the Continental Congress wrote that this act did more to sever the ties between Britain and its colonies ‘than any other expedient which could possibly have been thought of,’” Silverstein wrote.
     

    Although he would become the youngest signer of the Declaration of Independence, Rutledge, a hyper-cautious patriot, was torn, late in 1775, about whether the time was yet ripe to move forward with a formal separation from Britain. By early December, while serving his state in the Continental Congress, he had moved toward finally declaring independence, in response to various events that had expanded the Americans’ rebellion, including the American invasion of Canada; news of George III’s refusal to consider the Continental Congress’s petition for reconciliation; the British burning of the town of Falmouth, Maine; and, most recently, Dunmore’s proclamation, full news of which was only just reaching Philadelphia.
     

    In a private letter explaining his evolving thoughts, Rutledge described the proclamation as “tending in my judgment, more effectively to work an eternal separation” between Britain and America “than any other expedient which could possibly have been thought of.” By quoting only the second half of that statement, Silverstein altered its meaning, turning Rutledge’s personal and speculative observation into conclusive proof of a sweeping claim.
     

    This is not the only flaw in Silverstein’s discussion. He seems unaware that, in the end, Rutledge himself was not sufficiently moved by Dunmore’s proclamation to support independence, and he rather notoriously led the opposition inside the Congress before switching at the last minute on July 1, 1776. Moreover, a man whom John Adams had earlier described as “a Swallow—a Sparrow—a Peacock; excessively vain, excessively weak, and excessively variable and unsteady—jejune, inane, & puerile” may not be the most reliable source.
     

    To buttress his case, Silverstein also quoted the historian Jill Lepore: “Not the taxes and the tea, not the shots at Lexington and Concord, not the siege of Boston: rather, it was this act, Dunmore’s offer of freedom to slaves, that tipped the scales in favor of American independence.” But Silverstein’s claim about Dunmore’s proclamation and the coming of independence is no more convincing when it turns up, almost identically, in a book by a distinguished authority; Lepore also relies on a foreshortened version of the Rutledge quote, presenting it as evidence of what the proclamation actually did, rather than as one man’s expectation as to what it would do. As for Silverstein’s main contention, meanwhile, neither Lepore nor Rutledge said anything about the colonists’ fear of growing antislavery sentiment in Britain.

     

    https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:4-7735EkBD4J:https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/01/1619-project-new-york-times-wilentz/605152/+&cd=2

    Replies: @No Recent Commenting History

    Please learn to use this tag

    [MORE]

    It’s basic politeness. We’re trying to have a civilization here!

  151. OT: New Covid-19 data. A study looked at 25 people who tested positive for Covid-19, but were considered asymptomatic. 23 out of the 25 had blood type O. At most, a few of them had a slight cough. That’s a very skewed statistic.

    http://www.balkanmedicaljournal.org/uploads/pdf/pdf_BMJ_2206.pdf

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
    @Anon

    Come on dude. That's from the Balkan Medical Journal.

    Those guys are racist, anti-Semitic, white-supremacist, dog-faced pony soldiers. You can't trust a word they say (or write!)

  152. @Corvinus
    @Alexander Turok

    "And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section."

    Dude, it's tin cup month. He can't afford to upset the applecart. Hence, Mr. Sailer's over the top post replete with false premises and confirmation bias and his kid gloves approach to Covid-19 deniers and continued Trump malfeasance.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Alan Mercer, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Yes, because Steve’s salient feature is his tendency to say whatever he thinks people want to hear.

  153. @El Dato
    ‘We’re in your house’: Armed black protesters march through Georgia Confederate park

    https://twitter.com/tariqnasheed/status/1279587471915810816

    Looking for aggro and "interrogating motorists"?

    What's the worst that could happen?

    cowardly white supremacist groups who like to sneak around doing ambush attacks on protesters
     
    Who are those?

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Patrick in SC

    Who are those?

    He’s just making that up. It dates back to the early days of the Fentanyl Floyd Fest when a couple of guys in Hawaiian shirts got arrested for brawling with Antifa goons. Or something like that. Even the liberal media dropped it pretty quickly but Wakandans don’t heed the white man’s racist “truth.”

  154. @BB753
    Bezos was a nerd who got lucky. He's got a huge chip on his shoulder, like Bill Gates, the "philanthropist" who wants to genocide 90 % of humanity, after making their lives miserable for 30 years with Windows.

    Replies: @Alexander Turok, @nebulafox

    >Bezos was a nerd who got lucky.

    No. Bezos is not a nerd. He’s an soulless MBA hack at heart.

    Paul Allen, God bless his soul, was a nerd. And I mean the real, get your hands dirty with math and computers kind, not what “nerd” has been made to mean.

  155. @Jack D
    @Corvinus

    Right. we really need someone to point out "continued Trump malfeasance" because the MSM are not doing a good enough job. Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL. Apparently blaring this message 24/7 in virtually every story in the news and editorial sections of all major newspapers and all TV networks has not been enough. If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard.

    While he is at it, perhaps he could let us know that Black Lives Matter because we haven't been hearing that message enough lately either. Until Steve gets with the program, the Gleichschaltung of America will not be complete.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Alexander Turok, @nebulafox, @Peripatetic Commenter

    He does not need to be viewed as evil to lose: he needs to be viewed as grossly incompetent and unfit for the office. And an increasing amount of Americans think that.

    No amount of leftist misbehavior can make up for Trump’s response to COVID now that six-digit numbers of Americans are dead.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
    @nebulafox


    No amount of leftist misbehavior can make up for Trump’s response to COVID now that six-digit numbers of Americans are dead.
     
    So you are saying that Woodrow Wilson was a grossly incompetent president because 675,000 Americans died on his watch during the 1918 pandemic.

    Reading the following article, it looks like Democrats are using the same playbook as back then:

    https://www.history.com/news/1918-pandemic-midterm-elections

  156. @Anon
    OT: New Covid-19 data. A study looked at 25 people who tested positive for Covid-19, but were considered asymptomatic. 23 out of the 25 had blood type O. At most, a few of them had a slight cough. That's a very skewed statistic.

    http://www.balkanmedicaljournal.org/uploads/pdf/pdf_BMJ_2206.pdf

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

    Come on dude. That’s from the Balkan Medical Journal.

    Those guys are racist, anti-Semitic, white-supremacist, dog-faced pony soldiers. You can’t trust a word they say (or write!)

  157. I am not sure why you think Bezo thinks anything positive about our Constitutional Republic.

    Generally the left wants to blow our Constitutional Republic up because they find it irredeemably evil. They believe that they can engineer a more woke, a more socially just, a better union. Everything will be better when they can wash away the Constitution and start creating from year Zero.

    So being remembered for destroying our Constitutional Republic, s*it yea! He will be a founding father of the next government remembered in song and statue by a grateful people.

  158. @Corvinus
    @Alexander Turok

    "And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section."

    Dude, it's tin cup month. He can't afford to upset the applecart. Hence, Mr. Sailer's over the top post replete with false premises and confirmation bias and his kid gloves approach to Covid-19 deniers and continued Trump malfeasance.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Alan Mercer, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    You are so close to getting the hot civil war you have worked long for, and so earnestly desired. A couple of harmless incidents and then we will all kneel before you as the representative of God, the Great Prophet. Except we will not kneel before you and the image of the Beast. And the ten million dead Americans will be just part of the omelette-making process you have doggedly defended.

    You think the carnage will not include you.

    We know otherwise.

  159. @Just another serf
    @Anonymous

    I’m looking forward with great anticipation to the trial of the (possibly Eritrean) driver Dawit Kelete.

    Will we see 400 years on the murder count and 250 years for the assault causing great bodily harm charge?

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Will we see 400 years on the murder count and 250 years for the assault causing great bodily harm charge?

    No, he must be lauded, because Black Lives Matter even if BLM lives don’t.

  160. @Wilkey

    Is Bezos’ Washington Post’s verbiage conducive to the losers saying, “Well, we gave it our best shot, but Trump won under the Constitution, so four more years”? It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.
     
    I actually made a wager with a Hillary-voting colleague in 2016 that if Trump won there would be riots. I won, of course.

    Combine that already combustible atmosphere with four years of the left stoking the fire, the recent BLM riots, and the possibility that lots of people will still be out of work and/or school come November and...I don't want to imagine. It won't be good.

    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically - though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen. If Trump wins there will be riots. Massive riots. If Biden wins - and especially if Dems win control of the Senate - there will probably be some form of gun control. I want to be able to defend myself if/when shit hits the fan.

    It's incredibly stupid that it's come to this, because in most ways times have never been more peaceful or prosperous. People are just behaving like idiots.

    Replies: @fnn, @Anonymous, @jsm, @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous, @Chris Mallory, @Charlotte, @MarkinLA

    Buy an AR-15 lower receiver and build your own gun from the available parts kits. Buy the fully assembled upper since assembling that requires tools you may not want to buy. You will learn more about the gun that way. A short barrel AR is ideal – light, easy to maneuver, and packs enough punch with expansive hunting ammo. A good backup would be a used double action revolver in .357.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @MarkinLA

    Apparently, the lawsuit attacking Remington for selling AR-15s to the public, which resulted in their dropping the sales of said item, has caused them to stop manufacture and sell off their inventory of parts. This is what happens when actual Cosmopolitan Communists control the court system.


    25,000,000
    AR-15 PARTS LIQUIDATION
    DPMS-BUSHMASTER-REMINGTON
    WE BOUGHT THEIR PARTS

    https://www.cdnnsports.com/
     
  161. @nebulafox
    @Jack D

    He does not need to be viewed as evil to lose: he needs to be viewed as grossly incompetent and unfit for the office. And an increasing amount of Americans think that.

    No amount of leftist misbehavior can make up for Trump's response to COVID now that six-digit numbers of Americans are dead.

    Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter

    No amount of leftist misbehavior can make up for Trump’s response to COVID now that six-digit numbers of Americans are dead.

    So you are saying that Woodrow Wilson was a grossly incompetent president because 675,000 Americans died on his watch during the 1918 pandemic.

    Reading the following article, it looks like Democrats are using the same playbook as back then:

    https://www.history.com/news/1918-pandemic-midterm-elections

  162. @Jack D
    @Corvinus

    Right. we really need someone to point out "continued Trump malfeasance" because the MSM are not doing a good enough job. Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL. Apparently blaring this message 24/7 in virtually every story in the news and editorial sections of all major newspapers and all TV networks has not been enough. If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard.

    While he is at it, perhaps he could let us know that Black Lives Matter because we haven't been hearing that message enough lately either. Until Steve gets with the program, the Gleichschaltung of America will not be complete.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Alexander Turok, @nebulafox, @Peripatetic Commenter

    I wouldn’t bother replying to Corvinus. I think syphilis has destroyed his brain.

    That’s the only credible explanation.

  163. Assume for the moment that Trump, like Lincoln in 1860s wins the Electoral College with a minority of the popular vote, which is becoming more plausible as anti-Trump forces become more crazed with their anti-white racial hate.

    Which is the best election to model a campaign after? 1968, to utilize riot footage? 1972, ignore the nice, moderate man running and focus on all the crazies supporting him? Or 1860, just point the laser at the other side’s gallstone and blow it apart?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar


    1972, ignore the nice, moderate man running and focus on all the crazies supporting him?
     
    McGovern advocated a Dunkirk in Vietnam; not very moderate.
  164. @Kronos
    @dcthrowback

    Do you think Nixon deserves an honorable mention?

    Replies: @Jay Fink, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Do you think Nixon deserves an honorable mention?

    Nixon implemented the Left’s agenda. Nixon is no better than Mittens Romney. Both were happy to sell out the middle class to gain favor with the dishonest media.

    To Hell with Nixon and Romney. Nixon has seats on both sides of him in the abyss. One for Romney, and the other for Dubya. Oh, and they all have swimming suits suitable for the nearest body of “water.”

    Nixon, Romney, and George What-the-f\/ck-happened Bush, all traitors to America.

    • Agree: Alden
  165. @Alexander Turok
    @BB753


    Bezos was a nerd who got lucky. He’s got a huge chip on his shoulder
     
    It's been known to happen.

    “philanthropist” who wants to genocide 90 % of humanity
     
    Oh noes, what a horrid tragedy for humanity if Congans no longer have 6 kids per woman...

    after making their lives miserable for 30 years with Windows
     
    If you're complaining about Windows, you're either a macbook [email protected] or a Linuxer i.e. fellow nerd.

    Replies: @BB753

    “Oh noes, what a horrid tragedy for humanity if Congans no longer have 6 kids per woman”

    Congans (or is it Congolese) are next, but Whites are the first target.

  166. @James Braxton
    @Hibernian

    Not to mention Huey Long.

    Replies: @Giancarlo M. Kumquat

    George Wallace?

  167. @Anon
    One crazy part of this is the byline. Robert Costa used to work for National Review and got his big break when Larry Kudlow had him on his old CNBC show regularly. That's how he came to the attention of the Post. As some of you may remember, he repaid Kudlow by reporting/tattling that Larry had Peter Brimelow at his house as a guest for his birthday party. Costa knew because he was also an invited guest to the party.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-adviser-larry-kudlow-hosted-publisher-of-white-nationalists-at-his-home/2018/08/21/f418a76c-a55e-11e8-8fac-12e98c13528d_story.html%3foutputType=amp

    Now Costa makes big bucks hosting the unwatched and unwatchable Washington Week on PBS and appearing on MSNBC. And he also writes garbage like this for the Post. The disloyalty and abject bootlicking genuinely makes me nauseous.

    Replies: @Prester John, @Ed

    What a scummy guy. Curious as to why Trump folks would talk to hostile reporters? I wouldn’t feed this guy info if I worked at the WH.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Ed


    I wouldn’t feed this guy info if I worked at the WH Zoo.
     
    FIFY.
  168. @Anon
    Bolt-head Bolton claims he briefed Trump on Russian bounties. Now Bolton is clamming up about that. Interesting possibility is that Bolton is the one who planted the Russian bounty story in the NY Times in the first place. The bounty story emerged just after Bolton started touting his book. The timing is extremely suspicious. Bolton looks like he's the guilty culprit. If he's making up crap to frame the president, he's in big trouble.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/bolton-changes-tune-now-refuses-answer-russian-bounties-questions-after-vocally-pushing

    Replies: @MarkinLA

    Bolton looks like he’s the guilty culprit. If he’s making up crap to frame the president, he’s in big trouble.

    You mean like Brennan, Stzrok, Page, Obama, Rice, Comey, and all the rest?

  169. You had me at “grossly incompetent and unfit for the office,” NF, but lost me at “Trump’s response to COVID.”

    Everyone got the China Virus wrong. Trump’s incompetence was in refusing to stop the racist BLM/Antifa riots, three or four days after they began.

  170. @usNthem
    @Chris Mallory

    Another good guy is Hickok45

    Replies: @Chris Mallory

    I thought about adding Hickok. He is a go to source for reviews before you buy. Harrell gets into nuts and bolts between calibers, practical shooting, and other esoteric topics more than Hickok. Can’t go wrong with either.

  171. @Reg Cæsar
    @Chris Mallory


    The Republic ended in 1865 with the victory of the Yankee forces turning These United States into The Untied States and making the country an empire.

     

    No, the fugitive slave laws were a precedent, spitting on the free states' sovereignty. Did the coonhunters invade Windsor, Chatham, Fort Erie, and Halifax?

    My ancestors lived along the escape routes, and thus were subject to such laws. As was I, 125 years later. I worked a couple of summers in Finland, which had an unequal treaty with the USSR which mirrored Article IV, Section 2, Clause 3 of the US Constitution:


    No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.
     
    "States rights"? Ha!!

    As for "empire", which states' leaders* argued for the annexation of Cuba? Cuba! We were already an empire. If a multiethnic country is one by definition, a multiracial one is even more so.


    Anyone with a NYT subscription to read their 1860 piece which contains this sentence?


    For, as soon as the American Government pays for the island, and it is admitted into the Union as an independent State, it can immediately secede, and "reannex" itself to the crown of Spain.
     
    *One of those leaders, John A Quitman, shares an alma mater with Scott Adams.

    Replies: @Chris Mallory

    We know, you hate the Southern nation and free men who refused to bow down to Lincoln. I would ship every one of your african pets up north to live with you.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Chris Mallory


    We know, you hate the Southern nation and free men who refused to bow down to Lincoln. I would ship every one of your african pets up north to live with you.
     
    I have a very big disagreement with Lincoln: he thought five million niggerlovers "the Southern nation" was worth fighting to keep in the Union; I do not. Yesterday's Democrats were fundamentally no different from today's: "Diversity is our strength."

    The Union was more populous, richer, and stronger than the Confederacy because they were willing to hire white men. You were not. The latter fact correlates with the order of secessions:


    Six of the seven original states had slaves populations ranging from 44% to 57% of their total populations (Texas was an outlier with 30%) while the four states seceding post-Sumter had smaller slave populations, between 25% and 33%. In the four slave states that did not secede the slave population did not exceed 20%: Kentucky (20%), Maryland (13%), Missouri (10%), Delaware (2%).

     

    The sane solution happened in Virginia-- the white counties stayed, the mulatto ones left. What's not to like?

    You folks can be quite delusional, as Sam Francis pointed out in his classic "infantile disorder" column. How long would an independent CSA have lasted once the world discovered that when Punjabi, Uighurs, Uzbeks, etc, were sent into the fields, they actually picked the cotton, not lay around and smoked it?

    The early seceders were almost half colored. That portion of the population didn't fight, and they didn't work. They were sandbags.

    That's why you lost the war. We saved you from a fate worse than death.

    By the way, blacks, Mexicans, Jews, Arabs, and other constant complainers aren't worth the energy wasted to hate. Do you really want to identify with this group?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Sam Malone

  172. @Alexander Turok

    Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role in paying for this kind of rhetoric.
     
    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @J.Ross, @Corvinus, @Mr. Anon, @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    “And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.”

    I checked my venerable ‘Bedwetters’ text file. You are toppity-top because alphabet.

    Get Out Live Life! faggot!

  173. @Reg Cæsar

    Assume for the moment that Trump, like Lincoln in 1860s wins the Electoral College with a minority of the popular vote, which is becoming more plausible as anti-Trump forces become more crazed with their anti-white racial hate.
     
    Which is the best election to model a campaign after? 1968, to utilize riot footage? 1972, ignore the nice, moderate man running and focus on all the crazies supporting him? Or 1860, just point the laser at the other side's gallstone and blow it apart?

    Replies: @Hibernian

    1972, ignore the nice, moderate man running and focus on all the crazies supporting him?

    McGovern advocated a Dunkirk in Vietnam; not very moderate.

  174. Were you ever under the impression that the left would take another popular vote win-electoral vote loss and accept it? From what I can tell, we are already in a multipronged war for the future of this land. The left is already making it illegal for non elite whites to speak freely, assemble peaceably and defend themselves. A Biden presidency would accelerate, and we will be forced to revolt.

    If Trump wins again, they may riot but they still control all the cultural institutions, which now include sports.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Marty T


    Were you ever under the impression that the left would take another popular vote win-electoral vote loss and accept it?
     
    Or a loss of both, even a landslide. Think '72 and '84.
  175. McGovern advocated a Dunkirk in Vietnam; not very moderate.

    There are two conservative positions on foreign war: Win-and-get-out, or we-didn’t-belong-there-in-the-first-place-just-get-out. We were given a choice of both in 1972.

    Unfortunately, the latter coincided with the Ho-Chi-Minh-is-the-good-guy fantasy of the Left, just as the Lindberghs’ wariness dovetailed with the enthusiasms of the Kaiser and the Fuehrer.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar

    I don't consider precipitate withdrawal to have been a conservative position. (I was three weeks too young to vote in that election.)


    ...the Kaiser and the Fuehrer.
     
    These two don't belong together except for the fact that they were both German leaders at war with the UK, France, Russia, and the US.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    By 1972 there were only 50,000 Americans still over there. It was going to be an air war from now on, with the air force and navy bearing the brunt of the fighting. The days of sending masses of raw conscripts into the jungle to be shot and mortared by enemies they couldn't see were over.

  176. @Known Fact
    @Dr. X

    The lockdowns in some states have amply demonstrated that the constitution is no longer worth the paper it's printed on

    Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    “The lockdowns in some states have amply demonstrated that the constitution is no longer worth the paper it’s printed on”

    No. Democratic lockdowns amply demonstrate the populace is cowardly.

    Assert your constitutional rights. Open your church and business, force the state to arrest you for exercising your human rights. Video-record churchgoers getting arrested by pigs. Tell the pigs to leave you alone until they return with a warrant signed by a judge citing the statute supposedly violated.

    Fight, you fucking faggots! And take the diaper off your face – it is undignified and Science proves it is unhealthful.

  177. @Chris Mallory
    @Reg Cæsar

    We know, you hate the Southern nation and free men who refused to bow down to Lincoln. I would ship every one of your african pets up north to live with you.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    We know, you hate the Southern nation and free men who refused to bow down to Lincoln. I would ship every one of your african pets up north to live with you.

    I have a very big disagreement with Lincoln: he thought five million niggerlovers “the Southern nation” was worth fighting to keep in the Union; I do not. Yesterday’s Democrats were fundamentally no different from today’s: “Diversity is our strength.”

    The Union was more populous, richer, and stronger than the Confederacy because they were willing to hire white men. You were not. The latter fact correlates with the order of secessions:

    Six of the seven original states had slaves populations ranging from 44% to 57% of their total populations (Texas was an outlier with 30%) while the four states seceding post-Sumter had smaller slave populations, between 25% and 33%. In the four slave states that did not secede the slave population did not exceed 20%: Kentucky (20%), Maryland (13%), Missouri (10%), Delaware (2%).

    The sane solution happened in Virginia– the white counties stayed, the mulatto ones left. What’s not to like?

    You folks can be quite delusional, as Sam Francis pointed out in his classic “infantile disorder” column. How long would an independent CSA have lasted once the world discovered that when Punjabi, Uighurs, Uzbeks, etc, were sent into the fields, they actually picked the cotton, not lay around and smoked it?

    The early seceders were almost half colored. That portion of the population didn’t fight, and they didn’t work. They were sandbags.

    That’s why you lost the war. We saved you from a fate worse than death.

    By the way, blacks, Mexicans, Jews, Arabs, and other constant complainers aren’t worth the energy wasted to hate. Do you really want to identify with this group?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Reg Cæsar

    Oops-- the cite was from this informative blog post:


    https://havechanged.blogspot.com/2013/04/civil-war-demographics.html

    , @Sam Malone
    @Reg Cæsar

    I'm surprised and baffled to see your vehemence on this subject, Reg. I'd have thought that since you were here you understood that our people's lack of default in-group loyalty is what got us into this mess in the first place. The menial African laborers we'd imported were surely the least worthy specimens on the planet for us to ever come to blows over, much less upend society and kill each other en masse.

    Besides, if it had been clearly understood at the time of the Constitution's ratification in 1788-89 that the proposed Union was something no State, once joining, would ever be allowed to leave - had they been able to imagine that the federal entity being created would in such an eventuality create a posse of other States to come and drag the fleeing State back by the hair of its head by means of killing as many of its men, women, and children as necessary to break its spirit - I wonder if a single State would have surrendered it's sovereignty, much less thirteen. They were reluctant as it was.

    And no, I'm not a southerner. .

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  178. @Reg Cæsar
    @Chris Mallory


    We know, you hate the Southern nation and free men who refused to bow down to Lincoln. I would ship every one of your african pets up north to live with you.
     
    I have a very big disagreement with Lincoln: he thought five million niggerlovers "the Southern nation" was worth fighting to keep in the Union; I do not. Yesterday's Democrats were fundamentally no different from today's: "Diversity is our strength."

    The Union was more populous, richer, and stronger than the Confederacy because they were willing to hire white men. You were not. The latter fact correlates with the order of secessions:


    Six of the seven original states had slaves populations ranging from 44% to 57% of their total populations (Texas was an outlier with 30%) while the four states seceding post-Sumter had smaller slave populations, between 25% and 33%. In the four slave states that did not secede the slave population did not exceed 20%: Kentucky (20%), Maryland (13%), Missouri (10%), Delaware (2%).

     

    The sane solution happened in Virginia-- the white counties stayed, the mulatto ones left. What's not to like?

    You folks can be quite delusional, as Sam Francis pointed out in his classic "infantile disorder" column. How long would an independent CSA have lasted once the world discovered that when Punjabi, Uighurs, Uzbeks, etc, were sent into the fields, they actually picked the cotton, not lay around and smoked it?

    The early seceders were almost half colored. That portion of the population didn't fight, and they didn't work. They were sandbags.

    That's why you lost the war. We saved you from a fate worse than death.

    By the way, blacks, Mexicans, Jews, Arabs, and other constant complainers aren't worth the energy wasted to hate. Do you really want to identify with this group?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Sam Malone

    Oops– the cite was from this informative blog post:

    https://havechanged.blogspot.com/2013/04/civil-war-demographics.html

  179. @Dumbo
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    It takes a bit of thinking, but then again “Frozen” is the single greatest art-work of our era
     
    Well, I know current art mostly sucks, but really...? I mean, it's well-done, but... Come on...
    Now, if you want to examine it more intellectually, I think "Frozen" is really "about assimilating the shadow", in Jungian terms. Maybe Jordan Peterson likes it too. Plus, of course, some cheap Neo-Disneyan feminist themes thrown in.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Nope, you’re just mistaken. “Frozen” is grand, high art, we’re talking Mozart and Wagner and Talking Heads levels, and if you can’t or don’t or won’t understand why, then you can start at the beginning, I’m happy to help you grasp it: I’m not here to be snotty with you, I want you to understand what great art really is, and get uplifted by the understanding.

    “The window is open! So’s that door!
    I didn’t know they did that any more!
    Who knew we owned eight thousand salad plates?”

    Adventure time: come on and grab your friends.
    We’ll go to very… distant lands.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    "Frozen", Wagner, Talking Heads... "Great art". Ok, whatever. I might accept Wagner, if only for its huge cultural impact. The others are meaningless.
    So we'll just have to agree to disagree.

    , @Dumbo
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    "Frozen", Wagner, Talking Heads... "Great art". Ok, whatever. I might accept Wagner, if only for its huge cultural impact. The others are meaningless.
    So we'll just have to agree to disagree.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    One of the (many) brilliant ways that "Frozen" is extraordinary, is the way that on the surface it seems to be about Elsa's crazy self-hatred, (not fear, HATRED: she says she's afraid of herself, but in reality she hates herself, (Liv Ullman and Colonel Kurtz, pleaese call your office) but it's really about her love for her sister, in the same way that King Lear is all about Lear's love for Cordelia, or on a more primitive level, a father's (non-incestuous) love for his daughter. Ruth Malaczech proved me right on this score, bless her pointed little head.

    Ah, screw it, I need to go have a drink with Neil Young, and talk about "Tonight's the Night". He'll know what I mean.

  180. That’s pretty noble of Biden. Is he going to start by performing a public seppuku to begin the purge of evil white males ? Seriously though, I do not see how an explicit tax on whiteness and reparations can be avoided and maybe also monthly group flagellations should be considered.

  181. @IHTG
    Costa ia former NRO reporter. He's gone full Oliver Darcy.

    Replies: @Barnard, @SMK, @Stan, @Mr. XYZ, @Richard B

    Costa ia former NRO reporter. He’s gone full Oliver Darcy.

    calls for “white power,” the phrase chanted by one of his supporters

    10 to 1 it was either Costa or Rucker in disguise.

    Or some paid protester masquerading as a Trump supporter.

  182. Bezos, being an ugly guy, just does what any female around him tells him to do so he can win their approval.

    Well, like the ancient Greeks used to say, Ugly Face, Ugly Soul.

  183. @Anon
    Ann Althouse had two wonderful posts about Trump’s speech. She didn’t watch it (past her bedtime), but she posted on her reading of the entire transcript the next morning, fisking it in detail and reproducing the most salient parts and critiquing them.

    For the next post she went online and reproduced the headlines from major newspaper websites, news show websites, and political websites that adorned their stories about the speech, and she explained how she felt they completely mischaracterized it.

    This sort of do-the-work, fact-based blog post really appeals to me, especially for something so subject to spin.

    https://althouse.blogspot.com/2020/07/trumps-mount-rushmore-speech-came-on.html

    https://althouse.blogspot.com/2020/07/having-carefully-read-trumps-mount.html

    Replies: @Percy Gryce

    Thanks. It’s been a decade since I was a regular at the Althouse blog, but good for her for sticking with it and doing the good work you describe.

  184. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Dumbo

    Nope, you're just mistaken. "Frozen" is grand, high art, we're talking Mozart and Wagner and Talking Heads levels, and if you can't or don't or won't understand why, then you can start at the beginning, I'm happy to help you grasp it: I'm not here to be snotty with you, I want you to understand what great art really is, and get uplifted by the understanding.

    "The window is open! So's that door!
    I didn't know they did that any more!
    Who knew we owned eight thousand salad plates?"

    Adventure time: come on and grab your friends.
    We'll go to very... distant lands.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Dumbo, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Frozen”, Wagner, Talking Heads… “Great art”. Ok, whatever. I might accept Wagner, if only for its huge cultural impact. The others are meaningless.
    So we’ll just have to agree to disagree.

  185. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Dumbo

    Nope, you're just mistaken. "Frozen" is grand, high art, we're talking Mozart and Wagner and Talking Heads levels, and if you can't or don't or won't understand why, then you can start at the beginning, I'm happy to help you grasp it: I'm not here to be snotty with you, I want you to understand what great art really is, and get uplifted by the understanding.

    "The window is open! So's that door!
    I didn't know they did that any more!
    Who knew we owned eight thousand salad plates?"

    Adventure time: come on and grab your friends.
    We'll go to very... distant lands.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Dumbo, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Frozen”, Wagner, Talking Heads… “Great art”. Ok, whatever. I might accept Wagner, if only for its huge cultural impact. The others are meaningless.
    So we’ll just have to agree to disagree.

  186. @Corvinus
    @Jack D

    "Even turning up the volume on the hysteria up to 11 has not been enough to make stupid American white people FINALLY understand that Trump is EEEVIL."

    Not hysteria, just facts and reasoned analysis.

    "If only Steve would mention it, the message might be heard."

    Exactly. Rather than be cagey, he should be NOTICING.

    Replies: @Your verdict

    Based on hard facts and reasoned analysis, Trump is crass and unfit for office, elected by Hillary Clinton and her army of clinically insane mouthpieces, who is the epitome of evil, and you are a privileged useful idiot with a lot of time in your hands.

  187. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Dumbo

    Nope, you're just mistaken. "Frozen" is grand, high art, we're talking Mozart and Wagner and Talking Heads levels, and if you can't or don't or won't understand why, then you can start at the beginning, I'm happy to help you grasp it: I'm not here to be snotty with you, I want you to understand what great art really is, and get uplifted by the understanding.

    "The window is open! So's that door!
    I didn't know they did that any more!
    Who knew we owned eight thousand salad plates?"

    Adventure time: come on and grab your friends.
    We'll go to very... distant lands.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @Dumbo, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    One of the (many) brilliant ways that “Frozen” is extraordinary, is the way that on the surface it seems to be about Elsa’s crazy self-hatred, (not fear, HATRED: she says she’s afraid of herself, but in reality she hates herself, (Liv Ullman and Colonel Kurtz, pleaese call your office) but it’s really about her love for her sister, in the same way that King Lear is all about Lear’s love for Cordelia, or on a more primitive level, a father’s (non-incestuous) love for his daughter. Ruth Malaczech proved me right on this score, bless her pointed little head.

    Ah, screw it, I need to go have a drink with Neil Young, and talk about “Tonight’s the Night”. He’ll know what I mean.

  188. @James N. Kennett

    It sure seems instead as if the Post’s rhetoric implies that a coup or secession is the only alternative.
     
    This is the key point.

    If the Cathedral is out of control now, think how it will react if Trump wins a second term. Think how crazy things will get after another four years.

    In any four-year period there will be at least one unarmed African-American man who is filmed being killed by a cop. This will provide the excuse for riots that will lead to a coup. The real reason might be something completely different, such as the imminent indictments of staff of the three-letter agencies and Obama administration.

    Replies: @Gordo

    The real reason might be something completely different, such as the imminent indictments of staff of the three-letter agencies and Obama administration.

    You hit the nail on the head there, better if he offered them amnesty to go away quietly to their dachas.

  189. @Hypnotoad666
    The "divider" line of attack is rich. The crazed leftists say we must be united in hating America. So if you disagree with them and love America, you are being "divisive."

    I go back and forth as to whether these people really believe their own B.S. For example, how can they believe America is oppressively racist to blacks when every single institution in America bends over backwards to give them massive preferences in admissions, hiring, contracting, etc.

    Likewise, simple statistics show there is no pattern of anti-black police brutality.

    How can you reason with people who are delusional.

    Replies: @anon, @Johann Ricke

    How can you reason with people who are delusional.

    Delusional people might be reachable. Pathological liars, not so much.

  190. @syonredux

    Asked if it is "a good idea" to remove statues of George Washington, Duckworth says: "I think we should listen to everybody. I think we should listen to the argument there. But remember, the President at Mt. Rushmore was standing on ground that was stolen from Native Americans."
     
    https://twitter.com/aaronsibarium/status/1279797773760684032



    And the Lakota were not the original owners of the Black Hills.....They entered into that area after 1600, and seized control of the Black Hills from the Cheyenne.....

    On the Missouri River, the Cheyenne came into contact with the neighboring Mandan, Hidatsa (Tsé-heše'émâheónese, "people who have soil houses"), and Arikara people (Ónoneo'o), and they adopted many of their cultural characteristics. They were first of the later Plains tribes into the Black Hills and Powder River Country. About 1730, they introduced the horse to Lakota bands (Ho'óhomo'eo'o – "the invited ones (to Cheyenne lands i.e. the Black Hills)"). Conflict with migrating Lakota and Ojibwe people forced the Cheyenne further west, and they, in turn, pushed the Kiowa to the south.[14]

     


    By 1776, the Lakota had overwhelmed the Cheyenne and taken over much of their territory near the Black Hills. In 1804, Lewis and Clark visited a surviving Cheyenne village in what is now North Dakota. Such European explorers learned many different names for the Cheyenne, and did not realize how the different sections were forming a unified tribe.[14]

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheyenne#Expansion_on_the_Plains


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iehPf1n_5pQ

    Replies: @syonredux, @Pericles

    Dear SJWs, should the Caribbean be given back to the native indians?

  191. @Wilkey

    Trump: “Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values, and indoctrinate our children...Angry mobs are trying to tear down statues of our founders, deface our most sacred memorials, and unleash a wave of violent crime in our cities.”
     
    Now I'm not the biggest fan of Trump. I voted for Cruz in the caucuses four years ago, and never thought Trump had any shot at winning, but...this may literally be the most coherent and unquestionably accurate thing he has ever said in his entire life.

    By the way, while the mob is tearing down statues, is there any chance we could get them to tear down the Statue of Liberty?

    AFTER ALL, IT'S A STATUE OF A WHITE WOMAN WITH BROKEN CHAINS AT HER FEET!!! IS THIS TO IMPLY THAT THIS WHITE WOMAN WAS EVER A SLAVE??? OR MAYBE IT'S YET ANOTHER WHITE SAVIOR MYTH IMPLYING THAT THIS WHITE WOMAN FREED THE SLAVES, AS IF THE SLAVES NEEDED ANY HELP??? EITHER WAY, WHY IS THIS STATUE STILL STANDING???

    TEAR IT DOWN! TEAR IT DOWN! TEAR IT DOWN!

    At the very least, after all they've torn down, maybe we could at least tear down that stupid Emma Lazarus poem. If they're tearing down a few objectionable parts of history we certainly should, too.

    Replies: @Pericles

    I’m a bit disappointed that a lot of leftist landmarks are still standing around at this point.

  192. @Jack D
    @Dieter Kief

    Die Weltwoche is certainly a fine publication but it has a circulation of 45,000 German speaking readers. It is, pardon my French, a mere pimple on the ass of the NY Times or the Washington Post. I would wager that 99% of Americans have never even heard of it. Meanwhile CNN blasts full time (or at least it used to when people still flew) from every airport waiting area like Stalin's loudspeakers.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Pericles

    I wonder how many Americans, as a percentage, would correctly answer a multiple choice quiz about the NY Times.

    a. A news show on CNN
    b. New Year’s Clock on Times Square in New York City
    c. Wedding magazine
    d. One of the boroughs of New York City
    e. A famous Gentlemen’s Club in the Meat-Packing District with a free buffet

    (The same of course goes for WaPo.)

  193. @No Recent Commenting History
    @J.Ross

    All the commenters are actually Steve sockpuppetting.

    It's true. Even Tinny Duk. All iSteve, all of us.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    As I’ve often explained, I have lots of Unexpressed Opinions

    • Replies: @Alexander Turok
    @Steve Sailer

    It's not often that superhero movies are insightful. But I was struck by this quote from Batman:


    It's not who you are underneath, it's what you do that defines you.
     

    Replies: @anon

  194. @Anonymous
    @Wilkey


    All I can say is that I have never owned a gun, and never been a survivalist, and I live in a relatively sane town, politically – though there has been some political violence even here. But I definitely plan on buying a firearm or two very soon, and stocking up on needed supplies if anything really crazy begins to happen.
     
    One of the few gifts I’m thankful for receiving from BLM is a ready, inarguable response to the favorite Marxist query, "in what possible context would you ever need a semi-automatic weapon?"

    They’ll never be able to seriously ask that question again.

    Another BLM gift is the number of "anti-gun" Marxists who are destined to switch to gun-wielding conservators, as BLM protesters become bolder, and more brazen.

    As they say, "a Marxist is just a gun-wielding conservative who hasn’t been home-invaded and gang-raped for hours in front of his wife and kid yet."

    Everything you need to know about police deference to mob rule can be found in "A Clockwork Orange.," a story based on an incident involving American black soldiers running roughshod in parts of England after the war.

    Replies: @black sea

    A Clockwork Orange:

    The author’s wife — pregnant at that time — had been gang raped under these circumstances.

  195. @Whiskey
    1. Trump cannot win. Mail on voting due to WuFlu and every White woman in the blm train means a massive defeat.

    2. The Joint Chiefs hate Trump and his peace mongering. They are likely to remove him and appoint Hillary.

    Trump is toast. It's all over for him and us. What is still in play is Hillary vs Abrams. The monstrous Hillary machine vs lean and hungry non Whites. Bet the latter and prepare. Run if you can. Some place like Chile that might need you and offer some protection. Hide if you cannot run. Pass for non White. Decide if you will die in your feet or on your knees in a blm run camp.

    Besos loves China and wants a final solution to Whitey here the way China solved their Uighur problem.

    Replies: @A boxful of black pills

    Despite Trump being as incompetent as he is in all matters outside of twitting and conning, he may actually win thanks to the Tide of Madness sweeping the Left. The masks have slipped, literally and figuratively.

    Take a look at the election odds, betting agencies wised up this time around.

  196. @SMK
    @IHTG

    It doesn't surprise me that Costa is a "former NRO reporter." Trump-hating "cucks" and neocons are just as deranged and psychotic as Trump-hating leftists. David From has gone mad since Trump was elected president, as have Bill Kristol, who's joined the democratic party, and Max Boot, who said he'd voted for Stalin if he was running against Trump, and he wasn't joking, apparently. And Rick Wilson, the most deranged and execrable of all the deranged and execrable Trump-haters.

    Sam Harris has also gone mad since Trump was elected President, and has had Frum as a guest on four 2-hour podcasts, 8-hours of deranged and psychotic Trump hatred from two deranged and psychotic Trump-haters. One of the topics they discuss is "the prospect that Trump will refuse to leave office." So Frum and Harris are so deranged and psychotic that they believe Trump will "refuse to leave office" if he loses to Joe Biden or at the end of his second term if re-elected. Harris believes that Trump is an "existential threat to democracy. In response to this lunacy and psychosis I sent him an email which I'm sure he didn't read. To quote:

    Exactly how is Trump an "existential threat to democracy"? Exactly how is Trump, if he loses to Biden or is re-elected, going to abolish democracy, assuming that's his intention (which no sane person believes), when he'd be opposed, hypothetically, by all democrats, all republican, many if not most of whom detest him, all of the media, including Fox News and talk radio, the FBI and Justice Dept, which join the CIA in a conspiracy and witch-hunt and attempted coup, unprecedented in all of American history, to subvert democracy and the will of 60 million voters by to impeaching Trump and removing him from office with not a scintilla of evidence that he "colluded" with Putin and Russians to deny the evil witch he divine right to be the first woman president; and the military, which has always been neutral, politically, albeit some general have violated that history and tradition of neutrality by denouncing Trump. No president could abolish democracy, and impose a dictatorship, without the support of the police and military. Anyone wo believes that Trump has even thought of doing this for even a moment is psychotic and guilty of paranoia induced by "Trump derangement syndrome."

    The Trump-haters are guilty of "projection," as Tucker Carlson observes, of doing and wanting exactly what they accuse Trump of doing and wanting. But they see their goal as a crusade, idealistic and noble and imperative, to save democracy by abolishing democracy.

    Replies: @Neuday

    To save the village from Nazis, you have to burn down the village.

  197. @MarkinLA
    @Wilkey

    Buy an AR-15 lower receiver and build your own gun from the available parts kits. Buy the fully assembled upper since assembling that requires tools you may not want to buy. You will learn more about the gun that way. A short barrel AR is ideal - light, easy to maneuver, and packs enough punch with expansive hunting ammo. A good backup would be a used double action revolver in .357.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    Apparently, the lawsuit attacking Remington for selling AR-15s to the public, which resulted in their dropping the sales of said item, has caused them to stop manufacture and sell off their inventory of parts. This is what happens when actual Cosmopolitan Communists control the court system.

    25,000,000
    AR-15 PARTS LIQUIDATION
    DPMS-BUSHMASTER-REMINGTON
    WE BOUGHT THEIR PARTS

    https://www.cdnnsports.com/

  198. @Marty T
    Were you ever under the impression that the left would take another popular vote win-electoral vote loss and accept it? From what I can tell, we are already in a multipronged war for the future of this land. The left is already making it illegal for non elite whites to speak freely, assemble peaceably and defend themselves. A Biden presidency would accelerate, and we will be forced to revolt.

    If Trump wins again, they may riot but they still control all the cultural institutions, which now include sports.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Were you ever under the impression that the left would take another popular vote win-electoral vote loss and accept it?

    Or a loss of both, even a landslide. Think ’72 and ’84.

  199. @Reg Cæsar

    McGovern advocated a Dunkirk in Vietnam; not very moderate.
     
    There are two conservative positions on foreign war: Win-and-get-out, or we-didn't-belong-there-in-the-first-place-just-get-out. We were given a choice of both in 1972.

    Unfortunately, the latter coincided with the Ho-Chi-Minh-is-the-good-guy fantasy of the Left, just as the Lindberghs' wariness dovetailed with the enthusiasms of the Kaiser and the Fuehrer.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Anonymous

    I don’t consider precipitate withdrawal to have been a conservative position. (I was three weeks too young to vote in that election.)

    …the Kaiser and the Fuehrer.

    These two don’t belong together except for the fact that they were both German leaders at war with the UK, France, Russia, and the US.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hibernian


    These two don’t belong together except for the fact that they were both German leaders at war with the UK, France, Russia, and the US...
     
    ...and the Lindbergh family warned us against getting involved.
  200. @Ed
    @Anon

    What a scummy guy. Curious as to why Trump folks would talk to hostile reporters? I wouldn’t feed this guy info if I worked at the WH.

    Replies: @Forbes

    I wouldn’t feed this guy info if I worked at the WH Zoo.

    FIFY.

  201. @Steve Sailer
    @No Recent Commenting History

    As I've often explained, I have lots of Unexpressed Opinions

    Replies: @Alexander Turok

    It’s not often that superhero movies are insightful. But I was struck by this quote from Batman:

    It’s not who you are underneath, it’s what you do that defines you.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Alexander Turok

    No matter where you go...there you are.

  202. @Alexander Turok
    @Steve Sailer

    It's not often that superhero movies are insightful. But I was struck by this quote from Batman:


    It's not who you are underneath, it's what you do that defines you.
     

    Replies: @anon

    No matter where you go…there you are.

  203. @Black-hole creator
    @CajunSmiff


    The idea that Bezos or nearly anyone else in the elite class has much affinity or regard for what happens to America seems pretty optimistic. To the extent that such affinity exists, it only does so in a manner that’s so self-centered and megalomaniacal as to be beyond comprehension for most of us.
     
    I have to agree. Bezos specifically will go down in history as one of the largest slaveholders of our time. If there will be any human history left that is. His role in promoting the new type of "cyborg" jobs that completely dehumanize his workforce cannot be overstated. And that applies not only to the horrible warehouse jobs but also to white-collar jobs at Amazon - meet your quota and worship the company or else. Not many people want to work for Bezos unless they absolutely have to.

    Quite a few years back I was considering moving to one of the FAANG companies and I was weighing my options - back when I was young, smart and in some demand. Even then Amazon had a rep for creating a pretty unpleasant office culture. Read e.g. this
    https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2015/08/amazons-white-collar-salary-slaves.html

    However, Bezos has been extremely successful in shaping the narrative about Amazon and sustaining its cult following. So far he has managed to preserve Amazon's image as a tech rebel and community benefactor. I presume buying the second largest newspaper helps.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    IMO, the reputation is built on sand. A lot of people hate Amazon. It’s just so damned easy.

  204. @Hibernian
    @Reg Cæsar

    I don't consider precipitate withdrawal to have been a conservative position. (I was three weeks too young to vote in that election.)


    ...the Kaiser and the Fuehrer.
     
    These two don't belong together except for the fact that they were both German leaders at war with the UK, France, Russia, and the US.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    These two don’t belong together except for the fact that they were both German leaders at war with the UK, France, Russia, and the US…

    …and the Lindbergh family warned us against getting involved.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  205. @Chris Mallory
    @George

    The Republic ended in 1865 with the victory of the Yankee forces turning These United States into The Untied States and making the country an empire.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Sam Malone

    I would say that the Constitution was rescinded and the Republic terminated in 1861, upon the failure of the Congress to immediately impeach and convict the President for making war on the States which had determined lawfully, democratically and overwhelmingly to exit the Union.

  206. @Reg Cæsar
    @Chris Mallory


    We know, you hate the Southern nation and free men who refused to bow down to Lincoln. I would ship every one of your african pets up north to live with you.
     
    I have a very big disagreement with Lincoln: he thought five million niggerlovers "the Southern nation" was worth fighting to keep in the Union; I do not. Yesterday's Democrats were fundamentally no different from today's: "Diversity is our strength."

    The Union was more populous, richer, and stronger than the Confederacy because they were willing to hire white men. You were not. The latter fact correlates with the order of secessions:


    Six of the seven original states had slaves populations ranging from 44% to 57% of their total populations (Texas was an outlier with 30%) while the four states seceding post-Sumter had smaller slave populations, between 25% and 33%. In the four slave states that did not secede the slave population did not exceed 20%: Kentucky (20%), Maryland (13%), Missouri (10%), Delaware (2%).

     

    The sane solution happened in Virginia-- the white counties stayed, the mulatto ones left. What's not to like?

    You folks can be quite delusional, as Sam Francis pointed out in his classic "infantile disorder" column. How long would an independent CSA have lasted once the world discovered that when Punjabi, Uighurs, Uzbeks, etc, were sent into the fields, they actually picked the cotton, not lay around and smoked it?

    The early seceders were almost half colored. That portion of the population didn't fight, and they didn't work. They were sandbags.

    That's why you lost the war. We saved you from a fate worse than death.

    By the way, blacks, Mexicans, Jews, Arabs, and other constant complainers aren't worth the energy wasted to hate. Do you really want to identify with this group?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Sam Malone

    I’m surprised and baffled to see your vehemence on this subject, Reg. I’d have thought that since you were here you understood that our people’s lack of default in-group loyalty is what got us into this mess in the first place. The menial African laborers we’d imported were surely the least worthy specimens on the planet for us to ever come to blows over, much less upend society and kill each other en masse.

    Besides, if it had been clearly understood at the time of the Constitution’s ratification in 1788-89 that the proposed Union was something no State, once joining, would ever be allowed to leave – had they been able to imagine that the federal entity being created would in such an eventuality create a posse of other States to come and drag the fleeing State back by the hair of its head by means of killing as many of its men, women, and children as necessary to break its spirit – I wonder if a single State would have surrendered it’s sovereignty, much less thirteen. They were reluctant as it was.

    And no, I’m not a southerner. .

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Sam Malone

    When they wrote the Constitution, they could have made it clear whether secession was allowed or not. They didn't.

    So we had a war and that answered the question.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

  207. @Sam Malone
    @Reg Cæsar

    I'm surprised and baffled to see your vehemence on this subject, Reg. I'd have thought that since you were here you understood that our people's lack of default in-group loyalty is what got us into this mess in the first place. The menial African laborers we'd imported were surely the least worthy specimens on the planet for us to ever come to blows over, much less upend society and kill each other en masse.

    Besides, if it had been clearly understood at the time of the Constitution's ratification in 1788-89 that the proposed Union was something no State, once joining, would ever be allowed to leave - had they been able to imagine that the federal entity being created would in such an eventuality create a posse of other States to come and drag the fleeing State back by the hair of its head by means of killing as many of its men, women, and children as necessary to break its spirit - I wonder if a single State would have surrendered it's sovereignty, much less thirteen. They were reluctant as it was.

    And no, I'm not a southerner. .

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    When they wrote the Constitution, they could have made it clear whether secession was allowed or not. They didn’t.

    So we had a war and that answered the question.

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes we had a war that answered the question, but might doesn't make right.

    You're right that it wasn't stated either way whether exit was allowed. I suspect thought that if the truth had been realized, if it had been made clear that exit would be impossible and met with violence, few if any States would have entered in the first place. In other words, the spirit if not the letter of the undertaking was almost certainly violated by the President's actions in 1861.

    So yes, all those who were jealous of their States' sovereignty and freedom and suspicious of the inevitable power that would accrue to the central government failed hugely by not getting it in writing that the Union was a voluntary enterprise and that an orderly exit would be accommodated to any State which through its own lawful procedures made clear its determination to withdraw.

    Just as the general reluctance of the States to ratify had led to the Bill of Rights being introduced to placate and reassure them that their sovereignty and rights would be permanently sacrosanct and the federal entity not become a tyrant over them, so those forces should also have insisted upon clarification of how secession would be handled, maybe in an 11th amendment. We know now that they made an enormous mistake putting aside their doubts and quieting their darkest fears - this was a failure of imagination, their failure to anticipate just how powerful and self-aggrandizing and aggressive the federal entity would become within a single lifetime.

    By the way, since it was not ever made clear implicitly or explicitly in the Constitution that secession was disallowed, I would have thought that in the Anglo-Saxon tradition the presumption would be in favor of the freedom of the party that wished to cancel their membership of the club. And the Union being founded peacefully and voluntarily in a spirit of good-faith as an experiment in greater cooperation, logically the method of resolution for States wishing to depart should also have been non-violent and dealt with by the Supreme Court or Congress.

    But you're correct, we had a war instead of handling the matter as logic and justice would have indicated, and so yes, the issue was settled - settled though only with violence and murder, not through law or with persuasion or expressions of the democratic will. The question wasn't answered, rather the person posing it was simply silenced.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  208. @Steve Sailer
    @Sam Malone

    When they wrote the Constitution, they could have made it clear whether secession was allowed or not. They didn't.

    So we had a war and that answered the question.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

    Yes we had a war that answered the question, but might doesn’t make right.

    You’re right that it wasn’t stated either way whether exit was allowed. I suspect thought that if the truth had been realized, if it had been made clear that exit would be impossible and met with violence, few if any States would have entered in the first place. In other words, the spirit if not the letter of the undertaking was almost certainly violated by the President’s actions in 1861.

    So yes, all those who were jealous of their States’ sovereignty and freedom and suspicious of the inevitable power that would accrue to the central government failed hugely by not getting it in writing that the Union was a voluntary enterprise and that an orderly exit would be accommodated to any State which through its own lawful procedures made clear its determination to withdraw.

    Just as the general reluctance of the States to ratify had led to the Bill of Rights being introduced to placate and reassure them that their sovereignty and rights would be permanently sacrosanct and the federal entity not become a tyrant over them, so those forces should also have insisted upon clarification of how secession would be handled, maybe in an 11th amendment. We know now that they made an enormous mistake putting aside their doubts and quieting their darkest fears – this was a failure of imagination, their failure to anticipate just how powerful and self-aggrandizing and aggressive the federal entity would become within a single lifetime.

    By the way, since it was not ever made clear implicitly or explicitly in the Constitution that secession was disallowed, I would have thought that in the Anglo-Saxon tradition the presumption would be in favor of the freedom of the party that wished to cancel their membership of the club. And the Union being founded peacefully and voluntarily in a spirit of good-faith as an experiment in greater cooperation, logically the method of resolution for States wishing to depart should also have been non-violent and dealt with by the Supreme Court or Congress.

    But you’re correct, we had a war instead of handling the matter as logic and justice would have indicated, and so yes, the issue was settled – settled though only with violence and murder, not through law or with persuasion or expressions of the democratic will. The question wasn’t answered, rather the person posing it was simply silenced.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Sam Malone

    A giant war is pretty democratic. You can't say the losing side didn't give it their best shot. They came up about 10 yards short at Gettysburg.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

  209. @Sam Malone
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes we had a war that answered the question, but might doesn't make right.

    You're right that it wasn't stated either way whether exit was allowed. I suspect thought that if the truth had been realized, if it had been made clear that exit would be impossible and met with violence, few if any States would have entered in the first place. In other words, the spirit if not the letter of the undertaking was almost certainly violated by the President's actions in 1861.

    So yes, all those who were jealous of their States' sovereignty and freedom and suspicious of the inevitable power that would accrue to the central government failed hugely by not getting it in writing that the Union was a voluntary enterprise and that an orderly exit would be accommodated to any State which through its own lawful procedures made clear its determination to withdraw.

    Just as the general reluctance of the States to ratify had led to the Bill of Rights being introduced to placate and reassure them that their sovereignty and rights would be permanently sacrosanct and the federal entity not become a tyrant over them, so those forces should also have insisted upon clarification of how secession would be handled, maybe in an 11th amendment. We know now that they made an enormous mistake putting aside their doubts and quieting their darkest fears - this was a failure of imagination, their failure to anticipate just how powerful and self-aggrandizing and aggressive the federal entity would become within a single lifetime.

    By the way, since it was not ever made clear implicitly or explicitly in the Constitution that secession was disallowed, I would have thought that in the Anglo-Saxon tradition the presumption would be in favor of the freedom of the party that wished to cancel their membership of the club. And the Union being founded peacefully and voluntarily in a spirit of good-faith as an experiment in greater cooperation, logically the method of resolution for States wishing to depart should also have been non-violent and dealt with by the Supreme Court or Congress.

    But you're correct, we had a war instead of handling the matter as logic and justice would have indicated, and so yes, the issue was settled - settled though only with violence and murder, not through law or with persuasion or expressions of the democratic will. The question wasn't answered, rather the person posing it was simply silenced.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    A giant war is pretty democratic. You can’t say the losing side didn’t give it their best shot. They came up about 10 yards short at Gettysburg.

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
    @Steve Sailer

    In regard to your earlier statement that


    we had a war and that answered the question
     
    I would say:

    I may answer the question of who owns your car by beating you and taking it, but that doesn't mean my method of resolving the dispute was just, or sensible, or worthy of anyone else's recognition and respect. Would the car's ownership really then be a closed question?

    Or, a government may answer the question of whether you have the right to discuss group differences in intelligence by jailing you when you bring it up. That would certainly make the issue moot as a practical point, but it would neither affect the truth of the matter nor be a just solution deserving acquiescence by persons of conscience.

    The question of whether the States which had freely entered the Union could freely leave it was answered similarly, purely through the application of force. In other words, it was not actually 'answered' or engaged with; the less powerful party asking the question was simply dealt an almighty suckerpunch and warned never to bring it up again.

    If anything, the federal government's behavior from 1861 to 1865 in response to secession - all-out unprecedented violence - vindicated all those who had feared its growing accumulation of power and revealed it to be precisely the ogre its critics in the southern States claimed, a force that could not be reasoned with, would not abide by any written agreement restraining its appetites, and would not respect the people's overwhelmingly expressed democratic views on the most crucial matters when it would lose power thereby.

    In regard to your current statement that


    A giant war is pretty democratic.
     
    I would say that it only demonstrated that there indeed was a significant will in the remaining (Northern) States to quash the will for independence of the exiting (Southern) States.

    The giant war was certainly the precise opposite of democratic in explicitly and utterly disregarding the democratic decisions lawfully made through the legislatures of the exiting States to leave.

    Nor have you even attempted to argue that it was just, or wise, or the only course of action, or consonant with the voluntary spirit the Union had been embarked upon. Indeed, I notice that you have no response at all to any of my points except again to fall back on the observation that force was resorted to and that superior force prevailed.

  210. @Steve Sailer
    @Sam Malone

    A giant war is pretty democratic. You can't say the losing side didn't give it their best shot. They came up about 10 yards short at Gettysburg.

    Replies: @Sam Malone

    In regard to your earlier statement that

    we had a war and that answered the question

    I would say:

    I may answer the question of who owns your car by beating you and taking it, but that doesn’t mean my method of resolving the dispute was just, or sensible, or worthy of anyone else’s recognition and respect. Would the car’s ownership really then be a closed question?

    Or, a government may answer the question of whether you have the right to discuss group differences in intelligence by jailing you when you bring it up. That would certainly make the issue moot as a practical point, but it would neither affect the truth of the matter nor be a just solution deserving acquiescence by persons of conscience.

    The question of whether the States which had freely entered the Union could freely leave it was answered similarly, purely through the application of force. In other words, it was not actually ‘answered’ or engaged with; the less powerful party asking the question was simply dealt an almighty suckerpunch and warned never to bring it up again.

    If anything, the federal government’s behavior from 1861 to 1865 in response to secession – all-out unprecedented violence – vindicated all those who had feared its growing accumulation of power and revealed it to be precisely the ogre its critics in the southern States claimed, a force that could not be reasoned with, would not abide by any written agreement restraining its appetites, and would not respect the people’s overwhelmingly expressed democratic views on the most crucial matters when it would lose power thereby.

    In regard to your current statement that

    A giant war is pretty democratic.

    I would say that it only demonstrated that there indeed was a significant will in the remaining (Northern) States to quash the will for independence of the exiting (Southern) States.

    The giant war was certainly the precise opposite of democratic in explicitly and utterly disregarding the democratic decisions lawfully made through the legislatures of the exiting States to leave.

    Nor have you even attempted to argue that it was just, or wise, or the only course of action, or consonant with the voluntary spirit the Union had been embarked upon. Indeed, I notice that you have no response at all to any of my points except again to fall back on the observation that force was resorted to and that superior force prevailed.

  211. Anonymous[261] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    McGovern advocated a Dunkirk in Vietnam; not very moderate.
     
    There are two conservative positions on foreign war: Win-and-get-out, or we-didn't-belong-there-in-the-first-place-just-get-out. We were given a choice of both in 1972.

    Unfortunately, the latter coincided with the Ho-Chi-Minh-is-the-good-guy fantasy of the Left, just as the Lindberghs' wariness dovetailed with the enthusiasms of the Kaiser and the Fuehrer.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @Anonymous

    By 1972 there were only 50,000 Americans still over there. It was going to be an air war from now on, with the air force and navy bearing the brunt of the fighting. The days of sending masses of raw conscripts into the jungle to be shot and mortared by enemies they couldn’t see were over.

  212. @Alexander Turok

    Jeff Bezos really should ponder his role in paying for this kind of rhetoric.
     
    And maybe Steve Sailer should ponder his role in all the corona-denying crackpot rhetoric in his comment section.

    Replies: @BenKenobi, @J.Ross, @Corvinus, @Mr. Anon, @anon, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    I know it’s been 11 days, but I just want you to know that you are the single most consistently stupid poster on this site.

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