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Washington Post: "Horror in Brussels Is a Rebuke to Trump's Foreign Policy"
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From the Washington Post:

Screenshot 2016-03-22 18.06.48

… More than at any time since 1940, America’s commitment to its European allies is at issue in a presidential campaign.

I’d gotten used to it being always 1933 or 1938, but 1940?

However much they are reinforced, borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.

How’s NATO working out at defending the borders of Europe, anyway? Are the peoples of the North Atlantic getting their money’s worth? You know, sometimes I almost suspect that the Washington Post favors whatever foreign policy would lead to maximum expenditure of taxpayer dollars within its circulation area. Times being what they are, you gotta keep those ad rates up …

 
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  1. • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    @I.W.

    Why is it that everything now seems to be PR or Marketing, honed to eventually provide a nozzle via which any collective rage or fear can be redirected at will to hose whatever target is convenient or profitable for those pulling the strings?

    We saw this expertly played in the aftermath of 9/11, when public rage was channeled into support for a war long planned, against a nation-state whose rulers and people had nothing to do with the events on that day, while the official story ignored the fingerprints of [a] nation[s] since clearly more involved.

    Mass media + mass psychology = herd behavior on a scale not seen before, say, 100 years ago. Video (esp. TV) makes direction and amplification of the mass mind's emotions all too easy.

  2. I didn’t know a candidate for nomination by one of the parties was in the position to execute any sort of a foreign policy. Perhaps it’s an interesting corollary to the period while Hillary was in charge of the Department of State and it seemed like nobody was at the wheel all through Arab Spring and so on.

    Perhaps Mr. Thin-Skinned should start conducting his own foreign policy? Starting by issuing diplomatic passports… that immunity business sure sounds awesome.

  3. That’s hilarious. From claiming that Trump has no “policy” that’s quite a climb down for the WaPo clowns to concede he does.

  4. One possible effect of NATO and the non-necessity of Europeans defending their own borders without Uncle Sam standing behind them is the mistaken impression on the part of Europeans that armies are for intervention, not defense.

    I’ve never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions. I assume the media in Europe are basically the same.

    I suspect people who don’t think of their military as a defense force don’t think of their nation as requiring defense.

    So, maybe one of the best things that could be done to win hearts and minds in Europe on the immigration question would be to completely 100% pull out of Europe and NATO and let them fend for themselves against Russia, ISIS, etc.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous


    I’ve never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions.
     
    Because those were colonial powers for hundreds of years, and so strong nobody could touch them. Of course they would see an army and navy as projectiles rather than shields.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Discard, @guest, @random observer

    , @Diversity Heretic
    @Chrisnonymous

    I've had similar thoughts. If Europe hasn't figured out how to deal with Russia in 300 years (I'll use Peter the Great as the starting point) without North American support, they never will. On the intervention versus defense issue, I think it's telling that there are separate Departments of Homeland Security and Defense. The first is genuinely the Department of Internal Surveillance and the second is the Department of Empire Maintenance.

    Replies: @random observer

    , @Lurker
    @Chrisnonymous

    We can see what a bang up job the US military is doing along the border with Mexico. That being different - somehow.

    , @random observer
    @Chrisnonymous

    "mistaken impression on the part of Europeans that armies are for intervention, not defense."

    I hardly think the Europeans are any more to blame for having this attitude than the United States, whose armies and navies are organized for intervention. And which do not fight in border skirmishes to defend the United States nor have been required to do so since the days of Pancho Villa. Also, European armies train on their own soil. Where else would they do it? And why would American press report such routine activity? You think FAZ or the Times report on the US Army's endless iterations of Exercise Buttkicker IX in the deserts of Nevada, or any other such wargames?

    Also, armies and navies ARE for intervention as well as defense. That's what regular armed forces are for and always have been. It's why it's best to staff them with professionals. It's just more ideal if the national interests of the country are actually at stake in any given intervention, so that the lives of these native professionals are not risked uselessly or wasted. There have been few interventions by the US in which that was not plausibly the case, although the nature, scope and length of them has often been corrupted by other things like "American values" "nation-building" or "FREEDOM!", with corresponding waste of time, treasure and lives. These are structural failures of American political culture.

    Now, whether or not the British or French are intervening abroad appropriately or not, this is hardly a derogation from the defense of their borders. Their borders are not under any military threat and have not been for 25 years. The threats they face need police, CT units, intel, and coast guard. The US forces in Europe are of no value for those missions and are there not to defend Europe but to be there to get quickly to places the US wants to intervene in, all of which serve US foreign policy [whether I agree they serve valid goals or not] and not the defense of Europe.

    AS to pulling out, I agree the Europeans will bemoan that loss of cushion and should man up on defense spending. They should have done long ago. Still, no actual military threat to their borders or national security has as yet emerged. If Russia or ISIS become that, the US should actually stay and fight to help Europe. The US is primarily responsible for these threats emerging at all.

    Replies: @Lagertha

  5. Black Lies Matter hate it everytime there is a terrorist attack, because the media focus shifts away from police brutality of Dindus to Muslim extremists. After the Paris attacks happened, Black Lies Matter went on Twitter to tweet who cares about a bunch of dead White people. I am sure they will also tweet the same about the Brussels attacks.

    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @asks for it
    @Jefferson

    "Black Lies Matter hate it everytime there is a terrorist attack, because the media focus shifts away from police brutality of Dindus to Muslim extremists. After the Paris attacks happened, Black Lies Matter went on Twitter to tweet who cares about a bunch of dead White people. I am sure they will also tweet the same about the Brussels attacks."

    It doesn't take much imagination to picture the dorm room Media Response Strategy Meeting. Urgent!

  6. borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.

    Why do people get away with this line without having to defend it? This is nonsense on its face. If it’s true, it requires a thorough explanation.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Chrisnonymous


    Mr. Trump protests that NATO “is costing us a fortune” and that the United States is no longer a rich country. Never mind that the nation is far richer than it was when the alliance was set up in 1949, or that the national debt as well as spending on defense are lower as a portion of the economy.
     
    National Debt as Percentage of GDP:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/09/National_debt_as_a_percent_of_gdp.jpg

    So, basically, WaPo says it's okay for the US to maintain the economy in the state it was during WWII... "Oceania has always been at war with Eastasia."
    , @AndrewR
    @Chrisnonymous

    It doesn't require a thorough explanation to people who don't think highly of borders to begin with: namely, the gentry liberals that make up WaPo's core readership.

    , @dc.sunsets
    @Chrisnonymous

    People only read (and listen to) what they want to hear. What they want to hear is dictated by their emotions (where sit their biases & beliefs), not reason, and the impulsive/emotional cognitive pathway does not learn...it is entirely impervious to lessons of experience.

    How else does one explain the alcohol addict's continued indulgence in drink that is pulverizing his or her life? The decision-tree involved cannot, does not and never will learn.

    WaPo's readers, editors and employees all embrace the same biases and beliefs. Their rationalizations for what their impulsive minds dictate are not subject to falsification via experience or argument. They are addicted to a false sense of moral superiority and are no more likely to break their addiction than is an alcoholic.

    So are you still surprised nonsense gets such a podium?

    , @Richard A.
    @Chrisnonymous

    Borders seem to be providing protection for Japan. The horror in Brussels is a rebuke to the immigration policy supported by The Washington Post.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @random observer
    @Chrisnonymous

    I admit I may stand accused of lack of thoroughness of explanation, but it has historically been helpful to defeat the enemy in detail farther from the wall instead of ceding all the intervening territory to him and waiting for him to pound ceaselessly on one's gates.

  7. A terror attack on US soil is a sure fired way to get Trump elected! Me thinks the Musselmen will not risk it. It is not in their best interests. Word on the street!

  8. Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    • Replies: @Dwright
    @Tiny Duck

    Yeah, you being on front lines and risking it everyday.

    , @The most deplorable one
    @Tiny Duck

    Really, Mr S*ck D*ck, I am comfortable with my cowardice, thank you very much.

    Speaking of that, would you mind commenting using your real name?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @AndrewR
    @Tiny Duck

    Thank you Secretary Clinton.

    , @Obamadon_Imbecilis
    @Tiny Duck

    NATO is about as relevant to American national security interests as the Warsaw Pact is to Russia's. In the absence of the Soviet Union it's basically just corporate welfare for US defense manufacturers, as there are clauses stipulating that members buy arms from them. There's nothing resembling an overriding threat justifying the US having to protect these countries. Reasonable alliances for dealing with modern threats could be justified, but NATO would have to be entirely reworked for that to happen.

    , @iSteveFan
    @Tiny Duck


    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure.
     
    Where has Trump said withdrawing from NATO will keep us secure? Trump has suggested we are not getting the bang for the buck. We are providing the lion's share of manpower and funding of a defense pact in which most of the members are collectively confederated into the European Union which is more populous and has a larger GDP than the USA. Evaluating whether this is the most effective way to spend our defense dollars, or whether the Europeans should contribute more is a different argument that what you wrote.

    Now Patrick Buchanan might make the argument that withdrawing from NATO would make us safer. That of course would be based upon his concerns that any one NATO member, such as Turkey, could get us into a shooting war with a nuclear armed Russia over an incident that is not in our national interests. For example, last October's downing of a Russian jet might have been the tripwire that committed Uncle Sam to an armed conflict with Russia.

    Given how close we came to such an event, and given how Turkey's and possibly other European nations' interest differ from ours, there is a potential threat to USA security remaining in NATO twenty plus years after its reason to exist went out of business.

    Replies: @onetwothree, @AndrewR, @random observer

    , @MG
    @Tiny Duck

    Trump has said no such thing. He wants to rethink our role in NATO (a sensible idea), not withdraw.

    , @neutral
    @Tiny Duck

    This new idiotic narrative of calling people cowards because they don't want to live in 3rd world chaos or slums does not work. For one you already contradicted yourself in your first sentence, if NATO is providing you security (its not) then you are a coward for wanting it (using your logic). Second, the safest and lowest crime nations are those that have homogeneous and non 3rd worlders populating it, if you think that you are being brave by arguing for this, then I suggest you have a holiday in Somalia to prove how brave you are.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Pat Hannagan
    @Tiny Duck

    Doing things like racism and anti-immigration? These are not things that one does. One does not do racism nor anti-immigration. One may be racist or have an anti-immigration stance but one does not do racism nor anti-immigration.

    How old are you? Ask your teacher for more education in grammar and then, and only then, move on to Alinsky. You're an embarrassment to all that is hasbara.

    , @24AheadDotCom
    @Tiny Duck

    Us or Turkey withdrawing from NATO is what Putin wants (too). I wasn't aware Trump thinks we should drop NATO, but if so that's nuts and would let Putin or future Putins extend their influence over E. Europe.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters, but for an opposing reason: they think he's anti-mass immigration (despite him wanting the same immigration-via-college policy as Mitt Romney and despite him having a mass legalization plan for illegal aliens). They think he's strong on preventing terrorism, yet his suggestions in that area are completely unrealistic and only serve to help Obama continue his agenda.

    After San Bernardino, Trump called for a Muslims ban, a completely unrealistic idea that not even the only two Reps who've endorsed him support. It hasn't happened and it will never happen. That means Obama has been free to continue his agenda.

    After Brussels, Trump called to seal the borders. That too will never happen.

    In both cases, Trump could have called for realistic things that would have solved the problem and he could have used his celebrity to make them happen. Instead, he just called for lunkhead things that make his follower happy but that will never happen.

    P.S. There appear to be some Mobys around here who want Trump to continue being ineffective. They don't want him to propose things that would reduce illegal immigration, they want him to keep proposing things that will never happen and that will only help Obama continue his agenda. I suggest working through the bottom line of comments to be found at this site: would what a commenter suggests help or hurt the USA?

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @Dave Pinsen, @MarkinLA

    , @Cracker
    @Tiny Duck

    Your comment doesn't make much sense. What things do they do? Shoot people in Chicago and San Bernadino?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @Twinkie
    @Tiny Duck


    I feel sorry for Trump supporters.
     
    I vacillated between Trump and Cruz and chose to support the latter. I like many of Trump's (admittedly vague) policy positions, but could not (and still do not) trust him. And, yes, I also found him exceedingly vulgar and frequently incoherent.

    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.

    Replies: @Anon, @Twinkie

    , @Anon7
    @Tiny Duck

    Aww, one-time commenter trolls get all the replies...

    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Tiny Duck

    Rating -3
    Hashtags: #ObviousTroll

    , @Diversity Heretic
    @Tiny Duck

    Be gone, troll!

  9. @Chrisnonymous

    borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.
     
    Why do people get away with this line without having to defend it? This is nonsense on its face. If it's true, it requires a thorough explanation.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @AndrewR, @dc.sunsets, @Richard A., @random observer

    Mr. Trump protests that NATO “is costing us a fortune” and that the United States is no longer a rich country. Never mind that the nation is far richer than it was when the alliance was set up in 1949, or that the national debt as well as spending on defense are lower as a portion of the economy.

    National Debt as Percentage of GDP:

    So, basically, WaPo says it’s okay for the US to maintain the economy in the state it was during WWII… “Oceania has always been at war with Eastasia.”

  10. But who is it that demands the US & NATO invade and then invite?

    Who is that bans any non-Jew immigration into “that shitty little country”?

  11. I had no idea that Trump’s foreign policy was to import millions of MENAs into Belgium.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  12. I had a “waitaminnit” moment reading this. Back in ’01, were we not all assured by reliable sources that 9-11 was a consequence of GWB’s isolationism? I recall hearing that somehow or other his failure to ratify the Kyoto Treaty had some bearing on the incident. I guess green IS the color of Islam, but I digress.

    Is the WaPo running so short of spurious complaints they had to dig up the isolationism schtick? Or am I just supposed to not have a memory? I heard memories are racist, so yeah whatever…

  13. Trump is a chickenhawk.

    • Agree: Stephen R. Diamond
    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    @Anonymous

    Perhaps. No one knows until the morning after.

    OTOH, he's the only candidate who seems to grasp that you can have guns (military spending on foreign adventures) or butter (spending on domestic infrastructure) but not both (unless you're willing to issue debt by the galaxy, the effect of which is to burn today's capital while inflating the illusion of expanding wealth.)

    Trump's rhetoric is a break from the last 50 years in this regard. Whether he follows through as POTUS or not, it is a signal that the trend of the last 50 years is finally in a zone of reversal.

    The consequences of a debt-binge/credit-bubble inflationary asset mania reaching apogee cannot be overstated.

    Replies: @random observer

  14. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Yeah, you being on front lines and risking it everyday.

  15. @Chrisnonymous

    borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.
     
    Why do people get away with this line without having to defend it? This is nonsense on its face. If it's true, it requires a thorough explanation.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @AndrewR, @dc.sunsets, @Richard A., @random observer

    It doesn’t require a thorough explanation to people who don’t think highly of borders to begin with: namely, the gentry liberals that make up WaPo’s core readership.

  16. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Really, Mr S*ck D*ck, I am comfortable with my cowardice, thank you very much.

    Speaking of that, would you mind commenting using your real name?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The most deplorable one


    Really, Mr S*ck D*ck, I am comfortable with my cowardice, thank you very much.

    Speaking of that, would you mind commenting using your real name?

     

    I wondered if he is related to Fup Duck.
  17. While I understand your point NATO does not defend European borders Frontex does. If I understand it right Frontex’s budget is equal to one of the U-boats Germany sold Greece before the Greek financial crisis. So Germany ruined the Greek economy by selling Greece the single most useless ship when it comes to policing the refugee crisis. The refugees then invaded Germany.

    NATOs emphasis on the more substantial Soviet fleet makes them organizationally unable to deal with the smaller vessels your people smugglers and terrorists use.

    A challenge for the NATO ships is detecting smaller-sized vessels being used by some smugglers, who have been packing dozens of people onto small inflatable rafts that are “pretty hard to see,” Gen. Philip Breedlove, NATO supreme allied commander, said in an interview.

    http://www.stripes.com/news/nato-s-aegean-mission-grows-moves-south-1.399726

    • Replies: @gruff
    @George


    If I understand it right Frontex’s budget is equal to one of the U-boats Germany sold Greece before the Greek financial crisis. So Germany ruined the Greek economy by selling Greece the single most useless ship when it comes to policing the refugee crisis.
     
    I dunno, they could use the U-boat to sink the fugee boats.

    Replies: @Lurker

    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    @George

    They have an easy enough time seeing them when they board them and take their passengers to Europe.

  18. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Thank you Secretary Clinton.

  19. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    NATO is about as relevant to American national security interests as the Warsaw Pact is to Russia’s. In the absence of the Soviet Union it’s basically just corporate welfare for US defense manufacturers, as there are clauses stipulating that members buy arms from them. There’s nothing resembling an overriding threat justifying the US having to protect these countries. Reasonable alliances for dealing with modern threats could be justified, but NATO would have to be entirely reworked for that to happen.

  20. Has anyone else noticed that headlines and content from the Washington Post and Huffington Post are now impossible to tell apart? Huffington is intended to be a left tabloid and WAPO is meant to be serious.

    Even NYT got in on the act for a while but they are dialing back the crazy a little bit.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Mike1

    "Huffington is intended to be a left tabloid and WAPO is meant to be serious."

    Only in style.

    Look behind the style, and all news is just a lot of hooey.

  21. When someone gets attacked with both mutually exclusive ends of the evil-scale simultaneously, you know you’re in pure emotion territory.

    Trump is:

    an evil dictator and a weak sissy
    a new york elitist and an uneducated redneck
    an obscene plutocrat and a broke incompetent
    without any chance to win and the greatest threat to democracy
    a fascist and a life long liberal
    starting wwiii and too friendly with Putin

    and now the policies he doesn’t have are too dangerous. Oh well.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @kihowi

    Ha ha - nicely done.

    , @Anonymous
    @kihowi

    Your comment deserves the gold box.

  22. iSteveFan says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure.

    Where has Trump said withdrawing from NATO will keep us secure? Trump has suggested we are not getting the bang for the buck. We are providing the lion’s share of manpower and funding of a defense pact in which most of the members are collectively confederated into the European Union which is more populous and has a larger GDP than the USA. Evaluating whether this is the most effective way to spend our defense dollars, or whether the Europeans should contribute more is a different argument that what you wrote.

    Now Patrick Buchanan might make the argument that withdrawing from NATO would make us safer. That of course would be based upon his concerns that any one NATO member, such as Turkey, could get us into a shooting war with a nuclear armed Russia over an incident that is not in our national interests. For example, last October’s downing of a Russian jet might have been the tripwire that committed Uncle Sam to an armed conflict with Russia.

    Given how close we came to such an event, and given how Turkey’s and possibly other European nations’ interest differ from ours, there is a potential threat to USA security remaining in NATO twenty plus years after its reason to exist went out of business.

    • Replies: @onetwothree
    @iSteveFan

    Don't. Feed. The. Trolls.

    , @AndrewR
    @iSteveFan

    Would the US really have Turkey's back if Turkey picks a fight with Russia?

    If I'm out with some friends and one of my buddies picks a fight with a stranger, he's on his own unless it becomes a life or death scenario.

    I would like to think that Turkey's NATO allied would let Russia retaliate in a limited capacity and warn Turkey that it's on its own if it escalates.

    I'm not an expert in international law but I don't see how it would be in a country's interest to sign a treaty that would force it to go to bat for an aggressive or reckless ally.

    Replies: @Discordiax, @random observer

    , @random observer
    @iSteveFan

    Cogent.

    I would only criticize Trump's position in this regard so far as it is based on the assumption that US troops are still in Europe to defend it. They are there because successive US administrations want them there to pursue US ambitions, at least as they have defined them. The Europeans would cringe if they all left, but that is hardly the reason they have stayed.

  23. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Trump has said no such thing. He wants to rethink our role in NATO (a sensible idea), not withdraw.

  24. > I almost suspect that the Washington Post favors whatever
    > foreign policy would lead to maximum expenditure of
    > taxpayer dollars within its circulation area.

    funny & succinct, thus excellent rhetorics.

    > Times being what they are, you gotta keep those ad rates up …
    imo this needs beefing up. ads by whom? government-linked corporation obviously. however, papers of record aren’t plastered with ads by ratheon or blackwell, so this needs being fleshed out (cherchez la monnaie), then condensed.

  25. The appearance of this article today simply underscores the fact that the real political battle emerging is between globalism and nationalism, not liberalism and conservatism. The editorial board of one of the most prominent newspapers in the country jumps on the tragic fallout of a great international terror event in order to attack a presidential candidate’s foreign policy platform.

    The article is completely incoherent.

    “On one side are those who support the internationalist response of President Obama, who said the United States “will do whatever is necessary to support our friend and ally Belgium,” and who asserted that “we must be together, regardless of nationality or race or faith, in fighting against the scourge of terrorism.”

    The perfect articulation of internationalism – unqualified devotion to non-Americans. This is assumed to be a good thing; the position is never justified.

    “Against them is the radical isolationism of Donald Trump…”

    Anything not in the vein of Trotskyite internationalism is automatically branded “isolationism”.

    “However much they are reinforced, borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.”

    Simple non-sequitur. Even if ISIS is not defeated elsewhere, if they can’t get thru the border, or they at least have a decreased chance at getting thru the border, that keeps citizens of Belgium or the US, applicable, safer.”

    “Britain, France and Germany, among others, contribute materially to the war against the terrorist entity in Iraq and Syria, not to mention NATO member Turkey.”

    Yes, not to mention Turkey, who supports terrorist groups allied with ISIS in their fight against Assad, thus hindering the effort to bring stability to the Syrian situation.

    “But she or he must also accept that the alliance won’t function without U.S. leadership — which inevitably means a larger role militarily and financially as well as politically.”

    Yes, the world cannot function without US leadership. In the last 15 years, the United States’ international “leadership” has de-stabilized Iraq and Libya, sites that are now, as a result, prominent sources of radical Sunni terrorism.

  26. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    This new idiotic narrative of calling people cowards because they don’t want to live in 3rd world chaos or slums does not work. For one you already contradicted yourself in your first sentence, if NATO is providing you security (its not) then you are a coward for wanting it (using your logic). Second, the safest and lowest crime nations are those that have homogeneous and non 3rd worlders populating it, if you think that you are being brave by arguing for this, then I suggest you have a holiday in Somalia to prove how brave you are.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @neutral


    ...the safest and lowest crime nations are those that have homogeneous and non 3rd worlders populating it, if you think that you are being brave by arguing for this, then I suggest you have a holiday in Somalia to prove how brave you are.
     
    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jefferson, @Anon

  27. The leftist twits get the causality backwards so often that I suspect that they have some sort of dyslexia that scrambles events & effects instead of letters.

    Muslims don’t attack us because Donald Trump doesn’t want them here.

    Donald Trump doesn’t want Muslims here because they attack us.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Hosswire

    "This is why Japan has such a problem with Muslim terror attacks. Their secure border doesn’t seem to prevent any Islamic terror attacks."

    Even Japan's cab drivers are predominantly Non Muslim.

    , @Jefferson
    @Hosswire

    "The leftist twits get the causality backwards so often that I suspect that they have some sort of dyslexia that scrambles events & effects instead of letters.

    Muslims don’t attack us because Donald Trump doesn’t want them here.

    Donald Trump doesn’t want Muslims here because they attack us."

    Originally the Left said the Muslim world hates the West because of George W. Bush. Now they hate us because of Donald Trump.

    So acording to Left Wing logic, the Muslim world just loved the West during the almost 8 years of Hussein Obama in office, hence why there have been zero Islamic terrorist attacks in White Western countries since 2008, sarcasm. And they will love us even more if Hildabeast Clinton becomes POTUS.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  28. iSteveFan says:

    For a candidate who is a joke with zero chance of winning, and hopelessly behind either democrat in a general election matchup, the MSM and other candidates sure seem to focus a lot on Trump. I don’t think any major news outlet can go the day without condemning this candidate who has no chance of winning. Even Hillary and Bernie seem to be directing more of their attacks against this potential November walkover than they do against each other. People seem to show a lot of concern and expel a lot of energy over a guy who supposedly has no chance of winning.

    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    @iSteveFan

    Indeed. They should also know by now that a great many of us do not believe the media or most politicians.

    If they truly want Trump to lose in November they should be supporting him and telling us to vote for him.

    Replies: @utu

    , @Jefferson
    @iSteveFan

    "For a candidate who is a joke with zero chance of winning, and hopelessly behind either democrat in a general election matchup, the MSM and other candidates sure seem to focus a lot on Trump. I don’t think any major news outlet can go the day without condemning this candidate who has no chance of winning. Even Hillary and Bernie seem to be directing more of their attacks against this potential November walkover than they do against each other. People seem to show a lot of concern and expel a lot of energy over a guy who supposedly has no chance of winning."

    In December of 2015 Mitt Romney compared Donald Trump to Herman Cain, in that he had no chance in hell of winning the GOP nomination, let alone win The White House.

    , @Anon
    @iSteveFan

    "For a candidate who is a joke with zero chance of winning"

    True or not of Trump, it's truer of the other GOP candidates.

    I mean who's gonna vote for Jeb, Kasish, Rubio, or boogerman?

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @iSteveFan

    This is the response of the month. A most excellent point.

    Another thing: These same alleged polls that show Trump doing so poorly vs Clinton and Sanders also tend to show Cruz and even Kasich doing very well vs. Clinton and Sanders. How come the MSM isn't encouraging the GOP voters to continually back Cruz, since he especially can beat Clinton? Wouldn't that make sense, to go support the candidate who can win the November election? But since Trump dominates nearly every single political news cycle the other candidates can hardly get the time of day's worth of exposure. Would be interesting to check Cruz and Kasich's name recognition among independent voters as compared to Trump, if the former two candidates will have a much easier time beating Clinton then they must have pretty strong name recognition among non-GOP voters.

  29. If only we’d had an aggressive foreign policy for the last 15 years, invading and occupying and bombing and droning all over the middle east, I suppose we wouldn’t be facing the threat of ISIS today. What a pity Trump’s foreign policy has been in place all those years.

  30. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Doing things like racism and anti-immigration? These are not things that one does. One does not do racism nor anti-immigration. One may be racist or have an anti-immigration stance but one does not do racism nor anti-immigration.

    How old are you? Ask your teacher for more education in grammar and then, and only then, move on to Alinsky. You’re an embarrassment to all that is hasbara.

  31. However much they are reinforced, borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.”

    This is why Japan has such a problem with Muslim terror attacks. Their secure border doesn’t seem to prevent any Islamic terror attacks.

  32. What on Earth is NATO supposed to do to prevent this kind of attack, planned and run out of the Brussels slums? NATO can (and does) bomb ISIS, but so far, that hasn’t made either ISIS or its sympathizers in immigrant communities in France and Belgium go away.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @NOTA

    NATO has to nuke Brussels. It's the only way to be sure.

    , @Andrew
    @NOTA

    What on Earth is NATO supposed to do to prevent this kind of attack, planned and run out of the Brussels slums?

    Sink/torpedo/bomb the migrant boats. We could even do it humanely when there are no migrants in them. Seal and militarize the border points they are crossing at.

    Of course Turkey being part of NATO might make this course of action difficult.

  33. The WaPost, the NYTimes, the foreign policy industrial complex, most of our Congress, the State Dept., the university “experts” are all frauds. Complete frauds, either that or they are insane. We are ruled by criminal class of frauds or the utterly deranged. How did we let these people do this to us? This headline is impossible. The Emperor is standing in front of everyone, utterly naked, waving his organ around in his hand and still saying he is dressed in all his finery. He is bellowing it now.

  34. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Us or Turkey withdrawing from NATO is what Putin wants (too). I wasn’t aware Trump thinks we should drop NATO, but if so that’s nuts and would let Putin or future Putins extend their influence over E. Europe.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters, but for an opposing reason: they think he’s anti-mass immigration (despite him wanting the same immigration-via-college policy as Mitt Romney and despite him having a mass legalization plan for illegal aliens). They think he’s strong on preventing terrorism, yet his suggestions in that area are completely unrealistic and only serve to help Obama continue his agenda.

    After San Bernardino, Trump called for a Muslims ban, a completely unrealistic idea that not even the only two Reps who’ve endorsed him support. It hasn’t happened and it will never happen. That means Obama has been free to continue his agenda.

    After Brussels, Trump called to seal the borders. That too will never happen.

    In both cases, Trump could have called for realistic things that would have solved the problem and he could have used his celebrity to make them happen. Instead, he just called for lunkhead things that make his follower happy but that will never happen.

    P.S. There appear to be some Mobys around here who want Trump to continue being ineffective. They don’t want him to propose things that would reduce illegal immigration, they want him to keep proposing things that will never happen and that will only help Obama continue his agenda. I suggest working through the bottom line of comments to be found at this site: would what a commenter suggests help or hurt the USA?

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
    @24AheadDotCom

    It hasn’t happened and it will never happen. That means Obama has been free to continue his agenda.

    After Brussels, Trump called to seal the borders. That too will never happen.

    "Never say never" is an old rugby league expression.

    Replies: @27 year old

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @24AheadDotCom

    How about a compromise? The US stays in NATO, but Turkey gets kicked out. And NATO agrees never to expand to include countries in Russia's sphere of influence like Ukraine or Georgia. And NATO isn't used to destabilize any more MENA countries.

    Replies: @dc.sunsets, @Romanian

    , @MarkinLA
    @24AheadDotCom

    Well Trump seems to be more effective in his 8 months than all the "realistic" people have in their many years in the public.

  35. Hey, Steve, when I left DC in 2009 I couldn’t get the WashPost delivered to my door in Herndon, Virginia, 20 miles from DC out by Dulles Airport. I could only buy it at Giant Food on Sunday.

    Ad Rates? Ha! What do they mean when you couldn’t care less about the hard copy hitting your target’s doorstep?

  36. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Hulk Hogan compares sex tape ordeal to living in Minnesota:

    http://nypost.com/2016/03/22/hulk-hogan-speaks-out-on-his-140m-gawker-smackdown/

    He described the leaked sex tape and trial as “ the roughest’’ thing” he ever had to go through.

    “After Gawker had posted the video, it was almost like when I lived in Minnesota and the sun went away and it was like seven months of being real cloudy when I lived in the Twin Cities,’’ Hogan said.

    “I would run into kids who would say, ‘I’d downloaded the Hulk Hogan Wrestlemania video, and Hulk Hogan sex tape came up.’

    “I dealt with so many horrible things, people in public asking me about the tape. I felt like I had, all of a sudden I had a heat lamp on me at all times.’’

  37. OT- Emory University special snowflakes in meltdown about pro-Trump chalkings on sidewalk:

    “You are not listening! Come speak to us, we are in pain!” throughout the Quad. Peraza opened the door to the Administration Building and students moved forward towards the door, shouting “It is our duty to fight for our freedom. It is our duty to win. We must love each other and support each other. We have nothing to lose but our chains.”

    “I’m supposed to feel comfortable and safe [here],” one student said. “But this man is being supported by students on our campus and our administration shows that they, by their silence, support it as well … I don’t deserve to feel afraid at my school,” she added.

    “What do we have to do for you to listen to us?” students asked Wagner directly, to which he asked, “What actions should I take?” One student asked if Emory would send out a University-wide email to “decry the support for this fascist, racist candidate” to which Wagner replied, “No, we will not.” One student clarified that “the University doesn’t have to say they don’t support Trump, but just to acknowledge that there are students on this campus who feel this way about what’s happening … to acknowledge all of us here.”

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    @TangoMan

    I read as much of the original of the Emory article as I could stand. At first I thought that the pro-Trump students should have applied for the appropriate permit to "chalk." But given the hysterical reaction described in the article, the application would have been denied and the students seeking it would have been ostracized and probably required to go to some kind of remedial diversity inclusion counseling. The lunatics on campuses are now truly in control of the asylums!

  38. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @iSteveFan
    For a candidate who is a joke with zero chance of winning, and hopelessly behind either democrat in a general election matchup, the MSM and other candidates sure seem to focus a lot on Trump. I don't think any major news outlet can go the day without condemning this candidate who has no chance of winning. Even Hillary and Bernie seem to be directing more of their attacks against this potential November walkover than they do against each other. People seem to show a lot of concern and expel a lot of energy over a guy who supposedly has no chance of winning.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @Jefferson, @Anon, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Indeed. They should also know by now that a great many of us do not believe the media or most politicians.

    If they truly want Trump to lose in November they should be supporting him and telling us to vote for him.

    • Replies: @utu
    @The most deplorable one

    "If they truly want Trump to lose in November they should be supporting him and telling us to vote for him." - They know it. Trump is their Trojan horse?

  39. @Chrisnonymous
    One possible effect of NATO and the non-necessity of Europeans defending their own borders without Uncle Sam standing behind them is the mistaken impression on the part of Europeans that armies are for intervention, not defense.

    I've never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions. I assume the media in Europe are basically the same.

    I suspect people who don't think of their military as a defense force don't think of their nation as requiring defense.

    So, maybe one of the best things that could be done to win hearts and minds in Europe on the immigration question would be to completely 100% pull out of Europe and NATO and let them fend for themselves against Russia, ISIS, etc.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Diversity Heretic, @Lurker, @random observer

    I’ve never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions.

    Because those were colonial powers for hundreds of years, and so strong nobody could touch them. Of course they would see an army and navy as projectiles rather than shields.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    Because those were colonial powers for hundreds of years, and so strong nobody could touch them.
     
    From what I understand, European Powers great and small have touched each
    other repeatedly throughout the centuries. Thus Napoleon Bonaparte’s hated nickname Le Monstre Chatouille (The Tickle Monster).
    , @Discard
    @Reg Cæsar

    Germany couldn't touch Russia?
    Sweden couldn't touch Poland?
    Spain couldn't touch the Netherlands?
    England couldn't touch France?
    Those countries have been at each others' throats for a thousand years. My father and uncles participated in their last great bloodletting. Their wars of empire were mere training exercises compared to their home fronts. They definitely know that an army is a shield.

    , @guest
    @Reg Cæsar

    They were colonial powers, yes, but they were neighbors with a bunch of other colonial powers. So they didn't spend all their time playing games in Timbuktu, Burkina Faso, or wherever the heck the next flag was to be planted. They worried about defending themselves against eachother inordinately, in fact, and you may have heard of a couple of skirmishes they fought amongst themselves, which we call World Wars.

    , @random observer
    @Reg Cæsar

    I see others have noted similarly, but I feel it worth adding that in addition to the role played by armies and navies within Europe as mutual shields, or at least as projectiles to be used with Europe first and foremost, even Europe's colonial adventures were heavily the product of wars with one another. Even France, colonial adventurer # 2, never had more than a fraction of its forces overseas at any time. Even Britain, an oddity in having most of its army deployed overseas unless there was an actual war with France, usually had more of its navy in home waters than overseas. Or, at least, in "European" waters [they owned the Med for 100 years].

  40. Wow, he was just elected and took the oath today! I guess I’m not following the news…

  41. @iSteveFan
    @Tiny Duck


    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure.
     
    Where has Trump said withdrawing from NATO will keep us secure? Trump has suggested we are not getting the bang for the buck. We are providing the lion's share of manpower and funding of a defense pact in which most of the members are collectively confederated into the European Union which is more populous and has a larger GDP than the USA. Evaluating whether this is the most effective way to spend our defense dollars, or whether the Europeans should contribute more is a different argument that what you wrote.

    Now Patrick Buchanan might make the argument that withdrawing from NATO would make us safer. That of course would be based upon his concerns that any one NATO member, such as Turkey, could get us into a shooting war with a nuclear armed Russia over an incident that is not in our national interests. For example, last October's downing of a Russian jet might have been the tripwire that committed Uncle Sam to an armed conflict with Russia.

    Given how close we came to such an event, and given how Turkey's and possibly other European nations' interest differ from ours, there is a potential threat to USA security remaining in NATO twenty plus years after its reason to exist went out of business.

    Replies: @onetwothree, @AndrewR, @random observer

    Don’t. Feed. The. Trolls.

  42. HOW on EARTH does that headline make any sense to anyone anywhere who has an IQ above room temperature???!

    Man, the left really is doubling down on all their lies. Vox was right.

  43. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Your comment doesn’t make much sense. What things do they do? Shoot people in Chicago and San Bernadino?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Cracker

    Rally, I just discovered by looking down at my keyboard that the "u" and the "i" keys are next to each other, so you maybe possibly responding to a poster named Suck Dick.

  44. @iSteveFan
    For a candidate who is a joke with zero chance of winning, and hopelessly behind either democrat in a general election matchup, the MSM and other candidates sure seem to focus a lot on Trump. I don't think any major news outlet can go the day without condemning this candidate who has no chance of winning. Even Hillary and Bernie seem to be directing more of their attacks against this potential November walkover than they do against each other. People seem to show a lot of concern and expel a lot of energy over a guy who supposedly has no chance of winning.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @Jefferson, @Anon, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “For a candidate who is a joke with zero chance of winning, and hopelessly behind either democrat in a general election matchup, the MSM and other candidates sure seem to focus a lot on Trump. I don’t think any major news outlet can go the day without condemning this candidate who has no chance of winning. Even Hillary and Bernie seem to be directing more of their attacks against this potential November walkover than they do against each other. People seem to show a lot of concern and expel a lot of energy over a guy who supposedly has no chance of winning.”

    In December of 2015 Mitt Romney compared Donald Trump to Herman Cain, in that he had no chance in hell of winning the GOP nomination, let alone win The White House.

  45. “I’d gotten used to it being always 1933 or 1938, but 1940?”

    1940, the first full yr of the war, was when Hitler conquered Brussels. For the DC Post, they may have considered that a bit of subtlety, getting to once more attack Trump as Hitler reincarnated. But this time with a twist. In 2016, its not the actual victims of the Brussels horror who should be pitied. The really real victims are the terrorist perps cause everyone hates them in the West. And of course, obviously, Trump is to blame for all of it, just cause.

    “There’s a fine line between stupid…and clever”–This is Spinal Tap

    Doesn’t the editorial sound like it could’ve been written by William Kristol? Or maybe more of Max Boot. Whichever one tends to be more subtle about the whole Hitler thing.

  46. $$$ motivation?

    I heard money makes the world go around.

  47. > I almost suspect that the Washington Post favors whatever
    > foreign policy would lead to maximum expenditure of taxpayer dollars

    Things are so overdetermined… I know this is a blog that favors deep thought about long-term policy issues, but my first thought regarding that title was clickbait.

    Brussels Shows Trump Wrong

    It’s simple: like sex, Trump sells. And if it bleeds, it leads. Everyone wants an explanation. And we of course can’t say Trump is right. So.

    A. Bleeding: Brussels
    B. Trump: Wrong
    Explanation: A causes B, or B causes A.

    It’s a bit much to say that Trump Wrong Caused Brussels (but let’s keep that around, it might come in handy later). So Brussels Caused Trump Wrong.

    I’m overthinking it.

    [Insert news here] Shows Trump Wrong

    works for everything. That guy really is a gift to all of us.

  48. However much they are reinforced, borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.

    Maybe the people who want to defeat the jihadists elsewhere should move over there, and leave the rest of us to live out our lives here. We can take our chances with our own policy of simply closing the borders. Max Boot is welcome to leave for Syria any time he wants.

    • Replies: @Cwhatfuture
    @Rob McX

    Odd, no Jihadists in Japan.
    But be that as it may, if the Jihadists should be fought in Syria, shouldn't it be the Belgian Army which fights them?

  49. @Hosswire
    The leftist twits get the causality backwards so often that I suspect that they have some sort of dyslexia that scrambles events & effects instead of letters.

    Muslims don't attack us because Donald Trump doesn't want them here.

    Donald Trump doesn't want Muslims here because they attack us.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jefferson

    “This is why Japan has such a problem with Muslim terror attacks. Their secure border doesn’t seem to prevent any Islamic terror attacks.”

    Even Japan’s cab drivers are predominantly Non Muslim.

  50. @NOTA
    What on Earth is NATO supposed to do to prevent this kind of attack, planned and run out of the Brussels slums? NATO can (and does) bomb ISIS, but so far, that hasn't made either ISIS or its sympathizers in immigrant communities in France and Belgium go away.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Andrew

    NATO has to nuke Brussels. It’s the only way to be sure.

  51. @Hosswire
    The leftist twits get the causality backwards so often that I suspect that they have some sort of dyslexia that scrambles events & effects instead of letters.

    Muslims don't attack us because Donald Trump doesn't want them here.

    Donald Trump doesn't want Muslims here because they attack us.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jefferson

    “The leftist twits get the causality backwards so often that I suspect that they have some sort of dyslexia that scrambles events & effects instead of letters.

    Muslims don’t attack us because Donald Trump doesn’t want them here.

    Donald Trump doesn’t want Muslims here because they attack us.”

    Originally the Left said the Muslim world hates the West because of George W. Bush. Now they hate us because of Donald Trump.

    So acording to Left Wing logic, the Muslim world just loved the West during the almost 8 years of Hussein Obama in office, hence why there have been zero Islamic terrorist attacks in White Western countries since 2008, sarcasm. And they will love us even more if Hildabeast Clinton becomes POTUS.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Jefferson

    That's the funniest part. I would imagine that extremist Muzzies know that Pants Suit is one of the Obama's shrill R2P harpies responsible for blowing up Syria and Libya, not Trump.

  52. @kihowi
    When someone gets attacked with both mutually exclusive ends of the evil-scale simultaneously, you know you're in pure emotion territory.

    Trump is:

    an evil dictator and a weak sissy
    a new york elitist and an uneducated redneck
    an obscene plutocrat and a broke incompetent
    without any chance to win and the greatest threat to democracy
    a fascist and a life long liberal
    starting wwiii and too friendly with Putin

    and now the policies he doesn't have are too dangerous. Oh well.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Anonymous

    Ha ha – nicely done.

  53. @Rob McX

    However much they are reinforced, borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.
     
    Maybe the people who want to defeat the jihadists elsewhere should move over there, and leave the rest of us to live out our lives here. We can take our chances with our own policy of simply closing the borders. Max Boot is welcome to leave for Syria any time he wants.

    Replies: @Cwhatfuture

    Odd, no Jihadists in Japan.
    But be that as it may, if the Jihadists should be fought in Syria, shouldn’t it be the Belgian Army which fights them?

  54. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters.

    I vacillated between Trump and Cruz and chose to support the latter. I like many of Trump’s (admittedly vague) policy positions, but could not (and still do not) trust him. And, yes, I also found him exceedingly vulgar and frequently incoherent.

    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Twinkie

    "And, yes, I also found him exceedingly vulgar and frequently incoherent."

    Who's the one that ate his own booger?

    So, you think eating booger is less vulgar than cracking jokes about the bimbo Maggot Kelly.

    , @Twinkie
    @Twinkie


    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.
     
    And just as soon as I thought that, I am right back to finding Trump repulsive: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @JSM, @res, @Brutusale, @Lagertha, @Johann Ricke

  55. @neutral
    @Tiny Duck

    This new idiotic narrative of calling people cowards because they don't want to live in 3rd world chaos or slums does not work. For one you already contradicted yourself in your first sentence, if NATO is providing you security (its not) then you are a coward for wanting it (using your logic). Second, the safest and lowest crime nations are those that have homogeneous and non 3rd worlders populating it, if you think that you are being brave by arguing for this, then I suggest you have a holiday in Somalia to prove how brave you are.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …the safest and lowest crime nations are those that have homogeneous and non 3rd worlders populating it, if you think that you are being brave by arguing for this, then I suggest you have a holiday in Somalia to prove how brave you are.

    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.
     
    Homogeneity is very helpful, indeed, but I do not think that it is even a necessary condition let alone a sufficient one. Singapore isn't so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet. South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate of Singapore depending on which statistics you use. Mind you, that is still extremely low by global standards, but they are a more cantankerous bunch than the highly docile multi-ethnic Singaporeans.

    Replies: @Anon, @anonymous, @Bill B., @NickG

    , @Jefferson
    @Reg Cæsar

    "That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world."

    Haiti has a higher per capita murder rate than The U.S and it is a lot more racially homogeneous than The U.S.

    Haiti is 100 percent Black using the one drop rule and 95 percent Black if you exclude Mulattoes.

    Even if you exclude the one drop rule, Haiti is still an extremely Negro nation.

    , @Anon
    @Reg Cæsar

    "That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there."

    Right. By 'homogeneity', we mean of sanity and quality.

    You know that.

    I mean if a society were made up only guys and girls like Mike Tyson, that would be hell on earth for reasons of homogeneity.

  56. @The most deplorable one
    @Tiny Duck

    Really, Mr S*ck D*ck, I am comfortable with my cowardice, thank you very much.

    Speaking of that, would you mind commenting using your real name?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Really, Mr S*ck D*ck, I am comfortable with my cowardice, thank you very much.

    Speaking of that, would you mind commenting using your real name?

    I wondered if he is related to Fup Duck.

  57. @kihowi
    When someone gets attacked with both mutually exclusive ends of the evil-scale simultaneously, you know you're in pure emotion territory.

    Trump is:

    an evil dictator and a weak sissy
    a new york elitist and an uneducated redneck
    an obscene plutocrat and a broke incompetent
    without any chance to win and the greatest threat to democracy
    a fascist and a life long liberal
    starting wwiii and too friendly with Putin

    and now the policies he doesn't have are too dangerous. Oh well.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @Anonymous

    Your comment deserves the gold box.

  58. @Reg Cæsar
    @neutral


    ...the safest and lowest crime nations are those that have homogeneous and non 3rd worlders populating it, if you think that you are being brave by arguing for this, then I suggest you have a holiday in Somalia to prove how brave you are.
     
    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jefferson, @Anon

    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.

    Homogeneity is very helpful, indeed, but I do not think that it is even a necessary condition let alone a sufficient one. Singapore isn’t so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet. South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate of Singapore depending on which statistics you use. Mind you, that is still extremely low by global standards, but they are a more cantankerous bunch than the highly docile multi-ethnic Singaporeans.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Twinkie

    "Singapore isn’t so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet."

    Singapore is small, so easier to manage and police. And it is a police state, even if a modern and mild one.
    Also, Singaporean diversity is mostly of Chinese, Asian Indian merchant class, and some Malays. But if Singapore had 10% blacks, that'd be lots of trouble.

    "South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate..."

    SK isn't so homogeneous. It is a whore-house nation where many Korean women had kids with black GI's and many Korean men have children with poor women from Asian nations. It's turning into multi-culti cesspool.

    Replies: @MarkinLA, @Mr. Jones

    , @anonymous
    @Twinkie

    They are only that way because they are ruled through fear (Singapore has caning and the world's highest death penalty per capita, and unlike the US you are literally hanged to death, and death row cases take 2 years, not 20 years, and being caught with even a few grams of cocaine can mean death), like there zero rebellions against the Mongols, because of how the Mongols would just slaughter an entire city down to the last woman and baby is even a single Mongol soldier is killed inside that city. or how there was zero crime in cities during the Japanese occupation because of the Kempetai. A more apt comparison would be to compare crime rates in Japan and Korea, which are both democracies, Singapore is basically a one party state with a velvet glove. Japan's murder rate is 0.3 vs. 0.2 in Singapore, how high do you think the murder rate will be in Singapore vs. Japan if it takes 30 years to try death penalty cases there like in the US, and if they remove caning? The perpetrator for the Tokyo sarin gas attack of 1995 is still in death row.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Bill B.
    @Twinkie

    Yeah but Singapore quietly sticks to very strong ethnic quotas. The Chinese percentage of the population has remained rock solid despite much immigration.

    Singapore is multi-ethnic but mostly Chinese and that is how it will stay.

    , @NickG
    @Twinkie

    Multicultural Singapore, with it's admirable social and economic indicators, is majority Han Chinese in demographic, with significant Muslim Malay and Indian populations. It is also an authoritarian state with a mass media deferential to the government. It has been under the control of the PAP - People's Action Party - formed by Lee Kuan Yew - since the first post British rule election in 1959.

    Multiculturalism or Liberal democracy - pick one!

  59. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Aww, one-time commenter trolls get all the replies…

  60. @Reg Cæsar
    @neutral


    ...the safest and lowest crime nations are those that have homogeneous and non 3rd worlders populating it, if you think that you are being brave by arguing for this, then I suggest you have a holiday in Somalia to prove how brave you are.
     
    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jefferson, @Anon

    “That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.”

    Haiti has a higher per capita murder rate than The U.S and it is a lot more racially homogeneous than The U.S.

    Haiti is 100 percent Black using the one drop rule and 95 percent Black if you exclude Mulattoes.

    Even if you exclude the one drop rule, Haiti is still an extremely Negro nation.

  61. We should start referring to these papers as Onions, The Washington Onion and The New York Onion etc. If a country’s leader won’t come out and say deport all Muslim immigrants then they are not an ally to us. What benefit do the people of Western countries get by importing all these potential terrorists? None

  62. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @neutral


    ...the safest and lowest crime nations are those that have homogeneous and non 3rd worlders populating it, if you think that you are being brave by arguing for this, then I suggest you have a holiday in Somalia to prove how brave you are.
     
    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Jefferson, @Anon

    “That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there.”

    Right. By ‘homogeneity’, we mean of sanity and quality.

    You know that.

    I mean if a society were made up only guys and girls like Mike Tyson, that would be hell on earth for reasons of homogeneity.

  63. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.
     
    Homogeneity is very helpful, indeed, but I do not think that it is even a necessary condition let alone a sufficient one. Singapore isn't so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet. South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate of Singapore depending on which statistics you use. Mind you, that is still extremely low by global standards, but they are a more cantankerous bunch than the highly docile multi-ethnic Singaporeans.

    Replies: @Anon, @anonymous, @Bill B., @NickG

    “Singapore isn’t so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet.”

    Singapore is small, so easier to manage and police. And it is a police state, even if a modern and mild one.
    Also, Singaporean diversity is mostly of Chinese, Asian Indian merchant class, and some Malays. But if Singapore had 10% blacks, that’d be lots of trouble.

    “South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate…”

    SK isn’t so homogeneous. It is a whore-house nation where many Korean women had kids with black GI’s and many Korean men have children with poor women from Asian nations. It’s turning into multi-culti cesspool.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    @Anon

    But if Singapore had 10% blacks, that’d be lots of trouble.

    Well not with how easy it is to get the death penalty. You would quickly eliminate 30% of black males 18-40.

    , @Mr. Jones
    @Anon

    Hate to nitpick, but this is dead wrong. South Korea is something like 96% Korean, and most of that remaining 4% are Chinese. I've spent months around Seoul and have never even seen a mulatto kid. I can count on one hand the number of times I've seen black GIs in the streets. The Koreas are just about as homogenous as modern countries get.

  64. @Twinkie
    @Tiny Duck


    I feel sorry for Trump supporters.
     
    I vacillated between Trump and Cruz and chose to support the latter. I like many of Trump's (admittedly vague) policy positions, but could not (and still do not) trust him. And, yes, I also found him exceedingly vulgar and frequently incoherent.

    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.

    Replies: @Anon, @Twinkie

    “And, yes, I also found him exceedingly vulgar and frequently incoherent.”

    Who’s the one that ate his own booger?

    So, you think eating booger is less vulgar than cracking jokes about the bimbo Maggot Kelly.

  65. @iSteveFan
    For a candidate who is a joke with zero chance of winning, and hopelessly behind either democrat in a general election matchup, the MSM and other candidates sure seem to focus a lot on Trump. I don't think any major news outlet can go the day without condemning this candidate who has no chance of winning. Even Hillary and Bernie seem to be directing more of their attacks against this potential November walkover than they do against each other. People seem to show a lot of concern and expel a lot of energy over a guy who supposedly has no chance of winning.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @Jefferson, @Anon, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “For a candidate who is a joke with zero chance of winning”

    True or not of Trump, it’s truer of the other GOP candidates.

    I mean who’s gonna vote for Jeb, Kasish, Rubio, or boogerman?

  66. @Mike1
    Has anyone else noticed that headlines and content from the Washington Post and Huffington Post are now impossible to tell apart? Huffington is intended to be a left tabloid and WAPO is meant to be serious.

    Even NYT got in on the act for a while but they are dialing back the crazy a little bit.

    Replies: @Anon

    “Huffington is intended to be a left tabloid and WAPO is meant to be serious.”

    Only in style.

    Look behind the style, and all news is just a lot of hooey.

  67. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.
     
    Homogeneity is very helpful, indeed, but I do not think that it is even a necessary condition let alone a sufficient one. Singapore isn't so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet. South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate of Singapore depending on which statistics you use. Mind you, that is still extremely low by global standards, but they are a more cantankerous bunch than the highly docile multi-ethnic Singaporeans.

    Replies: @Anon, @anonymous, @Bill B., @NickG

    They are only that way because they are ruled through fear (Singapore has caning and the world’s highest death penalty per capita, and unlike the US you are literally hanged to death, and death row cases take 2 years, not 20 years, and being caught with even a few grams of cocaine can mean death), like there zero rebellions against the Mongols, because of how the Mongols would just slaughter an entire city down to the last woman and baby is even a single Mongol soldier is killed inside that city. or how there was zero crime in cities during the Japanese occupation because of the Kempetai. A more apt comparison would be to compare crime rates in Japan and Korea, which are both democracies, Singapore is basically a one party state with a velvet glove. Japan’s murder rate is 0.3 vs. 0.2 in Singapore, how high do you think the murder rate will be in Singapore vs. Japan if it takes 30 years to try death penalty cases there like in the US, and if they remove caning? The perpetrator for the Tokyo sarin gas attack of 1995 is still in death row.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @anonymous


    They are only that way because they are ruled through fear...
     
    Singapore is an authoritarian country, to be sure, but a very, very mild one. It is certainly not a repressive country. The low crime rate in Singapore, indeed, is not due to fear. If fear were what mattered, North Korea would have the lowest crime rate in the world (it actually has the highest murder rate in East Asia). It's because Singaporeans have been socialized to be extremely law-abiding. And that tendency extends to those in power as well - Singapore has one of the cleanest, most corruption-free government in the world. Unlike many other Asian nationalities, Singaporeans will form queues spontaneously without any authority present. They are simply people with a very strong culture of law-abidingness (I am sure part of the explanation is genetic, but that cannot be the entire explanation since other countries with Singaporean ethnicities - southern Chinese, Indian, and Malay - all have much higher crime rates).

    My earlier point was not that homogeneity did not matter - I clearly stated that it was very helpful - but rather that it was not a necessary condition for a low crime rate.

    Replies: @Jefferson

  68. @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous


    I’ve never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions.
     
    Because those were colonial powers for hundreds of years, and so strong nobody could touch them. Of course they would see an army and navy as projectiles rather than shields.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Discard, @guest, @random observer

    Because those were colonial powers for hundreds of years, and so strong nobody could touch them.

    From what I understand, European Powers great and small have touched each
    other repeatedly throughout the centuries. Thus Napoleon Bonaparte’s hated nickname Le Monstre Chatouille (The Tickle Monster).

  69. No, it’s simply Muslims being Muslims and preying on non-Muslims. Of course the Marxists and globalists at the WAPO could never admit that, thus they place the blame on Trump.

  70. I’m thinking about Steve’s concept of leapfrogging loyalties. As he wrote in 2012, “Modern liberals’ defining trait is making a public spectacle of how their loyalties leapfrog over some unworthy folks relatively close to them in favor of other people they barely know.”

    Loyalty, properly understood, has to be reciprocal. You have loyalty to your spouse or to a friend largely because you trust they are loyal to you. To a lesser degree there is some reciprocal loyalty to your neighbors, your coworkers, or members of any group to which you belong. That is how interpersonal bonds are forged. But the liberal, who leapfrogs his loyalty to underclass blacks or Mexican immigrants, gets no loyalty in return. Rather, they see in him someone who has made himself open to manipulation and exploitation. The liberal’s only reward from this arrangement is the pleasure he experiences from the resentment of his fellow citizens, who feel his loyalty would be more properly devoted to them. So his loyalty, the leapfrogging type, doesn’t create the normal bonds that exist between people, or in communities and nations, but fractures them.

    Obama frequently displays his leapfrogging loyalties, as when he refused to stop travel from Ebola afflicted nations. As it happened his policy caused few deaths, though that was by no means a given at the outset. However, the message to Americans was, “Your safety and well-being is not my foremost concern.” Similarly, with Syrian refugees, he expresses contempt for the natural concerns of his citizens–“This is not who we are! We’re better than that!”–which means, “If some of you die as a result of my admitting this hostile group, that’s a price I’m willing to pay.”

    In a democratic nation, citizens are loyal to their government because the government represents their interests; i.e., makes their safety and well being its primary concern. But in most Western societies that is no longer the case. As this fact sinks in to the citizens of Western nations, they must ask themselves what loyalty they owe their governments. Is their authority even legitimate anymore?

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    @Harry Baldwin

    I think you drew the logical conclusion out very well. One point Steve made a while back he sorta tossed off like a simple matter of taste but struck me kinda profound and made so much practical sense. He said to the effect that class warfare is what a better society once did argue about, and perhaps should argue about, because, and I'll state it stronger than Steve did, the racialism of American politics is never not pernicious, since its always more personal for the minority, and the majority should feel uneasy about winning by punching down. And I'll give you an example of how racialism debases the social structure.

    More than half of fast-food workers require some government aid. Last year they tried to organize a nationwide walkout of McDonald's employees. It fell flat on its face, as I recall. It was pathetic. Had they any class-consciousness whatsoever they perhaps could have tripled their wages. I mean our proles these days have literally never heard of Marx.

    I don't know if you have any sympathy for the proles, but it would seem the leapfrogging problem comes into sharp relief when the artificial category called class is effectively forgotten. Does that makes sense?

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

  71. And if smuggling drugs will only get you a prison term instead of death by hanging, with a 99.9% certainty of ending up inside a wooden box? And unlike Western countries you do not have freedom of speech in Singapore, and can get bankrupted if government officials sue you for libel, which they will surely win. The only reason why people there do not commit crimes is because of the fear of what will happen to them when they are caught. Otherwise the crime rate there will be as high as in Hong Kong or Taiwan.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Anonymous

    "The only reason why people there do not commit crimes is because of the fear of what will happen to them when they are caught. Otherwise the crime rate there will be as high as in Hong Kong or Taiwan."

    Taiwan and Hong Kong have murder rates similar to that of 1st World European countries.

  72. @George
    While I understand your point NATO does not defend European borders Frontex does. If I understand it right Frontex's budget is equal to one of the U-boats Germany sold Greece before the Greek financial crisis. So Germany ruined the Greek economy by selling Greece the single most useless ship when it comes to policing the refugee crisis. The refugees then invaded Germany.

    NATOs emphasis on the more substantial Soviet fleet makes them organizationally unable to deal with the smaller vessels your people smugglers and terrorists use.

    A challenge for the NATO ships is detecting smaller-sized vessels being used by some smugglers, who have been packing dozens of people onto small inflatable rafts that are “pretty hard to see,” Gen. Philip Breedlove, NATO supreme allied commander, said in an interview.

    http://www.stripes.com/news/nato-s-aegean-mission-grows-moves-south-1.399726

    Replies: @gruff, @Hippopotamusdrome

    If I understand it right Frontex’s budget is equal to one of the U-boats Germany sold Greece before the Greek financial crisis. So Germany ruined the Greek economy by selling Greece the single most useless ship when it comes to policing the refugee crisis.

    I dunno, they could use the U-boat to sink the fugee boats.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    @gruff

    All ships appear to be useless as they are not being used. Btw how are the USN carrier battle groups faring against illegal immigration into the US?

    Replies: @gruff

  73. Asking why so few people commit crimes in Singapore is like asking why nobody rebels against Tywin Lannister. In fact, considering the cost-benefit calculation, the more important thought to consider is why any crimes in Singapore occur at all.

  74. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Is Twinkie advocating a situation where Belgium in 30% Muslim is OK, as long as everybody, Muslims and non-Muslims alike are ruled through a government that governs with an iron fist in order to keep everyone in line, is that what he is saying? Because he is saying that it is OK for Singapore to be 30% Muslim, or 20%, because the government there keeps everyone there in check with the world’s highest death penalty rate relative to its population. Just remember to shout out in a public square about how Malays are lazy/stupid, or commit a lot of crime, and see what happens to you, really just try it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedition_Act_(Singapore)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maintenance_of_Religious_Harmony_Act

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Anonymous

    "Is Twinkie advocating a situation where Belgium in 30% Muslim is OK, as long as everybody, Muslims and non-Muslims alike are ruled through a government that governs with an iron fist in order to keep everyone in line, is that what he is saying? Because he is saying that it is OK for Singapore to be 30% Muslim, or 20%, because the government there keeps everyone there in check with the world’s highest death penalty rate relative to its population. Just remember to shout out in a public square about how Malays are lazy/stupid, or commit a lot of crime, and see what happens to you, really just try it."

    Malay Muslims are not as violent as Arab, Nigerian, Chechen, Somali, and Pakistani Muslims. Malay Muslims are docile.

    Replies: @Romanian

  75. The horror in Brussels is a rebuke to Trump’s foreign policy

    If by “rebuke to” they mean “confirmation of”, then I agree completely.

  76. The Washington Post editorial board just had a meeting with Trump on Monday where I’m pretty sure they asked him more questions about his hands than immigration.

  77. @NOTA
    What on Earth is NATO supposed to do to prevent this kind of attack, planned and run out of the Brussels slums? NATO can (and does) bomb ISIS, but so far, that hasn't made either ISIS or its sympathizers in immigrant communities in France and Belgium go away.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Andrew

    What on Earth is NATO supposed to do to prevent this kind of attack, planned and run out of the Brussels slums?

    Sink/torpedo/bomb the migrant boats. We could even do it humanely when there are no migrants in them. Seal and militarize the border points they are crossing at.

    Of course Turkey being part of NATO might make this course of action difficult.

  78. Let’s gather together the remaining airworthy B-17s and have them fly bombing runs over Molenbeek, just to make the good folks at the Washington Post happy.

  79. @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.
     
    Homogeneity is very helpful, indeed, but I do not think that it is even a necessary condition let alone a sufficient one. Singapore isn't so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet. South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate of Singapore depending on which statistics you use. Mind you, that is still extremely low by global standards, but they are a more cantankerous bunch than the highly docile multi-ethnic Singaporeans.

    Replies: @Anon, @anonymous, @Bill B., @NickG

    Yeah but Singapore quietly sticks to very strong ethnic quotas. The Chinese percentage of the population has remained rock solid despite much immigration.

    Singapore is multi-ethnic but mostly Chinese and that is how it will stay.

  80. OT: Trump appears to have cleaned up in Arizona but is trailing behind even Kasich so far in Utah. These two Southwestern states have radically different demographics that might be informative. Utah is almost America in the 1950s: more than 60% of households are married families, median age 27, high fertility but low Hispanic population (about 9%). Arizona has a median age around 35 (only a few years younger than the national average), less than half of households are married families, and the Hispanic population is over 30%.

    Quick takeaway: Trump does poorly among traditional Affordable-Family Formation Republicans, but well among more hardscrabble ones.

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Thomas

    Alternatively, Trump does well with those who feel that society needs what he's offering and does poorly with those who quite like the society that they inhabit and don't see the need for Trumpian policies.

    Replies: @Thomas

    , @MarkinLA
    @Thomas

    Utah is Mormon and Romney was making robocalls against Trump. Mormons don't give a damn about American as long as they have people they think they can convert.

  81. @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous


    I’ve never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions.
     
    Because those were colonial powers for hundreds of years, and so strong nobody could touch them. Of course they would see an army and navy as projectiles rather than shields.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Discard, @guest, @random observer

    Germany couldn’t touch Russia?
    Sweden couldn’t touch Poland?
    Spain couldn’t touch the Netherlands?
    England couldn’t touch France?
    Those countries have been at each others’ throats for a thousand years. My father and uncles participated in their last great bloodletting. Their wars of empire were mere training exercises compared to their home fronts. They definitely know that an army is a shield.

  82. @Twinkie
    @Tiny Duck


    I feel sorry for Trump supporters.
     
    I vacillated between Trump and Cruz and chose to support the latter. I like many of Trump's (admittedly vague) policy positions, but could not (and still do not) trust him. And, yes, I also found him exceedingly vulgar and frequently incoherent.

    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.

    Replies: @Anon, @Twinkie

    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.

    And just as soon as I thought that, I am right back to finding Trump repulsive: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @Twinkie

    Because it was so classy of Cruz (or his supporters) to use Melania's 15 year old picture against Trump.

    And do you really have a problem with Trump getting angry when his wife is attacked?

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    , @JSM
    @Twinkie

    Yeah, I clicked on your link. So Ted (or a front group for him) doing an absolutely unnecessary, and, frankly, vulgar, thing of tweeting a nearly nude pic of Melania (taken 15 years ago when she was a silly girl) is NOT repulsive. Okaaaaayyy.

    But, Trump threatening to spill the beans on Ted Cruz's wife *is.*

    Uh. Huh. You do know what the "beans" are, right? That she is an executive of Goldman Sachs and that GS gave undisclosed loans to Ted Cruz' campaign (no bribes there, right?) and has had active involvement in the, frankly, treasonous effort to abolish the border between Mexico and Canada under the project of North American Union. Telling THAT truth is "repulsive."

    You are nuts.

    Twinkie, every time I turn around, you just reconfirm my bias. Asians are *not* good immigrants. Even the ones who are ostensibly well-assimilated Catholics with tall sons.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    , @res
    @Twinkie

    You're a thoughtful person so I'd be interested in more detail about how you think/feel about Trump's use of threats like that. I see initiating intimidation with a threat like that repulsive, but I am tending to find it acceptable to use that as a response to another's aggression (but also note the allegations of Trump spreading rumors earlier). In this case , Trump was responding to a PAC (supposedly not Cruz related) using a provocative picture of Melania in a campaign ad. How do you feel about that campaign ad? I think there is an interesting discussion to be had about what constitutes a legitimate response/counter and what is unacceptable (escalation?).

    Another example of this was Trump's response (threat invoking Bill's history) to Hillary's sexism comment a few months ago. http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/26/politics/donald-trump-bill-clinton-sexism/

    Overall, as much as I dislike some aspects of Trump's manner, I don't see how anyone else would be able to deal with the media assault he is enduring so I am inclined to cut him a great deal of slack regarding his techniques for doing that.

    Replies: @Andrew, @Twinkie

    , @Brutusale
    @Twinkie

    Really, Twinks, it's somehow less reprehensible to post an old photo of Trump's wife naked than to bring up the very legitimate (depending on your feelings about Goldman Sucks) corporate position that Cruz's wife holds?

    Replies: @Judah Benjamin Hur

    , @Lagertha
    @Twinkie

    Pleazzzz, GQ never publishes full frontal nudity exposing genitals and all. Besides, most men in the world would admit that Melania could be THE hottest FLOTUS ever - fashion designers would be in a frenzy to create looks for her!

    Trump should relax about this and just end it: he should turn it into something really funny to convey how proud he is of his beautiful wife. And, who cares about the Mormon women in Utah anymore? Would love to know the statistics of Utah Mormon women who do breast augmentation, nose jobs, liposuction, silicone face implants, Botox...butt implants (yeah, they're really popular now!) etc. Melania is the real deal (and speaks 5 languages) as far as natural beauty - so, yeah envy is a b*tch.

    The GQ ad will backfire (just like calling all of his supporters racists, low-lives, dumbasses has) and, it's obvious this was a trick to get Trump to fire stuff back - and now it's time to make lemonade from lemons: Trump's handlers need to get Melania's permission first, and have her image printed on "Made in the USA" black T shirts, T shirts sold at Trump rallies! They would be sold-out! T-shirts could say, "From Slovenia With Love." Yeah, I know, silly...but I get depressed every time Jihadies kill.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Trump's handlers need to get Melania's permission first, and have her image printed on "Made in the USA" black T shirts, T shirts sold at Trump rallies!
     
    Given that she was not only born, but grew up abroad (in Slovenia), a fact that's apparent to anyone when she says anything in English, that's a stretch. In fact, Melania's father, Viktor Knavs, was a Party member, a card-carrying member of the Communist elite.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Twinkie, @Mark Eugenikos, @Brutusale

  83. Pat Casey says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    I'm thinking about Steve's concept of leapfrogging loyalties. As he wrote in 2012, “Modern liberals’ defining trait is making a public spectacle of how their loyalties leapfrog over some unworthy folks relatively close to them in favor of other people they barely know.”

    Loyalty, properly understood, has to be reciprocal. You have loyalty to your spouse or to a friend largely because you trust they are loyal to you. To a lesser degree there is some reciprocal loyalty to your neighbors, your coworkers, or members of any group to which you belong. That is how interpersonal bonds are forged. But the liberal, who leapfrogs his loyalty to underclass blacks or Mexican immigrants, gets no loyalty in return. Rather, they see in him someone who has made himself open to manipulation and exploitation. The liberal's only reward from this arrangement is the pleasure he experiences from the resentment of his fellow citizens, who feel his loyalty would be more properly devoted to them. So his loyalty, the leapfrogging type, doesn't create the normal bonds that exist between people, or in communities and nations, but fractures them.

    Obama frequently displays his leapfrogging loyalties, as when he refused to stop travel from Ebola afflicted nations. As it happened his policy caused few deaths, though that was by no means a given at the outset. However, the message to Americans was, "Your safety and well-being is not my foremost concern." Similarly, with Syrian refugees, he expresses contempt for the natural concerns of his citizens--"This is not who we are! We're better than that!"--which means, "If some of you die as a result of my admitting this hostile group, that's a price I'm willing to pay."

    In a democratic nation, citizens are loyal to their government because the government represents their interests; i.e., makes their safety and well being its primary concern. But in most Western societies that is no longer the case. As this fact sinks in to the citizens of Western nations, they must ask themselves what loyalty they owe their governments. Is their authority even legitimate anymore?

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    I think you drew the logical conclusion out very well. One point Steve made a while back he sorta tossed off like a simple matter of taste but struck me kinda profound and made so much practical sense. He said to the effect that class warfare is what a better society once did argue about, and perhaps should argue about, because, and I’ll state it stronger than Steve did, the racialism of American politics is never not pernicious, since its always more personal for the minority, and the majority should feel uneasy about winning by punching down. And I’ll give you an example of how racialism debases the social structure.

    More than half of fast-food workers require some government aid. Last year they tried to organize a nationwide walkout of McDonald’s employees. It fell flat on its face, as I recall. It was pathetic. Had they any class-consciousness whatsoever they perhaps could have tripled their wages. I mean our proles these days have literally never heard of Marx.

    I don’t know if you have any sympathy for the proles, but it would seem the leapfrogging problem comes into sharp relief when the artificial category called class is effectively forgotten. Does that makes sense?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Pat Casey

    Democrats replaced labor politics with ethnic/sexual identity politics as they flooded the country with cheap labor/future Democrats.

    Now, it would probably have been hard to maintain enough social cohesion to have labor solidarity in the face of that influx without the Dems' divisive identity politics, but that was a belt-and-suspenders approach. Donald Trump could trump Sanders by connecting the dots on this.

    Meanwhile, in Denmark:
    https://twitter.com/KingEric1974/status/684658847672188928

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Pericles

  84. @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    That homogeneity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition is illustrated by your last example there. Somalia is the most homogeneous nation in the world.
     
    Homogeneity is very helpful, indeed, but I do not think that it is even a necessary condition let alone a sufficient one. Singapore isn't so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet. South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate of Singapore depending on which statistics you use. Mind you, that is still extremely low by global standards, but they are a more cantankerous bunch than the highly docile multi-ethnic Singaporeans.

    Replies: @Anon, @anonymous, @Bill B., @NickG

    Multicultural Singapore, with it’s admirable social and economic indicators, is majority Han Chinese in demographic, with significant Muslim Malay and Indian populations. It is also an authoritarian state with a mass media deferential to the government. It has been under the control of the PAP – People’s Action Party – formed by Lee Kuan Yew – since the first post British rule election in 1959.

    Multiculturalism or Liberal democracy – pick one!

  85. The stupidity of the vast number of northwestern Europeans is coming home to roost.

  86. Ted Cruz completely crushed Donald Trump in Utah by a yuge landslide. The Donald is too rated R and non traditional for the Mormons. The irony is that Mormons are also seen as non traditional by other branches of Christianity. A lot of Evangelicals and Catholics do not even see Mormons as real Christians.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    @Jefferson

    A point Michael Dougherty made on Twitter was that Trump does poorly in states with high social cohesion. He does better in more diverse states. Sort of like Hillary, I guess.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @TangoMan

    , @utu
    @Jefferson

    Mormons by definition (world wide proselytization) are globalists. They delude themselves they might outcompete Jews in being agents of globalization or perhaps they already work together. Mormons were always a great asset for CIA. They are not anti DC establishment.

    , @5371
    @Jefferson

    Mormons are not Christians, any more than Taiping followers were. Like them they use the same words as Christians, but they mean something different by them.

  87. @Pat Casey
    @Harry Baldwin

    I think you drew the logical conclusion out very well. One point Steve made a while back he sorta tossed off like a simple matter of taste but struck me kinda profound and made so much practical sense. He said to the effect that class warfare is what a better society once did argue about, and perhaps should argue about, because, and I'll state it stronger than Steve did, the racialism of American politics is never not pernicious, since its always more personal for the minority, and the majority should feel uneasy about winning by punching down. And I'll give you an example of how racialism debases the social structure.

    More than half of fast-food workers require some government aid. Last year they tried to organize a nationwide walkout of McDonald's employees. It fell flat on its face, as I recall. It was pathetic. Had they any class-consciousness whatsoever they perhaps could have tripled their wages. I mean our proles these days have literally never heard of Marx.

    I don't know if you have any sympathy for the proles, but it would seem the leapfrogging problem comes into sharp relief when the artificial category called class is effectively forgotten. Does that makes sense?

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen

    Democrats replaced labor politics with ethnic/sexual identity politics as they flooded the country with cheap labor/future Democrats.

    Now, it would probably have been hard to maintain enough social cohesion to have labor solidarity in the face of that influx without the Dems’ divisive identity politics, but that was a belt-and-suspenders approach. Donald Trump could trump Sanders by connecting the dots on this.

    Meanwhile, in Denmark:

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Dave Pinsen

    Great! What's her net?

    , @Pericles
    @Dave Pinsen

    Converted into Swedish crowns, that 21 year old Danish McDonalds worker would then make close to the average pre-tax salary of a Swedish worker, any category and any age (28500 kr versus 30500 kr). That's without looking at overtime and whatnot. It's good to be a Dane, it seems. Maybe I should seek asylum.

  88. @Jefferson
    Ted Cruz completely crushed Donald Trump in Utah by a yuge landslide. The Donald is too rated R and non traditional for the Mormons. The irony is that Mormons are also seen as non traditional by other branches of Christianity. A lot of Evangelicals and Catholics do not even see Mormons as real Christians.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @utu, @5371

    A point Michael Dougherty made on Twitter was that Trump does poorly in states with high social cohesion. He does better in more diverse states. Sort of like Hillary, I guess.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Dave Pinsen

    "A point Michael Dougherty made on Twitter was that Trump does poorly in states with high social cohesion. He does better in more diverse states. Sort of like Hillary, I guess."

    Donald Trump does well with Right Wing people who are not Conservative in the traditional sense, because they use a lot of profanity. That is why The Donald is popular with people like Anthony Cumia, Legion Of Skanks, Gavin McInnes, Nick DiPaolo, Jim Norton, and Adam Carolla, but not Steve Sailer. The Donald is too vulgar for Steve, who has a very PG vocabulary.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Harry Baldwin

    , @TangoMan
    @Dave Pinsen

    I was looking at county level data for the Trump and anti-Trump voters. The higher the percentage of the county which is black, foreign born, Hispanic the higher the Trump vote and the opposite for the anti-Trump voters. Those were all independent measures. The only measure with higher correlation was poverty in the county. So poverty, followed by black, followed by Hispanic, followed by foreign born, followed by tw0 or more races, etc.

    Living in close proximity to diversity sure seems to predict support for Trump.

    Replies: @Jefferson

  89. @Dave Pinsen
    @Jefferson

    A point Michael Dougherty made on Twitter was that Trump does poorly in states with high social cohesion. He does better in more diverse states. Sort of like Hillary, I guess.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @TangoMan

    “A point Michael Dougherty made on Twitter was that Trump does poorly in states with high social cohesion. He does better in more diverse states. Sort of like Hillary, I guess.”

    Donald Trump does well with Right Wing people who are not Conservative in the traditional sense, because they use a lot of profanity. That is why The Donald is popular with people like Anthony Cumia, Legion Of Skanks, Gavin McInnes, Nick DiPaolo, Jim Norton, and Adam Carolla, but not Steve Sailer. The Donald is too vulgar for Steve, who has a very PG vocabulary.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Jefferson

    Gosh darn it, you're right!

    Replies: @Jefferson

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Jefferson

    You forgot the King of All Media, Howard Stern.

  90. @Jefferson
    @Dave Pinsen

    "A point Michael Dougherty made on Twitter was that Trump does poorly in states with high social cohesion. He does better in more diverse states. Sort of like Hillary, I guess."

    Donald Trump does well with Right Wing people who are not Conservative in the traditional sense, because they use a lot of profanity. That is why The Donald is popular with people like Anthony Cumia, Legion Of Skanks, Gavin McInnes, Nick DiPaolo, Jim Norton, and Adam Carolla, but not Steve Sailer. The Donald is too vulgar for Steve, who has a very PG vocabulary.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Harry Baldwin

    Gosh darn it, you’re right!

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Steve Sailer

    "Gosh darn it, you’re right!"

    If you ever watch a Gavin McInnes or Anthony Cumia podcast, let's just say its not for the whole family. Sometimes they even have female porn stars on showing their breasts. They also use the N word more freely, get into specific details about sexual acts, and drug use. They are definitely not your parents Conservatives. They are more anti-PC than they are Conservative in the traditional sense. They are like South Park.

  91. @Thomas
    OT: Trump appears to have cleaned up in Arizona but is trailing behind even Kasich so far in Utah. These two Southwestern states have radically different demographics that might be informative. Utah is almost America in the 1950s: more than 60% of households are married families, median age 27, high fertility but low Hispanic population (about 9%). Arizona has a median age around 35 (only a few years younger than the national average), less than half of households are married families, and the Hispanic population is over 30%.

    Quick takeaway: Trump does poorly among traditional Affordable-Family Formation Republicans, but well among more hardscrabble ones.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @MarkinLA

    Alternatively, Trump does well with those who feel that society needs what he’s offering and does poorly with those who quite like the society that they inhabit and don’t see the need for Trumpian policies.

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @TangoMan

    You say tomato...

  92. @Dave Pinsen
    @Jefferson

    A point Michael Dougherty made on Twitter was that Trump does poorly in states with high social cohesion. He does better in more diverse states. Sort of like Hillary, I guess.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @TangoMan

    I was looking at county level data for the Trump and anti-Trump voters. The higher the percentage of the county which is black, foreign born, Hispanic the higher the Trump vote and the opposite for the anti-Trump voters. Those were all independent measures. The only measure with higher correlation was poverty in the county. So poverty, followed by black, followed by Hispanic, followed by foreign born, followed by tw0 or more races, etc.

    Living in close proximity to diversity sure seems to predict support for Trump.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @TangoMan

    "Living in close proximity to diversity sure seems to predict support for Trump."

    Do you think Ted Cruz would have have sweeped the South if there weren't so many Sub Saharans there?

    Replies: @TangoMan

  93. @TangoMan
    @Thomas

    Alternatively, Trump does well with those who feel that society needs what he's offering and does poorly with those who quite like the society that they inhabit and don't see the need for Trumpian policies.

    Replies: @Thomas

    You say tomato…

  94. @Steve Sailer
    @Jefferson

    Gosh darn it, you're right!

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “Gosh darn it, you’re right!”

    If you ever watch a Gavin McInnes or Anthony Cumia podcast, let’s just say its not for the whole family. Sometimes they even have female porn stars on showing their breasts. They also use the N word more freely, get into specific details about sexual acts, and drug use. They are definitely not your parents Conservatives. They are more anti-PC than they are Conservative in the traditional sense. They are like South Park.

  95. defeating of jihadists is really difficult when you fight anybody who actually tries defeating them (Russia, Assad, China) as much as possible and when your allies (Saudi Arabia, Turkey) back up those jihadists and when your own country actually give weapons to so called moderate rebels which turn out to be jihadists, too, and when you support the finale aim of jihadists (conquering the whole western world via demographic imperialism)

    • Replies: @utu
    @Erik Sieven

    They do not want to defeat jihadist. Sometimes they even create them. They are happy after each attack. Sometimes they arrange the attacks.

  96. @TangoMan
    @Dave Pinsen

    I was looking at county level data for the Trump and anti-Trump voters. The higher the percentage of the county which is black, foreign born, Hispanic the higher the Trump vote and the opposite for the anti-Trump voters. Those were all independent measures. The only measure with higher correlation was poverty in the county. So poverty, followed by black, followed by Hispanic, followed by foreign born, followed by tw0 or more races, etc.

    Living in close proximity to diversity sure seems to predict support for Trump.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “Living in close proximity to diversity sure seems to predict support for Trump.”

    Do you think Ted Cruz would have have sweeped the South if there weren’t so many Sub Saharans there?

    • Replies: @TangoMan
    @Jefferson

    I have no opinion on how Cruz would have done because a lot of his platform is a reaction to Trump's presence in the race. It's probably a good bet that his strategy, which he's been planning for quite a long time, would have paid off. Analyzing that path is like engaging in alternate history debates, there's been too much water under the bridge with Trump's presence since last summer.

  97. @Chrisnonymous
    One possible effect of NATO and the non-necessity of Europeans defending their own borders without Uncle Sam standing behind them is the mistaken impression on the part of Europeans that armies are for intervention, not defense.

    I've never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions. I assume the media in Europe are basically the same.

    I suspect people who don't think of their military as a defense force don't think of their nation as requiring defense.

    So, maybe one of the best things that could be done to win hearts and minds in Europe on the immigration question would be to completely 100% pull out of Europe and NATO and let them fend for themselves against Russia, ISIS, etc.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Diversity Heretic, @Lurker, @random observer

    I’ve had similar thoughts. If Europe hasn’t figured out how to deal with Russia in 300 years (I’ll use Peter the Great as the starting point) without North American support, they never will. On the intervention versus defense issue, I think it’s telling that there are separate Departments of Homeland Security and Defense. The first is genuinely the Department of Internal Surveillance and the second is the Department of Empire Maintenance.

    • Replies: @random observer
    @Diversity Heretic

    They managed Russia well enough back in the day by either keeping it on one side or the other of the alliance system (prior to 1854 and from 1865 or so to 1914) as just another of the players at the table, or all ganging up against it or to exclude it (Crimean War and aftermath). Worked well enough until 1914, and even then Russia was not operating as a threat to Europe as a whole and its power was only one part of the war that destroyed Europe.

    The situation in which Russia represents an existential threat to Europe [actual or at least potential] is post 1922, and for the first part of that it was actually still playing the role of a balancer, switching sides at need. It was really only a threat during the Cold War, and not really since.

    To the extent it is becoming one again, this is largely due to US foreign policy.

  98. @Jefferson
    @TangoMan

    "Living in close proximity to diversity sure seems to predict support for Trump."

    Do you think Ted Cruz would have have sweeped the South if there weren't so many Sub Saharans there?

    Replies: @TangoMan

    I have no opinion on how Cruz would have done because a lot of his platform is a reaction to Trump’s presence in the race. It’s probably a good bet that his strategy, which he’s been planning for quite a long time, would have paid off. Analyzing that path is like engaging in alternate history debates, there’s been too much water under the bridge with Trump’s presence since last summer.

  99. @24AheadDotCom
    @Tiny Duck

    Us or Turkey withdrawing from NATO is what Putin wants (too). I wasn't aware Trump thinks we should drop NATO, but if so that's nuts and would let Putin or future Putins extend their influence over E. Europe.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters, but for an opposing reason: they think he's anti-mass immigration (despite him wanting the same immigration-via-college policy as Mitt Romney and despite him having a mass legalization plan for illegal aliens). They think he's strong on preventing terrorism, yet his suggestions in that area are completely unrealistic and only serve to help Obama continue his agenda.

    After San Bernardino, Trump called for a Muslims ban, a completely unrealistic idea that not even the only two Reps who've endorsed him support. It hasn't happened and it will never happen. That means Obama has been free to continue his agenda.

    After Brussels, Trump called to seal the borders. That too will never happen.

    In both cases, Trump could have called for realistic things that would have solved the problem and he could have used his celebrity to make them happen. Instead, he just called for lunkhead things that make his follower happy but that will never happen.

    P.S. There appear to be some Mobys around here who want Trump to continue being ineffective. They don't want him to propose things that would reduce illegal immigration, they want him to keep proposing things that will never happen and that will only help Obama continue his agenda. I suggest working through the bottom line of comments to be found at this site: would what a commenter suggests help or hurt the USA?

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @Dave Pinsen, @MarkinLA

    It hasn’t happened and it will never happen. That means Obama has been free to continue his agenda.

    After Brussels, Trump called to seal the borders. That too will never happen.

    “Never say never” is an old rugby league expression.

    • Replies: @27 year old
    @Pat Hannagan

    Somehow I doubt 24aheaddotcom has ever played a team sport, let alone a contact sport

  100. @George
    While I understand your point NATO does not defend European borders Frontex does. If I understand it right Frontex's budget is equal to one of the U-boats Germany sold Greece before the Greek financial crisis. So Germany ruined the Greek economy by selling Greece the single most useless ship when it comes to policing the refugee crisis. The refugees then invaded Germany.

    NATOs emphasis on the more substantial Soviet fleet makes them organizationally unable to deal with the smaller vessels your people smugglers and terrorists use.

    A challenge for the NATO ships is detecting smaller-sized vessels being used by some smugglers, who have been packing dozens of people onto small inflatable rafts that are “pretty hard to see,” Gen. Philip Breedlove, NATO supreme allied commander, said in an interview.

    http://www.stripes.com/news/nato-s-aegean-mission-grows-moves-south-1.399726

    Replies: @gruff, @Hippopotamusdrome

    They have an easy enough time seeing them when they board them and take their passengers to Europe.

  101. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Rating -3
    Hashtags: #ObviousTroll

  102. @Anonymous
    Is Twinkie advocating a situation where Belgium in 30% Muslim is OK, as long as everybody, Muslims and non-Muslims alike are ruled through a government that governs with an iron fist in order to keep everyone in line, is that what he is saying? Because he is saying that it is OK for Singapore to be 30% Muslim, or 20%, because the government there keeps everyone there in check with the world's highest death penalty rate relative to its population. Just remember to shout out in a public square about how Malays are lazy/stupid, or commit a lot of crime, and see what happens to you, really just try it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedition_Act_(Singapore)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maintenance_of_Religious_Harmony_Act

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “Is Twinkie advocating a situation where Belgium in 30% Muslim is OK, as long as everybody, Muslims and non-Muslims alike are ruled through a government that governs with an iron fist in order to keep everyone in line, is that what he is saying? Because he is saying that it is OK for Singapore to be 30% Muslim, or 20%, because the government there keeps everyone there in check with the world’s highest death penalty rate relative to its population. Just remember to shout out in a public square about how Malays are lazy/stupid, or commit a lot of crime, and see what happens to you, really just try it.”

    Malay Muslims are not as violent as Arab, Nigerian, Chechen, Somali, and Pakistani Muslims. Malay Muslims are docile.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Jefferson

    For now. Let a few more go to Mecca and dye their beards orange and we'll see what tune they're singing. The Malays have their own terrorist problems. Actually met a security expert from the area who spoke English with an American accent (but he was Malay) who recounted the extent to which the establishment is afraid of radicalization.

  103. @Anonymous
    And if smuggling drugs will only get you a prison term instead of death by hanging, with a 99.9% certainty of ending up inside a wooden box? And unlike Western countries you do not have freedom of speech in Singapore, and can get bankrupted if government officials sue you for libel, which they will surely win. The only reason why people there do not commit crimes is because of the fear of what will happen to them when they are caught. Otherwise the crime rate there will be as high as in Hong Kong or Taiwan.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “The only reason why people there do not commit crimes is because of the fear of what will happen to them when they are caught. Otherwise the crime rate there will be as high as in Hong Kong or Taiwan.”

    Taiwan and Hong Kong have murder rates similar to that of 1st World European countries.

  104. @24AheadDotCom
    @Tiny Duck

    Us or Turkey withdrawing from NATO is what Putin wants (too). I wasn't aware Trump thinks we should drop NATO, but if so that's nuts and would let Putin or future Putins extend their influence over E. Europe.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters, but for an opposing reason: they think he's anti-mass immigration (despite him wanting the same immigration-via-college policy as Mitt Romney and despite him having a mass legalization plan for illegal aliens). They think he's strong on preventing terrorism, yet his suggestions in that area are completely unrealistic and only serve to help Obama continue his agenda.

    After San Bernardino, Trump called for a Muslims ban, a completely unrealistic idea that not even the only two Reps who've endorsed him support. It hasn't happened and it will never happen. That means Obama has been free to continue his agenda.

    After Brussels, Trump called to seal the borders. That too will never happen.

    In both cases, Trump could have called for realistic things that would have solved the problem and he could have used his celebrity to make them happen. Instead, he just called for lunkhead things that make his follower happy but that will never happen.

    P.S. There appear to be some Mobys around here who want Trump to continue being ineffective. They don't want him to propose things that would reduce illegal immigration, they want him to keep proposing things that will never happen and that will only help Obama continue his agenda. I suggest working through the bottom line of comments to be found at this site: would what a commenter suggests help or hurt the USA?

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @Dave Pinsen, @MarkinLA

    How about a compromise? The US stays in NATO, but Turkey gets kicked out. And NATO agrees never to expand to include countries in Russia’s sphere of influence like Ukraine or Georgia. And NATO isn’t used to destabilize any more MENA countries.

    • Replies: @dc.sunsets
    @Dave Pinsen


    And NATO agrees never to expand to include countries in Russia’s sphere of influence like Ukraine or Georgia.
     
    Been there, done that, have the T-shirt to prove it.

    That "word" was already broken. Why bother with such meaningless platitudes?
    , @Romanian
    @Dave Pinsen

    Ross Douthat phrased it as "promiscuous partnerships" - talk is cheap, and the beneficiary countries are lulled into thinking that their security needs are being met when all they receive are assurances, not deterrence, since there is not a total overlap between the two. Assurances being what you give Tbilisi, and deterrence something you give to Moscow, but what Tbilisi actually wants and takes assurances as being an indication of. Having these psychological needs met can be a good thing, attenuating knee jerk reactions and diminishing paranoia, so long as they don't entice the beneficiary into behaving aggressively, thereby provoking a response which exposes the Western bluff. This was the case of Georgia. To my mind, it was right for it to assert its sovereignty in Ossetia and Abkhazia, though I am not familiar with whether they crossed a line, but the fact that it did so was impolitic, as it gave Russia an opening to administer a beatdown as a lesson to others and as a sign of its resurgence.

  105. @Chrisnonymous
    One possible effect of NATO and the non-necessity of Europeans defending their own borders without Uncle Sam standing behind them is the mistaken impression on the part of Europeans that armies are for intervention, not defense.

    I've never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions. I assume the media in Europe are basically the same.

    I suspect people who don't think of their military as a defense force don't think of their nation as requiring defense.

    So, maybe one of the best things that could be done to win hearts and minds in Europe on the immigration question would be to completely 100% pull out of Europe and NATO and let them fend for themselves against Russia, ISIS, etc.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Diversity Heretic, @Lurker, @random observer

    We can see what a bang up job the US military is doing along the border with Mexico. That being different – somehow.

  106. @gruff
    @George


    If I understand it right Frontex’s budget is equal to one of the U-boats Germany sold Greece before the Greek financial crisis. So Germany ruined the Greek economy by selling Greece the single most useless ship when it comes to policing the refugee crisis.
     
    I dunno, they could use the U-boat to sink the fugee boats.

    Replies: @Lurker

    All ships appear to be useless as they are not being used. Btw how are the USN carrier battle groups faring against illegal immigration into the US?

    • Replies: @gruff
    @Lurker

    I heard they're planning to drag a CGN up the Rio Grande.

  107. The more I reflect on the WaPo editorial, the more disconnected from reality it becomes. In 1940, the United States didn’t have European allies–it was neutral in the war that started in September 1939. The U.S. stayed neutral (although obviously favoring Great Britain) until Germany, rather stupidly, declared war on the U.S. For a major newspaper to have this level of historical ignorance does not bode well for the future of the Republic.

  108. @Tiny Duck
    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure. Isis would love for us to leave NATO and would consider that a victory.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters. They live in a constant of fear and end up doing things ( racism, anti-immigration) that are harmful to society as a whole. Such cowardice must be terrible to live with.

    Replies: @Dwright, @The most deplorable one, @AndrewR, @Obamadon_Imbecilis, @iSteveFan, @MG, @neutral, @Pat Hannagan, @24AheadDotCom, @Cracker, @Twinkie, @Anon7, @Hippopotamusdrome, @Diversity Heretic

    Be gone, troll!

  109. @Pat Hannagan
    @24AheadDotCom

    It hasn’t happened and it will never happen. That means Obama has been free to continue his agenda.

    After Brussels, Trump called to seal the borders. That too will never happen.

    "Never say never" is an old rugby league expression.

    Replies: @27 year old

    Somehow I doubt 24aheaddotcom has ever played a team sport, let alone a contact sport

  110. @TangoMan
    OT- Emory University special snowflakes in meltdown about pro-Trump chalkings on sidewalk:

    “You are not listening! Come speak to us, we are in pain!” throughout the Quad. Peraza opened the door to the Administration Building and students moved forward towards the door, shouting “It is our duty to fight for our freedom. It is our duty to win. We must love each other and support each other. We have nothing to lose but our chains.”

    “I’m supposed to feel comfortable and safe [here],” one student said. “But this man is being supported by students on our campus and our administration shows that they, by their silence, support it as well … I don’t deserve to feel afraid at my school,” she added.

    “What do we have to do for you to listen to us?” students asked Wagner directly, to which he asked, “What actions should I take?” One student asked if Emory would send out a University-wide email to “decry the support for this fascist, racist candidate” to which Wagner replied, “No, we will not.” One student clarified that “the University doesn’t have to say they don’t support Trump, but just to acknowledge that there are students on this campus who feel this way about what’s happening … to acknowledge all of us here.”
     

    Replies: @Diversity Heretic

    I read as much of the original of the Emory article as I could stand. At first I thought that the pro-Trump students should have applied for the appropriate permit to “chalk.” But given the hysterical reaction described in the article, the application would have been denied and the students seeking it would have been ostracized and probably required to go to some kind of remedial diversity inclusion counseling. The lunatics on campuses are now truly in control of the asylums!

  111. “More than at any time since 1940, America’s commitment to its European allies is at issue in a presidential campaign.” What makes the stupid fellow think that in 1940 the US had any European allies?

    Though I suppose Joseph Kennedy had.

  112. So Euro hipsters and their new Arab brethren can sit in cafes, smoke dope all day long and their politicians can spend their way to oblivion giving away free stuff.

    June 23, 2015

    Defense Secretary Ash Carter makes announcement in Estonia

    250 tanks, Bradley armored fighting vehicles and self-propelled howitzers will be sent to the Baltics and Eastern Europe

    Armor going to Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, Bulgaria, Romania and Poland

    http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/23/politics/us-armor-tanks-europe-russia-ash-carter/

    The White House plans to increase the deployment of heavy weapons, vehicles, and other military equipment to its NATO allies in Central and Eastern Europe in 2017, The New York Times reported on Feb. 2.

    http://rbth.com/international/2016/02/05/russia-us-plan-to-deploy-more-nato-arms-in-europe-will-stoke-tensions_565259

  113. @The most deplorable one
    @iSteveFan

    Indeed. They should also know by now that a great many of us do not believe the media or most politicians.

    If they truly want Trump to lose in November they should be supporting him and telling us to vote for him.

    Replies: @utu

    “If they truly want Trump to lose in November they should be supporting him and telling us to vote for him.” – They know it. Trump is their Trojan horse?

  114. @Erik Sieven
    defeating of jihadists is really difficult when you fight anybody who actually tries defeating them (Russia, Assad, China) as much as possible and when your allies (Saudi Arabia, Turkey) back up those jihadists and when your own country actually give weapons to so called moderate rebels which turn out to be jihadists, too, and when you support the finale aim of jihadists (conquering the whole western world via demographic imperialism)

    Replies: @utu

    They do not want to defeat jihadist. Sometimes they even create them. They are happy after each attack. Sometimes they arrange the attacks.

  115. @Twinkie
    @Twinkie


    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.
     
    And just as soon as I thought that, I am right back to finding Trump repulsive: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @JSM, @res, @Brutusale, @Lagertha, @Johann Ricke

    Because it was so classy of Cruz (or his supporters) to use Melania’s 15 year old picture against Trump.

    And do you really have a problem with Trump getting angry when his wife is attacked?

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @reiner Tor

    "Because it was so classy of Cruz (or his supporters) to use Melania’s 15 year old picture against Trump."

    Not Classy, San Diego. However, Trump gets to defend his woman publicly, which scores points, and people get to see how smokin hot his wife is, which scores more optics points.

  116. @Twinkie
    @Twinkie


    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.
     
    And just as soon as I thought that, I am right back to finding Trump repulsive: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @JSM, @res, @Brutusale, @Lagertha, @Johann Ricke

    Yeah, I clicked on your link. So Ted (or a front group for him) doing an absolutely unnecessary, and, frankly, vulgar, thing of tweeting a nearly nude pic of Melania (taken 15 years ago when she was a silly girl) is NOT repulsive. Okaaaaayyy.

    But, Trump threatening to spill the beans on Ted Cruz’s wife *is.*

    Uh. Huh. You do know what the “beans” are, right? That she is an executive of Goldman Sachs and that GS gave undisclosed loans to Ted Cruz’ campaign (no bribes there, right?) and has had active involvement in the, frankly, treasonous effort to abolish the border between Mexico and Canada under the project of North American Union. Telling THAT truth is “repulsive.”

    You are nuts.

    Twinkie, every time I turn around, you just reconfirm my bias. Asians are *not* good immigrants. Even the ones who are ostensibly well-assimilated Catholics with tall sons.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @JSM

    You make some good points, but consigning Twinkie to the bad immigrant pile is a capital mistake. When the bottom falls out Twinkie will be reaching down to grab your hand. I don't think you would grab Twinkie's hand under an antipodal reversal of circumstances. That is a plus for Twinkie and a minus for you.

    All you Alt-Right purists make the path to a practical and rational political outcome much more difficult than it needs to be. Look to your interests and do not trust your reactive emotions.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Twinkie

  117. https://willyloman.wordpress.com/2016/03/23/the-brussels-attacks-of-patsies-and-fascist-european-patriot-acts/

    Everywhere you look, someone is trying to use these events for their own purposes.

    -John McCain is saying it ties back to Syria and therefore we have to get 10,000 Saudi Salafist terrorists to follow a couple dozen US Special Ops troops into Syria for a ground invasion. Of course, he thinks we should bomb the shit out of Syria before they get there.
    -Donald Trump says we need to pass new laws allowing for all sorts of torture because… Muslims.
    -There are all kinds of reports stating the brothers “probably” used encryption to communicate with “ISIS™” so Apple better turn over their code to the feds.
    -Ted Cruz thinks we should start kicking in doors in Muslim neighborhoods right here in the states just for the fun of it I guess.

    Everyone has an agenda when something like this happens. They are all political and they are all changes expected to take place in the wake of a terrorist event. Kinda like the definition of terrorism, ain’t it?

    But the big one, the one that seems to be dominating the airwaves right now is what appears to be a European version of the USA Patriot Act.

  118. @iSteveFan
    @Tiny Duck


    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure.
     
    Where has Trump said withdrawing from NATO will keep us secure? Trump has suggested we are not getting the bang for the buck. We are providing the lion's share of manpower and funding of a defense pact in which most of the members are collectively confederated into the European Union which is more populous and has a larger GDP than the USA. Evaluating whether this is the most effective way to spend our defense dollars, or whether the Europeans should contribute more is a different argument that what you wrote.

    Now Patrick Buchanan might make the argument that withdrawing from NATO would make us safer. That of course would be based upon his concerns that any one NATO member, such as Turkey, could get us into a shooting war with a nuclear armed Russia over an incident that is not in our national interests. For example, last October's downing of a Russian jet might have been the tripwire that committed Uncle Sam to an armed conflict with Russia.

    Given how close we came to such an event, and given how Turkey's and possibly other European nations' interest differ from ours, there is a potential threat to USA security remaining in NATO twenty plus years after its reason to exist went out of business.

    Replies: @onetwothree, @AndrewR, @random observer

    Would the US really have Turkey’s back if Turkey picks a fight with Russia?

    If I’m out with some friends and one of my buddies picks a fight with a stranger, he’s on his own unless it becomes a life or death scenario.

    I would like to think that Turkey’s NATO allied would let Russia retaliate in a limited capacity and warn Turkey that it’s on its own if it escalates.

    I’m not an expert in international law but I don’t see how it would be in a country’s interest to sign a treaty that would force it to go to bat for an aggressive or reckless ally.

    • Replies: @Discordiax
    @AndrewR

    "Would the US really have Turkey’s back if Turkey picks a fight with Russia?"

    If you've ever been around children, you know how easy it is to determine clearly who's picking a fight with whom.

    NATO Article V obligates us to come to Turkey's defense if they are attacked. Who started it? Well, the Turks say the Russians are attacking them. The Russians say they are responding to Turkish attacks. And both sides lie like rugs.

    This was a fairly common Cold War problem, where we had to manage difficult, headstrong client states. It's a major reason that Washington makes a fetish of credibility, of carrying out promises even if they no longer make sense, so that you can say "If X happens, we will defend Turkey up to and including nuclear escalation. But if Turkey does Y, you're on your own. And if you don't do Z, we will tell that to the Russians."

    That has ossified into an unthinking reflex, where when Trump questions NATO, he's attacked because it's unthinkable to revisit an alliance created in 1948 to keep the Red ARmy from driving to the Rhine and to the Atlantic and crushing continental Europe under Stalin's heel.

    "I’m not an expert in international law but I don’t see how it would be in a country’s interest to sign a treaty that would force it to go to bat for an aggressive or reckless ally."

    Well, it's not. But the foreign policy community was pretty well convinced in the 1990s when the Cold War ended that Russia would never challenge us again, and that democracy was irreversible. NATO and EU membership were used as incentives to get eastern European countries to behave themselves in various ways.

    It was not thinkable that a NATO democracy like Turkey would transform itself into an ISlamicist, adventurist semi-authoritarian power.

    , @random observer
    @AndrewR

    You're right- Article 5 obliges the US and other members to act only if a member is attacked, and it gives them plenty of wiggle room to decide whether or not that has been the case- it does not impose any definitions of what that means, nor does it actually require any specific military response in any circumstances.

    Of course, failure to agree a member has been attacked and to aid it, in the event of such agreement, would mean that member quits for sure, not necessarily a bad thing, and might mean [if the lack of agreement was heavily contested] the end of the alliance. Which might be OK too, although that's a huge waste of useful interoperability and comms/operational protocols and equipment.

    On the wider issue, yeah, most countries aren't that stupid. I am aware of no treaty that actually obliged anyone to aid an ally if the ally was the attacker, and if there ever were any I'll bet the circumstances were highly detailed and limited.

  119. @Jefferson
    @Dave Pinsen

    "A point Michael Dougherty made on Twitter was that Trump does poorly in states with high social cohesion. He does better in more diverse states. Sort of like Hillary, I guess."

    Donald Trump does well with Right Wing people who are not Conservative in the traditional sense, because they use a lot of profanity. That is why The Donald is popular with people like Anthony Cumia, Legion Of Skanks, Gavin McInnes, Nick DiPaolo, Jim Norton, and Adam Carolla, but not Steve Sailer. The Donald is too vulgar for Steve, who has a very PG vocabulary.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Harry Baldwin

    You forgot the King of All Media, Howard Stern.

  120. @I.W.
    Of interest ...
    http://www.globalresearch.ca/fake-video-used-in-news-coverage-of-brussels-terror-attacks/5515894

    Replies: @dc.sunsets

    Why is it that everything now seems to be PR or Marketing, honed to eventually provide a nozzle via which any collective rage or fear can be redirected at will to hose whatever target is convenient or profitable for those pulling the strings?

    We saw this expertly played in the aftermath of 9/11, when public rage was channeled into support for a war long planned, against a nation-state whose rulers and people had nothing to do with the events on that day, while the official story ignored the fingerprints of [a] nation[s] since clearly more involved.

    Mass media + mass psychology = herd behavior on a scale not seen before, say, 100 years ago. Video (esp. TV) makes direction and amplification of the mass mind’s emotions all too easy.

  121. @Chrisnonymous

    borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.
     
    Why do people get away with this line without having to defend it? This is nonsense on its face. If it's true, it requires a thorough explanation.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @AndrewR, @dc.sunsets, @Richard A., @random observer

    People only read (and listen to) what they want to hear. What they want to hear is dictated by their emotions (where sit their biases & beliefs), not reason, and the impulsive/emotional cognitive pathway does not learn…it is entirely impervious to lessons of experience.

    How else does one explain the alcohol addict’s continued indulgence in drink that is pulverizing his or her life? The decision-tree involved cannot, does not and never will learn.

    WaPo’s readers, editors and employees all embrace the same biases and beliefs. Their rationalizations for what their impulsive minds dictate are not subject to falsification via experience or argument. They are addicted to a false sense of moral superiority and are no more likely to break their addiction than is an alcoholic.

    So are you still surprised nonsense gets such a podium?

  122. @Twinkie
    @Twinkie


    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.
     
    And just as soon as I thought that, I am right back to finding Trump repulsive: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @JSM, @res, @Brutusale, @Lagertha, @Johann Ricke

    You’re a thoughtful person so I’d be interested in more detail about how you think/feel about Trump’s use of threats like that. I see initiating intimidation with a threat like that repulsive, but I am tending to find it acceptable to use that as a response to another’s aggression (but also note the allegations of Trump spreading rumors earlier). In this case , Trump was responding to a PAC (supposedly not Cruz related) using a provocative picture of Melania in a campaign ad. How do you feel about that campaign ad? I think there is an interesting discussion to be had about what constitutes a legitimate response/counter and what is unacceptable (escalation?).

    Another example of this was Trump’s response (threat invoking Bill’s history) to Hillary’s sexism comment a few months ago. http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/26/politics/donald-trump-bill-clinton-sexism/

    Overall, as much as I dislike some aspects of Trump’s manner, I don’t see how anyone else would be able to deal with the media assault he is enduring so I am inclined to cut him a great deal of slack regarding his techniques for doing that.

    • Replies: @Andrew
    @res

    "In this case , Trump was responding to a PAC (supposedly not Cruz related) using a provocative picture of Melania in a campaign ad. How do you feel about that campaign ad? I think there is an interesting discussion to be had about what constitutes a legitimate response/counter and what is unacceptable (escalation?)."

    Well, this was another masterful Trump is King Alpha win and an own-goal by Cruz.

    Trump gets to simultaneously burnish his street cred by having pictures of his incredibly hot wife splashed all through the media in a not so subtle reminder of the eye-candy to come if you elect him, while also getting to act as the outraged and ever-protective husband of his beloved in her Lady Godiva moment.

    Cruz, meanwhile, looks like a slimeball who drags actions by another man's wife (from years before they were married!) into the race to try to bring him down and then can't even take responsibility for the actions of his supporters even as he supports them in slut shaming. Who exactly is that stance supposed to appeal to?

    , @Twinkie
    @res


    You’re a thoughtful person so I’d be interested in more detail about how you think/feel about Trump’s use of threats like that... In this case , Trump was responding to a PAC (supposedly not Cruz related) using a provocative picture of Melania in a campaign ad. How do you feel about that campaign ad?
     
    You obviously see the important details here that simpletons seem to be missing. Let's look at the sequence of events, shall we?

    1. At some point in the past, Mrs. Trump decided to get naked, be photographed, and be published, which does not speak well to her character as a lady.

    2. An independent PAC group that supports Cruz but is NOT controlled by Cruz decided to use it to appeal to the traditionally-minded Mormons.

    3. Trump then threatens to "spill the beans" on Cruz's wife, presumably about her now rather well-known bout with depression earlier in her marriage.

    4. Then he deletes the tweet (probably because he realizes it comes off badly).

    Anyway one cuts it, this is a very bad look for Trump. Either he is a dolt and directed his fire at the wrong target and threatened another man's wife like a douchebag or he has such poor judgment and temper that he allowed himself to be baited into making a very unwise move.

    Now, here is what I think should have happened.

    1. I don't think the independent group should have used the photograph of Mrs. Trump even though she is the one who put it out there in the public domain. Unfortunately when you make yourself a public figure, you invite publicity, good or bad. Nonetheless, it is bad taste to attack a candidate's family in anyway.

    2. Even though he does not control this PAC group, the Cruz campaign should have disavowed it and told the group to knock it off (he may or may not have, I do not know).

    3. Trump had a great chance here to be the bigger man. "Yes, well, I married a very beautiful woman, and I think it is very tasteless for this group that supports Senator Cruz to stoop to this. Will Senator Cruz disavow this type of attacks on candidate's families?" But, no, he just doesn't have the impulse-control and instead chose the worst possible option of threatening to unearth some dirt on a competitor's wife.

    Replies: @res

  123. @Anonymous
    Trump is a chickenhawk.

    Replies: @dc.sunsets

    Perhaps. No one knows until the morning after.

    OTOH, he’s the only candidate who seems to grasp that you can have guns (military spending on foreign adventures) or butter (spending on domestic infrastructure) but not both (unless you’re willing to issue debt by the galaxy, the effect of which is to burn today’s capital while inflating the illusion of expanding wealth.)

    Trump’s rhetoric is a break from the last 50 years in this regard. Whether he follows through as POTUS or not, it is a signal that the trend of the last 50 years is finally in a zone of reversal.

    The consequences of a debt-binge/credit-bubble inflationary asset mania reaching apogee cannot be overstated.

    • Replies: @random observer
    @dc.sunsets

    You can certainly have both guns and butter if you want, you just can't have as much of either at the same time. It doesn't have to be all one or the other.

  124. @24AheadDotCom
    @Tiny Duck

    Us or Turkey withdrawing from NATO is what Putin wants (too). I wasn't aware Trump thinks we should drop NATO, but if so that's nuts and would let Putin or future Putins extend their influence over E. Europe.

    I feel sorry for Trump supporters, but for an opposing reason: they think he's anti-mass immigration (despite him wanting the same immigration-via-college policy as Mitt Romney and despite him having a mass legalization plan for illegal aliens). They think he's strong on preventing terrorism, yet his suggestions in that area are completely unrealistic and only serve to help Obama continue his agenda.

    After San Bernardino, Trump called for a Muslims ban, a completely unrealistic idea that not even the only two Reps who've endorsed him support. It hasn't happened and it will never happen. That means Obama has been free to continue his agenda.

    After Brussels, Trump called to seal the borders. That too will never happen.

    In both cases, Trump could have called for realistic things that would have solved the problem and he could have used his celebrity to make them happen. Instead, he just called for lunkhead things that make his follower happy but that will never happen.

    P.S. There appear to be some Mobys around here who want Trump to continue being ineffective. They don't want him to propose things that would reduce illegal immigration, they want him to keep proposing things that will never happen and that will only help Obama continue his agenda. I suggest working through the bottom line of comments to be found at this site: would what a commenter suggests help or hurt the USA?

    Replies: @Pat Hannagan, @Dave Pinsen, @MarkinLA

    Well Trump seems to be more effective in his 8 months than all the “realistic” people have in their many years in the public.

  125. @Anon
    @Twinkie

    "Singapore isn’t so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet."

    Singapore is small, so easier to manage and police. And it is a police state, even if a modern and mild one.
    Also, Singaporean diversity is mostly of Chinese, Asian Indian merchant class, and some Malays. But if Singapore had 10% blacks, that'd be lots of trouble.

    "South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate..."

    SK isn't so homogeneous. It is a whore-house nation where many Korean women had kids with black GI's and many Korean men have children with poor women from Asian nations. It's turning into multi-culti cesspool.

    Replies: @MarkinLA, @Mr. Jones

    But if Singapore had 10% blacks, that’d be lots of trouble.

    Well not with how easy it is to get the death penalty. You would quickly eliminate 30% of black males 18-40.

  126. @Thomas
    OT: Trump appears to have cleaned up in Arizona but is trailing behind even Kasich so far in Utah. These two Southwestern states have radically different demographics that might be informative. Utah is almost America in the 1950s: more than 60% of households are married families, median age 27, high fertility but low Hispanic population (about 9%). Arizona has a median age around 35 (only a few years younger than the national average), less than half of households are married families, and the Hispanic population is over 30%.

    Quick takeaway: Trump does poorly among traditional Affordable-Family Formation Republicans, but well among more hardscrabble ones.

    Replies: @TangoMan, @MarkinLA

    Utah is Mormon and Romney was making robocalls against Trump. Mormons don’t give a damn about American as long as they have people they think they can convert.

  127. @Twinkie
    @Twinkie


    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.
     
    And just as soon as I thought that, I am right back to finding Trump repulsive: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @JSM, @res, @Brutusale, @Lagertha, @Johann Ricke

    Really, Twinks, it’s somehow less reprehensible to post an old photo of Trump’s wife naked than to bring up the very legitimate (depending on your feelings about Goldman Sucks) corporate position that Cruz’s wife holds?

    • Replies: @Judah Benjamin Hur
    @Brutusale

    I totally agree with Trump defending his wife, but the threat was ambiguous. Cruz's wife apparently had some mental health issues so it could be about that.

  128. @Dave Pinsen
    @Pat Casey

    Democrats replaced labor politics with ethnic/sexual identity politics as they flooded the country with cheap labor/future Democrats.

    Now, it would probably have been hard to maintain enough social cohesion to have labor solidarity in the face of that influx without the Dems' divisive identity politics, but that was a belt-and-suspenders approach. Donald Trump could trump Sanders by connecting the dots on this.

    Meanwhile, in Denmark:
    https://twitter.com/KingEric1974/status/684658847672188928

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Pericles

    Great! What’s her net?

  129. @Jefferson
    Ted Cruz completely crushed Donald Trump in Utah by a yuge landslide. The Donald is too rated R and non traditional for the Mormons. The irony is that Mormons are also seen as non traditional by other branches of Christianity. A lot of Evangelicals and Catholics do not even see Mormons as real Christians.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @utu, @5371

    Mormons by definition (world wide proselytization) are globalists. They delude themselves they might outcompete Jews in being agents of globalization or perhaps they already work together. Mormons were always a great asset for CIA. They are not anti DC establishment.

  130. @Dave Pinsen
    @24AheadDotCom

    How about a compromise? The US stays in NATO, but Turkey gets kicked out. And NATO agrees never to expand to include countries in Russia's sphere of influence like Ukraine or Georgia. And NATO isn't used to destabilize any more MENA countries.

    Replies: @dc.sunsets, @Romanian

    And NATO agrees never to expand to include countries in Russia’s sphere of influence like Ukraine or Georgia.

    Been there, done that, have the T-shirt to prove it.

    That “word” was already broken. Why bother with such meaningless platitudes?

  131. I’m reminded of Chesterton’s quip that the church was discredited by the war like the ark was discredited by the flood.

  132. @iSteveFan
    For a candidate who is a joke with zero chance of winning, and hopelessly behind either democrat in a general election matchup, the MSM and other candidates sure seem to focus a lot on Trump. I don't think any major news outlet can go the day without condemning this candidate who has no chance of winning. Even Hillary and Bernie seem to be directing more of their attacks against this potential November walkover than they do against each other. People seem to show a lot of concern and expel a lot of energy over a guy who supposedly has no chance of winning.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @Jefferson, @Anon, @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    This is the response of the month. A most excellent point.

    Another thing: These same alleged polls that show Trump doing so poorly vs Clinton and Sanders also tend to show Cruz and even Kasich doing very well vs. Clinton and Sanders. How come the MSM isn’t encouraging the GOP voters to continually back Cruz, since he especially can beat Clinton? Wouldn’t that make sense, to go support the candidate who can win the November election? But since Trump dominates nearly every single political news cycle the other candidates can hardly get the time of day’s worth of exposure. Would be interesting to check Cruz and Kasich’s name recognition among independent voters as compared to Trump, if the former two candidates will have a much easier time beating Clinton then they must have pretty strong name recognition among non-GOP voters.

  133. @res
    @Twinkie

    You're a thoughtful person so I'd be interested in more detail about how you think/feel about Trump's use of threats like that. I see initiating intimidation with a threat like that repulsive, but I am tending to find it acceptable to use that as a response to another's aggression (but also note the allegations of Trump spreading rumors earlier). In this case , Trump was responding to a PAC (supposedly not Cruz related) using a provocative picture of Melania in a campaign ad. How do you feel about that campaign ad? I think there is an interesting discussion to be had about what constitutes a legitimate response/counter and what is unacceptable (escalation?).

    Another example of this was Trump's response (threat invoking Bill's history) to Hillary's sexism comment a few months ago. http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/26/politics/donald-trump-bill-clinton-sexism/

    Overall, as much as I dislike some aspects of Trump's manner, I don't see how anyone else would be able to deal with the media assault he is enduring so I am inclined to cut him a great deal of slack regarding his techniques for doing that.

    Replies: @Andrew, @Twinkie

    “In this case , Trump was responding to a PAC (supposedly not Cruz related) using a provocative picture of Melania in a campaign ad. How do you feel about that campaign ad? I think there is an interesting discussion to be had about what constitutes a legitimate response/counter and what is unacceptable (escalation?).”

    Well, this was another masterful Trump is King Alpha win and an own-goal by Cruz.

    Trump gets to simultaneously burnish his street cred by having pictures of his incredibly hot wife splashed all through the media in a not so subtle reminder of the eye-candy to come if you elect him, while also getting to act as the outraged and ever-protective husband of his beloved in her Lady Godiva moment.

    Cruz, meanwhile, looks like a slimeball who drags actions by another man’s wife (from years before they were married!) into the race to try to bring him down and then can’t even take responsibility for the actions of his supporters even as he supports them in slut shaming. Who exactly is that stance supposed to appeal to?

  134. borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.

    That sorta describes what the French did in 1940.

  135. @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous


    I’ve never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions.
     
    Because those were colonial powers for hundreds of years, and so strong nobody could touch them. Of course they would see an army and navy as projectiles rather than shields.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Discard, @guest, @random observer

    They were colonial powers, yes, but they were neighbors with a bunch of other colonial powers. So they didn’t spend all their time playing games in Timbuktu, Burkina Faso, or wherever the heck the next flag was to be planted. They worried about defending themselves against eachother inordinately, in fact, and you may have heard of a couple of skirmishes they fought amongst themselves, which we call World Wars.

  136. @Brutusale
    @Twinkie

    Really, Twinks, it's somehow less reprehensible to post an old photo of Trump's wife naked than to bring up the very legitimate (depending on your feelings about Goldman Sucks) corporate position that Cruz's wife holds?

    Replies: @Judah Benjamin Hur

    I totally agree with Trump defending his wife, but the threat was ambiguous. Cruz’s wife apparently had some mental health issues so it could be about that.

  137. @Chrisnonymous

    borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.
     
    Why do people get away with this line without having to defend it? This is nonsense on its face. If it's true, it requires a thorough explanation.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @AndrewR, @dc.sunsets, @Richard A., @random observer

    Borders seem to be providing protection for Japan. The horror in Brussels is a rebuke to the immigration policy supported by The Washington Post.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Richard A.


    Borders seem to be providing protection for Japan
     
    Since losing the bottom half of Sakhalin Island, Japan's borders have been entirely aqueous. Makes things a lot easier.
  138. @reiner Tor
    @Twinkie

    Because it was so classy of Cruz (or his supporters) to use Melania's 15 year old picture against Trump.

    And do you really have a problem with Trump getting angry when his wife is attacked?

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    “Because it was so classy of Cruz (or his supporters) to use Melania’s 15 year old picture against Trump.”

    Not Classy, San Diego. However, Trump gets to defend his woman publicly, which scores points, and people get to see how smokin hot his wife is, which scores more optics points.

  139. @Anon
    @Twinkie

    "Singapore isn’t so homogenous, but it has one of the lowest rates of crime anywhere on the planet."

    Singapore is small, so easier to manage and police. And it is a police state, even if a modern and mild one.
    Also, Singaporean diversity is mostly of Chinese, Asian Indian merchant class, and some Malays. But if Singapore had 10% blacks, that'd be lots of trouble.

    "South Korea is much more homogenous than Singapore, but it has something like 2-4 times the murder rate..."

    SK isn't so homogeneous. It is a whore-house nation where many Korean women had kids with black GI's and many Korean men have children with poor women from Asian nations. It's turning into multi-culti cesspool.

    Replies: @MarkinLA, @Mr. Jones

    Hate to nitpick, but this is dead wrong. South Korea is something like 96% Korean, and most of that remaining 4% are Chinese. I’ve spent months around Seoul and have never even seen a mulatto kid. I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve seen black GIs in the streets. The Koreas are just about as homogenous as modern countries get.

  140. Small Bridge Collapses In Peru, Trump Blamed

  141. @Jefferson
    Ted Cruz completely crushed Donald Trump in Utah by a yuge landslide. The Donald is too rated R and non traditional for the Mormons. The irony is that Mormons are also seen as non traditional by other branches of Christianity. A lot of Evangelicals and Catholics do not even see Mormons as real Christians.

    Replies: @Dave Pinsen, @utu, @5371

    Mormons are not Christians, any more than Taiping followers were. Like them they use the same words as Christians, but they mean something different by them.

  142. @Dave Pinsen
    @Pat Casey

    Democrats replaced labor politics with ethnic/sexual identity politics as they flooded the country with cheap labor/future Democrats.

    Now, it would probably have been hard to maintain enough social cohesion to have labor solidarity in the face of that influx without the Dems' divisive identity politics, but that was a belt-and-suspenders approach. Donald Trump could trump Sanders by connecting the dots on this.

    Meanwhile, in Denmark:
    https://twitter.com/KingEric1974/status/684658847672188928

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Pericles

    Converted into Swedish crowns, that 21 year old Danish McDonalds worker would then make close to the average pre-tax salary of a Swedish worker, any category and any age (28500 kr versus 30500 kr). That’s without looking at overtime and whatnot. It’s good to be a Dane, it seems. Maybe I should seek asylum.

  143. @AndrewR
    @iSteveFan

    Would the US really have Turkey's back if Turkey picks a fight with Russia?

    If I'm out with some friends and one of my buddies picks a fight with a stranger, he's on his own unless it becomes a life or death scenario.

    I would like to think that Turkey's NATO allied would let Russia retaliate in a limited capacity and warn Turkey that it's on its own if it escalates.

    I'm not an expert in international law but I don't see how it would be in a country's interest to sign a treaty that would force it to go to bat for an aggressive or reckless ally.

    Replies: @Discordiax, @random observer

    “Would the US really have Turkey’s back if Turkey picks a fight with Russia?”

    If you’ve ever been around children, you know how easy it is to determine clearly who’s picking a fight with whom.

    NATO Article V obligates us to come to Turkey’s defense if they are attacked. Who started it? Well, the Turks say the Russians are attacking them. The Russians say they are responding to Turkish attacks. And both sides lie like rugs.

    This was a fairly common Cold War problem, where we had to manage difficult, headstrong client states. It’s a major reason that Washington makes a fetish of credibility, of carrying out promises even if they no longer make sense, so that you can say “If X happens, we will defend Turkey up to and including nuclear escalation. But if Turkey does Y, you’re on your own. And if you don’t do Z, we will tell that to the Russians.”

    That has ossified into an unthinking reflex, where when Trump questions NATO, he’s attacked because it’s unthinkable to revisit an alliance created in 1948 to keep the Red ARmy from driving to the Rhine and to the Atlantic and crushing continental Europe under Stalin’s heel.

    “I’m not an expert in international law but I don’t see how it would be in a country’s interest to sign a treaty that would force it to go to bat for an aggressive or reckless ally.”

    Well, it’s not. But the foreign policy community was pretty well convinced in the 1990s when the Cold War ended that Russia would never challenge us again, and that democracy was irreversible. NATO and EU membership were used as incentives to get eastern European countries to behave themselves in various ways.

    It was not thinkable that a NATO democracy like Turkey would transform itself into an ISlamicist, adventurist semi-authoritarian power.

  144. @Chrisnonymous
    One possible effect of NATO and the non-necessity of Europeans defending their own borders without Uncle Sam standing behind them is the mistaken impression on the part of Europeans that armies are for intervention, not defense.

    I've never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions. I assume the media in Europe are basically the same.

    I suspect people who don't think of their military as a defense force don't think of their nation as requiring defense.

    So, maybe one of the best things that could be done to win hearts and minds in Europe on the immigration question would be to completely 100% pull out of Europe and NATO and let them fend for themselves against Russia, ISIS, etc.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Diversity Heretic, @Lurker, @random observer

    “mistaken impression on the part of Europeans that armies are for intervention, not defense.”

    I hardly think the Europeans are any more to blame for having this attitude than the United States, whose armies and navies are organized for intervention. And which do not fight in border skirmishes to defend the United States nor have been required to do so since the days of Pancho Villa. Also, European armies train on their own soil. Where else would they do it? And why would American press report such routine activity? You think FAZ or the Times report on the US Army’s endless iterations of Exercise Buttkicker IX in the deserts of Nevada, or any other such wargames?

    Also, armies and navies ARE for intervention as well as defense. That’s what regular armed forces are for and always have been. It’s why it’s best to staff them with professionals. It’s just more ideal if the national interests of the country are actually at stake in any given intervention, so that the lives of these native professionals are not risked uselessly or wasted. There have been few interventions by the US in which that was not plausibly the case, although the nature, scope and length of them has often been corrupted by other things like “American values” “nation-building” or “FREEDOM!”, with corresponding waste of time, treasure and lives. These are structural failures of American political culture.

    Now, whether or not the British or French are intervening abroad appropriately or not, this is hardly a derogation from the defense of their borders. Their borders are not under any military threat and have not been for 25 years. The threats they face need police, CT units, intel, and coast guard. The US forces in Europe are of no value for those missions and are there not to defend Europe but to be there to get quickly to places the US wants to intervene in, all of which serve US foreign policy [whether I agree they serve valid goals or not] and not the defense of Europe.

    AS to pulling out, I agree the Europeans will bemoan that loss of cushion and should man up on defense spending. They should have done long ago. Still, no actual military threat to their borders or national security has as yet emerged. If Russia or ISIS become that, the US should actually stay and fight to help Europe. The US is primarily responsible for these threats emerging at all.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @random observer

    The US is primarily responsible for these threats emerging at all.

    ah, no. The Paris attacks and Brussels attacks, many terrorist attacks in Europe have been perpetrated by 2nd-3rd generation Muslim men (a few women, too); or, are you now suggesting, what both US & European elites, liberals & media want to desperately hide from their constituents, that refugees are indeed, a direct threat?

    Europe has allowed these Muslim neighborhoods to evolve for over 35 years and have just hoped the Muslims would be so good as to assimilate. They have been given every opportunity as children, to go to school, stick with it, go to university and jump into middle class life with children, mortgages, making dinner and washing clothes, etc., like the rest of the world.

    Replies: @random observer

  145. @Twinkie
    @Twinkie


    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.
     
    And just as soon as I thought that, I am right back to finding Trump repulsive: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @JSM, @res, @Brutusale, @Lagertha, @Johann Ricke

    Pleazzzz, GQ never publishes full frontal nudity exposing genitals and all. Besides, most men in the world would admit that Melania could be THE hottest FLOTUS ever – fashion designers would be in a frenzy to create looks for her!

    Trump should relax about this and just end it: he should turn it into something really funny to convey how proud he is of his beautiful wife. And, who cares about the Mormon women in Utah anymore? Would love to know the statistics of Utah Mormon women who do breast augmentation, nose jobs, liposuction, silicone face implants, Botox…butt implants (yeah, they’re really popular now!) etc. Melania is the real deal (and speaks 5 languages) as far as natural beauty – so, yeah envy is a b*tch.

    The GQ ad will backfire (just like calling all of his supporters racists, low-lives, dumbasses has) and, it’s obvious this was a trick to get Trump to fire stuff back – and now it’s time to make lemonade from lemons: Trump’s handlers need to get Melania’s permission first, and have her image printed on “Made in the USA” black T shirts, T shirts sold at Trump rallies! They would be sold-out! T-shirts could say, “From Slovenia With Love.” Yeah, I know, silly…but I get depressed every time Jihadies kill.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Lagertha


    ...Melania could be THE hottest FLOTUS ever – fashion designers would be in a frenzy to create looks for her!
     
    With the added bonus that she can't run for president later.

    Better a Slovenian than a fast venial.
  146. @Chrisnonymous

    borders will provide no protection to Americans if the jihadists are not defeated elsewhere.
     
    Why do people get away with this line without having to defend it? This is nonsense on its face. If it's true, it requires a thorough explanation.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous, @AndrewR, @dc.sunsets, @Richard A., @random observer

    I admit I may stand accused of lack of thoroughness of explanation, but it has historically been helpful to defeat the enemy in detail farther from the wall instead of ceding all the intervening territory to him and waiting for him to pound ceaselessly on one’s gates.

  147. @iSteveFan
    @Tiny Duck


    Trump is crazy if he thinks withdrawing from NATO will keep our nation secure.
     
    Where has Trump said withdrawing from NATO will keep us secure? Trump has suggested we are not getting the bang for the buck. We are providing the lion's share of manpower and funding of a defense pact in which most of the members are collectively confederated into the European Union which is more populous and has a larger GDP than the USA. Evaluating whether this is the most effective way to spend our defense dollars, or whether the Europeans should contribute more is a different argument that what you wrote.

    Now Patrick Buchanan might make the argument that withdrawing from NATO would make us safer. That of course would be based upon his concerns that any one NATO member, such as Turkey, could get us into a shooting war with a nuclear armed Russia over an incident that is not in our national interests. For example, last October's downing of a Russian jet might have been the tripwire that committed Uncle Sam to an armed conflict with Russia.

    Given how close we came to such an event, and given how Turkey's and possibly other European nations' interest differ from ours, there is a potential threat to USA security remaining in NATO twenty plus years after its reason to exist went out of business.

    Replies: @onetwothree, @AndrewR, @random observer

    Cogent.

    I would only criticize Trump’s position in this regard so far as it is based on the assumption that US troops are still in Europe to defend it. They are there because successive US administrations want them there to pursue US ambitions, at least as they have defined them. The Europeans would cringe if they all left, but that is hardly the reason they have stayed.

  148. @random observer
    @Chrisnonymous

    "mistaken impression on the part of Europeans that armies are for intervention, not defense."

    I hardly think the Europeans are any more to blame for having this attitude than the United States, whose armies and navies are organized for intervention. And which do not fight in border skirmishes to defend the United States nor have been required to do so since the days of Pancho Villa. Also, European armies train on their own soil. Where else would they do it? And why would American press report such routine activity? You think FAZ or the Times report on the US Army's endless iterations of Exercise Buttkicker IX in the deserts of Nevada, or any other such wargames?

    Also, armies and navies ARE for intervention as well as defense. That's what regular armed forces are for and always have been. It's why it's best to staff them with professionals. It's just more ideal if the national interests of the country are actually at stake in any given intervention, so that the lives of these native professionals are not risked uselessly or wasted. There have been few interventions by the US in which that was not plausibly the case, although the nature, scope and length of them has often been corrupted by other things like "American values" "nation-building" or "FREEDOM!", with corresponding waste of time, treasure and lives. These are structural failures of American political culture.

    Now, whether or not the British or French are intervening abroad appropriately or not, this is hardly a derogation from the defense of their borders. Their borders are not under any military threat and have not been for 25 years. The threats they face need police, CT units, intel, and coast guard. The US forces in Europe are of no value for those missions and are there not to defend Europe but to be there to get quickly to places the US wants to intervene in, all of which serve US foreign policy [whether I agree they serve valid goals or not] and not the defense of Europe.

    AS to pulling out, I agree the Europeans will bemoan that loss of cushion and should man up on defense spending. They should have done long ago. Still, no actual military threat to their borders or national security has as yet emerged. If Russia or ISIS become that, the US should actually stay and fight to help Europe. The US is primarily responsible for these threats emerging at all.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    The US is primarily responsible for these threats emerging at all.

    ah, no. The Paris attacks and Brussels attacks, many terrorist attacks in Europe have been perpetrated by 2nd-3rd generation Muslim men (a few women, too); or, are you now suggesting, what both US & European elites, liberals & media want to desperately hide from their constituents, that refugees are indeed, a direct threat?

    Europe has allowed these Muslim neighborhoods to evolve for over 35 years and have just hoped the Muslims would be so good as to assimilate. They have been given every opportunity as children, to go to school, stick with it, go to university and jump into middle class life with children, mortgages, making dinner and washing clothes, etc., like the rest of the world.

    • Replies: @random observer
    @Lagertha

    I quite agree with you as regards the foolishness of European immigration policy, multiculturalism policy, and the failure [seen again today] of actual, official Europeans to realize that the second generation of the migrants are not "Europeans" and are a worse threat than the original migrants [that may change with the current wave].

    On the other hand the emergence of the caliphate IS and the ability of its propaganda and foreign fighter networks to reach into Europe are a part of the terrorism picture today, and the main generator of the refugee flow that will worsen it tomorrow. The Muslim threat in Europe is greater now than it was even 10 years ago, and the Middle Eastern drivers element of the threat to Europe has benefited greatly from American foreign policy. As, separately, has the current aggressive posture of the Russians. I was thinking more of these.

  149. @Reg Cæsar
    @Chrisnonymous


    I’ve never once seen an article about border skirmishes or even war games on European soil. However, there are constant articles about NATO or French or British military interventions.
     
    Because those were colonial powers for hundreds of years, and so strong nobody could touch them. Of course they would see an army and navy as projectiles rather than shields.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Discard, @guest, @random observer

    I see others have noted similarly, but I feel it worth adding that in addition to the role played by armies and navies within Europe as mutual shields, or at least as projectiles to be used with Europe first and foremost, even Europe’s colonial adventures were heavily the product of wars with one another. Even France, colonial adventurer # 2, never had more than a fraction of its forces overseas at any time. Even Britain, an oddity in having most of its army deployed overseas unless there was an actual war with France, usually had more of its navy in home waters than overseas. Or, at least, in “European” waters [they owned the Med for 100 years].

  150. @Diversity Heretic
    @Chrisnonymous

    I've had similar thoughts. If Europe hasn't figured out how to deal with Russia in 300 years (I'll use Peter the Great as the starting point) without North American support, they never will. On the intervention versus defense issue, I think it's telling that there are separate Departments of Homeland Security and Defense. The first is genuinely the Department of Internal Surveillance and the second is the Department of Empire Maintenance.

    Replies: @random observer

    They managed Russia well enough back in the day by either keeping it on one side or the other of the alliance system (prior to 1854 and from 1865 or so to 1914) as just another of the players at the table, or all ganging up against it or to exclude it (Crimean War and aftermath). Worked well enough until 1914, and even then Russia was not operating as a threat to Europe as a whole and its power was only one part of the war that destroyed Europe.

    The situation in which Russia represents an existential threat to Europe [actual or at least potential] is post 1922, and for the first part of that it was actually still playing the role of a balancer, switching sides at need. It was really only a threat during the Cold War, and not really since.

    To the extent it is becoming one again, this is largely due to US foreign policy.

  151. @AndrewR
    @iSteveFan

    Would the US really have Turkey's back if Turkey picks a fight with Russia?

    If I'm out with some friends and one of my buddies picks a fight with a stranger, he's on his own unless it becomes a life or death scenario.

    I would like to think that Turkey's NATO allied would let Russia retaliate in a limited capacity and warn Turkey that it's on its own if it escalates.

    I'm not an expert in international law but I don't see how it would be in a country's interest to sign a treaty that would force it to go to bat for an aggressive or reckless ally.

    Replies: @Discordiax, @random observer

    You’re right- Article 5 obliges the US and other members to act only if a member is attacked, and it gives them plenty of wiggle room to decide whether or not that has been the case- it does not impose any definitions of what that means, nor does it actually require any specific military response in any circumstances.

    Of course, failure to agree a member has been attacked and to aid it, in the event of such agreement, would mean that member quits for sure, not necessarily a bad thing, and might mean [if the lack of agreement was heavily contested] the end of the alliance. Which might be OK too, although that’s a huge waste of useful interoperability and comms/operational protocols and equipment.

    On the wider issue, yeah, most countries aren’t that stupid. I am aware of no treaty that actually obliged anyone to aid an ally if the ally was the attacker, and if there ever were any I’ll bet the circumstances were highly detailed and limited.

  152. @dc.sunsets
    @Anonymous

    Perhaps. No one knows until the morning after.

    OTOH, he's the only candidate who seems to grasp that you can have guns (military spending on foreign adventures) or butter (spending on domestic infrastructure) but not both (unless you're willing to issue debt by the galaxy, the effect of which is to burn today's capital while inflating the illusion of expanding wealth.)

    Trump's rhetoric is a break from the last 50 years in this regard. Whether he follows through as POTUS or not, it is a signal that the trend of the last 50 years is finally in a zone of reversal.

    The consequences of a debt-binge/credit-bubble inflationary asset mania reaching apogee cannot be overstated.

    Replies: @random observer

    You can certainly have both guns and butter if you want, you just can’t have as much of either at the same time. It doesn’t have to be all one or the other.

  153. @Lagertha
    @random observer

    The US is primarily responsible for these threats emerging at all.

    ah, no. The Paris attacks and Brussels attacks, many terrorist attacks in Europe have been perpetrated by 2nd-3rd generation Muslim men (a few women, too); or, are you now suggesting, what both US & European elites, liberals & media want to desperately hide from their constituents, that refugees are indeed, a direct threat?

    Europe has allowed these Muslim neighborhoods to evolve for over 35 years and have just hoped the Muslims would be so good as to assimilate. They have been given every opportunity as children, to go to school, stick with it, go to university and jump into middle class life with children, mortgages, making dinner and washing clothes, etc., like the rest of the world.

    Replies: @random observer

    I quite agree with you as regards the foolishness of European immigration policy, multiculturalism policy, and the failure [seen again today] of actual, official Europeans to realize that the second generation of the migrants are not “Europeans” and are a worse threat than the original migrants [that may change with the current wave].

    On the other hand the emergence of the caliphate IS and the ability of its propaganda and foreign fighter networks to reach into Europe are a part of the terrorism picture today, and the main generator of the refugee flow that will worsen it tomorrow. The Muslim threat in Europe is greater now than it was even 10 years ago, and the Middle Eastern drivers element of the threat to Europe has benefited greatly from American foreign policy. As, separately, has the current aggressive posture of the Russians. I was thinking more of these.

  154. @Jefferson
    @Anonymous

    "Is Twinkie advocating a situation where Belgium in 30% Muslim is OK, as long as everybody, Muslims and non-Muslims alike are ruled through a government that governs with an iron fist in order to keep everyone in line, is that what he is saying? Because he is saying that it is OK for Singapore to be 30% Muslim, or 20%, because the government there keeps everyone there in check with the world’s highest death penalty rate relative to its population. Just remember to shout out in a public square about how Malays are lazy/stupid, or commit a lot of crime, and see what happens to you, really just try it."

    Malay Muslims are not as violent as Arab, Nigerian, Chechen, Somali, and Pakistani Muslims. Malay Muslims are docile.

    Replies: @Romanian

    For now. Let a few more go to Mecca and dye their beards orange and we’ll see what tune they’re singing. The Malays have their own terrorist problems. Actually met a security expert from the area who spoke English with an American accent (but he was Malay) who recounted the extent to which the establishment is afraid of radicalization.

  155. @Cracker
    @Tiny Duck

    Your comment doesn't make much sense. What things do they do? Shoot people in Chicago and San Bernadino?

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Rally, I just discovered by looking down at my keyboard that the “u” and the “i” keys are next to each other, so you maybe possibly responding to a poster named Suck Dick.

  156. @Jefferson
    Black Lies Matter hate it everytime there is a terrorist attack, because the media focus shifts away from police brutality of Dindus to Muslim extremists. After the Paris attacks happened, Black Lies Matter went on Twitter to tweet who cares about a bunch of dead White people. I am sure they will also tweet the same about the Brussels attacks.

    Replies: @asks for it

    “Black Lies Matter hate it everytime there is a terrorist attack, because the media focus shifts away from police brutality of Dindus to Muslim extremists. After the Paris attacks happened, Black Lies Matter went on Twitter to tweet who cares about a bunch of dead White people. I am sure they will also tweet the same about the Brussels attacks.”

    It doesn’t take much imagination to picture the dorm room Media Response Strategy Meeting. Urgent!

  157. @res
    @Twinkie

    You're a thoughtful person so I'd be interested in more detail about how you think/feel about Trump's use of threats like that. I see initiating intimidation with a threat like that repulsive, but I am tending to find it acceptable to use that as a response to another's aggression (but also note the allegations of Trump spreading rumors earlier). In this case , Trump was responding to a PAC (supposedly not Cruz related) using a provocative picture of Melania in a campaign ad. How do you feel about that campaign ad? I think there is an interesting discussion to be had about what constitutes a legitimate response/counter and what is unacceptable (escalation?).

    Another example of this was Trump's response (threat invoking Bill's history) to Hillary's sexism comment a few months ago. http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/26/politics/donald-trump-bill-clinton-sexism/

    Overall, as much as I dislike some aspects of Trump's manner, I don't see how anyone else would be able to deal with the media assault he is enduring so I am inclined to cut him a great deal of slack regarding his techniques for doing that.

    Replies: @Andrew, @Twinkie

    You’re a thoughtful person so I’d be interested in more detail about how you think/feel about Trump’s use of threats like that… In this case , Trump was responding to a PAC (supposedly not Cruz related) using a provocative picture of Melania in a campaign ad. How do you feel about that campaign ad?

    You obviously see the important details here that simpletons seem to be missing. Let’s look at the sequence of events, shall we?

    1. At some point in the past, Mrs. Trump decided to get naked, be photographed, and be published, which does not speak well to her character as a lady.

    2. An independent PAC group that supports Cruz but is NOT controlled by Cruz decided to use it to appeal to the traditionally-minded Mormons.

    3. Trump then threatens to “spill the beans” on Cruz’s wife, presumably about her now rather well-known bout with depression earlier in her marriage.

    4. Then he deletes the tweet (probably because he realizes it comes off badly).

    Anyway one cuts it, this is a very bad look for Trump. Either he is a dolt and directed his fire at the wrong target and threatened another man’s wife like a douchebag or he has such poor judgment and temper that he allowed himself to be baited into making a very unwise move.

    Now, here is what I think should have happened.

    1. I don’t think the independent group should have used the photograph of Mrs. Trump even though she is the one who put it out there in the public domain. Unfortunately when you make yourself a public figure, you invite publicity, good or bad. Nonetheless, it is bad taste to attack a candidate’s family in anyway.

    2. Even though he does not control this PAC group, the Cruz campaign should have disavowed it and told the group to knock it off (he may or may not have, I do not know).

    3. Trump had a great chance here to be the bigger man. “Yes, well, I married a very beautiful woman, and I think it is very tasteless for this group that supports Senator Cruz to stoop to this. Will Senator Cruz disavow this type of attacks on candidate’s families?” But, no, he just doesn’t have the impulse-control and instead chose the worst possible option of threatening to unearth some dirt on a competitor’s wife.

    • Replies: @res
    @Twinkie

    Thanks for the reply. I prefer your scenario to what Trump did.

    Some further thoughts on this.

    1. Trump is targeting his messages at a more emotional level, where I think we are more analytical. I prefer a world more like your scenario, but I suspect Trump better knows what works with the masses (who will or will not elect him).

    2. Cruz's exact role in this is a major wild card IMHO. Would a super PAC do this without at least some sign off from the campaign? (if only a nod and a wink from an adviser) Trump seems very plugged in to the world of rumors (or else is sharp about ferreting out truth) so I wonder if he actually has a basis for accusing Cruz personally. Agreed about Cruz's lack of disavowal. I think Trump is playing a game within a game (i.e. there is a subtext which I am unable to interpret) with these threats.

    3. I am also bothered by Mrs. Trump's photo, but I think it makes a good litmus test for something I worry about: what is acceptable earlier life behavior for public figures? I am concerned we are limiting ourselves to candidates in the following categories:
    - Truly upstanding people who have managed to pursue a life of achievement without doing anything transgressive (which has a shifting definition difficult to predict in the future, e.g. see Brandon Eich for a semi-related case, also see Thomas Eagleton for a more relevant example). How possible is this in the world of politics? (sincere question)
    - People who have aspired to politics from an early age and consciously avoided doing or saying anything controversial (e.g. Obama's lack of written work at HLS, potential supreme court justice avoidance of controversial opinions).
    - People who appear plugged in and/or owned enough to be given a pass (e.g. IMHO both Clinton and Rubio to some degree).

    This issue with earlier behavior is only going to get worse in the era of social media and ubiquitous cameras.

    I don't like Trump making our election cycle look like a reality TV show, but I like even less the likelihood Clinton gets a pass for serious problems with the handling of classified information, and both Clinton and Rubio appearing to have past behavior which I think speaks much more to their suitability for power than Mrs. Trump's picture which shows nothing I can't see on a beach any time. (please excuse the grammatical liberties, too much effort to parallelize that overly long sentence, hopefully my meaning is clear).

    One note, regarding your point "4. Then he deletes the tweet (probably because he realizes it comes off badly)."
    See this WaPo article for both versions of the tweet: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/
    I would argue editing and substituting an improved version is a good thing (better still to get it right the first time though, as you noted, impulse control is not Trump's strong suit).

  158. @anonymous
    @Twinkie

    They are only that way because they are ruled through fear (Singapore has caning and the world's highest death penalty per capita, and unlike the US you are literally hanged to death, and death row cases take 2 years, not 20 years, and being caught with even a few grams of cocaine can mean death), like there zero rebellions against the Mongols, because of how the Mongols would just slaughter an entire city down to the last woman and baby is even a single Mongol soldier is killed inside that city. or how there was zero crime in cities during the Japanese occupation because of the Kempetai. A more apt comparison would be to compare crime rates in Japan and Korea, which are both democracies, Singapore is basically a one party state with a velvet glove. Japan's murder rate is 0.3 vs. 0.2 in Singapore, how high do you think the murder rate will be in Singapore vs. Japan if it takes 30 years to try death penalty cases there like in the US, and if they remove caning? The perpetrator for the Tokyo sarin gas attack of 1995 is still in death row.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    They are only that way because they are ruled through fear…

    Singapore is an authoritarian country, to be sure, but a very, very mild one. It is certainly not a repressive country. The low crime rate in Singapore, indeed, is not due to fear. If fear were what mattered, North Korea would have the lowest crime rate in the world (it actually has the highest murder rate in East Asia). It’s because Singaporeans have been socialized to be extremely law-abiding. And that tendency extends to those in power as well – Singapore has one of the cleanest, most corruption-free government in the world. Unlike many other Asian nationalities, Singaporeans will form queues spontaneously without any authority present. They are simply people with a very strong culture of law-abidingness (I am sure part of the explanation is genetic, but that cannot be the entire explanation since other countries with Singaporean ethnicities – southern Chinese, Indian, and Malay – all have much higher crime rates).

    My earlier point was not that homogeneity did not matter – I clearly stated that it was very helpful – but rather that it was not a necessary condition for a low crime rate.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Twinkie

    If El Chapo had been caught in Singapore smuggling his product, his Mexican ass would have been carne asada in the electric chair.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  159. @Twinkie
    @anonymous


    They are only that way because they are ruled through fear...
     
    Singapore is an authoritarian country, to be sure, but a very, very mild one. It is certainly not a repressive country. The low crime rate in Singapore, indeed, is not due to fear. If fear were what mattered, North Korea would have the lowest crime rate in the world (it actually has the highest murder rate in East Asia). It's because Singaporeans have been socialized to be extremely law-abiding. And that tendency extends to those in power as well - Singapore has one of the cleanest, most corruption-free government in the world. Unlike many other Asian nationalities, Singaporeans will form queues spontaneously without any authority present. They are simply people with a very strong culture of law-abidingness (I am sure part of the explanation is genetic, but that cannot be the entire explanation since other countries with Singaporean ethnicities - southern Chinese, Indian, and Malay - all have much higher crime rates).

    My earlier point was not that homogeneity did not matter - I clearly stated that it was very helpful - but rather that it was not a necessary condition for a low crime rate.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    If El Chapo had been caught in Singapore smuggling his product, his Mexican ass would have been carne asada in the electric chair.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Jefferson


    If El Chapo had been caught in Singapore smuggling his product, his Mexican ass would have been carne asada in the electric chair.
     
    Probably a firing squad.

    I am comfortable with murderous drug dealers getting the death penalty, followed by a swift execution of justice.

    Besides, the Singaporean authority gives you plenty of warning about drug dealing in Singapore. Once, when I was on Singapore Airlines about to land at Changi, the captain of the flight got on the mic and said in a crisp English accent (I believe he was English), "Ladies and gentleman, we are about to land at Changi Airport in Singapore. Just a friendly reminder: drug trafficking is punishable by DEATH in Singapore. So if that were your intent, perhaps now might be a good time to head to the toilet and dispose of any inconvenient articles."

    He delivered that so deadpan, the whole cabin laughed, and NOBODY went to the loo!
  160. @JSM
    @Twinkie

    Yeah, I clicked on your link. So Ted (or a front group for him) doing an absolutely unnecessary, and, frankly, vulgar, thing of tweeting a nearly nude pic of Melania (taken 15 years ago when she was a silly girl) is NOT repulsive. Okaaaaayyy.

    But, Trump threatening to spill the beans on Ted Cruz's wife *is.*

    Uh. Huh. You do know what the "beans" are, right? That she is an executive of Goldman Sachs and that GS gave undisclosed loans to Ted Cruz' campaign (no bribes there, right?) and has had active involvement in the, frankly, treasonous effort to abolish the border between Mexico and Canada under the project of North American Union. Telling THAT truth is "repulsive."

    You are nuts.

    Twinkie, every time I turn around, you just reconfirm my bias. Asians are *not* good immigrants. Even the ones who are ostensibly well-assimilated Catholics with tall sons.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    You make some good points, but consigning Twinkie to the bad immigrant pile is a capital mistake. When the bottom falls out Twinkie will be reaching down to grab your hand. I don’t think you would grab Twinkie’s hand under an antipodal reversal of circumstances. That is a plus for Twinkie and a minus for you.

    All you Alt-Right purists make the path to a practical and rational political outcome much more difficult than it needs to be. Look to your interests and do not trust your reactive emotions.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Twinks seems a capital fellow, but his moralistic blatherings mean about as much to me as those coming from the drunk (and profane) Irish priests of my youth. That he supports the bright but fatally oleaginous Cruz is no surprise.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Twinkie
    @Charles Erwin Wilson


    When the bottom falls out Twinkie will be reaching down to grab your hand.
     
    You are correct, sir. I would.

    I don’t think you would grab Twinkie’s hand under an antipodal reversal of circumstances.
     
    I have a suspicion she would not. But in her mind, I am the bad guy.

    Forget immigrants, if all whites in this country voted the way I have, we would all be a heck of a lot better off.
  161. @Twinkie
    @Twinkie


    But the more outlandish and unhinged attacks on him I see in the media, the more I like the idea of a Trump candidacy.
     
    And just as soon as I thought that, I am right back to finding Trump repulsive: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/

    Replies: @reiner Tor, @JSM, @res, @Brutusale, @Lagertha, @Johann Ricke

    Trump’s handlers need to get Melania’s permission first, and have her image printed on “Made in the USA” black T shirts, T shirts sold at Trump rallies!

    Given that she was not only born, but grew up abroad (in Slovenia), a fact that’s apparent to anyone when she says anything in English, that’s a stretch. In fact, Melania’s father, Viktor Knavs, was a Party member, a card-carrying member of the Communist elite.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Johann Ricke


    Given that she was not only born, but grew up abroad (in Slovenia)
     
    Definition #17 of the transitive verb make in my three-decade-old dictionary:

    17. [Slang] to succeed in becoming the lover of; seduce

    The star [☼] denotes an Americanism. I think we can safely say that Melania was made in the USA.

    "Melania", by the way, means "black" in Greek. Some additional street cred there?
    , @Twinkie
    @Johann Ricke

    You directed fire to the wrong target. That quote is from "Lagertha."

    , @Mark Eugenikos
    @Johann Ricke

    I don't think you are using the term "Communist elite" correctly here. Communist elite would apply to the high-ranking officials of the Communist party, i.e. at least those on the city/state/federal level. It doesn't seem from the article you linked that Melania's father was anything more than a simple card-carrying member of the Communist party. To put things in perspective, there were almost 2 M card-carrying members of the Communist party in Yugoslavia out of almost 24 M people (as of 1980s, figures assembled from various Wikipedia articles). By the same token, you wouldn't call every registered Democrat in the U.S. part of the "Democratic elite".

    Btw, that linked Metro article is really dumb and sensationalistic. Examples: "The 45-year-old former model grew up in the small town of Sevnica, which before the break-up of Yugoslavia in the 1990s was under the dictatorship of Marshall Tito [wrong: Tito died in 1980, so he couldn't have continued to rule as a dictator into 1990s] and satellite state of the USSR [wrong: Yugoslavia stopped being a satellite state of USSR in 1948]." Also, there's no way to confirm that Viktor Knavs from the supposed list of Communist party members of Slovenia is Melania's father. And on top of that, it's not like kids can be responsible for what their parents did anyway.

    , @Brutusale
    @Johann Ricke

    When I was in college I dated an Italian-American girl who lived in Rome, her UN FAO father's permanent post, and SHE was a card-carrying member of the Italian Communist Party. As she described it, it was like being a Bernie Bro now; all her friends in Rome were members.

  162. @Dave Pinsen
    @24AheadDotCom

    How about a compromise? The US stays in NATO, but Turkey gets kicked out. And NATO agrees never to expand to include countries in Russia's sphere of influence like Ukraine or Georgia. And NATO isn't used to destabilize any more MENA countries.

    Replies: @dc.sunsets, @Romanian

    Ross Douthat phrased it as “promiscuous partnerships” – talk is cheap, and the beneficiary countries are lulled into thinking that their security needs are being met when all they receive are assurances, not deterrence, since there is not a total overlap between the two. Assurances being what you give Tbilisi, and deterrence something you give to Moscow, but what Tbilisi actually wants and takes assurances as being an indication of. Having these psychological needs met can be a good thing, attenuating knee jerk reactions and diminishing paranoia, so long as they don’t entice the beneficiary into behaving aggressively, thereby provoking a response which exposes the Western bluff. This was the case of Georgia. To my mind, it was right for it to assert its sovereignty in Ossetia and Abkhazia, though I am not familiar with whether they crossed a line, but the fact that it did so was impolitic, as it gave Russia an opening to administer a beatdown as a lesson to others and as a sign of its resurgence.

  163. @Jefferson
    @Hosswire

    "The leftist twits get the causality backwards so often that I suspect that they have some sort of dyslexia that scrambles events & effects instead of letters.

    Muslims don’t attack us because Donald Trump doesn’t want them here.

    Donald Trump doesn’t want Muslims here because they attack us."

    Originally the Left said the Muslim world hates the West because of George W. Bush. Now they hate us because of Donald Trump.

    So acording to Left Wing logic, the Muslim world just loved the West during the almost 8 years of Hussein Obama in office, hence why there have been zero Islamic terrorist attacks in White Western countries since 2008, sarcasm. And they will love us even more if Hildabeast Clinton becomes POTUS.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    That’s the funniest part. I would imagine that extremist Muzzies know that Pants Suit is one of the Obama’s shrill R2P harpies responsible for blowing up Syria and Libya, not Trump.

  164. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @JSM

    You make some good points, but consigning Twinkie to the bad immigrant pile is a capital mistake. When the bottom falls out Twinkie will be reaching down to grab your hand. I don't think you would grab Twinkie's hand under an antipodal reversal of circumstances. That is a plus for Twinkie and a minus for you.

    All you Alt-Right purists make the path to a practical and rational political outcome much more difficult than it needs to be. Look to your interests and do not trust your reactive emotions.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Twinkie

    Twinks seems a capital fellow, but his moralistic blatherings mean about as much to me as those coming from the drunk (and profane) Irish priests of my youth. That he supports the bright but fatally oleaginous Cruz is no surprise.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Brutusale


    Twinks seems a capital fellow, but his moralistic blatherings mean about as much to me as those coming from the drunk (and profane) Irish priests of my youth.
     
    If everyone followed the Aristotelian virtue ethics to which I subscribe, this sure would be a much better world.

    That he supports the bright but fatally oleaginous Cruz is no surprise.
     
    I voted for Cruz... very reluctantly. There is no doubt that Cruz gives off that proverbial used car salesman vibe.

    But I tend to weigh more heavily on what people have done, not what they say they will do. Trump has been a silver spooned, narcissistic, rich leftist with questionable business ethics and even more questionable personal ethics.

    Cruz may have been an ambitious, abrasive pol who is too bright for his own good, but at least he opposed ethanol subsidies in Iowa and still won the caucus there (while Trump was dragging out his mother's Bible to "prove" that he was a Christian despite a complete lack of any attendance record at any church anywhere). Cruz didn't pander and won there while Trump did and lost. That settled the choice of the lesser of the unpalatable for me.

    I like much of what Trump says now, but I can easily imagine the possibility of Trump stabbing me and others like me on the back once in power on, say, the Supreme Court nominee, abortion or gun rights for his own gain. I can't see Cruz doing the same. Whether he is "oily" or not, he is going to stick to his conservative guns, pun intended.

    But don't think that I support him with any enthusiasm or joy. And should Trump be the eventual nominee, I will gladly vote for him, raise money and votes, because 1) I pledged to support the eventual GOP nominee and 2) I'd rather take my chances with Trump than with Hillary Clinton.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

  165. @Lagertha
    @Twinkie

    Pleazzzz, GQ never publishes full frontal nudity exposing genitals and all. Besides, most men in the world would admit that Melania could be THE hottest FLOTUS ever - fashion designers would be in a frenzy to create looks for her!

    Trump should relax about this and just end it: he should turn it into something really funny to convey how proud he is of his beautiful wife. And, who cares about the Mormon women in Utah anymore? Would love to know the statistics of Utah Mormon women who do breast augmentation, nose jobs, liposuction, silicone face implants, Botox...butt implants (yeah, they're really popular now!) etc. Melania is the real deal (and speaks 5 languages) as far as natural beauty - so, yeah envy is a b*tch.

    The GQ ad will backfire (just like calling all of his supporters racists, low-lives, dumbasses has) and, it's obvious this was a trick to get Trump to fire stuff back - and now it's time to make lemonade from lemons: Trump's handlers need to get Melania's permission first, and have her image printed on "Made in the USA" black T shirts, T shirts sold at Trump rallies! They would be sold-out! T-shirts could say, "From Slovenia With Love." Yeah, I know, silly...but I get depressed every time Jihadies kill.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …Melania could be THE hottest FLOTUS ever – fashion designers would be in a frenzy to create looks for her!

    With the added bonus that she can’t run for president later.

    Better a Slovenian than a fast venial.

  166. @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Trump's handlers need to get Melania's permission first, and have her image printed on "Made in the USA" black T shirts, T shirts sold at Trump rallies!
     
    Given that she was not only born, but grew up abroad (in Slovenia), a fact that's apparent to anyone when she says anything in English, that's a stretch. In fact, Melania's father, Viktor Knavs, was a Party member, a card-carrying member of the Communist elite.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Twinkie, @Mark Eugenikos, @Brutusale

    Given that she was not only born, but grew up abroad (in Slovenia)

    Definition #17 of the transitive verb make in my three-decade-old dictionary:

    17. [Slang] to succeed in becoming the lover of; seduce

    The star [☼] denotes an Americanism. I think we can safely say that Melania was made in the USA.

    “Melania”, by the way, means “black” in Greek. Some additional street cred there?

  167. @Twinkie
    @res


    You’re a thoughtful person so I’d be interested in more detail about how you think/feel about Trump’s use of threats like that... In this case , Trump was responding to a PAC (supposedly not Cruz related) using a provocative picture of Melania in a campaign ad. How do you feel about that campaign ad?
     
    You obviously see the important details here that simpletons seem to be missing. Let's look at the sequence of events, shall we?

    1. At some point in the past, Mrs. Trump decided to get naked, be photographed, and be published, which does not speak well to her character as a lady.

    2. An independent PAC group that supports Cruz but is NOT controlled by Cruz decided to use it to appeal to the traditionally-minded Mormons.

    3. Trump then threatens to "spill the beans" on Cruz's wife, presumably about her now rather well-known bout with depression earlier in her marriage.

    4. Then he deletes the tweet (probably because he realizes it comes off badly).

    Anyway one cuts it, this is a very bad look for Trump. Either he is a dolt and directed his fire at the wrong target and threatened another man's wife like a douchebag or he has such poor judgment and temper that he allowed himself to be baited into making a very unwise move.

    Now, here is what I think should have happened.

    1. I don't think the independent group should have used the photograph of Mrs. Trump even though she is the one who put it out there in the public domain. Unfortunately when you make yourself a public figure, you invite publicity, good or bad. Nonetheless, it is bad taste to attack a candidate's family in anyway.

    2. Even though he does not control this PAC group, the Cruz campaign should have disavowed it and told the group to knock it off (he may or may not have, I do not know).

    3. Trump had a great chance here to be the bigger man. "Yes, well, I married a very beautiful woman, and I think it is very tasteless for this group that supports Senator Cruz to stoop to this. Will Senator Cruz disavow this type of attacks on candidate's families?" But, no, he just doesn't have the impulse-control and instead chose the worst possible option of threatening to unearth some dirt on a competitor's wife.

    Replies: @res

    Thanks for the reply. I prefer your scenario to what Trump did.

    Some further thoughts on this.

    1. Trump is targeting his messages at a more emotional level, where I think we are more analytical. I prefer a world more like your scenario, but I suspect Trump better knows what works with the masses (who will or will not elect him).

    2. Cruz’s exact role in this is a major wild card IMHO. Would a super PAC do this without at least some sign off from the campaign? (if only a nod and a wink from an adviser) Trump seems very plugged in to the world of rumors (or else is sharp about ferreting out truth) so I wonder if he actually has a basis for accusing Cruz personally. Agreed about Cruz’s lack of disavowal. I think Trump is playing a game within a game (i.e. there is a subtext which I am unable to interpret) with these threats.

    3. I am also bothered by Mrs. Trump’s photo, but I think it makes a good litmus test for something I worry about: what is acceptable earlier life behavior for public figures? I am concerned we are limiting ourselves to candidates in the following categories:
    – Truly upstanding people who have managed to pursue a life of achievement without doing anything transgressive (which has a shifting definition difficult to predict in the future, e.g. see Brandon Eich for a semi-related case, also see Thomas Eagleton for a more relevant example). How possible is this in the world of politics? (sincere question)
    – People who have aspired to politics from an early age and consciously avoided doing or saying anything controversial (e.g. Obama’s lack of written work at HLS, potential supreme court justice avoidance of controversial opinions).
    – People who appear plugged in and/or owned enough to be given a pass (e.g. IMHO both Clinton and Rubio to some degree).

    This issue with earlier behavior is only going to get worse in the era of social media and ubiquitous cameras.

    I don’t like Trump making our election cycle look like a reality TV show, but I like even less the likelihood Clinton gets a pass for serious problems with the handling of classified information, and both Clinton and Rubio appearing to have past behavior which I think speaks much more to their suitability for power than Mrs. Trump’s picture which shows nothing I can’t see on a beach any time. (please excuse the grammatical liberties, too much effort to parallelize that overly long sentence, hopefully my meaning is clear).

    One note, regarding your point “4. Then he deletes the tweet (probably because he realizes it comes off badly).”
    See this WaPo article for both versions of the tweet: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/03/22/donald-trump-just-threatened-to-spill-the-beans-on-ted-cruzs-wife/
    I would argue editing and substituting an improved version is a good thing (better still to get it right the first time though, as you noted, impulse control is not Trump’s strong suit).

  168. @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Trump's handlers need to get Melania's permission first, and have her image printed on "Made in the USA" black T shirts, T shirts sold at Trump rallies!
     
    Given that she was not only born, but grew up abroad (in Slovenia), a fact that's apparent to anyone when she says anything in English, that's a stretch. In fact, Melania's father, Viktor Knavs, was a Party member, a card-carrying member of the Communist elite.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Twinkie, @Mark Eugenikos, @Brutusale

    You directed fire to the wrong target. That quote is from “Lagertha.”

  169. @Jefferson
    @Twinkie

    If El Chapo had been caught in Singapore smuggling his product, his Mexican ass would have been carne asada in the electric chair.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    If El Chapo had been caught in Singapore smuggling his product, his Mexican ass would have been carne asada in the electric chair.

    Probably a firing squad.

    I am comfortable with murderous drug dealers getting the death penalty, followed by a swift execution of justice.

    Besides, the Singaporean authority gives you plenty of warning about drug dealing in Singapore. Once, when I was on Singapore Airlines about to land at Changi, the captain of the flight got on the mic and said in a crisp English accent (I believe he was English), “Ladies and gentleman, we are about to land at Changi Airport in Singapore. Just a friendly reminder: drug trafficking is punishable by DEATH in Singapore. So if that were your intent, perhaps now might be a good time to head to the toilet and dispose of any inconvenient articles.”

    He delivered that so deadpan, the whole cabin laughed, and NOBODY went to the loo!

  170. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @JSM

    You make some good points, but consigning Twinkie to the bad immigrant pile is a capital mistake. When the bottom falls out Twinkie will be reaching down to grab your hand. I don't think you would grab Twinkie's hand under an antipodal reversal of circumstances. That is a plus for Twinkie and a minus for you.

    All you Alt-Right purists make the path to a practical and rational political outcome much more difficult than it needs to be. Look to your interests and do not trust your reactive emotions.

    Replies: @Brutusale, @Twinkie

    When the bottom falls out Twinkie will be reaching down to grab your hand.

    You are correct, sir. I would.

    I don’t think you would grab Twinkie’s hand under an antipodal reversal of circumstances.

    I have a suspicion she would not. But in her mind, I am the bad guy.

    Forget immigrants, if all whites in this country voted the way I have, we would all be a heck of a lot better off.

  171. @Brutusale
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Twinks seems a capital fellow, but his moralistic blatherings mean about as much to me as those coming from the drunk (and profane) Irish priests of my youth. That he supports the bright but fatally oleaginous Cruz is no surprise.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Twinks seems a capital fellow, but his moralistic blatherings mean about as much to me as those coming from the drunk (and profane) Irish priests of my youth.

    If everyone followed the Aristotelian virtue ethics to which I subscribe, this sure would be a much better world.

    That he supports the bright but fatally oleaginous Cruz is no surprise.

    I voted for Cruz… very reluctantly. There is no doubt that Cruz gives off that proverbial used car salesman vibe.

    But I tend to weigh more heavily on what people have done, not what they say they will do. Trump has been a silver spooned, narcissistic, rich leftist with questionable business ethics and even more questionable personal ethics.

    Cruz may have been an ambitious, abrasive pol who is too bright for his own good, but at least he opposed ethanol subsidies in Iowa and still won the caucus there (while Trump was dragging out his mother’s Bible to “prove” that he was a Christian despite a complete lack of any attendance record at any church anywhere). Cruz didn’t pander and won there while Trump did and lost. That settled the choice of the lesser of the unpalatable for me.

    I like much of what Trump says now, but I can easily imagine the possibility of Trump stabbing me and others like me on the back once in power on, say, the Supreme Court nominee, abortion or gun rights for his own gain. I can’t see Cruz doing the same. Whether he is “oily” or not, he is going to stick to his conservative guns, pun intended.

    But don’t think that I support him with any enthusiasm or joy. And should Trump be the eventual nominee, I will gladly vote for him, raise money and votes, because 1) I pledged to support the eventual GOP nominee and 2) I’d rather take my chances with Trump than with Hillary Clinton.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    ...the possibility of Trump stabbing me and others like me on the back once in power on, say, the Supreme Court nominee, abortion or gun rights for his own gain.
     
    If Trump does that, we'll bite his head off. He knows that, too.

    But if Cruz stabs us in the back on immigration-- Trump had to knock him back into line--it will have the long-term effect of doing the same with the Supreme Court, abortion, and gun rights, no matter how true he is to his principles. Immigrants don't care about the first two, and can be downright hostile to the last ("Arm my relatives? Are you nuts?" Indeed, are we?) They vote for benefits. Period.

    With immigration control, we can fix our other problems in time. Without immigration control, there will be nothing left to fix.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Brutusale
    @Twinkie

    I don't think anyone with a modicum of intelligence is casting a ballot with anything approaching joy, but for the first time since my maiden vote in 1976, I'm a one-issue voter.

  172. @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Trump's handlers need to get Melania's permission first, and have her image printed on "Made in the USA" black T shirts, T shirts sold at Trump rallies!
     
    Given that she was not only born, but grew up abroad (in Slovenia), a fact that's apparent to anyone when she says anything in English, that's a stretch. In fact, Melania's father, Viktor Knavs, was a Party member, a card-carrying member of the Communist elite.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Twinkie, @Mark Eugenikos, @Brutusale

    I don’t think you are using the term “Communist elite” correctly here. Communist elite would apply to the high-ranking officials of the Communist party, i.e. at least those on the city/state/federal level. It doesn’t seem from the article you linked that Melania’s father was anything more than a simple card-carrying member of the Communist party. To put things in perspective, there were almost 2 M card-carrying members of the Communist party in Yugoslavia out of almost 24 M people (as of 1980s, figures assembled from various Wikipedia articles). By the same token, you wouldn’t call every registered Democrat in the U.S. part of the “Democratic elite”.

    Btw, that linked Metro article is really dumb and sensationalistic. Examples: “The 45-year-old former model grew up in the small town of Sevnica, which before the break-up of Yugoslavia in the 1990s was under the dictatorship of Marshall Tito [wrong: Tito died in 1980, so he couldn’t have continued to rule as a dictator into 1990s] and satellite state of the USSR [wrong: Yugoslavia stopped being a satellite state of USSR in 1948].” Also, there’s no way to confirm that Viktor Knavs from the supposed list of Communist party members of Slovenia is Melania’s father. And on top of that, it’s not like kids can be responsible for what their parents did anyway.

  173. @Twinkie
    @Brutusale


    Twinks seems a capital fellow, but his moralistic blatherings mean about as much to me as those coming from the drunk (and profane) Irish priests of my youth.
     
    If everyone followed the Aristotelian virtue ethics to which I subscribe, this sure would be a much better world.

    That he supports the bright but fatally oleaginous Cruz is no surprise.
     
    I voted for Cruz... very reluctantly. There is no doubt that Cruz gives off that proverbial used car salesman vibe.

    But I tend to weigh more heavily on what people have done, not what they say they will do. Trump has been a silver spooned, narcissistic, rich leftist with questionable business ethics and even more questionable personal ethics.

    Cruz may have been an ambitious, abrasive pol who is too bright for his own good, but at least he opposed ethanol subsidies in Iowa and still won the caucus there (while Trump was dragging out his mother's Bible to "prove" that he was a Christian despite a complete lack of any attendance record at any church anywhere). Cruz didn't pander and won there while Trump did and lost. That settled the choice of the lesser of the unpalatable for me.

    I like much of what Trump says now, but I can easily imagine the possibility of Trump stabbing me and others like me on the back once in power on, say, the Supreme Court nominee, abortion or gun rights for his own gain. I can't see Cruz doing the same. Whether he is "oily" or not, he is going to stick to his conservative guns, pun intended.

    But don't think that I support him with any enthusiasm or joy. And should Trump be the eventual nominee, I will gladly vote for him, raise money and votes, because 1) I pledged to support the eventual GOP nominee and 2) I'd rather take my chances with Trump than with Hillary Clinton.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    …the possibility of Trump stabbing me and others like me on the back once in power on, say, the Supreme Court nominee, abortion or gun rights for his own gain.

    If Trump does that, we’ll bite his head off. He knows that, too.

    But if Cruz stabs us in the back on immigration– Trump had to knock him back into line–it will have the long-term effect of doing the same with the Supreme Court, abortion, and gun rights, no matter how true he is to his principles. Immigrants don’t care about the first two, and can be downright hostile to the last (“Arm my relatives? Are you nuts?” Indeed, are we?) They vote for benefits. Period.

    With immigration control, we can fix our other problems in time. Without immigration control, there will be nothing left to fix.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    If Trump does that, we’ll bite his head off. He knows that, too.
     
    Yeah? How?

    But if Cruz stabs us in the back on immigration
     
    NumbersUSA gave Cruz a better rating than Trump.

    Again, on what basis do you trust Trump on immigration? He had no problem outsourcing work and insourcing workers when it suited him. Again, action vs. talk.

    A President Cruz would be far more sensitive to a revolt from the base than a President Trump would be on any topic, be it immigration or gun-control.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jefferson

  174. @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    ...the possibility of Trump stabbing me and others like me on the back once in power on, say, the Supreme Court nominee, abortion or gun rights for his own gain.
     
    If Trump does that, we'll bite his head off. He knows that, too.

    But if Cruz stabs us in the back on immigration-- Trump had to knock him back into line--it will have the long-term effect of doing the same with the Supreme Court, abortion, and gun rights, no matter how true he is to his principles. Immigrants don't care about the first two, and can be downright hostile to the last ("Arm my relatives? Are you nuts?" Indeed, are we?) They vote for benefits. Period.

    With immigration control, we can fix our other problems in time. Without immigration control, there will be nothing left to fix.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    If Trump does that, we’ll bite his head off. He knows that, too.

    Yeah? How?

    But if Cruz stabs us in the back on immigration

    NumbersUSA gave Cruz a better rating than Trump.

    Again, on what basis do you trust Trump on immigration? He had no problem outsourcing work and insourcing workers when it suited him. Again, action vs. talk.

    A President Cruz would be far more sensitive to a revolt from the base than a President Trump would be on any topic, be it immigration or gun-control.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    Again, on what basis do you trust Trump on immigration?
     
    Because he doesn't want Jeff Sessions to vote for his removal after the House impeaches him. Coattails have ballast.

    He doesn't need the money like Cruz (or any other candidate.) So there's no reason for him to betray us before the election, à la Romney. (He'd lose, too.)

    Also, he'll probably get the endorsement of the CBP union. Those guys are like cops and firemen; I've known a few. You don't want to cross them.

    Don't forget that Congress, not the President, makes the laws. All he has to do is to enforce them. Deporting any prospective immigrant getting EITC would be a nice start-- "public charge" is already the law.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Jefferson
    @Twinkie

    Twinkie what is your theory as to why Donald Trump is obsessed with Megyn Kelly?

    The vast majority of mainstream media journalists bash Donald Trump, yet he only gets angry when Megyn Kelly does it.

    You never see Donald Trump go after Rachel Maddow or Whoopi Goldberg who constantly compares him to Adolf Hitler.

    At least Megyn has never compared The Donald to Adolf.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  175. @Richard A.
    @Chrisnonymous

    Borders seem to be providing protection for Japan. The horror in Brussels is a rebuke to the immigration policy supported by The Washington Post.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Borders seem to be providing protection for Japan

    Since losing the bottom half of Sakhalin Island, Japan’s borders have been entirely aqueous. Makes things a lot easier.

  176. @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    If Trump does that, we’ll bite his head off. He knows that, too.
     
    Yeah? How?

    But if Cruz stabs us in the back on immigration
     
    NumbersUSA gave Cruz a better rating than Trump.

    Again, on what basis do you trust Trump on immigration? He had no problem outsourcing work and insourcing workers when it suited him. Again, action vs. talk.

    A President Cruz would be far more sensitive to a revolt from the base than a President Trump would be on any topic, be it immigration or gun-control.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jefferson

    Again, on what basis do you trust Trump on immigration?

    Because he doesn’t want Jeff Sessions to vote for his removal after the House impeaches him. Coattails have ballast.

    He doesn’t need the money like Cruz (or any other candidate.) So there’s no reason for him to betray us before the election, à la Romney. (He’d lose, too.)

    Also, he’ll probably get the endorsement of the CBP union. Those guys are like cops and firemen; I’ve known a few. You don’t want to cross them.

    Don’t forget that Congress, not the President, makes the laws. All he has to do is to enforce them. Deporting any prospective immigrant getting EITC would be a nice start– “public charge” is already the law.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    Because he doesn’t want Jeff Sessions to vote for his removal after the House impeaches him. Coattails have ballast.
     
    You assume the GOP will maintain its Senate majority, and that, even if it did, all of its members still maintain solidarity.

    He doesn’t need the money like Cruz (or any other candidate.) So there’s no reason for him to betray us before the election, à la Romney. (He’d lose, too.)
     
    He is extremely wealthy. His presidential run strikes me as an ego-driven move. You can't possibly see a scenario under which he'd sell out the GOP/conservatives to "reach across the partisan divide" and make a "grand bargain"? Imagine the accolades from the mainstream media.

    If Cruz stabs us in the back, he'd have nowhere to go. Nowhere. Trump, on the other hand, has a lot of options - including going back to be leftist Manhattan billionaire with a string of gold digger wives. And that's if the media doesn't do a 180 and praise his "bipartisan statesmanship."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  177. @Lurker
    @gruff

    All ships appear to be useless as they are not being used. Btw how are the USN carrier battle groups faring against illegal immigration into the US?

    Replies: @gruff

    I heard they’re planning to drag a CGN up the Rio Grande.

  178. @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    If Trump does that, we’ll bite his head off. He knows that, too.
     
    Yeah? How?

    But if Cruz stabs us in the back on immigration
     
    NumbersUSA gave Cruz a better rating than Trump.

    Again, on what basis do you trust Trump on immigration? He had no problem outsourcing work and insourcing workers when it suited him. Again, action vs. talk.

    A President Cruz would be far more sensitive to a revolt from the base than a President Trump would be on any topic, be it immigration or gun-control.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jefferson

    Twinkie what is your theory as to why Donald Trump is obsessed with Megyn Kelly?

    The vast majority of mainstream media journalists bash Donald Trump, yet he only gets angry when Megyn Kelly does it.

    You never see Donald Trump go after Rachel Maddow or Whoopi Goldberg who constantly compares him to Adolf Hitler.

    At least Megyn has never compared The Donald to Adolf.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Jefferson


    Twinkie what is your theory as to why Donald Trump is obsessed with Megyn Kelly?
     
    Who the heck knows? I find both unpleasant characters though varying degrees.

    If I were speculate, I'd say Mr. Trump has a problem being criticized by a woman of a certain type.

    By the way, I recently had a chance to see some internal polling numbers in one of the key battleground states, and while blue collar white males are flocking in droves to Trump, he is losing married middle class/suburban white women massively, usually a key voting bloc for the GOP (he already does poorly with unmarried/urban women, of course, but that's not critical for the GOP since that demographic is a reliable foot soldier group for the Dems).

    It's up in the air how those votes are all going to shake out in the end.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jefferson

  179. @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    Again, on what basis do you trust Trump on immigration?
     
    Because he doesn't want Jeff Sessions to vote for his removal after the House impeaches him. Coattails have ballast.

    He doesn't need the money like Cruz (or any other candidate.) So there's no reason for him to betray us before the election, à la Romney. (He'd lose, too.)

    Also, he'll probably get the endorsement of the CBP union. Those guys are like cops and firemen; I've known a few. You don't want to cross them.

    Don't forget that Congress, not the President, makes the laws. All he has to do is to enforce them. Deporting any prospective immigrant getting EITC would be a nice start-- "public charge" is already the law.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Because he doesn’t want Jeff Sessions to vote for his removal after the House impeaches him. Coattails have ballast.

    You assume the GOP will maintain its Senate majority, and that, even if it did, all of its members still maintain solidarity.

    He doesn’t need the money like Cruz (or any other candidate.) So there’s no reason for him to betray us before the election, à la Romney. (He’d lose, too.)

    He is extremely wealthy. His presidential run strikes me as an ego-driven move. You can’t possibly see a scenario under which he’d sell out the GOP/conservatives to “reach across the partisan divide” and make a “grand bargain”? Imagine the accolades from the mainstream media.

    If Cruz stabs us in the back, he’d have nowhere to go. Nowhere. Trump, on the other hand, has a lot of options – including going back to be leftist Manhattan billionaire with a string of gold digger wives. And that’s if the media doesn’t do a 180 and praise his “bipartisan statesmanship.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    If Cruz stabs us in the back, he’d have nowhere to go. Nowhere
     
    Goldman Sachs is hardly "nowhere".

    Replies: @Twinkie

  180. @Jefferson
    @Twinkie

    Twinkie what is your theory as to why Donald Trump is obsessed with Megyn Kelly?

    The vast majority of mainstream media journalists bash Donald Trump, yet he only gets angry when Megyn Kelly does it.

    You never see Donald Trump go after Rachel Maddow or Whoopi Goldberg who constantly compares him to Adolf Hitler.

    At least Megyn has never compared The Donald to Adolf.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Twinkie what is your theory as to why Donald Trump is obsessed with Megyn Kelly?

    Who the heck knows? I find both unpleasant characters though varying degrees.

    If I were speculate, I’d say Mr. Trump has a problem being criticized by a woman of a certain type.

    By the way, I recently had a chance to see some internal polling numbers in one of the key battleground states, and while blue collar white males are flocking in droves to Trump, he is losing married middle class/suburban white women massively, usually a key voting bloc for the GOP (he already does poorly with unmarried/urban women, of course, but that’s not critical for the GOP since that demographic is a reliable foot soldier group for the Dems).

    It’s up in the air how those votes are all going to shake out in the end.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    he is losing married middle class/suburban white women massively
     
    Do these women have sons? What are those boys' prospects in the land of 600,000,000 coolies that Hillary's promised us?

    Speaking of the stabbing of backs, are these women ready to, at home?

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Jefferson
    @Twinkie

    Donald Trump says he only attacks people if they attack him first, which is false. Donald fired the first shot in his feud against Ted Cruz, by basically saying it should be illegal for Ted to run for POTUS because he is not really an American and that him being Cuban should disqualify him from being an Evangelical. As if there is some law that says only people who draw most or their entire ancestry back to Northern Europe can be Evangelicals. Only Nordics can be Evangelicals.

    Former member of The Columbo Crime Family Michael Franzese converted to Evangelicalism.

    Olympic distance runner the late Louis Zamperini converted to Evangelicalism.

  181. @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    Because he doesn’t want Jeff Sessions to vote for his removal after the House impeaches him. Coattails have ballast.
     
    You assume the GOP will maintain its Senate majority, and that, even if it did, all of its members still maintain solidarity.

    He doesn’t need the money like Cruz (or any other candidate.) So there’s no reason for him to betray us before the election, à la Romney. (He’d lose, too.)
     
    He is extremely wealthy. His presidential run strikes me as an ego-driven move. You can't possibly see a scenario under which he'd sell out the GOP/conservatives to "reach across the partisan divide" and make a "grand bargain"? Imagine the accolades from the mainstream media.

    If Cruz stabs us in the back, he'd have nowhere to go. Nowhere. Trump, on the other hand, has a lot of options - including going back to be leftist Manhattan billionaire with a string of gold digger wives. And that's if the media doesn't do a 180 and praise his "bipartisan statesmanship."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    If Cruz stabs us in the back, he’d have nowhere to go. Nowhere

    Goldman Sachs is hardly “nowhere”.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    Goldman Sachs is hardly “nowhere”.
     
    That's his wife's, not his gig. I seriously doubt Cruz would fit well (or at all) with Goldman Sachs.

    Trump has enough celebrity power (and massive resources) of his own to survive his betrayal. Cruz has neither.
  182. @Twinkie
    @Jefferson


    Twinkie what is your theory as to why Donald Trump is obsessed with Megyn Kelly?
     
    Who the heck knows? I find both unpleasant characters though varying degrees.

    If I were speculate, I'd say Mr. Trump has a problem being criticized by a woman of a certain type.

    By the way, I recently had a chance to see some internal polling numbers in one of the key battleground states, and while blue collar white males are flocking in droves to Trump, he is losing married middle class/suburban white women massively, usually a key voting bloc for the GOP (he already does poorly with unmarried/urban women, of course, but that's not critical for the GOP since that demographic is a reliable foot soldier group for the Dems).

    It's up in the air how those votes are all going to shake out in the end.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jefferson

    he is losing married middle class/suburban white women massively

    Do these women have sons? What are those boys’ prospects in the land of 600,000,000 coolies that Hillary’s promised us?

    Speaking of the stabbing of backs, are these women ready to, at home?

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    Do these women have sons? What are those boys’ prospects in the land of 600,000,000 coolies that Hillary’s promised us?
     
    If you haven't realize by now most people vote on feelings and instincts, not careful, rational analyses...

    For the same reason a lot of voters flock to "Make America Great" (whatever that actually means), other voters recoil away from this: https://twitter.com/Don_Vito_08/status/712845257289965568/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

    Do you think most women in American look like, and identify with, Mrs. Trump or Mrs. Cruz, especially the married, college-educated suburban ones?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  183. @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    If Cruz stabs us in the back, he’d have nowhere to go. Nowhere
     
    Goldman Sachs is hardly "nowhere".

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Goldman Sachs is hardly “nowhere”.

    That’s his wife’s, not his gig. I seriously doubt Cruz would fit well (or at all) with Goldman Sachs.

    Trump has enough celebrity power (and massive resources) of his own to survive his betrayal. Cruz has neither.

  184. @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    he is losing married middle class/suburban white women massively
     
    Do these women have sons? What are those boys' prospects in the land of 600,000,000 coolies that Hillary's promised us?

    Speaking of the stabbing of backs, are these women ready to, at home?

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Do these women have sons? What are those boys’ prospects in the land of 600,000,000 coolies that Hillary’s promised us?

    If you haven’t realize by now most people vote on feelings and instincts, not careful, rational analyses…

    For the same reason a lot of voters flock to “Make America Great” (whatever that actually means), other voters recoil away from this: https://twitter.com/Don_Vito_08/status/712845257289965568/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

    Do you think most women in American look like, and identify with, Mrs. Trump or Mrs. Cruz, especially the married, college-educated suburban ones?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Twinkie


    If you haven’t realize by now most people vote on feelings and instincts, not careful, rational analyses…
     
    I don't know about you, but the thought of a half-billion-or-more in a multi-cult post-America where my child is the only one without affirmative action and "protected status"

    plays to my feelings and instincts

    not to "rational analyses". California was the Massachusetts, Connecticut, Minnesota, Iowa of 1960. Look at where California falls on this list:

    https://wallethub.com/edu/states-with-the-best-schools/5335/

    then tell the mothers in the top twelve-- many swing states-- that California is their future-- their child's future. Rational analysis will come to a halt, and the medulla will kick in.

  185. Again, on what basis do you trust Trump on immigration?

    Because he doesn’t want Jeff Sessions to vote for his removal after the House impeaches him. Coattails have ballast.

    Sessions’ support is a very good sign, but on what pretext can you see the House impeaching Trump?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Rob McX

    Improved C-Span ratings?

  186. @Rob McX


    Again, on what basis do you trust Trump on immigration?
     
    Because he doesn’t want Jeff Sessions to vote for his removal after the House impeaches him. Coattails have ballast.
     
    Sessions' support is a very good sign, but on what pretext can you see the House impeaching Trump?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Improved C-Span ratings?

  187. @Twinkie
    @Brutusale


    Twinks seems a capital fellow, but his moralistic blatherings mean about as much to me as those coming from the drunk (and profane) Irish priests of my youth.
     
    If everyone followed the Aristotelian virtue ethics to which I subscribe, this sure would be a much better world.

    That he supports the bright but fatally oleaginous Cruz is no surprise.
     
    I voted for Cruz... very reluctantly. There is no doubt that Cruz gives off that proverbial used car salesman vibe.

    But I tend to weigh more heavily on what people have done, not what they say they will do. Trump has been a silver spooned, narcissistic, rich leftist with questionable business ethics and even more questionable personal ethics.

    Cruz may have been an ambitious, abrasive pol who is too bright for his own good, but at least he opposed ethanol subsidies in Iowa and still won the caucus there (while Trump was dragging out his mother's Bible to "prove" that he was a Christian despite a complete lack of any attendance record at any church anywhere). Cruz didn't pander and won there while Trump did and lost. That settled the choice of the lesser of the unpalatable for me.

    I like much of what Trump says now, but I can easily imagine the possibility of Trump stabbing me and others like me on the back once in power on, say, the Supreme Court nominee, abortion or gun rights for his own gain. I can't see Cruz doing the same. Whether he is "oily" or not, he is going to stick to his conservative guns, pun intended.

    But don't think that I support him with any enthusiasm or joy. And should Trump be the eventual nominee, I will gladly vote for him, raise money and votes, because 1) I pledged to support the eventual GOP nominee and 2) I'd rather take my chances with Trump than with Hillary Clinton.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Brutusale

    I don’t think anyone with a modicum of intelligence is casting a ballot with anything approaching joy, but for the first time since my maiden vote in 1976, I’m a one-issue voter.

  188. @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Trump's handlers need to get Melania's permission first, and have her image printed on "Made in the USA" black T shirts, T shirts sold at Trump rallies!
     
    Given that she was not only born, but grew up abroad (in Slovenia), a fact that's apparent to anyone when she says anything in English, that's a stretch. In fact, Melania's father, Viktor Knavs, was a Party member, a card-carrying member of the Communist elite.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Twinkie, @Mark Eugenikos, @Brutusale

    When I was in college I dated an Italian-American girl who lived in Rome, her UN FAO father’s permanent post, and SHE was a card-carrying member of the Italian Communist Party. As she described it, it was like being a Bernie Bro now; all her friends in Rome were members.

  189. @Twinkie
    @Jefferson


    Twinkie what is your theory as to why Donald Trump is obsessed with Megyn Kelly?
     
    Who the heck knows? I find both unpleasant characters though varying degrees.

    If I were speculate, I'd say Mr. Trump has a problem being criticized by a woman of a certain type.

    By the way, I recently had a chance to see some internal polling numbers in one of the key battleground states, and while blue collar white males are flocking in droves to Trump, he is losing married middle class/suburban white women massively, usually a key voting bloc for the GOP (he already does poorly with unmarried/urban women, of course, but that's not critical for the GOP since that demographic is a reliable foot soldier group for the Dems).

    It's up in the air how those votes are all going to shake out in the end.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Jefferson

    Donald Trump says he only attacks people if they attack him first, which is false. Donald fired the first shot in his feud against Ted Cruz, by basically saying it should be illegal for Ted to run for POTUS because he is not really an American and that him being Cuban should disqualify him from being an Evangelical. As if there is some law that says only people who draw most or their entire ancestry back to Northern Europe can be Evangelicals. Only Nordics can be Evangelicals.

    Former member of The Columbo Crime Family Michael Franzese converted to Evangelicalism.

    Olympic distance runner the late Louis Zamperini converted to Evangelicalism.

  190. @Twinkie
    @Reg Cæsar


    Do these women have sons? What are those boys’ prospects in the land of 600,000,000 coolies that Hillary’s promised us?
     
    If you haven't realize by now most people vote on feelings and instincts, not careful, rational analyses...

    For the same reason a lot of voters flock to "Make America Great" (whatever that actually means), other voters recoil away from this: https://twitter.com/Don_Vito_08/status/712845257289965568/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

    Do you think most women in American look like, and identify with, Mrs. Trump or Mrs. Cruz, especially the married, college-educated suburban ones?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    If you haven’t realize by now most people vote on feelings and instincts, not careful, rational analyses…

    I don’t know about you, but the thought of a half-billion-or-more in a multi-cult post-America where my child is the only one without affirmative action and “protected status”

    plays to my feelings and instincts

    not to “rational analyses”. California was the Massachusetts, Connecticut, Minnesota, Iowa of 1960. Look at where California falls on this list:

    https://wallethub.com/edu/states-with-the-best-schools/5335/

    then tell the mothers in the top twelve– many swing states– that California is their future– their child’s future. Rational analysis will come to a halt, and the medulla will kick in.

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