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WaPo: "Born That Way? ‘Scientific’ Racism Is Creeping Back Into Our Thinking. Here’s What to Watch Out for."
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As we all know liberal-progressive ideology is strongly pro-Science! Except when it’s not …

From the Washington Post’s social science blog, Monkey Cage:

Born that way? ‘Scientific’ racism is creeping back into our thinking. Here’s what to watch out for.

By W. Carson Byrd and Matthew W. Hughey September 28

This month, Jennifer Cramblett lost her “wrongful birth” lawsuit, which centered on a troubling ideology that has been creeping into mainstream discussions in ways not seen in decades. Cramblett claimed that the sperm used to inseminate her came from the wrong donor, leading to a biracial child, which she had not wanted. Her lawsuit claimed that this mix-up in the lab caused her and her family personal injuries of various kinds.

This lawsuit was shadowed by a troubling logic: the idea that race is a biological reality with particular traits and behaviors that can be avoided through proper breeding practices. In doing so, Cramblett’s claims echoed arguments made in a darker era of global history of “scientific” racism.

Volkswagen’s lawyers ought to study this precedent so they can better craft their defense against customer lawsuits. Maybe something along the lines of: “The concepts of ’emissions’ and ‘defeat devices’ are just social constructs. So, nyah-nyah-nyah.” Or “Well, sure, car buyers of America, we failed to deliver to you what we told you you were paying for, but … considering America’s long history of racism, how do you know you weren’t just only getting what you deserve? Huh? Huh?”

Here’s how the argument goes. Some people are born with outstanding talents, easily mastering basketball, mathematics, languages or piano, if given the right environment in which to grow. What biologist or social scientist could argue with that? But alongside that genetic understanding, an old and pernicious assumption has crept back into the American conversation, in which aptitudes are supposedly inherited by race: certain peoples are thought to have rhythm, or intellect, or speed or charm. That’s a fast track toward the old 19th- and early 20th-century problem of “scientific” racism. …

In the recent issue of the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, we invited experts in anthropology, evolutionary biology, government, law, medicine, public policy and sociology to examine the return of racial essentialism and biological determinism. Those are separate but related. Racial essentialism is the concept that people of different racial and ethnic groups possess specific traits and behaviors unique to their group. Biological determinism is the belief that race is a genetic reality that regulates how we behave.

Two of the studies included in the volume look at how misguided beliefs in genetically distinct races with differing capabilities underlie our everyday conversations about race and inequality.

The first study, “A Level Playing Field? Media Constructions of Athletics, Genetics, and Race,” examines news media coverage implying that genetic differences lead particular racial groups to succeed more often at sports, and focuses on how that belief shows up within journalism. Collaborating with University of Connecticut doctoral student Devon Goss, Matthew W. Hughey researched nearly 24,000 English-language newspaper articles across the globe from 2003-2014. Among the articles that discussed race, genetics and athletics, Hughey and Goss found that nearly 55 percent of these media narratives uncritically parroted and perpetuated the belief that African-descended groups excel in athletics, such as sprinting, because of genetic racial differences — despite the research debunking that belief.

For instance, in the wake of the 2012 Olympics, nearly one-third of the news articles that evoked race, genetics and athletics posited that African American and West Indian sprinters are fastest because they descend from testosterone-heavy ancestors who survived the brutal conditions of transatlantic slave trade—a belief that found resonance and widespread acceptance in a BBC-produced documentary entitled, “Survival of the Fastest.” But there is no gene or allele for “speed,” and no direct link between testosterone and speed (while sprinters may have high testosterone, not all high-testosterone people can sprint).

Logic!

… Recent controversies illustrate how such beliefs about race, difference and inequality can influence discussions of societal development and policies. A highly-praised volume by journalist Nicholas Wade, “A Troublesome Inheritance,” posited that recent genetic and genomic research suggests that Africa’s underdevelopment was a result of genetic inferiority of the communities on the continent, eschewing the devastating effects of colonialism.

Former Heritage Foundation policy analyst Jason Richwine’s highly criticized immigration reform approach, a proposal based on his doctoral research, used deterministic beliefs that IQ scores could select who could immigrate to the United States, and framed Latino immigrants as permanently less intelligent than whites. …

W. Carson Byrd is assistant professor of Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville. Matthew W. Hughey is associate professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut.

The whole thing (there’s much more) is quite an enjoyable read in a fish-in-a-barrel sort of way.

 
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  1. W. Carson Byrd is assistant professor of Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville. Matthew W. Hughey is associate professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut.

    Are professors of Pan-African Studies and of Sociology academic experts about the science of racial differences?

  2. Racial essentialism… Honey, we don’t even believe in species essentialism any more, let alone racial. What an idiot.

  3. Boy do these two need to read The Sports Gene! Or, you know, just watch the Olympic sprinting events.

    Way off topic: I’ve been thinking how one reason employers love H1b visas is that the foreigners they employ are tied to their jobs. As they acquire more skills they can’t shop around with other employers to get a higher paying job or even get an offer they can use to push their current employer to give them a raise. What would be the downside to changing the law allowing them to move freely from one job to another, instead of being indentured servants? Wouldn’t that make them much less attractive to employers in the U.S.?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Joe H.


    As they acquire more skills they can’t shop around with other employers to get a higher paying job or even get an offer they can use to push their current employer to give them a raise
     
    Sure they could… back home.
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Joe H.

    Why take such an indirect approach.? We should instead take the Judge Smails approach: "You'll get nothing, and you'll like it." Eliminate the H1-B visa altogether.

  4. “…some people are born with outstanding talents, easily mastering basketball…”

    “…aptitudes are supposedly inherited by race: certain peoples are thought to have rhythm…”

    These two gems brought a smile to my face. Fish in a barrel indeed!

  5. “…while sprinters may have high testosterone, not all high-testosterone people can sprint.” And in other news, people who give birth have uteruses, but not all people with uteruses give birth. I mean, how misogynist is it to say that “women” give birth? Really, wow, just wow.. I just can’t even…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Tracy

    Well, it is now considered transphobic. The proper thing to say, apparently, is that women and transmen and various kinds of genderqueer people give birth.

  6. I approve of what VW did with diesel emissions. The real villains here are the EPA and its European counterpart that demand ever escalating MPG while approaching zero emissions. You can’t have both but what does some sinecured bureaucrat with an English or law degree know or want to know? How many people at the EPA are affirmative action hires?

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    @Clyde

    The very purpose of the original federal Clean Air Act was to eliminate gasoline powered cars from the marketplace. The thinking was that only electric cars-expensive and with a short range-or hideously expensive steam, gas turbine or Stirling engines (which would triple or quadruple car prices) would be allowed. However, by going to catalytic converters and electronic engine controls, it turned out that the gasoline piston engine not only could meet the requirements, it was the only engine that could. So they have progressively made the requirements even stricter. Consumers blame the car makers for the increasing complexity and expense of cars, instead of placing blame on the government.

    Replies: @bomag

  7. It looks like a good amount of the commenters aren’t buying this.

    One compared these professors to the bishops who dismissed Galileo. Another wrote “This article smacks of Lysenckoism in the Soviet Union where certain research was banned and geneticists whose views clashed with official ideology were sent to gulags.”

    Another good one: “The article attempts to use emotional appeal to disprove science.”

    If this keeps up, they’ll have to follow the lead of other news-gathering organizations and shut down comments because they’re too…(you guessed it!) PROBLEMATIC.

    • Replies: @Patton
    @Days of Broken Arrows

    Yeah, the comments I saw, in LIFO order, were near-uniformly dismissive. I didn't want to presume that people are continuing to have the scales falling from their eyes, simply because that's what I hope to see continuing to happen.

    So I wrote it off as a storm of comments from people here (pretended to, actually), rather than read them all and be ultimately disappointed.

    , @AndrewR
    @Days of Broken Arrows

    I was discussing the injustice of what happened to James Watson with my sister a while back. She is a dyed-in-the-wool "Progressive" "Democrat."

    Once I got her to concede that Watson may have had a point, she said "but what good would it do to spread that kind of knowledge"? The idea that ending the misallocation of resources and tempering expectations of what Africa can achieve was anathema to her

    To the ideologue, science is only a means to Equality and Justice. Once science gets in the way of the agenda then it is seen as evil.

  8. The comments I read on the article looked very reasonable, as seems to increasingly be the case with these kinds of articles when comments are allowed.

    People get it. Comments sections throughout the US get it.

    Unless the president or zuckerberg or google figure out a way to keep people too scared to comment, it is only a matter of time before people can admit openly what their lying eyes and science have been telling them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @wren

    "(K)eep people to scared to comment ... "

    I think we're already seeing the beginnings of the ultimate way they will deal with this. Online shaming of "controversial" views by having computer-savvy types do any feasible detective work to crack online anonymity, discover actual identities, and attack their reputations.

    It's been demonstrated any large company will fold like a cheap suit if someone publicly points to an actual employee of theirs by name and complains of their "racist," "sexist," or "homophobic" comments. Remember the Mozilla CEO? Recall the white female resident in the Texas pool party incident earlier this summer who had the temerity to come to her neighbor's aid in a fight with some hood rat? Her identity was tracked down, along with her employer, which turned out to be a subsidiary of Bank of America named Core Logic. A Tweet was sent to the company along the lines of "Do you support your employees engaging in this kind of racist behavior??"

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2015/06/race-mob-gets-mckinney-woman-fired-for-her-alleged-part-in-pool-incident-video/

    So I can very easily see this become more common. Why wouldn't they, it seems to work!

  9. Professor of Pan-African Studies? We all know ethnic studies are mostly grievance studies, but I didn’t know you could put such a explicit reference to a specific political movement in the name of an academic department. How are you supposed to get a mainstream publication’s audience to take you seriously with a byline like that?

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @WowJustWow

    Maybe it's African-Pan Studies- You know, how to cook fried chicken (or a neighbor)

  10. From Vox Media’s SBNation:

    A normal testosterone-to-epitestosterone ratio is slightly more than 1-to-1. Conte says that one recent study of the general population “placed the average T-E ratio for whites at 1.2-to-1 and for blacks at 1.3-to-1.”

    http://www.sbnation.com/longform/2015/9/9/9271811/can-boxing-trust-usada

  11. But there is no gene or allele for “speed,” and no direct link between testosterone and speed (while sprinters may have high testosterone, not all high-testosterone people can sprint).

    There is no link between being a poodle and being a dog, after all there are plenty of dogs that are not poodles.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Lot

    I can't tell exactly where a cocker spaniel becomes a German shepherd, therefore there's no such thing as a cocker spaniel and no such thing as a German Shepherd

  12. I wonder if Ms. Cramblett had discovered the error in sperm donor prior to giving birth and wanted an abortion, would the left support that, or would they have finally found a situation in which the child’s right to life trumps the mother’s reproductive choice?

    I also find the reliance on colonialism as the explanation of all that is wrong with basket case countries amusing, as it’s not like they were leading the pack before the English, French, Spanish, Italians, or whomever found them. It must be more comforting than thinking about why places like sub-Saharan Africa or North America were so primitive compared to the European nations for the last few thousand years.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Arclight


    I also find the reliance on colonialism as the explanation of all that is wrong with basket case countries amusing...
     
    Good point.

    It would seem that a certain thirteen states in America did rather well after they ceased being colonies. I wonder what the difference was?
    , @Anonymous
    @Arclight

    It's an old saw with the pro-lifers to bitterly speculate that metro-libs would only turn against consumer-scale abortion once the "gay gene" is discoverable in obstetric screening (a related self-pitying meme is that legal abortion is a form of black genocide, which misreads the audience [white pro-choice liberals] since many blacks already guiltily suspect this is the case). But now things aren't looking so simple for that moralistic scenario, assuming a concrete single genetic determinant could ever be identified -- existence of which, of course, is the liberals' stock excuse for homosexual excess, so they get you coming and going. Seems "heads I win/tails you lose" is a staple of modern progressive thought actually.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @The most deplorable one

  13. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/poll-jeb-falls-4_1039884.html

    Ridiculous guy. Remember when he stood on his tiptoes despite being the tallest candidate? When the tallest guy feels inadequate about his height, what does that tell you? Funnier yet, if he’s so mindful of height, why did he marry a midget and have not-so-tall children?

    And then his style. It’s pure wussy-land. I could never stand the lover-boy in West Side Story. I mean grow a pair. And Jeb is like that. Illegal aliens are a story of the bravery of love. Gimmez a break.

    The Bush family. As if picking Dan Quayle wasn’t dumb enough, they raised a Dan Quayle.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Priss Factor

    We may be close to the point when picking on Jeb Bush begins to feel pointlessly cruel. I recall something similar happened a few years ago when Brittney Spears got so out of control that her antics didn't seem funny anymore, just sad. Perhaps we should turn away and allow Jeb to fade quietly from the scene, rather than drive him off in a hail of hoots and jeers. Let's do it for Columba and the children; they've suffered enough.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Priss Factor

    , @ganderson
    @Priss Factor

    J. Danforth was Daniel Webster compared to Jeb

  14. I’m glad, now I know what to “…watch out for.” More like this because science.

  15. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:

    Remove adjectives like ‘pernicious’ and the article has no legs to stand on.

    Certain things are wrong simply because the reporter describes them as ‘pernicious’, ‘darker(era)’, ‘misguided’, etc.

    Oooh, Oooh…

  16. We all know ethnic studies are mostly grievance studies, but I didn’t know you could put such a explicit reference to a specific political movement in the name of an academic department.

    Something that came out of the Steven Salaita scandal at the University of Illinois is that its American Indians Studies department, whose staff is less than 25% visibly American Indian, and which got in trouble for trying to hire that antisemitic Palestinian, was trying to get approval to become an “Indigenous Studies Program,” dropping “American Indian” from its name.

    While American Indian studies might involve all sorts of study of Indian culture, the only thing linking the Maori and the Palestinians with Indians is their supposed shared oppression at the hands of whitey’s “settler colonialism.”

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Lot


    While American Indian studies might involve all sorts of study of Indian culture, the only thing linking the Maori and the Palestinians with Indians is their supposed shared oppression at the hands of whitey’s “settler colonialism.”
     
    The only thing linking them is theft from the taxpayers at that public university (U of Illinois) because its all about getting paid!
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Lot

    In what way are Palestinians "indigenous"? They seem to identify with alien invaders, which is an odd way of celebrating your indigeneity, or whatever.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Lot

    , @Jefferson
    @Lot

    "Something that came out of the Steven Salaita scandal at the University of Illinois is that its American Indians Studies department, whose staff is less than 25% visibly American Indian,"

    I wonder what percentage of the "Native American Studies Department" at the University Of Illinois have blue eyes like Elizabeth Warren? There is probably a lot of Flight From White among the "American Indian Studies Department" staff.

    Replies: @Lot

  17. Pat Casey says:

    This is kind of extraneous to the context, but I’ve lately been watching The Five on Fox News very regularly, mostly because attention given to Dana Perino is a well-spent gaze of time to my mind, especially when Happy Hour arrives, but more acutely because Perino interestingly seems to have gotten noticeably smarter since when she was on her feet fielding easy questions as Bush’s suspiciously gorgeous thirty-four-year-old press secretary. She wasn’t awful but she was was never very apt or very convincing or at all given to answering in a paragraphs advancing equivocation-under-cover-of-nuance. For a job that wants a deft equivocator, and for a town that dreams of being White House Press Secretary far, far more than anything else, you kind of couldn’t help but think the thought that she was GB’s mistress (especially when you found what her husband looks like).

    But now on The Five, she seems like the most insightful one among them and maybe the most poised woman on TV, and, well, damn if she often doesn’t change my mind on particulars about this or that pose some politicians has contrived for the press, ready with some outside-the-box-ish view or even a nice paradox to counter or qualify what one of the others says. She now lacks not nuance, or the ability to offer an extended thought.

    My point is, I now take for granted that IQ is exactly as important as Steve Sailer teaches. But, and not that I think Steve himself does this or accidentally purveys it, but I realize that as I’ve come to assume the fixity of intelligence, this assumption has diminished a proper regard for the possibility that people can indeed become wiser, in a way that makes them definitely appear to be smarter. Kinda seems that if IQ is stable, then nothing could be more important than giving attention and concern to how one goes about acquiring wisdom, and what exactly it consists of.

  18. @Lot

    But there is no gene or allele for “speed,” and no direct link between testosterone and speed (while sprinters may have high testosterone, not all high-testosterone people can sprint).
     
    There is no link between being a poodle and being a dog, after all there are plenty of dogs that are not poodles.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I can’t tell exactly where a cocker spaniel becomes a German shepherd, therefore there’s no such thing as a cocker spaniel and no such thing as a German Shepherd

  19. Fish in a barrel, yeah, logically, but I’m kind of worried the progress we were making in chipping away at the blank-slate consensus is going to be threatened.

    I guess it’s logical the Empire would strike back, but…

  20. posited that recent genetic and genomic research suggests that Africa’s underdevelopment was a result of genetic inferiority of the communities on the continent

    “Genetic inferiority”? I doubt Nicholas Wade used that term, but if the authors want to summarize his argument that way then they’re already race realists without knowing it.

    • Replies: @Ic1000
    @GW

    > A highly-praised volume by journalist Nicholas Wade, “A Troublesome Inheritance,” posited that recent genetic and genomic research suggests that Africa’s underdevelopment was a result of genetic inferiority of the communities on the continent, eschewing the devastating effects of colonialism.

    Neither Hughey nor Byrd actually read Wade. They are interested in what they imagine he must have written. What's actually in the book -- not so much.

    These professors' scholarly writings have got to be amusing. Doubtless more than adequate for tenure at prestigious East German universities.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @GW

    Nicholas Wade studiously avoids implying "genetic inferiority."

    , @ben tillman
    @GW


    “Genetic inferiority”? I doubt Nicholas Wade used that term, but if the authors want to summarize his argument that way then they’re already race realists without knowing it.
     
    Not race realists but real racists.
    , @Anonymo1
    @GW

    Nobody prominent, like Wade/Derb/Richwine or bloggers like Razib, or whoever, use the terms inferior/superior. But they keep getting accused of it..

  21. Ok, I read the article and I came away with the conclusion that if the only difference between blacks and white was that blacks were faster, I’d be cool with that.

  22. When modern Bolsheviks use words like pernicious, noxious or odious, they mean “truth that is forbidden to know, write or speak.”

    Donald Trump knows and speaks forbidden truths. And that encourages others. Bolsheviks no likey.

    Comes a Trumpening.

  23. Has anyone else noticed that articles denouncing upsetting science often seem to endorse the very same upsetting science? (Or perhaps a barely distinguishable version of it?) It’s as if they’re trying to edge their way toward admitting the unpleasant things (because they actually do want their views to be scientific) while denouncing along the way, naming and shaming the villains etc There was a Guardian article on race a while ago (Steve may have linked to it) which seemed to simultaneously claim that group differences are widely understood and accepted by the relevant scientists, and that believing in group differences was satanic thoughtcrime.

    Maybe it’s just me. Or maybe Steve’s esoteric/exoteric lens can come in handy here…..

  24. W. Carson Byrd is assistant professor of Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville. Matthew W. Hughey is associate professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut.

    Hughey is also “Affiliate Faculty, Africana Studies Institute” at UConn.

    Would anyone be interested in guessing the race of these two gentlemen?

    Dr. Byrd, the PanAfrican Studies professor, is paler and blonder than the typical Swedish man:

    http://louisville.edu/panafricanstudies/faculty-and-staff/w-carson-byrd-ph-d-assistant-professor.html

    Dr. Hughey is nearly that pale, but his sweater vest and bow tie lead one to think he may be 1% black and thus fully black and you are a racist if you think otherwise, or perhaps is another transracial African American.

    Another contributor to the special “Watch out scientists, race still doesn’t exist!” special edition is this lady:

    She also served as a “Postdoctoral Fellow, Africana Studies”

    • Replies: @wren
    @Lot

    Perhaps Dr. Byrd has a black wife or husband.

    , @Penguinchip
    @Lot

    In regard to Ms. Bliss, I'd do her.

  25. WhatEvvs [AKA "Anonymuss Annie"] says:

    It’s not really to the point but I enjoy the irony of the Cramblett ruling. Bitch got what she deserved. The kid, not so much.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @WhatEvvs


    It’s not really to the point but I enjoy the irony of the Cramblett ruling. Bitch got what she deserved.
     
    Not at all. The judge said she can sue again under the proper legal theory, and presumably she'll win.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  26. It’s hard to believe that intelligent adults can actually believe in racial equality.

    Secular liberals are forced to maintain the position that natural selection leads to differences in ability in every organism except for humans. How could that possibly be true?

    • Replies: @advancedatheist
    @Clement Pulaski

    Notice that secular liberals now endorse biological explanations for political orientation. Funny how that works.

    , @epochehusserl
    @Clement Pulaski

    Because they are not Christians, they feel as though they would become Nazis if they didnt enforce the belief in racial equality.

  27. Even though the authors are adamantly against scientific racism, they fall for the out-dated 1986 study that supposedly showed that people of African descent are genetically endowed with high serum testosterone levels. Recent investigations have proven otherwise:

    Contrary to the postulated racial difference, testosterone concentrations did not differ notably between black and white men.

    “Serum estrogen, but not testosterone, levels differ between black and white men in a nationally representative sample of Americans” (2007):
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17456570

  28. advancedatheist [AKA "RedneckCryonicist"] says:
    @Clement Pulaski
    It's hard to believe that intelligent adults can actually believe in racial equality.

    Secular liberals are forced to maintain the position that natural selection leads to differences in ability in every organism except for humans. How could that possibly be true?

    Replies: @advancedatheist, @epochehusserl

    Notice that secular liberals now endorse biological explanations for political orientation. Funny how that works.

  29. PanAfrican Studies .
    Must be North Africa because nothing more than a grass hut was ever built south of the equator. In North Africa there were the pyramids and the….the…. And they were built by the Egyptians who were as everyone knows black.

  30. @Lot

    W. Carson Byrd is assistant professor of Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville. Matthew W. Hughey is associate professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut.
     
    Hughey is also "Affiliate Faculty, Africana Studies Institute" at UConn.


    Would anyone be interested in guessing the race of these two gentlemen?

    Dr. Byrd, the PanAfrican Studies professor, is paler and blonder than the typical Swedish man:

    http://louisville.edu/panafricanstudies/faculty-and-staff/w-carson-byrd-ph-d-assistant-professor.html

    https://pmsol3.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/averageswedeman.jpg?w=490

    Dr. Hughey is nearly that pale, but his sweater vest and bow tie lead one to think he may be 1% black and thus fully black and you are a racist if you think otherwise, or perhaps is another transracial African American.

    http://generalbooks.bookstore.uconn.edu/sites/generalbooks.bookstore.uconn.edu/files/Hughey_PromoPic1.jpg

    Another contributor to the special "Watch out scientists, race still doesn't exist!" special edition is this lady:

    http://www.catherinebliss.com/uploads/5/2/5/0/5250134/3853857.jpg?286

    She also served as a "Postdoctoral Fellow, Africana Studies"

    Replies: @wren, @Penguinchip

    Perhaps Dr. Byrd has a black wife or husband.

  31. Dear Mr. Sailer,

    Many posters express my thoughts or opinions, way better than I ever could.

    I would like to express my opinion just by generating the “Agree” tag.
    I do not want to write a comment repeating thoughts already offered.

    How does one generate the “Agree” tag?

    Do I need to enable pop-ups?

    I click the right mouse button, nothing useful shows.

    The UNZ.com web page does not display an obvious HELP (button, or tag)

    Please repost the instructions given by Mr. Unz when he introduced these new features.

    With Great Respect,
    SF

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Old Jew

    I think you have to post a certain number of replies in a month before you can reply. Look at the Faq.

  32. @Lot

    We all know ethnic studies are mostly grievance studies, but I didn’t know you could put such a explicit reference to a specific political movement in the name of an academic department.
     
    Something that came out of the Steven Salaita scandal at the University of Illinois is that its American Indians Studies department, whose staff is less than 25% visibly American Indian, and which got in trouble for trying to hire that antisemitic Palestinian, was trying to get approval to become an “Indigenous Studies Program,” dropping "American Indian" from its name.

    While American Indian studies might involve all sorts of study of Indian culture, the only thing linking the Maori and the Palestinians with Indians is their supposed shared oppression at the hands of whitey's "settler colonialism."

    Replies: @Clyde, @Reg Cæsar, @Jefferson

    While American Indian studies might involve all sorts of study of Indian culture, the only thing linking the Maori and the Palestinians with Indians is their supposed shared oppression at the hands of whitey’s “settler colonialism.”

    The only thing linking them is theft from the taxpayers at that public university (U of Illinois) because its all about getting paid!

  33. I completely understand if someone didn’t want a biracial baby. Especially when she did it with donated sperm. That lawsuit is legit.

  34. Pan African studies and sociology doctorate, nothing further needs to be said.

  35. I can sum this up easily:
    “All the observational evidence points to racial differences, but we are going to obfuscate that with bullshit propaganda anyway.”

  36. Even though the authors are adamantly against scientific racism, they fall for the out-dated 1986 study that supposedly showed that people of African descent are genetically endowed with high serum testosterone levels. Recent investigations have proven otherwise:

    “Serum estrogen, but not testosterone, levels differ between black and white men in a nationally representative sample of Americans” (2007)”

    In the study you reference, 45-69 year old black men had higher t levels (5.62) than 20-44 year old black men (5.35). This is contrary to the literature on hormonal variation and points to something very wrong with the dataset.

    I have tried to communicate with the lead author on this point but have received no reply. Whatever the reason, this study has no place in the scientific literature. The same dataset that found no race difference also found that older black men had higher t levels than younger black men.

    I suspect the problem here is a biased dataset, i.e., polygynous males had been removed from it as a result of an earlier study. The authors said they used serum samples that the National Center for Health Statistics had collected for its Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). However, only 1,479 samples were still available out of an initial total of 1,998. Therefore, over 25% of the original samples were missing.

    According to the authors, some samples were missing because they were being used for another study. Another study had in fact used the NHANES-III serum bank for research on a sexually transmitted disease: Herpes Simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). That other study reported that more than 25% of adults between 30 and 39 years of age were positive for HSV-2. It may be that samples that tested positive were set aside for further testing or simply for legal reasons. Removing such samples would have also meant removing the most polygynous young men from the dataset.

    Reference

    Rohrmann, S., Nelson, W.G., Rifai, N., Brown, T.R., Dobs, A., Kanarek, N., Yager, J.D., Platz, E.A. (2007). Serum estrogen, but not testosterone levels differ between Black and White men in a nationally representative sample of Americans. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 92, 2519-2525

    • Replies: @Mark Caplan
    @Peter Frost

    Peter Frost, I see what you are referring to. Table 3 in the referenced article seems to show young black men having lower testosterone levels than middle-aged black men, which wouldn't make sense. However, the bottom of Table 3 says, "The geometric mean concentration was adjusted for age...." So I take it that the given testosterone levels within each age strata are still age-adjusted figures. Supporting that interpretation, the testosterone levels shown in Table 3 for whites are roughly the same in all three age strata: ages 20-44, 45-69, and 70+. So it's pretty clear those would be age-adjusted testosterone levels.

    In the body of the article, the authors mention four other studies that support their conclusion:


    In our analysis, serum testosterone concentration was similar in young non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men, which has also been reported in three U.S. cross-sectional studies (19, 20, 21). In a U.S. longitudinal study, testosterone concentration was higher in young black than white men after adjustment for age and BMI (22). However, after further adjustment for waist circumference, there was no difference between non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men.

     

    The article being referred to may be found here:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17456570
  37. @Days of Broken Arrows
    It looks like a good amount of the commenters aren't buying this.

    One compared these professors to the bishops who dismissed Galileo. Another wrote "This article smacks of Lysenckoism in the Soviet Union where certain research was banned and geneticists whose views clashed with official ideology were sent to gulags."

    Another good one: "The article attempts to use emotional appeal to disprove science."

    If this keeps up, they'll have to follow the lead of other news-gathering organizations and shut down comments because they're too...(you guessed it!) PROBLEMATIC.

    Replies: @Patton, @AndrewR

    Yeah, the comments I saw, in LIFO order, were near-uniformly dismissive. I didn’t want to presume that people are continuing to have the scales falling from their eyes, simply because that’s what I hope to see continuing to happen.

    So I wrote it off as a storm of comments from people here (pretended to, actually), rather than read them all and be ultimately disappointed.

  38. @GW

    posited that recent genetic and genomic research suggests that Africa’s underdevelopment was a result of genetic inferiority of the communities on the continent
     
    "Genetic inferiority"? I doubt Nicholas Wade used that term, but if the authors want to summarize his argument that way then they're already race realists without knowing it.

    Replies: @Ic1000, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman, @Anonymo1

    > A highly-praised volume by journalist Nicholas Wade, “A Troublesome Inheritance,” posited that recent genetic and genomic research suggests that Africa’s underdevelopment was a result of genetic inferiority of the communities on the continent, eschewing the devastating effects of colonialism.

    Neither Hughey nor Byrd actually read Wade. They are interested in what they imagine he must have written. What’s actually in the book — not so much.

    These professors’ scholarly writings have got to be amusing. Doubtless more than adequate for tenure at prestigious East German universities.

  39. I am glad you read this tripe Steve so I don’t have to. I subscribed to the WaPo for 20 years but quit about 10 years ago because the paper was full of the twaddle and No Real News. The pensioned off all their real reporters and replaced them with J-school grads with hyphenated last names.
    A shame really. It used to be a good paper, and I think an honest press is good for our country. Now they are just an NYT wannabe.

    • Replies: @Patton
    @Jim Don Bob

    Oddly enough, I find the new WaPo to be quite readable. Partly, that's because I ignore the editorial page in its entirety. Every last one of their opinionators, on both sides of the fence, is insufferable.

    But across the rest of the news section, perhaps four of every five stories is worth at least a slim, and some are quite good.

  40. @Old Jew
    Dear Mr. Sailer,

    Many posters express my thoughts or opinions, way better than I ever could.


    I would like to express my opinion just by generating the "Agree" tag.
    I do not want to write a comment repeating thoughts already offered.

    How does one generate the "Agree" tag?

    Do I need to enable pop-ups?

    I click the right mouse button, nothing useful shows.

    The UNZ.com web page does not display an obvious HELP (button, or tag)


    Please repost the instructions given by Mr. Unz when he introduced these new features.

    With Great Respect,
    SF

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I think you have to post a certain number of replies in a month before you can reply. Look at the Faq.

    • Agree: another fred
  41. The argument that the adopting parents must believe in racial “essentialism” to argue that they have been damaged by the mixup doesn’t make sense even by the lights of the hard core environmentalists. Such environmentalists argue that black and biracial adoptees into middle class white families don’t do as well on IQ and academically because they are still subject to Factor X — stereotype threat, perhaps — that suppresses their performance.

    So why wouldn’t a parent who believes this environmental account, and who seeks a sperm donor, have a legitimate stake in avoiding that fate for their children?

    There isn’t a shred of consistency in the argument.

    • Replies: @al gore rhythms
    @candid_observer

    True. In fact doesn't the logic of this author's position mean that people using the services of sperm banks should not be able to specify the race of the donor? How can you request something that does not exist? And what possible grounds can a parent have for wanting to specify the race of their child other than racism?

    This is the way a lot of 'liberal' legislation ends up coming into being. No-one particularly wanted it, and no-one asked for it. It benefits no-one. But the logic of their own position is so dominant that once it has found it's way onto the agenda no person can argue against it without accusations of racism. And there are always incentives for bringing such legislation forward, such as proving you are not racist, being Anti Racist Of The Month, nomintated for a nobel peace prize, etc. So it just kind of happens.

  42. They deny the reality of intelligence tests in every form from kindergarten to graduate school and the racial differences that always appear magically from them, why should sports be any different?

  43. @Priss Factor
    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/poll-jeb-falls-4_1039884.html

    Ridiculous guy. Remember when he stood on his tiptoes despite being the tallest candidate? When the tallest guy feels inadequate about his height, what does that tell you? Funnier yet, if he's so mindful of height, why did he marry a midget and have not-so-tall children?

    And then his style. It's pure wussy-land. I could never stand the lover-boy in West Side Story. I mean grow a pair. And Jeb is like that. Illegal aliens are a story of the bravery of love. Gimmez a break.

    The Bush family. As if picking Dan Quayle wasn't dumb enough, they raised a Dan Quayle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BQMgCy-n6U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu7sRdRrm_w

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @ganderson

    We may be close to the point when picking on Jeb Bush begins to feel pointlessly cruel. I recall something similar happened a few years ago when Brittney Spears got so out of control that her antics didn’t seem funny anymore, just sad. Perhaps we should turn away and allow Jeb to fade quietly from the scene, rather than drive him off in a hail of hoots and jeers. Let’s do it for Columba and the children; they’ve suffered enough.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "We may be close to the point when picking on Jeb Bush begins to feel pointlessly cruel. ........
    Perhaps we should turn away and allow Jeb to fade quietly from the scene, rather than drive him off in a hail of hoots and jeers."

    No. He and his whole rotten family and their whole rotten retinue of hangers-on like Karl Rove deserve the full measure of our disdain. Let Jeb run off to exile in Mexico if he loves it so much.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @Priss Factor
    @Harry Baldwin

    "Let’s do it for Columba and the children; they’ve suffered enough."

    You're right.

    A final farewell to Jebby.

    https://youtu.be/vR51YrUXQUM?t=1m10s

  44. “But there is no gene or allele for “speed,” and no direct link between testosterone and speed (while sprinters may have high testosterone, not all high-testosterone people can sprint).”

    Well, I for one am wondering why they didn’t just follow through on this to the “logical” progressive end, questioning whether men are actually capable of running faster than women, and conclude that since testosterone isn’t linked to speed that it is clearly the result of institutional sexism that no top female sprinter posts a time that could even get her into the finals of the men’s event, much less win the event.

  45. @Arclight
    I wonder if Ms. Cramblett had discovered the error in sperm donor prior to giving birth and wanted an abortion, would the left support that, or would they have finally found a situation in which the child's right to life trumps the mother's reproductive choice?

    I also find the reliance on colonialism as the explanation of all that is wrong with basket case countries amusing, as it's not like they were leading the pack before the English, French, Spanish, Italians, or whomever found them. It must be more comforting than thinking about why places like sub-Saharan Africa or North America were so primitive compared to the European nations for the last few thousand years.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Anonymous

    I also find the reliance on colonialism as the explanation of all that is wrong with basket case countries amusing…

    Good point.

    It would seem that a certain thirteen states in America did rather well after they ceased being colonies. I wonder what the difference was?

  46. @GW

    posited that recent genetic and genomic research suggests that Africa’s underdevelopment was a result of genetic inferiority of the communities on the continent
     
    "Genetic inferiority"? I doubt Nicholas Wade used that term, but if the authors want to summarize his argument that way then they're already race realists without knowing it.

    Replies: @Ic1000, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman, @Anonymo1

    Nicholas Wade studiously avoids implying “genetic inferiority.”

    • Agree: Daniel Williams
  47. W. Carson Byrd and Matthew W. Hughey demonstrate how you debunk scientific racism: always refer to it as “scientific” racism.

  48. @Jim Don Bob
    I am glad you read this tripe Steve so I don't have to. I subscribed to the WaPo for 20 years but quit about 10 years ago because the paper was full of the twaddle and No Real News. The pensioned off all their real reporters and replaced them with J-school grads with hyphenated last names.
    A shame really. It used to be a good paper, and I think an honest press is good for our country. Now they are just an NYT wannabe.

    Replies: @Patton

    Oddly enough, I find the new WaPo to be quite readable. Partly, that’s because I ignore the editorial page in its entirety. Every last one of their opinionators, on both sides of the fence, is insufferable.

    But across the rest of the news section, perhaps four of every five stories is worth at least a slim, and some are quite good.

  49. WGG [AKA "World\'s Greatest Grandson"] says:

    The obvious point about Drs. Byrd and Hughey is that their careers absolutely depend on marginalizing Wade and Richwine (and Steve Sailer of course.) Coming up with fantastical, sparkly, abstract, improvable theories for why nothing is as it seems is the new norm for soft science professors.

    Meteorology/ climatology comes to mind, as does the holy grail of bs: cosmology. Pontification about multiverses, parallel universes, doppelgangers and other nerd-bait has less concrete evidence than the Bhagavad Gita or my daily horoscope. The old dead horse String Theory and Big Bang the same. It’s all really quite extraneous.

  50. When you order vanilla and you get chocolate, you have a right to complain.

    The WaPo piece falls into the “wow just wow” category, proof we have gone through the looking glass — 1984 good think crossed with college sophomore essay-ism. Mental syrup of ipecac.

  51. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Since Byrd & the 12 (!) other active faculty members of Pan-African Studies at Louisville only exist to provide meaningless classes for the basketball team and related educational disciplines (UNC having already dispensed with this middle man) maybe they actually believe this? All the kids they teach in a typical week, black or white or Samoan or combinations thereof, are huge and athletically freakish. The female students too! Reminds me of an old Jonah Goldberg line, “If Bill Clinton really picked his Cabinet to look like America he must think that 90% of Americans are lawyers”

    • Replies: @EriK
    @Anonymous

    The courses are probably popular with the football team as well. Although the most popular major for the football team is reportedly Communication.

  52. @GW

    posited that recent genetic and genomic research suggests that Africa’s underdevelopment was a result of genetic inferiority of the communities on the continent
     
    "Genetic inferiority"? I doubt Nicholas Wade used that term, but if the authors want to summarize his argument that way then they're already race realists without knowing it.

    Replies: @Ic1000, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman, @Anonymo1

    “Genetic inferiority”? I doubt Nicholas Wade used that term, but if the authors want to summarize his argument that way then they’re already race realists without knowing it.

    Not race realists but real racists.

  53. @WhatEvvs
    It's not really to the point but I enjoy the irony of the Cramblett ruling. Bitch got what she deserved. The kid, not so much.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    It’s not really to the point but I enjoy the irony of the Cramblett ruling. Bitch got what she deserved.

    Not at all. The judge said she can sue again under the proper legal theory, and presumably she’ll win.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @ben tillman


    Not at all. The judge said she can sue again under the proper legal theory, and presumably she’ll win.

     

    What is the "proper legal theory" covering a commercial transaction little different from a slave auction?

    It doesn't matter whether the kid is white or black; he's bought. A purchase.

    Which is the very word some of these "mothers" use when discussing their experiences with these "clinics".

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @ben tillman

  54. If gays are “born that way” how come black’s behavior isn’t also explained by being “born that way?”

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Krn


    If gays are “born that way” how come black’s behavior isn’t also explained by being “born that way?”
     
    Good point.

    Let's face it, the Left has no principles; every part of the narrative is generated ad hoc to serve the particular purpose at hand.
  55. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Yuk it up if you wish but op-eds nearly identical to this one in form & substance were common fare in the early 90s. I remember in social studies class at my Pasadena prep school having to read photocopies from Time Magazine or the Utne Reader or similar middlebrow outlets explaining that stereotypes are wholly fabricated to justify some other ulterior scheme; racism is a special formula taught via movies and tabloid news, which are comparable as fictitious media; colocation of blacks with crime is coincidental because the latter’s “root cause” is poverty without enough social workers/free day-care/midnight basketball — an ironic theory since out of the other side of their mouth they promiscuously accused all CEOs and Wall Street financiers of being thieves and gangsters; etc. Once you observe that they have to keep writing this same “science is settled” op-ed over & over again the implications are interesting.

    • Agree: snorlax, Mike Sylwester
    • Replies: @Days of Broken Arrows
    @Anonymous

    "Yuk it up if you wish but op-eds nearly identical to this one in form & substance were common fare in the early 90s."

    Back then, we were closer in time to the Civil Rights movement and Brown vs. the Board of Education. So the explanations given about the lack of achievement by blacks seemed somewhat plausible. If you'd been kept out of mainstream schools and barred from much of mainstream society, perhaps you'd be behind the curve as well.

    But as more and more decades passed and the problems of blacks didn't go away but in some cases got worse, this type of thinking went from "progressive" to "outmoded" to a lot of people. The "racism" argument fell apart even more once we all started to notice how more recently-arrived non-white minority groups leapfrogged to the top of the heap in education and the workplace. Why didn't "racism" affect Indians and Asians? Or Sicilians, for that matter?

    Had discrimination and/or "racism" really been the issue, the problems of black American should have disappeared starting from about 1970. It didn't work out like that. But some people cling to old ideas.

    To give a an allegory from popular culture, the character of Mike Stivik once seemed bold and daring. It now seems hopelessly dated and naive. So it is with a lot of "progressive" thinkers. All we need now is for the gatekeepers of media to realize this -- or at least publicly admit it.

  56. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Arclight
    I wonder if Ms. Cramblett had discovered the error in sperm donor prior to giving birth and wanted an abortion, would the left support that, or would they have finally found a situation in which the child's right to life trumps the mother's reproductive choice?

    I also find the reliance on colonialism as the explanation of all that is wrong with basket case countries amusing, as it's not like they were leading the pack before the English, French, Spanish, Italians, or whomever found them. It must be more comforting than thinking about why places like sub-Saharan Africa or North America were so primitive compared to the European nations for the last few thousand years.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Anonymous

    It’s an old saw with the pro-lifers to bitterly speculate that metro-libs would only turn against consumer-scale abortion once the “gay gene” is discoverable in obstetric screening (a related self-pitying meme is that legal abortion is a form of black genocide, which misreads the audience [white pro-choice liberals] since many blacks already guiltily suspect this is the case). But now things aren’t looking so simple for that moralistic scenario, assuming a concrete single genetic determinant could ever be identified — existence of which, of course, is the liberals’ stock excuse for homosexual excess, so they get you coming and going. Seems “heads I win/tails you lose” is a staple of modern progressive thought actually.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Anonymous

    I think the days when gay activists claimed "it's genetic thus we shouldn't be oppressed" are long gone. I think most people now would say "choice or not, it doesn't hurt anyone so leave us alone."

    Replies: @e

    , @The most deplorable one
    @Anonymous

    I think Greg Cochran has pretty firmly established that male homosexuality is likely caused by a pathogen.

    In that case, the metro-lib infatuation with big-pharma and inoculation is the one at risk once the pathogen is identified, although, if research funds are denied the pathogen is unlikely to be found.

    See here for the paper: Infectious Causation of Disease

    Also, use a search engine.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @5371, @Difference Maker

  57. This WaPo article may be the largest depository of straw-men I’ve come across. But then I’m not old enough to have read Walter Duranty.

  58. @Joe H.
    Boy do these two need to read The Sports Gene! Or, you know, just watch the Olympic sprinting events.

    Way off topic: I've been thinking how one reason employers love H1b visas is that the foreigners they employ are tied to their jobs. As they acquire more skills they can't shop around with other employers to get a higher paying job or even get an offer they can use to push their current employer to give them a raise. What would be the downside to changing the law allowing them to move freely from one job to another, instead of being indentured servants? Wouldn't that make them much less attractive to employers in the U.S.?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    As they acquire more skills they can’t shop around with other employers to get a higher paying job or even get an offer they can use to push their current employer to give them a raise

    Sure they could… back home.

  59. @Lot

    We all know ethnic studies are mostly grievance studies, but I didn’t know you could put such a explicit reference to a specific political movement in the name of an academic department.
     
    Something that came out of the Steven Salaita scandal at the University of Illinois is that its American Indians Studies department, whose staff is less than 25% visibly American Indian, and which got in trouble for trying to hire that antisemitic Palestinian, was trying to get approval to become an “Indigenous Studies Program,” dropping "American Indian" from its name.

    While American Indian studies might involve all sorts of study of Indian culture, the only thing linking the Maori and the Palestinians with Indians is their supposed shared oppression at the hands of whitey's "settler colonialism."

    Replies: @Clyde, @Reg Cæsar, @Jefferson

    In what way are Palestinians “indigenous”? They seem to identify with alien invaders, which is an odd way of celebrating your indigeneity, or whatever.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @Reg Cæsar

    Support the Byzantine Restoration Front of Jerusalem (BμαΙε), out with the tyrannical Arab invaders!

    , @Lot
    @Reg Cæsar

    According to Robert Warrior, who to my eye looks awfully white* (and a lot like Penn Jillette) but claims to be Osage, when he read the Bible he identified with the Canaanites rather than the Jews, and the various radical left Palestinians at US universities took up that idea, that they were there in Israel before the late-coming ancient Jews fleeing their Egyptian captivity.

    *Here's a picture:
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_kniuiab1xLM/TBo5CmLXbpI/AAAAAAAAAlI/aHy225Yq_aU/s1600/Robert+Warrior+AZ.png

  60. @ben tillman
    @WhatEvvs


    It’s not really to the point but I enjoy the irony of the Cramblett ruling. Bitch got what she deserved.
     
    Not at all. The judge said she can sue again under the proper legal theory, and presumably she'll win.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Not at all. The judge said she can sue again under the proper legal theory, and presumably she’ll win.

    What is the “proper legal theory” covering a commercial transaction little different from a slave auction?

    It doesn’t matter whether the kid is white or black; he’s bought. A purchase.

    Which is the very word some of these “mothers” use when discussing their experiences with these “clinics”.

    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    @Reg Cæsar

    100% correct.

    (BTW, what I meant by the previous comment was that she lost, and deserved to. She deserves to lose, again. The kid, no. The "mother" [perhaps a better descriptor would be 'egg donor'] is a monster.)

    Replies: @Rebes

    , @ben tillman
    @Reg Cæsar


    What is the “proper legal theory” covering a commercial transaction little different from a slave auction?
     
    Breach of contract or negligence.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  61. @Reg Cæsar
    @Lot

    In what way are Palestinians "indigenous"? They seem to identify with alien invaders, which is an odd way of celebrating your indigeneity, or whatever.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Lot

    Support the Byzantine Restoration Front of Jerusalem (BμαΙε), out with the tyrannical Arab invaders!

  62. @candid_observer
    The argument that the adopting parents must believe in racial "essentialism" to argue that they have been damaged by the mixup doesn't make sense even by the lights of the hard core environmentalists. Such environmentalists argue that black and biracial adoptees into middle class white families don't do as well on IQ and academically because they are still subject to Factor X -- stereotype threat, perhaps -- that suppresses their performance.

    So why wouldn't a parent who believes this environmental account, and who seeks a sperm donor, have a legitimate stake in avoiding that fate for their children?

    There isn't a shred of consistency in the argument.

    Replies: @al gore rhythms

    True. In fact doesn’t the logic of this author’s position mean that people using the services of sperm banks should not be able to specify the race of the donor? How can you request something that does not exist? And what possible grounds can a parent have for wanting to specify the race of their child other than racism?

    This is the way a lot of ‘liberal’ legislation ends up coming into being. No-one particularly wanted it, and no-one asked for it. It benefits no-one. But the logic of their own position is so dominant that once it has found it’s way onto the agenda no person can argue against it without accusations of racism. And there are always incentives for bringing such legislation forward, such as proving you are not racist, being Anti Racist Of The Month, nomintated for a nobel peace prize, etc. So it just kind of happens.

  63. @Tracy
    "...while sprinters may have high testosterone, not all high-testosterone people can sprint." And in other news, people who give birth have uteruses, but not all people with uteruses give birth. I mean, how misogynist is it to say that "women" give birth? Really, wow, just wow.. I just can't even...

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Well, it is now considered transphobic. The proper thing to say, apparently, is that women and transmen and various kinds of genderqueer people give birth.

  64. @Lot

    We all know ethnic studies are mostly grievance studies, but I didn’t know you could put such a explicit reference to a specific political movement in the name of an academic department.
     
    Something that came out of the Steven Salaita scandal at the University of Illinois is that its American Indians Studies department, whose staff is less than 25% visibly American Indian, and which got in trouble for trying to hire that antisemitic Palestinian, was trying to get approval to become an “Indigenous Studies Program,” dropping "American Indian" from its name.

    While American Indian studies might involve all sorts of study of Indian culture, the only thing linking the Maori and the Palestinians with Indians is their supposed shared oppression at the hands of whitey's "settler colonialism."

    Replies: @Clyde, @Reg Cæsar, @Jefferson

    “Something that came out of the Steven Salaita scandal at the University of Illinois is that its American Indians Studies department, whose staff is less than 25% visibly American Indian,”

    I wonder what percentage of the “Native American Studies Department” at the University Of Illinois have blue eyes like Elizabeth Warren? There is probably a lot of Flight From White among the “American Indian Studies Department” staff.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Jefferson


    I wonder what percentage of the “Native American Studies Department” at the University Of Illinois have blue eyes like Elizabeth Warren?
     
    Much of UIUC department quit in protest about Salaita. But when the issue first hit the news, I had a look at their site, and roughly it was 50% people who you'd assume were white like Penn Jillete, I mean Robert Warrior, 25% Asian/PI, and 25% people who looked like the American Indians you'd see if you went to an actual reservation.

    Looking at a few other departments, they seem to be about 50/50 white and native. You have to be a little careful though, some schools have an AIS major, but not an actual department, so they use people from English, Anthropology, etc on the AIS "faculty page." This group tends to be about 75% white, but they are not primarily AIS scholars. Actual departments are mainly found in large public universities and more likely to have visible natives.

    Here's a mostly native Cal State Long Beach department group photo:
    http://www.cla.csulb.edu/departments/americanindianstudies/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/IMG_2219.jpg

    Here's the mostly white U. Wash AIS faculty:
    https://ais.washington.edu/people/faculty

    The chair is a "Cherokee" with light blond hair and blue eyes:
    https://sarweb.org/media/images/colloquium_teuton/colloquium_teuton_l.jpg

    Actual American Indian:

    https://c676132.ssl.cf0.rackcdn.com/RapidCity2012072300197-500dbde3055ac.jpg?5610f2558a933

    Replies: @cthulhu, @Jefferson

  65. @Reg Cæsar
    @Lot

    In what way are Palestinians "indigenous"? They seem to identify with alien invaders, which is an odd way of celebrating your indigeneity, or whatever.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Lot

    According to Robert Warrior, who to my eye looks awfully white* (and a lot like Penn Jillette) but claims to be Osage, when he read the Bible he identified with the Canaanites rather than the Jews, and the various radical left Palestinians at US universities took up that idea, that they were there in Israel before the late-coming ancient Jews fleeing their Egyptian captivity.

    *Here’s a picture:

  66. @Lot

    W. Carson Byrd is assistant professor of Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville. Matthew W. Hughey is associate professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut.
     
    Hughey is also "Affiliate Faculty, Africana Studies Institute" at UConn.


    Would anyone be interested in guessing the race of these two gentlemen?

    Dr. Byrd, the PanAfrican Studies professor, is paler and blonder than the typical Swedish man:

    http://louisville.edu/panafricanstudies/faculty-and-staff/w-carson-byrd-ph-d-assistant-professor.html

    https://pmsol3.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/averageswedeman.jpg?w=490

    Dr. Hughey is nearly that pale, but his sweater vest and bow tie lead one to think he may be 1% black and thus fully black and you are a racist if you think otherwise, or perhaps is another transracial African American.

    http://generalbooks.bookstore.uconn.edu/sites/generalbooks.bookstore.uconn.edu/files/Hughey_PromoPic1.jpg

    Another contributor to the special "Watch out scientists, race still doesn't exist!" special edition is this lady:

    http://www.catherinebliss.com/uploads/5/2/5/0/5250134/3853857.jpg?286

    She also served as a "Postdoctoral Fellow, Africana Studies"

    Replies: @wren, @Penguinchip

    In regard to Ms. Bliss, I’d do her.

  67. @Jefferson
    @Lot

    "Something that came out of the Steven Salaita scandal at the University of Illinois is that its American Indians Studies department, whose staff is less than 25% visibly American Indian,"

    I wonder what percentage of the "Native American Studies Department" at the University Of Illinois have blue eyes like Elizabeth Warren? There is probably a lot of Flight From White among the "American Indian Studies Department" staff.

    Replies: @Lot

    I wonder what percentage of the “Native American Studies Department” at the University Of Illinois have blue eyes like Elizabeth Warren?

    Much of UIUC department quit in protest about Salaita. But when the issue first hit the news, I had a look at their site, and roughly it was 50% people who you’d assume were white like Penn Jillete, I mean Robert Warrior, 25% Asian/PI, and 25% people who looked like the American Indians you’d see if you went to an actual reservation.

    Looking at a few other departments, they seem to be about 50/50 white and native. You have to be a little careful though, some schools have an AIS major, but not an actual department, so they use people from English, Anthropology, etc on the AIS “faculty page.” This group tends to be about 75% white, but they are not primarily AIS scholars. Actual departments are mainly found in large public universities and more likely to have visible natives.

    Here’s a mostly native Cal State Long Beach department group photo:

    Here’s the mostly white U. Wash AIS faculty:
    https://ais.washington.edu/people/faculty

    The chair is a “Cherokee” with light blond hair and blue eyes:

    Actual American Indian:

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    @Lot

    The Cherokee have been mixed genetically for a long time. John Ross, who was the principal chief of the Cherokee before, during, and after the Trail of Tears (Ross successfully argued the Cherokee case in front of the US Supreme Court, but Jackson refused to abide by the Court's ruling), had substantial Scottish ancestry, and the Scots still claim him today. Even in the Oklahoma town of Tahlequah, the seat of the Cherokee Nation, few of the card-carrying Cherokee look more than modestly like the stereotypical Native American. (And yes, I personally know several blonde, blue-eyed Cherokee.)

    All of this of course begs the question of what it truly means to be Cherokee, or any other group that is held to be distinct. Some months ago, I saw a genealogy program on television where somebody had their family tree researched, and then got a big reveal on the results. One older woman found out that her mother, who had died some years before, had hidden her black ancestry (maybe 15-20%) from everyone; the show tried to portray this newfound black ancestry as a point of pride, but is was clear that the elderly daughter wanted to throw up on finding out that by some definitions, she was actually "black". What does a racial admixture of single digits even mean? Maybe we need a label marked "mutt" on all of those government forms.

    Replies: @IA

    , @Jefferson
    @Lot

    Elizabeth Warren gave the most retarded reason in the world as to why she considers herself to be an "Amerindian", apparently a distant ancestor of hers had high cheekbones. Newsflash some Scandinavians specifically Finnish and Icelandic people have high cheekbones and some Eastern Europeans have high cheekbones as well, so does that mean Amerindians made their way into Europe by her retarded logic?

    This high cheekbone ancestor of Elizabeth Warren is probably a descendant of Genghis Khan just like Joseph Gordon Levitt and Charles Bronson and not a descendant of Pocahontas.

    Also I remember it was reported that this high cheekbone ancestor of Elizabeth Warren had White listed on her birth certificate and not Amerindian. There is no evidence of anybody in Elizabeth Warren's family tree being listed as Indigenous on their birth certificate.

  68. @Anonymous
    Yuk it up if you wish but op-eds nearly identical to this one in form & substance were common fare in the early 90s. I remember in social studies class at my Pasadena prep school having to read photocopies from Time Magazine or the Utne Reader or similar middlebrow outlets explaining that stereotypes are wholly fabricated to justify some other ulterior scheme; racism is a special formula taught via movies and tabloid news, which are comparable as fictitious media; colocation of blacks with crime is coincidental because the latter's "root cause" is poverty without enough social workers/free day-care/midnight basketball -- an ironic theory since out of the other side of their mouth they promiscuously accused all CEOs and Wall Street financiers of being thieves and gangsters; etc. Once you observe that they have to keep writing this same "science is settled" op-ed over & over again the implications are interesting.

    Replies: @Days of Broken Arrows

    “Yuk it up if you wish but op-eds nearly identical to this one in form & substance were common fare in the early 90s.”

    Back then, we were closer in time to the Civil Rights movement and Brown vs. the Board of Education. So the explanations given about the lack of achievement by blacks seemed somewhat plausible. If you’d been kept out of mainstream schools and barred from much of mainstream society, perhaps you’d be behind the curve as well.

    But as more and more decades passed and the problems of blacks didn’t go away but in some cases got worse, this type of thinking went from “progressive” to “outmoded” to a lot of people. The “racism” argument fell apart even more once we all started to notice how more recently-arrived non-white minority groups leapfrogged to the top of the heap in education and the workplace. Why didn’t “racism” affect Indians and Asians? Or Sicilians, for that matter?

    Had discrimination and/or “racism” really been the issue, the problems of black American should have disappeared starting from about 1970. It didn’t work out like that. But some people cling to old ideas.

    To give a an allegory from popular culture, the character of Mike Stivik once seemed bold and daring. It now seems hopelessly dated and naive. So it is with a lot of “progressive” thinkers. All we need now is for the gatekeepers of media to realize this — or at least publicly admit it.

  69. @GW

    posited that recent genetic and genomic research suggests that Africa’s underdevelopment was a result of genetic inferiority of the communities on the continent
     
    "Genetic inferiority"? I doubt Nicholas Wade used that term, but if the authors want to summarize his argument that way then they're already race realists without knowing it.

    Replies: @Ic1000, @Harry Baldwin, @ben tillman, @Anonymo1

    Nobody prominent, like Wade/Derb/Richwine or bloggers like Razib, or whoever, use the terms inferior/superior. But they keep getting accused of it..

  70. @Priss Factor
    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/poll-jeb-falls-4_1039884.html

    Ridiculous guy. Remember when he stood on his tiptoes despite being the tallest candidate? When the tallest guy feels inadequate about his height, what does that tell you? Funnier yet, if he's so mindful of height, why did he marry a midget and have not-so-tall children?

    And then his style. It's pure wussy-land. I could never stand the lover-boy in West Side Story. I mean grow a pair. And Jeb is like that. Illegal aliens are a story of the bravery of love. Gimmez a break.

    The Bush family. As if picking Dan Quayle wasn't dumb enough, they raised a Dan Quayle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BQMgCy-n6U

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu7sRdRrm_w

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @ganderson

    J. Danforth was Daniel Webster compared to Jeb

  71. @Peter Frost
    Even though the authors are adamantly against scientific racism, they fall for the out-dated 1986 study that supposedly showed that people of African descent are genetically endowed with high serum testosterone levels. Recent investigations have proven otherwise:

    “Serum estrogen, but not testosterone, levels differ between black and white men in a nationally representative sample of Americans” (2007)"



    In the study you reference, 45-69 year old black men had higher t levels (5.62) than 20-44 year old black men (5.35). This is contrary to the literature on hormonal variation and points to something very wrong with the dataset.

    I have tried to communicate with the lead author on this point but have received no reply. Whatever the reason, this study has no place in the scientific literature. The same dataset that found no race difference also found that older black men had higher t levels than younger black men.

    I suspect the problem here is a biased dataset, i.e., polygynous males had been removed from it as a result of an earlier study. The authors said they used serum samples that the National Center for Health Statistics had collected for its Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). However, only 1,479 samples were still available out of an initial total of 1,998. Therefore, over 25% of the original samples were missing.

    According to the authors, some samples were missing because they were being used for another study. Another study had in fact used the NHANES-III serum bank for research on a sexually transmitted disease: Herpes Simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). That other study reported that more than 25% of adults between 30 and 39 years of age were positive for HSV-2. It may be that samples that tested positive were set aside for further testing or simply for legal reasons. Removing such samples would have also meant removing the most polygynous young men from the dataset.

    Reference

    Rohrmann, S., Nelson, W.G., Rifai, N., Brown, T.R., Dobs, A., Kanarek, N., Yager, J.D., Platz, E.A. (2007). Serum estrogen, but not testosterone levels differ between Black and White men in a nationally representative sample of Americans. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 92, 2519-2525

    Replies: @Mark Caplan

    Peter Frost, I see what you are referring to. Table 3 in the referenced article seems to show young black men having lower testosterone levels than middle-aged black men, which wouldn’t make sense. However, the bottom of Table 3 says, “The geometric mean concentration was adjusted for age….” So I take it that the given testosterone levels within each age strata are still age-adjusted figures. Supporting that interpretation, the testosterone levels shown in Table 3 for whites are roughly the same in all three age strata: ages 20-44, 45-69, and 70+. So it’s pretty clear those would be age-adjusted testosterone levels.

    In the body of the article, the authors mention four other studies that support their conclusion:

    In our analysis, serum testosterone concentration was similar in young non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men, which has also been reported in three U.S. cross-sectional studies (19, 20, 21). In a U.S. longitudinal study, testosterone concentration was higher in young black than white men after adjustment for age and BMI (22). However, after further adjustment for waist circumference, there was no difference between non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men.

    The article being referred to may be found here:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17456570

  72. @Clement Pulaski
    It's hard to believe that intelligent adults can actually believe in racial equality.

    Secular liberals are forced to maintain the position that natural selection leads to differences in ability in every organism except for humans. How could that possibly be true?

    Replies: @advancedatheist, @epochehusserl

    Because they are not Christians, they feel as though they would become Nazis if they didnt enforce the belief in racial equality.

  73. How incredibly racist of the WaPo to imply that blacks dominate sprinting due to the nurturing effect of always having to run from cops instead of dominating due to natural genetic advantage. Of course, what else should one expect from a section of the paper entitled “Monkey Cage”?

  74. @Days of Broken Arrows
    It looks like a good amount of the commenters aren't buying this.

    One compared these professors to the bishops who dismissed Galileo. Another wrote "This article smacks of Lysenckoism in the Soviet Union where certain research was banned and geneticists whose views clashed with official ideology were sent to gulags."

    Another good one: "The article attempts to use emotional appeal to disprove science."

    If this keeps up, they'll have to follow the lead of other news-gathering organizations and shut down comments because they're too...(you guessed it!) PROBLEMATIC.

    Replies: @Patton, @AndrewR

    I was discussing the injustice of what happened to James Watson with my sister a while back. She is a dyed-in-the-wool “Progressive” “Democrat.”

    Once I got her to concede that Watson may have had a point, she said “but what good would it do to spread that kind of knowledge”? The idea that ending the misallocation of resources and tempering expectations of what Africa can achieve was anathema to her

    To the ideologue, science is only a means to Equality and Justice. Once science gets in the way of the agenda then it is seen as evil.

  75. @Anonymous
    @Arclight

    It's an old saw with the pro-lifers to bitterly speculate that metro-libs would only turn against consumer-scale abortion once the "gay gene" is discoverable in obstetric screening (a related self-pitying meme is that legal abortion is a form of black genocide, which misreads the audience [white pro-choice liberals] since many blacks already guiltily suspect this is the case). But now things aren't looking so simple for that moralistic scenario, assuming a concrete single genetic determinant could ever be identified -- existence of which, of course, is the liberals' stock excuse for homosexual excess, so they get you coming and going. Seems "heads I win/tails you lose" is a staple of modern progressive thought actually.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @The most deplorable one

    I think the days when gay activists claimed “it’s genetic thus we shouldn’t be oppressed” are long gone. I think most people now would say “choice or not, it doesn’t hurt anyone so leave us alone.”

    • Replies: @e
    @AndrewR

    Yes, until the biological etiology is understood and until science can prevent what causes it or can reverse it...then all hell will break loose. They will try to pass laws to prevent parents from taking steps to insure their kids are hetero.

  76. @Anonymous
    Since Byrd & the 12 (!) other active faculty members of Pan-African Studies at Louisville only exist to provide meaningless classes for the basketball team and related educational disciplines (UNC having already dispensed with this middle man) maybe they actually believe this? All the kids they teach in a typical week, black or white or Samoan or combinations thereof, are huge and athletically freakish. The female students too! Reminds me of an old Jonah Goldberg line, "If Bill Clinton really picked his Cabinet to look like America he must think that 90% of Americans are lawyers"

    Replies: @EriK

    The courses are probably popular with the football team as well. Although the most popular major for the football team is reportedly Communication.

  77. Peter Frost has an excellent explanation for why Black women on Napa Wine Trains are kicked off.

    Yup, you guessed it: Genetics, AKA born that way.

  78. @Joe H.
    Boy do these two need to read The Sports Gene! Or, you know, just watch the Olympic sprinting events.

    Way off topic: I've been thinking how one reason employers love H1b visas is that the foreigners they employ are tied to their jobs. As they acquire more skills they can't shop around with other employers to get a higher paying job or even get an offer they can use to push their current employer to give them a raise. What would be the downside to changing the law allowing them to move freely from one job to another, instead of being indentured servants? Wouldn't that make them much less attractive to employers in the U.S.?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Mr. Anon

    Why take such an indirect approach.? We should instead take the Judge Smails approach: “You’ll get nothing, and you’ll like it.” Eliminate the H1-B visa altogether.

  79. @Harry Baldwin
    @Priss Factor

    We may be close to the point when picking on Jeb Bush begins to feel pointlessly cruel. I recall something similar happened a few years ago when Brittney Spears got so out of control that her antics didn't seem funny anymore, just sad. Perhaps we should turn away and allow Jeb to fade quietly from the scene, rather than drive him off in a hail of hoots and jeers. Let's do it for Columba and the children; they've suffered enough.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Priss Factor

    “We may be close to the point when picking on Jeb Bush begins to feel pointlessly cruel. ……..
    Perhaps we should turn away and allow Jeb to fade quietly from the scene, rather than drive him off in a hail of hoots and jeers.”

    No. He and his whole rotten family and their whole rotten retinue of hangers-on like Karl Rove deserve the full measure of our disdain. Let Jeb run off to exile in Mexico if he loves it so much.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Mr. Anon

    Yeah, I'm just kidding. I can't get enough of the humiliation of Jeb Bush. It helps make up for the fact that "W" never faced trial and imprisonment. The turmoil he inflicted on the Middle East, the enormous amount of death, horrible injuries, wasted resources, and dislocation of entire populations is a crime for which no punishment would suffice. And there was no necessity for it--it was merely a blunder!

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  80. Cramblett claimed that the sperm used to inseminate her came from the wrong donor, leading to a biracial child, which she had not wanted. Her lawsuit claimed that this mix-up in the lab caused her and her family personal injuries of various kinds.

    I love it. If you won’t make a baby the natural way, then you’ll take what you get and you’ll like it.

  81. Byrd and Hughey and others like them have sinecures at a University. If some enterprising politicians wanted an issue that would appeal to young voters, how about this: Abolish tenure at state-universities. Make it possible to fire these parasites.

    And then fire them.

    Imagine young college students today, sitting in a class listening to these two credentialed nitwits spew forth twaddle, while worrying about the enormous student loan debt they are piling up. When they graduate, they will be paying it off for years with the meager earnings from a low-paying job with no security, while these two clowns will have a guaranteed job for life.

    A lot of college students hate thier professors. This could be put to use. The universities have become the enemy of conservatives; conservatives should attack the universities. And not with rhetoric, but where it counts – at the payroll. Liberals understand this tactic – deny your opponent a livelihood; keep him so busy eking out a living that he has no time left over to make political war on you. Conservatives must learn to adopt this tactic as well.

    There’s a get-out-the-vote slogan for the “youth vote”: Screw the professors. Abolish tenure!

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Mr. Anon

    Screw the professors. Abolish tenure!

    Wouldn't the greatest blow that could be struck against universities be to make student debt dischargeable through bankruptcy?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  82. @Lot
    @Jefferson


    I wonder what percentage of the “Native American Studies Department” at the University Of Illinois have blue eyes like Elizabeth Warren?
     
    Much of UIUC department quit in protest about Salaita. But when the issue first hit the news, I had a look at their site, and roughly it was 50% people who you'd assume were white like Penn Jillete, I mean Robert Warrior, 25% Asian/PI, and 25% people who looked like the American Indians you'd see if you went to an actual reservation.

    Looking at a few other departments, they seem to be about 50/50 white and native. You have to be a little careful though, some schools have an AIS major, but not an actual department, so they use people from English, Anthropology, etc on the AIS "faculty page." This group tends to be about 75% white, but they are not primarily AIS scholars. Actual departments are mainly found in large public universities and more likely to have visible natives.

    Here's a mostly native Cal State Long Beach department group photo:
    http://www.cla.csulb.edu/departments/americanindianstudies/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/IMG_2219.jpg

    Here's the mostly white U. Wash AIS faculty:
    https://ais.washington.edu/people/faculty

    The chair is a "Cherokee" with light blond hair and blue eyes:
    https://sarweb.org/media/images/colloquium_teuton/colloquium_teuton_l.jpg

    Actual American Indian:

    https://c676132.ssl.cf0.rackcdn.com/RapidCity2012072300197-500dbde3055ac.jpg?5610f2558a933

    Replies: @cthulhu, @Jefferson

    The Cherokee have been mixed genetically for a long time. John Ross, who was the principal chief of the Cherokee before, during, and after the Trail of Tears (Ross successfully argued the Cherokee case in front of the US Supreme Court, but Jackson refused to abide by the Court’s ruling), had substantial Scottish ancestry, and the Scots still claim him today. Even in the Oklahoma town of Tahlequah, the seat of the Cherokee Nation, few of the card-carrying Cherokee look more than modestly like the stereotypical Native American. (And yes, I personally know several blonde, blue-eyed Cherokee.)

    All of this of course begs the question of what it truly means to be Cherokee, or any other group that is held to be distinct. Some months ago, I saw a genealogy program on television where somebody had their family tree researched, and then got a big reveal on the results. One older woman found out that her mother, who had died some years before, had hidden her black ancestry (maybe 15-20%) from everyone; the show tried to portray this newfound black ancestry as a point of pride, but is was clear that the elderly daughter wanted to throw up on finding out that by some definitions, she was actually “black”. What does a racial admixture of single digits even mean? Maybe we need a label marked “mutt” on all of those government forms.

    • Replies: @IA
    @cthulhu


    All of this of course begs the question of what it truly means to be Cherokee, or any other group that is held to be distinct.
     
    You can tell by what artifacts groups (when left to their own devices) hold sacred - and their mythologies. Tragic heroes, ancestor worship, voodoo, cargoe cults, animal sacrifice, etc. The problem is euros blew the rest out of the water.
  83. WhatEvvs [AKA "Anonymuss Annie"] says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @ben tillman


    Not at all. The judge said she can sue again under the proper legal theory, and presumably she’ll win.

     

    What is the "proper legal theory" covering a commercial transaction little different from a slave auction?

    It doesn't matter whether the kid is white or black; he's bought. A purchase.

    Which is the very word some of these "mothers" use when discussing their experiences with these "clinics".

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @ben tillman

    100% correct.

    (BTW, what I meant by the previous comment was that she lost, and deserved to. She deserves to lose, again. The kid, no. The “mother” [perhaps a better descriptor would be ‘egg donor’] is a monster.)

    • Replies: @Rebes
    @WhatEvvs

    Why does she deserve to lose? She paid for a white man's sperm. She paid for a white kid. She did not get what she paid for.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  84. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    @Priss Factor

    We may be close to the point when picking on Jeb Bush begins to feel pointlessly cruel. I recall something similar happened a few years ago when Brittney Spears got so out of control that her antics didn't seem funny anymore, just sad. Perhaps we should turn away and allow Jeb to fade quietly from the scene, rather than drive him off in a hail of hoots and jeers. Let's do it for Columba and the children; they've suffered enough.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Priss Factor

    “Let’s do it for Columba and the children; they’ve suffered enough.”

    You’re right.

    A final farewell to Jebby.

  85. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Anonymous
    @Arclight

    It's an old saw with the pro-lifers to bitterly speculate that metro-libs would only turn against consumer-scale abortion once the "gay gene" is discoverable in obstetric screening (a related self-pitying meme is that legal abortion is a form of black genocide, which misreads the audience [white pro-choice liberals] since many blacks already guiltily suspect this is the case). But now things aren't looking so simple for that moralistic scenario, assuming a concrete single genetic determinant could ever be identified -- existence of which, of course, is the liberals' stock excuse for homosexual excess, so they get you coming and going. Seems "heads I win/tails you lose" is a staple of modern progressive thought actually.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @The most deplorable one

    I think Greg Cochran has pretty firmly established that male homosexuality is likely caused by a pathogen.

    In that case, the metro-lib infatuation with big-pharma and inoculation is the one at risk once the pathogen is identified, although, if research funds are denied the pathogen is unlikely to be found.

    See here for the paper: Infectious Causation of Disease

    Also, use a search engine.

    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    @The most deplorable one

    I just noticed this in that paper by Cochran, et al:


    The occurrence of exclusive male/male sexual preferences in sheep shows that cultural “powers of suggestion” are not necessary to generate the phenomenon [127–130]. (Sheep do not watch television, read newspapers, or discuss alternatives lifestyles.)
     
    , @5371
    @The most deplorable one

    Firmly established? It's an utterly absurd idea.

    Replies: @e

    , @Difference Maker
    @The most deplorable one

    Absolutely frightening

    I have had homosexuals come on to me by NSFW breathing their ass breath onto my face. Hopefully it's just a matter of attempting to remind me of my non existent homosexual activities, rather than transmitting or triggering some kind of sleeper pathogen

    Short of brain damage I am in no danger of becoming homosexual, but the real concern is for my future children

  86. “devastating effects of colonialism” ??

    As if they were better off before.

    On the whole colonialism was a net gain for Africa. Of course we do see how well sub-saharan Africa is now doing without the Euro-whites.

    Filth, disease, crime, violence, over breeding, on & on, without fail in every black dominated area, region, city, country, continent.

  87. @WowJustWow
    Professor of Pan-African Studies? We all know ethnic studies are mostly grievance studies, but I didn't know you could put such a explicit reference to a specific political movement in the name of an academic department. How are you supposed to get a mainstream publication's audience to take you seriously with a byline like that?

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Maybe it’s African-Pan Studies- You know, how to cook fried chicken (or a neighbor)

  88. “Cramblett claimed that the sperm used to inseminate her came from the wrong donor”

    Which is correct. The donor she chose had a specific set of characteristics other than just race and the chances of the real egg squirter having those same characteristics is vanishingly small.
    It was a simple breach of contract and the turkey-baster wielders should have lost.

  89. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @The most deplorable one
    @Anonymous

    I think Greg Cochran has pretty firmly established that male homosexuality is likely caused by a pathogen.

    In that case, the metro-lib infatuation with big-pharma and inoculation is the one at risk once the pathogen is identified, although, if research funds are denied the pathogen is unlikely to be found.

    See here for the paper: Infectious Causation of Disease

    Also, use a search engine.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @5371, @Difference Maker

    I just noticed this in that paper by Cochran, et al:

    The occurrence of exclusive male/male sexual preferences in sheep shows that cultural “powers of suggestion” are not necessary to generate the phenomenon [127–130]. (Sheep do not watch television, read newspapers, or discuss alternatives lifestyles.)

  90. @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "We may be close to the point when picking on Jeb Bush begins to feel pointlessly cruel. ........
    Perhaps we should turn away and allow Jeb to fade quietly from the scene, rather than drive him off in a hail of hoots and jeers."

    No. He and his whole rotten family and their whole rotten retinue of hangers-on like Karl Rove deserve the full measure of our disdain. Let Jeb run off to exile in Mexico if he loves it so much.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Yeah, I’m just kidding. I can’t get enough of the humiliation of Jeb Bush. It helps make up for the fact that “W” never faced trial and imprisonment. The turmoil he inflicted on the Middle East, the enormous amount of death, horrible injuries, wasted resources, and dislocation of entire populations is a crime for which no punishment would suffice. And there was no necessity for it–it was merely a blunder!

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    Yes, most of these bastards skate.

  91. @Mr. Anon
    Byrd and Hughey and others like them have sinecures at a University. If some enterprising politicians wanted an issue that would appeal to young voters, how about this: Abolish tenure at state-universities. Make it possible to fire these parasites.

    And then fire them.

    Imagine young college students today, sitting in a class listening to these two credentialed nitwits spew forth twaddle, while worrying about the enormous student loan debt they are piling up. When they graduate, they will be paying it off for years with the meager earnings from a low-paying job with no security, while these two clowns will have a guaranteed job for life.

    A lot of college students hate thier professors. This could be put to use. The universities have become the enemy of conservatives; conservatives should attack the universities. And not with rhetoric, but where it counts - at the payroll. Liberals understand this tactic - deny your opponent a livelihood; keep him so busy eking out a living that he has no time left over to make political war on you. Conservatives must learn to adopt this tactic as well.

    There's a get-out-the-vote slogan for the "youth vote": Screw the professors. Abolish tenure!

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    Screw the professors. Abolish tenure!

    Wouldn’t the greatest blow that could be struck against universities be to make student debt dischargeable through bankruptcy?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "Wouldn’t the greatest blow that could be struck against universities be to make student debt dischargeable through bankruptcy?"

    That might be a good tack. I'm not sure how student loans work exactly. Wouldn't the universities still get paid; it would be the lenders who would get shafted (which itself would not necessarily be a bad thing). Over time, that would cause credit to dry up and make such loans less common, I suppose, which would hit the unis too.

    I'm for attacking the beast in any manner that works.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  92. @The most deplorable one
    @Anonymous

    I think Greg Cochran has pretty firmly established that male homosexuality is likely caused by a pathogen.

    In that case, the metro-lib infatuation with big-pharma and inoculation is the one at risk once the pathogen is identified, although, if research funds are denied the pathogen is unlikely to be found.

    See here for the paper: Infectious Causation of Disease

    Also, use a search engine.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @5371, @Difference Maker

    Firmly established? It’s an utterly absurd idea.

    • Replies: @e
    @5371

    It's not "firmly established," true, but it's a well-developed, sensical hypothesis. It makes more sense than anything else that's been posited.

    Replies: @5371

  93. @Harry Baldwin
    @Mr. Anon

    Yeah, I'm just kidding. I can't get enough of the humiliation of Jeb Bush. It helps make up for the fact that "W" never faced trial and imprisonment. The turmoil he inflicted on the Middle East, the enormous amount of death, horrible injuries, wasted resources, and dislocation of entire populations is a crime for which no punishment would suffice. And there was no necessity for it--it was merely a blunder!

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Yes, most of these bastards skate.

  94. @Harry Baldwin
    @Mr. Anon

    Screw the professors. Abolish tenure!

    Wouldn't the greatest blow that could be struck against universities be to make student debt dischargeable through bankruptcy?

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    “Wouldn’t the greatest blow that could be struck against universities be to make student debt dischargeable through bankruptcy?”

    That might be a good tack. I’m not sure how student loans work exactly. Wouldn’t the universities still get paid; it would be the lenders who would get shafted (which itself would not necessarily be a bad thing). Over time, that would cause credit to dry up and make such loans less common, I suppose, which would hit the unis too.

    I’m for attacking the beast in any manner that works.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Mr. Anon

    Prior to The Bush Regime's bankruptcy act in 2005 student loan debt was dischargable. One more gift to the Banksters.

  95. @cthulhu
    @Lot

    The Cherokee have been mixed genetically for a long time. John Ross, who was the principal chief of the Cherokee before, during, and after the Trail of Tears (Ross successfully argued the Cherokee case in front of the US Supreme Court, but Jackson refused to abide by the Court's ruling), had substantial Scottish ancestry, and the Scots still claim him today. Even in the Oklahoma town of Tahlequah, the seat of the Cherokee Nation, few of the card-carrying Cherokee look more than modestly like the stereotypical Native American. (And yes, I personally know several blonde, blue-eyed Cherokee.)

    All of this of course begs the question of what it truly means to be Cherokee, or any other group that is held to be distinct. Some months ago, I saw a genealogy program on television where somebody had their family tree researched, and then got a big reveal on the results. One older woman found out that her mother, who had died some years before, had hidden her black ancestry (maybe 15-20%) from everyone; the show tried to portray this newfound black ancestry as a point of pride, but is was clear that the elderly daughter wanted to throw up on finding out that by some definitions, she was actually "black". What does a racial admixture of single digits even mean? Maybe we need a label marked "mutt" on all of those government forms.

    Replies: @IA

    All of this of course begs the question of what it truly means to be Cherokee, or any other group that is held to be distinct.

    You can tell by what artifacts groups (when left to their own devices) hold sacred – and their mythologies. Tragic heroes, ancestor worship, voodoo, cargoe cults, animal sacrifice, etc. The problem is euros blew the rest out of the water.

  96. @Reg Cæsar
    @ben tillman


    Not at all. The judge said she can sue again under the proper legal theory, and presumably she’ll win.

     

    What is the "proper legal theory" covering a commercial transaction little different from a slave auction?

    It doesn't matter whether the kid is white or black; he's bought. A purchase.

    Which is the very word some of these "mothers" use when discussing their experiences with these "clinics".

    Replies: @WhatEvvs, @ben tillman

    What is the “proper legal theory” covering a commercial transaction little different from a slave auction?

    Breach of contract or negligence.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @ben tillman


    Breach of contract or negligence.
     
    That trumps the Thirteenth Amendment?

    Replies: @bomag

  97. The “racism” argument fell apart even more once we all started to notice how more recently-arrived non-white minority groups leapfrogged to the top of the heap in education and the workplace. Why didn’t “racism” affect Indians and Asians? Or Sicilians, for that matter?

    Leftist answer: because it targets blacks first and foremost.

    Nobody prominent, like Wade/Derb/Richwine or bloggers like Razib, or whoever, use the terms inferior/superior. But they keep getting accused of it..

    Even a lot of ethnopatriots avoid it. I’ve used it maybe once or twice here, tops, in 10+ years.

    Once I got her to concede that Watson may have had a point, she said “but what good would it do to spread that kind of knowledge”? The idea that ending the misallocation of resources and tempering expectations of what Africa can achieve was anathema to her.

    Should’ve turned her leftism around on her. The white race has been falsely accused of breaking blacks, and she’s okay with that false accusation sticking. She should be shamed for her shriveled sense of justice.

    Equality and Justice my ass, she knowingly approves a culture of witch-hunting and scapegoating.

  98. @Krn
    If gays are "born that way" how come black's behavior isn't also explained by being "born that way?"

    Replies: @ben tillman

    If gays are “born that way” how come black’s behavior isn’t also explained by being “born that way?”

    Good point.

    Let’s face it, the Left has no principles; every part of the narrative is generated ad hoc to serve the particular purpose at hand.

    • Agree: Percy Gryce
  99. Born That Way? ‘Scientific’ Racism Is Creeping Back Into Our Thinking. Here’s What to Watch Out for:

    The Washington Post printing articles like this.

  100. @Mr. Anon
    @Harry Baldwin

    "Wouldn’t the greatest blow that could be struck against universities be to make student debt dischargeable through bankruptcy?"

    That might be a good tack. I'm not sure how student loans work exactly. Wouldn't the universities still get paid; it would be the lenders who would get shafted (which itself would not necessarily be a bad thing). Over time, that would cause credit to dry up and make such loans less common, I suppose, which would hit the unis too.

    I'm for attacking the beast in any manner that works.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Prior to The Bush Regime’s bankruptcy act in 2005 student loan debt was dischargable. One more gift to the Banksters.

  101. So, this woman and her family were “harmed” by having a “bi-racial” child as a result of the “wrong” sperm being used for artificial insemination, and she’s suing. Do the Libturds know about this “racist?”

    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    @VivaLaMigra


    So, this woman and her family were “harmed” by having a “bi-racial” child as a result of the “wrong” sperm being used for artificial insemination, and she’s suing. Do the Libturds know about this “racist?”
     
    LGBT > black.
  102. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @wren
    The comments I read on the article looked very reasonable, as seems to increasingly be the case with these kinds of articles when comments are allowed.

    People get it. Comments sections throughout the US get it.

    Unless the president or zuckerberg or google figure out a way to keep people too scared to comment, it is only a matter of time before people can admit openly what their lying eyes and science have been telling them.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    “(K)eep people to scared to comment … ”

    I think we’re already seeing the beginnings of the ultimate way they will deal with this. Online shaming of “controversial” views by having computer-savvy types do any feasible detective work to crack online anonymity, discover actual identities, and attack their reputations.

    It’s been demonstrated any large company will fold like a cheap suit if someone publicly points to an actual employee of theirs by name and complains of their “racist,” “sexist,” or “homophobic” comments. Remember the Mozilla CEO? Recall the white female resident in the Texas pool party incident earlier this summer who had the temerity to come to her neighbor’s aid in a fight with some hood rat? Her identity was tracked down, along with her employer, which turned out to be a subsidiary of Bank of America named Core Logic. A Tweet was sent to the company along the lines of “Do you support your employees engaging in this kind of racist behavior??”

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2015/06/race-mob-gets-mckinney-woman-fired-for-her-alleged-part-in-pool-incident-video/

    So I can very easily see this become more common. Why wouldn’t they, it seems to work!

  103. @Clyde
    I approve of what VW did with diesel emissions. The real villains here are the EPA and its European counterpart that demand ever escalating MPG while approaching zero emissions. You can't have both but what does some sinecured bureaucrat with an English or law degree know or want to know? How many people at the EPA are affirmative action hires?

    Replies: @Former Darfur

    The very purpose of the original federal Clean Air Act was to eliminate gasoline powered cars from the marketplace. The thinking was that only electric cars-expensive and with a short range-or hideously expensive steam, gas turbine or Stirling engines (which would triple or quadruple car prices) would be allowed. However, by going to catalytic converters and electronic engine controls, it turned out that the gasoline piston engine not only could meet the requirements, it was the only engine that could. So they have progressively made the requirements even stricter. Consumers blame the car makers for the increasing complexity and expense of cars, instead of placing blame on the government.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Former Darfur

    And some of the strictest requirements were signed into law by W. Bush.

  104. @VivaLaMigra
    So, this woman and her family were "harmed" by having a "bi-racial" child as a result of the "wrong" sperm being used for artificial insemination, and she's suing. Do the Libturds know about this "racist?"

    Replies: @Percy Gryce

    So, this woman and her family were “harmed” by having a “bi-racial” child as a result of the “wrong” sperm being used for artificial insemination, and she’s suing. Do the Libturds know about this “racist?”

    LGBT > black.

  105. @AndrewR
    @Anonymous

    I think the days when gay activists claimed "it's genetic thus we shouldn't be oppressed" are long gone. I think most people now would say "choice or not, it doesn't hurt anyone so leave us alone."

    Replies: @e

    Yes, until the biological etiology is understood and until science can prevent what causes it or can reverse it…then all hell will break loose. They will try to pass laws to prevent parents from taking steps to insure their kids are hetero.

  106. @5371
    @The most deplorable one

    Firmly established? It's an utterly absurd idea.

    Replies: @e

    It’s not “firmly established,” true, but it’s a well-developed, sensical hypothesis. It makes more sense than anything else that’s been posited.

    • Replies: @5371
    @e

    No. Exclusive sexual preference of males for males does not spread rapidly at some times and shrink almost to nothing at others, as epidemic infections do. Nor does it even exist except as part of a continuum. If there are some homos like Cocteau who can't get it up for a woman at all, there are others who have the whole range of capacities to do so, from rudimentary to normal.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

  107. @e
    @5371

    It's not "firmly established," true, but it's a well-developed, sensical hypothesis. It makes more sense than anything else that's been posited.

    Replies: @5371

    No. Exclusive sexual preference of males for males does not spread rapidly at some times and shrink almost to nothing at others, as epidemic infections do. Nor does it even exist except as part of a continuum. If there are some homos like Cocteau who can’t get it up for a woman at all, there are others who have the whole range of capacities to do so, from rudimentary to normal.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @5371


    Exclusive sexual preference of males for males does not spread rapidly at some times and shrink almost to nothing at others, as epidemic infections do.
     
    Chronic infections don't show those patterns you are talking about. (No rapid spread, no shrinkage to zero.) Normally infections carried by vectors don't show those patterns either.

    Nor does it even exist except as part of a continuum.
     
    That's wrong. As Chochran wrote, according to surveys, roughly 2% of males are exclusively homosexuals and a further 2% are bisexual. However, homosexuals do infect each other with a whole bunch of STDs, and if there were so many bisexuals, they'd pass the infections on to heterosexuals. And they do, to an extent, but not nearly enough for so many bisexuals. The only logical explanation is that they there are way way way less homosexuals, and probably the 2% self-professed bisexuals are mostly just lying homosexuals. Yes, Virginia, people do lie in anonymous surveys.

    Being able to get it up for women doesn't change the fact that a person has exclusively homosexual preferences (i.e. only watches gay porn online, and if possible, only has gay sex). And STDs don't lie.

    In other words, male homosexuality is mostly binary.

    Female homosexuality is a different story, Cochran only posits male homosexuality to be caused by pathogens, because Lesbianism shows totally different patterns.

    I used to be skeptical, too, but I think his case is persuasive.

    Replies: @5371, @Jefferson

  108. @5371
    @e

    No. Exclusive sexual preference of males for males does not spread rapidly at some times and shrink almost to nothing at others, as epidemic infections do. Nor does it even exist except as part of a continuum. If there are some homos like Cocteau who can't get it up for a woman at all, there are others who have the whole range of capacities to do so, from rudimentary to normal.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

    Exclusive sexual preference of males for males does not spread rapidly at some times and shrink almost to nothing at others, as epidemic infections do.

    Chronic infections don’t show those patterns you are talking about. (No rapid spread, no shrinkage to zero.) Normally infections carried by vectors don’t show those patterns either.

    Nor does it even exist except as part of a continuum.

    That’s wrong. As Chochran wrote, according to surveys, roughly 2% of males are exclusively homosexuals and a further 2% are bisexual. However, homosexuals do infect each other with a whole bunch of STDs, and if there were so many bisexuals, they’d pass the infections on to heterosexuals. And they do, to an extent, but not nearly enough for so many bisexuals. The only logical explanation is that they there are way way way less homosexuals, and probably the 2% self-professed bisexuals are mostly just lying homosexuals. Yes, Virginia, people do lie in anonymous surveys.

    Being able to get it up for women doesn’t change the fact that a person has exclusively homosexual preferences (i.e. only watches gay porn online, and if possible, only has gay sex). And STDs don’t lie.

    In other words, male homosexuality is mostly binary.

    Female homosexuality is a different story, Cochran only posits male homosexuality to be caused by pathogens, because Lesbianism shows totally different patterns.

    I used to be skeptical, too, but I think his case is persuasive.

    • Agree: Reg Cæsar
    • Replies: @5371
    @reiner Tor

    [Chronic infections don’t show those patterns you are talking about. (No rapid spread, no shrinkage to zero.) Normally infections carried by vectors don’t show those patterns either.]

    So this mysterious pathogen will have to be chronic, and its vector present, to an equal extent over the surface of the globe. Curiouser and curiouser.

    [However, homosexuals do infect each other with a whole bunch of STDs, and if there were so many bisexuals, they’d pass the infections on to heterosexuals]

    By this argument homo sex is pretty much absent from Muslim countries, where AIDS has never spread widely even in Africa.

    [Yes, Virginia, people do lie in anonymous surveys.]

    What do they gain by it here? And why don't fewer lie as "gays" go from outcasts to heroes?

    [Being able to get it up for women doesn’t change the fact that a person has exclusively homosexual preferences (i.e. only watches gay porn online, and if possible, only has gay sex).]

    "If possible" is an infinitely elastic term in this context. When you prefer the vague concept of "preference" to the objective criterion of behaviour, you become trapped in circular reasoning.

    [In other words, male homosexuality is mostly binary.]

    With an arbitrary definition of "homosexuality", this claim is vacuous. With a more natural definition, it is obviously false.

    [ I think his case is persuasive]

    He should have stuck with his usual hereditarianism. A genetic element in some cases of homo sex practice, while not proved, is far from being evidently absurd.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

    , @Jefferson
    @reiner Tor

    "That’s wrong. As Chochran wrote, according to surveys, roughly 2% of males are exclusively homosexuals and a further 2% are bisexual. However, homosexuals do infect each other with a whole bunch of STDs, and if there were so many bisexuals, they’d pass the infections on to heterosexuals. And they do, to an extent, but not nearly enough for so many bisexuals. The only logical explanation is that they there are way way way less homosexuals, and probably the 2% self-professed bisexuals are mostly just lying homosexuals. Yes, Virginia, people do lie in anonymous surveys.

    Being able to get it up for women doesn’t change the fact that a person has exclusively homosexual preferences (i.e. only watches gay porn online, and if possible, only has gay sex). And STDs don’t lie.

    In other words, male homosexuality is mostly binary."

    What do you personally call guys who are attracted to Lady Boys/World War Ts, but are not attracted to regular Cisgender men?

  109. @WhatEvvs
    @Reg Cæsar

    100% correct.

    (BTW, what I meant by the previous comment was that she lost, and deserved to. She deserves to lose, again. The kid, no. The "mother" [perhaps a better descriptor would be 'egg donor'] is a monster.)

    Replies: @Rebes

    Why does she deserve to lose? She paid for a white man’s sperm. She paid for a white kid. She did not get what she paid for.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Rebes


    She paid for a white kid
     
    Paying for a white kid is now defensible behavior?

    Wow, have we fallen.

    Replies: @bomag

  110. @reiner Tor
    @5371


    Exclusive sexual preference of males for males does not spread rapidly at some times and shrink almost to nothing at others, as epidemic infections do.
     
    Chronic infections don't show those patterns you are talking about. (No rapid spread, no shrinkage to zero.) Normally infections carried by vectors don't show those patterns either.

    Nor does it even exist except as part of a continuum.
     
    That's wrong. As Chochran wrote, according to surveys, roughly 2% of males are exclusively homosexuals and a further 2% are bisexual. However, homosexuals do infect each other with a whole bunch of STDs, and if there were so many bisexuals, they'd pass the infections on to heterosexuals. And they do, to an extent, but not nearly enough for so many bisexuals. The only logical explanation is that they there are way way way less homosexuals, and probably the 2% self-professed bisexuals are mostly just lying homosexuals. Yes, Virginia, people do lie in anonymous surveys.

    Being able to get it up for women doesn't change the fact that a person has exclusively homosexual preferences (i.e. only watches gay porn online, and if possible, only has gay sex). And STDs don't lie.

    In other words, male homosexuality is mostly binary.

    Female homosexuality is a different story, Cochran only posits male homosexuality to be caused by pathogens, because Lesbianism shows totally different patterns.

    I used to be skeptical, too, but I think his case is persuasive.

    Replies: @5371, @Jefferson

    [Chronic infections don’t show those patterns you are talking about. (No rapid spread, no shrinkage to zero.) Normally infections carried by vectors don’t show those patterns either.]

    So this mysterious pathogen will have to be chronic, and its vector present, to an equal extent over the surface of the globe. Curiouser and curiouser.

    [However, homosexuals do infect each other with a whole bunch of STDs, and if there were so many bisexuals, they’d pass the infections on to heterosexuals]

    By this argument homo sex is pretty much absent from Muslim countries, where AIDS has never spread widely even in Africa.

    [Yes, Virginia, people do lie in anonymous surveys.]

    What do they gain by it here? And why don’t fewer lie as “gays” go from outcasts to heroes?

    [Being able to get it up for women doesn’t change the fact that a person has exclusively homosexual preferences (i.e. only watches gay porn online, and if possible, only has gay sex).]

    “If possible” is an infinitely elastic term in this context. When you prefer the vague concept of “preference” to the objective criterion of behaviour, you become trapped in circular reasoning.

    [In other words, male homosexuality is mostly binary.]

    With an arbitrary definition of “homosexuality”, this claim is vacuous. With a more natural definition, it is obviously false.

    [ I think his case is persuasive]

    He should have stuck with his usual hereditarianism. A genetic element in some cases of homo sex practice, while not proved, is far from being evidently absurd.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @5371


    So this mysterious pathogen will have to be chronic, and its vector present, to an equal extent over the surface of the globe. Curiouser and curiouser.
     
    1) I don't have any data showing that homosexuality's prevalence is the same across the globe. Do you? According to Harpending homosexuality is curiously absent among hunting-gathering populations.

    2) If its prevalence is the same around the globe, and it's genetic, it would be the only genetically inherited trait to be present in all populations around the world to an equal extent. In other words, being prevalent everywhere doesn't mean anything.

    3) It doesn't have to be chronic. It doesn't have to be vector-driven. It could be either. Or, a third alternative, it could be an illness which is cured quickly but in some cases causes permanent brain damage (i.e. homosexuality). There are diseases that are prevalent everywhere, like tuberculosis.

    By this argument homo sex is pretty much absent from Muslim countries, where AIDS has never spread widely even in Africa.
     
    I'm not familiar with STD prevalence in the Muslim world, but I guess it's lower than elsewhere. What does it have to do with Cochran's point that researchers have been able to isolate strains of STD that were spread exclusively among homosexuals?

    What do they gain by it here?
     
    After an elections if you ask people if they turned up at the voting booth, more people will claim having voted than is the actual turnout rate. The discrepancy could be 10% or more. Similarly of those claiming to have voted, a higher percentage claims to have voted for the winner than its actual share of the vote. If the winner becomes unpopular a couple years later, less people will remember having voted for it. What do they gain by it? Is that not a stupid question?

    And why don’t fewer lie as “gays” go from outcasts to heroes?
     
    I don't know if the numbers have changed or not. I don't know why they lied in the first place, so how can I know their motivations? Does it matter?

    “If possible” is an infinitely elastic term in this context. When you prefer the vague concept of “preference” to the objective criterion of behaviour, you become trapped in circular reasoning.
     
    Actually, no. For example in the animal kingdom it's often seen that males in the absence of females will engage in homosexual sex. However, there are examples (domestic sheep is one example brought up in Wikipedia) of animals exclusively engaging in homosexual behavior, even when females are available. With domestic sheep the owners may want the rams to sire offspring, but they refuse to, and only show mating behavior in the presence of other rams.

    On the other hand, while preference is possible to measure even in the absence of modern techniques like brain scanning (a person who searches for online gay porn certainly has a preference for homosexuality, since searching for heterosexual porn costs exactly the same number of clicks, and we know there are people who consistently only search for gay porn online; same thing for gay prostitution, since gay prostitutes often cost more than female ones), modern techniques make it possible to directly measure preferences. So, no circular reasoning here.

    A genetic element in some cases of homo sex practice, while not proved, is far from being evidently absurd.
     
    The concordance rate among identical twins is only maybe 20-30%. I'd say this pretty much precludes genetics as the main factor. There might be a genetic predisposition the same way there's a genetic predisposition to catch tuberculosis.

    Replies: @5371

  111. @5371
    @reiner Tor

    [Chronic infections don’t show those patterns you are talking about. (No rapid spread, no shrinkage to zero.) Normally infections carried by vectors don’t show those patterns either.]

    So this mysterious pathogen will have to be chronic, and its vector present, to an equal extent over the surface of the globe. Curiouser and curiouser.

    [However, homosexuals do infect each other with a whole bunch of STDs, and if there were so many bisexuals, they’d pass the infections on to heterosexuals]

    By this argument homo sex is pretty much absent from Muslim countries, where AIDS has never spread widely even in Africa.

    [Yes, Virginia, people do lie in anonymous surveys.]

    What do they gain by it here? And why don't fewer lie as "gays" go from outcasts to heroes?

    [Being able to get it up for women doesn’t change the fact that a person has exclusively homosexual preferences (i.e. only watches gay porn online, and if possible, only has gay sex).]

    "If possible" is an infinitely elastic term in this context. When you prefer the vague concept of "preference" to the objective criterion of behaviour, you become trapped in circular reasoning.

    [In other words, male homosexuality is mostly binary.]

    With an arbitrary definition of "homosexuality", this claim is vacuous. With a more natural definition, it is obviously false.

    [ I think his case is persuasive]

    He should have stuck with his usual hereditarianism. A genetic element in some cases of homo sex practice, while not proved, is far from being evidently absurd.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

    So this mysterious pathogen will have to be chronic, and its vector present, to an equal extent over the surface of the globe. Curiouser and curiouser.

    1) I don’t have any data showing that homosexuality’s prevalence is the same across the globe. Do you? According to Harpending homosexuality is curiously absent among hunting-gathering populations.

    2) If its prevalence is the same around the globe, and it’s genetic, it would be the only genetically inherited trait to be present in all populations around the world to an equal extent. In other words, being prevalent everywhere doesn’t mean anything.

    3) It doesn’t have to be chronic. It doesn’t have to be vector-driven. It could be either. Or, a third alternative, it could be an illness which is cured quickly but in some cases causes permanent brain damage (i.e. homosexuality). There are diseases that are prevalent everywhere, like tuberculosis.

    By this argument homo sex is pretty much absent from Muslim countries, where AIDS has never spread widely even in Africa.

    I’m not familiar with STD prevalence in the Muslim world, but I guess it’s lower than elsewhere. What does it have to do with Cochran’s point that researchers have been able to isolate strains of STD that were spread exclusively among homosexuals?

    What do they gain by it here?

    After an elections if you ask people if they turned up at the voting booth, more people will claim having voted than is the actual turnout rate. The discrepancy could be 10% or more. Similarly of those claiming to have voted, a higher percentage claims to have voted for the winner than its actual share of the vote. If the winner becomes unpopular a couple years later, less people will remember having voted for it. What do they gain by it? Is that not a stupid question?

    And why don’t fewer lie as “gays” go from outcasts to heroes?

    I don’t know if the numbers have changed or not. I don’t know why they lied in the first place, so how can I know their motivations? Does it matter?

    “If possible” is an infinitely elastic term in this context. When you prefer the vague concept of “preference” to the objective criterion of behaviour, you become trapped in circular reasoning.

    Actually, no. For example in the animal kingdom it’s often seen that males in the absence of females will engage in homosexual sex. However, there are examples (domestic sheep is one example brought up in Wikipedia) of animals exclusively engaging in homosexual behavior, even when females are available. With domestic sheep the owners may want the rams to sire offspring, but they refuse to, and only show mating behavior in the presence of other rams.

    On the other hand, while preference is possible to measure even in the absence of modern techniques like brain scanning (a person who searches for online gay porn certainly has a preference for homosexuality, since searching for heterosexual porn costs exactly the same number of clicks, and we know there are people who consistently only search for gay porn online; same thing for gay prostitution, since gay prostitutes often cost more than female ones), modern techniques make it possible to directly measure preferences. So, no circular reasoning here.

    A genetic element in some cases of homo sex practice, while not proved, is far from being evidently absurd.

    The concordance rate among identical twins is only maybe 20-30%. I’d say this pretty much precludes genetics as the main factor. There might be a genetic predisposition the same way there’s a genetic predisposition to catch tuberculosis.

    • Replies: @5371
    @reiner Tor

    1) Yes, survey data.
    Gibbon wrote, "I hope and trust that the negroes, in their own country, were exempt from this moral pestilence." It is easier to believe that any society is without homo sex, the less we know about it. And hunter-gatherer societies consist of smaller groups than others, so a relatively uncommon behaviour like homo sex is easier to overlook.
    2) I don't think "it" is genetic because I don't believe in the "it" that you do.
    3) So you have no idea how it could be possible but are sure it must be a pathogen anyway.
    If the small proportion of men who declare themselves bisexual on western surveys would be enough to spread STDs widely among the general population, how much more would widespread homo sex on the part of a larger proportion of Muslim men do so.
    So how is bisexuality analogous to voting for the winner in an election? Do explain.
    [examples (domestic sheep is one example brought up in Wikipedia) of animals exclusively engaging in homosexual behavior]
    Not well attested, and if true would do absolutely nothing for your pathogen case.
    [there are people who consistently only search for gay porn online]
    Who ever doubted it? What you need to prove is that all men fall into two categories. 1. Only search for gay porn online and could never in any circumstances be sexually aroused by a woman and 2. Only search for straight porn online and could never in any circumstances be sexually aroused by a male. You have not done that.
    [modern techniques make it possible to directly measure preferences]
    Voodoo science.

  112. @reiner Tor
    @5371


    So this mysterious pathogen will have to be chronic, and its vector present, to an equal extent over the surface of the globe. Curiouser and curiouser.
     
    1) I don't have any data showing that homosexuality's prevalence is the same across the globe. Do you? According to Harpending homosexuality is curiously absent among hunting-gathering populations.

    2) If its prevalence is the same around the globe, and it's genetic, it would be the only genetically inherited trait to be present in all populations around the world to an equal extent. In other words, being prevalent everywhere doesn't mean anything.

    3) It doesn't have to be chronic. It doesn't have to be vector-driven. It could be either. Or, a third alternative, it could be an illness which is cured quickly but in some cases causes permanent brain damage (i.e. homosexuality). There are diseases that are prevalent everywhere, like tuberculosis.

    By this argument homo sex is pretty much absent from Muslim countries, where AIDS has never spread widely even in Africa.
     
    I'm not familiar with STD prevalence in the Muslim world, but I guess it's lower than elsewhere. What does it have to do with Cochran's point that researchers have been able to isolate strains of STD that were spread exclusively among homosexuals?

    What do they gain by it here?
     
    After an elections if you ask people if they turned up at the voting booth, more people will claim having voted than is the actual turnout rate. The discrepancy could be 10% or more. Similarly of those claiming to have voted, a higher percentage claims to have voted for the winner than its actual share of the vote. If the winner becomes unpopular a couple years later, less people will remember having voted for it. What do they gain by it? Is that not a stupid question?

    And why don’t fewer lie as “gays” go from outcasts to heroes?
     
    I don't know if the numbers have changed or not. I don't know why they lied in the first place, so how can I know their motivations? Does it matter?

    “If possible” is an infinitely elastic term in this context. When you prefer the vague concept of “preference” to the objective criterion of behaviour, you become trapped in circular reasoning.
     
    Actually, no. For example in the animal kingdom it's often seen that males in the absence of females will engage in homosexual sex. However, there are examples (domestic sheep is one example brought up in Wikipedia) of animals exclusively engaging in homosexual behavior, even when females are available. With domestic sheep the owners may want the rams to sire offspring, but they refuse to, and only show mating behavior in the presence of other rams.

    On the other hand, while preference is possible to measure even in the absence of modern techniques like brain scanning (a person who searches for online gay porn certainly has a preference for homosexuality, since searching for heterosexual porn costs exactly the same number of clicks, and we know there are people who consistently only search for gay porn online; same thing for gay prostitution, since gay prostitutes often cost more than female ones), modern techniques make it possible to directly measure preferences. So, no circular reasoning here.

    A genetic element in some cases of homo sex practice, while not proved, is far from being evidently absurd.
     
    The concordance rate among identical twins is only maybe 20-30%. I'd say this pretty much precludes genetics as the main factor. There might be a genetic predisposition the same way there's a genetic predisposition to catch tuberculosis.

    Replies: @5371

    1) Yes, survey data.
    Gibbon wrote, “I hope and trust that the negroes, in their own country, were exempt from this moral pestilence.” It is easier to believe that any society is without homo sex, the less we know about it. And hunter-gatherer societies consist of smaller groups than others, so a relatively uncommon behaviour like homo sex is easier to overlook.
    2) I don’t think “it” is genetic because I don’t believe in the “it” that you do.
    3) So you have no idea how it could be possible but are sure it must be a pathogen anyway.
    If the small proportion of men who declare themselves bisexual on western surveys would be enough to spread STDs widely among the general population, how much more would widespread homo sex on the part of a larger proportion of Muslim men do so.
    So how is bisexuality analogous to voting for the winner in an election? Do explain.
    [examples (domestic sheep is one example brought up in Wikipedia) of animals exclusively engaging in homosexual behavior]
    Not well attested, and if true would do absolutely nothing for your pathogen case.
    [there are people who consistently only search for gay porn online]
    Who ever doubted it? What you need to prove is that all men fall into two categories. 1. Only search for gay porn online and could never in any circumstances be sexually aroused by a woman and 2. Only search for straight porn online and could never in any circumstances be sexually aroused by a male. You have not done that.
    [modern techniques make it possible to directly measure preferences]
    Voodoo science.

  113. @The most deplorable one
    @Anonymous

    I think Greg Cochran has pretty firmly established that male homosexuality is likely caused by a pathogen.

    In that case, the metro-lib infatuation with big-pharma and inoculation is the one at risk once the pathogen is identified, although, if research funds are denied the pathogen is unlikely to be found.

    See here for the paper: Infectious Causation of Disease

    Also, use a search engine.

    Replies: @The most deplorable one, @5371, @Difference Maker

    Absolutely frightening

    I have had homosexuals come on to me by NSFW breathing their ass breath onto my face. Hopefully it’s just a matter of attempting to remind me of my non existent homosexual activities, rather than transmitting or triggering some kind of sleeper pathogen

    Short of brain damage I am in no danger of becoming homosexual, but the real concern is for my future children

  114. @Rebes
    @WhatEvvs

    Why does she deserve to lose? She paid for a white man's sperm. She paid for a white kid. She did not get what she paid for.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    She paid for a white kid

    Paying for a white kid is now defensible behavior?

    Wow, have we fallen.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Reg Cæsar

    Paying for a [certain ethnicity] kid is now defensible behavior?

    Wow, have we fallen.


    In today's world we are often bargaining on the basis of ethnicity: babies from Africa; workers of a certain hue; defensive backs in football from ...; etc. Coin of the realm, and it is natural to have disputes concerning such.

  115. @ben tillman
    @Reg Cæsar


    What is the “proper legal theory” covering a commercial transaction little different from a slave auction?
     
    Breach of contract or negligence.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Breach of contract or negligence.

    That trumps the Thirteenth Amendment?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Reg Cæsar

    It is not going to fall under the 13th amendment, despite your efforts to shoehorn any transaction you don't like into that category.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  116. @reiner Tor
    @5371


    Exclusive sexual preference of males for males does not spread rapidly at some times and shrink almost to nothing at others, as epidemic infections do.
     
    Chronic infections don't show those patterns you are talking about. (No rapid spread, no shrinkage to zero.) Normally infections carried by vectors don't show those patterns either.

    Nor does it even exist except as part of a continuum.
     
    That's wrong. As Chochran wrote, according to surveys, roughly 2% of males are exclusively homosexuals and a further 2% are bisexual. However, homosexuals do infect each other with a whole bunch of STDs, and if there were so many bisexuals, they'd pass the infections on to heterosexuals. And they do, to an extent, but not nearly enough for so many bisexuals. The only logical explanation is that they there are way way way less homosexuals, and probably the 2% self-professed bisexuals are mostly just lying homosexuals. Yes, Virginia, people do lie in anonymous surveys.

    Being able to get it up for women doesn't change the fact that a person has exclusively homosexual preferences (i.e. only watches gay porn online, and if possible, only has gay sex). And STDs don't lie.

    In other words, male homosexuality is mostly binary.

    Female homosexuality is a different story, Cochran only posits male homosexuality to be caused by pathogens, because Lesbianism shows totally different patterns.

    I used to be skeptical, too, but I think his case is persuasive.

    Replies: @5371, @Jefferson

    “That’s wrong. As Chochran wrote, according to surveys, roughly 2% of males are exclusively homosexuals and a further 2% are bisexual. However, homosexuals do infect each other with a whole bunch of STDs, and if there were so many bisexuals, they’d pass the infections on to heterosexuals. And they do, to an extent, but not nearly enough for so many bisexuals. The only logical explanation is that they there are way way way less homosexuals, and probably the 2% self-professed bisexuals are mostly just lying homosexuals. Yes, Virginia, people do lie in anonymous surveys.

    Being able to get it up for women doesn’t change the fact that a person has exclusively homosexual preferences (i.e. only watches gay porn online, and if possible, only has gay sex). And STDs don’t lie.

    In other words, male homosexuality is mostly binary.”

    What do you personally call guys who are attracted to Lady Boys/World War Ts, but are not attracted to regular Cisgender men?

  117. @Lot
    @Jefferson


    I wonder what percentage of the “Native American Studies Department” at the University Of Illinois have blue eyes like Elizabeth Warren?
     
    Much of UIUC department quit in protest about Salaita. But when the issue first hit the news, I had a look at their site, and roughly it was 50% people who you'd assume were white like Penn Jillete, I mean Robert Warrior, 25% Asian/PI, and 25% people who looked like the American Indians you'd see if you went to an actual reservation.

    Looking at a few other departments, they seem to be about 50/50 white and native. You have to be a little careful though, some schools have an AIS major, but not an actual department, so they use people from English, Anthropology, etc on the AIS "faculty page." This group tends to be about 75% white, but they are not primarily AIS scholars. Actual departments are mainly found in large public universities and more likely to have visible natives.

    Here's a mostly native Cal State Long Beach department group photo:
    http://www.cla.csulb.edu/departments/americanindianstudies/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/IMG_2219.jpg

    Here's the mostly white U. Wash AIS faculty:
    https://ais.washington.edu/people/faculty

    The chair is a "Cherokee" with light blond hair and blue eyes:
    https://sarweb.org/media/images/colloquium_teuton/colloquium_teuton_l.jpg

    Actual American Indian:

    https://c676132.ssl.cf0.rackcdn.com/RapidCity2012072300197-500dbde3055ac.jpg?5610f2558a933

    Replies: @cthulhu, @Jefferson

    Elizabeth Warren gave the most retarded reason in the world as to why she considers herself to be an “Amerindian”, apparently a distant ancestor of hers had high cheekbones. Newsflash some Scandinavians specifically Finnish and Icelandic people have high cheekbones and some Eastern Europeans have high cheekbones as well, so does that mean Amerindians made their way into Europe by her retarded logic?

    This high cheekbone ancestor of Elizabeth Warren is probably a descendant of Genghis Khan just like Joseph Gordon Levitt and Charles Bronson and not a descendant of Pocahontas.

    Also I remember it was reported that this high cheekbone ancestor of Elizabeth Warren had White listed on her birth certificate and not Amerindian. There is no evidence of anybody in Elizabeth Warren’s family tree being listed as Indigenous on their birth certificate.

  118. @Former Darfur
    @Clyde

    The very purpose of the original federal Clean Air Act was to eliminate gasoline powered cars from the marketplace. The thinking was that only electric cars-expensive and with a short range-or hideously expensive steam, gas turbine or Stirling engines (which would triple or quadruple car prices) would be allowed. However, by going to catalytic converters and electronic engine controls, it turned out that the gasoline piston engine not only could meet the requirements, it was the only engine that could. So they have progressively made the requirements even stricter. Consumers blame the car makers for the increasing complexity and expense of cars, instead of placing blame on the government.

    Replies: @bomag

    And some of the strictest requirements were signed into law by W. Bush.

  119. @Reg Cæsar
    @ben tillman


    Breach of contract or negligence.
     
    That trumps the Thirteenth Amendment?

    Replies: @bomag

    It is not going to fall under the 13th amendment, despite your efforts to shoehorn any transaction you don’t like into that category.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @bomag



    It is not going to fall under the 13th amendment, despite your efforts to shoehorn any transaction you don’t like into that category.

     

    Trafficking in human beings is a crime for a reason.

    Would the Act Prohibiting the Importation of Slaves of 1807 be a better model to cite? There's no ethical difference between a sperm purchase and a slave auction.
  120. @Reg Cæsar
    @Rebes


    She paid for a white kid
     
    Paying for a white kid is now defensible behavior?

    Wow, have we fallen.

    Replies: @bomag

    Paying for a [certain ethnicity] kid is now defensible behavior?

    Wow, have we fallen.

    In today’s world we are often bargaining on the basis of ethnicity: babies from Africa; workers of a certain hue; defensive backs in football from …; etc. Coin of the realm, and it is natural to have disputes concerning such.

  121. @bomag
    @Reg Cæsar

    It is not going to fall under the 13th amendment, despite your efforts to shoehorn any transaction you don't like into that category.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It is not going to fall under the 13th amendment, despite your efforts to shoehorn any transaction you don’t like into that category.

    Trafficking in human beings is a crime for a reason.

    Would the Act Prohibiting the Importation of Slaves of 1807 be a better model to cite? There’s no ethical difference between a sperm purchase and a slave auction.

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