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The commemoration of the Mostly Peaceful Protest of January 6, 2021 is too important for just one day. We need Congress to declare a “January 6th History Month,” or maybe a January 6 History Quarter that runs through March every year. Or perhaps channeling January 6 into any part of the calendar is a Threat to Our Democracy, so we should have ongoing never-ending year-round blanket headline coverage like that of Emmett Till (who, in case you missed it, is all over the news 67 years after his tragic death) and of long-ago Hair-Touching Incidents.

From the New York Times on January 7, 2022 at 6pm EST:

 
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  1. El Dato says:

    “Emmett Till was murdered AGAIN on January 6!”

    “January 6: Like Tiananmen, just without tank guy trying to stop the tanks leaving the square after the event”

  2. El Dato says:

    January 6: Replaces Epiphany like Christmas replaced Yuletide!

  3. Kyle Rittenhouse needs to go after some broadcast licenses.

  4. dearieme says:

    An insurrection where nobody was armed! Who said that America couldn’t innovate?

  5. JimDandy says:

    Of course. It’s all part of the plan. The plan to cheapen and punish white lives in perpetuity. All three guys who were involved in the jogger incident just got life. Defund the police and prohibit the citizenry from doing anything to stop crime. Sit in your discomfort and watch sullenly, kulaks.

  6. Muggles says:

    “Armed capitol police kill peaceful demonstrator” not in Kazakhstan? Khartoum?

    Never mind, nothing to see here.

  7. Wake me when Steve says her name.

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  8. Charles says:

    A person can love the USA of many generations ago, just like an elderly man can revere the memory of a wife who died decades before. The deceased beloved cannot be brought back. The USA now is a neurotic, drug-addicted middle-aged tramp who wants to kill the old man for his insurance money; she has nothing in common with the beloved.

  9. The “insurrection” is brought to us by the same gang that sold us the Steele dossier, the Scamdemic, the illegal phone call, and on and on. The Republicans will go along with memorializing Jan 6th (another museum on the Mall) so long as the Democrats allow tax credits for fans of the Daytona 500.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  10. What is the difference between a “knife at the throat” or a “boot stomping on the face?” Asking for a friend.

  11. Mike Tre says:

    I have 3 friends from high school who are corporate litigators for West Coast Firms. All three are neocons, and love Bush W. All three were in absolute hysteria over the events of Jan 6th last year, hyperventilating that Trump was going to take over the world or something.

    Guys, get past this idea that lawyers are particularly smart because they are lawyers. They’re not. All they do is figure out ways to manipulate the written law in order to transfer large sums of money to their client (and themselves). That’s it. Most of them would cut their own foot off trying to start a lawnmower.

  12. “Or perhaps channeling January 6 into any part of the calendar is a Threat to Our Democracy, so we should have ongoing never-ending year-round blanket headline coverage like that of Emmett Till (who, in case you missed it, is all over the news 67 years after his tragic death)”

    So then this means that the single death directly tied to the January 6th 2021 protest will be commemorated? Perhaps with a stamp, or a statue like the kind George Floyd got? And for decades to come, her name will live on as an example of what happens when DC police, which symbolizes the Federal Government, go too far and exceed their levels of power by shooting and killing an unarmed person that was dutifully exercising their constitutional First Amendment rights to protest the government? The NY Times, Wash Post, etc will continue to inform the public that she was an innocent victim exercising her First Amendment rights as a citizen?

    If so, then that’s awesome.

    Ashli Babbitt.

    Died while exercising her First Amendment rights as a US citizen. Unarmed.

    She should not be so quickly forgotten.

    • Agree: Mike Tre
  13. Wake Me When January 6th Is Over

  14. Anonymous[134] • Disclaimer says:

    Apparently the FBI can’t track down which one of its informants or agents was behind this extra 01/06 false flag op??

    Maybe it was Susan Rosenberg who on November 7, 1983 planted a bomb which exploded in the U.S. Capitol?


    Susan Rosenberg

    Nah, after Obama pardoned her she’s been too busy with tikkun olam, like in her current leadership gig in the Black Lives Matter Global Network.

    • Replies: @clifford brown
  15. syonredux says:

    Meanwhile, in the UK:

    Jury in Colston statue trial urged to ‘be on the right side of history’
    In closing speeches, defence for four accused of damaging slave trader memorial say judgment will reverberate around world

    A jury has been urged to “be on the right side of history” by acquitting four defendants accused of criminal damage over the toppling of the statue of the slave trader Edward Colston.

    In closing speeches at Bristol crown court on Tuesday, barristers for the accused argued that the statue, which stood over the multicultural south-west city for 125 years, was so indecent and potentially abusive that it constituted a crime.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2022/jan/04/jury-in-colston-statue-trial-urged-to-be-on-the-right-side-of-history

    And the strategy was successful:

    Colston statue verdict ‘landmark’ in Britain’s slave history

    The acquittal of four people charged with criminal damage after tearing down a statue of Edward Colston is a “landmark” in Britain coming to terms with its past, a TV historian said.

    The memorial to the slave trader was toppled during a Black Lives Matter protest in Bristol on 7 June 2020.

    Rhian Graham, Milo Ponsford, Sage Willoughby and Jake Skuse stood trial.

    Prof David Olusoga said the real offence was in allowing a statue to a mass murderer to stand for 125 years.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-bristol-59892211

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  16. @JimDandy

    Of course. It’s all part of the plan. The plan to cheapen and punish white lives in perpetuity. All three guys who were involved in the jogger incident just got life. Defund the police and prohibit the citizenry from doing anything to stop crime. Sit in your discomfort and watch sullenly, kulaks.

    Agree that’s the plan. (These are some seriously nasty people we’re dealing with here.)

    But it’s not like you just have to sit there and take their beating. There are things you can do. Most of them are broadly “separationist”:

    — move away from “diversity”; hard to do in the South, but still possible
    — ideally find communities that are essentially 100% “your people”–based
    — ideally communities with a strong fertility, big families orientation
    — you may have to home school, or at minimum do “based education” on top your kid schooling; while pushing for “school choice”
    — assume now that the police–or at least the legal system–are no longer “on your side” at least in any incident related to black people; behave accordingly if involved in such an incident; (this is a smart group, details left as an exercise for the reader)
    — push and promote the ideal of “separate nations”

    Having to do this … sucks. The victory–or at least dominance–of minoritarianism is not a pleasant thing to contemplate. But that’s the reality.

    In the end, we’re going to have to either get “separate nations”, or conservatives are going to have to create autonomous communities like the Amish, Orthodox Jews, etc.

  17. @Mike Tre

    Why are you trolling Jack D?

    • LOL: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @Mike Tre
  18. @Sagamore Sam

    Rittenhouse for Homeland Security chief.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  19. @dearieme

    The insurrection was November 3rd, 2020 by Dominion “Voting” Systems.

    The Insurrection of January 6th – The Day of Infamy That Wasn’t, by David Stockman
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2022/01/david-stockman/the-insurrection-of-january-6th-the-day-of-infamy-that-wasnt/

  20. JimB says:

    Every day will be Jan 6 until Nov 8.

  21. JMcG says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    Not for fans, for the owners of the luxury suites at the Daytona 500.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  22. Richard B says:
    @JimDandy

    Sit in your discomfort and watch sullenly, kulaks.

    You get what you put up with.

  23. There was no “insurrection.” The FBI stated that two months ago. No one arrested has been charged with insurrection. There are only a few questions that the January 6 Committee needs to look into:

    Why wasn’t the Capitol building protected by National Guard troops. Pelosi says that Trump knew there would be a riot; if so, why didn’t she know? Will anyone ever ask her?

    How many federal agents were among the protestors, and in particular, how many were acting as provocateurs?

    After a year in which charges were dropped for rioters who seized sections of cities, looted and burned businesses, attacked police officers and burned police stations and patrol cars, why are the Capitol protestors being held for a year now without bail on trespassing and obstruction charges? (These are charges that Democrat activists and progressive DAs now say shouldn’t require bail or result in incarceration.)

    Everything else is on video and there is nothing more to be discovered about it.

    Glenn Greenwald has an excellent article on this abomination.

  24. Anon[266] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimDandy

    Part of the plan to diminish white lives … such as today’s news of life imprisonment of the 2 Georgia guys who were trying to keep the jogger from shooting them. In today’s America, you may not impede the Sacred Jogger demographic from trespassing, robbing, smash’n’grabbing, or burning the city down.
    The practical, actionable plan is: stay the hell away from blacks and away from white liberals, as much as possible.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  25. JimDandy says:
    @AnotherDad

    Thanks. I agree. The sticking point for me is making a living in such a place.

    I also fear that it won’t be that easy. If actual civil war occurs, I suspect it will happen when a standoff between red states and blue feds culminates in troops being sent to enforce some progressive nonsense and the local government/law enforcement says no.

  26. @El Dato

    Even Global TV in Canada is pitching some American Emmett Till movie on every commercial break. “I want everyone to know he’s a good boy.”

  27. @Citizen of a Silly Country

    “Wake me when Steve says her name.”

    Whoopi Goldberg.

    • LOL: PaceLaw
  28. I’m looking forward to the Bill Murray movie about Jan 6th.

    Will Nancy ever stop seeing her shadow?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  29. NYT: There was near “universal” outrage over what happened, but there are now “separate blue and red realities.”

    Huh?

    What’s changed since January 6, 2021 other than the facts that the only people killed were unarmed protesters by the police and that the thing was likely a set-up?

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Reg Cæsar
  30. Trelane says:

    A protest about a stolen election gets a little bit out of hand, protesters enter the Capitol, invited by DC police, and variously steal podiums and sit at the desks of legislators.

    • Replies: @Trelane
  31. @El Dato

    One of the networks filled 3 prime time hours one night this week with all Emmett Till all the time. Didn’t watch any of it. Just noticed the programming when I was looking up the TV schedule for my wife.

  32. @Buffalo Joe

    “Knife to the throat” is when they say we are doing it to them. “Boot stomping face” is when they really do it to us.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
  33. Twinkie says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    After a year in which charges were dropped for rioters who seized sections of cities, looted and burned businesses, attacked police officers and burned police stations and patrol cars, why are the Capitol protestors being held for a year now without bail on trespassing and obstruction charges?

    Because lawmakers don’t really care about ordinary citizens’ livelihood going up in smoke, but do care a great deal about peons (esp. angry peons) showing up to their own place of work.

    Now that’s “insurrection,” i.e. peons not knowing their own place in the pecking order, you see. How dare they?

    • Agree: AnotherDad, nebulafox
  34. gc says:

    If a civil war will come like Ms. Goldberg says it can, then who will actually fight in the democrat side? She and Ms. Rubin? Now, they are speaking about civil war, of course because they see the risk, but their base ain’t so motivated.

  35. @Bard of Bumperstickers

    The insurrection was November 3rd, 2020 by Dominion “Voting” Systems.

    Of Chinatown, Toronto, Dominion of Canada.

    永远不要忘记!

  36. @Buffalo Joe

    What is the difference between a “knife at the throat” or a “boot stomping on the face?”

    A knife to the throat is too obvious. What you want to do is knive the fellow so subtly and smoothly that he doesn’t feel it until you twist it.

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
  37. I think a month would be appropriate.

    Just one month should suffice. We won’t need to repeat it.

  38. Dube says:

    Anyone who doubts the preparation of intelligence and enforcement for the staging of 1/6 should review (if early reports are sill up) the elaborate FBI field plan to secure the streets, the block, and the hotel where Roger Stone was to be captured and arrested. Fortunately someone tipped him off and he left town early.

    However, contra David Stockman, the day’s disorder was due to more than failings by Capitol police. The entire event was and still is under full management and planning.

  39. @AnotherDad

    Your advice may be good for some families and individuals, but for others, particularly those more rooted in their respective locations, many with family history going back generations, it doesn’t work.

    If you like where you live, even if it’s solid “Blue”, you can stay put and be effectively armed and ready to engage in (defensive) mutual combat. It’s likely that “may issue” permits are to be ruled unconstitutional this year, so if you don’t have a criminal/mental record, you’re legally good to go: Know the laws and have a good DGU (defensive gun use) lawyer on retainer. There is also carry insurance for this.

    Of course, if the ‘national conversation’ goes ‘hot’ (or if you’re wrongfully targeted by the state, e.g. Zimmerman, Chauvin, Rittenhouse, etc.) you need not worry about the law per se; you have the option to use force against all immediate threats, and to take targets of opportunity if so inclined (by yourself or jointly). Have contingency plans/procedures for your family to follow if for any reason you (if you’re the prime protector) should expire—those procedures should be in place already: Every day is ‘anything can happen day’.

    Yoo hoo!

    Look at me!

    Friend or foe?

    • Replies: @megabar
    , @Thea
    , @AnotherDad
    , @Russ
  40. @Anonymous

    Note, Rosenberg was pardoned by Clinton.

  41. Golf clap for Sailer.

    The puling hyperbole spewed by the White Genocide Party and fakestream media viz the 1/6/21 FBI falseflag house party is a longform troll and/or punking of pureblood White men of normal sexuality. ((They)) are stealing a page from the erstwhile celebrated übertroll and now disgraced Vax Covidian Donald Trump – don’t fall for it!

  42. Wake me up when September ends.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  43. On the bright side, long after the rest of the Anglosphere*, we finally have a female head of government.

    We just don’t know which one she is!


    [MORE]

    * UK 1979
    Canada 1993
    New Zealand, Guyana 1997
    Liberia, Jamaica 2006
    Trinidad, Australia 2010
    Malta 2014
    Marshall Islands 2016

    Ireland and Barbados have had female presidents, but not prime ministers, so they don’t count.

  44. Redman says:
    @dearieme

    Exactly. Here’s what the New Insurrectionists (sounds like a good name for a band) look like.

    file:///var/mobile/Library/SMS/Attachments/0e/14/EE7A3163-C38D-49C7-823C-A8B7AE88B776/IMG_1862.jpeg

    • LOL: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  45. A festive new tradition would be for the Washington Football Team to play their final regular season home game each year on Jan 6. Much like the Lions always take the field on Thanksgiving Day

  46. Redman says:
    @JimDandy

    But don’t forget. Ted Cruz thinks anyone who attacks a cop is a “terrorist.” Or so he says.

    So I guess Ahmad Robbery would have been a “terrorist” if the McMichael dude had had a badge.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Chrisnonymous
  47. Mr. Anon says:

    Ah yes, January 6th…….

    I remember it well, my friends. Don’t ever forget. Teach your children what happened that dark day when Our Democracy (TM) fell under attack. Assault-weapon wielding hordes of nazis and klansmen stormed the most sacred temple of Our Democracy (TM), erecting a massive burning cross on the summit of the Capitol Dome. Kyle Rittenhouse, striding through the Halls of Congress, shot and killed Emmett Till, a proud and brave LGBT activist, whose corpse was then dragged three times around the Capitol grounds by a Dodge Challenger driven by James Fields. Lt. Michael Byrd bravely shot insurrectionist Derek Chauvin, who had his knee on the neck of brave sex-worker and drug legalization activist George Floyd. AOC was assaulted and violated (bravely!) on the shards of a broken glass table by Nicholas Sandmann and his Frat brothers, while Proud Boys played hackey-sack with Nancy Pelosi’s dentures.

    I was there. I saw it. And it happened just as I’ve described it, or my name isn’t Brian Williams!

  48. Mr. Anon says:
    @JimDandy

    Of course. It’s all part of the plan. The plan to cheapen and punish white lives in perpetuity. All three guys who were involved in the jogger incident just got life.

    Life without possibility of parole. One of them was just standing there with a phone in his hand. They were railroaded.

  49. Anon7 says:

    I hold the Republican Party responsible for this. Their job was to state and then hold to the contrary Narrative: the insurrection story is pure play Leftist propaganda, it’s time for the Justice department to come clean about how many agents provocateurs were present and so on.

    The Republican Party will never win elections as the Whipped Dogs party. That’s the whole point of January 6th, and they’re just letting it stand.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Spect3r
  50. @Twinkie

    [politicians] care a great deal about peons (esp. angry peons) showing up to their own place of work.

    I once called my assemblyman (corporate stooge). His flunky answered the phone.

    Please transfer my call to the boss.
    He’s out of the office.

    How about telling me where he’ll be appearing in the district, so I can have a word with him?
    Security violation.

    How about if I show up at his Sacramento office during the upcoming session and wait around?
    Don’t bother.

    Could the boss’ political position have anything to do with the thousands of dollars in campaign cash he receives from the industry each year?
    Of course not.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  51. Welcome to the neurotocracy. Be afraid, very afraid. Your neighbors are plague rats and fascist thugs. Any second now, Trump will lead his army of buffalo-pelt clad Blackshirts in a March on D.C., extinguishing the beacon of liberty for all eternity. But you, Dear Citizen, can prevent this awful future. Trust the Science, Trust the Experts, and report any hint of wrongthink to the Twatter Thought Police at the earliest possible opportunity. Only you can save democracy from the facist next door.

    • Replies: @riches
  52. Hey! If it hadn’t been for White oppression, Emmett Till would have turned 80 last summer with friends and family blowing out the candles in a half-way house somewhere.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  53. SafeNow says:

    The psychological literature on the persistence of false beliefs is disappointing, after brief research. The leading study seems to be about asparagus:

    “Do false beliefs last? To explore this question, this study planted false beliefs or memories of a childhood experience with asparagus. We found that these false beliefs had consequences for subjects, when assessed directly after the suggestive manipulation. Moreover, subjects were brought back two weeks later to see if their false beliefs persisted. After two weeks, subjects’ confidence in their new memories, and the consequences of those memories were diminished, but not extinguished.”

    I guess if we can extrapolate from asparagus to January 6, the answer to Steve’s question is that the Jan. 6 effect will diminish, but not be extinguished. And so it must be refreshed and refreshed and refreshed, or it will diminish.

  54. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    She should not be so quickly forgotten.

    Neither should this guy – the murderer, Michael Leroy Byrd:

  55. Kronos says:
    @Mike Tre

    All three were in absolute hysteria over the events of Jan 6th last year, hyperventilating that Trump was going to take over the world or something.

    It’s definitely a boomer class marker. Many boomer professionals are hopelessly addicted to Francis Fukuyama‘s “end of history” globalist free market paradise pipe-dream. These political forces manifesting in Trump and Sanders signify stormy political/economic storms ahead. The idea of a major upheaval akin to a New Deal societal restructuring is terrifying to these people. It was never supposed to happen or at least NEVER in their lifetimes. Hysteria is their knee jerk reaction history “restarting” again.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @S. Anonyia
  56. @El Dato

    Stop downplaying the January 6 HOLOCAUST!!

    • Replies: @Alrenous
  57. @Achmed E. Newman

    Emmett Till would have turned 80 last summer with friends and family blowing out the candles in a half-way house somewhere.

    ABC thought they would continue the Blackety-Black cultural reprogramming of Whitey by running MORE ET death-by-pale-face television yesterday.

  58. Kronos says:
    @Patrick in SC

    US elites learned a lot on media spin and information control since the 1932 “Bonus Strike.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonus_Army

  59. Jan 6 was the completion of the unnecessary coup conducted by the Uniparty and the Deep State.

    It was unnecessary because for all his good intentions, Trump wasn’t competent enough to threaten the oligarchy.

  60. The “insurrectionists” weren’t terrorists.
    They were undocumented tourists.

  61. Danindc says:
    @Mike Tre

    Find new friends. Those guys are embarrassments.

  62. Danindc says:
    @AnotherDad

    Great comment. You’re one of the best.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
  63. @syonredux

    Well, I guess we can only hope the Attorney General and Court of Appeals decide to veer back to the right side of the law… these four get a walk, but she realises they’ve opened the door to all sorts of social-justice mischief.

    Attorney General says she is ‘carefully considering’ whether to refer Colston statue case to Court of Appeal saying trial verdict is ‘causing confusion’

    -Suella Braverman said the ‘Colston Four’ verdict was causing ‘confusion’
    -She said she is ‘carefully considering’ seeking a review so judges can ‘clarify’ law
    -Acquittal cannot be overturned; there can be no retrial without new evidence
    -But the Attorney General can ask a higher court to clarify a point of law
    -Rhian Graham, 30, Milo Ponsford, 26, Sage Willoughby, 22, and Jake Skuse, 33, were prosecuted for pulling the statue but were cleared by a jury

    source: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10378713/AG-says-carefully-considering-referring-confusing-Colston-statue-case-Court-Appeal.html

  64. @Reg Cæsar

    I thought this First Lady functioned as our first Female President:

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Reg Cæsar
  65. pirelli says:

    Time to wake up and write a post on the recently departed Lani Guinier, whose life story and ideology are an iSteve gold mine.

    From the NYT obit:

    “Descended from a long line of lawyers, Ms. Guinier made her name in the 1980s as an unorthodox thinker about whether America’s legal institutions, even after the civil rights revolution of the 1960s, needed to change further to realize true democracy.

    She argued, for example, that the principle of “one person, one vote” was insufficient in a system where the interests of minorities, racial or otherwise, were inevitably trampled by those of the majority, and that alternatives needed to be considered to give more weight to minority interests.

    While the rest of the country remembered her for her failed nomination, she continued to make strides as a legal scholar and teacher. She pioneered research on implicit bias in the classroom and workplace. Later in her career she opened a *wide-ranging critique of merit*, especially the way it distorts institutions like her own.“

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/07/us/politics/lani-guinier-dead.html

    Her mother’s obituary in 2009 provides more family background:

    “Genii Paprin Guinier was a woman before her time. During World War II, Genii Paprin, a Hunter College graduate who had majored in French, with a master’s degree from the University of Michigan, volunteered for the Red Cross and was shipped to Hawaii.

    In Hawaii, she, a child of Jewish immigrants, broke off her engagement to a nice Jewish doctor and married a black man, Ewart Guinier, who was serving as a warrant officer in the then-segregated U.S. Army. He was a union organizer and labor leader, a member of the Harvard Class of 1933 who dropped out when he could not pay his tuition.”

    https://vineyardgazette.com/obituaries/2009/08/28/genii-guinier-91-civil-rights-champion

  66. @Redman

    Ted Cruz thinks anyone who attacks a cop is a “terrorist.” Or so he says.

    That’s his inner Mountie coming out.

  67. @Redman

    Ted Cruz should be finished. His attempts to walk back his remarks are transparently insincere. If he had just used the term “terrorists”, it might be plausible that he just misspoke, but he said they should rot in jail. There is NO WAY that was a mistake of any kind.

    No one should forget this about Cruz. Ever. And he should be finished for everyone on the right.

  68. Kronos says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Growing up, I always thought that song referred to 9/11.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
  69. “Wake me when January 6th is over.”

    This is a joke for a tombstone, like “On the whole I’d rather be in Philadelphia.”

  70. Seekers says:
    @Mike Tre

    Neoconservatives began as skeptics back in the 1960s. They’ve become among the worst hysterics in the country.

  71. Yep, I’m tired of being triggered by videos of lawless people running amok through the hallowed halls of our government and putting democracy in peril. It’s enough to make one pine for the mostly peaceful protests after a drug-addled career criminal encountered misadventure while resisting arrest.

  72. Altai says:

    • LOL: AndrewR
  73. res says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    One thing that has been interesting recently is the move to blacken Ashli Babbitt’s reputation. Has anyone else noticed this?
    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/ashli-babbitt-jan-6-insurrectionist-portrayed-as-martyr-by-some-had-violent-past

    • Thanks: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Russ
    , @Muggles
  74. @Kronos

    The idea of a major upheaval akin to a New Deal societal restructuring is terrifying to these people.

    The New Deal led to foreign wars, the first three fueled with conscription, and all but the first never formally declared. Murray Rothbard rightly called this the “welfare-warfare state”. You can keep your “societal restructuring”! Some of us prefer a free country.

    The generation that came of age in the 1950s and 1960s had never known a time when there was no draft… conscription had always ended when the war did. The draft that began with [sic; it began in 1940] World War II was different. It lasted for close to 33 years.

    https://www.airforcemag.com/article/0408draft/

    As for “boomers”, those born before July, 1955 faced an active and enforced draft. Those born after March, 1957 (and before January, 1960), such as Steve, and Mike Pence, didn’t even have to register. I have a draft card, my slightly younger brother does not. Our older half-brother was actually called, and went. This stupid catch-all term covers all kinds of experiences.

    The last draft call went out in December 1972. On June 30, 1973, Dwight Elliott Stone, a 24-year-old apprentice plumber from Sacramento, Calif., became the last person to be inducted into the armed forces as a result of the draft.

    1973 – 24 = 1949.

    Oh, and those internment camps were part of the New Deal as well. They were just for Nips, Krauts, and Dagoes… the first time.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Kronos
  75. Q: What’s the difference between Kamala Harris and Jimmy Carter?

    [MORE]
  76. Mr. Anon says:
    @Redman

    “The New Insurrectionists” is indeed an outstanding name for a band.

  77. Anonymous[301] • Disclaimer says:

    Concerning the deliberate, cold blooded, political – and no doubt racial hatred motivated – summary execution of Ashli Babbitt, (where the Hell is Amnesty International), by that big fat bully of a black cop, one is reminded of that famous photograph from South Vietnam in the 1960s in which a Viet Cong suspect is summarily shot through the head, without due process, by a South Vietnamese police chief.

    Quite rightly, that photograph shocked, disgusted and horrified the world, but saying that, I have no doubt whatsoever that the victim was infinitely more guilty than Ashli Babbitt.

    And yet, and yet, look how (white) American elitists – the people who actually *wholly own* politicians react to Babbitt’s murder – “Ha, ha, ha stupid dirty white trash bitch! She *deserved* it all, and more some!”.
    Ladies and Gentleman, that is the *real* story of America. The bastards want to kill you.

    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @onetwothree
    , @Twinkie
  78. AndrewR says:
    @Sagamore Sam

    That kid either has terrible advisors or he’s just not heeding their advice. He could be a great man but he would rather hang out with Charlie Kirk and brag about how he’s gotten laid before. It’s all so sad.

  79. AndrewR says:
    @AnotherDad

    Hogs’ll eat about anything you give ’em

    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
  80. AndrewR says:
    @Anon

    I have a much more effective plan but it requires a bit of sacrifice

  81. @pirelli

    Lani Guinier’s dad was a prominent Communist.

  82. Our discourse these days is pretty pretty bad. Very tribal. Very dumb.

    Very vindictive too.

    So I have no reason to assume that this article will have the effect that it ought to.

    But the effect this article ought ideally to have is deep conscience-searching followrd by a public call for resistance against vaccine mandates (or punishments for the unvaccinated) by many people who had not yet considered doing so and who themselves were quick to get vaccinated.

    Will it? Will even 10,000 people end up reading this humble little soul-share all the way through?

    Part of me hopes not. That would mean that the world must be filled with compelling written arguments that are delightful to read. But now we’re getting transcendental, for the time being if you are interested in knowing why people like me so oppose punishing the unvaccinated and other heavy heavy pressures inherent in covid policies, read this fellow.

    https://www.coryzue.com/writing/coming-clean/

    • Thanks: res
  83. @Reg Cæsar

    “On June 30, 1973, Dwight Elliott Stone, a 24-year-old apprentice plumber from Sacramento, Calif., became the last person to be inducted into the armed forces as a result of the draft.”

    Dwight Stone, the high jumper?

  84. @Mr. Anon

    Yes. An in-depth treatment of the events will be featured in a series on the History Channel and a PBS production with a special interview of Michelle Obama.

  85. @Mr. Anon

    Good one, Mr. Anon. I’d like to use that on PS. OK with you?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  86. It is strange that so many conspiracy theorists do not believe that there was any conspiracy on 1/6, in spite of ongoing revelations of communications between certain legislators and the White House during the invasion of the Government buildings.

    Just a failure of the Capitol Police to properly control a bunch of boisterous revellers celebrating the election of a new president?

    1/6 will go down in history as the date on which the ending of the First US Republic began, like 9/11, 12/25, 7/4 and Bastille Day and Pearl Harbour.

    Future high school students in the Corporate North American People’s Republic (CNAPR) will learn about these proper and improper fractions in history classes, or will have the information implanted in microchips.

  87. Where is the Republican politico who called for a day of mourning on January 6 for Ashli Babbitt?

    Ben Braddock has an interesting essay in which he argues:

    The solution is not some national divorce or civil war. The solution is for the Right to stop being rank amateurs when it comes to politics and governance. Purge the grifters and incompetents. Bring back the old sharks and have them train a new generation in the art of election warfare. And once in power, actually use that power to purge or destroy the institutions responsible for brainwashing so many of our countrymen.

    When the GOP has had power over the last couple decades, they could not even manage to defund NPR or Planned Parenthood, much less Harvard.

    That is the real significance of Tucker’s pounding on Cruz over Cruz calling the 1/6 protesters “terrorists.” The real issue is not whether “terrorist” is the proper term for anyone who hits a cop.

    The real issue is to acknowledge that the Left has declared war on us: they are out to get us.

    All of us. All peaceful, productive citizens of all races who simply want to do our jobs, take care of our families, and raise our kids so that they in turn can have productive jobs and their own children and their own families.

    Ourselves and our posterity.

    The Left is playing hardball. The Right is playing smurfball.

    A simple test for any GOP candidate for President: will you move to make January 6 “Ashli Babbitt Day”?

    • Agree: Redman
  88. @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason wrote:

    It is strange that so many conspiracy theorists do not believe that there was any conspiracy on 1/6, in spite of ongoing revelations of communications between certain legislators and the White House during the invasion of the Government buildings.

    I have a tendency to misread you, so I’ll ask explicitly: are you claiming the Trump White House was involved in something nefarious on 1/6?

    Are you unaware that only one person died from violence in the 1/6 protest: Ashli Babbitt, who was brutally shot and killed by a federal cop?

    Are you unaware that the 2020 US Presidential election was conducted in blatant and open violation of Article II, Section 1 of the United States Constitution?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  89. @AnotherDad

    AnotherDad wrote:

    Having to do this … sucks. The victory–or at least dominance–of minoritarianism is not a pleasant thing to contemplate. But that’s the reality.

    In the end, we’re going to have to either get “separate nations”, or conservatives are going to have to create autonomous communities like the Amish, Orthodox Jews, etc.

    What you are advocating is tantamount to surrender.

    Decent Americans need to retake our country. As everyone knows, lots of Hispanic Americans are disgusted by what is happening. Moderates are being redpilled.

    It can be done.

    • Agree: nebulafox, Redman
  90. @pirelli

    She argued, for example, that the principle of “one person, one vote” was insufficient in a system where the interests of minorities, racial or otherwise, were inevitably trampled by those of the majority, and that alternatives needed to be considered to give more weight to minority interests.

    The whole point of democracies is that you have majority rule based on voting, and that minorities are on the outs.

    Democracy works until it doesn’t work. For example history shows that democracy doesn’t work very well in Nations that are divided into two or more tribes.

    It looks like the United States is becoming more and more like Nigeria every day, even though the native Americans are hardly visible as a political force in the US, though in many countries in the Americas that is not the case.

    In the United States you have these tribal division between Americans of European descent, descendants of African slaves, and descendants of descendants of assorted migrants from South and Central America.

    The last two groups take advantage of the voting system to demand a greater slice of the American pie, while the descendants of the original conquistadores of the West and plantation owners of the East continue to control much of the land and the corporations.

    Who will win, and can one man/woman/confused person-one vote survive?

    Come back in 2024 for the next thrilling installment of Plutocracy here on UBC, starring Don JR Ewing, Kamala Bollywood, Florida Saint, Carlson Fucker, Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Alex Jones, Bruce Willis, and introducing Virginia Giuffre as the Girl with the American Dream

    • Replies: @Redman
    , @Ben tillman
    , @Odin
  91. Anonymous[244] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    That big, fat atrocity of a black cop could simply have arrested and detained Ashli Babbitt -he was certainly big and powerful enough to do this with no difficulty.

    Yet, he cold bloodedly murdered her.

    He did that because he wanted to. In his reptile brain he derived a hit of pleasure from doing so. He did it because he could do it. In the same way that cruel people torture animals slowly to death simply because they *can* do so.
    Make no mistake about it – what I’ve written here is the certain truth.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  92. @Anonymous

    You made just about the worst possible comparison that you could right there. The Viet Cong shot was a (real) terrorist who had just murdered an entire family. He was going to be executed one way or the other.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  93. @PhysicistDave

    Are you unaware that the 2020 US Presidential election was conducted in blatant and open violation of Article II, Section 1 of the United States Constitution?

    If that’s the case, it is doubtful whether any presidential election within living memory has been a legal election.

    And if that is what the Republican Party thought, they should have gone to the supreme Court BEFORE the election for a ruling on how the electoral college is supposed to work.

    The assumption of the last decades has always been that the electoral college has a purely ceremonial function, and that the ratification of the election by Congress is purely ceremonial after the vote count has been decided, and not a negotiated process.

    Anyway you are simply making the case that the United States Constitution is becoming increasingly obsolete in the modern world, and there is a serious need for a constitutional convention to revise the Constitution and bring it up to date.

    The Founding Fathers had no possible reason to think that the president of the United States would be the most powerful office in the world, in a world with jet travel and internet, a world in which it was possible for men to travel to the Moon.

    The Founding Fathers did a remarkable job under the circumstances and all credit to them for their noble work, but their laws are becoming increasingly irrelevant in the modern world. They didn’t even take into account the existence of political parties.

  94. ic1000 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    > It is strange that so many conspiracy theorists do not believe that there was any conspiracy on 1/6, in spite of ongoing revelations…

    Steve and others have noted that conspiracy theorist refers to (1) paranoids who see implausible plots under every bed, and (2) realists who recognize that like-minded powerful people sometimes coordinate activities in secret.

    Revolver News revealed that numerous individuals who played prominent on-the-scene organizing roles early on January 6th are being sheltered by the Department of Justice, while bit-player trespassers spend months in solitary confinement awaiting their speedy trial. This is ignored by respectable media’s Fact Check assurances that “The FBI played no role in creating the 1/6 Insurrection.”

    Does this comment make me a Conspiracy Theorist?

    Enough with the motte-and-bailey. Be less tiresome in your writing, please.

    • Agree: res
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  95. Kronos says:
    @The Alarmist

    I take it that’s President Wilson’s wife?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  96. Twinkie says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    Write a large check for his re-election campaign – he’ll take your call.

  97. Twinkie says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Plot twist, she’s not in the photograph.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  98. Twinkie says:
    @Anonymous

    that famous photograph from South Vietnam in the 1960s in which a Viet Cong suspect is summarily shot through the head, without due process, by a South Vietnamese police chief.

    Here is the actual story on that: https://allthatsinteresting.com/saigon-execution

    First of all, the executioner wasn’t a police chief. He was a famous South Vietnamese general. Second, the prisoner was a nasty piece of work:

    On the morning of the “Saigon Execution” photo, Nguyễn Văn Lém’s death squad had just killed 34 people – seven police officers, two or three Americans, and several police officers’ family members, all bound at the wrists and shot in the head over a pit – and they may have been looking for Loan himself.

    Legally, this put Lém in a bad position. He wasn’t wearing a uniform, he wasn’t fighting a battle, and he had evidently committed a major war crime against General Loan’s own subordinates and their kids.

    As a war criminal and terrorist, Lém had effectively no protection under the Geneva Conventions and was eligible for summary execution when caught.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  99. @Steve Sailer

    Wikipedia says that the high jumper is “Dwight Edwin Stones”, so, no. But the name is amazingly close.

  100. Kronos says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I was using the New Deal simply as an example of a major societal restructuring. The one before that was of course the US Civil War. Both profoundly changed the economic system(s) in the US.

    But the Jan. 6 fear porn seems to target and resonate mostly with Boomer professionals. The same people who positively support BLM and view it as a Alzheimers fueled 1960s Civil Rights trip through memory lane. This segment of the population are (quite literally) the most invested in the neoliberal order.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    , @Reg Cæsar
  101. nebulafox says:
    @Twinkie

    When the former INS tried to deport Loan in the late 70s back to Vietnam as a “war criminal” (aka, sending him to his probable death), they got in contact with Eddie Adams in the anticipation that he’d testify against him.

    He testified: but not in the way they were expecting.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  102. @Jonathan Mason

    It’s big of you to acknowledge that “The Founding Fathers did a remarkable job under the circumstances.” Maybe even as well as you might have done.

    But your argument that they didn’t anticipate many relevant features of contemporary political realities is undercut when you say that “They didn’t even take into account the existence of political parties.”

    They were, to a man, intensely focused on political parties (or, as everyone knows, what they usually called “factions”). They saw them as a necessary evil to be minimized.

    Washington as President said that “The common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it.”

    Hamilton called them “the most fatal disease” of popular governments.

    Madison, famously in Federalist 10 wrote that “well-constructed Union” should be “its tendency to break and control the violence of faction.”

    Jefferson wrote late in life that “Men by their constitutions are naturally divided into two parties.’’

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  103. nebulafox says:
    @Kronos

    It’s not bizarre for the ruling elite of a society to manipulate events in public perception to their advantage, or for politics to attract narcissists like schoolyards attract pedophiles.

    But actively claiming helpless victimhood in uniform-in the context of what happened the previous summer, no less-and putting themselves on par with or even beyond Pearl Harbor or 9/11 is a bizarre testament to the tacit moral values of said neoliberal order.

    Hard times create hard men…

    • Replies: @Kronos
  104. megabar says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Nobody said it’s easy to move.

    You can be prepared, all you want, as an individual. The McMichael boys would’ve slapped an “Agree” on your post.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  105. Stan says:

    Kulaks are destined for destruction unless kulaks organize to destroy the parasite. Destroy the parasite by defunding the IRS, opposing IRS requirements which require cash apps to report business transactions over 600 dollars. etc

  106. @megabar

    Do you have a coherent point? If so, hit that reply button…

    • Replies: @megabar
  107. megabar says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Individuals are powerless when opposed by numbers or institutions. If you have a gun, they have a police force. If you have a lawyer, they have the judges. The McMichaels thought they were prepared, and were defending their neighborhood. Now they’re in jail for life.

    If you choose to stay in a liberal area, that is your right. But there are risks that no amount of prep can reduce.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  108. Thea says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I agree that constantly picking up and moving is wrong. Many have ceded valuable real estate they will never get back in cities.

    if you’re wrongfully targeted by the state, e.g. Zimmerman, Chauvin, Rittenhouse,

    Not if when.

    Guns won’t help but babies will. What got us into this mess was sterile baby boomer women. The boomers who had big families should be lauded for going against the tide and trying to preserve the people. But too many did inot and low birth rates justified immigration.

    Have lots of babies, teach them to fear God and encourage them to live close by as adults. That is the only defense that I see.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  109. Spect3r says:
    @Mike Tre

    No one ever thought that lawyers are smart.

  110. Spect3r says:
    @Anon7

    You still believe that the parties actually represent two different sides… that’s cute.

  111. Spect3r says:
    @Brutusale

    One of the things that i was never able to understand, is this “obsession” a lot of conservative folks have with professional sports/athletes.

    The teams are not your friends, the athletes are not your friends, none of these people cares about you, your family or any of the things you care about (using you in general, not you personally).
    Stop buying, paying, reading, anything related to these organizations and the people involved with them, none of them is worth a second of your time or a dime of your money.

  112. @Kronos

    Is hysteria over Jan 6th really restricted to “Boomers?” I’m a millennial and several of my close-age friends and relatives are obsessed with it.

    What I’ve noticed about people who are really disturbed by Jan 6th is that they fit a certain profile- grew up in conservative households and became liberal later, college-educated, professional class (especially lawyers like the OP pointed out), supportive of military industrial complex, etc. Also liberal men appear to be way more interested in Jan 6th than liberal women.

  113. Redman says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Most Democrats are still white descendants of Europeans. Woke ones off course.

    NPR is just about the wokest organ around and it’s audience is 84% white.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  114. Corvinus says:
    @Bard of Bumperstickers

    “The insurrection was November 3rd, 2020 by Dominion “Voting” Systems.”

    “No reasonable person would conclude that the statements were truly statements of fact,” caliemd Sydney Powell in reference to her past claim that Dominion patently aided in a fraudulent election. Remember, she stated unequivocally that she had irrefutable proof that U.S. Army seized servers in Germany showing how Trump votes were switched to Biden. Why has yet to release this evidence yet?

    And Cyber Ninjas is shutting down. Their report did not support the claims made by the (Arizona) GOP that Biden lost Arizona.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/cyber-ninjas-company-led-arizona-gop-election-audit-shutting-down-n1287145

  115. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    JIE–i hear you. Plenty of people like where they are–the life they have–and don’t want to be pushed out. Fine.

    But lots of folks are either
    a) not so rooted, they like their patch, but they do not have any deep connection to it–it’s American suburbia and they can bail if they really want to (ex. me)
    b) they are rural/small town and their patch is more traditionally white-American and probably Republican voting and they need to focus on keeping it that way and building actually conservative community around them to preserve it.

    More importantly i’m talking about generationally. How do you behave so that you are building a family that endures. I.e. continues as part of a coherent nation. (A nation–not just the “buy now!” marketplace run by the bossy WallStreet-Washington super-state.)

    ~~

    Note: i’m no expert in how to do any of this. My thoughts are pretty basic and half-assed. (My strength–if i have one–is “glass half full” analysis. “This is broken.” “This is what’s gone wrong.” “This makes no sense.”)

    I think the questions of
    a) how we can more effectively fight politically
    and
    b) how do we build communities that can survive
    are questions i’d like to see discussed around here.

    (It’s easy to pick apart and mock the latest piece of nonsense trickling down from the verbalist blatherers. But … doesn’t really move the ball forward.)

    • Replies: @Gabe Ruth
  116. res says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    It is fascinating to observe the topics where you choose to engage given you are a Brit currently based in Ecuador who only comments on things he knows about or has an interest in.

    PhysicistDave asked three questions. How about responding to the other two?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  117. @Reg Cæsar

    Ron, where’s the “Yuck” button?

  118. Anonymous[897] • Disclaimer says:
    @onetwothree

    Yes.

    But 99% of people who saw that photograph did not know that – mostly, of course, because it was *deliberately* concealed from them by newspaper editors etc.
    ‘A picture paints a thousand words’ – then image just became emblematic of the whole war, despite the back story, which I’m aware of.

  119. Corvinus says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, that was quite predicable on your part to wait until January 7 to present your opinion about January 6. It’s a thank you for your fanbois and fangirlz who donate to your tin cup narratives. But what’s 140 police officers injured. 5 dead. 725 arrested, hundreds still wanted by law enforcement. DOJ and House investigations into Trump’s cronies, and millions in damage to the United States Capitol.

    That’s why you simply cannot be trusted when it comes to matters of the rule of law and law and order. We know you read this individual’s work, but you just cannot bring yourself publicly to admit what in reality has been taking place. Of course, if the roles were reversed, you would be screaming at the top of your SoCal lungs that the perpetrators ought to be brought to justice.

    https://sethabramson.substack.com/p/breaking-major-update-on-january

    “The attack at the Capitol was a despicable act of terrorism and a shocking assault on our democratic system. The January 6 terrorist attack on the Capitol was a dark moment in our nation’s history, and I fully support the ongoing law enforcement investigations into anyone involved”–Ted Cruz

  120. Russ says:
    @res

    One thing that has been interesting recently is the move to blacken Ashli Babbitt’s reputation. Has anyone else noticed this?
    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/ashli-babbitt-jan-6-insurrectionist-portrayed-as-martyr-by-some-had-violent-past

    Indeed. Brought to you by the same interests which gave us Trayvon “Skittles” Martin and Michael “Gentle Giant” Brown. And while some discern ironic difference, others buy it lock/stock/barrel. Based on the premises of their COVID-driven questioning yesterday, count Justices Breyer, Kagan, and Wise Latina Sontomayor in the latter category — it’s the bubonic plague! We must act!

    Note also how PBS and NPR never suffer defunding by the GOP when it is in power.

  121. Russ says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    If you like where you live, even if it’s solid “Blue”, you can stay put and be effectively armed and ready to engage in (defensive) mutual combat. It’s likely that “may issue” permits are to be ruled unconstitutional this year, so if you don’t have a criminal/mental record, you’re legally good to go: Know the laws and have a good DGU (defensive gun use) lawyer on retainer. There is also carry insurance for this.

    The McCloskeys in the wealthiest part of St. Louis city are the canaries in this coal mine. Recall their brandishing their guns (awkwardly) whilst the Summer 2020 Peaceful Protestors were passing their mansion on the private street on which they live. He is running for U.S. Senate in MO as a GOPer; I believe that he has been a Dem (as a personal injury lawyer …)

  122. res says:
    @Corvinus

    5 dead.

    A closer look at the causes of death makes clear just how hollow your narrative is.
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/04/07/capitol-riot-deaths-cause-death-released-4-5-not-sicknick/7128040002/

    That’s why you simply cannot be trusted

    Oh, the projection.

    • Agree: ic1000
  123. Corvinus says:
    @ic1000

    “2) realists who recognize that like-minded powerful people sometimes coordinate activities in secret.”

    On its face, that is true. But when we dig deeper, we realize this statement needs to be properly vetted. What is required is specific evidence showing how and why how that group conducted clandestine efforts to for their benefit. Someone merely stating, for example, that the FBI was involved in causing or leading or creating the 1/6 Insurrection is merely speculation, i.e an opinion. Who exactly was behind it? When and where was this plan hatched? Is there a paper trial? Video or digital records? Eyewitness and/or “whistleblower accounts”?

    Here is the Revolver News Article you alluded to…

    https://www.revolver.news/2021/10/meet-ray-epps-the-fed-protected-provocateur-who-appears-to-have-led-the-very-first-1-6-attack-on-the-u-s-capitol/

    followed by a counter by Snopes.

    https://www.snopes.com/articles/389126/who-is-ray-epps

    “Does this comment make me a Conspiracy Theorist?”

    Depends if you are absolutely convinced the FBI played an integral role, or was unequivocally behind, the 1/6 insurrection (or that the Holocaust did not happen, or that the U.S. never landed astronauts on the moon, or that…).

    • Troll: Alrenous
  124. @Jonathan Mason

    No. Majority rule and democracy are completely incompatible notions.

  125. SF says:

    I watched part of the Emmett Till drama on TV with my wife. I learned that he had suffered brain damage from anoxia during birth. That explains a lot. I had an uncle with that affliction, born before ceasarians were common. His personality was like he had always had a couple of drinks, although he didn’t drink much. He lived with his parents until they died. He had poor impulse control. There were four incidents of inappropriate fondling, with family members between six and 70 years old. And that is just the ones I know about. Of course, he was never lynched, although there were people who probably would have liked to. After he died, my parents were cleaning out his trailer and settling his affairs. One of the neighbors described him as an interesting conversationalist but a lousy human being. He liked black women. I have a mixed race dna match who might be his granddaughter.

  126. anonymous[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimDandy

    Can you provide links to the “All three guys who were involved in the jogger incident just got life”

    There should be memorial markers to where the Central Park jogger was attacked, gang raped and left for dead.

    Also markers for:

    The Knoxville horror

    Saint Vicki Weaver on Ruby Ridge Idaho.

    Thanks

    JR
    TPC

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  127. @AndrewR

    “Hence the expression: “As greedy as a pig”.

  128. riches says:
    @Dmitri Fyodorovich

    “Only you can save our democracy from the facist next door.”

    FIFY, Comrade Dmitri. You who has exhibited near perfect parroting should know that even the slightest deviation isn’t tolerated.

  129. Odin says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    The whole point of democracies is that you have majority rule based on voting, and that minorities are on the outs.

    Democracy works until it doesn’t work.

    Agreed. If 51% of the citizens vote to kill all the Capricorns, then a democracy kills all its Capricorns. Not a good look. Democracy needs to be seriously constrained.

    Below are some steps that might be considered to avoid democracy’s perils when establishing a country. (Just to be clear, this is in support of your later comment #94 on what a good job the Founding Fathers did under the circumstances.)

    1. Make the country a federation in which many powers, including the police power, are retained by the federates [federation members] and by the citizens, rather than being held at a unitary over-all level.

    2. Write a founding document that guarantees basic rights to citizens and to the federates, and that limits the powers of the federal level. Studiously avoid using the word “democracy” in this document.

    3. When creating the structures at the federal level, make at most one of those structures (you might call it the House of Representatives) democratically based.

    4. Don’t let the democratic voting powers of citizens in the largest federates overwhelm the votes of citizens in the smaller federates. Set up some kind of electoral structure to facilitate the balancing.

    5. Guarantee the rights of citizens to move from one federate to another.

    Of course this is by no means a complete list.

    And if the citizens were to lose sight of how such points comport with the original goals, or if the citizens could be manipulated into deviating from them, all might still be for naught.

    Still, it was a fine start. I wish our Canadian Fathers of Confederation had paid more attention to it. Although with the vacuity our judges have demonstrated during the current pandemic, it might have made no difference.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    , @Gamecock
  130. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    It is strange that so many conspiracy theorists do not believe that there was any conspiracy on 1/6, in spite of ongoing revelations of communications between certain legislators and the White House during the invasion of the Government buildings.

    What was conspiratorial about those communications? What was the nature of them? Is it not customary for the Whitehouse to communicate with members of Congress – especially members of the same party?

    A couple of things that are interesting to me is that there are a number of people present that day who were acting as instigators, like Ray Epps and the “Scaffold Commander”, who are not drawing scrutiny from the Feds – are not under arrest or indictment, and apparently aren’t even being investigated.

    Perhaps some internet sleuth should see what publicly available information can be gleaned about Ray Epps. Has he recently paid off a large loan? Had tax troubles go away? Had legal problems that suddenly went away?

    Then there is the matter of the three Washington D.C. area cops who committed suicide soon after 1/6 – two Capitol police officers and one D.C. cop. One of them ostensibly shot himself in the head while driving to work – literally while driving a moving vehicle. Is that common? Some riot cops just lost it because they were actually called to put down a riot? Some bad people yelled mean things at them and threw stuff at them and they just couldn’t take it anymore? Are cops usually such shrinking flowers?

  131. Mr. Anon says:
    @Corvinus

    On its face, that is true. But when we dig deeper, we realize this statement needs to be properly vetted.

    Vetted by whom? By idiots like you?

    What is required is specific evidence showing how and why how that group conducted clandestine efforts to for their benefit. Someone merely stating, for example, that the FBI was involved in causing or leading or creating the 1/6 Insurrection is merely speculation, i.e an opinion. Who exactly was behind it? When and where was this plan hatched? Is there a paper trial? Video or digital records? Eyewitness and/or “whistleblower accounts”?

    Yeah, sure, and the FBI is just going to hand over everything they have on the matter.

    followed by a counter by Snopes.

    https://www.snopes.com/articles/389126/who-is-ray-epps

    Who cares what Snopes thinks? They’re propagandists and stooges, like you only paid better. That Snopes article stated: “The argument goes that Epps, who can be seen above encouraging others to go peacefully into the Capitol building, escaped prosecution because, supposedly, he is an undercover federal agent.” What Snopes (and most media outlets) neglected to show was the video showing Epps standing right at the first barricade that was breached, whispering into the ear of one of the guys who pushed it over, which is shown at the following site:

    https://www.revolver.news/2021/10/meet-ray-epps-the-fed-protected-provocateur-who-appears-to-have-led-the-very-first-1-6-attack-on-the-u-s-capitol/

    He seems to be directing them, which could be taken to be instigating, and yet the FBI claims not to know anything about him.

  132. The need to keep the word “Insurrection” front and center is that it makes participants Constitutionally incapable of holding elected office.

    This is the groundwork for the mid-term lawfare to which we will be treated.

    • Thanks: Hibernian
  133. @Corvinus

    Why do you generally only drop in to comment on the same issues that the intelligence community obsesses over?

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  134. Colin Allred at CNN manages to be unintentionally amusing.

    https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/05/opinions/january-6-anniversary-voting-rights-allred/index.html

    He’s entirely right about the authoritarian trend, of course. He just mistakes the source.

  135. @Corvinus

    ‘Yeah, that was quite predicable on your part to wait until January 7 to present your opinion about January 6. It’s a thank you for your fanbois and fangirlz who donate to your tin cup narratives. But what’s 140 police officers injured…’

    Is it the idiocy or the mendacity of your post that’s most impressive? I’m torn.

    Doesn’t it dawn on you that the very fact that you have to resort to such drivel to justify your cause is significant?

  136. ic1000 says:
    @Corvinus

    Thanks for the Snopes link, I’ll take a look. Since I searched on 1/6, I missed it (published on 1/7).

    There are two relevant Revolver News articles. The one you linked, from 10/25/21:

    Meet Ray Epps: The Fed-Protected Provocateur Who Appears To Have Led The Very First 1/6 Attack On The U.S. Capitol.

    And this one, from 12/18/21:

    Meet Ray Epps, Part 2: Damning New Details Emerge Exposing Massive Web Of Unindicted Operators At The Heart Of January 6.

    My hope is that Snopes will (1) describe and then (2) discuss the major claims of the Dec. 18th article. Revolver News backs their account with time-stamped video clips. The people at the center of their story:

    * Ray Epps’ activities at three points — organizing for the Capitol break-in on 1/5, immediately prior to the breach, and during the breach. Curiously: without explanation, the FBI removed Epps from the “Most Wanted” list, one day after a 6/30/21 NYT story mentioned him. Epps faces no charges.

    * The actions of publicly-unnamed “FenceCutterBulwark” at one point — immediately prior to the breach. The FBI is not seeking to identify him, and he faces no charges.

    * The actions of publicly-unnamed “ScaffoldCommander” at one point — during the breach. The FBI is not seeking to identify him, and he faces no charges.

    * The actions of publicly-unnamed “BlackSkiMask” at two points — on 1/5, and during the breach. The FBI knows his identity from his detention during the 1/5 incident. He faces no charges.

    * The actions of publicly-unnamed “BeCivilGuy” at two points — immediately prior to the breach, and during the breach. The FBI is not seeking to identify him, and he faces no charges.

    That’s five individuals and 3+1+1+2+2=9 activities for Scopes to cover. Are they up to the job?

    Corvinus, you end your comment with a particularly sleazy paragraph. Since it equates me with a Holocaust-denier and a moon-landing-hoaxer, I’ll return the favor by imputing the same about you. No — actually, as you can see, by making these scurrilous accusations so baldly, I’m emphasizing their lack of merit.

    You display many faults in iSteve threads, but Holocaust denial is not one of them.

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @ic1000
  137. nebulafox says:
    @Corvinus

    >Depends if you are absolutely convinced the FBI played an integral role, or was unequivocally behind, the 1/6 insurrection

    Do you know how the KKK had its back broken in the 1960s and 1970s Deep South, Corvy? I’ll tell you something you won’t hear on NPR: it wasn’t Baby Boomer protesters ushering us into a more civilized age in their imaginations. It was mean ‘ol J. Edgar Hoover and his boys swiss cheesing them with federal agents. It worked. Surprisingly, given their reputations for attracting calm, stable people content with their lives, political radicals of all stripes are usually easy to goad into doing dumb, self-defeating things! This is something that police agencies have mysteriously exploited with people far, far more serious, dedicated, and dangerous than the LARPers throwing a hissy fit from 1/6: from Tsarist Russia and the Bolsheviks to the modern Islamic World and jihadis. Agents provacateur is part of the game, always has been.

    No, that’s boring, given the known myopia of our governing class who supposedly believe themselves in a sea of neo-Nazis. (Supposedly. Some might actually be that dumb or narcissistic.) I’m more interested in what happened during the BLM riots, given the interest private donors had in seeing retail stores go up in flames. You know, the ones that ruined thousands of loves and got no comment from the media. Now *that* would be an interesting conspiracy theory.

    • Agree: ic1000
  138. ic1000 says:
    @ic1000

    Well, that was fast.

    Corvinus referred me to this 1/7/22 fact check by Dan Evon at Snopes, Who is Ray Epps?”

    From his text, Evon is disputing Revolver News’ claims about Epps, but without mentioning its name or linking to either the 10/25/21 article or the 12/18/21 article. Few Snopes readers will be able to connect the rebuttal to the accounts being challenged.

    Evon asserts that Epps’ actions were anodyne. He fails to mention Revolver‘s claims that Epps facilitated the breach of the Capitol perimeter, urged follow-on Trumpist crowds to trespass, and did so in coordination with others (i.e. in some kind of conspiracy).

    Evon explains that the FBI removed Epps’ name from its “Most Wanted List” on July 1 (177 days after 1/6) without notice, because the FBI is “largely” charging people who entered the Capitol Building itself (Evon’s explanation, not the FBI’s).

    By limiting his discussion to Ray Epps, Evon avoids any discussion of the activities of “FenceCutterBulwark,” “ScaffoldCommander,” “BlackSkiMask,” or “BeCivilGuy” — some of which appear to have been coordinated with Epps (i.e. that conspiracy, again).

    This is Duranty-caliber investigative journalism.

    Fortunately, prestige media organs (the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, CBS’ 60 Minutes, NBC’s Lester Holt) have done a better job than lowly Snopes.

    Links below.

  139. @Recently Based

    It’s big of you to acknowledge that “The Founding Fathers did a remarkable job under the circumstances.” Maybe even as well as you might have done.

    Just a friendly head’s up: Mason’s Bumbling Brit that doesn’t understand America act and consistently being wrong about almost everything has landed him on quite a few “Commenters to Ignore” lists. There’s no point trying to educate him or explain anything to him.

    • Agree: Kylie
  140. @res

    The other two questions have been discussed online ad infinitum. I addressed the third question, because it seemed like an original and rather odd point of view.

    I have participated in elections at first hand in three different countries, and observed elections in two others, so I know a thing or two about voting systems.

    Actually the law that PhysicistDave was so concerned about had been pretty much ignored since the Jefferson-Burr debacle, and was one of the worst boo boos of the founding fathers, since it created the possibility that the President and vice President might easily be deadly enemies!

  141. @The Alarmist

    Yes. I didn’t say these rivals were first. Arguably, our first lady President was James Buchanan. I can never remember if he was Miss Nancy or Aunt Fancy.

    Edith Wilson sent out Palmer’s raiders. On Census Day. To the opposition’s states. Shrewd of her, but her fellow women* got the vote in every state, and Republicans romped in the next five elections.

    *Isn’t this a contradiction in terms?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  142. Mike Tre says:
    @Redneck farmer

    He’s a lawyer? I thought he was HR.

  143. Alrenous says: • Website
    @Days of Broken Arrows

    Don’t you dare cheapen Jan 6 by comparing it to the Holocaust!

    The Holocaust supports their power, whereas Jan 6 showed they can’t even keep random yahoos from stealing the icons of their sacred temples.

    If Americans got mad, and stood up…that would be quite sufficient. They wouldn’t be able to do shit about it. Now there’s evidence of their impotence, especially impotence before military insults. If Americans realized their defences rely entirely on mind-control, the whole system would crash within two years. Terrifying.

  144. @Mr. Anon

    We’re living in clown world now. Even Charles Manson got the possibility of parole.

  145. @Kronos

    But the Jan. 6 fear porn seems to target and resonate mostly with Boomer professionals.

    I attended Mike Lindell’s MAGA rally last summer. If you don’t care for “Boomers”, you were better off not being there. More pot bellies than a Vietnamese pork farm.

    As with “marriage equality” and “canceling”, Epiphaporn is a minority view among those born between Donald Trump and Kamala Harris, and significantly more popular among those younger.

    Exit polls of the 2020 Presidential Election in the United States on November 3, 2020, share of votes by age

    Note that this poll’s age categories split the pop-psy categories in two. The only age group Biden didn’t carry was 65+. Men 66 and older were the last to face the real possibility of being conscripted and sent abroad.

    Is that the real difference?

    • Replies: @Kronos
  146. @Jonathan Mason

    1/6 will go down in history as the date on which the ending of the First US Republic began, like 9/11, 12/25, 7/4 and Bastille Day and Pearl Harbour.

    Wow, never need to pay attention to anything you write again.

  147. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Replace MLK day with Ashli Babbit Day.

  148. Leon says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Republicans bring a case to the Supremes before the election? Same result as bringing after – no standing, non-justiciable, anything to dodge that bullet. “They didn’t take into account the existence of political parties.” Yes, they did, it is called the 12th Amendment.

  149. Muggles says:
    @res

    Smearing the dead, killed by government thugs, has always been a fascist trope.

    Or Communist.

    Now a Woke one.

    Actual criminal thugs are, in a reverse move, turned into fake heroes a la G. Floyd, et. al.

    Hating the dead is a mental defect, which should be a sign of psychopathic behavior. Where is the DSM when we need it?

    But we live in an era where former pioneers and heroes, whose contemporaries erected statues of them, are now torn down by hateful Woke communists. (No, not actual communists as the Wokies are too stupid for that, but emulators of style and behavior.)

    They also try to re-write the actual words written by the New Woke Enemies class of writers or scholars.

    There is nothing evil or hypocritical that the Woke Comrades won’t do. They are a small group, but their influence is greatly magnified by the corporate media and Woke fellow travelers.

    When you see hate and violence played out, normally, aside from the criminals they embrace and celebrate, you find the Woke Comrades. Count on it.

    “There is no antifa. No such group exists.” Official FBI position.

  150. @Corvinus

    I tend to agree.

    The daily Mail is currently running stories about how Tony Blair struck a deal with George W Bush a YEAR before the invasion of Iraq that Blair would work on the PR side of the war to sell it to the European public.

    One may remember at the time that some newspapers called Blair Bush’s poodle, and did not understand why Blair didn’t put up more opposition to the Iraq War, considering that millions of people were marching in Britain to protest the aggression against Iraq.

    Well, now we know. But then again I suspected something of the kind at the time, and now secret memos are being published, and other former government ministers are speaking out.

    So, does that make me a conspiracy theorist?

    Not really, because I never really believed Colin Powell’s United Nations presentation, which seemed incredibly weak to me, and I could not believe that it was the real reason for the Iraq War.

    And I never believed Dick Cheney when he said that there was proof of Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, and that he knew exactly where they were–when in retrospect he had no idea and was just lying.

    So now what millions of us suspected at the time is now being proved to be true.

    But yes there is a huge difference from that to all these allegations about that fixed election.

    Where are the witnesses who saw the false ballot papers being printed? Where are the witnesses who sold the boxes of ballot papers being smuggled into the polling stations? How did they do this? Did nobody write down the registration tags of the vehicles involved? There just don’t seem to be any substantive witnesses ready to come forward with nuts and bolts evidence of falsification of ballots.

    If the voting machines were fixed, name the names of the people who did it, and explain how they did it. Not just claims that votes were sent from China by Wi-Fi through the light fixtures.

    Can you understand the difference in quality of the different types of evidence?

  151. Kronos says:
    @nebulafox

    It goes back to one of Steve Sailer’s key observations on this era. That speaking “power to truth” is a central component of our contemporary political philosophy. Our leadership/elites are forever revolutionaries fighting an evil authority/establishment that doesn’t even exist. They rule, yet recognizing that power officially is anathema to them.

    • Agree: ic1000
  152. Muggles says:
    @Redman

    NPR is just about the wokest organ around and it’s audience is 84% white.

    My guess is that close to 100% of their constantly badgered “donors” are White. I suspect that more than 2/3s are college “educated” females. Most of those are not currently married.

    Mooching as a mere “listener” is more of a POC trademark.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  153. Muggles says:
    @Corvinus

    None of the ‘facts’ you cite are true.

    Do you get paid for lying here or is just a hobby? The nurses at the home don’t mind?

  154. ic1000 says:
    @Corvinus

    > “The January 6 terrorist attack on the Capitol was a dark moment in our nation’s history, and I fully support the ongoing law enforcement investigations into anyone involved”–Ted Cruz

    Based on the timestamped videos that Revolver News unearthed and assembled for their 12/18/21 expose: Merrick Garland has chosen Disagree.

  155. @pirelli

    ‘…In Hawaii, she, a child of Jewish immigrants…’

    I’ll be a monkey’s uncle. Who’da thought?

    It does get old. Could some gentiles please step up and help to dilute the ratio of Jews to some defensible figure?

  156. Mr. Anon says:
    @Corvinus

    We know you read this individual’s work, but you just cannot bring yourself publicly to admit what in reality has been taking place.

    You know that Steve reads Seth Abramson? How? He’s never mentioned him. Nobody here cares about Seth Abramson other than you. This Seth Abramson fellow is your little obsession. While you’re at it, why don’t you admonish us to read Leonard Pitts too.

    “The attack at the Capitol was a despicable act of terrorism and a shocking assault on our democratic system. The January 6 terrorist attack on the Capitol was a dark moment in our nation’s history, and I fully support the ongoing law enforcement investigations into anyone involved”–Ted Cruz

    And within a day, Ted Cruz begged Tucker Carlson to appear on his show and atone for his statement. The backlash against Cruz on social media by the kind of people who actually vote for him, rather than the praise expressed by people who don’t, evidently scared the piss out of him that he had just destroyed his own political career.

    • Agree: Redman
  157. Mr. Anon says:
    @Muggles

    I’ve never donated to NPR. I figure that I’ve already involuntarily contributed to them through my taxes. The only thing worthwhile on NPR was Car Talk and Schickele Mix. I don’t even think they’re still on. Everything else they have is crap.

    If Republicans regain Congress, and they really want to start fighting the culture war to win, they should end all media subsidies and defund all public TV and radio for good. It’s outrageous that we are forced to pay for propaganda directed against us.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  158. @Buffalo Joe

    “Knife at the throat” is just a metaphor for Wille’s sword and Kammie’s gullet.

  159. @Steve Sailer

    Dwight Stones was born in 1953, of which the Social Security Administration tells us:

    The year when the name Dwight was most popular is 1953. In that year, the number of births is 2697, which represents 0.135 percent of total male births in 1953.

    One in every 741 boys born that year were given the name. Dwights had a bulge from 1943-6, and again at 1952-3. Wonder why?

    Singer Dwight Twilley was born on the seventh anniversary of D-Day.

  160. JimDandy says:
    @anonymous

    Just Google:

    Aubrey life sentence

  161. @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason wrote:

    And if that is what the Republican Party thought, they should have gone to the supreme Court BEFORE the election for a ruling on how the electoral college is supposed to work.

    The Supreme Court has no say in the matter.

    Article II, Section 1 states:

    Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

    There is no provision that the Supreme Court can in any way alter that Section.

    In a number of states in 2020, including Pennsylvania and Georgia, the Dems convinced the judiciary or the executive to alter the means of choosing the electors from the “Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct…”

    Those electors were therefore not legal electors.

    Joe Biden is not legally President of the United States of America.

    Now I realize of course that de facto, Biden does control the Deep State (to the degree anyone does!), the military, etc. But that is the result of an illegal coup d’etat.

    JM also wrote:

    If that’s the case, it is doubtful whether any presidential election within living memory has been a legal election.

    Really? Why?

    The 2020 coup d’etat is quite exceptional.

    I think you have no idea what you are talking about.

    JM also wrote:

    The Founding Fathers had no possible reason to think that the president of the United States would be the most powerful office in the world, in a world with jet travel and internet, a world in which it was possible for men to travel to the Moon.

    The Founders were men of the Enlightenment. They expected — they planned for — enormous advances in science, technology, industry, etc.

    Nothing that you cite invalidates the Constitution or makes it unworkable.

    Now of course a world-spanning imperial state, a Deep State that is completely out of control — yeah, all that is certainly inconsistent with the Constitution! And that is an excellent reason to euthanize the Deep State and the American imperium.

    JM also wrote:

    The assumption of the last decades has always been that the electoral college has a purely ceremonial function, and that the ratification of the election by Congress is purely ceremonial after the vote count has been decided, and not a negotiated process.

    Whose assumption?

    Personally, I had this vague hope that we were still a constitutional republic.

    If you are right, then the Republic is dead and the only recourse of a free people is civil war.

    I’d like to think we are not there yet.

    “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

    We the people have no obligation to give loyalty or allegiance to the coup meisters who now control the White House.

    Our only obligation is to use intelligence, prudence, and courage to restore constitutional government in the United States of America.

    • Agree: Bumpkin
  162. @megabar

    Individuals are powerless when opposed by numbers or institutions.

    Not true. Many individuals independently acting in a similar manner can be powerful force. The assumed “numbers” factor can be a deceptive illusion of stasis or status quo. Remember when Trump announced his candidacy in 2015, and ‘conventional wisdom’ media pundits were laughing their asses off, thinking he would be trounced in the primaries? Who will even vote for him? He doesn’t have the numbers, LOL. Oops.

    If you have a gun, they have a police force. If you have a lawyer, they have the judges.

    None of that matters if you’re being railroaded (false felony arrest warrant) and you are willing to physically go ‘all the way’ in an honor-based modus operandi.

    The McMichaels thought they were prepared, and were defending their neighborhood. Now they’re in jail for life.

    The McMichaels were ignorant of the big picture, and thus acted in a half-assed manner. They had no anti-railroader contingency plan. The American zeitgeist is trending towards “mutual combat” and no parties are exempt.

    If you choose to stay in a liberal area, that is your right. But there are risks that no amount of prep can reduce.

    Your mindset shouldn’t be only weighted towards “risk reduction” (and the weakness of retreat). Instead, you can stay put and be a hidden-in-plain-sight (gray man) “risk” to potential aggressive malefactors.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • LOL: Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    , @megabar
  163. @Thea

    Guns won’t help but babies will.

    It’s both.

    Have lots of babies, teach them to fear God

    Teach them to respect God, and as they get older, to fear no man. Man, like God, is a creator and destroyer, a life-giver and a killer. Our mission in life, should we choose to accept it: Create and preserve that which is good, and destroy that which is bad.

  164. Kronos says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I attended Mike Lindell’s MAGA rally last summer.

    I still need to buy one of his pillows…

    Keep in mind who’s been choosing the epiphaporn for kids for the last 50 years. In terms of education-indoctrination the youth are simply a blank canvas for a certain Boomer segment to express themselves on. The younger folks are simply indoctrinated after 12+ of boomer immersion or natural sociopaths willing to go with whatever the education establishment wants.

  165. @Jonathan Mason

    You’re off by 90 years, Jonathan. The ending of the first US Republic began after the election of FDR.

    If I get a reply that I am off by 80 years myself, then I wouldn’t argue the case – going back to Lincoln, we see the precedent that the various States are not allowed to leave the Union of their own free will. Where does it say THAT in the Constitution, Jonathan? What’d you do on the immigration test, anyway?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  166. @Mr. Anon

    Oh, they say they’re gonna do that every 10 or 20 years. It never happens. Of course the money is peanuts in the face of \$5 Trillion budgets, but it would be a nice gesture.

  167. @Reg Cæsar

    Are you doing a Scott Adams on us?

    My history teacher quipped that once women got the suffrage, the first thing they did was to vote for the better looking candidate.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  168. @Achmed E. Newman

    Nah, Achmed, the First Republic died in 1865.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  169. AndrewR says:
    @PhysicistDave

    We are due for a big war. It was about 80 years between the revolution and the war of northern aggression. Then another 80 years until WW2 (almost four times as many Americans died then than in WW1). Now it’s been 80 years since we conquered da ebil nahtzees and the japs

  170. @The Alarmist

    My history teacher quipped that once women got the suffrage, the first thing they did was to vote for the better looking candidate.

    Richard Nixon was better looking than John F Kennedy?

    By the way, Warren Harding’s opponent in 1920 was James M Cox, the first divorced major party candidate. Divorced from Mary Simpson Harding.

    That can’t have helped with the ladies.

  171. @The Alarmist

    Nah, Achmed, the First Republic died in 1865.

    It was in terminal condition long before that. To quote Lincoln, this government cannot stand, permanently half-Negro and half-human.

  172. @The Alarmist

    Yep, I mentioned Lincoln in the 2nd paragraph, just rounding off to 80 years from 1861. As I wrote, no argument.

  173. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Nonsense. In both Georgia and Pennsylvania Biden received more votes than Trump, and therefore Biden obtained the maximum number of votes in the electoral college for those two states.

    Okay the margins were relatively small in those two states, but then practically all presidential elections are determined by a few marginal States.

    In a two-party state this is almost inevitable, because both parties will attempt to tweak their manifestos so as to win 51% of the electoral college votes, and obviously one side wins and the other side loses, even if it is by only one vote in the electoral college.

    But basically both sides agreed to the same rules before the election and these rules have been in effect for a long time. Both candidates knew in advance of the election how many electoral college votes each state had, and how they were apportioned depending on the popular vote in each state, and the whole world also knew this information.

    It would make the whole procedure a farce if the legislature of individual states decided after the election to throw all their electoral college votes to the minority party!

    But remember Bush versus Gore, which you could also consider to be a coup d’etat, and which led to the disastrous Bush presidency after the whole election depended on hanging chads in Florida and the intervention of the Supreme Court to end a recount.

    I cannot remember anything in the Constitution that says that when an election comes down to one state and it is very close, then the Supreme Court can intervene and decide which side wins, but that is what happened that year.

    Instead of whining about a stolen election, the Republicans should come back in 3 years with a better set of policies that are more popular with the electorate, and a better candidate who would be a more competent president, and who would follow through on free electoral promises.

    What happened to Trump’s plan to clip the wings of the high flying pharmaceutical companies? What happened to Trump’s plan for universal health insurance that would have everybody covered by affordable premiums? Don’t you think his failure in those areas cost votes in key marginal States?

    • LOL: Gabe Ruth
  174. nebulafox says:
    @ic1000

    Doesn’t anybody think it is a bit strange for supposed “insurrectionists” to seem surprised by the day’s events, anyhow? Bit strange for coup plotters to walk around in a daze after spending all the time planning that they’d need to do to overthrow a government.

    (Making Nancy Pelosi pee in her diaper because you scared her during her insider trading-that will not receive the same attention as your 600 dollars from the Fed, peasant-is not the same thing.)

    The media narrative doesn’t just add up on the details, but the common sense.

  175. @ic1000

    It is just a massive leap to assume that Ray Epps must be an undercover agent for the FBI because he was not arrested.

    Why not email or call Epps yourself to ask for clarification, or get in touch with your local legislator and ask him to ask questions about the role of Epps in the riots?

    In any case, why would the FBI want to encourage an attempted coup? I don’t see how you can possibly explain this without going into unfounded conspiracy theory territory.

    As far as I can see Epps did not enter the capital building and did not attack anybody or break any windows or kick down any doors.

    Maybe he did encourage other people to do so, but what kind of mindless sheep were these people that they would act in such a criminal manner because they were verbally encouraged to do so by a plain clothes FBI agent directing pedestrian traffic on the sidewalk?

    However I would encourage anybody who knows the name of anybody who actively participated in the riot and has not yet been identified or arrested, to come forward and name them, so keep on digging!

    • Replies: @ic1000
  176. megabar says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    > Your mindset shouldn’t be only weighted towards “risk reduction” (and the weakness of retreat). Instead, you can stay put and be a hidden-in-plain-sight (gray man) “risk” to potential aggressive malefactors.

    You are correct that simply reducing risk guarantees a strategic loss.

    But that isn’t my mindset. It’s an overall value analysis, of which risk evaluation is but a part. By forming organizations, both logical and geographical, you maximize the strength of your position and your individual safety.

    Consider sanctuary states. These states ignore Federal immigration law because they have strong enough support for progressive ideas from their voter base, and because the Trump Federal government was not willing to send troops to force them to comply. As long as the voters support these politicians, there is nothing an individual can do to stop the migrant influx.

    And so, if a state has enough committed right-wingers, it could nullify parts of the progressive agenda. If this happens, then the possibility of real, meaningful change can take place. It could lead to discussions about secession. Or conflict. Who knows?

    Applied to specific area, it’s important to distinguish between an area that is currently to the left, and one that has no realistic possibility of ever moving to the right. In the latter case, your vote is wasted, and your risks are higher. You have to balance that with personal reasons to stay, which are, of course, also valid.

  177. Wokechoke says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    The Election Day lasted all summer. That’s part of the problem. People were voting in September on issues that there’re not given a full picture about. 2020 was an election held in the dark about the big issues.

    For example, the impending approval of vaccines. The insiders on both sides of the establishment and in the press knew there was a vaccine at Pfizer, yet that confirmation was deliberately withheld until after the vote. That’s the medical, media and political establishment not telling the patient what’s really going on. What’s about to be rolled out as policy. We could have been debating vaccine mandates before the election and not six months after the real power is awarded to to winners and losers, after such a misinformed contest.

    The BLM rioting. A knife was held to the throat of the electorate all summer, in effect saying “vote Biden or we burn this bitch down.” It was a blackmail operation/color revolution op. No wonder these boobs stormed the Capitol! they’d watched BLM act with impunity all year and thought there was an equal standard of appeasement they could share in if they acted out.

    The Democratic Party is going to get wiped out in the 2022 November contest after the scam they’ve pulled on the electorate.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  178. ic1000 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason, sequence is important.

    In the future, please read and think about what I’ve written, then respond.

    I am assuming you aren’t trolling me — although it’s been known to happen around here. If you care about my opinion (there’s no pressing reason why you should), then up your game before hitting “Reply” again.

  179. Gamecock says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Note that we peaceful, productive citizens are paying for all this happy horseshit.

    Sooner or later, we will get what we are paying for, or we will stop paying.

  180. Hibernian says:
    @Odin

    Although with the vacuity our judges have demonstrated during the current pandemic, it might have made no difference.

    With the vacuity our judges have demonstrated ever since the late 1930s, it has made less and less difference with the passing of years.

    • Agree: Odin
  181. Gamecock says:
    @Odin

    5. Guarantee the rights of citizens to move from one federate to another.

    This one concerns me. We’ve got southern Californians moving to South Carolina. They say they are fleeing radical government. But the sad fact is they are bringing it with them.

    They are not against radical, all powerful government. They are just against how California governments use that power.

    • Agree: Odin
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  182. Hibernian says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    But basically both sides agreed to the same rules before the election and these rules have been in effect for a long time.

    Not true in 2020 with the massive rule changes, usually by executive and/or judicial fiat. I say that as a believer that Biden truly won by a very narrow margin, due to Trump disappointing his supporters and Biden at least appearing to be less repulsive than Hilary.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    , @Jonathan Mason
  183. Wokechoke says:

    One of the historical reasons the US has fewer burglaries and property crimes than Merry Olde England or Liberty Egalité Fraternity France etc is that the property owner customarily has a firearm and will blow your head off if you trespass on their property, and that juries have often looked the other way. These three guys appear to have been living in another age and shouldn’t have chased this fellow down. Wider issue is that the ground is shifting under the general culture in ways that will generate an earthquake. The US is based on little more than the sacredness of property rights. The McCloskey campaign in Missouri will be interesting indeed.

  184. nebulafox says:
    @S. Anonyia

    Because the intelligence community, contra stereotypes, is full of sheep who take their cues from NPR too and lean toward generic “Establishment” views on politics. And since we live in a world where our elites are supposedly the last bastion of democracy against an evil conspiracy…

    It’s when you go abroad that you really see their inability to look outside their world-view, because foreign countries to them are simply battlegrounds for US politics. This just reflects what goes on in DC as a whole: ever since the 1990s, nonstop frivolity. Since a lot of the DC IC shares the views of the rest of DC without questioning them, this has consequences in our relationships with other countries. What’s going on with Biden dismantling the agreements Trump made with Mexico and Guatemala to stem Central American migration in favor of completely culturally alien concepts (“anti-corruption” czars who just happen to promote wokeism) is really just an intensification of things the Bush II era State Department did with the Baltics, not a divergence.

  185. nebulafox says:
    @Hibernian

    The fact that Donald Trump didn’t fire Anthony Fauci because “it would cause a firestorm with the Left” should make everybody here think twice about whether they want him to be Grover Cleveland 2.0.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  186. @ic1000

    Snopes is as worthless as Wikipedia.

    2) The press is strangely uninterested in where Antifa got the money to buy all their gear, rent cars, buy commercial grade fireworks, etc. The FBI used to be good at this.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @ic1000
  187. @PhysicistDave

    A simple test for any GOP candidate for President: will you move to make January 6 “Ashli Babbitt Day”?

    Are you crazy? That poor, stupid, deluded woman lost her life while engaged in criminal activity, suicide by cop, but at least her death more or less brought an end to the rioting, and had the effect of knocking some sense into the heads of the those lunatics who were trying to break down doors to get into the Congressional Chambers under the absurd delusional belief that they could somehow reverse the election by terrorizing legislators.

    The fortunate thing was that more people were not killed by law enforcement officers who showed remarkable restraint under the circumstances. People get shot by law enforcement officers everyday for lesser offenses than an attempted coup d’etat.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  188. @Hibernian

    I can tell you that I voted for Trump the first time, but I did not vote for him the second time due to the fact that he in no way fulfilled his prior election policy promises, or even showed any desire to work with the Congress to bring about substantive new legislation that would improve the quality of life for the majority of people in the United States.

    Even though Biden was an absolutely terrible candidate, possibly even worse than Hillary Clinton, it is difficult to imagine that any swing voter who originally voted for Trump would vote for him again.

    So the swingers swung to Biden.

    In Hillary Clinton versus Trump, Trump was the lesser of two evils. In Biden versus Trump, Biden was the lesser of two evils. That was what it came down to.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  189. ic1000 says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    > Snopes is as worthless as Wikipedia

    I was looking for the most comprehensive and analytical Fact Checks on the 1/6 Insurrection/Trespass that post-dated the Revolver News stories.

    Articles that tackle claims that Federal agents (by title or function) were involved in 1/6:
    (1). Have to state what those allegations are.
    (2). Have to state who made them.
    (3). Have to do some analysis, evaluating the strength and credibility of the evidence.

    Actually, as the Snopes article showed, (1) is only partly correct, while (2) and (3) are not true. The mainstream press doesn’t have to do anything they don’t want to.

    I’m interested in more ambitious Fact Checks, if you have links.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  190. @Wokechoke

    For example, the impending approval of vaccines. The insiders on both sides of the establishment and in the press knew there was a vaccine at Pfizer, yet that confirmation was deliberately withheld until after the vote.

    Nonsense.

    I had written several articles about the impending vaccines, which had a global readership, during the later months of 2020, and there was a massive amount of material on the internet about the various vaccines that were being developed and the technologies used and the expected date at which they would be available.

    Anybody who is even slightly interested knew that Pfizer vaccine was close to emergency approval around the time of the election.

    Consider that approximately 20% of the US economy is healthcare, so straight off the bat you have a vast number of workers who have an interest in developments in treatment for Covid-19.

    Also I covered elections in several countries in the region during 2020, including Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, St Vincent, Jamaica, and Bermuda and in some of those countries governments were returned with hugely increased majorities, and in others governments were turfed out of office.

    In none of those elections was the issue of approvals or non-approvals of vaccines an issue.

    The question of whether the approval of the Pfizer vaccine occurred before or after the election was never an electoral issue. Furthermore there was no boxes in opposition to operation Warp Speed, and it was the one issue on which the post parties were united in support.

    • Troll: ic1000
    • Replies: @ic1000
  191. ic1000 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    > Anybody who is even slightly interested knew that Pfizer vaccine was close to emergency approval around the time of the election.

    I know more about vaccine R&D and regulatory approvals than say 97% of Americans — maybe not a high bar? While very interested, I did not know that the Pfizer vaccine was close to emergency approval.

    What you are stating as fact is stupidly false. A bad habit.

    > The question of whether the approval of the Pfizer vaccine occurred before or after the election was never an electoral issue.

    Don’t waste your breath here. Tell it to cardiologist Eric Topol MD and his allies in the Democratic-Medical Complex who — puzzlingly!– ensured that no good vaccine news would be forthcoming until after Election Day.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  192. Gabe Ruth says:
    @AnotherDad

    Good comments AD. You have to try to judge your situation from the perspective of your kids and grandkids.

    An idea I’ve been mulling for some time is regional protectionism, and the way the dormant commerce clause interferes with such a concept.

  193. @ic1000

    I know more about vaccine R&D and regulatory approvals than say 97% of Americans — maybe not a high bar? While very interested, I did not know that the Pfizer vaccine was close to emergency approval.

    Boloney, you can look at the FDC and NIH bulletins for October 2020, and see that globally there were 10 vaccines in phase 3 trials at the beginning of October 2020, then early in October of 2020 the AstraZeneca phase 3 trial was put on hold because of a negative event concerning a patient in Britain, so how many vaccines did that leave in the running after you excluded those like a Sinovac and Sputnik V that were not not seeking approval in the United States, and you already had it narrowed down to three vaccines.

    Do you have actually have any proof that Pfizer had all its documentation for the phase 3 trials which were conducted in the United States, Brazil, and Argentina and just sat on that information for x number of days waiting for the election to be over before announcing its results on November 9th? If that was the case, why not announce it on the day after the election?

    Do you actually have any proof that Pfizer did this, for example internal memos, or personal knowledge of people high up in the decision-making chain in Pfizer, or knowledge of unusual movements in the stock market such as insider sales prior to the announcement?

    You mentioned some Democratic doctor whose name is not familiar to me, but can you explain his connection to Pfizer, and how he could delay the announcement of the success in phase 3 trials?

    Or is this just a matter of you being a psychic, and it is obvious to you that since the announcement came soon out of the election, then it must have been delayed because of the election?

    • Troll: ic1000
    • Replies: @ic1000
    , @ic1000
  194. ic1000 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    > Boloney, you can look at the FDC and NIH bulletins for October 2020, and see that globally there were 10 vaccines in phase 3 trials at the beginning of October 2020, then early in October of 2020 the AstraZeneca phase 3 trial was put on hold because of a negative event concerning a patient in Britain, so how many vaccines did that leave in the running after you excluded those like a Sinovac and Sputnik V that were not not seeking approval in the United States, and you already had it narrowed down to three vaccines.

    Jonathan Mason, some questions.

    * For a BLA to be cleared, the applicant must prove Efficacy and Safety. For Pfizer, Moderna, and J&J, this wasn’t a BLA but the much-laxer EUA. But what, exactly, would it take to meet the Efficacy standards of the EUA? Sure, “50%,” but define that technically. As we have seen and continue to see, this “detail” is no small matter.

    * Likewise, what exactly — technically — were the safety standards that would allow the approval of a vaccine’s EUA? What were the criteria for frequency and severity of Adverse Events during the reporting window (2 months, IIRC)? This, too, continues to be a matter of controversy.

    The history of experimental vaccine development to the SARS and, later, MERS threw up many yellow flags — some fundamental to coronavirus-host interactions.

    * Would any of the manufacturers encounter problems in cGMP manufacturing or in QSR (quality systems)? These are far from trivial matters, as the subsequent tribulations of Novavax continue to make clear.

    To review, you claimed that “anybody who [was] even slightly interested knew that Pfizer vaccine was close to emergency approval around the time of the election.” I — along with many other informed observers — had a less Panglossian view.

    I was delighted to be proven wrong.

    This exchange has not increased my confidence in your subject-matter expertise. Or in the soundness of your judgement on the drug approval process.

  195. ic1000 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    > Do you have actually have any proof that Pfizer had all its documentation for the phase 3 trials which were conducted in the United States, Brazil, and Argentina and just sat on that information…

    Proof? HD video feeds from multiple cameras, accompanied by studio-quality sound?

    Epstein wasn’t involved, so No.

    Recently, Sailer walked through the available evidence to a skeptical audience in the comments to Scott Alexander’s Dec. 30, 2021 post, Links For December.

    Search for “Steve Sailer” and read through his comments 3 through 20 in sequence (the first two in the thread are on a different topic).

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  196. @Bard of Bumperstickers

    I didn’t know David Stockman was still around.
    Pretty good article, actually.
    Thanks for linking it.

  197. Jack D says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    In Biden versus Trump, Biden was the lesser of two evils.

    Really, with all of his enormous Socialist plans for future spending involving taking trillions and trillions of \$ from white people and giving it to non-whites, the complete collapse of border control, the appointment of leftist judges, etc., Biden was the lesser of two evils?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  198. Gamecock says:
    @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Stockman’s Trump hate scuttles his post.

  199. @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason wrote to me:

    Nonsense. In both Georgia and Pennsylvania Biden received more votes than Trump, and therefore Biden obtained the maximum number of votes in the electoral college for those two states.

    You are a profound fool.

    Neither I nor anyone else complaining about the illegality of the election is complaining about the margins having been small.

    What we are complaining about is that they changed the voting rules in a number of states, including Georgia and Pennsylvania, illegally. In various states, the executive and/or judiciary changed the procedures for voting in the 2020 Presidential election.

    In fact, under the provision I quoted from Article II Section 1, only the state legislatures can determine those procedures.

    JM also wrote:

    But basically both sides agreed to the same rules before the election and these rules have been in effect for a long time.

    That is a falsehood.

    In multiple states, as I and others have said again and again, the executive and/or judiciary changed the rules fr the 2020 elections, without the consent of the state legislatures.

    “Both sides” did not agree, but even if they had, it would not matter: under the law, only the state legislatures can make such changes.

    JM also wrote:

    It would make the whole procedure a farce if the legislature of individual states decided after the election to throw all their electoral college votes to the minority party!

    Well, legally they could do that, but that is not what I or anyone else is advocating. We are simply advocating that the Constitution be followed, and the Constitution says that only the state legislatures can alter the procedures in Presidential elections.

    But, as I keep saying, that is not what happened in 2020: in various states, the executive and/or the judiciary changed the rules without the consent of the state legislatures.

    That is illegal, and Joe Biden is therefore not legally President of the United States.

    He does de facto hold power, but no loyal American owes the coup government our allegiance or loyalty. The coup government has force majeure, and we may have to submit to that, but we do not have to pretend that it is legally legitimate.

    Can you grasp this?

    No, of course you cannot, because you are very stupid: you have made clear for a long time that you are an ignorant, pompous fool who worships whomever holds power, even when they seize power illegally.

    David Hume pointed out that no government can endure long-term unless the people at least passively accept its legitimacy.

    We need to delegitimize the illegal coup government now controlling the White House. They took power in violation of the Constitution.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  200. @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason wrote to me:

    [Dave] A simple test for any GOP candidate for President: will you move to make January 6 “Ashli Babbitt Day”?

    [JM] Are you crazy? That poor, stupid, deluded woman lost her life while engaged in criminal activity, suicide by cop, but at least her death more or less brought an end to the rioting,

    You are truly evil, aren’t you?

    Babbitt was protesting an illegal coup d’etat against the government of the United States. You refuse to admit this because you seem unwilling or, most likely, unable to read Article II Section 1 of the Constitution of the United States.

    She was unarmed. Thousands of Leftists over the last few decades have occupied government buildings in protest without being shot or even arrested.

    Babbitt was shot dead.

    That is murder.

    And you approve.

    And no, it did not bring an “end to the rioting.”

    I take it you are not physically present in the United States? Good — do not come back. We are better off without monstrously evil people like you.

    • Replies: @res
  201. @nebulafox

    nebulafox wrote:

    The fact that Donald Trump didn’t fire Anthony Fauci because “it would cause a firestorm with the Left” should make everybody here think twice about whether they want him to be Grover Cleveland 2.0.

    Yeah. A big part of Trump’s problem is that he thought of the federal government as if it were the private sector: in the private sector, most (not all, of course) employees have a basic loyalty to the company.

    In DC, everyone is political, the more so the higher up you go. Trump never grasped that even the “best people” whom he himself appointed were not loyal to him.

    Also, Trump never quite had the guts to put it all on the table and go for broke: he was always trying to maintain his long-term viability, at the cost of selling out the Republic.

    Glenn Greenwald has an interesting post up about why Trump did not pardon Snowden while he was leaving office: in a nutshell, the GOP Establishment used the impeachment to neuter Trump.

    Sad to hear how an adult male lost his masculinity.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  202. Twinkie says:
    @nebulafox

    He testified: but not in the way they were expecting.

    Eddie Adams apologized to Gen. Loan in a published eulogy to him: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nguy%E1%BB%85n_Ng%E1%BB%8Dc_Loan#Death

    The general killed the Viet Cong; I killed the general with my camera. Still photographs are the most powerful weapon in the world. People believe them, but photographs do lie, even without manipulation. They are only half-truths. What the photograph didn’t say was, “What would you do if you were the general at that time and place on that hot day, and you caught the so-called bad guy after he blew away one, two or three American soldiers?”[36][38]

    By the way, the sole survivor of Lem’s murders of the Tuan family (he had killed ARVN LTC Nguyen Tuan, his wife, their six children, and his mother), Huan Nguyen, who as a nine-year-old had been shot twice and watched his mother bleed to death, grew up to be a rear admiral of the USN in America.

    • Thanks: ic1000, Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @nebulafox
  203. @ic1000

    This is Pillow Guy-level rhetoric.

    What about the evidence that the Pfizer executive team had a strong interest in delaying the announcement of the successful phase 3 trials, because they believed this would be harmful to President Trump’s reelection prospects, and that in some way a Biden electoral victory in the United States would be better for Pfizer and its stockholders?

    Without any proof of that, this whole line of argument is meaningless.

    What we do know is that not a single whistleblower from Pfizer has come forward and said that the vaccine trial results were deliberately delayed so as to disadvantage Donald Trump in the US general election.

    However it does seem likely that Pfizer was waiting for additional results to come in from overseas so as to bolster the application for an emergency license to use the vaccine and meet all the criteria worldwide. As a global company Pfizer is not only looking at the United States, and as subsequent bmj articles have shown, they were certainly some criticism of Pfizer’s testing, that probably made it useful for them too getting some additional numbers.

    • Troll: ic1000
    • Replies: @ic1000
    , @res
  204. @PhysicistDave

    This is Pillow Guy-level rhetoric.

    There is no evidence that there were any changes made in the way that electoral college votes were apportioned for the 2020 election.

    Of course there was some changes in the way votes were cast in the 2020 election, because of the needs for social distancing during the viral epidemic, and the encouragement of mail-in and early voting.

    But there is absolutely nothing to suggest that any changes in rules prevented eligible Republican voters from casting their votes, or that Republican voters were intimidated or turned away from the polling stations.

    Nobody has produced any evidence of mail-in votes being fraudulently mass manufactured in marginal states.

    However if you really want evidence of election fraud, how about the well documented instance of Donald Trump calling Georgia election officials and demanding that they “find” a specific number of votes.

    Where in the Constitution does it say that the candidates are allowed to do this and what is the evidence that this number of Republican votes were removed from the count?

    If the Constitution allows presidential candidates to get on the phone and intimidate election officials, then surely there should be a constitutional amendment to forbid this practice going forward? What other constitutional republic allows this?

    Isn’t this electoral “wire fraud”?

    • Troll: ic1000
  205. @Jonathan Mason

    What evidence do you have that Bourla was lying? (See link below).

    The notion that Pfizer deliberately delayed the announcement seems to have originally come from Donald Trump himself.

    Is Donald Trump well known as a truthful and honest person whose word can be trusted? Did he have any one-on-one discussions with Bourla in the weeks and days running out to the election, when he was saying that an announcement on a vaccine could come at any time? I don’t think he has ever claimed that that was the case.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-pfizer-election-idUSKBN27X2N3

    • Troll: ic1000
    • Replies: @ic1000
    , @nebulafox
  206. ic1000 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason, some comments about your online persona.

    1. You opine about the Pfizer vaccine delay, but without having read the Matthew Herper piece that broke the scandal. If you read it, you haven’t understood the implications. Even after Sailer walked through them in the linked Astral Codex Ten thread.

    2. You weigh in on clinical trials and drug regulation, seemingly without insight into industry best practices.

    3. You don’t apply the concepts of Type I and Type II errors to the topic of “alleged conspiracies.” You aren’t a Bayesian and you aren’t a frequentist. You just like your priors.

    Assuming good faith, this persona embodies the quip, you don’t know what you don’t know. Many people find that an agreeable way to go through life. One minor drawback is that you don’t add much value to iSteve threads.

    A drawback for other people.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    , @res
  207. ic1000 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    > What evidence do you have that Bourla was lying? (See link below).

    You found a Reuters story that didn’t challenge Bourla on any of the specifics raised by Matthew Herper, when he broke the story of the Pfizer vaccine delay in STATNews.

    Reporters playing softball during work hours may be regrettable, but it isn’t news.

  208. @ic1000

    You have said that you are an expert on vaccines, and yet you had absolutely no idea that Pfizer was close to publishing the results of successful phase 3 trials.

    Here is a link to an article published on September 3rd 2020, in which CNBC reports that the Pfizer CEO says to phase 3 studies are looking promising and they could be publishing results before the end of October.

    So this was out there on mass media, but you a vaccine expert did not know this!

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/09/03/pfizer-ceo-confirms-coronavirus-vaccine-trial-may-have-results-in-october.html

    • LOL: ic1000
  209. @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason wrote to me:

    This is Pillow Guy-level rhetoric.

    There is no evidence that there were any changes made in the way that electoral college votes were apportioned for the 2020 election.

    I did not say there were, Jonny.

    You are a truly, monstrously evil liar. (What makes you deeply evil, of course, is your approval of the murder of Ashli Babbitt.)

    The monster also wrote:

    Of course there was some changes in the way votes were cast in the 2020 election, because of the needs for social distancing during the viral epidemic, and the encouragement of mail-in and early voting.

    Those changes were fiercely sought by Democrats, who clearly believed they would benefit from those changes and who almost certainly did.

    But, again, those changes were illegal.

    As I, and many others, have pointed out, again and again, only the state legislatures can make such changes under Article II Section 1. If the legislatures of the various states had concluded that such changes were required by Covid, they could have made those changes.

    But they didn’t. Instead, in several states, the executive or judiciary over-rode the authority of the legislatures and changed the procedures for the Presidential election.

    That was illegal.

    The evil liar also wrote:

    But there is absolutely nothing to suggest that any changes in rules prevented eligible Republican voters from casting their votes, or that Republican voters were intimidated or turned away from the polling stations.

    Nobody has produced any evidence of mail-in votes being fraudulently mass manufactured in marginal states.

    Not true at all, but none of that matters anyway.

    Only the state legislatures had the Constitutional right to change the electoral rules. They chose not to.

    In various states, the executive and judiciary went ahead and changed the procedures, in ways that Democrats (but not the Trump campaign) demanded and which Democrats clearly believed would benefit them.

    That is illegal.

    The election was a fraud.

    Biden is not President of the United States. He is just an illegal tyrant.

    You can lie all you want and refuse to face up to the provision of Article II Section 1.

    But it is there.

    The election was illegal, at the behest of the Democrats.

    Joe Biden has the power. But he lacks legitimacy.

    And all of your evasions cannot change that fact.

    But of course you have admitted that you are a Biden supporter.

    A very typical one indeed.

    I.e., a liar.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @ic1000
  210. ic1000 says:
    @PhysicistDave

    PD, you wrote:

    > You are a truly, monstrously evil liar.

    You might as well reply in fury to one of the toxic-liver adverts that pop up over at Taki’s.

    Before this thread, what was your prior that a comments-exchange with “Jonathan Mason” would be worthwhile to you, however you define worthwhile? 20%?

    Presumably you’ve now adjusted that, so what is it now? 3%?

    I’m talking to myself. Of course!
    😉

    • Agree: res
  211. nebulafox says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    >Is Donald Trump well known as a truthful and honest person whose word can be trusted?

    Of course not. But Donald Trump doesn’t radiate contempt for entire swathes of America. I also don’t think Donald Trump actively sees me as a problem to be managed, or as a nonperson to be used as a means for other people or ideological fantasies rather than a human being like any other. Donald Trump can be talked to rationally. I don’t think Nancy Pelosi can be talked to rationally.

    Donald Trump might be a lazy backstabber with the attention span of a flea, but I can assume that he doesn’t disdain me to the point where immersing me in miasma is seen as a good in and of itself. That’s more than you say for most of our ruling class. You deal with the world you have, not the one you wish you have.

  212. nebulafox says:
    @PhysicistDave

    I think Trump honestly underestimated the degree of petty turf war vengeance he’d be getting into. Considering that he’s a 1980s NYC real estate developer, that speaks volumes about DC.

    That said, my sympathy for a man who routinely sold out his supporters for those who would have nothing to do with him is limited. I appreciate Trump’s achievements, particularly on foreign policy (we are seeing right now how much worse it can get with Biden!), but he never seemed to truly grasp that it wasn’t this or that policy the GOP Establishment or the Left objected to, but his existence. I suspect that’s more because it would have been impalatable than anything else. And if you don’t want to grasp unsavory realities, don’t sign up for political leadership. There is no reason to think this will be any different for any outsider, even ones more formidable and hygienic than Trump.

    It’s best to look at Trump’s Presidency as a learning experience. We have pointed the obvious ad nauseam, so let me try and say something more original. Machiavelli’s famous aphorism that you need a different crowd of people to wield power than to win it smacks true. This is where the New Right is weak. It doesn’t lack for potential broad support among the masses or potential leaders: activating both won’t be easy, but it’s relatively straightforward. It’s that missing middle administrative strata is a glaring weak spot.

    You don’t necessarily need many people if your goal is to burst the Wasserkopf. But you do need some, and you’ve got to make sure your changes embed after you are gone. Quality over quantity is probably your bet for institutional change. Given the coming economic conditions as the Fed tries to make America solvent… well, this is where broad changes can take place in a relatively short time, much like the early 1930s. Listen to the goddess of history singing in the distance and humbly surf her wave…

  213. nebulafox says:
    @Twinkie

    Mmm. I admire it, but it’d be more of a feel good story if it wasn’t for the recent Navy scandals. 🙁

    The thing that this tale taught me, though, is that the perma-bureaucracy’s ideological tendencies isn’t something new. This is true even within the IC: even back in 1970, you had people openly hanging VC flags in their offices after the Lon Nol coup and the subsequent interdiction into eastern Cambodia, even as they were busy collaborating with right-wing Latin American dicatorships. It’s just radicalized drastically, and Establishment views have gotten more monolithic and rigid even as the rate of change in the world around us has grown faster. It’s not good.

    (It was a Democratic administration that intervened on Loan’s behalf at the time, whereas now, the distinction between the White House and the mandarinate is academic. One could argue that by 1978 it was impossible for everybody outside the nut-left to deny the horrors going on in Indochina, so this doesn’t represent any real changes. But I disagree: it really does underline how things have radicalized. Take openly ordering soldiers to shut up about how the Taliban exploited the victims of boy rapists in Afghanistan in the name of cultural tolerance. That specific… very globalist line of reasoning doesn’t strike me as feasible even during the height of the ’60s zeitgeist, much as you wouldn’t have seen Vice Presidential candidates openly feting riots or left-wing terrorism. Might have been too cowardly to act against them in some cases, particularly among local Democratic politicians, but that’s not the same thing. This is “new”. Especially given that the 1970s had a level of left-wing terrorism that would shock many people today.)

  214. @Jack D

    I think more a matter of printing billions of dollars and thus devaluing the dollar, and causing some inflation.

    This seems to be part of Manchin’s beef.

    But if that is what is necessary to make the United States more of a modern democracy, then why not?

    Here in Ecuador everybody uses tanks of propane gas for their hot water. A refill of gas costs \$3 delivered to your door.

    It is so cheap because it is subsidized by the government, and the government was planning to remove the subsidy so that the price of a refill would go up to \$20 or more per tank.

    However they were mighty protests, mostly from the indigenous people, and the government quickly caved in.

    Everybody is perfectly happy with the subsidy, because everybody benefits from it. Why not?

    In the US people would be saying “but nobody is becoming a millionaire out of selling gas, so it is morally wrong!”

    So why not make it easier for people to get child care, so that they can work? Why should homosexuals and childless people not pay taxes to support child care and schools? Children are the future citizens, but gays are an evolutionary dead end.

    Why not have health care that everybody can afford? Why is it morally Superior to have health insurance companies making billions in profits, and the executives becoming millionaires and multimillionaires?

    What has the Republican party ever done to improve anyone’s life?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  215. @Jonathan Mason

    The deeply evil pathological liar Jonathan Mason wrote to Jack D:

    I think more a matter of printing billions of dollars and thus devaluing the dollar, and causing some inflation.

    This seems to be part of Manchin’s beef.

    But if that is what is necessary to make the United States more of a modern democracy, then why not?

    Because inflation is theft. Because debauching the currency rewards those with a short time horizon and penalizes responsible people who try to think long term.

    Look at what the great inflation in Germany did in wiping out the middle class and causing people to turn to the nationalist socialists.

    And because a lot of Americans do not want a “modern democracy” — AKA rule by a criminal globalist elite supported by evil monsters like you.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  216. @PhysicistDave

    Well

    Because inflation is theft. Because debauching the currency rewards those with a short time horizon and penalizes responsible people who try to think long term.

    The kind of hyperinflation that occurred in Germany or Argentina is unlikely in the US.

    I lived through a period of a lot of inflation in Britain in the late sixties and seventies, and actually the people who benefited from inflation were property owners, and the people who lost out from inflation were wage earners.

    Along with higher prices, you also get a declining exchange rate relative to foreign currencies, and higher interest rates.

    However as the world’s main reserve currency, the dollar is in a different situation to the currency of small countries, and it is likely that other currencies would devalue along with the dollar as their own governments overspend, so the position of the United States relative to other countries would not change as much as you would think.

    The dollar is also backed by the massive productive land value of the United States and the fact that owning real estate in the United States is very appealing to foreigners.

    Inflation would also devalue the massive debt which the US owes to China due years of trade imbalance.

    Another factor is that many of the world’s largest multinational companies are US based, and they get a very large percentage of that earnings from overseas. Pharmaceutical companies for example.

    So you have to weigh off the pros and cons of moderate inflation versus improving the quality of life of working people in the United States.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  217. Corvinus says:
    @ic1000

    “Ray Epps’ activities at three points — organizing for the Capitol break-in on 1/5, immediately prior to the breach, and during the breach. Curiously: without explanation, the FBI removed Epps from the “Most Wanted” list, one day after a 6/30/21 NYT story mentioned him. Epps faces no charges.”

    There is nothing curious here. Occam’s Razor says that he was not arrested or charged because his actions were not criminal. So where is the evidence that shows a direct connection to Epps being an FBI plant? Epps was just interviewed (under oath) by the House Select Committee, which came out saying “[It] is aware of unsupported claims that Ray Epps was an FBI informant based on the fact that he was on the FBI Wanted list and then was removed from that list without being charged”.

    There is no public evidence that Epps entered the interior of the Capitol building nor attacked law enforcement on its grounds. To be certain, he was unlawfully present on its restricted grounds. Would you suggest that EVERYONE there be charged?

    It would appear that Epps is being touted as an agent provocateur in a quest to shift blame away from Trump’s various war rooms.

    • Agree: Jonathan Mason
    • Replies: @ic1000
  218. @Gamecock

    They are not against radical, all powerful government. They are just against how California governments use that power.

    True dat. I have some vacation neighbors who were all in on government ecological controls until they found out they could not cut down dead trees on their own property without a county review and permit.

    I felt like saying to them, “You conceded the county the right to do these sort of things and you are now surprised?!”. But I did not.

    Giving more power to government only makes things worse.

    That is why I am a conservative. Stop improving what works!

  219. @Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason wrote to me:

    The kind of hyperinflation that occurred in Germany or Argentina is unlikely in the US.

    According to the BLS inflation calculator, the dollar has lost almost exactly seven-eighths of its value since I started high school.

    Not quite hyperinflation, but pretty rough on those advanced in years who have been trying to save up over the last five decades.

    And, of course, inflation of the money supply lowers interest rates: savers get hit twice — the value of their savings depreciates and then the interest they can earn is also lowered.

    Perhaps worst of all, given the way that financial and monetary systems work in the crony-capitalist nations (what you euphemistically call “advanced democracies”!), inflation of the money supply produces or exacerbates asset bubbles, because the new money is first injected into asset markets.

    And, in the end, asset bubbles always pop.

    JM also wrote:

    I lived through a period of a lot of inflation in Britain in the late sixties and seventies, and actually the people who benefited from inflation were property owners, and the people who lost out from inflation were wage earners.
    [snip]

    So you have to weigh off the pros and cons of moderate inflation versus improving the quality of life of working people in the United States.

    You see a lttle contradiction there???

    You admit that the people who suffered the most in the inflation you witnessed were “wage earners” but then propose that it might improve “the quality of life of working people in the United States”???

    The whole problem with hangers-on of the ruling elite such as yourself is that you are eager to play these games of pretending to trade off costs and benefits of evil policies.

    Inflation is theft. And it is particularly pernicious theft because it penalizes responsible people and thereby degrades the character of a nation.

    But you can see some positives: yeah, as you say:

    Inflation would also devalue the massive debt which the US owes to China due years of trade imbalance.

    Another factor is that many of the world’s largest multinational companies are US based, and they get a very large percentage of that earnings from overseas. Pharmaceutical companies for example.

    Yeah, and a big war can really goose an economy too — at least, if you happen to be in a position (like the Cheney family) to get some nice fat war contracts.

    Not so much if you are one of those killed or maimed in the war.

    The decent and productive people on this planet are sick of people like you, Jonny, all of you who think that you can do fake cost/benefit analyses on the pluses and minuses of theft via inflation, of murder via war, of indoctrination via schooling, and all the rest. We have had enough: we want to demolish the Deep State, the universities, the government-medical complex, the financial-banking cartel, the military-industrial complex, and the public-education scam. It is Samson-in-the-temple time, Jonny.

    We want you gone. We want you off our planet. We want your leaders in prison doing hard labor.

    We want to be left alone. We want to be free.

    “Ourselves and our posterity.”

  220. res says:
    @PhysicistDave

    You are truly evil, aren’t you?

    It sure seems like it. Much worse than just being the naive fool he superficially appears to be.

  221. res says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    This is Pillow Guy-level rhetoric.

    Oh, the projection. You and Corvinus make quite the pair.

    • Agree: ic1000
  222. res says:
    @ic1000

    You aren’t a Bayesian and you aren’t a frequentist. You just like your priors.

    Have to remember that one. Thanks.

  223. ic1000 says:
    @Corvinus

    > Epps was just interviewed (under oath) by the House Select Committee…

    Typical establishment press stories (USA TODAY, NBC) make no mention of sworn testimony.

    Is that wishful thinking on your part? (Not that it’s dispositive: people commit perjury.) Please supply your citation for under oath, or withdraw the claim.

    > There is no public evidence that Epps entered the interior of the Capitol building nor attacked law enforcement on its grounds. To be certain, he was unlawfully present on its restricted grounds. Would you suggest that EVERYONE there be charged?

    If anybody had asked my suggestion on 1/6/21, I would have said, “Turn around and go back to your Trump rally, or better yet, go home. Trespassing, fighting cops, tramping through the Capitol can’t possibly advance your cause… do you even know what your cause is?”

    Oh, my suggestion to prosecutors. That’d be, “You’ve had a year of Mostly Peaceful Protests to determine which actions by leftists require aggressive prosecution. Apply the same standards to these rightists. Just Say No to Anarcho-Tyranny.”

    Obviously, Merrick Garland doesn’t agree.

    Based on Revolver News‘ timestamped videos, Epp trespassed and incited lawbreaking. He conspired beforehand to make the riot happen. He conspired to remove security fencing and warning signs. He then conspired to funnel people onto the Capitol grounds.

    Funnily enough, Wikipedia lists the names of people who neither “entered the interior of the Capitol building nor attacked law enforcement on its grounds” — yet are under arrest for Conspiracy.

    Few if any establishment press articles link to the Dec. 18 Revolver News story with the most important evidence. That’s the story that documents the activities of Epps and four other conspirators (whose names are unknown to the public). Epps isn’t the only one leading a charmed life.

    Also, no links to Glenn Greenwald, who rebutted your rozar s’macco view of Deep State innocence seven months before you wrote it: Questions About the FBI’s Role in 1/6 Are Mocked Because the FBI Shapes Liberal Corporate Media: The FBI has been manufacturing and directing terror plots and criminal rings for decades. But now, reverence for security state agencies reigns.

    > There is nothing curious here.

    Indeed.

    What I wrote to Jonathan Mason about Bayesians, frequentists, and priors applies equally to you.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  224. Corvinus says:
    @ic1000

    Of course Epps was under oath. You do not appear before a committee es of this nature and not bear legal responsibilities. He is one of more 340 individuals called forth to a body with subpoena power. It’ is called drawing a conclusion. No citation is needed, given the context of this situation. Epps appeared and submitted his statement to a committee that has clearly stated to anyone who appeared before it that “if you lie to this panel, you will face perjury charges at the very least, so you are swearing that your testimony is honest before us”. One member of this committee was explicitly clear about Epps’ testimony in November.

    Does Cruz, Gaetz, or Greene (or even you() have inside information demonstrating clearly that Epps went into the Capitol on January 6?

    Because that is a factor that federal prosecutors have heavily weighed when deciding who to charge with a crime, and a major reason why he was removed from the most wanted list because he apparently broke no laws.

    “If anybody had asked my suggestion on 1/6/21, I would have said, “Turn around and go back to your Trump rally, or better yet, go home. Trespassing, fighting cops, tramping through the Capitol can’t possibly advance your cause… do you even know what your cause is?””

    Is that type of the advice you would have given to Kyle Rittenhouse? “Hey, you really should leave, it’s not your place to be, considering the cops already stated you and others are violation of orders to immediately vacate the premises, you have no earthly business here”.

    “Oh, my suggestion to prosecutors. That’d be, “You’ve had a year of Mostly Peaceful Protests to determine which actions by leftists require aggressive prosecution. Apply the same standards to these rightists. Just Say No to Anarcho-Tyranny. Obviously, Merrick Garland doesn’t agree.”

    Let’s be more nuanced here, shall we?

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/roberthart/2021/01/07/figures-show-stark-difference-between-arrests-at-dc-black-lives-matter-protest-and-arrests-at-capitol-hill/?sh=1f43faed5706

    Just 52 people were arrested in Washington D.C. Wednesday after Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol and interrupted Congress certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s win. [direct federal matter] Between May 30 and June 2 2020, the height of the racial justice protests, 427 “unrest-related” arrests were made in D.C., including 24 juveniles, the police department says. [local matter] On June 1 alone, more than five times the number of people were arrested than on the day the Capitol was stormed, with 289 people booked. The day before also saw a high number of arrests — 90 — nearly double the number seen on Wednesday. 

    We know that the Capitol Police were overwhelmed and lacked the manpower to make mass arrests, especially when the Capitol was breached by hundreds of protestors, and that the National Guard could not quickly respond to the Capitol attack. Hmm, I wonder why?

    https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2021/01/07/this-is-why-the-national-guard-didnt-respond-to-the-attack-on-the-capitol/

    There must be an investigation into why National Guard troops were not mobilized to the Capitol earlier to stop the insurrectionists from storming the building and disrupting the 2020 presidential election certification process, a former Trump Cabinet member, who asked not to be named, told Military Times on Wednesday. “Why wasn’t the D.C. National Guard, and perhaps Guard troops from Maryland and Virginia, there ahead of time?” the former Cabinet member said, speaking on condition of anonymity out of safety concerns.

    “He conspired beforehand to make the riot happen. He conspired to remove security fencing and warning signs. He then conspired to funnel people onto the Capitol grounds.”

    Conspire, as to make plans jointly to commit an unlawful or harmful act. So where is the proof Epps is an FBI plant? That he conspired prior to this event with federal agents? Conjecture is not proof. .

    Now, are you suggesting that everyone in the videos that Revolver provided—which they admit are shortened versions—be charged? The people there ALL conspired to engage in those actions, as they openly discussed together what should be done? Well, it seems that the prosecution attorneys are using discretion on who and who not to charge, given they have that lee-way. But, since you favor law and order and the rule of law, like Mr. Sailer, then we should have every single one of the people in the videos that Revolver showed be charged.

    “Funnily enough, Wikipedia lists the names of people who neither “entered the interior of the Capitol building nor attacked law enforcement on its grounds” — yet are under arrest for Conspiracy.”

    Is it not reasonable that federal prosecutors know much more about the circumstances in each of those cases compared to you and I, and thus the charge is warranted?

    “There is no doubt that the FBI has infiltrated at least some if not all of these groups — which it has been warning for years pose a grave national security threat — with informants and/or undercover spies. What would be shocking and strange is not if the FBI had embedded informants and other infiltrators in the groups planning the January 6 Capitol riot.”

    Again, how exactly is Epps linked to the FBI? Just because the FBI has engaged in malfeasance in the past does not automatically mean it is patently true he is an infiltrator or a spy or a plant. Such pronouncements require evidence, not supposition and innuendo, which is Greenwald’s specialty.

    Consider there has been original reporting for the past year that has documented ample evidence of several Trump war rooms which planned 1/6 and noted how many alleged leaders have not yet been indicted. While low-level protesters have been aggressively charged with major felonies and held without bail, many of the alleged plot leaders have thus far been shielded from charges. The implications of these facts are obvious. It seems extremely likely that GOP leaders tragically refuse to “connect the dots” and have purposely stonewalled the investigation for political reasons. Yet the GOP-loyal sector of corporate media and its Alt Right auxiliaries have reacted to that reporting as though those sources were positing something that no sentient being could possibly regard as viable.

    “What I wrote to Jonathan Mason about Bayesians, frequentists, and priors applies equally to you.”

    Thanks for the gaslighting, but I’ve had my fill for today.

    • Replies: @ic1000
  225. ic1000 says:
    @Corvinus

    > Of course Epps was under oath.

    In other words, you read the same Twitter thread as everybody else.

    Kinzinger tweeted that somebody from the J6 committee contacted Ray Epps and asked him some questions. The following tweets contain Kinzinger’s paraphrases of Epps’ responses. Nothing about “under oath” or “subpoena.”

    Who asked the questions? How were the inquiries worded? Did Epps decline to answer any of them? Was the Q&A session recorded? Did Epps’ counsel attend?

    “Under oath.” As far as I can tell, that’s just made up. You write as if you know what you want to believe, and proceed accordingly.

    The rest of your response includes mind-reading and “do you still beat your wife?” rhetorical flourishes. This is entry #240 in an old thread, so I am not writing for a broad audience, but having a dialog with you. However, in my view, you show yourself to be dogmatic and closed-minded. Also discourteous, even by the low standards of the internet.

    You display these unwelcome traits in the service of the Establishment Left. That makes you something of an outlier at iSteve. Not in the United States as a whole, sad to say.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    , @Corvinus
  226. ic1000 says:
    @ic1000

    On reflection, I’ll add that your online persona could just as well be a false flag in the service of the Alt-Right. A voice from the peanut gallery that, thread after thread, illustrates one of Sailer’s recurring themes — the obvious shortcomings of elite Establishment discourse.

    Whether you’re a cagey volunteer for the Okhrana or a sincere Chekist doesn’t really matter. In the end, the key outcome is the same.

    Scott Alexander once quipped that for a comment to pass his moderation, it had to score at least two of three: True, Helpful, Kind.

    Something to think about.

  227. Corvinus says:
    @ic1000

    “In other words, you read the same Twitter thread as everybody else.”

    I read several sources and drew my own conclusions.

    “Kinzinger tweeted that somebody from the J6 committee contacted Ray Epps and asked him some questions. The following tweets contain Kinzinger’s paraphrases of Epps’ responses. Nothing about “under oath” or “subpoena.””

    Again, a committee of this importance and stature compels that the witness tell the truth under oath, or face legal consequences. That is common knowledge, yet you act as if it is something strange or out of the ordinary.

    “Who asked the questions? How were the inquiries worded? Did Epps decline to answer any of them? Was the Q&A session recorded? Did Epps’ counsel attend?”

    You know damn well that during an investigation by House and/or Senate committees, those matters may not necessarily be privy to the general population. But, if you insist, contact your House representative and request that he/she inquire.

    ““Under oath.” As far as I can tell, that’s just made up. You write as if you know what you want to believe, and proceed accordingly.”

    Thanks for your projection.

    “The rest of your response includes mind-reading and “do you still beat your wife?” rhetorical flourishes. This is entry #240 in an old thread, so I am not writing for a broad audience, but having a dialog with you. However, in my view, you show yourself to be dogmatic and closed-minded. Also discourteous, even by the low standards of the internet.”

    Pro-Tip —> Never go full Glenn Greenwald.

    “On reflection, I’ll add that your online persona could just as well be a false flag in the service of the Alt-Right. A voice from the peanut gallery that, thread after thread, illustrates one of Sailer’s recurring themes — the obvious shortcomings of elite Establishment discourse.”

    LOL, I love the qualifier–“could be”. In that way, you’re not really saying it, but you’re saying it. You’re taking a page from Mr. Sailer’s caginess.

    “Scott Alexander once quipped that for a comment to pass his moderation, it had to score at least two of three: True, Helpful, Kind.”

    And exactly how would you make the cut?

    Anyways, so where is the evidence Epps is an “FBI plant”? That he conspired prior to this event with federal agents? Conjecture is not proof.

    Furthermore, why has a known Trump supporter from Arizona, who is a veteran and a political conservative, suddenly targeted by increasing numbers on the right as now working for the federal government against a cause he championed? What exactly motivated him to change his allegiance?

    • Troll: ic1000
    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
  228. @Corvinus

    Troll:

    Your character & your credibility are worthless here at The Unz Review for good reasons. One reason will suffice:

    You are happy Europeans are in prison right now — for merely questioning (((your version of WWII))).

    If you really believed your “Holocaust” fable you would welcome its investigation, NOT the imprisonment of the investigators.

    We assess your character & your credibility accordingly.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  229. Corvinus says:
    @Pat Kittle

    Coming from you who favors the outright butchering of Jews, I’m not surprised by you sullying my impeccable reputation on this fine opinion webzine.

    • Troll: Pat Kittle
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