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From my new movie review in Taki’s Magazine:

Vice stars Christian Bale, Christopher Nolan’s Batman, in an eerily impeccable impersonation of former vice president Dick Cheney. Amy Adams is forceful as the veep’s intellectual wife, Lynne Cheney, and Sam Rockwell is wonderfully well cast as George W. Bush.

With a trio that strong (although Steve Carell is clownish as Cheney’s mentor-turned-wingman Donald Rumsfeld), a wise writer-director would get out of their way and let them act. Indeed, the biopic’s adroit trailer largely consists of a single scene of Bale and Rockwell superbly reenacting the masterful Cheney agreeing to be the callow Bush’s running mate in 2000.

Unfortunately, “wise” is not the word for Adam McKay, Will Ferrell’s writer from Saturday Night Live and director of the mortgage meltdown movie The Big Short.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. Has Steve reviewed Mule yet? It has some interesting subtext about race and how America has been changed. Be interesting to see a review of it.

  2. Steve, I have to hand it to you. I just can’t be bothered with anything coming out of the entertainment industry any more. This is written and directed by a typical pagan true believer, about characters I was barely mildly sympathetic to at the time, and don’t give much of a fig about now. Hollyweird is just so much copy and paste today. My son rented and watched the latest dinosaur movie (Jurassic World Kingdom Park Dinosaur Weapons Doomsday or whatever), and every scene seemed to be rip-off of scenes from a dozen or more movies of the past. Has the law of diminishing returns set in yet on visual entertainment?

    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    That's because your a lonely angry old man who doesn't contribute anything to scoeity and has never known the touch of a woman
    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    "Has the law of diminishing returns set in yet on visual entertainment?"

    On what is considered acceptable, yes.

    Hollywood has had little to say about the Bolshevik revolution, for example, or any honest movie about inner city dysfunction in the US, just to name two examples.
    , @Paul Jolliffe
    Steve’s review concluded with Peter Dale Scott’s theory that those closely involved with the “continuity of government” plans are (thanks in part to their super-secure channels of communication) beyond the reach or accountability of any democratic processes. Or, at least they believe and act as if they are.

    However, such plans (and cabals) predate the Reagan Administration by decades. John Frankenheimer’s 1964 “Seven Days in May” used “Mount Thunder” to allude to the real-life Mount Weather, the nuke-proof underground complex, run by a combination of very high-ranking military brass, very powerful Wall Street interests, and the spookiest of the intelligence community.

    Scott has highlighted the still-unexplained role that various COG-connected officials played in various “Deep Events” since the early 1960’s.

    Although he did not attribute it, I suspect that Steve has read at least some of Scott’s work. Dick Cheney is the physical embodiment of mysterious role that COG has played in our nation’s recent history and Steve was smart enough to end with that.
  3. I appreciate your reading the JYT, WaPo, etc and watching Hollyweird dreck for us. Your job is akin to those vice cops on the kiddie porn details. God Bless you sir.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri, Bubba
    • Replies: @Venator
    Oh, come on, that's one praise I wouldn't be too keen to hear. Let's just hopefully assume that Mr. Steve has at least some fun in what he is doing. La situation est grave mais pas sans divertissement.
  4. I’m not sure Bush lost in 92 because of California or that he lost California because of defense cuts. Several red states experienced cuts without the resulting permanent electoral swing. But maybe the argument is that Cheney believed this illusion?

    Otherwise, good review. I enjoyed it.

  5. But Cheney’s peace divided helped the national economy boom in the 1990s.

    Dividend?

    • Replies: @anon
    What peace dividend? The USA spends more money on "defense" then the next ten countries in the world combined. Where were all those F-16's on September 11?
  6. Without reading Sailer, nor seeing the Cheney movie, I will say that I have seen reports that the movie downplays Cheney’s role in pushing for massive increases in legal immigration and Cheney’s role in pushing for amnesty for illegal alien invaders.

    Vice President Dick Cheney was pushing hard for the GOP to embrace George W Bush’s plot to destroy the United States by massively ramping up legal immigration while giving amnesty to upwards of 30 million illegal alien invaders.

    Cheney is a treasonous globalizer who pushed nation-wrecking mass immigration, sovereignty-sapping trade deal scams and endless, unnecessary overseas war. Cheney was a big backer of the Bush/Neo-Con Iraq War debacle.

    • Replies: @Tusk

    Vice President Dick Cheney was pushing hard for the GOP to embrace George W Bush’s plot to destroy the United States
     
    I don't think this was GWB plan, he was never the type.
    , @Corn
    “Vice President Dick Cheney was pushing hard for the GOP to embrace George W Bush’s plot to destroy the United States by massively ramping up legal immigration while giving amnesty to upwards of 30 million illegal alien invaders.”

    Sheep in Wyoming won’t shear themselves.
  7. It’s an Adam McKay movie. If I want complex historical analysis of contemporary events I’ll read Robert Caro.

  8. It’s an Adam McKay movie, a 90-minute SNL sketch.

    • LOL: bomag
  9. The Trailer was enjoyable, Bale nails the way Cheney’s jaw seems permanently wired shut. Brolin was good in W., but Rockwell looks well cast, as Steve says. Rockwell’s grown on me, wasn’t a big fan when he started out.

    I’d be interested in a piece about actors who really improve over their careers. Bale wouldn’t be one of them, he’s always been pretty great IMO.

    A good trailer and an iSteve review, good enough for me. Doesn’t look like a big-screener, maybe I’ll catch it on Anaconda prime.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    I haven't seen the movie, but Amy Adams as Lynne Cheney seems like more than a bit of a stretch to me.
    , @syonredux

    I’d be interested in a piece about actors who really improve over their careers. Bale wouldn’t be one of them, he’s always been pretty great IMO.
     
    You could make a pretty strong argument that circa the making of Empire of the Sun, he was the best kid actor in the world.
  10. Typo alert:

    “peace divided” should be “peace dividend”.

    You can delete this comment.

  11. “Instead of No War for Oil, we got War for No Oil.”

    I always thought that a big hunk of the world’s most crucial resource was a pretty good reason for fighting. After all, if you won’t fight for the world’s most important commodity, you’ve pretty much conceded you won’t fight for anything at all. So not only could such a fight be materially beneficial, but it bolsters your credibility and prestige.

    Of course, the neocons managed to get us the worst of all worlds: plenty of war, but no oil, no prestige, no credibility. Then inviting as many hostiles as possible into the homeland.

    It takes a peculiar kind of genius, as they say…

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Yes. As I've said before, if we were going to invade somewhere and overthrow a government, it should have been Saudi Arabia.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Of course, the neocons managed to get us the worst of all worlds: plenty of war, but no oil, no prestige, no credibility. Then inviting as many hostiles as possible into the homeland.
     
    Some people hoped to get oil out of it, and perhaps did.

    https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2006/07/where-does-israel-get-oil.html

    "Meanwhile, Israel continues to seek nearby suppliers. In the lead-up to the war in Iraq, there was some talk of restarting an abandoned pipeline that runs from Mosul, Iraq, to Haifa. In order for this to happen, Israel would need to somehow wrangle the support of the Syrians, since they control part of the route."
     

    https://www.jpost.com/Business-and-Innovation/Israel-importing-77-percent-of-its-oil-from-Iraqi-Kurdistan-report-says-413056
     
    , @El Dato

    After all, if you won’t fight for the world’s most important commodity, you’ve pretty much conceded you won’t fight for anything at all.
     
    If you won't fight for stuff that doesn't belong to you won't fight for anything at all?!??

    "THE SPICE MUST FLOW!"

    or rather more low-life:

    "CHEEKI BREEKI I VAN DAMKE"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAm29XMYL2o

    , @dr kill
    Yeah, why not kill American kids for foreign oil instead of paying them a good kick to pull the dragon from the ground. Makes sense if you want to kill white kids.
    , @anon
    Maybe we should call your idea the Japan Option. Japan decided on war after America imposed a total oil embargo upon her. (As strange as it may sound today, America was an important oil exporting nation in 1941). Japan decided to invade the oil rich Dutch East Indies. Because of misinformation given to them by the FDR administration they believed America would fight a war with them over this and thus decided on the 'sneak' attack at Pearl Harbor. Japan was essentially manipulated into war with the USA. Both the British and American ambassadors to Tokyo at the time said as much and were muzzled for doing so.
  12. “Why did the man who prudently sided with GHWB to not go to Baghdad in 1991 fanatically encourage GWB to go to Baghdad in 2003?”

    In 1991, the US-Coalition forces were hosted by Saudi Arabia. The Saudis, who live on the Eurasian landmass and therefore understand the concept of a “buffer state”, did not want the Americans to wreck the Saudi’s buffer state against Iran.

    In 2003, the US-Coalition forces were hosted by Kuwait, which had just gotten reamed out by Iraq, so they weren’t in a buffering mood anymore.

    As America is separated from most of the world by oceans no one can cross without our permission, we’ve forgotten about the ancient necessity of buffer states. Also, we’re arrogant, presumptuous and careless, but enough about our strengths, now let me discuss our weaknesses…

    • Replies: @George
    "Why did the man who prudently sided with GHWB to not go to Baghdad in 1991 fanatically encourage GWB to go to Baghdad in 2003?"

    Cheney maybe wasn't the key man in GHWB days. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Baker

    James Baker, and his now elderly and out of power friends, eventually tried to get control of the situation through persuasion but short of a putsch, it was not going to happen. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_Study_Group

    I didn't know that Leon Panetta was in the Iraq Study Group. Why did he flip to the dark side during the Obama regime? Or did he, Obama I think tried to exit Iraq sort of but then stuff got real. Or was the foreign militaries tossed out by the Iraqi parliament? I forget.

    "The neocons’ influence waned with the election of George H.W. Bush, a so-called realist who did not share the neocons’ grand dreams of remaking the world. "
    https://theweek.com/articles/528827/rise-neocons

    Why no mention of GWB evangelical faith? Maybe Rev Hagee was the Rasputin of the Bush Admin.

    , @Jack D
    Nobody actually wants a true buffer state on their border (and do buffer states actually get a say in this matter?) - what they want is a puppet regime that they can control. If you are say Poland (or Iraq) and stuck between two great powers you are never really a true neutral buffer - you pretty much have to choose sides. Even if you are nominally neutral the great powers around you will cross over your territory to get at each other (see Belgium). The Swiss avoided this fate only because they had favorable terrain (mountains are hard to cross) and because they were armed to the teeth and even then they made themselves useful to the Nazis hoping that they were worth more alive than dead.

    The US won the war in Iraq (and quite easily) so it's hard to say that the war was a mistake. However, we did not win the peace. Not winning the peace was a big mistake. We no longer have the civilizational confidence to win the peace. We won the peace in Germany and Japan because back then we were quite convinced ourselves that our path was the right path and that everyone should be converted to our religion (meaning democracy and capitalism, not Christianity). But it's impossible to convert other people to a religion which you yourself no longer believe in.
  13. @Almost Missouri

    "Instead of No War for Oil, we got War for No Oil."
     
    I always thought that a big hunk of the world's most crucial resource was a pretty good reason for fighting. After all, if you won't fight for the world's most important commodity, you've pretty much conceded you won't fight for anything at all. So not only could such a fight be materially beneficial, but it bolsters your credibility and prestige.

    Of course, the neocons managed to get us the worst of all worlds: plenty of war, but no oil, no prestige, no credibility. Then inviting as many hostiles as possible into the homeland.

    It takes a peculiar kind of genius, as they say...

    Yes. As I’ve said before, if we were going to invade somewhere and overthrow a government, it should have been Saudi Arabia.

  14. I’m not sure what the angle here is, but the single biggest change in world affairs between Iraq I and Iraq II was the rise of the Internet, with all the effects and all the possibilities that portended.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @El Dato
    Between Iraq I and Iraq II there was this big bizarre political semi-void, in which you distinguish an evil snake starting to powerfully twitch. While The Economist had another scare story about "Saddam" or "Putin in Chechnia" every second week, the news was becoming clownish. OJ, Presidential Stains, abysmally stupid and self-destructive politicking, Israel upgrading its chutzpah to Third Reich levels, the FBI becoming a politicial machine with Janet Reno and Louis Freeh with "kill them" operations and dreams of Clipper Chip telecom surveillance. Then the Clinton Internet bubble. Which burst. Which was followed by precise inspection of hanging or pregnant chads.

    Today is just like back them, but the snake has grown to Alien Queen proportions. Not funny.
  15. Before he was a reasonably competent Secretary of Defense under Bush I (a second choice, IIRC, after John Tower ran into confirmation problems) Dick Cheney was a good Wyoming congressman and a good Republican Whip. I also wonder why he went over to the dark side as Veep. My theory has always been that his experience at Halliburton transformed him, but perhaps it was something else. It looks as if Vice, however, is not the movie to explore that transformation.

  16. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    The Trailer was enjoyable, Bale nails the way Cheney's jaw seems permanently wired shut. Brolin was good in W., but Rockwell looks well cast, as Steve says. Rockwell's grown on me, wasn't a big fan when he started out.

    I'd be interested in a piece about actors who really improve over their careers. Bale wouldn't be one of them, he's always been pretty great IMO.

    A good trailer and an iSteve review, good enough for me. Doesn't look like a big-screener, maybe I'll catch it on Anaconda prime.

    I haven’t seen the movie, but Amy Adams as Lynne Cheney seems like more than a bit of a stretch to me.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    She's way too gorgeous, unless they make-up artists uglified her all to Hell, I cannot see it at all. It's like casting Hayden Panetierre as young Hillary Clinton. Just...no.
    , @Bubba
    Amy Adams is an excellent actress and has always been very gracious to active duty soldiers and vets, but unfortunately I could not finish watching Julie and Julia despite Ms. Adams' very respectable acting.

    The writing was absolutely atrocious, ugly and fawningly politically correct. I am so glad that Mrs. Child did not cooperate with the unsophisticated, PC-sycophant & anti-1st Amendment tyrant Nora Ephron for this terrible movie.

    If Judy Garland can be a gay icon, then I suggest that Mrs. Julia Child be a heterosexual icon. Mrs. Child was a brilliant woman, an American patriot and way ahead of her time. She also earned the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2003.

  17. @Almost Missouri

    "Instead of No War for Oil, we got War for No Oil."
     
    I always thought that a big hunk of the world's most crucial resource was a pretty good reason for fighting. After all, if you won't fight for the world's most important commodity, you've pretty much conceded you won't fight for anything at all. So not only could such a fight be materially beneficial, but it bolsters your credibility and prestige.

    Of course, the neocons managed to get us the worst of all worlds: plenty of war, but no oil, no prestige, no credibility. Then inviting as many hostiles as possible into the homeland.

    It takes a peculiar kind of genius, as they say...

    Of course, the neocons managed to get us the worst of all worlds: plenty of war, but no oil, no prestige, no credibility. Then inviting as many hostiles as possible into the homeland.

    Some people hoped to get oil out of it, and perhaps did.

    https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2006/07/where-does-israel-get-oil.html

    “Meanwhile, Israel continues to seek nearby suppliers. In the lead-up to the war in Iraq, there was some talk of restarting an abandoned pipeline that runs from Mosul, Iraq, to Haifa. In order for this to happen, Israel would need to somehow wrangle the support of the Syrians, since they control part of the route.”

    https://www.jpost.com/Business-and-Innovation/Israel-importing-77-percent-of-its-oil-from-Iraqi-Kurdistan-report-says-413056

  18. McKay is such a loathesome liberal douchebag, I don’t think I could bring myself to watch one of his movies, let alone actually pay money to watch one.

  19. OT (or perhaps not): The army is turning to liberal cities to meet recruitment goals.

    Do your gap-year in the army:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/02/us/army-recruiting-tech-industry-seattle.html

    Maybe the army should take a cue from all those foundations and media companies that are considered desirable places to work by the children of the elite. They could offer unpaid internships in Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Gangs of men could be sent out into the country to recruit them off the streets of college towns on a Saturday night.

  20. @Almost Missouri

    "Why did the man who prudently sided with GHWB to not go to Baghdad in 1991 fanatically encourage GWB to go to Baghdad in 2003?"
     
    In 1991, the US-Coalition forces were hosted by Saudi Arabia. The Saudis, who live on the Eurasian landmass and therefore understand the concept of a "buffer state", did not want the Americans to wreck the Saudi's buffer state against Iran.

    In 2003, the US-Coalition forces were hosted by Kuwait, which had just gotten reamed out by Iraq, so they weren't in a buffering mood anymore.

    As America is separated from most of the world by oceans no one can cross without our permission, we've forgotten about the ancient necessity of buffer states. Also, we're arrogant, presumptuous and careless, but enough about our strengths, now let me discuss our weaknesses...

    “Why did the man who prudently sided with GHWB to not go to Baghdad in 1991 fanatically encourage GWB to go to Baghdad in 2003?”

    Cheney maybe wasn’t the key man in GHWB days. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Baker

    James Baker, and his now elderly and out of power friends, eventually tried to get control of the situation through persuasion but short of a putsch, it was not going to happen. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_Study_Group

    I didn’t know that Leon Panetta was in the Iraq Study Group. Why did he flip to the dark side during the Obama regime? Or did he, Obama I think tried to exit Iraq sort of but then stuff got real. Or was the foreign militaries tossed out by the Iraqi parliament? I forget.

    “The neocons’ influence waned with the election of George H.W. Bush, a so-called realist who did not share the neocons’ grand dreams of remaking the world. ”
    https://theweek.com/articles/528827/rise-neocons

    Why no mention of GWB evangelical faith? Maybe Rev Hagee was the Rasputin of the Bush Admin.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Cheney maybe wasn’t the key man in GHWB days. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Baker

    James Baker, and his now elderly and out of power friends, eventually tried to get control of the situation through persuasion but short of a putsch, it was not going to happen. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_Study_Group
     
    And, of course, elite Jews loathed Baker....
  21. @Almost Missouri

    "Why did the man who prudently sided with GHWB to not go to Baghdad in 1991 fanatically encourage GWB to go to Baghdad in 2003?"
     
    In 1991, the US-Coalition forces were hosted by Saudi Arabia. The Saudis, who live on the Eurasian landmass and therefore understand the concept of a "buffer state", did not want the Americans to wreck the Saudi's buffer state against Iran.

    In 2003, the US-Coalition forces were hosted by Kuwait, which had just gotten reamed out by Iraq, so they weren't in a buffering mood anymore.

    As America is separated from most of the world by oceans no one can cross without our permission, we've forgotten about the ancient necessity of buffer states. Also, we're arrogant, presumptuous and careless, but enough about our strengths, now let me discuss our weaknesses...

    Nobody actually wants a true buffer state on their border (and do buffer states actually get a say in this matter?) – what they want is a puppet regime that they can control. If you are say Poland (or Iraq) and stuck between two great powers you are never really a true neutral buffer – you pretty much have to choose sides. Even if you are nominally neutral the great powers around you will cross over your territory to get at each other (see Belgium). The Swiss avoided this fate only because they had favorable terrain (mountains are hard to cross) and because they were armed to the teeth and even then they made themselves useful to the Nazis hoping that they were worth more alive than dead.

    The US won the war in Iraq (and quite easily) so it’s hard to say that the war was a mistake. However, we did not win the peace. Not winning the peace was a big mistake. We no longer have the civilizational confidence to win the peace. We won the peace in Germany and Japan because back then we were quite convinced ourselves that our path was the right path and that everyone should be converted to our religion (meaning democracy and capitalism, not Christianity). But it’s impossible to convert other people to a religion which you yourself no longer believe in.

    • Replies: @GermanReader2
    The US lost the peace in Iraq, because Iraqis are neither Japanese nor German.
    , @EliteCommInc.
    Uhhhhhh No.


    We did not. We did not establish a democracy. We simply exchanged who the players were. The fundamentals goals were not established. There was no major traditional defense. Hence the war commenced on the ground inside of cities and provinces. The US was forced or chose to hunker down in the green zone to avoid casualties, never taking full control of the country, never obtaining a peace agreement of any kind.

    The country literally fell apart in our hands.


    we won battles -- we lost the war.

    Afghanistan is a protracted consequence of the same game. We did not need to invade Afghanistan to deal with Al Quaeda.

    , @Variable term
    You won the peace in Germany and Japan because they are coherent states and civilized nations. You won the war in Iraq because you are a Zionist military puppet with a century’s worth of doctrinal and technological superiority.
    , @Alec Leamas
    I think that the presumed value of buffer states, such as the Benelux states and Switzerland, is that border scuffles are lopsided affairs that don't threaten a catastrophic continental war. Obviously Hitler's ambitions were greater than what such an arrangement could reasonably contain.

    Perhaps it would have been nice during partition had Kashmir been folded into an "Independent Kashmiristan" or somesuch.
  22. @Jack D
    Nobody actually wants a true buffer state on their border (and do buffer states actually get a say in this matter?) - what they want is a puppet regime that they can control. If you are say Poland (or Iraq) and stuck between two great powers you are never really a true neutral buffer - you pretty much have to choose sides. Even if you are nominally neutral the great powers around you will cross over your territory to get at each other (see Belgium). The Swiss avoided this fate only because they had favorable terrain (mountains are hard to cross) and because they were armed to the teeth and even then they made themselves useful to the Nazis hoping that they were worth more alive than dead.

    The US won the war in Iraq (and quite easily) so it's hard to say that the war was a mistake. However, we did not win the peace. Not winning the peace was a big mistake. We no longer have the civilizational confidence to win the peace. We won the peace in Germany and Japan because back then we were quite convinced ourselves that our path was the right path and that everyone should be converted to our religion (meaning democracy and capitalism, not Christianity). But it's impossible to convert other people to a religion which you yourself no longer believe in.

    The US lost the peace in Iraq, because Iraqis are neither Japanese nor German.

    • Agree: Kyle
    • Replies: @George
    If you want to bring it down to one person, in 1948 the US appointed Gen. Lucius Clay 'vice roy' of Germany. Clay was an engineer and had engineering posts, compare with today's Generals with degrees in Poli-Sci and public administration.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_D._Clay
    , @J.Ross
    I don't think you get to use that construction when you're the aggressor. As Iraqi as Iraqis are, they were doing alright by some metrics before we decided to destroy their country for no reason.
  23. @Jack D
    Nobody actually wants a true buffer state on their border (and do buffer states actually get a say in this matter?) - what they want is a puppet regime that they can control. If you are say Poland (or Iraq) and stuck between two great powers you are never really a true neutral buffer - you pretty much have to choose sides. Even if you are nominally neutral the great powers around you will cross over your territory to get at each other (see Belgium). The Swiss avoided this fate only because they had favorable terrain (mountains are hard to cross) and because they were armed to the teeth and even then they made themselves useful to the Nazis hoping that they were worth more alive than dead.

    The US won the war in Iraq (and quite easily) so it's hard to say that the war was a mistake. However, we did not win the peace. Not winning the peace was a big mistake. We no longer have the civilizational confidence to win the peace. We won the peace in Germany and Japan because back then we were quite convinced ourselves that our path was the right path and that everyone should be converted to our religion (meaning democracy and capitalism, not Christianity). But it's impossible to convert other people to a religion which you yourself no longer believe in.

    Uhhhhhh No.

    We did not. We did not establish a democracy. We simply exchanged who the players were. The fundamentals goals were not established. There was no major traditional defense. Hence the war commenced on the ground inside of cities and provinces. The US was forced or chose to hunker down in the green zone to avoid casualties, never taking full control of the country, never obtaining a peace agreement of any kind.

    The country literally fell apart in our hands.

    we won battles — we lost the war.

    Afghanistan is a protracted consequence of the same game. We did not need to invade Afghanistan to deal with Al Quaeda.

  24. @Jack D
    Nobody actually wants a true buffer state on their border (and do buffer states actually get a say in this matter?) - what they want is a puppet regime that they can control. If you are say Poland (or Iraq) and stuck between two great powers you are never really a true neutral buffer - you pretty much have to choose sides. Even if you are nominally neutral the great powers around you will cross over your territory to get at each other (see Belgium). The Swiss avoided this fate only because they had favorable terrain (mountains are hard to cross) and because they were armed to the teeth and even then they made themselves useful to the Nazis hoping that they were worth more alive than dead.

    The US won the war in Iraq (and quite easily) so it's hard to say that the war was a mistake. However, we did not win the peace. Not winning the peace was a big mistake. We no longer have the civilizational confidence to win the peace. We won the peace in Germany and Japan because back then we were quite convinced ourselves that our path was the right path and that everyone should be converted to our religion (meaning democracy and capitalism, not Christianity). But it's impossible to convert other people to a religion which you yourself no longer believe in.

    You won the peace in Germany and Japan because they are coherent states and civilized nations. You won the war in Iraq because you are a Zionist military puppet with a century’s worth of doctrinal and technological superiority.

  25. It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.

    Lest we forget, all of the leading neocons were McCain supporters, because candidate Bush showed no interest in foreign affairs. As s result, when Bush got the nomination, the neocons were shut out of power.

    Yes, Bill Kristol was a cheerleader for the war, from his desk at the Weekly Standard. But neither he nor his friends held positions of power in the Bush 2 White House.

    The war was launched by Ford administration holdovers, not by sinister Jewish intellectuals.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    Kristol was an informal, off the record advisor to many in the Bush Administration. Many members of the Administration read he put out in the Weekly Standard religiously and followed what he said on FOX News closely. The Neocons were very influential in making the Iraq war a reality.
    , @Mr. Anon

    It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.

    Lest we forget, all of the leading neocons were McCain supporters, because candidate Bush showed no interest in foreign affairs. As s result, when Bush got the nomination, the neocons were shut out of power.
     
    Is that ignorance speaking, or are you just flat-out lying?

    In any event, what you said is a complete crock of crap. Perle, Feith, Libby, Zelikow, Frum, Bolton - all neocons. Even Cheney himself seemed to be on board with their agenda.
    , @Russ
    "It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration."

    Paul Wolfowitz.
    , @Mr. Anon

    It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.

    Lest we forget, all of the leading neocons were McCain supporters, because candidate Bush showed no interest in foreign affairs. As s result, when Bush got the nomination, the neocons were shut out of power.
     

    Are you kidding? Perle, Wolfowitz, Feith, Libby, Frum, Zelikow, Bolton - all neo-cons.
  26. @Jack D
    Nobody actually wants a true buffer state on their border (and do buffer states actually get a say in this matter?) - what they want is a puppet regime that they can control. If you are say Poland (or Iraq) and stuck between two great powers you are never really a true neutral buffer - you pretty much have to choose sides. Even if you are nominally neutral the great powers around you will cross over your territory to get at each other (see Belgium). The Swiss avoided this fate only because they had favorable terrain (mountains are hard to cross) and because they were armed to the teeth and even then they made themselves useful to the Nazis hoping that they were worth more alive than dead.

    The US won the war in Iraq (and quite easily) so it's hard to say that the war was a mistake. However, we did not win the peace. Not winning the peace was a big mistake. We no longer have the civilizational confidence to win the peace. We won the peace in Germany and Japan because back then we were quite convinced ourselves that our path was the right path and that everyone should be converted to our religion (meaning democracy and capitalism, not Christianity). But it's impossible to convert other people to a religion which you yourself no longer believe in.

    I think that the presumed value of buffer states, such as the Benelux states and Switzerland, is that border scuffles are lopsided affairs that don’t threaten a catastrophic continental war. Obviously Hitler’s ambitions were greater than what such an arrangement could reasonably contain.

    Perhaps it would have been nice during partition had Kashmir been folded into an “Independent Kashmiristan” or somesuch.

  27. @Almost Missouri

    "Instead of No War for Oil, we got War for No Oil."
     
    I always thought that a big hunk of the world's most crucial resource was a pretty good reason for fighting. After all, if you won't fight for the world's most important commodity, you've pretty much conceded you won't fight for anything at all. So not only could such a fight be materially beneficial, but it bolsters your credibility and prestige.

    Of course, the neocons managed to get us the worst of all worlds: plenty of war, but no oil, no prestige, no credibility. Then inviting as many hostiles as possible into the homeland.

    It takes a peculiar kind of genius, as they say...

    After all, if you won’t fight for the world’s most important commodity, you’ve pretty much conceded you won’t fight for anything at all.

    If you won’t fight for stuff that doesn’t belong to you won’t fight for anything at all?!??

    “THE SPICE MUST FLOW!”

    or rather more low-life:

    “CHEEKI BREEKI I VAN DAMKE”

  28. Cheney was a Christian fascist just like Drumpf. He was opposed by most Jews. Get your facts right and stop spreading fake news, Sailor!

  29. @Chrisnonymous
    I'm not sure what the angle here is, but the single biggest change in world affairs between Iraq I and Iraq II was the rise of the Internet, with all the effects and all the possibilities that portended.

    Between Iraq I and Iraq II there was this big bizarre political semi-void, in which you distinguish an evil snake starting to powerfully twitch. While The Economist had another scare story about “Saddam” or “Putin in Chechnia” every second week, the news was becoming clownish. OJ, Presidential Stains, abysmally stupid and self-destructive politicking, Israel upgrading its chutzpah to Third Reich levels, the FBI becoming a politicial machine with Janet Reno and Louis Freeh with “kill them” operations and dreams of Clipper Chip telecom surveillance. Then the Clinton Internet bubble. Which burst. Which was followed by precise inspection of hanging or pregnant chads.

    Today is just like back them, but the snake has grown to Alien Queen proportions. Not funny.

  30. @Almost Missouri

    "Instead of No War for Oil, we got War for No Oil."
     
    I always thought that a big hunk of the world's most crucial resource was a pretty good reason for fighting. After all, if you won't fight for the world's most important commodity, you've pretty much conceded you won't fight for anything at all. So not only could such a fight be materially beneficial, but it bolsters your credibility and prestige.

    Of course, the neocons managed to get us the worst of all worlds: plenty of war, but no oil, no prestige, no credibility. Then inviting as many hostiles as possible into the homeland.

    It takes a peculiar kind of genius, as they say...

    Yeah, why not kill American kids for foreign oil instead of paying them a good kick to pull the dragon from the ground. Makes sense if you want to kill white kids.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Not saying I agree, just that it was a respectable reason, so it was strange when the administration immediately disavowed it.

    And yes, we've got plenty here, but various Dem/left lobbies keep us from drilling it. Of course, if oil really is a finite resource, it could make sense to use foreign supplies first and save our own. If only we could be sure of the country's future we were saving it for...
  31. ?

    It’s pretty simple.

    Bush lost his re-election bid because he challenged The Israel Lobby, and Cheney learned that This Is The Way Of The World. The Neocons were The Power, and they wanted regime change in Iraq. Cheney’s motto was: “I’m no dummy.”

    Later, another Shabbos Goy was needed to officially place the blame for the Iraq debacle on a few Evil Gentiles.

    Not so different from Cheney after all, are you Apatow?

  32. @GermanReader2
    The US lost the peace in Iraq, because Iraqis are neither Japanese nor German.

    If you want to bring it down to one person, in 1948 the US appointed Gen. Lucius Clay ‘vice roy’ of Germany. Clay was an engineer and had engineering posts, compare with today’s Generals with degrees in Poli-Sci and public administration.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_D._Clay

  33. Steve you should review Bumblebee. Some very obvious analogies about the Transformers Civil War is the intrawhite civil war.

    Also its a big fat love letter to the 80s California aesthetic, with Michael Bay no longer part of the franchise.

  34. Does this Cheney movie leave out the ISRAEL FIRST Neo-Conservative role in getting Bush and Cheney to launch the Iraq War debacle?

    Is somebody suggesting that a guy who works in a business with heavy duty Jew involvement would write a movie that ignores the role some Neo-Conservative Jews had in starting the Iraq War debacle?

    Does this writer and director try to leave out the Jew-controlled Neo-Conservative element in the Bush administration that pushed for the Iraq War debacle?

    Oil is important, but the Jew-controlled Neo-Conservative faction in the GOP was screaming for war against Iraq, and Dick Cheney and George W Bush were listening.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Adorable: big oil was, predictably enough given their interests, completely against it.
    If Hollywood set out to make a movie about two plus two equalling four, they'd end up with non-repeating pi divided by zero, and they would call all their critics Luddites.
  35. “Unlike everything else these days, Vice doesn’t end with a tacked-on epilogue about how this is really about…Trump.”

    It’s probably in the Director’s Cut.

  36. Ah the usual (((suspects))) out in force pretending it was all the fault of Dominionist Christianity and not the influence of a certain ethnic cadre.

  37. Abe says: • Website

    As another commentator so righteously put it right after Trump’s inauguration, that even if he reneged on every single promise he ran on, he’d still be invaluable as a one-man master class in 50+ years of mass media reality distortion, what is the point of this movie at this point in time?

    Steve, you are a national treasurer, and before the New Year’s champagne has even had a chance to go warm you’ve already fired off 2 all-time best bon mots (“Twitter do your thing”, “white people prefer to die of cancer than to unleash all that untapped black scientific talent in the ghettos”), yet this is a surprisingly normie review considering YOU’RE the one who made most of us hip to the Deep State.

    Meaning, given that Bush 43 has been on the career rehabilitation wagon for several years now and the incentive for the globalist uniparty is to circle wagons given the emergence of real populist alternatives to their rule (all the Bushes voting for Hillary Clinton, etc.) why the sudden Howard Dean scream, Freedom Fries, General Betrayus return to 15+ year old culture war issues now? Red State/Fox News normie interpretation is that this is just another scurrilous Hollyweird attack on true-hearted conservative patriots. My best guess is that this is simply a sunk cost maintenance operation to reestablish Hollywood’s reputation as a (false) center of resistance to Establishment power and that McKay is simply a useful idiot Howard Dean inverse-style type drunk uncle getting out his screamies.

    • Replies: @Gunner
    McKay seems pretty stupid to me. Him and Will Ferrill have had a hardon for trashing Bush and Cheney for years. I think they genuinely believed people were still mad about Harriet Miers etc.
  38. Looks like a must-see movie, its shortcomings notwithstanding. Frankly I had forgotten that Cheney was Old Man Bush’s S o D. That his objection to a full scale invasion/occupation of Iraq on the occasion of Gulf War I when contrasted to his 180 degree turnabout as advocate of the same while as Veep under Junior and which took the form of Gulf War II remains a complete mystery. And the fact that this issue apparently wasn’t addressed in the movie is a mystery in itself. iSteve’s review is the most in-depth that I’ve read, which is not surprising, but for me it only reinforces a suspicion that I’ve had from Day One, namely that Junior was nothing more than a garden variety douche bag, a classic example of The Peter Principle writ large, who was getting his marching orders from Cheney and that Robert McNamara wannabe, Rumsfeld. Almost twenty years, seven thousand American deaths (not counting hundreds of thousands of dead in the MidEast), one mini-economic depression and 7 trillion dollars later and here we are, still paying the price.

  39. Somebody needs to mention Deep Fakes in connection with this movie.

    The uncanny depiction of living persons in recent historical events is dangerous territory. We have already reached levels of propaganda, credulity, cargo cultism, and fake news that are incompatible with a functioning society, and stuff like this isn’t helping.

  40. OT:

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    They always come in threes.

    https://twitter.com/THR/status/1080586925323534338

    Coincidentally, all three were 76 years old.
    , @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/VinceMcMahon/status/1080651165854060544
  41. I hate Cheney but there is this factless indulgence about everything these clueless lefty propagandists do that forces demonic sympathy. At one point, because Cheney’s homosexual daughter gets the lefties tangled in their own shifting positions, they try to make him evil for tolerating gays for the wrong reasons or something. It’s like Oliver Stone spiking his own W movie with a completely unnecessary and unhelpful acid trip sequence.
    ———-
    How did Cass Sunstein’s catchphrase “nudge” get a bad reputation? Was it because of re-creating scenes from Catch-22?
    https://nationalpost.com/life/food/convincing-westerners-to-eat-insect-based-foods-requires-some-subversive-nudging

  42. Cheney as late as 1996 was still against the idea of toppling Saddam Hussein. His concerns were valid then but half a decade later he became a lunatic.

    …the idea of going into Baghdad, for example, or trying to topple the regime wasn’t anything I was enthusiastic about. I felt there was a real danger here that you would get bogged down in a long drawn-out conflict, that this was a dangerous, difficult part of the world; if you recall we were all worried about the possibility of Iraq coming apart, the Iranians restarting the conflict that they’d had in the eight-year bloody war with Iranians and the Iraqis over eastern Iraq.”
    Dick Cheney 1996

  43. By far the funniest part of Vice was hearing the liberal NY middle-aged couple behind me continually curse and gasp in horror at reliving all the horrors of the Bush administration (Halliburton! Valerie Plame!). If only McKay had managed to tie in Katrina and stem cell research…

  44. @Astorian
    It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.

    Lest we forget, all of the leading neocons were McCain supporters, because candidate Bush showed no interest in foreign affairs. As s result, when Bush got the nomination, the neocons were shut out of power.

    Yes, Bill Kristol was a cheerleader for the war, from his desk at the Weekly Standard. But neither he nor his friends held positions of power in the Bush 2 White House.

    The war was launched by Ford administration holdovers, not by sinister Jewish intellectuals.

    Kristol was an informal, off the record advisor to many in the Bush Administration. Many members of the Administration read he put out in the Weekly Standard religiously and followed what he said on FOX News closely. The Neocons were very influential in making the Iraq war a reality.

    • Replies: @RVBlake
    There's a retired Air Force colonel named Karen Kwiatkowski who writes for Lew Rockwell. I recall reading an article she wrote about 10 years ago about her tour at the Pentagon as a planning officer of some sort. She stated that sometime in the mid '90s there was a lot of activity coming from a group headed by Paul Wolfowitz, planning for a new war in Iraq. This is during the Clinton years.
  45. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    The Trailer was enjoyable, Bale nails the way Cheney's jaw seems permanently wired shut. Brolin was good in W., but Rockwell looks well cast, as Steve says. Rockwell's grown on me, wasn't a big fan when he started out.

    I'd be interested in a piece about actors who really improve over their careers. Bale wouldn't be one of them, he's always been pretty great IMO.

    A good trailer and an iSteve review, good enough for me. Doesn't look like a big-screener, maybe I'll catch it on Anaconda prime.

    I’d be interested in a piece about actors who really improve over their careers. Bale wouldn’t be one of them, he’s always been pretty great IMO.

    You could make a pretty strong argument that circa the making of Empire of the Sun, he was the best kid actor in the world.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    "You could make a pretty strong argument that circa the making of Empire of the Sun, he [Bale] was the best kid actor in the world."

    When I watched Bale in Empire of the Sun, he was so brilliant that I hoped for his sake he'd never make another movie. I thought he couldn't possibly equal his performance, much less top it, so he might as well get out while he was on top.
  46. Cheney was the Left’s bete noire in the mid-2000’s only because W. was likable and the Left had settled on a narrative that cast W. as a bumbling, simple-minded ignoramus. So Cheney therefore had to be cast in the role of evil puppet-master.

    But ten years on, I can’t believe anyone on either the Right or the Left (much less the apolitical middle) has the slightest interest in re-litigating Dick Cheney. Leftist political message movies consistently bat .000. So it seems like this movie was essentially guaranteed to bomb at the box office even if it were good (and it sounds like it’s not). Yet, someone had no problem throwing $60 million at the project. https://www.google.com/search?q=Budget+for+Vice&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS777US777&oq=Budget+for+Vice&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l3.4298j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-

    On the other hand, imagine as a thought experiment that someone in Hollywood put the same budget into making a pro-Trump comedy-drama about his preposterous rise to the Presidency. The potential material is inexhaustible. (They could title it “GEOTUS”). You couldn’t lose money on this project if you tried. Just the pro-Trump 4-Chan crowd alone would guarantee a profit. But apparently ideology currently overrides even the profit motive.

    • Replies: @Prusmc
    I read the link concerning Cheney's heart problems and potential brain effects. If half the information cited(about the Neuro connections) not Cheney, is valid, it is kind of depressing to a defibulator/pacemaker and heart valve replacement receiver.
    BTW is there any reference to the hunting accident where Cheney shot a partner and did not tell the President until the next day? It may be that he was drinking and needed to have a clear head before reporting to the Chief. But I find it hard to believe a man with his cardiovascular history would be drinking the hard stuff or even a couple of beers. OTOH, Ted Kennedy only had two beers in July of 1969.
  47. @George
    "Why did the man who prudently sided with GHWB to not go to Baghdad in 1991 fanatically encourage GWB to go to Baghdad in 2003?"

    Cheney maybe wasn't the key man in GHWB days. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Baker

    James Baker, and his now elderly and out of power friends, eventually tried to get control of the situation through persuasion but short of a putsch, it was not going to happen. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_Study_Group

    I didn't know that Leon Panetta was in the Iraq Study Group. Why did he flip to the dark side during the Obama regime? Or did he, Obama I think tried to exit Iraq sort of but then stuff got real. Or was the foreign militaries tossed out by the Iraqi parliament? I forget.

    "The neocons’ influence waned with the election of George H.W. Bush, a so-called realist who did not share the neocons’ grand dreams of remaking the world. "
    https://theweek.com/articles/528827/rise-neocons

    Why no mention of GWB evangelical faith? Maybe Rev Hagee was the Rasputin of the Bush Admin.

    Cheney maybe wasn’t the key man in GHWB days. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Baker

    James Baker, and his now elderly and out of power friends, eventually tried to get control of the situation through persuasion but short of a putsch, it was not going to happen. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_Study_Group

    And, of course, elite Jews loathed Baker….

  48. Hollywood, or at least one movie, backed the Iraq War redux before 9/11. See Three Kings, where it dwells on Bush I’s supposed betrayal of the marsh Arabs et al for not finishing off Saddam.

    Kinda like how the Feminist Majority Foundation’s Campaign to End Gender Apartheid in Afghanistan, launched in 1997, paved the way for the later “co-opting” (as stated in retrospect) of feminist rhetoric in drumming up support for Afghan War. Pre 9/11 they were advocating the US and UN do “everything in their power” to end gender apartheid in Afghanistan.

    They knew very well what “everything in their power” ultimately entailed.

  49. Bob Einstein has died:

    https://deadline.com/2019/01/bob-einstein-dead-curb-your-enthusiasm-super-dave-osborne-smothers-brothers-1202527938/

    Always liked him on Curn Your Enthusiasm :

    For those who don’t know, he was Albert Brooks’ brother…..Gotta say, though, those are some of the most dissimilar looking brothers that I have ever seen:

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    For those who don’t know, he was Albert Brooks’ brother…..Gotta say, though, those are some of the most dissimilar looking brothers that I have ever seen:
     
    Anthony Bourdain and his brother hardly looked like they were in the same species.


    https://bodyheightweight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/anthony-bourdain-family-siblings-brother-Christopher-Bourdain.jpg
    , @Alfa158
    RIP. To this day I still refer to over bearing cops as Officer Judy.
    , @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/normmacdonald/status/1080610789348630529
  50. @Captain Tripps
    Steve, I have to hand it to you. I just can't be bothered with anything coming out of the entertainment industry any more. This is written and directed by a typical pagan true believer, about characters I was barely mildly sympathetic to at the time, and don't give much of a fig about now. Hollyweird is just so much copy and paste today. My son rented and watched the latest dinosaur movie (Jurassic World Kingdom Park Dinosaur Weapons Doomsday or whatever), and every scene seemed to be rip-off of scenes from a dozen or more movies of the past. Has the law of diminishing returns set in yet on visual entertainment?

    That’s because your a lonely angry old man who doesn’t contribute anything to scoeity and has never known the touch of a woman

  51. @syonredux

    I’d be interested in a piece about actors who really improve over their careers. Bale wouldn’t be one of them, he’s always been pretty great IMO.
     
    You could make a pretty strong argument that circa the making of Empire of the Sun, he was the best kid actor in the world.

    “You could make a pretty strong argument that circa the making of Empire of the Sun, he [Bale] was the best kid actor in the world.”

    When I watched Bale in Empire of the Sun, he was so brilliant that I hoped for his sake he’d never make another movie. I thought he couldn’t possibly equal his performance, much less top it, so he might as well get out while he was on top.

  52. @syonredux
    Bob Einstein has died:

    https://deadline.com/2019/01/bob-einstein-dead-curb-your-enthusiasm-super-dave-osborne-smothers-brothers-1202527938/

    Always liked him on Curn Your Enthusiasm :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOKAkZvCAVA

    For those who don't know, he was Albert Brooks' brother.....Gotta say, though, those are some of the most dissimilar looking brothers that I have ever seen:


    http://danoday.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/ModernRomance.jpg

    For those who don’t know, he was Albert Brooks’ brother…..Gotta say, though, those are some of the most dissimilar looking brothers that I have ever seen:

    Anthony Bourdain and his brother hardly looked like they were in the same species.

    • Replies: @(((They))) Live
    Which one of them looks like the milkman ?
    , @Jack D
    They both have the same chin. It's a Gallic chin - Gerard Depardieu has it also.

    Bourdain's mother is Jewish. It looks like his brother got the Jewish nose and Anthony the Gallic one.
    , @Captain Tripps
    Sad. Politics/religion aside, I always thought Albert Brooks is a great comedic actor. Particularly his role in Defending Your Life, lol!

    Also, sadly, the Captain has passed...

    https://youtu.be/Lkf5Q0APkyE

  53. @Astorian
    It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.

    Lest we forget, all of the leading neocons were McCain supporters, because candidate Bush showed no interest in foreign affairs. As s result, when Bush got the nomination, the neocons were shut out of power.

    Yes, Bill Kristol was a cheerleader for the war, from his desk at the Weekly Standard. But neither he nor his friends held positions of power in the Bush 2 White House.

    The war was launched by Ford administration holdovers, not by sinister Jewish intellectuals.

    It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.

    Lest we forget, all of the leading neocons were McCain supporters, because candidate Bush showed no interest in foreign affairs. As s result, when Bush got the nomination, the neocons were shut out of power.

    Is that ignorance speaking, or are you just flat-out lying?

    In any event, what you said is a complete crock of crap. Perle, Feith, Libby, Zelikow, Frum, Bolton – all neocons. Even Cheney himself seemed to be on board with their agenda.

  54. @Abe
    As another commentator so righteously put it right after Trump’s inauguration, that even if he reneged on every single promise he ran on, he’d still be invaluable as a one-man master class in 50+ years of mass media reality distortion, what is the point of this movie at this point in time?

    Steve, you are a national treasurer, and before the New Year’s champagne has even had a chance to go warm you’ve already fired off 2 all-time best bon mots (“Twitter do your thing”, “white people prefer to die of cancer than to unleash all that untapped black scientific talent in the ghettos”), yet this is a surprisingly normie review considering YOU’RE the one who made most of us hip to the Deep State.

    Meaning, given that Bush 43 has been on the career rehabilitation wagon for several years now and the incentive for the globalist uniparty is to circle wagons given the emergence of real populist alternatives to their rule (all the Bushes voting for Hillary Clinton, etc.) why the sudden Howard Dean scream, Freedom Fries, General Betrayus return to 15+ year old culture war issues now? Red State/Fox News normie interpretation is that this is just another scurrilous Hollyweird attack on true-hearted conservative patriots. My best guess is that this is simply a sunk cost maintenance operation to reestablish Hollywood’s reputation as a (false) center of resistance to Establishment power and that McKay is simply a useful idiot Howard Dean inverse-style type drunk uncle getting out his screamies.

    McKay seems pretty stupid to me. Him and Will Ferrill have had a hardon for trashing Bush and Cheney for years. I think they genuinely believed people were still mad about Harriet Miers etc.

  55. @dr kill
    Yeah, why not kill American kids for foreign oil instead of paying them a good kick to pull the dragon from the ground. Makes sense if you want to kill white kids.

    Not saying I agree, just that it was a respectable reason, so it was strange when the administration immediately disavowed it.

    And yes, we’ve got plenty here, but various Dem/left lobbies keep us from drilling it. Of course, if oil really is a finite resource, it could make sense to use foreign supplies first and save our own. If only we could be sure of the country’s future we were saving it for…

    • Replies: @Thea
    In Russia’s Sputnik Generation by Raleigh, one man , Gennadii Ivanov, praises this policy and laments russia’s continued drilling. He says they will run out of oil, having sold most of it to foreigners while we still have Alaska untouched.

    How I wish FDR had never met at Bitter Lake and instead invested American ingenuity in oil free technology or self reliance on our own reserves including any restraint that may have entailed.

  56. @Reg Cæsar

    For those who don’t know, he was Albert Brooks’ brother…..Gotta say, though, those are some of the most dissimilar looking brothers that I have ever seen:
     
    Anthony Bourdain and his brother hardly looked like they were in the same species.


    https://bodyheightweight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/anthony-bourdain-family-siblings-brother-Christopher-Bourdain.jpg

    Which one of them looks like the milkman ?

  57. @syonredux
    Bob Einstein has died:

    https://deadline.com/2019/01/bob-einstein-dead-curb-your-enthusiasm-super-dave-osborne-smothers-brothers-1202527938/

    Always liked him on Curn Your Enthusiasm :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOKAkZvCAVA

    For those who don't know, he was Albert Brooks' brother.....Gotta say, though, those are some of the most dissimilar looking brothers that I have ever seen:


    http://danoday.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/ModernRomance.jpg

    RIP. To this day I still refer to over bearing cops as Officer Judy.

  58. @Barnard
    Kristol was an informal, off the record advisor to many in the Bush Administration. Many members of the Administration read he put out in the Weekly Standard religiously and followed what he said on FOX News closely. The Neocons were very influential in making the Iraq war a reality.

    There’s a retired Air Force colonel named Karen Kwiatkowski who writes for Lew Rockwell. I recall reading an article she wrote about 10 years ago about her tour at the Pentagon as a planning officer of some sort. She stated that sometime in the mid ’90s there was a lot of activity coming from a group headed by Paul Wolfowitz, planning for a new war in Iraq. This is during the Clinton years.

  59. @Charles Pewitt
    Without reading Sailer, nor seeing the Cheney movie, I will say that I have seen reports that the movie downplays Cheney's role in pushing for massive increases in legal immigration and Cheney's role in pushing for amnesty for illegal alien invaders.

    Vice President Dick Cheney was pushing hard for the GOP to embrace George W Bush's plot to destroy the United States by massively ramping up legal immigration while giving amnesty to upwards of 30 million illegal alien invaders.

    Cheney is a treasonous globalizer who pushed nation-wrecking mass immigration, sovereignty-sapping trade deal scams and endless, unnecessary overseas war. Cheney was a big backer of the Bush/Neo-Con Iraq War debacle.

    Vice President Dick Cheney was pushing hard for the GOP to embrace George W Bush’s plot to destroy the United States

    I don’t think this was GWB plan, he was never the type.

  60. @Almost Missouri
    Not saying I agree, just that it was a respectable reason, so it was strange when the administration immediately disavowed it.

    And yes, we've got plenty here, but various Dem/left lobbies keep us from drilling it. Of course, if oil really is a finite resource, it could make sense to use foreign supplies first and save our own. If only we could be sure of the country's future we were saving it for...

    In Russia’s Sputnik Generation by Raleigh, one man , Gennadii Ivanov, praises this policy and laments russia’s continued drilling. He says they will run out of oil, having sold most of it to foreigners while we still have Alaska untouched.

    How I wish FDR had never met at Bitter Lake and instead invested American ingenuity in oil free technology or self reliance on our own reserves including any restraint that may have entailed.

  61. @Captain Tripps
    Steve, I have to hand it to you. I just can't be bothered with anything coming out of the entertainment industry any more. This is written and directed by a typical pagan true believer, about characters I was barely mildly sympathetic to at the time, and don't give much of a fig about now. Hollyweird is just so much copy and paste today. My son rented and watched the latest dinosaur movie (Jurassic World Kingdom Park Dinosaur Weapons Doomsday or whatever), and every scene seemed to be rip-off of scenes from a dozen or more movies of the past. Has the law of diminishing returns set in yet on visual entertainment?

    “Has the law of diminishing returns set in yet on visual entertainment?”

    On what is considered acceptable, yes.

    Hollywood has had little to say about the Bolshevik revolution, for example, or any honest movie about inner city dysfunction in the US, just to name two examples.

  62. @MEH 0910
    OT:
    https://twitter.com/WWE/status/1080488900890628101

    They always come in threes.

    Coincidentally, all three were 76 years old.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    I don't care what any big meanie says but "Love Will Keep Us Together," was a great pop hit. "Muskrat Love," on the other hand, took me to some dark places, man.
  63. @Reg Cæsar

    For those who don’t know, he was Albert Brooks’ brother…..Gotta say, though, those are some of the most dissimilar looking brothers that I have ever seen:
     
    Anthony Bourdain and his brother hardly looked like they were in the same species.


    https://bodyheightweight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/anthony-bourdain-family-siblings-brother-Christopher-Bourdain.jpg

    They both have the same chin. It’s a Gallic chin – Gerard Depardieu has it also.

    Bourdain’s mother is Jewish. It looks like his brother got the Jewish nose and Anthony the Gallic one.

  64. @Charles Pewitt
    Does this Cheney movie leave out the ISRAEL FIRST Neo-Conservative role in getting Bush and Cheney to launch the Iraq War debacle?

    Is somebody suggesting that a guy who works in a business with heavy duty Jew involvement would write a movie that ignores the role some Neo-Conservative Jews had in starting the Iraq War debacle?

    Does this writer and director try to leave out the Jew-controlled Neo-Conservative element in the Bush administration that pushed for the Iraq War debacle?

    Oil is important, but the Jew-controlled Neo-Conservative faction in the GOP was screaming for war against Iraq, and Dick Cheney and George W Bush were listening.

    https://twitter.com/ScottMcConnell9/status/1080463776980320257

    Adorable: big oil was, predictably enough given their interests, completely against it.
    If Hollywood set out to make a movie about two plus two equalling four, they’d end up with non-repeating pi divided by zero, and they would call all their critics Luddites.

  65. @GermanReader2
    The US lost the peace in Iraq, because Iraqis are neither Japanese nor German.

    I don’t think you get to use that construction when you’re the aggressor. As Iraqi as Iraqis are, they were doing alright by some metrics before we decided to destroy their country for no reason.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    I don’t think you get to use that construction when you’re the aggressor. As Iraqi as Iraqis are, they were doing alright by some metrics before we decided to destroy their country for no reason.
     
    Yeah, but Bush II Administration officials (and their media shills) were fond of comparing Iraq to Germany and Japan.....Many of them even stated that a post-Invasion Iraq would ultimately be as successful as post-war Germany and Japan...Rumsfeld even tried to explain away the anti-occupation insurgency in Iraq by referencing (non-existent) Nazi guerilla activity in occupied Germany...
    , @anon
    There were reasons. They just were not moral or ethical reasons. Or ones that brought benefits to ordinary Americans.
  66. A sure-fire way to make a bad work of art is to make it about a contemporary figure that you and your broader social clique despise.

  67. @Hypnotoad666
    Cheney was the Left's bete noire in the mid-2000's only because W. was likable and the Left had settled on a narrative that cast W. as a bumbling, simple-minded ignoramus. So Cheney therefore had to be cast in the role of evil puppet-master.

    But ten years on, I can't believe anyone on either the Right or the Left (much less the apolitical middle) has the slightest interest in re-litigating Dick Cheney. Leftist political message movies consistently bat .000. So it seems like this movie was essentially guaranteed to bomb at the box office even if it were good (and it sounds like it's not). Yet, someone had no problem throwing $60 million at the project. https://www.google.com/search?q=Budget+for+Vice&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS777US777&oq=Budget+for+Vice&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l3.4298j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-

    On the other hand, imagine as a thought experiment that someone in Hollywood put the same budget into making a pro-Trump comedy-drama about his preposterous rise to the Presidency. The potential material is inexhaustible. (They could title it "GEOTUS"). You couldn't lose money on this project if you tried. Just the pro-Trump 4-Chan crowd alone would guarantee a profit. But apparently ideology currently overrides even the profit motive.

    I read the link concerning Cheney’s heart problems and potential brain effects. If half the information cited(about the Neuro connections) not Cheney, is valid, it is kind of depressing to a defibulator/pacemaker and heart valve replacement receiver.
    BTW is there any reference to the hunting accident where Cheney shot a partner and did not tell the President until the next day? It may be that he was drinking and needed to have a clear head before reporting to the Chief. But I find it hard to believe a man with his cardiovascular history would be drinking the hard stuff or even a couple of beers. OTOH, Ted Kennedy only had two beers in July of 1969.

  68. @Barnard
    I haven't seen the movie, but Amy Adams as Lynne Cheney seems like more than a bit of a stretch to me.

    She’s way too gorgeous, unless they make-up artists uglified her all to Hell, I cannot see it at all. It’s like casting Hayden Panetierre as young Hillary Clinton. Just…no.

  69. @Barnard
    I haven't seen the movie, but Amy Adams as Lynne Cheney seems like more than a bit of a stretch to me.

    Amy Adams is an excellent actress and has always been very gracious to active duty soldiers and vets, but unfortunately I could not finish watching Julie and Julia despite Ms. Adams’ very respectable acting.

    The writing was absolutely atrocious, ugly and fawningly politically correct. I am so glad that Mrs. Child did not cooperate with the unsophisticated, PC-sycophant & anti-1st Amendment tyrant Nora Ephron for this terrible movie.

    If Judy Garland can be a gay icon, then I suggest that Mrs. Julia Child be a heterosexual icon. Mrs. Child was a brilliant woman, an American patriot and way ahead of her time. She also earned the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2003.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Amy Adams is fantastic, gorgeous but also extremely talented.

    Funny you should mention J & J, the author and I performed in a play together a couple of years before she had this idea. You must admit it's a great idea for a stunt book, even if the execution wasn't great.

    She and her strangely epicene husband were theater dorks, so that explains the PC.
  70. @Charles Pewitt
    Without reading Sailer, nor seeing the Cheney movie, I will say that I have seen reports that the movie downplays Cheney's role in pushing for massive increases in legal immigration and Cheney's role in pushing for amnesty for illegal alien invaders.

    Vice President Dick Cheney was pushing hard for the GOP to embrace George W Bush's plot to destroy the United States by massively ramping up legal immigration while giving amnesty to upwards of 30 million illegal alien invaders.

    Cheney is a treasonous globalizer who pushed nation-wrecking mass immigration, sovereignty-sapping trade deal scams and endless, unnecessary overseas war. Cheney was a big backer of the Bush/Neo-Con Iraq War debacle.

    “Vice President Dick Cheney was pushing hard for the GOP to embrace George W Bush’s plot to destroy the United States by massively ramping up legal immigration while giving amnesty to upwards of 30 million illegal alien invaders.”

    Sheep in Wyoming won’t shear themselves.

    • Replies: @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Sheep in Wyoming won’t shear themselves.

     

    Then bring in more Basques, not bums
  71. @Reg Cæsar

    For those who don’t know, he was Albert Brooks’ brother…..Gotta say, though, those are some of the most dissimilar looking brothers that I have ever seen:
     
    Anthony Bourdain and his brother hardly looked like they were in the same species.


    https://bodyheightweight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/anthony-bourdain-family-siblings-brother-Christopher-Bourdain.jpg

    Sad. Politics/religion aside, I always thought Albert Brooks is a great comedic actor. Particularly his role in Defending Your Life, lol!

    Also, sadly, the Captain has passed…

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Ray Sawyer - the eyepatch guy from Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show (and who sang The Cover of the Rolling Stone) - also recently passed away.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Also, sadly, the Captain has passed…
     
    His father and sister were both named Carmen. I remember Stereo Review on C&T's first album: "Oh, those nights in the Hollywood Bowl"!

    I never knew the family was Bay Area Italian, though. Musical DiMaggios.

    That might explain why they chose a Neil Sedaka song:

    Sedaka was very popular in Italy. Many of his English-language records were released there and proved quite successful, especially "Crying My Heart Out For You" (Italian No. 6, 1959) and "Oh! Carol" (Italian No. 1, 1960).

    In 1961, Sedaka began to record some of his hits in Italian, starting with "Esagerata" and "Un giorno inutile", local versions of "Little Devil" and "I Must Be Dreaming". Other recordings were to follow, such as "Tu non-lo sai" ("Breaking Up Is Hard to Do"), "Il re dei pagliacci" ("King of Clowns"), "I tuoi capricci" ("Look Inside Your Heart"), and "La terza luna" ("Waiting For Never"). "La terza luna" reached No. 1 on the Italian pop charts in April 1963. Cinebox videos exist for "La terza luna" and "I tuoi capricci". From a language standpoint, his recordings in Italian had very little American accent. RCA Victor's Italiana branch distributed his records in Italy and released three compilation LPs of Sedaka's Italian recordings.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Sedaka#Foreign-language_recordings
     
  72. @The preferred nomenclature is...
    I appreciate your reading the JYT, WaPo, etc and watching Hollyweird dreck for us. Your job is akin to those vice cops on the kiddie porn details. God Bless you sir.

    Oh, come on, that’s one praise I wouldn’t be too keen to hear. Let’s just hopefully assume that Mr. Steve has at least some fun in what he is doing. La situation est grave mais pas sans divertissement.

    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Yeah, documenting your Civilization burn must be fun. I was dead serious in my analogy, especially since I am a Father.
  73. I saw quite a few commercials for “Vice” during Sunday Night Football a few weeks ago. I thought at the time that it was a curious marketing decision. Nothing in Steve’s review suggests that the movie would in any way appeal to an ordinary, football-watching audience.

    Apparently it has grossed $21 million to date so seems unlikely to exceed the $60 million production budget. Those pricey SNF commercials were good money after bad it seems.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri

    "Nothing in Steve’s review suggests that the movie would in any way appeal to an ordinary, football-watching audience."
     
    The footballers don't have to enjoy the movie. They just have to buy the tickets. If they hate the actual movie, that's on them, the studio already got their money. The advertiser's job is not to inform the audience about the movie, it is to get the audience to buy tickets irrespective of what the movie is. So it sounds like the advertisers did a better job than the movie producers did.

    If it is any consolation, the distribution budget is typically as large again as the production budget, so the movie may still lose money, especially once word gets out that the movie is not as good as the advertisements made it appear to be.

  74. @Astorian
    It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.

    Lest we forget, all of the leading neocons were McCain supporters, because candidate Bush showed no interest in foreign affairs. As s result, when Bush got the nomination, the neocons were shut out of power.

    Yes, Bill Kristol was a cheerleader for the war, from his desk at the Weekly Standard. But neither he nor his friends held positions of power in the Bush 2 White House.

    The war was launched by Ford administration holdovers, not by sinister Jewish intellectuals.

    “It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.”

    Paul Wolfowitz.

    • LOL: Dan Hayes
  75. @Captain Tripps
    Steve, I have to hand it to you. I just can't be bothered with anything coming out of the entertainment industry any more. This is written and directed by a typical pagan true believer, about characters I was barely mildly sympathetic to at the time, and don't give much of a fig about now. Hollyweird is just so much copy and paste today. My son rented and watched the latest dinosaur movie (Jurassic World Kingdom Park Dinosaur Weapons Doomsday or whatever), and every scene seemed to be rip-off of scenes from a dozen or more movies of the past. Has the law of diminishing returns set in yet on visual entertainment?

    Steve’s review concluded with Peter Dale Scott’s theory that those closely involved with the “continuity of government” plans are (thanks in part to their super-secure channels of communication) beyond the reach or accountability of any democratic processes. Or, at least they believe and act as if they are.

    However, such plans (and cabals) predate the Reagan Administration by decades. John Frankenheimer’s 1964 “Seven Days in May” used “Mount Thunder” to allude to the real-life Mount Weather, the nuke-proof underground complex, run by a combination of very high-ranking military brass, very powerful Wall Street interests, and the spookiest of the intelligence community.

    Scott has highlighted the still-unexplained role that various COG-connected officials played in various “Deep Events” since the early 1960’s.

    Although he did not attribute it, I suspect that Steve has read at least some of Scott’s work. Dick Cheney is the physical embodiment of mysterious role that COG has played in our nation’s recent history and Steve was smart enough to end with that.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I suspect that Steve has read at least some of Scott’s work.

    I am not familiar with the name, but I may have read something by him.

    My point was more psychological: that in the 1980s Cheney and Rumsfeld spent a few dozen days and nights in nuclear-proof bunkers training for the end of the world. That would likely make them take the one percent doctrine more seriously.

    , @Mr. Anon
    During the Iran-Contra hearings, the veil of secrecy over COG was briefly lifted, and then unceremoniously dropped again by Daniel Inouye. Anybody who thinks that the Constitution is really the law of the land...................think again:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWaNFLEZODc
  76. @Paul Jolliffe
    Steve’s review concluded with Peter Dale Scott’s theory that those closely involved with the “continuity of government” plans are (thanks in part to their super-secure channels of communication) beyond the reach or accountability of any democratic processes. Or, at least they believe and act as if they are.

    However, such plans (and cabals) predate the Reagan Administration by decades. John Frankenheimer’s 1964 “Seven Days in May” used “Mount Thunder” to allude to the real-life Mount Weather, the nuke-proof underground complex, run by a combination of very high-ranking military brass, very powerful Wall Street interests, and the spookiest of the intelligence community.

    Scott has highlighted the still-unexplained role that various COG-connected officials played in various “Deep Events” since the early 1960’s.

    Although he did not attribute it, I suspect that Steve has read at least some of Scott’s work. Dick Cheney is the physical embodiment of mysterious role that COG has played in our nation’s recent history and Steve was smart enough to end with that.

    I suspect that Steve has read at least some of Scott’s work.

    I am not familiar with the name, but I may have read something by him.

    My point was more psychological: that in the 1980s Cheney and Rumsfeld spent a few dozen days and nights in nuclear-proof bunkers training for the end of the world. That would likely make them take the one percent doctrine more seriously.

    • Troll: Tiny Duck.
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    That Cheney got worried about the 1% Event doesn't explain why Iraq specifically. It doesn't explain why Cheney got "bluepilled" on the possibility of a functional democracy there.

    It also doesn't explain the Bush administration's Islamophilia and anti-xenophobia.

    If the possibilities of the Internet and IT combined in Cheney's mind with paranoia from his COG experiences, he (and others) may have concluded that dealing with the chaotic forces unleashed by the Internet meant creating "conflict sinks" overseas and monitoring the population back home.

    "Overseas conflict sink" is a nice way of saying "forever war," of course. Maybe Cheney's view of the aftermath of overthrowing Saddam never changed, just his view of the utility of the outcome.

    Anti-xenophobia is a necessary underpinning of the Patriot Act and such, as the obvious and much easier solution was a Trump-style travel ban.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    • Troll: Tiny Duck.
     
    No, trolls are found under bridges. Like ducks.


    https://static.independent.co.uk/s3fs-public/thumbnails/image/2012/12/11/13/duck1.jpg?width=1368&height=912&fit=bounds&format=pjpg&auto=webp&quality=70
    , @duncsbaby
    Tiny Duck. (with a period) is upping his game. Respect.
  77. @Bubba
    Amy Adams is an excellent actress and has always been very gracious to active duty soldiers and vets, but unfortunately I could not finish watching Julie and Julia despite Ms. Adams' very respectable acting.

    The writing was absolutely atrocious, ugly and fawningly politically correct. I am so glad that Mrs. Child did not cooperate with the unsophisticated, PC-sycophant & anti-1st Amendment tyrant Nora Ephron for this terrible movie.

    If Judy Garland can be a gay icon, then I suggest that Mrs. Julia Child be a heterosexual icon. Mrs. Child was a brilliant woman, an American patriot and way ahead of her time. She also earned the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2003.

    Amy Adams is fantastic, gorgeous but also extremely talented.

    Funny you should mention J & J, the author and I performed in a play together a couple of years before she had this idea. You must admit it’s a great idea for a stunt book, even if the execution wasn’t great.

    She and her strangely epicene husband were theater dorks, so that explains the PC.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Amy Adams (see her, for example, in American Hustle) is the most beautiful, sexiest actress working today. She is the Susan Sarandon of the current year.
    , @Bubba

    She and her strangely epicene husband were theater dorks, so that explains the PC.
     
    Thank you for the info and that definitely explains it!
  78. @J.Ross
    I don't think you get to use that construction when you're the aggressor. As Iraqi as Iraqis are, they were doing alright by some metrics before we decided to destroy their country for no reason.

    I don’t think you get to use that construction when you’re the aggressor. As Iraqi as Iraqis are, they were doing alright by some metrics before we decided to destroy their country for no reason.

    Yeah, but Bush II Administration officials (and their media shills) were fond of comparing Iraq to Germany and Japan…..Many of them even stated that a post-Invasion Iraq would ultimately be as successful as post-war Germany and Japan…Rumsfeld even tried to explain away the anti-occupation insurgency in Iraq by referencing (non-existent) Nazi guerilla activity in occupied Germany…

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Good point, I had forgotten about that. There are three Middle-Eastern countries with the capacity to potentially be something like "a Germany:" Israel as it is now, Iran emerging from under the mullahs, and Lebanon considered with its diaspora. Comparing Iraqis to Japanese is as insane as anything else the neocons believed.
  79. @MEH 0910
    OT:
    https://twitter.com/WWE/status/1080488900890628101

    • Agree: Prester John
  80. @Anon
    But Cheney’s peace divided helped the national economy boom in the 1990s.

    Dividend?

    What peace dividend? The USA spends more money on “defense” then the next ten countries in the world combined. Where were all those F-16’s on September 11?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Where were all those F-16′s on September 11?
     
    Taking off from Andrews AFB with no ammo: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/f-16-pilot-was-ready-to-give-her-life-on-sept-11/2015/09/06/7c8cddbc-d8ce-11e0-9dca-a4d231dfde50_story.html?utm_term=.c33e03e28d00
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Where were all those F-16′s on September 11?
     
    I can tell you where one of the pilots was:


    https://images.findagrave.com/photos250/photos/2001/222/hultgreenk.jpg


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara_Hultgreen
  81. anon[355] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri

    "Instead of No War for Oil, we got War for No Oil."
     
    I always thought that a big hunk of the world's most crucial resource was a pretty good reason for fighting. After all, if you won't fight for the world's most important commodity, you've pretty much conceded you won't fight for anything at all. So not only could such a fight be materially beneficial, but it bolsters your credibility and prestige.

    Of course, the neocons managed to get us the worst of all worlds: plenty of war, but no oil, no prestige, no credibility. Then inviting as many hostiles as possible into the homeland.

    It takes a peculiar kind of genius, as they say...

    Maybe we should call your idea the Japan Option. Japan decided on war after America imposed a total oil embargo upon her. (As strange as it may sound today, America was an important oil exporting nation in 1941). Japan decided to invade the oil rich Dutch East Indies. Because of misinformation given to them by the FDR administration they believed America would fight a war with them over this and thus decided on the ‘sneak’ attack at Pearl Harbor. Japan was essentially manipulated into war with the USA. Both the British and American ambassadors to Tokyo at the time said as much and were muzzled for doing so.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    Herbert Hoover's book, Freedom Betrayed, has, inter alia, a fairly detailed exposition of the steps that FDR took to provoke the Japanese into an attack.
    , @J.Ross
    But Japan was in the grip of both an incoherent constitution (the military was effectively a government unto itself, it was parallel and not subordinate to the elected government) and Paraguay-level nineteenth century militarist utopianism (we've got to strike while the iron is hot, because it's not like there's an option where we don't strike). So it's both that the oil is less important than reasonablists want it to be, and the example is closer than would be comfortable because of the runaway neocons and military-industrial complex.
  82. @J.Ross
    I don't think you get to use that construction when you're the aggressor. As Iraqi as Iraqis are, they were doing alright by some metrics before we decided to destroy their country for no reason.

    There were reasons. They just were not moral or ethical reasons. Or ones that brought benefits to ordinary Americans.

  83. @Steve Sailer
    I suspect that Steve has read at least some of Scott’s work.

    I am not familiar with the name, but I may have read something by him.

    My point was more psychological: that in the 1980s Cheney and Rumsfeld spent a few dozen days and nights in nuclear-proof bunkers training for the end of the world. That would likely make them take the one percent doctrine more seriously.

    That Cheney got worried about the 1% Event doesn’t explain why Iraq specifically. It doesn’t explain why Cheney got “bluepilled” on the possibility of a functional democracy there.

    It also doesn’t explain the Bush administration’s Islamophilia and anti-xenophobia.

    If the possibilities of the Internet and IT combined in Cheney’s mind with paranoia from his COG experiences, he (and others) may have concluded that dealing with the chaotic forces unleashed by the Internet meant creating “conflict sinks” overseas and monitoring the population back home.

    “Overseas conflict sink” is a nice way of saying “forever war,” of course. Maybe Cheney’s view of the aftermath of overthrowing Saddam never changed, just his view of the utility of the outcome.

    Anti-xenophobia is a necessary underpinning of the Patriot Act and such, as the obvious and much easier solution was a Trump-style travel ban.

  84. @Astorian
    It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.

    Lest we forget, all of the leading neocons were McCain supporters, because candidate Bush showed no interest in foreign affairs. As s result, when Bush got the nomination, the neocons were shut out of power.

    Yes, Bill Kristol was a cheerleader for the war, from his desk at the Weekly Standard. But neither he nor his friends held positions of power in the Bush 2 White House.

    The war was launched by Ford administration holdovers, not by sinister Jewish intellectuals.

    It’s hard to blame the neocons for the second Iraq war when there weren’t any neoconservatives in the Dubya administration.

    Lest we forget, all of the leading neocons were McCain supporters, because candidate Bush showed no interest in foreign affairs. As s result, when Bush got the nomination, the neocons were shut out of power.

    Are you kidding? Perle, Wolfowitz, Feith, Libby, Frum, Zelikow, Bolton – all neo-cons.

  85. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Amy Adams is fantastic, gorgeous but also extremely talented.

    Funny you should mention J & J, the author and I performed in a play together a couple of years before she had this idea. You must admit it's a great idea for a stunt book, even if the execution wasn't great.

    She and her strangely epicene husband were theater dorks, so that explains the PC.

    Amy Adams (see her, for example, in American Hustle) is the most beautiful, sexiest actress working today. She is the Susan Sarandon of the current year.

  86. @Paul Jolliffe
    Steve’s review concluded with Peter Dale Scott’s theory that those closely involved with the “continuity of government” plans are (thanks in part to their super-secure channels of communication) beyond the reach or accountability of any democratic processes. Or, at least they believe and act as if they are.

    However, such plans (and cabals) predate the Reagan Administration by decades. John Frankenheimer’s 1964 “Seven Days in May” used “Mount Thunder” to allude to the real-life Mount Weather, the nuke-proof underground complex, run by a combination of very high-ranking military brass, very powerful Wall Street interests, and the spookiest of the intelligence community.

    Scott has highlighted the still-unexplained role that various COG-connected officials played in various “Deep Events” since the early 1960’s.

    Although he did not attribute it, I suspect that Steve has read at least some of Scott’s work. Dick Cheney is the physical embodiment of mysterious role that COG has played in our nation’s recent history and Steve was smart enough to end with that.

    During the Iran-Contra hearings, the veil of secrecy over COG was briefly lifted, and then unceremoniously dropped again by Daniel Inouye. Anybody who thinks that the Constitution is really the law of the land……………….think again:

  87. @Captain Tripps
    Sad. Politics/religion aside, I always thought Albert Brooks is a great comedic actor. Particularly his role in Defending Your Life, lol!

    Also, sadly, the Captain has passed...

    https://youtu.be/Lkf5Q0APkyE

    Ray Sawyer – the eyepatch guy from Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show (and who sang The Cover of the Rolling Stone) – also recently passed away.

    • Replies: @Prester John
    Also Mean Gene Okerlund of early WWF fame (before McMahon took them Full Glitz and Glam).
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Ray Sawyer – the eyepatch guy from Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show (and who sang The Cover of the Rolling Stone) – also recently passed away.
     
    Not to be confused with Ray Sawhill. Whose alter-ego Michael Blowhard is no longer with us.

    https://raysawhill.info/

    http://www.2blowhards.com/
  88. @Captain Tripps
    Sad. Politics/religion aside, I always thought Albert Brooks is a great comedic actor. Particularly his role in Defending Your Life, lol!

    Also, sadly, the Captain has passed...

    https://youtu.be/Lkf5Q0APkyE

    Also, sadly, the Captain has passed…

    His father and sister were both named Carmen. I remember Stereo Review on C&T’s first album: “Oh, those nights in the Hollywood Bowl”!

    I never knew the family was Bay Area Italian, though. Musical DiMaggios.

    That might explain why they chose a Neil Sedaka song:

    Sedaka was very popular in Italy. Many of his English-language records were released there and proved quite successful, especially “Crying My Heart Out For You” (Italian No. 6, 1959) and “Oh! Carol” (Italian No. 1, 1960).

    In 1961, Sedaka began to record some of his hits in Italian, starting with “Esagerata” and “Un giorno inutile”, local versions of “Little Devil” and “I Must Be Dreaming”. Other recordings were to follow, such as “Tu non-lo sai” (“Breaking Up Is Hard to Do”), “Il re dei pagliacci” (“King of Clowns”), “I tuoi capricci” (“Look Inside Your Heart”), and “La terza luna” (“Waiting For Never”). “La terza luna” reached No. 1 on the Italian pop charts in April 1963. Cinebox videos exist for “La terza luna” and “I tuoi capricci”. From a language standpoint, his recordings in Italian had very little American accent. RCA Victor’s Italiana branch distributed his records in Italy and released three compilation LPs of Sedaka’s Italian recordings.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Sedaka#Foreign-language_recordings

  89. @Steve Sailer
    I suspect that Steve has read at least some of Scott’s work.

    I am not familiar with the name, but I may have read something by him.

    My point was more psychological: that in the 1980s Cheney and Rumsfeld spent a few dozen days and nights in nuclear-proof bunkers training for the end of the world. That would likely make them take the one percent doctrine more seriously.

    • Troll: Tiny Duck.

    No, trolls are found under bridges. Like ducks.

  90. “In Cheney’s defense, he articulated his “one percent doctrine” about how the threat of a “low-probability, high-impact event,” such as al-Qaeda setting off a nuclear bomb in Times Square, justified the Iraq War….”

    Maybe Cheney didn’t understand Black Swan Theory.

  91. @Steve Sailer
    I suspect that Steve has read at least some of Scott’s work.

    I am not familiar with the name, but I may have read something by him.

    My point was more psychological: that in the 1980s Cheney and Rumsfeld spent a few dozen days and nights in nuclear-proof bunkers training for the end of the world. That would likely make them take the one percent doctrine more seriously.

    Tiny Duck. (with a period) is upping his game. Respect.

  92. @MEH 0910
    They always come in threes.

    https://twitter.com/THR/status/1080586925323534338

    Coincidentally, all three were 76 years old.

    I don’t care what any big meanie says but “Love Will Keep Us Together,” was a great pop hit. “Muskrat Love,” on the other hand, took me to some dark places, man.

  93. @SnakeEyes
    I saw quite a few commercials for "Vice" during Sunday Night Football a few weeks ago. I thought at the time that it was a curious marketing decision. Nothing in Steve's review suggests that the movie would in any way appeal to an ordinary, football-watching audience.

    Apparently it has grossed $21 million to date so seems unlikely to exceed the $60 million production budget. Those pricey SNF commercials were good money after bad it seems.

    “Nothing in Steve’s review suggests that the movie would in any way appeal to an ordinary, football-watching audience.”

    The footballers don’t have to enjoy the movie. They just have to buy the tickets. If they hate the actual movie, that’s on them, the studio already got their money. The advertiser’s job is not to inform the audience about the movie, it is to get the audience to buy tickets irrespective of what the movie is. So it sounds like the advertisers did a better job than the movie producers did.

    If it is any consolation, the distribution budget is typically as large again as the production budget, so the movie may still lose money, especially once word gets out that the movie is not as good as the advertisements made it appear to be.

  94. @Venator
    Oh, come on, that's one praise I wouldn't be too keen to hear. Let's just hopefully assume that Mr. Steve has at least some fun in what he is doing. La situation est grave mais pas sans divertissement.

    Yeah, documenting your Civilization burn must be fun. I was dead serious in my analogy, especially since I am a Father.

  95. @Mr. Anon
    Ray Sawyer - the eyepatch guy from Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show (and who sang The Cover of the Rolling Stone) - also recently passed away.

    Also Mean Gene Okerlund of early WWF fame (before McMahon took them Full Glitz and Glam).

  96. @anon
    Maybe we should call your idea the Japan Option. Japan decided on war after America imposed a total oil embargo upon her. (As strange as it may sound today, America was an important oil exporting nation in 1941). Japan decided to invade the oil rich Dutch East Indies. Because of misinformation given to them by the FDR administration they believed America would fight a war with them over this and thus decided on the 'sneak' attack at Pearl Harbor. Japan was essentially manipulated into war with the USA. Both the British and American ambassadors to Tokyo at the time said as much and were muzzled for doing so.

    Herbert Hoover’s book, Freedom Betrayed, has, inter alia, a fairly detailed exposition of the steps that FDR took to provoke the Japanese into an attack.

    • Replies: @anon
    Another good book is NO CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER.
    , @gcochran
    The key provocation was the German conquest of France & Holland and the defeat of the BEF - putting East Asia up for grabs.
  97. A long-form artistic product, like a book or a movie, should not be like an elongated newspaper editorial or a 2-hour MSM chat show. The longer format is supposed to accommodate more nuance.

  98. @syonredux

    I don’t think you get to use that construction when you’re the aggressor. As Iraqi as Iraqis are, they were doing alright by some metrics before we decided to destroy their country for no reason.
     
    Yeah, but Bush II Administration officials (and their media shills) were fond of comparing Iraq to Germany and Japan.....Many of them even stated that a post-Invasion Iraq would ultimately be as successful as post-war Germany and Japan...Rumsfeld even tried to explain away the anti-occupation insurgency in Iraq by referencing (non-existent) Nazi guerilla activity in occupied Germany...

    Good point, I had forgotten about that. There are three Middle-Eastern countries with the capacity to potentially be something like “a Germany:” Israel as it is now, Iran emerging from under the mullahs, and Lebanon considered with its diaspora. Comparing Iraqis to Japanese is as insane as anything else the neocons believed.

  99. @anon
    Maybe we should call your idea the Japan Option. Japan decided on war after America imposed a total oil embargo upon her. (As strange as it may sound today, America was an important oil exporting nation in 1941). Japan decided to invade the oil rich Dutch East Indies. Because of misinformation given to them by the FDR administration they believed America would fight a war with them over this and thus decided on the 'sneak' attack at Pearl Harbor. Japan was essentially manipulated into war with the USA. Both the British and American ambassadors to Tokyo at the time said as much and were muzzled for doing so.

    But Japan was in the grip of both an incoherent constitution (the military was effectively a government unto itself, it was parallel and not subordinate to the elected government) and Paraguay-level nineteenth century militarist utopianism (we’ve got to strike while the iron is hot, because it’s not like there’s an option where we don’t strike). So it’s both that the oil is less important than reasonablists want it to be, and the example is closer than would be comfortable because of the runaway neocons and military-industrial complex.

  100. @anon
    What peace dividend? The USA spends more money on "defense" then the next ten countries in the world combined. Where were all those F-16's on September 11?
  101. @Mr. Anon
    Ray Sawyer - the eyepatch guy from Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show (and who sang The Cover of the Rolling Stone) - also recently passed away.

    Ray Sawyer – the eyepatch guy from Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show (and who sang The Cover of the Rolling Stone) – also recently passed away.

    Not to be confused with Ray Sawhill. Whose alter-ego Michael Blowhard is no longer with us.

    https://raysawhill.info/

    http://www.2blowhards.com/

  102. @anon
    What peace dividend? The USA spends more money on "defense" then the next ten countries in the world combined. Where were all those F-16's on September 11?

    Where were all those F-16′s on September 11?

    I can tell you where one of the pilots was:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara_Hultgreen

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DYQejO_wRQ
  103. @syonredux
    Bob Einstein has died:

    https://deadline.com/2019/01/bob-einstein-dead-curb-your-enthusiasm-super-dave-osborne-smothers-brothers-1202527938/

    Always liked him on Curn Your Enthusiasm :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOKAkZvCAVA

    For those who don't know, he was Albert Brooks' brother.....Gotta say, though, those are some of the most dissimilar looking brothers that I have ever seen:


    http://danoday.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/ModernRomance.jpg

  104. @Reg Cæsar

    Where were all those F-16′s on September 11?
     
    I can tell you where one of the pilots was:


    https://images.findagrave.com/photos250/photos/2001/222/hultgreenk.jpg


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara_Hultgreen

  105. @Corn
    “Vice President Dick Cheney was pushing hard for the GOP to embrace George W Bush’s plot to destroy the United States by massively ramping up legal immigration while giving amnesty to upwards of 30 million illegal alien invaders.”

    Sheep in Wyoming won’t shear themselves.

    Sheep in Wyoming won’t shear themselves.

    Then bring in more Basques, not bums

  106. it’s about Traitor Dick, DickUS.
    How can there be any humor?

    Mr. Evil.

    Who
    would waste time watching about his life
    when
    all everyone wants is for his 74th replacement heart
    to do us all a favor?

    #74 will have place of honor in the Smithsonian.

  107. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Amy Adams is fantastic, gorgeous but also extremely talented.

    Funny you should mention J & J, the author and I performed in a play together a couple of years before she had this idea. You must admit it's a great idea for a stunt book, even if the execution wasn't great.

    She and her strangely epicene husband were theater dorks, so that explains the PC.

    She and her strangely epicene husband were theater dorks, so that explains the PC.

    Thank you for the info and that definitely explains it!

  108. @Diversity Heretic
    Herbert Hoover's book, Freedom Betrayed, has, inter alia, a fairly detailed exposition of the steps that FDR took to provoke the Japanese into an attack.

    Another good book is NO CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER.

  109. @Diversity Heretic
    Herbert Hoover's book, Freedom Betrayed, has, inter alia, a fairly detailed exposition of the steps that FDR took to provoke the Japanese into an attack.

    The key provocation was the German conquest of France & Holland and the defeat of the BEF – putting East Asia up for grabs.

  110. But I can’t recall a film since Midnight Cowboy in which the director needlessly distracts from his stars more than Vice.

    SCTV, ‘3-D FIRING LINE’ ‘MIDNIGHT COWBOY II’

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