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Variety: It's a Sad Reflection of the State of the World That White Men Composed So Many Songs People Like
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The music industry doesn’t expect many popular songwriters to emerge in the future, so the trend in recent years has been to buy up all the song rights of aged rock stars for massive sums. So, the highest income musician for a recent year is not the most popular long run musician, but whoever did the biggest one time cash in for selling his song catalog that year. From Variety:

Bruce Springsteen Tops 2021’s (Nearly All-White Male) Highest-Paid Musicians List With \$590 Million

By Jem Aswad

The pandemic may have completely up-ended the music industry’s traditional business model, but artists found all kinds of ways to make many millions of dollars in 2021 — and the big winners were nearly all white and male, according to a “10 Highest Paid Musicians” list published by Rolling Stone on Friday.

The list, created by former Forbes correspondent Zack O’Malley Greenburg, not surprisingly features several artists who cashed in their song catalogs for nine-figure sums last year, with the big leader being Bruce Springsteen, who not only sold his publishing and recorded-music rights to Sony Music in December for a figure sources say was around \$550 million, but also was the rare performer to make a healthy sum from live performances, with his “Springsteen on Broadway” summer reprise.

Seven of the 10 made the list based on catalog sales, with the only exceptions being Jay-Z, Kanye West, and Taylor Swift, who had big years either with non-music ventures like West’s Yeezy shoe empire, Jay’s sale of his half of his champagne line, or a bounty of heavily streamed and sold music, like Swift’s four albums released in just 18 months (along with lucrative partnerships with Peloton and Starbucks). Also notable is a previously undisclosed \$50 million catalog deal from Blake Shelton.

And in a sad reflection of the state of the world, apart from those exceptions, the list is all older white men — with Stevie Nicks, who struck a \$100 million catalog deal with Primary Wave, just missing the cutoff.

If only white men hadn’t written so many songs that people still enjoy decades later, the world would be a better place.

 
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  1. JimDandy says:

    Why is Jem Asswad wasting our time with this nonsense when there are more pressing matters to kvetch about, such as Hellen Mirren playing Golda Meir? This isn’t like casting Aryan stud Daniel Craig as various badass Jewish avengers or shiksa cutie Felicity Jones playing RBG because it’s different.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  2. Blacks as a percentage of US population: 12%

    Blacks as a percentage of ten highest-paid musicians in the US last year: 20%

    Problem identified by Variety: “Nearly All-White Male List”

    • Thanks: Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    , @Anonymous
  3. geez, Springsteen is such a mediocre songwriter, but it’s true that white males have dominated high-IQ songwriting–and for a long time (12th century)

  4. These assholes really go out of their way to try to make me hate them.

  5. @Meretricious

    Abottess Hildegarde von Bingen was top of the charts back in the Gregorian chant days.

    • Agree: Meretricious
    • Thanks: Grahamsno(G64)
    • LOL: Hangnail Hans
  6. yep; there were other females (and I love her work)

  7. Anon[181] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s hard to imagine anyone listening to the music on that list in 20 years. Does anyone still listen to the Red Hot Chili Peppers non-ironically?

  8. She is OK,but she’s no Francesco Landini, I will tell you that much! Time for a nice drinkie poo,while I “jam”,a little Remy Martin Louis XIII should do it.

    • Replies: @Meretricious
  9. Came across this cute song from the Atomic Age.

  10. \$590 million? How? Ok, I can see Candy’s Room being worth \$500 million, but there’s no way the rest of it adds up to \$90 million.

    • LOL: Old Prude
    • Replies: @David Davenport
    , @JimB
    , @JMcG
  11. I have a feeling that both the buyers and sellers of these “song catalogues” (how long has that stupid term existed?) will someday come to regret the deal.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    , @clyde
  12. JMR says:

    How appropriate that someone named Aswad (Arabic for black) is bitching about white guys.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
  13. The songbooks are being bought up by hedge fund guys looking to corner the market in streaming royalties.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  14. MEH 0910 says:

    How Taylor Swift Outsmarted Her Record Label

    Dec 13, 2021

    In this episode we discuss how Taylor Swift is owning the music industry and beating the system through her album re-records.

  15. The list, created by former Forbes correspondent Zack O’Malley Greenburg, not surprisingly features several artists who cashed in their song catalogs for nine-figure sums last year

    edit

    The list, created by former Forbes correspondent Zack O’Malley (not surprisingly) Greenburg, features several artists who cashed in their song catalogs for nine-figure sums last year.

    Best not to get Mr. Greenburg started on hit musicals.

  16. SafeNow says:

    If it ain’t broke…

  17. Muggles says:

    I was just discussing with Wife today this song rights sale fad going on now.

    And how current and recent rap performers will largely be cut out of future royalties since that kind of noise has little appeal as background music in public places or in future video/film.

    They can sell rights of course, but how many want to listen? Streaming services already collect on a per download/sale/listen basis and know what “new rap” is bringing in. Will black braggadocio (much sounding the same) with heavy beats appeal to future generations? What particular ones?

    There are also all kinds of hands in the till of music rights, not just performers. “Writing” is mostly producing and/or a collective effort. The pie gets cut pretty thin. A lot of recent music rights sales stem from aging boomers doing estate planning and the expectation that after 2021 capital gains rates will go up.

    (Oh, and no one keeps black composers from selling their music to the highest bidder. Many do. If they own the rights and haven’t sold them, just like whites/Asians/etc. )

    New music will always crowd out old.

    I will here have to give the late Michael Jackson credit for being an early music rights investing genius. He bought the Beatles catalog in the 90s when that seemed ridiculously pricey.

    It ended up being worth over a billion dollars at his death. Probably the smartest entertainment investor ever. For all of his up and downsides, who would have thought that? His estate is very happy about that.

    • Thanks: ic1000
    • Replies: @SafeNow
    , @Reg Cæsar
    , @AceDeuce
  18. @Recently Based

    Liberals are insulted by White men as pop musicians and taking certain sports positions which tells us that they don’t truly believe in equality.

    They are taking offense to what they subconsciously believe should be high-paying positions reserved for Blacks.

    But if they TRULY believed in equality then it should just be a matter of time before all races are equally distributed across all occupations. They would just view such inequality as merely temporary.

    A renaissance period of Asian quarterbacks and boxers should be happening any day now according to liberal theory. 1 million professors can’t be wrong……..right?

  19. Much like John Wayne, the Boss is fag:

    • Thanks: JimDandy
  20. SafeNow says:
    @Muggles

    I was just discussing with Wife today…

    Congrats on that. I am not trying to be sarcastic, I really do mean, that is so nice. (Now, apart from discussions, if she also listens to your old stories, smiles and says “I heard that one, but tell me again!” then double congrats.)

    Anyway, great comment, I would have simply clicked “Agree,” but I wanted to add my congrats for what it’s worth.

    • Thanks: Muggles
  21. @Muggles

    It ended up being worth over a billion dollars at his death.

    Is everything in his birthplace of Gary, Indiana put together even worth that?

    [MORE]

  22. Jay Z and Kanye West are White?

  23. Zack O’Malley Greenburg

    Wow. Three Hall-of-Famer. Two Dodgers and a Tiger.

    [MORE]

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  24. Altai says:

    Is there problem that the Western world was the music market and exported this influence the world over or is their problem that not enough non-whites had been imported yet to ensure they dominated through the West during that time? Why wouldn’t you expect a Western-dominated music market to be dominated by white men?

    The Western anti-white elites seem really interested in cramming lots of non-whites and white immigrants into their host societies in pure anti-social hatred, a kind of school shooting by editorial.

    But in terms of substantial interests in the non-Western world be it economic or social development, that all seemed to stall circa 1990. About the same time that core America began to lose the last vestiges of political importance in the US. Old Stock America seemed to really care about helping Africa, the Middle East and South East Asia. This new mongrel elite seems to only care about destroying to the best of their ability any suggestion that these countries ever belonged to the people who built them and, in many cases, have been the sole inhabitants for thousands of years.

    Debt or unstable poly-ethnic borders in Africa never seem to be seen as being very crucial.

    Another example, why is the massive teeming numbers of people coming over the Southern US border possibly also a serious issue during covid?

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  25. @Joe Stalin

    That radioactive piece is credited to Harry Warren and Ralph Blane. Warren had already composed “Chattanooga Choo Choo”, “On the Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa Fe”, and “Shuffle Off to Buffalo”, all with far better lyricists. He should have stuck with trains.

    Blane had teamed with Hugh Martin for Meet Me in St Louis, which featured the classic “Trolley Song” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas”. Martin later claimed Blane contributed nothing.

    He was obviously preoccupied with the lyrics to “Tic, Tic, Tic”!

  26. tyrone says:

    What’s sad is going through life with a name like ass-wad.

  27. EdwardM says:

    This notion of selling one’s catalog is the most first-world, white-people thing ever. I don’t really understand how this works. I guess whenever a song plays on the radio or is downloaded on iSpotify or whatever, the artist gets royalties. But are these the most common methods of distribution? I assume that the music playing the background of every bar and cafe I sit in is just a YouTube playlist, where the artist gets nothing, right? Ditto for most people listening at home. Do CDs still exist?

    I suppose the intellectual property rights are largely held up by the honor system and some complicated contractual rights that can be enforced in court. But how much longer will these institutions last? Will the Bruce Springsteen-equivalent of 2022 be able to monetize his catalog in 40 years? I suspect not, and I assume that no such system effectively exists outside the Anglosphere. (I am sure there is plenty of literature on the current state and future of the recording industry, but I don’t follow this.)

    Good for these artists for cashing in while they can. ​Further examples of America’s cultural heritage and rule of law that won’t last for long.

    (On a side note, I love the Taylor Swift case. By her telling, a couple of evil manipulative men exploited her and callously stripped her of control of her artistic output (and probably banged her too). Naturally, the media is sympathetic to the innocent, doe-eyed starlet facing down the capitalist sharks. The reality seems like people invested in her, advised her, gave her the tools to create product, gave her a platform that she couldn’t build on her own, created a business infrastructure, and then rightfully shared the rewards years later. They presumably lost on the 99 other singers they invested in who didn’t make it big. Then somehow she “outsmarted” them.)

    Can someone please give a Music Royalties 101 primer for the ignorant?

  28. @Intelligent Dasein

    Most of the sellers are old enough they won’t have much time time for regrets.

    • LOL: El Dato
  29. If only white men hadn’t written so many songs that people still enjoy decades later, the world would be a better place.

    Bruce Johnston wrote this song, or maybe he was just passing it along. Time for a spin of Ultimate Manilow. You’re all welcome.

  30. JosephD says:
    @Anon

    It’s hard to imagine anyone listening to the music on that list in 20 years. Does anyone still listen to the Red Hot Chili Peppers non-ironically?

    “Under the Bridge” and “Dani California” are decent. But that could just be nostalgia.

  31. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:

    One wonders that, in one hundred years’ time, will *anyone* even listen – let alone have the any possible interest in whatsoever, the current garbage which passes for popular ‘music’ in the contemporary USA? – the talentless black talkers who seem to dominate it, all that nasty instant trash bleepy black ‘r n b’ which assails ones eardrums in all public places.

    My strong conviction is absolutely no one will give a damn.
    All these people and their execrable garbage pile of recorded trash will pass forgotten as if they never had existed and defecated their crap in the first place.

    Of this I am certain.

  32. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimDandy

    The only person who, possibly, could have played a convincing Golda Meir was her political contemporary Lyndon Baines Johnson.

    • LOL: Old Prude, Gordo, Alden
    • Replies: @Gordo
  33. clyde says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I have a feeling that both the buyers and sellers of these “song catalogues” (how long has that stupid term existed?) will someday come to regret the deal.

    The sellers are making out like bandits. They now have a few hundred million in FU money, that they can never spend it all on coke and other garbage. On paper, a bad deal for the buyers, who must have exotic ways of financing these purchases of fading artist’s music catalogs. Who will care about Bruce Springsteen in 20 years? Go to YouTube. You will see the future, and it is mediocres like Bruno Mars who get half a billion views. The top Springsteen on you tube – Dancing in the Dark, his disco tune.

  34. El Dato says:
    @anon

    Well it’s pretty nice that they didn’t demand Spielberg hire real Nazis to the play the part in his much-applauded but truly dreadful extermination camp anecdote collection.

    Remember when Helen could play a non-jewish Russian and everyone was ok with that.

    • Thanks: Hangnail Hans
  35. AndrewR says:
    @Anon

    I love RHCP. Their 2016 album was great and they’re overdue for a new ome which I’m really looking forward to. Not remotely comparable to Springsteen, who is Obama’s new bff.

  36. Anonymous[183] • Disclaimer says:
    @Recently Based

    Pretty sure that Mathematics is also white supremacy these days, so that won’t help you.

  37. AceDeuce says:
    @Muggles

    Didn’t Pedo Jacko fk over his “White friend” Paul McCartney to get the Beatles catalog?

    Speaking of Jackson, the “black musical genius”, his two best albums, arguably, were Off the Wall and Thriller.

    There are a total of 19 tracks between those two albums, and White people wrote 10 of the 19 songs.

    On Bad, essentially a vanity project for Jacko, the Gloved Pedo wrote 9 of the 11 songs. Of the other two, one (“Man in the Mirror”) was co-written by a White man and the other was written by two White men.

    The nigrows yammering about “black music” need to get schooled on how much of it is due to YTs genius.

    Hope this comment makes it. Who’s the new schoolmarm that shitcans my comments?

  38. @El Dato

    Helen Mirren’s father was from Russia. She once starred as the Russian-Jewish Ayn Rand in The Passion of Ayn Rand.

    The picture you posted was taken from 2010, a movie starring Roy Scheider as Dr. Heywood Floyd. The Jewish Scheider replaced the non-Jewish William Sylvester, who originated the role in 2001. Jewish actor Bob Balaban played Dr. Chandra, a character portrayed as Indian in Arthur C. Clarke’s novel.

    Clarke was not Jewish, and he may or may not have been overly fond of little Sri Lankan boys.

    For some reason, Scheider’s character kept a dolphin in his swimming pool. Scheider later starred in seaQuest, which featured a talking dolphin.

    The novel of 2010 indicated that Chandra’s SAL 9000 computer had adopted his Indian accent. (SAL was the female earthbound counterpart to the spacefaring HAL.) But in the movie, SAL was voiced by the decidedly non-Indian-accented Candice Bergen.

    In both 2001 and 2010, HAL was voiced by Canadian goy Douglas Rain. Originally, the Jewish director Stanley Kubrick hired the Jewish actor Martin Balsam to voice HAL, but he later decided that Rain’s “mid-Atlantic” accent was more appropriate.

    Rain had a brief cameo in Sleeper, directed by and starring the prototypically Jewish Woody Allen.

    Martin Balsam appeared in Psycho, directed by the non-Jewish Alfred Hitchcock. He recreated his Psycho role in a terrible spoof movie called The Silence of the Hams, directed by some (presumably non-Jewish) Italian guy whose name escapes me at the moment.

    The Silence of the Hams is truly one of the worst movies I’ve ever seen. It fails as comedy to the same extent that Plan 9 from Outer Space fails as drama, but it lacks Plan 9‘s corny charm.

    Ed Wood was not Jewish.

  39. Jay Fink says:
    @Anon

    I’m Gen X and should be a fan but I strongly dislike their music. Never did like it. “Give It Away” is one of the most annoying songs I ever heard.

  40. @Steve Sailer

    And now there is a “bardcore” youtuber called Hildegard von Blingin’

  41. Old Prude says:
    @Meretricious

    Springsteen is a very mixed bag. Each of his early albums were astonishingly different. His creativity peaked with the album “Born to Run”, then took a long down hill slide to “Ghost of Tom Joad” which was so bad I stopped listening or paying attention.

    Born to Run, (the album, not the song, which is the weakest on the album) is not just good song writing, but genius arrangement. Absolutely smashing stuff. Backstreets and She’s the One thrill even after a thousand listens.

    And he’s a terrific live performer.

  42. Old Prude says:
    @Altai

    Hey, hey, we’re talking Music here! Quit harshing our mellow with Covid and Immigration. You dink. Who cares about that sh#t?

  43. Ralph L says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    It took me a week to get the title song of 42nd Street out of my head, and you had to mention “Shuffle.”

  44. @EdwardM

    Royalties go half to the songwriters, half to the music publishers. Iirc, it’s \$0.07 for airplay, I don’t remember what it is for record/CDs or downloads. Sorry I don’t have more.

  45. Anon[173] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s hard to market products using tuneless rap songs about guns, hos, and drugs. The white guy stuff is tuneful and civilized in comparison.

  46. @MEH 0910

    Rick Beato has made some pretty good (and short) informative videos about different aspects of the music industry.

    Here’s his take on the greatest keyboard intro’s of all time:

  47. First ask who pays for music. People under 30 don’t – hell I haven’t paid for music in over 25 years and I’m a lot older.
    That is why old whites like Bruce Springsteen still have portfolios that generate revenue.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  48. @Anonymous

    In 100 years will there even be electricity to listen to the music to?

    • LOL: Paul Mendez
  49. Gordo says:
    @Anonymous

    The only person who, possibly, could have played a convincing Golda Meir was her political contemporary Lyndon Baines Johnson.

    I believe they may have been related.

  50. Arclight says:

    For the left, every conversation around minorities (mostly blacks) revolves around trying to convince others they are not as dysfunctional compared to everyone else as the evidence says. When it comes to whites, it’s about convincing others they are not as accomplished as the evidences says.

  51. @Anonymous

    I have often wondered about that as we are only now approaching the 100th anniversary of the first mass market recordings.

    Some people, particularly students of musical jazz, still listen to the Louis Armstrong recordings of the 1920s, like Mr. Potato head, but I listen almost every day to Big band recordings from around 80 years ago, and then only 30 years from now we will be hitting the 100th anniversary of Hi-Fi recording and the long playing record.

    I certainly believe that many of the greatest songs of Cole Porter will still be listened to for pleasure when they reach their centenary. I’ve got them under my skin.

    It is now 66 years since the release of the tremendous Sonny Rollins album entitled Saxophone Colossus, which still sounds as fresh today as the day it was released. At least to me.

    I am inclined to think that most of the rap or hip hop that is published today is just ephemera that will not survive the fandom of the current artists, but then I am not an aficionado of that style of music.

  52. Mike Tre says:
    @El Dato

    They could always get porn star Nina Hartley to play Meir. Seems like a fairly realistic casting.

  53. Most of these people are not “artists”, they’re performers.

    Some are songwriters, and good ones, too. But this is not an art. And if they get money for that, it’s OK with me, I don’t have anything against popular culture- if it is not a complete trash like rap.

    Or “modern art” …

    • LOL: Liza
  54. @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, but she also was a cunning… pharmacist.

  55. AceDeuce says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Some people, particularly students of musical jazz, still listen to the Louis Armstrong recordings of the 1920s, like Mr. Potato head,

    Not “Mr. Potato Head”, fer Krisssake–“Potato Head Blues”.

    Which is one of the things, BTW, that Woody Allen’s character in the film Manhattan says makes life worth living.

  56. @Anon

    Does anyone still listen to the Red Hot Chili Peppers non-ironically?

    Truth, brother. You couldn’t even give it away now.

  57. @anon

    So generic-NW-Euro Brit Jew Maureen Lipman shares with some Jew-obsessed Unzites the belief that Ashkenazis have distinct Jewish looks.

    The Nazis thought so too, that’s why they found it completely unnecessary to look up genealogical records and never thought of having Jews wear the star of David on their sleeve. Oh wait…

  58. Astorian says:

    Bob Dylan was one of the first song writers to sell off his catalogue, and I’m betting his lawyers told him to do it. Bob is old, he won’t live forever, and he has several kids. When he dies, it will be a lot easier to divide \$800 million among his heirs than for them to fight over future streams of royalties.

  59. @EdwardM

    BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.) is an American performing rights organization that represents songwriters, composers and music publishers. Often called PRO’s, performing rights organizations collect licensing fees from businesses that use music, including television and radio stations; websites, broadcast and cable networks; the Internet and mobile technologies; satellite radio services such as Sirius XM; nightclubs, hotels, bars, restaurants, breweries, colleges, fitness facilities, live concerts and many other industries. The fees that BMI collects are then distributed as royalties to the songwriters, composers, and music publishers we represent. BMI has been in operation for more than 80 years, is recognized in U.S. copyright law as a licensor of music, and currently represents more than 1.2 million copyright owners and their over 18.7 million musical works.

  60. While a man named Jem (!!!) kvetches about Whites in music, the hope is no one notices how many Jews produced and profited from both Black and White artists, sort of how no one is supposed to notice Fraudsident Diapers’ entire Cabinet fits under the roof of a single synagogue.

  61. STL says:
    @El Dato

    I believe Helen Mirren actually does have Russian ancestry. Birth name is Helen Lydia Mironoff.

  62. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    A century from now, we can be pretty sure that European descended peoples, worldwide, will be an insignificant minority – and a hated, marginalized and abused one at that.
    But, we can also be sure that the music of the classical age of musical composition in Europe, the music of the Great Composers, will still be assiduously played, studied and analysed by countless eager musicians and scholars.

    Only that the musicians and scholars will be Chinese.

  63. Spud Boy says:

    “And in a sad reflection of the state of the world, apart from those exceptions, the list is all older white men…”

    Where do idiots like Jem Aswad come from? As if a few old white guys cashing in somehow harms the precious brown people in the world.

  64. @Abolish_public_education

    All the free money from the Fed has to go somewhere.
    They’re now reduced to ” What have people always thought was worthless? There must be some bargains there.”
    Financial Assets are so Passe.

    Here’s an opportunity for you.
    https://www.masterworks.io/?&&utm_campaign=Art-Investing_Invest-In-Art&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=platform&gclid=67c9b2d459e8100bfb40d336ae48c4ee&gclsrc=3p.ds&msclkid=67c9b2d459e8100bfb40d336ae48c4ee&gclid=67c9b2d459e8100bfb40d336ae48c4ee&gclsrc=3p.ds

    Next up. Biden spawn Non-Fungible Tokens.

  65. @Meretricious

    “Springsteen is such a mediocre songwriter”

    I would say Bruce’s output is spotty. Even his best songs ooze melodrama; similar to the Broadway musicals Steve is oftly fond of.

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Meretricious
  66. ganderson says:
    @El Dato

    She was smokin’ in The Long Good Friday.

  67. @Abolish_public_education

    Maybe the hedge fund guys like the politically connected BlackRock guys are gobbling up all forms of culture to erase the past in preparation for Year Zero scheduled to arrive on January 1, 2026 which I believe is Klaus Schwab’s 366th birthday.

  68. @clifford brown

    So saying the Jews run Hollywood is “anti-Semitic”, but refusing to say Jew ran Hollywood is too?

    A Catch-כ”ב!

    • LOL: Paul Mendez
  69. Kylie says:

    “Some people, particularly students of musical jazz, still listen to the Louis Armstrong recordings of the 1920s, like Mr. Potato head, but I listen almost every day to Big band recordings from around 80 years ago…”

    Not a student of musical jazz, as you call it, but I still listen to Armstrong’s 1920s recordings. Classical music is my first love but really I don’t see how any knowledgeable music lover cannot love Armstrong’s early recordings. They are excellent. The things he was doing and the way he was doing them! Just got this:

    https://www.discogs.com/release/2586278-Louis-Armstrong-Hot-Fives-And-Sevens

    I came to Armstrong via Artie Shaw. The latter is really the only essential Big Band era musician you need to listen to, though some others are worthwhile. I saw Benny Goodman live back in the 70s. Excellent performer who obviously loved entertaining his audiences, unlike the grumpy but far superior Shaw.

    I still think you are vile. You’re probably a Glenn Miller fan.

  70. @EdwardM

    MR pre-101: There are a few big (# subscribers) streaming services that actually pay royalties (I’ve heard that a popular one doesn’t). The services pay (out of subscription \$) based on the rights-holder’s “streaming share”. For example,

    • Service X has 1M subscribers @\$10/m.
    • X pays out 1/2 its revenues as royalties (\$5M)
    • X serves 1B per streams month.
    • 1/4 of the streams are for artists Rec Co Z owns the rights to
    • X pays Z \$1.25M

    Z distributes that \$1.25M among its artists (presumably the ones whose songs were streamed), depending on the deal it has made with each. So if ..

    Z pays out 3/5 of its royalties (\$750,000) in direct proportion, and
    Songs from Z artist, known as Lil’A, were streamed 25M times, then
    Z pays Lil’A \$75,000.

    The data shows that ~90% of the streams are pulled for major artists, e..g. Bruce, Mick, and Taylor. Therefore, an unknown artist (< 10,000 requests), signed with a small (independent) label (< 100,000 streams) is going to receive, at most, about:

    \$5M x 0.01% x 60% x 10% = \$30.

    The streaming services deny that they work for the Z's. They claim that their biggest joy is giving new artists the opportunity for worldwide exposure.

  71. Sailer Strategy Rule: six shot, none dead (yet) at “concert” in Eugene. Eugene? Calypso Gene is on the scene!

    6 people shot outside Oregon concert; suspect not in custody

    The “artists”? Lil Bean and Zay Bang.

    • Thanks: Inquiring Mind
  72. @Reg Cæsar

    All-time best rendition of the Trolley Song: Martin Prince.

  73. @MEH 0910

    Taylor Swift remains an honorary white male, though she’s tried mighty hard to be woke in recent years.

    • Replies: @Right_On
  74. @JMR

    How appropriate that that someone is named Asswad.

  75. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    I listen to old popular music, too, and love tune-hopping through YouTube discovering new ear candy from the before times. Whether it’s Tommy Dorsey, Annette Hanshaw or Dion and the Belmonts, I find it quite delightful. I don’t see it as any different from liking Mozart, Brahms and Ravel.
    But it may be an artifact of my age that I ever got into old ear candy because my high school years correspond with the late 1990s swing revival, so I partied to Squirrel Nut Zippers, Cherry Poppin’ Daddies and the Brian Setzer Orchestra. Then I found my grandparents’ and parents old 78s and 45s and it was off to the races for me. What a treasure trove of splendid sounds!
    Of course I enjoyed other music of my era that then-adults probably never noticed or cared for — Jimmy Eat World, Linkin Park ,and later Hey Monday. I never listened to rap or hip hop and don’t even know what’s popular today.
    But I do notice that I clearly am in the minority of listeners picking out songs from the past on YouTube, based on views. Some songs I like may have only a few hundred views. Even the most popular are only in the hundreds of thousands, while contemporary ditties may have hundreds of millions of views. So I do imagine that all the old music, from the Beach Boys to Benny Goodman, will just fade away, replaced by dub step and rap and perhaps, finally, merely random hooting and thumping.

  76. The usual suspects are throwing a feces fit over CountryBro, White man Morgan Wallen having the most album sales in 2021, with his 2021 release hitting 3.2 million in sales. This after he was “canceled” by the CMA awards and many country radio stations for drunkenly yelling at some friends, at 3am, calling them “naggers”(i). Rolling Stone reports that Wallen had a “1,220% increase in digital album sales and a 327% increase in song sales immediately following the incident,”.

    The Grand Ole Opry had him perform on their weekly Saturday night show a couple weeks ago. That led to even more “How dare they!?!?!?” reactions for the woke. Including a black woman who heads an association of black country music singers. Who said she could not book her singers on that stage now, since country fans will not accept minority singers, ignoring long time star Charlie Pride, heart surgeon/country singer Cleve Francis, Darius Rucker whole left behind what ever Hootie and the Blowfish was to have some success on the Country charts, and more Hispanic singers than I care to look up. Come to think of it, I can not think of an Asian singer who has been on the Country charts. That must be what she means.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  77. Muggles says:
    @EdwardM

    For someone who admits that they no nothing about the music rights process, you have a lot of brash opinions.

    I’m not a Taylor Swift historian but your brief account is mainly wrong.

    Some of her rights (not all) belonged to a business (not sure how it was structured) that supported her efforts from very early. Her father was a major owner in that business.

    That business was sold a couple of years ago, So her father collected his large share. No one “cheated” anyone. She still owned some rights as a composer/writer (partial, or full for only the ones she wrote by herself — her song credits are usually co-written) but had to pay or get permission for certain performance rights. That seemed to piss her off greatly.

    One wonders why she was so upset. Surely she knew about how these things work legally.

    What she did, as others have done, is re-record songs she had composed so she would have a new set of auxiliary rights. That is expensive but she can afford it. So now for the newly recorded (old material she wrote) she owns it all.

    While new artists have to accept what they can get for rights arrangements (in exchange for cash up front for recording/distribution/promotion expenses) this isn’t “sharks.”

    Any entrepreneur has to start out with investors who get a thick percentage, and abide by those agreements. It is called risk capital.

    I’m sure Taylor had good lawyers. Plus her father was a successful businessman and ended up with a big chunk of that sale money, presumably Taylor will benefit eventually from that.

    She is probably worth half a billion dollars (more or less) so she isn’t some misused charity case.

    Up until COVID mandates shut down performances, most modern musicians made most of their money from concerts where they receive the lions share of profits. Royalties aren’t nearly as large, usually, unless you are a hit performer like Swift.

  78. Thea says:

    Just wait till they realize who wrote most of the best selling Christmas tunes.

  79. johnmark7 says:
    @Meretricious

    Yeah, Springsteen made off like a bandit. Sony will never make back what it paid out for it. How many hits did Bruce ever have? 2 or 3 at best, Dancing in the Dark being the biggest which is a song no one remembers.

    The thing is, Bruce’s music lacks much in the way of vocal, tonal, chordal, rhythmic, or melodic variation so the songs are rarely covered by anyone else and they are generally so somber and wearisome that even a few more upbeat rockers seem sluggish that movies, TV, and ads can hardly use them.

  80. Anonymous[234] • Disclaimer says:

    I am just glad to see Lindsey Buckingham doing so surprisingly well. He deserves it.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  81. Anonymous[492] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    A strange fact is that many an Irishman thinks that ‘Chattanooga Choo Choo’ is a maudlin old Irish folk ballad … this from the opening line which is misheard as “Paddy me Boy” – by that name the song is popularly known in Ireland.

  82. @Muggles

    What she did .. is re-record songs she had composed so she would have a new set of auxiliary rights.

    I get what you’re saying, and I assume that [her] actions were scrutinized by record company lawyers, but I don’t see how an artist can normally get away with it.

    It’s one thing to sell your bakery and (despite a non-compete) open up a coffee shop, across the street, that incidentally sells pastries. It’s quite another to set-up a bakery with essentially the same name and menu.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Feryl
    , @Muggles
  83. HA says:
    @Anon

    “It’s hard to imagine anyone listening to the music on that list in 20 years.”

    Keep in mind that it’s POP music, written for the benefit of the “hope I die before I get old” crowd.

    No one will want to eat the Chinese leftovers sitting in the back of your fridge in 20 years, either, if they’re still around. But they were dished out, (partially) consumed, and maybe even fondly remembered until the next time someone in your circle decides on take-out. That’s all it was designed for.

    That being said, the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ biggest hit is about to hit 30, and since most people’s musical preferences get burned in during their high school years, give or take, I’m guessing that one probably will be around another 20, playing in various retirement home lobbies and on ski slope intercoms. I think the guys who buy these catalogs probably try and crunch that kind of thing out as well as they can before the bidding starts.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
  84. @Kylie

    I came to Armstrong via Artie Shaw. The latter is really the only essential Big Band era musician you need to listen to, though some others are worthwhile. I saw Benny Goodman live back in the 70s. Excellent performer who obviously loved entertaining his audiences, unlike the grumpy but far superior Shaw.

    I agree.

    Some of Shaw’s greatest hits, like Stardust and Frenesi are sublime, and I love the insane Gramercy 5 album with the harpsichord.

    Goodman has a much wider range of recorded music available, ranging from small bands with Charlie Christian on guitar and Lionel Hampton on vibes to albums with Peggy Lee as vocalist.

    Both Goodman and Shaw were clarinetists of quite extraordinary virtuosity.

    Shaw became sick of audiences wanting to hear his greatest hits, and laid down his clarinet at a young age, never to play again.

    He had the young Billie Holiday in his band too, but she was never accepted by his audiences.

    Had he had a different temperament, he might have gone on to have a career like Wynton Marsalis, a virtuoso who excels in both classical and jazz recordings and performances.

    A lot of Glenn Miller is schmaltzy, but Chattanooga Choo Choo is a great classic, and the extended movie version with the Nicholas Brothers and Dorothy Dandridge is amazing.

    But a lot of Count Basie and Duke Ellington is still very listenable, and some of the other bands like Harry James in their best configurations were stellar.

  85. Anonymous[786] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    I recently a acquired a stack of old Jazz LPs, mostly from the 60s. Most likely the prized collection of a recently deceased old geezer.

  86. @Steve Sailer

    Hildegarde has her fans today still. Lisa Gerrard (Dead Can Dance), the Swedish folkies Garmana, Synfonye.

  87. @Muggles

    “Up until COVID mandates shut down performances, most modern musicians made most of their money from concerts where they receive the lions share of profits.”

    One of my great heroes, folkie Martin Carthy, who I’ve been listening to since I was 16, is appealing for donations. The folk circuit doesn’t come with a pension.

    Right now the Carthy family, as many others, is struggling to survive the pandemic. Martin and Norma are 80 and 82, Norma being unable to perform for years due to illness. She is currently in hospital with pneumonia.
    Eliza and her two young children moved back home to help care for her 11 years ago; for the last 2 the family’s income has dried up. There have been almost no concerts, club dates or festivals: everything has been moved. They urgently need funds to tide them over until the pandemic lifts and Martin and Eliza can return to touring and again become self sufficient. During the pandemic Eliza recorded a new album. Once touring resumes there will be that extra income stream plus the small income derived from the limited releases of the Waterson Family Archive.
    Until then the family is hard-pressed, and any donations you can make will be greatly appreciated.

    https://ko-fi.com/elizacarthy

  88. Alrenous says: • Website

    Envy is a hell of a drug.

    Can we ban music for only these writers and their editors and publishers? They can have the world they clearly desire without affecting the rest of us.

    …affecting the rest of us is the whole point of these articles, isn’t it? They feel like minding their own business would be death, don’t they?

  89. @ganderson

    She was even more smoking in Savage Messiah (1972). The scene which introduces her, walking naked and full-frontal down a staircase, even distracted adolescent me from the brilliant Dorothy Tutin. I think the word is “stacked”.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  90. @Anonymous

    there is a lot of good music being produced today. You sound like an old fogie

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  91. Mark G. says:

    Goodman has a much wider range of recorded music available, ranging from small bands with Charlie Christian on guitar and Lionel Hampton on vibes to albums with Peggy Lee as vocalist.

    Goodman and Christian are before my time, though I can remember being told in the sixties by an uncle that Goodman is better than the Beatles. I recently discovered that a jazz guitarist from Indianapolis where I live was quite talented. His name was Wes Montgomery. Montgomery’s main influence was Charlie Christian.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    , @AceDeuce
  92. @Kylie

    I saw Benny Goodman live back in the 70s.

    Your name is Kylie and you remember the ’70s? Your folks were way ahead of the curve. That name didn’t crack the top 1,000 until 1978.

    I knew a Keely (whose father was famous in his field) born ca. 1963. Perhaps mom was a bobbysoxer who remembered Keely Smith. That name didn’t show up until 1959.

    • Replies: @Kylie
  93. @Meretricious

    there is a lot of good music being produced today.

    Please point us in its general direction. It’s not wafting our way.

    You sound like an old fogie

    No initial capital, but a period. Then an initial capital, but no period. Are you trying to keep us on our toes?

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Meretricious
  94. @SunBakedSuburb

    off the top of my head I can name 100 songwriters of his generation that tower over him

  95. @Che Blutarsky

    Candy’s Room …

    Springsteen’s paen to a prostitute. Listen to the lyrics.

    • Replies: @M.A
    , @David
  96. I hope the Great American Songbook that Mark Steyn so cherishes will endure, maybe with new performers, and I’d like to see other music of the 20th century endure — doubtful the entire 50 years of rock n roll, but hopefully Booker T & the MG’s, maybe not all country music but hopefully Hank and Patsy and the outlaw country of Cash & Willie & Waylon.

    …but more important is the cultural confidence to push civilization forward, and the realism about cultures and races and sexes to abandon the current madness and start work on planetary bases and warp drives and transporters.

    Anyway, the shared knowledge here among the commenters, from the biz to big band, is excellent, much appreciated!

    (My grandfather loved Glenn Miller, and I’m not going to contradict him!)

    What I can contribute is one almighty parody of the typical Chili Pepper song.

  97. Kylie says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “Your name is Kylie and you remember the ’70s? Your folks were way ahead of the curve. That name didn’t crack the top 1,000 until 1978.”

    No, my username here is “Kylie”, in honor of my dog. I was named after my grandmother.

    I grew up listening to the 1958 single ”

  98. @Mark G.

    West Montgomery was indeed a remarkable talent, and, unusually, he played with his thumb and not with a plectrum.

    Like so many instrumental virtuosos of jazz, he was self-taught.

    In this version of Stardust, you have beautiful solos by Goodman and Lionel Hampton, and then an exquisite solo by Charlie Christian.

  99. @EdwardM

    But how much longer will these institutions last? Will the Bruce Springsteen-equivalent of 2022 be able to monetize his catalog in 40 years

    ?

    After we all get bio-chip implants, the artist will be able to collect royalties every time we hear, hum, whistle or even think of their song.

  100. @HA

    …most people’s musical preferences get burned in during their high school years, give or take…

    I listen to the “SiriusXMU” and “Alt Nation” channels in my car a lot. They play new songs that sound exactly like what I was listening to in college. Like going to a dorm party where the host has the same musical tastes but a totally different record collection than you.

    It’s the best of both worlds: novelty + familiarity.

  101. JimB says:
    @Che Blutarsky

    Fake New Jersey working-class hero. I bet he couldn’t change the oil or sparkplugs in his Chevy on Thunder Road.

    • Agree: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
  102. teo toon says:
    @anon

    Well, if the Jews are complaining about a White actor playing a role of a Jew, isn’t turnabout fair play: Jews should stop playing White characters. Ah, who am I kidding; Hell will freeze over before that happens.

  103. @Meretricious

    “geez, Springsteen is such a mediocre songwriter, but it’s true that white males have dominated high-IQ songwriting–and for a long time (12th century)”

    Just plain lousy.

    “This gun’s for hire,
    “Even if we’re just dancin’ in the dark….

    “I’m sick of sittin’ ‘round here tryin’ to write this book,
    “I need a love reaction,
    “Come on now, baby, gimme just one look.”

    The guy functions like a primitive AI program with a downloaded rhyming dictionary.

    When I saw Steve’s title, I immediately thought of the songwriters of The Great American Songbook. But with these mutts (excepting Paul Simon and Lindsey Buckingham), who cares if we’re talking about black cursers or White rockers? Well, once important outfits like Variety obviously do.

    • Agree: Meretricious
    • Replies: @AceDeuce
  104. Rosie says:

    Imagine my shock when I hear Thunderstruck, greatest of hits by AC/DC, a grunge band avant la lettre, albeit with a twist of sleaze, in a Mitsubishi commercial!

    [MORE]

    The original:

    The best cover:

  105. @Reg Cæsar

    You have to be kidding me, right? Take any high-IQ director–eg, Tarantino or the Coens and look at the soundtracks. And a lot of good commercial stuff is being produced:

    You’re not familiar with what Arvo Part is doing?

    Lots of great work is being produced worldwide. You know who Julie Fowlis is? Imee Ooi?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  106. Mr. Anon says:

    I write the songs that trigger BIPOCs cries…………

    I write the songs that other and colonize……………

    I write the songs that privilege my white skin…….

    I write the songs, I write the songs……………………

    • LOL: silviosilver
  107. @Meretricious

    but it’s true that white males have dominated high-IQ songwriting–and for a long time

    Why do you assume songwriting takes a high IQ? What is “high-IQ songwriting”, anyway? Schoenberg? Stockhausen? Cage?

    Harry Partch?

  108. @Meretricious

    Imee Ooi?

    Wasn’t that a George Harrison song?

    Of course I’ve heard of Arvo Pärt. He’s 86. What did Elliot Carter write after 100?

    It’s nice that Pärt composed a piece honoring St Cecilia, the patroness of music. So did Charles Gounod, a Mass in 1855. Anyone in the Twin Cities vicinity should be aware that this is scheduled for next Sunday, the 23rd, at the Church of St Agnes. Her feast is the 21st, and they do this every January, as they could find no Mass for St Agnes. Cecilia shared a similar fate, so they use hers. (BTW, this is not a performance (except to the union), but an actual Mass, with crying babies.)

    Miss Fowlis’s ensemble, Dòchas, does not inspire a Wikipedia page, putting it in the same league as Public Foot the Roman of a half-century ago. Whether or not the music is good, it’s not getting around.

    Perhaps you can create this page, and do them and all of us a favor.

    • Replies: @Meretricious
    , @Hibernian
  109. @Reg Cæsar

    “high-IQ songwriting” is my shorthand for top-notch songwriting–and don’t kid yourself: the best songwriters tend to be highly intelligent

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  110. Right_On says:
    @Hangnail Hans

    I preferred it when Taylor Swift was a white-nationalist meme (thank you, 4-chan) and was seen as the embodiment of the perfect Aryan woman.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
  111. @Anonymous

    A strange fact is that many an Irishman thinks that ‘Chattanooga Choo Choo’ is a maudlin old Irish folk ballad

    I didn’t realize Calabria was in Ireland! Harry Warren, Salvatore Guaragna, was about as paisan as an American could be. The lyrics to what might be Warren’s biggest– and certainly most Italian– hit, “That’s Amore”, were written by native Liverpudlian Jack Brooks. Who’da thunk it?

    Warren was a donor to Loyola U in L.A. He also composed a Mass, which the music department eventually performed there.

    Fun story: Warren and his primary lyricist Al Dubin visited a private library to do research for a show. Dubin didn’t look Jewish at all, and eventually converted to his wife’s (and Warren’s) Catholicism. He was very sensitive about his background, though.

    Some WASPy patron of the library sidled up to Dubin and whispered, “You’re alright, but we’d rather not have his kind in here.” True to their natures, Dubin was stung but said nothing, while Warren, when told later, thought it was the funniest thing he’d ever heard.

    Warren would certainly be canceled today. Michael Feinstein, who worked with him, said that while Warren was the very opposite of a bigot, he had a habit of referring to any demographic by the worst moniker possible.

  112. @Reg Cæsar

    Fowlis sings in Scottish Gaelic (I turned Roger Ebert on to her–he loved her music):

    • Thanks: YetAnotherAnon
  113. AceDeuce says:
    @Mark G.

    And Montgomery, in turn, was the main influence on a lot of players, most notably George Benson.

    Montgomery was at his best playing straight ahead jazz, something he had relatively little opportunity to do in his prime. He had a wife and kids–if I remember, a lot of kids–and for much of his career, even after becoming a jazz star, he had a day job-I think in a factory.

    His best cuts are from the 50s and 60s, IMHO, especially some of his Pacific Jazz work with his brothers (he had two brothers who were also musicians of note).

    In the mid 1960s, he “hit it big”. He put out a bunch of albums with his instrumental versions of pop hits of the day, including the Beatles. These were overdone cotton candy elevator music albums. His playing was fine as always, of course, but jazz purists regarded him, not unfairly, as a sellout. He finally made decent money with that dreck, but died not long afterwards–he was only in his early 40s.

    My favorite album of his is “Full House”, a live recording of a date in a Berkeley coffeehouse from, I think, 1960. He’s joined by a stellar lineup of great jazz sidemen, including several of Miles Davis’s lineup of the time, and they kick ass. “Cariba” is my favorite cut. Get it. Thank me later.

    • Thanks: Mark G.
  114. @Muggles

    Surely she knew about how these things work legally.

    She was 15/16 when she recorded her first album. Her father probably signed all the paperwork for her.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  115. @JimB

    The Ballad of Thunder Road was the best song ever recorded by Robert Mitchum.

    It just doesn’t get any cooler than ol’ Sleepy Eyes Mitchum in that movie.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
  116. M.A says:
    @David Davenport

    Christ, it’s well over 40 years since I listened to or even thought about Candy’s Room. It’s a measure of my then innocence, that I never realized she was a prostitute. I simply thought that she was a popular girl!

  117. Anonymous[331] • Disclaimer says:

    One of the better things on YouTube are the archives of the West German 1960s pop music show ‘Beat Club’, which happens to be a great big storehouse of 1960s British rock music at its best, oddly in fact, since it was only a couple of decades after WW2, and that the supposedly ‘hip’ British TV of the time simply has no contemporary archive of the same quality.

    Hosted by a gorgeous young woman, these Beat Club videos have introduced me to a lot of great British music of that time which simply would have passed me by.
    A particular favorite of mine is the Beat Club version of ‘Boogie for George’ by UFO, which merits a posting here.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  118. @Meretricious

    I agree about Springsteen. In high-IQ songwriting, a top performer was Joni Mitchell.

    • Agree: sayless
  119. Anonymous[303] • Disclaimer says:

    The music industry doesn’t expect many popular songwriters to emerge in the future

    Why not?

  120. Alden says:
    @ganderson

    Great great movie The Long Good Friday.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  121. Alden says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Then there’s Maria Anna Mozart.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  122. J.Ross says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    Music industry and fine art dealing have laws and practices that were essentially designed to generate lawyer jokes. They don’t work like real businesses. They get away with this because of massive amounts of money.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  123. @Anonymous

    A strange fact is that many an Irishman thinks that ‘Chattanooga Choo Choo’ is a maudlin old Irish folk ballad … this from the opening line which is misheard as “Paddy me Boy” – by that name the song is popularly known in Ireland.

    Very droll!

    The opening lyric “Pardon me, boy, is that the Chattanooga choo-choo” is apparently addressed by the traveler to a shoeshine boy at the Pennsylvania station in New York, who is presumably black, and of course using boy in that context is no longer regarded as acceptable, so the third word is often changed to something else like “pal”.

    Of course even in World War II times adults did not normally refer to trains as choo-choos!

    I love this song though because it seems to express such confidence in mid-century America.

    The traveler does not have a lot of money, but he has “a trifle to spare” and he can afford dinner in the diner and read a magazine by the time the train gets to Baltimore. And of course when he arrives in Tennessee, he has “a certain party” waiting for him, but no hint of pedophilia.

    It would be a shame if the generations of the future don’t know this song.

  124. @michael droy

    “People under 30 don’t”

    Some foolish young people actually pay Spotify. Same demographic that pay Netflix. But I know a fair few well off older people who have both, too.

  125. Feryl says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    Re-recorded songs/albums are quite common in the music industry, usually done for the purpose of an artist trying to “re-claim” ownership/royalties of their music if they feel that they got hosed in some fashion regarding the original release. Keep in mind the legalese regarding distribution; if an artist releases something via a particular label, that label is essentially responsible for managing the finances related to the release, including royalties as per whatever (often one-sided*) contract exists between the artist and label. Labels have also successfully stopped certain artists from basically releasing anything if the label isn’t satisfied that an artist has fulfilled the terms of their contract.

    Once an artist exits a contract they are then free to do whatever the hell they feel like, and that includes re-recording their own songs and then attempting to profit from it on a new set of terms.

    *By the 1980’s record labels were notorious for holding artists responsible for paying back debts incurred via promotion, concerts, etc. So technically a lot of music profits went right back to the label and unless your album sold Platinum you weren’t going to get much in terms of royalties. This was perfectly legal as the terms of the contract laid out the artist’s responsibility for “debts” or “losses” to be pinned on the artist.

  126. @Reg Cæsar

    How about Neddy Dick’s lithophone?

    https://swaag.org/Neddy%20Dick.htm

    In Keld, they still keep green the memory of Dick Alderson, alias Neddy Dick (1845-1926). Neddy made music from stones! While climbing near Kisdon Force one day, he dislodged a sliver of rock and heard a distinct musical ring as it fell upon another rock. Thus began a search for other tuneful pieces, with the result that eventually he created a full ‘limestone scale’. He would sing to the accompaniment of his stones, and sometimes added a few bells for greater effect.
    He never achieved his ambition to go ‘on tour’ with this melodic outfit piled into his donkey cart, but he meant more to Swaledale folk than any Kreisler. Alas, after a period of neglect, his ‘rock band’ died with him.

  127. Old Prude says:
    @Chris Mallory

    oooooo! She threatened that no blacks would perform at the Grand Old Opry? That must have them shaking in their boots.

  128. Ralph L says:
    @Right_On

    Rumor has it that several of Swift’s celebrity boyfriends were beards for her and she for them.

  129. Paleoconn says:

    The Stevie Nicks text should have been followed by the sentence ‘but at least Nicks was benevolent enough to abort her baby with Don Henley back in 1980, which may have prevented another white male singer from infesting the airwaves in our time.’

  130. AceDeuce says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    I always say that Springsteen sounds like Meat Loaf with half a Valium in him.

    • LOL: Nicholas Stix
  131. Mr Mox says:
    @johnmark7

    The thing is, Bruce’s music lacks much in the way of vocal, tonal, chordal, rhythmic, or melodic variation so the songs are rarely covered by anyone else and they are generally so somber and wearisome that even a few more upbeat rockers seem sluggish that movies, TV, and ads can hardly use them.

    Manfred Mann’s Earth Band covered several of Springsteen’s songs, including “Blinded By The Light” and “Davy’s On The Road Again”. In my opinion they did a far better job than Springsteen did.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    , @Old Prude
  132. Muggles says:
    @Chris Mallory

    Swift wasn’t a legal adult when those early contracts were signed. Her father did that since she was a minor.

    She evidently stayed with Big Machine (the company in question) until it was sold to others for hundreds of millions. Her father owned a big chunk and got his share (or we haven’t heard otherwise.)

    But Swift’s big complaints and fuss, and subsequent re-recording, only came last year. She in the meantime had plenty of time to ask and/or learn about how these contracts work. She could ask Dad. She just didn’t like the answer. So she went to Plan B, which is costly but she can afford it.

    She did re-record her music since she had separate rights as the composer (or part composer). Yes these get complicated but that’s why property rights and lawyers exist.

    Many other performers have done similar re-recordings. In Taylor’s case, her huge fan base and public complaints have probably made this financially sound for her. She can sing/perform/record the “new” versions all she wants.

    I don’t know what if anything changed in the music/lyrics/arrangements/etc/ from old to new.

    So far the new owners of her “old music” recordings haven’t sued to stop her, and probably won’t.

  133. @Feryl

    Re-recorded songs/albums are quite common in the music industry

    I will take your word for it. I just don’t see how that can be tolerated as a normal business practice.

    Entertainment industry accounting gimmicks aside, I can support a bargaining position that states “You start collecting royalties at the same time that we, your business partner, have recouped all the money we invested in producing and marketing your album, i.e. when we begin to make money, also.” I cannot support an [artist/lawyer’s] sleazy position that re-recording entitles her to royalty bucks attributed to the arrangement.

    I live in my own apartment building.
    I have a perpetual lease, i.e. with my RE corp.
    My corp sells the building to you, and I start paying you rent.
    I fix-up my suite, and start renting it out, at a profit, to another.

    When it comes to a new version of the song and said performing artist, the financial terms of the original deal, i.e. with her ex-record company, should always apply.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  134. Muggles says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    It’s one thing to sell your bakery and (despite a non-compete) open up a coffee shop, across the street, that incidentally sells pastries. It’s quite another to set-up a bakery with essentially the same name and menu.

    Yes, that’s why there are non compete clauses.

    With music and the various elements that go into that type of property, there are separate segments to that which are bundled into contracts.

    Swift could re-record compositions she already owned since she would still presumably receive royalties from the new company that bought those rights. But she was entitled to royalties.

    If she re-records she pays herself royalties again (depending on how her personal ownership of the new stuff is legally set up) but has to hire new musicians/studios/arrangers/producers/etc. and do any new product distribution herself (much easier in the streaming reality.)

    I’m sure the details are spelled out in the contracts. There is a lot of past litigation about music rights. Taylor herself was recently sued for using “the same” or similar phrases in one of her songs which someone else claimed to have originally authored. That is as yet unresolved.

  135. “And in a sad reflection of the state of the world, apart from those exceptions, the list is all older white men…”

    That’s the fault of capitalism. A centrally planned command economy would produce more just outcomes and better music. Have a listen:

  136. @Muggles

    I wonder about Taylor’s love life. She has had some very public romances. And in a sad reflection of the state of the world,the list is all older white men…Well,except for Conor Kennedy.

  137. Muggles says:
    @J.Ross

    Music industry and fine art dealing have laws and practices that were essentially designed to generate lawyer jokes. They don’t work like real businesses. They get away with this because of massive amounts of money.

    You seem pretty naive about “real businesses.”

    Each kind has its own unique litigation problems.

    In an “original creation” business you have issues with the creators.

    But say, in oil & gas (something I know something about in detail) there is far more litigation due to the complications of getting minerals out of the ground and sent off elsewhere. Who owns what, when, for how long, how to split the pie, etc.

    You don’t hear about the non entertainment litigation because, aside from the participants, who cares?

    There is always litigation when there is “massive amounts of money” involved.

    Lawyers have to get paid somehow. There are probably more government funded lawyers than anywhere else. The money the government steals from you and me pays for a lot of drone attorneys.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  138. JMcG says:
    @Che Blutarsky

    We are brothers from another mother. Boy, that’s a great song!

  139. @Occasional lurker

    I wish I could agree with you about Mitchell. While she showed great promise early in her career (Urge for Going), IMO she blew it by becoming a narcissist

  140. The trap is for all future artists. Every musical piece is composed of fragments that have probably been used before. If every new piece of music can near instantaneously be compared to every other piece of music ever created then new artists will be left with two choices. Sign up to an intellectual property protection racket or walk away from the industry.

  141. @Muggles

    Swift could re-record compositions she already owned ..

    As I understand copyrighted music, the law allows anyone to make commercial use of it so long as they pay the toll. Logically, for purposes of re-recording her own [album], Taylor counts as an “anyone”. Her ex-record company redistributes the toll \$ and nets the same amount as had the artist been someone else.

    It’s still sleazy.

    For all we know, there are all sorts of little people who depend on sales of the original album for money or exposure, e.g. the names on the credits. Taylor is not going to contentiously track them all down and satisfy them. Maybe the record company was counting on sales of that album to help amortize the cost of its press/machinery? If Taylor feels that the new arrangement is “better”, then she should have recorded it during the sessions for the original. Nobody wants to partner with someone who’s in it for themself.

    My strong belief is that copyright protection is totally rigged (overly lengthy) to begin with. By the time the original artist re-records the album, the IP should have already passed into the public domain.

  142. Pepe 79 says:
    @Anonymous

    My father said the same thing about the Beatles as he was tossing out my Beatles bobble heads. “In 6 months nobody will remember who the Beatles are.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  143. @Occasional lurker

    I’d put John Prine aboue her when it comes to song writing any day.

    • Thanks: JMcG
    • Replies: @Old Prude
  144. J.Ross says:
    @Muggles

    In art, you just make up a value, and the court doesn’t laugh at you. It laughs at the earlier value you gave to the owner to be able to legally steal their art. In music you have things like Blondie contractually obligated to crank out an impossible quantity of original albums per month, because music is this nightmare marriage of literate operators with idealistic kids.

  145. @Chris Mallory

    A Duet of Good vs. Evil: Lillian Gish vs. Robert Mitchum

    (I couldn’t get the video to show up.)

    Unfortunately, in the real case this picture was based on, nobody was able to save the children. There was no real-life Rachel Cooper (Gish).

    Herman Drenth, aka Harry F. Powers (“Harry Powell” in the novel and picture).

    Drenth/Powers’ real known victims: Aster Eicher, 50, and her children Greta, 14; Harry, 12; and Anabel, 9; and Dorothy Lemke, 50. He was believed to have murdered as many as 50 victims, mostly widows seeking to remarry, who had responded to his “lonely hearts” ads.

    Since we still had a criminal justice system in those days, the only earthly justice possible was meted out to Drenth/Powers: Execution (by hanging) on March 18, 1932.

    https://murderpedia.org/male.P/p/powers-harry.htm

    Bob Mitchum cut a couple of successful albums. The man could sing.

  146. Anonymous[331] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pepe 79

    The Beatles *had* talent.

    Kanye West, Jay Zee and all the rest of those black talkers do not have talent.

    It is as simple as that, and this and not ‘trendiness’ will judge the future reaction to their output.

  147. @Muggles

    most modern musicians made most of their money from concerts where they receive the lions share of profits

    Once upon a time it was the opposite, as the concerts themselves broke even, but were used to promote album sales.

  148. @johnmark7

    How many hits did Bruce ever have? 2 or 3 at best

    Despite being from New Jersey, I’m not the biggest Bruce fan. Nevertheless, your statement is objectively false. He hasn’t written a hit song in over 25 years, but when he was very popular, his songs were hits. I can think of at least a dozen he has written.

  149. @Mr Mox

    Blinded By The Light is the only song written by Bruce to reach number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, but it was the Manfred Mann’s Earth Band version that did so in 1977.

  150. Old Prude says:
    @Mr Mox

    There are covers of Atlantic City, Highway Patrolman, and Valentines Day. And no one has mentioned Because the Night, without which Patti Smith would just be a scrawny forgotten footnote.

  151. Old Prude says:
    @Sick 'n Tired

    John Prine’s lyrics are just cutesy non-sequitors. Guy Clark wrote songs with lyrics that not only make sense, but surprise and thrill with their originality and craft. Prines songs are like modern art: All originality and no skill.

    • Disagree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Hibernian
  152. @Alden

    You cannot compare her with Hildegard, who was a polymath genius.

    • Replies: @Alden
  153. @JosephD

    “Under the Bridge” and “Dani California” are decent. But that could just be nostalgia.

    Nostalgia is lucrative though. Your grandfather listened to Tommy Dorsey and the Andrews Sisters, which were the RHCP of his youth.

    My guess is that the labels have some next step in music planned, accounting for them buying up all of the musical catalogs of musicians well past their peaks. Maybe it’ll be a new format, where everybody is going to have to buy the music all over again in order to listen to it (i.e., cassette tapes to CDs). I think they take the position that the mp3 that you bought is a revocable “license” to the music which they can end (by removing the track from your iTunes or similar when it connects online for a totally necessary software upgrade).

  154. Anonymous[786] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    British live shows of that era were rarely videotaped. When shows were taped, the tapes were usually wiped after a period of time.

    This was because of powerful broadcast unions that opposed the rebroadcasting of shows. If a British broadcaster wanted to repeat a show, they had to remake it from scratch, rehiring all of the same cast and crew a second time.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  155. The only Bruce song with musical value is NYC Serenade. The Sancious improv-intro was excellent.

  156. @johnmark7

    One of Bruce’s best songs is All That Heaven Will Allow done beautifully by The Mavericks. Bruce’s acoustic version, OTOH, sounds like a funeral dirge.

  157. Alden says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I don’t know much about either than their musician and composing ability. I’ll check out Hildegard

  158. J.Ross says:
    @Anonymous

    Two pieces of trivia from the Avengers illustrate this: the first is that a significant minority of Avengers episodes are permanently lost, except one discovered on a very old Californian university tape. The other is that if you watch the surviving episodes in order you will notice brazen re-performance of essentially the same episode. I remember this with the “dog funeral” episode and there may be more.
    Probably the best color episodes were the spotlight from Venus (“I plump for gas”), the KGB guy smitten with Western luxury (“Correct Way To Kill”), and the Batman parody/tribute (Diana Rigg, on the ceiling. Not wearing a skirt of course). And the train assassination one (“We will assassinate your prime minister!” “My prime minister? What makes you think I voted for him?”) And the “ghosts turn out to be the European common market” one, with Steamhammer Sam. None of those were redone.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  159. David says:
    @David Davenport

    Greensleeves is written to a prostitute. The green on her sleeves comes from reclining in the grass and propping herself up on her elbows.

  160. Brutusale says:
    @ganderson

    She’s the total package. I respect Liam Neeson even more now after finding out about his four-year affair with Mirren.

    The story Neeson tells about first meeting her at 3:50:

  161. Brutusale says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    It really makes me laugh when I hear a young actress, like the twit who played the dragon queen in Game of Thrones, say, after spending a good bit of screen time during first season of the series naked or nearly so, that she’s done doing nude scenes for the sake of her career.

    The we have Dame Helen, with roles like the one you mentioned or in Age of Consent, where she was wearing her birthday suit for about a quarter of the film. It really ruined her career!

    Young Helen was a peach!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  162. boocat says:
    @Joe Stalin

    I have never heard this. Thanks for posting it, Mr. Stalin.

  163. Jack D says:
    @J.Ross

    You have to distinguish between the early episodes, which were recorded in B&W on UK standard videotape and shown only in the UK (those are the ones that are lost) and the later ones that were filmed on 35mm film in color because they had a contract to show them in the US.

    As far as I am concerned, Diana Rigg is the one who makes the show worth watching so the loss of the earlier episodes (before her character was introduced) are no great loss.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  164. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    True. The Honor Blackman episodes are worth a look too. But in addition to color and medium, it has to be added that the earliest episodes are a different show in character. Rigg-era Avengers (which is usually what people mean when they talk about loving the show, mostly color but Rigg did start in black and white) is campy yet intelligently written, supremely witty, and gently satirical about the UK losing great power status. The earliest episodes, before the addition of a female sidekick, were attempting to be a serious spy action show. Not really such a loss.

  165. J.Ross says:
    @Brutusale

    The rules are different, or the wider situation is. For Helen’s generation, there was a relaxation from a previous order of rules, which meant that both not everyone was screamingly fat and shrouded in tattoos, and that a woman employing her appeal was liberating or empowering. Most importantly for voluntary female sexual display, there were men around (targets or not, that doesn’t matter here) with flat stomachs, good jawlines, heterosexual voices, and manly costume. Each of these good things, which originate in a strict regime of rules, has burst like a rotting animal’s bloated belly into horror and chaos.

  166. Hibernian says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    It’s nice that Pärt composed a piece honoring St Cecilia, the patroness of music.

    As did Paul Simon. One line references two Mayors of Chicago.

    • Replies: @The Ringmaster
  167. Hibernian says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    Looks like a case where the sharp practices of the artist cancel out the sharp practices of the promoters. More power to the artists who do this. I’m

    sure

    the labels are scrupulous in their accounting practices WRT to the promotional expenses. In this case maybe they were since her Dad owned a major share of the company. It’s sad that this involved family although I’m not aware of any Spears family type public conflict in this instance.

  168. Hibernian says:
    @Old Prude

    His entire schtick is having been an Appalachian kid in Chicago. (Now all Black Maywood, former company town of American Can.)

  169. Down to the River has got nothing on Down By the River.

  170. @Hibernian

    “As did Paul Simon. One line references two Mayors of Chicago.”

    You’re shakin my confidence Daley?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  171. @Joe Stalin

    I’m picturing Doris Day with a realistic electric tick. Thankyou, and my wife agrees.

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