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UNC Journalism School Has Accreditation Downgraded for Not Instantly Offering Tenure to a Crank Amateur Historian
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Academic accreditation is a weapon of mass destruction in maintaining the hegemony of the woke.

For example, the U of North Carolina’s journalism school has had its accreditation downgraded for not immediately offering tenure to crank amateur historian Nikole “1619” Hannah-Jones. From Insight into Diversity:

UNC Journalism School Downgraded to Provisional Accreditation in the Wake of DEI Concerns
By INSIGHT Staff – May 4, 2022

The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC) recently voted to downgrade the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill’s Hussman School of Journalism and Media to “provisional accreditation” status, according to an email written by Interim Dean Heidi Hennink-Kaminski to school faculty.

The change is due to the ACEJMC’s concerns regarding diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) at the school, especially in the wake of journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones turning down a tenured position because of administrative controversy surrounding her hiring. In 2021, Hannah-Jones was hired as the Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism but was originally only offered a five-year contract instead of tenure by the UNC Board of Trustees. Despite later receiving a tenure offer, Hannah-Jones decided to take the same position at Howard University instead. The ACEJMC determined that this high-profile incident was evidence of significant DEI issues within the school that warranted reevaluation of its accreditation.

“[T]he UNC Hussman School is dealing with an existential crisis both internally and externally,” the ACEJMC wrote. “The [Hannah-Jones] controversy… exposed long-standing problems.”

 
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  1. Heidi?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    Heidi?


    It's a form of Alice. Really-- same root.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @Alden
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    It was a popular name for girls at one time. It’s often possible to determine a woman’s birth within about 5 years just by her name. For instance, I knew Hillary Clinton was about my age as soon as I heard the name.

    , @Muggles
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    It's the hyphenated last names that's the tell.

    While there may be exceptions to this, say people from aristocratic type families in England, or in some cases, Mexico and S. America where tacking on more names is a cultural practice. In the US having the two names connected is usually a sign of an aggressive leftist woman and her meekly compliant husband.

    Or same sex partners.

    You find a lot of women with that in HR departments, i.e. Personnel. As in. "no, you look like an Alpha male and we're not hiring those now."

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse, @Art Deco

  2. the underlying issue here is the University violating the taboo against identifying specific Negroes who have benefited from affirmative action and are therefore incompetent

  3. Clyde says:

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Dean+Heidi+Hennink-Kaminski&form=HDRSC2&first=1&tsc=ImageHoverTitle

    She/Heidi is in my hot take and like column. In contrast to the eternally fugly, and the self clown red behaired Nicole (appropriated name) whatever. Heidi is prolly gay but under the correct regime here she would be putting out righteously.

    • LOL: bomag
  4. Well, she would teach her students to report the Narrative, not the facts.

    • Agree: bomag
  5. Pixo says:

    I’d like to see Ron DeSantis, or any other gov who wants my primary vote, take an ax to higher ed.

    Eliminating all humanities and social sciences graduate programs and all gender/race studies classes completely is a good start.

    These are all full time leftists on the government payroll.

    Next eliminate completely state ed schools, and ban all districts from paying teachers with graduate degrees more than BAs.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Pixo

    Slight quibble here, Pixo: You de-fund the Ed Schools first, because that is most important, then the journalism schools, then the humanities departments that end with "Studies", ... well, that's a start, anyway.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @Pixo


    I’d like to see Ron DeSantis, or any other gov who wants my primary vote, take an ax to higher ed.
     
    Given that DeSantis would almost certainly be nothing on the political scene except for first going to Yale for a history degree, which he taught at a prep school for a year, and then getting a law degree from Harvard, this strikes me as unlikely. Although as Achmed E. Newman points out ed schools should be the highest priority target, and they're notorious in being low quality.

    I'm not sure the existing system can be reformed, at least not without some "salt the earth" style punishment of some of the worst and most conspicuous offenders, which would also include accreditation bodies like this one which as I previously noted in one of the recent education topics are some of the most powerful forces in pushing American higher education to the left. Very conspicuous punishment like Taliban style physical destruction of Harvard Yard (after the books are confiscated from the libraries in it). I think we'll need a Pareto style circulation of elite, without the new elite coming from the same set of schools.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Pop Warner
    @Pixo

    You're ultimately going after the wrong targets. The true rot in the universities is the bloated administration that outnumbers faculty at most schools. These bureaucrats protect the shitty professors and use the instruments of power to punish dissenters. They are also a big part of why tuition has increased so much; admin is the only thing that has increased relative to tuition. And the top admin get cushy salaries, especially for Public employees. Most of them need to be laid off, especially the DIE officers.

    When I was in college, I looked up the staff at my schools diversity office. They had two dozen paid employees. And that was a decade ago, no doubt that number has doubled since. These are the people who justify tuition increases, and these are the people making universities worse. Start with the bureaucracy, and fixing the other problems will get a lot easier.

    , @Seneca44
    @Pixo

    Since the necessary journalism workforce has been literally decimated by e-periodicals which pay pretty close to nil, perhaps these unis should dump journalism majors. I know, I know—fat chance of sending the profs to the unemployment line.

    Ms. Jones was wise to choose Howard since they will take a lot longer to see through her grift.

  6. @Bardon Kaldlan
    Heidi?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Muggles

    Heidi?

    It’s a form of Alice. Really– same root.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Reg Cæsar

    It’s a form of Alice. Really– same root.

    Not a form of Karen?

  7. Amigos, Sailerinos. No me gusta.

    • Thanks: Alden
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Mr. Walker, though I agree to an extent and love that bee, I'd say this:

    The open border IS the most important problem we have and the most threatening one to the existence of America NINO (Not In Name Only). However, one can multitask and try to fathom the (expected, I will add) economic disaster and the increasing black crime at the same time. There is even some relation too in that the latter 2 are partially results of the former 1.

    That Ukraine/Russia war is indeed a big distraction, I think purposefully, as was the Kung Flu PanicFest to an even greater degree.

    On that note, I will praise Mr. Sailer for NOT fixating on the Ukraine/Russia War* as he did on the Kung Flu PanicFest for months. Don't let them distract you.

    .

    * There was a little bit of that, but only for a short while.

    , @AnotherDad
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Exactly. The war against America/Americans is being waged through the marionette Biden by the usual suspects, his patrons and handlers.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  8. A journalism school. Really.

    I believe that accreditation has something to do with being pre-qualified to leech tax dollars. In the US, school accreditation means that the institution has an adequate number of handicap parking spaces, has implemented policies to combat climate change, etc. I once witnessed an accreditation committee being led around campus. The group looked like a gathering of the geezer, NY Democratic Socialists Club.

    Btw, I am so sick and tired of rich communists who buy perpetual naming rights to public buildings. Worse, when public buildings are named after politicians. (Those guys certainly never gave a dime of their own money.) But it’s most disturbing when the miserable, politician-honoree was the leading voice, in this country, for rounding up loyal, coastal Japanese-AMERICANS and putting them in inland prison camps. I’m talking about progressive champion and California favorite son, Earl Warren. The State of CA has roads, public schools, and even a UCSD college named after him.

  9. @Pixo
    I’d like to see Ron DeSantis, or any other gov who wants my primary vote, take an ax to higher ed.

    Eliminating all humanities and social sciences graduate programs and all gender/race studies classes completely is a good start.

    These are all full time leftists on the government payroll.

    Next eliminate completely state ed schools, and ban all districts from paying teachers with graduate degrees more than BAs.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @That Would Be Telling, @Pop Warner, @Seneca44

    Slight quibble here, Pixo: You de-fund the Ed Schools first, because that is most important, then the journalism schools, then the humanities departments that end with “Studies”, … well, that’s a start, anyway.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Achmed E. Newman

    If our side had intellect we'd handle the student loan situation so as to win over indebted students while using a non-forgiveness, non-bailout deliberate bath to crash the schools into horrified alertness, forcing them to jettison woke and cling bitterly to stuff that led to a career.

  10. I have a journalism degree. Students and professors in journalism schools are overwhelmingly liberal. I can’t remember running into a conservative or libertarian the whole time I was majoring in journalism. I felt intellectually lonely and out of place and had a low opinion of the intelligence of my professors and fellow students. When I worked on the student newspaper, I especially hated my long haired, pot smoking, sandal wearing hippie editor. In addition to being a right winger who disliked hippies, I played bass guitar in a punk rock band and all the punk rockers I hung out with hated hippies too. I decided I didn’t want to spend my whole life around people like that and switched into working with computerized accounting systems.

    It would be difficult for a non-liberal to get high grades in journalism school that would lead to a high paying journalism job. I took an editorial writing course where we had to write 12 editorials. As an experiment, I turned in 6 of them written from a liberal point of view and 6 from a conservative point of view. I got an “A” grade on the left slanted ones and “D” and even one “F” on the right slanted ones. At the end of the course my professor said I could be quite good but was very inconsistent. He never figured out what I had been doing and to him “good” was just being a conformist parroting liberal talking points. Only people like that, with a few exceptions, could have a successful mainstream journalism career. As bad as it was then, it would be even worse now with pressure to hire affirmative action hires like Nikole Hannah-Jones.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Mark G.

    You made the right choice leaving.

    Journalism used to be a job filled with hard-bitten men with real life experiences who could write simply and directly. It wasn’t a profession, just a job.

    Say what you will about the humanities, in history, English, and philosophy one must at least master a body of knowledge bigger and wider than the present, and gain some measure of competence in a specific field. Journalism majors know nothing and grow dumber over time.

    Replies: @NOTA, @Art Deco, @International Jew

  11. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Pixo

    Slight quibble here, Pixo: You de-fund the Ed Schools first, because that is most important, then the journalism schools, then the humanities departments that end with "Studies", ... well, that's a start, anyway.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    If our side had intellect we’d handle the student loan situation so as to win over indebted students while using a non-forgiveness, non-bailout deliberate bath to crash the schools into horrified alertness, forcing them to jettison woke and cling bitterly to stuff that led to a career.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
  12. SFG says:

    This is more serious than people seem to realize. This means they are willing to use de accreditation (which would make your degree worthless) against schools that step out of line. Forget that University of Austin nobody knows if will exist, they could use this against Christian schools or even liberal schools that still respect free speech like the University of Chicago.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @SFG

    That's why the whole edifice of higher education needs to be imploded, SFG. The only things keeping it going is Feral Gov't guaranteed loan money, the lack of other methods (thanks to SCROTUS) of measuring prospective employee intelligence, and most American families' expectation of 4 years of partying and fun being a birthright and an expected phase of life.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @Hibernian
    @SFG


    ...liberal schools that still respect free speech like the University of Chicago.
     
    That's become questionable in recent years.

    Replies: @SFG

    , @NOTA
    @SFG

    If the other colleges had any sense, they would push back massively on this, because it is a massive threat to their freedom of action, and it's happening to a highly-regarded university.

  13. @SFG
    This is more serious than people seem to realize. This means they are willing to use de accreditation (which would make your degree worthless) against schools that step out of line. Forget that University of Austin nobody knows if will exist, they could use this against Christian schools or even liberal schools that still respect free speech like the University of Chicago.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Hibernian, @NOTA

    That’s why the whole edifice of higher education needs to be imploded, SFG. The only things keeping it going is Feral Gov’t guaranteed loan money, the lack of other methods (thanks to SCROTUS) of measuring prospective employee intelligence, and most American families’ expectation of 4 years of partying and fun being a birthright and an expected phase of life.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I mean, I agree it’s very bad. I’m just not sure how conservatives are going to build up a multibillion dollar research infrastructure from scratch. Odious as a lot of these studies programs are there is a lot of unprofitable but useful basic sciences research still being done by universities.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  14. “crank amateur historian Nikole “1619” Hannah-Jones. ”

    More like fake historian. To call her an amateur is an insult to amateurs.

  15. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/USTechWorkers/status/1522785953726619649

    Amigos, Sailerinos. No me gusta.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KYS6xeoBnc

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad

    Mr. Walker, though I agree to an extent and love that bee, I’d say this:

    The open border IS the most important problem we have and the most threatening one to the existence of America NINO (Not In Name Only). However, one can multitask and try to fathom the (expected, I will add) economic disaster and the increasing black crime at the same time. There is even some relation too in that the latter 2 are partially results of the former 1.

    That Ukraine/Russia war is indeed a big distraction, I think purposefully, as was the Kung Flu PanicFest to an even greater degree.

    On that note, I will praise Mr. Sailer for NOT fixating on the Ukraine/Russia War* as he did on the Kung Flu PanicFest for months. Don’t let them distract you.

    .

    * There was a little bit of that, but only for a short while.

  16. The current head of the ACEJMC Executive Committee, Patricia Thompson.

    https://jnm.olemiss.edu/2018/05/21/thompson-named-executive-director-of-accrediting-council-on-education-in-journalism-and-mass-communications/

    There are only two other subordinate members, both men one of whom has an Indian surname.

    http://www.acejmc.org/about/executive-committee/

    And here is the ‘Accrediting Committee’.

    http://www.acejmc.org/about/committee-members/

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Altai

    Gee having minorities in power with an ideology that promotes minority hostility ... what could go wrong?

  17. This is what life in a totalitarian society looks like.

    • Agree: J.Ross
  18. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/USTechWorkers/status/1522785953726619649

    Amigos, Sailerinos. No me gusta.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KYS6xeoBnc

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @AnotherDad

    Exactly. The war against America/Americans is being waged through the marionette Biden by the usual suspects, his patrons and handlers.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    VDare's A.W. Morgan wrote yesterday - Great Replacement Update: DHS Has Released 836,000 Illegals Into U.S. Since Biden Took Office.


    During that powwow [Fox News Sunday], Mayorkas confessed that the regime has released 836,000 illegals since January 2021.

    “That matches your numbers roughly?” Baier asked.

    “I believe so,” Mayorkas replied.

    Baier noted the obvious: That figure is with Title 42 expulsions.
     

    Title 42 is set to be un-enforced starting May 23rd.

    None of these numbers count illegal aliens who weren't caught, be they Hispanics, Africans, etc. across the southern border or Chinese and other illegals through airports-of-entry via corrupt immigration officials.

    Replies: @Alden, @bomag

  19. @Altai
    The current head of the ACEJMC Executive Committee, Patricia Thompson.

    https://masterimc.olemiss.edu/files/2018/06/Thompson.jpg

    https://jnm.olemiss.edu/2018/05/21/thompson-named-executive-director-of-accrediting-council-on-education-in-journalism-and-mass-communications/

    There are only two other subordinate members, both men one of whom has an Indian surname.

    http://www.acejmc.org/about/executive-committee/

    And here is the 'Accrediting Committee'.

    http://www.acejmc.org/about/committee-members/

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Gee having minorities in power with an ideology that promotes minority hostility … what could go wrong?

  20. @AnotherDad
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Exactly. The war against America/Americans is being waged through the marionette Biden by the usual suspects, his patrons and handlers.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    VDare’s A.W. Morgan wrote yesterday – Great Replacement Update: DHS Has Released 836,000 Illegals Into U.S. Since Biden Took Office.

    During that powwow [Fox News Sunday], Mayorkas confessed that the regime has released 836,000 illegals since January 2021.

    “That matches your numbers roughly?” Baier asked.

    “I believe so,” Mayorkas replied.

    Baier noted the obvious: That figure is with Title 42 expulsions.

    Title 42 is set to be un-enforced starting May 23rd.

    None of these numbers count illegal aliens who weren’t caught, be they Hispanics, Africans, etc. across the southern border or Chinese and other illegals through airports-of-entry via corrupt immigration officials.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Mayorkas every single time

    , @bomag
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes.

    And I wonder how many were caught, but released as having some inchoate legal excuse: fake docs; family connection; mouthed the right words; paperwork quota met for the day.

  21. @Bardon Kaldlan
    Heidi?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Muggles

    It was a popular name for girls at one time. It’s often possible to determine a woman’s birth within about 5 years just by her name. For instance, I knew Hillary Clinton was about my age as soon as I heard the name.

  22. There are only two other subordinate members, both men one of whom has an Indian surname.

    The guy with the Indian surname, Peter Bhatia, is the President of that outfit, and so, I’m assuming he’s actually her boss.

    He is the editor of a once great newspaper, the Detroit Free Press but more to the point, he’s one of the two least South Asian looking guys with a South Asian surname that I’ve seen.

    He got his undergraduate degree from Stanford University five decades ago, and I’m going to assume that he’s descended from the Sikhs who settled in the Sacramento Valley more than a century ago—because the other guy I’ve met who looked white, like he does, was descended from them.

    • Thanks: That Would Be Telling
  23. So Hannah-Jones takes her act to Howard, not Harvard, as I first thought. Good for Howard, she can teach all things black to blacks. How many Whites on Howard’s faculty, or doesn’t that matter? Wait, I think I answered that question.

  24. One of the biggest problems now is that wokeness tends to be particularly concentrated in accrediting organizations (and has been for a long time — aggressive affirmative action has been a de facto requirement for law school accreditation for 20 years).

  25. Alden says:

    There’s an article by Ron UNZ about the ongoing lawsuit against Harvard by Asians discriminated against in favor of blacks. Asian political party affiliation came up. All the out of touch codgers kept citing that in some elections Asians voted Republican back in the 1990s. And it’s surprising they switched to Democrats in the last 25 years. Same old same old Jared Taylor UNZ thing. Asians are natural conservatives why won’t they ally with White conservatives,

    To my mind, it’s the education system that did it. Asians kids go to school and are indoctrinated with liberal propaganda from age 5 till they finish. That has to have some effect. From observing what was preached when I worked at UCLA I can tell you, it’s non stop liberal propaganda. The public school system is a democrat party indoctrination system. So is the private school system. And anti White propaganda starts in kindergarten.

  26. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    VDare's A.W. Morgan wrote yesterday - Great Replacement Update: DHS Has Released 836,000 Illegals Into U.S. Since Biden Took Office.


    During that powwow [Fox News Sunday], Mayorkas confessed that the regime has released 836,000 illegals since January 2021.

    “That matches your numbers roughly?” Baier asked.

    “I believe so,” Mayorkas replied.

    Baier noted the obvious: That figure is with Title 42 expulsions.
     

    Title 42 is set to be un-enforced starting May 23rd.

    None of these numbers count illegal aliens who weren't caught, be they Hispanics, Africans, etc. across the southern border or Chinese and other illegals through airports-of-entry via corrupt immigration officials.

    Replies: @Alden, @bomag

    Mayorkas every single time

  27. @Pixo
    I’d like to see Ron DeSantis, or any other gov who wants my primary vote, take an ax to higher ed.

    Eliminating all humanities and social sciences graduate programs and all gender/race studies classes completely is a good start.

    These are all full time leftists on the government payroll.

    Next eliminate completely state ed schools, and ban all districts from paying teachers with graduate degrees more than BAs.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @That Would Be Telling, @Pop Warner, @Seneca44

    I’d like to see Ron DeSantis, or any other gov who wants my primary vote, take an ax to higher ed.

    Given that DeSantis would almost certainly be nothing on the political scene except for first going to Yale for a history degree, which he taught at a prep school for a year, and then getting a law degree from Harvard, this strikes me as unlikely. Although as Achmed E. Newman points out ed schools should be the highest priority target, and they’re notorious in being low quality.

    I’m not sure the existing system can be reformed, at least not without some “salt the earth” style punishment of some of the worst and most conspicuous offenders, which would also include accreditation bodies like this one which as I previously noted in one of the recent education topics are some of the most powerful forces in pushing American higher education to the left. Very conspicuous punishment like Taliban style physical destruction of Harvard Yard (after the books are confiscated from the libraries in it). I think we’ll need a Pareto style circulation of elite, without the new elite coming from the same set of schools.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @That Would Be Telling

    Given that DeSantis would almost certainly be nothing on the political scene except for first going to Yale for a history degree, which he taught at a prep school for a year, and then getting a law degree from Harvard, this strikes me as unlikely.

    His Republican predecessor as Governor attended the University of Missouri - Kansas City and Southern Methodist's law school. The Ivy League constituency is a cargo cult. Note, deSantis grew up in an ordinary family in a provincial city, the sort of people about which fancy schools do not give a rip. He passed through their admissions screens anyway.

    He's something on the political scene because of his policy sense, skills at political tactics, and his talent for public relations.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  28. Minorities who’ve had some historic abuse at the hands of other peoples, are going to have a hard time being objective about both normal people and their own group’s experience, and so on average are going to be more biased and ergo crappier, less interesting historians.

    Even with smart people like Jews, this is a big problem. Deal honestly with the situation: That their game theory solution–a religiously hostile/separate ethnic group middle manning the normies–is bound to generate mutual hostility? Some Jews being smart and more naturally objective, less ethnocentric can do it. Most can’t, their narrative is psychologically too important.

    But blacks? Especially in the current environment. How many are going to do any history that’s worth a tinker’s dam?

    • Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost
    @AnotherDad

    This is a good point. I also think more intelligent people tend to be drawn to subjects of greater complexity; the less intelligent, to their own identity. The smartest Jewish scholars don’t do Holocaust studies. The smartest blacks don’t do black studies. Even among more conservative religious types, the better ones aren’t working on internal histories of their own denominations. The Great Awokening is dangerous for many reasons, but an unintended consequence will be that it will cut down all unique thinkers.

    Replies: @NOTA

  29. “[T]he UNC Hussman School is dealing with an existential crisis both internally and externally,” the ACEJMC wrote.

    Everything is an existential crisis for these neurotic busybodies. Maybe the AJEJMC should have its accreditation downgraded.

  30. @SFG
    This is more serious than people seem to realize. This means they are willing to use de accreditation (which would make your degree worthless) against schools that step out of line. Forget that University of Austin nobody knows if will exist, they could use this against Christian schools or even liberal schools that still respect free speech like the University of Chicago.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Hibernian, @NOTA

    …liberal schools that still respect free speech like the University of Chicago.

    That’s become questionable in recent years.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Hibernian

    Hm, what’s happened lately? I thought they were the last holdout.

    Replies: @Hibernian

  31. Sen. Jesse Helms used to call UNC “University of Negroes and Communists” for a reason…

  32. @Pixo
    I’d like to see Ron DeSantis, or any other gov who wants my primary vote, take an ax to higher ed.

    Eliminating all humanities and social sciences graduate programs and all gender/race studies classes completely is a good start.

    These are all full time leftists on the government payroll.

    Next eliminate completely state ed schools, and ban all districts from paying teachers with graduate degrees more than BAs.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @That Would Be Telling, @Pop Warner, @Seneca44

    You’re ultimately going after the wrong targets. The true rot in the universities is the bloated administration that outnumbers faculty at most schools. These bureaucrats protect the shitty professors and use the instruments of power to punish dissenters. They are also a big part of why tuition has increased so much; admin is the only thing that has increased relative to tuition. And the top admin get cushy salaries, especially for Public employees. Most of them need to be laid off, especially the DIE officers.

    When I was in college, I looked up the staff at my schools diversity office. They had two dozen paid employees. And that was a decade ago, no doubt that number has doubled since. These are the people who justify tuition increases, and these are the people making universities worse. Start with the bureaucracy, and fixing the other problems will get a lot easier.

  33. @Hibernian
    @SFG


    ...liberal schools that still respect free speech like the University of Chicago.
     
    That's become questionable in recent years.

    Replies: @SFG

    Hm, what’s happened lately? I thought they were the last holdout.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @SFG

    Dartmouth was at one time a holdout. If you go far enough back, Princeton. Public Us might give dissenter's some protection because thay can be sued based on the 14th Amendment. Not sure how much that happens in practice.

    Replies: @SFG

  34. @Mark G.
    I have a journalism degree. Students and professors in journalism schools are overwhelmingly liberal. I can't remember running into a conservative or libertarian the whole time I was majoring in journalism. I felt intellectually lonely and out of place and had a low opinion of the intelligence of my professors and fellow students. When I worked on the student newspaper, I especially hated my long haired, pot smoking, sandal wearing hippie editor. In addition to being a right winger who disliked hippies, I played bass guitar in a punk rock band and all the punk rockers I hung out with hated hippies too. I decided I didn't want to spend my whole life around people like that and switched into working with computerized accounting systems.

    It would be difficult for a non-liberal to get high grades in journalism school that would lead to a high paying journalism job. I took an editorial writing course where we had to write 12 editorials. As an experiment, I turned in 6 of them written from a liberal point of view and 6 from a conservative point of view. I got an "A" grade on the left slanted ones and "D" and even one "F" on the right slanted ones. At the end of the course my professor said I could be quite good but was very inconsistent. He never figured out what I had been doing and to him "good" was just being a conformist parroting liberal talking points. Only people like that, with a few exceptions, could have a successful mainstream journalism career. As bad as it was then, it would be even worse now with pressure to hire affirmative action hires like Nikole Hannah-Jones.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost

    You made the right choice leaving.

    Journalism used to be a job filled with hard-bitten men with real life experiences who could write simply and directly. It wasn’t a profession, just a job.

    Say what you will about the humanities, in history, English, and philosophy one must at least master a body of knowledge bigger and wider than the present, and gain some measure of competence in a specific field. Journalism majors know nothing and grow dumber over time.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Going into journalism as a field now seems like going into art history or something--a good choice for someone with a wealthy family or spouse who will support them, but not otherwise. I'm such an evil alt-right hbdist that I would advise upwardly mobile black kids at Howard to avoid studying journalism or black studies in favor of, say, nursing, education, business, accounting, computer programming, marketing, etc., so they can get a decent middle-class job and live a decent middle-class life, instead of entering a tournament field where they can make a good income if they land in the top 1%, and then spend the rest of their career fending off cutthroat rivals for their spot.

    OTOH, letting the accreditation organizations impose ideological conditions on the schools is a total disaster, and that org should find itself losing all its schools over the next few years.

    Replies: @Nachum

    , @Art Deco
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Journalism used to be a job filled with hard-bitten men with real life experiences who could write simply and directly. It wasn’t a profession, just a job.

    Maybe so. Cannot help but notice...

    1. H.L. Mencken. Had a high school diploma, quite atypical for someone of the 1880 cohort. Worked in the family business, then landed his first newspaper job at age 18.

    2. Louella Parsons. b. 1881, high school graduate, some college. Reporter from about age 25

    3. Clifton Daniel. b. 1912, baccalaureate degree. Already a reporter at age 27

    4. Edward R. Murrow. b. 1908, baccalaureate degree. Reporter from age 27

    5. Allan Drury. b. 1918, baccalaureate degree, reporter from age 22 (until he turned to novels)

    6. William L. Shirer. b. 1904, baccalaureate degree, reporter from age 21 (though often broke)

    7. Dave Garroway. b. 1913. baccalaureate degree. Radio announcer from age 25.

    8. Margaret Bourke-White. b. 1904. baccalaureate degree. Magazine photographer from age 25.

    9. Marguerite Higgins. b 1920. baccalaureate degree. Reporter from age 22


    (Possible counterpoints, Damon Runyon (b. 1880, left school at age 10) and James Kilgallen, b. 1888, left school at 14).

    , @International Jew
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    The elite papers and magazines don't hire from journalism schools anyway (same as Andover and Exeter don't hire out of Ed schools). So given that J schools exist to staff local papers, TV stations and trade journals, maybe a hack like Hannah-Nicole Jones is their ideal faculty member.

  35. @AnotherDad
    Minorities who've had some historic abuse at the hands of other peoples, are going to have a hard time being objective about both normal people and their own group's experience, and so on average are going to be more biased and ergo crappier, less interesting historians.

    Even with smart people like Jews, this is a big problem. Deal honestly with the situation: That their game theory solution--a religiously hostile/separate ethnic group middle manning the normies--is bound to generate mutual hostility? Some Jews being smart and more naturally objective, less ethnocentric can do it. Most can't, their narrative is psychologically too important.

    But blacks? Especially in the current environment. How many are going to do any history that's worth a tinker's dam?

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost

    This is a good point. I also think more intelligent people tend to be drawn to subjects of greater complexity; the less intelligent, to their own identity. The smartest Jewish scholars don’t do Holocaust studies. The smartest blacks don’t do black studies. Even among more conservative religious types, the better ones aren’t working on internal histories of their own denominations. The Great Awokening is dangerous for many reasons, but an unintended consequence will be that it will cut down all unique thinkers.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    I suspect (based on some stuff Thomas Sowell wrote) that affirmative action admissions cause blacks to end up in easier and less well-paid fields. The black kid who'd be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou will wash out of engineering at Stanford, because the competition is insanely tough. (Nearly all his white classmates at Mizzou would fare the same in that environment.). So the same kid goes to Mizzou and gets a civil engineering degree, followed by a nice middle-class life with a stable and valuable professional job building roads or buildings or something, or he goes to Stanford and ends up with a sociology degree and stuggles to piece together a middle-class income in any way other than becoming some kind of diversity bureaucrat.

    Overall, this has probably pushed black culture toward words and away from more practical fields, in ways that probably haven't been good for either blacks or the country overall. (Though I think blacks are somewhat skewed verbal in some of the same way that East Asians are somewhat skewed spatial, so there would probably always be more black wordcels than shape rotators.)

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  36. @That Would Be Telling
    @Pixo


    I’d like to see Ron DeSantis, or any other gov who wants my primary vote, take an ax to higher ed.
     
    Given that DeSantis would almost certainly be nothing on the political scene except for first going to Yale for a history degree, which he taught at a prep school for a year, and then getting a law degree from Harvard, this strikes me as unlikely. Although as Achmed E. Newman points out ed schools should be the highest priority target, and they're notorious in being low quality.

    I'm not sure the existing system can be reformed, at least not without some "salt the earth" style punishment of some of the worst and most conspicuous offenders, which would also include accreditation bodies like this one which as I previously noted in one of the recent education topics are some of the most powerful forces in pushing American higher education to the left. Very conspicuous punishment like Taliban style physical destruction of Harvard Yard (after the books are confiscated from the libraries in it). I think we'll need a Pareto style circulation of elite, without the new elite coming from the same set of schools.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Given that DeSantis would almost certainly be nothing on the political scene except for first going to Yale for a history degree, which he taught at a prep school for a year, and then getting a law degree from Harvard, this strikes me as unlikely.

    His Republican predecessor as Governor attended the University of Missouri – Kansas City and Southern Methodist’s law school. The Ivy League constituency is a cargo cult. Note, deSantis grew up in an ordinary family in a provincial city, the sort of people about which fancy schools do not give a rip. He passed through their admissions screens anyway.

    He’s something on the political scene because of his policy sense, skills at political tactics, and his talent for public relations.

    • Agree: David In TN
    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Art Deco


    His Republican predecessor as Governor attended the University of Missouri – Kansas City and Southern Methodist’s law school.
     
    I wasn't trying to say modest higher educations backgrounds make it impossible to rise to high offices but that was strongly implied; I'm mostly guessing that for DeSantis it made a very big difference, and that in aggregate this is generally true and more and more true.

    Correction would be welcome, and the best data might be on people who've had success from outside the Left's higher education hive mind, like graduates of Hillsdale or Liberty. But even then the latter is accredited by all the wrong organizations, although ABET is probably mostly harmless. The less ambitious Hillsdale also by one of the former regional accreditation entities, did not easily find or try to find out about program accreditations like the one here.

    Although neither's journalism programs are by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC) that's the topic of this discussion, while I note major well thought of ones I've already heard of like Columbia and UT Austin are. ACEJMC actually doesn't accredit all that many programs....

    (BTW, his Republican predecessor is awful. A gun grabber who also intervened in the Martin/Zimmerman case to make sure the latter would be persecuted. None of which the GOPe cares about, not just elevating him to Senator but quickly making him the chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, that's the important party organization that focuses on getting the correct Republican senators elected.)

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @bomag

  37. @SFG
    This is more serious than people seem to realize. This means they are willing to use de accreditation (which would make your degree worthless) against schools that step out of line. Forget that University of Austin nobody knows if will exist, they could use this against Christian schools or even liberal schools that still respect free speech like the University of Chicago.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Hibernian, @NOTA

    If the other colleges had any sense, they would push back massively on this, because it is a massive threat to their freedom of action, and it’s happening to a highly-regarded university.

  38. NOTA says:
    @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Mark G.

    You made the right choice leaving.

    Journalism used to be a job filled with hard-bitten men with real life experiences who could write simply and directly. It wasn’t a profession, just a job.

    Say what you will about the humanities, in history, English, and philosophy one must at least master a body of knowledge bigger and wider than the present, and gain some measure of competence in a specific field. Journalism majors know nothing and grow dumber over time.

    Replies: @NOTA, @Art Deco, @International Jew

    Going into journalism as a field now seems like going into art history or something–a good choice for someone with a wealthy family or spouse who will support them, but not otherwise. I’m such an evil alt-right hbdist that I would advise upwardly mobile black kids at Howard to avoid studying journalism or black studies in favor of, say, nursing, education, business, accounting, computer programming, marketing, etc., so they can get a decent middle-class job and live a decent middle-class life, instead of entering a tournament field where they can make a good income if they land in the top 1%, and then spend the rest of their career fending off cutthroat rivals for their spot.

    OTOH, letting the accreditation organizations impose ideological conditions on the schools is a total disaster, and that org should find itself losing all its schools over the next few years.

    • Thanks: Inquiring Mind
    • Replies: @Nachum
    @NOTA

    The first episode of the new Star Trek series had a casual reference to the "Stanford Morehouse Epigenetics Program." It's a subtle little Woke nod to those who know.

    Of course, those who scoff at such things will also see the irony of it being epigenetics...

  39. @Bardon Kaldlan
    Heidi?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alden, @Muggles

    It’s the hyphenated last names that’s the tell.

    While there may be exceptions to this, say people from aristocratic type families in England, or in some cases, Mexico and S. America where tacking on more names is a cultural practice. In the US having the two names connected is usually a sign of an aggressive leftist woman and her meekly compliant husband.

    Or same sex partners.

    You find a lot of women with that in HR departments, i.e. Personnel. As in. “no, you look like an Alpha male and we’re not hiring those now.”

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
    @Muggles

    It's not just tacking on more surnames in Latin nations.

    It's a tradition that predates the current insanity.

    The second surname is the maternal surname (mother's maiden name).

    Coincidentally, being born a Jew is dependent on the mother being Jewish, as it is passed through the maternal lineage.

    Replies: @Nachum

    , @Art Deco
    @Muggles

    In the US having the two names connected is usually a sign of an aggressive leftist woman and her meekly compliant husband.

    Forty years ago. It suddenly dawned on women so disposed that their children would have to cut bait when the grandchildren were born. I know a family which had three sisters born during the years running from 1948 to 1957. Two of the children were born to 2d husbands at a time when hyphenation was much less fashionable, and received their father's name. Of the six children who were given hyphenated names, four ditched them around age 16.

  40. @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Mark G.

    You made the right choice leaving.

    Journalism used to be a job filled with hard-bitten men with real life experiences who could write simply and directly. It wasn’t a profession, just a job.

    Say what you will about the humanities, in history, English, and philosophy one must at least master a body of knowledge bigger and wider than the present, and gain some measure of competence in a specific field. Journalism majors know nothing and grow dumber over time.

    Replies: @NOTA, @Art Deco, @International Jew

    Journalism used to be a job filled with hard-bitten men with real life experiences who could write simply and directly. It wasn’t a profession, just a job.

    Maybe so. Cannot help but notice…

    1. H.L. Mencken. Had a high school diploma, quite atypical for someone of the 1880 cohort. Worked in the family business, then landed his first newspaper job at age 18.

    2. Louella Parsons. b. 1881, high school graduate, some college. Reporter from about age 25

    3. Clifton Daniel. b. 1912, baccalaureate degree. Already a reporter at age 27

    4. Edward R. Murrow. b. 1908, baccalaureate degree. Reporter from age 27

    5. Allan Drury. b. 1918, baccalaureate degree, reporter from age 22 (until he turned to novels)

    6. William L. Shirer. b. 1904, baccalaureate degree, reporter from age 21 (though often broke)

    7. Dave Garroway. b. 1913. baccalaureate degree. Radio announcer from age 25.

    8. Margaret Bourke-White. b. 1904. baccalaureate degree. Magazine photographer from age 25.

    9. Marguerite Higgins. b 1920. baccalaureate degree. Reporter from age 22

    (Possible counterpoints, Damon Runyon (b. 1880, left school at age 10) and James Kilgallen, b. 1888, left school at 14).

  41. NOTA says:
    @John Milton’s Ghost
    @AnotherDad

    This is a good point. I also think more intelligent people tend to be drawn to subjects of greater complexity; the less intelligent, to their own identity. The smartest Jewish scholars don’t do Holocaust studies. The smartest blacks don’t do black studies. Even among more conservative religious types, the better ones aren’t working on internal histories of their own denominations. The Great Awokening is dangerous for many reasons, but an unintended consequence will be that it will cut down all unique thinkers.

    Replies: @NOTA

    I suspect (based on some stuff Thomas Sowell wrote) that affirmative action admissions cause blacks to end up in easier and less well-paid fields. The black kid who’d be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou will wash out of engineering at Stanford, because the competition is insanely tough. (Nearly all his white classmates at Mizzou would fare the same in that environment.). So the same kid goes to Mizzou and gets a civil engineering degree, followed by a nice middle-class life with a stable and valuable professional job building roads or buildings or something, or he goes to Stanford and ends up with a sociology degree and stuggles to piece together a middle-class income in any way other than becoming some kind of diversity bureaucrat.

    Overall, this has probably pushed black culture toward words and away from more practical fields, in ways that probably haven’t been good for either blacks or the country overall. (Though I think blacks are somewhat skewed verbal in some of the same way that East Asians are somewhat skewed spatial, so there would probably always be more black wordcels than shape rotators.)

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @NOTA


    The black kid who’d be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou
     
    Let me finish the sentence. "The black kid who’d be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou doesn't exist."

    That's the real issue.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  42. @Art Deco
    @That Would Be Telling

    Given that DeSantis would almost certainly be nothing on the political scene except for first going to Yale for a history degree, which he taught at a prep school for a year, and then getting a law degree from Harvard, this strikes me as unlikely.

    His Republican predecessor as Governor attended the University of Missouri - Kansas City and Southern Methodist's law school. The Ivy League constituency is a cargo cult. Note, deSantis grew up in an ordinary family in a provincial city, the sort of people about which fancy schools do not give a rip. He passed through their admissions screens anyway.

    He's something on the political scene because of his policy sense, skills at political tactics, and his talent for public relations.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    His Republican predecessor as Governor attended the University of Missouri – Kansas City and Southern Methodist’s law school.

    I wasn’t trying to say modest higher educations backgrounds make it impossible to rise to high offices but that was strongly implied; I’m mostly guessing that for DeSantis it made a very big difference, and that in aggregate this is generally true and more and more true.

    Correction would be welcome, and the best data might be on people who’ve had success from outside the Left’s higher education hive mind, like graduates of Hillsdale or Liberty. But even then the latter is accredited by all the wrong organizations, although ABET is probably mostly harmless. The less ambitious Hillsdale also by one of the former regional accreditation entities, did not easily find or try to find out about program accreditations like the one here.

    Although neither’s journalism programs are by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC) that’s the topic of this discussion, while I note major well thought of ones I’ve already heard of like Columbia and UT Austin are. ACEJMC actually doesn’t accredit all that many programs….

    (BTW, his Republican predecessor is awful. A gun grabber who also intervened in the Martin/Zimmerman case to make sure the latter would be persecuted. None of which the GOPe cares about, not just elevating him to Senator but quickly making him the chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, that’s the important party organization that focuses on getting the correct Republican senators elected.)

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @That Would Be Telling

    his Republican predecessor is awful

    Personal styles aside, they're cookie-cutter GOPs. The current officeholder is spending more than his predecessor did. The job of the new guy is to make the old guy look good.

    Sleepy is better than anything we're ever going to get.

    , @bomag
    @That Would Be Telling

    The Ivies have a business model where they attract the ambitious and capable from across the spectrum, then take credit for the accomplishments.

    And at some point the elites have to police themselves. As far as Ivy grads rule the country, they have to get over the thrill of gaining more air speed by diving ever more steeply towards the ground.

  43. @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Mark G.

    You made the right choice leaving.

    Journalism used to be a job filled with hard-bitten men with real life experiences who could write simply and directly. It wasn’t a profession, just a job.

    Say what you will about the humanities, in history, English, and philosophy one must at least master a body of knowledge bigger and wider than the present, and gain some measure of competence in a specific field. Journalism majors know nothing and grow dumber over time.

    Replies: @NOTA, @Art Deco, @International Jew

    The elite papers and magazines don’t hire from journalism schools anyway (same as Andover and Exeter don’t hire out of Ed schools). So given that J schools exist to staff local papers, TV stations and trade journals, maybe a hack like Hannah-Nicole Jones is their ideal faculty member.

  44. @Muggles
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    It's the hyphenated last names that's the tell.

    While there may be exceptions to this, say people from aristocratic type families in England, or in some cases, Mexico and S. America where tacking on more names is a cultural practice. In the US having the two names connected is usually a sign of an aggressive leftist woman and her meekly compliant husband.

    Or same sex partners.

    You find a lot of women with that in HR departments, i.e. Personnel. As in. "no, you look like an Alpha male and we're not hiring those now."

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse, @Art Deco

    It’s not just tacking on more surnames in Latin nations.

    It’s a tradition that predates the current insanity.

    The second surname is the maternal surname (mother’s maiden name).

    Coincidentally, being born a Jew is dependent on the mother being Jewish, as it is passed through the maternal lineage.

    • Replies: @Nachum
    @SaneClownPosse

    Except in Judaism, tribal affiliation (which surnames sometimes reflect) is patrilineal.

    P.J. O'Rourke once had a book called "The Enemies List." One item was "Anyone with a hyphenated last name."

    Hannah-Jones goes even further than that, with her misspelled first name and the fact that her spouse is *also* hyphenated.

    My own wife kept her surname for no reason other than convenience; she thinks that hyphenation is silly.

    Of course, *non*-hyphenation is even more posh. Tom Wolfe:

    "The John Bradley Martins were latecomers from Troy, New York, who had inserted an invisible hyphen between the Bradley and the Martin and preferred to be known as the Bradley Martins, after the manner of the Gordon Walkers in England."

    Arthur Conan Doyle is a famous example of that. "Conan" was just his given middle name, but his wife and kids were all "Conan Doyle," and he's alphabetized under "C".

  45. @Muggles
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    It's the hyphenated last names that's the tell.

    While there may be exceptions to this, say people from aristocratic type families in England, or in some cases, Mexico and S. America where tacking on more names is a cultural practice. In the US having the two names connected is usually a sign of an aggressive leftist woman and her meekly compliant husband.

    Or same sex partners.

    You find a lot of women with that in HR departments, i.e. Personnel. As in. "no, you look like an Alpha male and we're not hiring those now."

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse, @Art Deco

    In the US having the two names connected is usually a sign of an aggressive leftist woman and her meekly compliant husband.

    Forty years ago. It suddenly dawned on women so disposed that their children would have to cut bait when the grandchildren were born. I know a family which had three sisters born during the years running from 1948 to 1957. Two of the children were born to 2d husbands at a time when hyphenation was much less fashionable, and received their father’s name. Of the six children who were given hyphenated names, four ditched them around age 16.

  46. @That Would Be Telling
    @Art Deco


    His Republican predecessor as Governor attended the University of Missouri – Kansas City and Southern Methodist’s law school.
     
    I wasn't trying to say modest higher educations backgrounds make it impossible to rise to high offices but that was strongly implied; I'm mostly guessing that for DeSantis it made a very big difference, and that in aggregate this is generally true and more and more true.

    Correction would be welcome, and the best data might be on people who've had success from outside the Left's higher education hive mind, like graduates of Hillsdale or Liberty. But even then the latter is accredited by all the wrong organizations, although ABET is probably mostly harmless. The less ambitious Hillsdale also by one of the former regional accreditation entities, did not easily find or try to find out about program accreditations like the one here.

    Although neither's journalism programs are by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC) that's the topic of this discussion, while I note major well thought of ones I've already heard of like Columbia and UT Austin are. ACEJMC actually doesn't accredit all that many programs....

    (BTW, his Republican predecessor is awful. A gun grabber who also intervened in the Martin/Zimmerman case to make sure the latter would be persecuted. None of which the GOPe cares about, not just elevating him to Senator but quickly making him the chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, that's the important party organization that focuses on getting the correct Republican senators elected.)

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @bomag

    his Republican predecessor is awful

    Personal styles aside, they’re cookie-cutter GOPs. The current officeholder is spending more than his predecessor did. The job of the new guy is to make the old guy look good.

    Sleepy is better than anything we’re ever going to get.

  47. @Pixo
    I’d like to see Ron DeSantis, or any other gov who wants my primary vote, take an ax to higher ed.

    Eliminating all humanities and social sciences graduate programs and all gender/race studies classes completely is a good start.

    These are all full time leftists on the government payroll.

    Next eliminate completely state ed schools, and ban all districts from paying teachers with graduate degrees more than BAs.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @That Would Be Telling, @Pop Warner, @Seneca44

    Since the necessary journalism workforce has been literally decimated by e-periodicals which pay pretty close to nil, perhaps these unis should dump journalism majors. I know, I know—fat chance of sending the profs to the unemployment line.

    Ms. Jones was wise to choose Howard since they will take a lot longer to see through her grift.

  48. @Reg Cæsar
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    Heidi?


    It's a form of Alice. Really-- same root.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    It’s a form of Alice. Really– same root.

    Not a form of Karen?

  49. @NOTA
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Going into journalism as a field now seems like going into art history or something--a good choice for someone with a wealthy family or spouse who will support them, but not otherwise. I'm such an evil alt-right hbdist that I would advise upwardly mobile black kids at Howard to avoid studying journalism or black studies in favor of, say, nursing, education, business, accounting, computer programming, marketing, etc., so they can get a decent middle-class job and live a decent middle-class life, instead of entering a tournament field where they can make a good income if they land in the top 1%, and then spend the rest of their career fending off cutthroat rivals for their spot.

    OTOH, letting the accreditation organizations impose ideological conditions on the schools is a total disaster, and that org should find itself losing all its schools over the next few years.

    Replies: @Nachum

    The first episode of the new Star Trek series had a casual reference to the “Stanford Morehouse Epigenetics Program.” It’s a subtle little Woke nod to those who know.

    Of course, those who scoff at such things will also see the irony of it being epigenetics…

  50. @SaneClownPosse
    @Muggles

    It's not just tacking on more surnames in Latin nations.

    It's a tradition that predates the current insanity.

    The second surname is the maternal surname (mother's maiden name).

    Coincidentally, being born a Jew is dependent on the mother being Jewish, as it is passed through the maternal lineage.

    Replies: @Nachum

    Except in Judaism, tribal affiliation (which surnames sometimes reflect) is patrilineal.

    P.J. O’Rourke once had a book called “The Enemies List.” One item was “Anyone with a hyphenated last name.”

    Hannah-Jones goes even further than that, with her misspelled first name and the fact that her spouse is *also* hyphenated.

    My own wife kept her surname for no reason other than convenience; she thinks that hyphenation is silly.

    Of course, *non*-hyphenation is even more posh. Tom Wolfe:

    “The John Bradley Martins were latecomers from Troy, New York, who had inserted an invisible hyphen between the Bradley and the Martin and preferred to be known as the Bradley Martins, after the manner of the Gordon Walkers in England.”

    Arthur Conan Doyle is a famous example of that. “Conan” was just his given middle name, but his wife and kids were all “Conan Doyle,” and he’s alphabetized under “C”.

  51. anonymous[470] • Disclaimer says:

    Like her or detest her, Hannah-Jones is one of the great historians of our time. She completely changed the way America sees itself. For almost 400 years, the Mayflower landing in 1620 was regarded as the founding myth. Now the American mainstream sees the landing of the Angolan slaves in 1619 as where the story of America begins. The notion of an American founded on original sin has pervasive consequences, most notably in border enforcement. Hannah-Jones is probably the only historian worth considering as one of the 100 most influential people in American history.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @anonymous

    Tiny, y u no sign yo post 2day???

    , @Jack Kennedy
    @anonymous

    da, comrade …. Putin/Xi agree

    , @bomag
    @anonymous

    She's not a historian. She's a political hack.

  52. @That Would Be Telling
    @Art Deco


    His Republican predecessor as Governor attended the University of Missouri – Kansas City and Southern Methodist’s law school.
     
    I wasn't trying to say modest higher educations backgrounds make it impossible to rise to high offices but that was strongly implied; I'm mostly guessing that for DeSantis it made a very big difference, and that in aggregate this is generally true and more and more true.

    Correction would be welcome, and the best data might be on people who've had success from outside the Left's higher education hive mind, like graduates of Hillsdale or Liberty. But even then the latter is accredited by all the wrong organizations, although ABET is probably mostly harmless. The less ambitious Hillsdale also by one of the former regional accreditation entities, did not easily find or try to find out about program accreditations like the one here.

    Although neither's journalism programs are by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC) that's the topic of this discussion, while I note major well thought of ones I've already heard of like Columbia and UT Austin are. ACEJMC actually doesn't accredit all that many programs....

    (BTW, his Republican predecessor is awful. A gun grabber who also intervened in the Martin/Zimmerman case to make sure the latter would be persecuted. None of which the GOPe cares about, not just elevating him to Senator but quickly making him the chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, that's the important party organization that focuses on getting the correct Republican senators elected.)

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @bomag

    The Ivies have a business model where they attract the ambitious and capable from across the spectrum, then take credit for the accomplishments.

    And at some point the elites have to police themselves. As far as Ivy grads rule the country, they have to get over the thrill of gaining more air speed by diving ever more steeply towards the ground.

  53. @Achmed E. Newman
    @AnotherDad

    VDare's A.W. Morgan wrote yesterday - Great Replacement Update: DHS Has Released 836,000 Illegals Into U.S. Since Biden Took Office.


    During that powwow [Fox News Sunday], Mayorkas confessed that the regime has released 836,000 illegals since January 2021.

    “That matches your numbers roughly?” Baier asked.

    “I believe so,” Mayorkas replied.

    Baier noted the obvious: That figure is with Title 42 expulsions.
     

    Title 42 is set to be un-enforced starting May 23rd.

    None of these numbers count illegal aliens who weren't caught, be they Hispanics, Africans, etc. across the southern border or Chinese and other illegals through airports-of-entry via corrupt immigration officials.

    Replies: @Alden, @bomag

    Yes.

    And I wonder how many were caught, but released as having some inchoate legal excuse: fake docs; family connection; mouthed the right words; paperwork quota met for the day.

  54. Interestingly, the ACEJMC did not try to discern if and why Hannah-Jones deserved tenure. They determined that she must have been tenure-worthy because – she got tenure at Howard University. So Howard is the gold standard, like Harvard.
    To be fair to Hannah-Jones, she did not pretend to be a historian. She applied as a journalist.
    To be fair to poor Howard, they could not afford to dismiss her. She brings 20 millions donor dollars with her.

  55. @anonymous
    Like her or detest her, Hannah-Jones is one of the great historians of our time. She completely changed the way America sees itself. For almost 400 years, the Mayflower landing in 1620 was regarded as the founding myth. Now the American mainstream sees the landing of the Angolan slaves in 1619 as where the story of America begins. The notion of an American founded on original sin has pervasive consequences, most notably in border enforcement. Hannah-Jones is probably the only historian worth considering as one of the 100 most influential people in American history.

    Replies: @Charon, @Jack Kennedy, @bomag

    Tiny, y u no sign yo post 2day???

  56. @SFG
    @Hibernian

    Hm, what’s happened lately? I thought they were the last holdout.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Dartmouth was at one time a holdout. If you go far enough back, Princeton. Public Us might give dissenter’s some protection because thay can be sued based on the 14th Amendment. Not sure how much that happens in practice.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Hibernian

    U of C’s actually private, despite its name. I was wondering if anything had happened lately there in particular.

  57. @NOTA
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    I suspect (based on some stuff Thomas Sowell wrote) that affirmative action admissions cause blacks to end up in easier and less well-paid fields. The black kid who'd be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou will wash out of engineering at Stanford, because the competition is insanely tough. (Nearly all his white classmates at Mizzou would fare the same in that environment.). So the same kid goes to Mizzou and gets a civil engineering degree, followed by a nice middle-class life with a stable and valuable professional job building roads or buildings or something, or he goes to Stanford and ends up with a sociology degree and stuggles to piece together a middle-class income in any way other than becoming some kind of diversity bureaucrat.

    Overall, this has probably pushed black culture toward words and away from more practical fields, in ways that probably haven't been good for either blacks or the country overall. (Though I think blacks are somewhat skewed verbal in some of the same way that East Asians are somewhat skewed spatial, so there would probably always be more black wordcels than shape rotators.)

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    The black kid who’d be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou

    Let me finish the sentence. “The black kid who’d be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou doesn’t exist.”

    That’s the real issue.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @AceDeuce


    “The black kid who’d be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou doesn’t exist.”
     
    He does exist if only because MIT turns out a number of good black engineering students per my direct observation. Also saw that with a couple from Howard University when I lived in the D.C. area, if you consider software engineering to be sufficiently real engineering

    So population distribution statistics say there are even more capable at the lower intensity level of Mizzou. There's enough it's criminal we create so many artificial failures out of 75% black students admitted to 99% institutions like Cornell as Thomas Sowell observed many decades ago while teaching there, or the Stanford of the example you're quoting.

    Thus I'd guess people like you disbelieve in the concept if for no other reason than that few can manage to downshift into a university that's at their level and then make a successful career of it, or recognize the con ahead of matriculation. I myself have only met one such black in my career (amusingly, he was extremely based, even more anti-union then myself because his father was in construction in Philadelphia, was part of the D.C. political social scene and personally attested to strong circumstantial evidence that Marion Barry was a drug fiend).
  58. @AceDeuce
    @NOTA


    The black kid who’d be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou
     
    Let me finish the sentence. "The black kid who’d be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou doesn't exist."

    That's the real issue.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    “The black kid who’d be a good solid engineering student at Mizzou doesn’t exist.”

    He does exist if only because MIT turns out a number of good black engineering students per my direct observation. Also saw that with a couple from Howard University when I lived in the D.C. area, if you consider software engineering to be sufficiently real engineering

    So population distribution statistics say there are even more capable at the lower intensity level of Mizzou. There’s enough it’s criminal we create so many artificial failures out of 75% black students admitted to 99% institutions like Cornell as Thomas Sowell observed many decades ago while teaching there, or the Stanford of the example you’re quoting.

    Thus I’d guess people like you disbelieve in the concept if for no other reason than that few can manage to downshift into a university that’s at their level and then make a successful career of it, or recognize the con ahead of matriculation. I myself have only met one such black in my career (amusingly, he was extremely based, even more anti-union then myself because his father was in construction in Philadelphia, was part of the D.C. political social scene and personally attested to strong circumstantial evidence that Marion Barry was a drug fiend).

  59. @anonymous
    Like her or detest her, Hannah-Jones is one of the great historians of our time. She completely changed the way America sees itself. For almost 400 years, the Mayflower landing in 1620 was regarded as the founding myth. Now the American mainstream sees the landing of the Angolan slaves in 1619 as where the story of America begins. The notion of an American founded on original sin has pervasive consequences, most notably in border enforcement. Hannah-Jones is probably the only historian worth considering as one of the 100 most influential people in American history.

    Replies: @Charon, @Jack Kennedy, @bomag

    da, comrade …. Putin/Xi agree

  60. @Hibernian
    @SFG

    Dartmouth was at one time a holdout. If you go far enough back, Princeton. Public Us might give dissenter's some protection because thay can be sued based on the 14th Amendment. Not sure how much that happens in practice.

    Replies: @SFG

    U of C’s actually private, despite its name. I was wondering if anything had happened lately there in particular.

  61. @anonymous
    Like her or detest her, Hannah-Jones is one of the great historians of our time. She completely changed the way America sees itself. For almost 400 years, the Mayflower landing in 1620 was regarded as the founding myth. Now the American mainstream sees the landing of the Angolan slaves in 1619 as where the story of America begins. The notion of an American founded on original sin has pervasive consequences, most notably in border enforcement. Hannah-Jones is probably the only historian worth considering as one of the 100 most influential people in American history.

    Replies: @Charon, @Jack Kennedy, @bomag

    She’s not a historian. She’s a political hack.

  62. SFG says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    @SFG

    That's why the whole edifice of higher education needs to be imploded, SFG. The only things keeping it going is Feral Gov't guaranteed loan money, the lack of other methods (thanks to SCROTUS) of measuring prospective employee intelligence, and most American families' expectation of 4 years of partying and fun being a birthright and an expected phase of life.

    Replies: @SFG

    I mean, I agree it’s very bad. I’m just not sure how conservatives are going to build up a multibillion dollar research infrastructure from scratch. Odious as a lot of these studies programs are there is a lot of unprofitable but useful basic sciences research still being done by universities.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @SFG


    I’m just not sure how conservatives are going to build up a multibillion dollar research infrastructure from scratch. Odious as a lot of these studies programs are there is a lot of unprofitable but useful basic sciences research still being done by universities.
     
    "Unprofitable?" There's overhead charged for this sort of thing, ostensibly designed to reimburse everything from office and lab space and utilities to supply them to the library system and its subscriptions to necessary journals and online resources (one thing to look for when deciding on where to go for chemistry is one of the latter, some lowest level schools I'm familiar with don't).

    So one problem for a "conservative" university in becoming become a R1 research one is that its professors are going to find it difficult to impossible to get grants from any Federal agency, foundation, company etc. I'd also expect them to find it difficult to impossible get published in the good journals, so the "impact" of their research is likely to be low. It would be a very bad proposition for grad students as well, they wouldn't get (good) postdoc or faculty positions, so maybe it would be mostly foreign ones seeking H-1B paths or terminal degrees if you aspired to become a lowly lab technician.

    See also the issue that it's considered to be all but essential undergraduates go to a different institution for graduate study to learn how to do things in different ways and my citation of how this worked for Richard Feynman when he went from MIT to Princeton, it's in "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!", I also learned it was a standard policy at MIT at least in the sciences, with one notable exception for the special case of CS where we haven't agreed on how to do things in general.

    On the other hand an undergraduate engineering degree is frequently terminal, or see MIT's MEng program where an extra year funded by industry has come a standard thing for EECS. But again people coming out of these programs would get shunned by FAANG etc., we're really talking about creating a completely parallel society, I believe all the way to a parallel Internet, except we won't be allowed to do that in peace.
  63. @SFG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I mean, I agree it’s very bad. I’m just not sure how conservatives are going to build up a multibillion dollar research infrastructure from scratch. Odious as a lot of these studies programs are there is a lot of unprofitable but useful basic sciences research still being done by universities.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    I’m just not sure how conservatives are going to build up a multibillion dollar research infrastructure from scratch. Odious as a lot of these studies programs are there is a lot of unprofitable but useful basic sciences research still being done by universities.

    “Unprofitable?” There’s overhead charged for this sort of thing, ostensibly designed to reimburse everything from office and lab space and utilities to supply them to the library system and its subscriptions to necessary journals and online resources (one thing to look for when deciding on where to go for chemistry is one of the latter, some lowest level schools I’m familiar with don’t).

    So one problem for a “conservative” university in becoming become a R1 research one is that its professors are going to find it difficult to impossible to get grants from any Federal agency, foundation, company etc. I’d also expect them to find it difficult to impossible get published in the good journals, so the “impact” of their research is likely to be low. It would be a very bad proposition for grad students as well, they wouldn’t get (good) postdoc or faculty positions, so maybe it would be mostly foreign ones seeking H-1B paths or terminal degrees if you aspired to become a lowly lab technician.

    See also the issue that it’s considered to be all but essential undergraduates go to a different institution for graduate study to learn how to do things in different ways and my citation of how this worked for Richard Feynman when he went from MIT to Princeton, it’s in “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!”, I also learned it was a standard policy at MIT at least in the sciences, with one notable exception for the special case of CS where we haven’t agreed on how to do things in general.

    On the other hand an undergraduate engineering degree is frequently terminal, or see MIT’s MEng program where an extra year funded by industry has come a standard thing for EECS. But again people coming out of these programs would get shunned by FAANG etc., we’re really talking about creating a completely parallel society, I believe all the way to a parallel Internet, except we won’t be allowed to do that in peace.

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