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U. of California Academic Senate Informs the Regents Once Again That the SAT Is the Most Valid Admissions Test
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A few years ago, the University of California Board of Regents, incensed that Asians are pulling away from blacks and Latinos on SAT scores, demanded than an expert panel of professors nominated by the UC Academic Senate study whether the SAT actually complemented high school GPA in predicting whether students could survive the rigors of U. of California colleges.

The faculty experts r eported back in early 2020 that SAT scores were even better than GPA at predicting college performance, especially for nonwhites. The Regents replied, “Nyaaaah Nyaaaah NyNyaaaah, we can’t hear you,” and banned the SAT, and pronounced that UC would within 5 years find a test, such as the one that California gives out to public school high school students that wouldn’t have racial gaps.

The Regents assigned the Academic Senate experts to show that California’s Smarter Balanced test was better than the SAT.

The Regents, being politicians rather than data nerds, said Screw You to the Academic Senate, we are banning the SAT no matter what your find. Go tell us if we can use some low brow high school tests.

The experts just now reported back to the Regents that the Smarter Balanced high school test had worse validity than the SAT. The clueless L.A, Times spins it as another blow to the SAT:

Another blow to UC admissions tests: Nix the SAT alternative exam, faculty recommend

The University of California should not use an alternative standardized test for admissions to replace the discarded SAT, faculty say.

BY TERESA WATANABE STAFF WRITER
OCT. 15, 2021 UPDATED 5:21 PM PT

In another blow to the future of standardized testing for University of California admissions, a faculty group has recommended nixing the use of an alternative assessment to replace the SAT in a new report to UC leaders.

The UC Board of Regents, in a move that reverberated nationally, unanimously voted last year to drop the use of the SAT and ACT for admissions decisions through 2024 because the tests exacerbated disparities based on race and income. Faculty were asked to examine whether an alternative test without those biases could be used beginning in 2025.

UC President Michael V. Drake asked the Academic Senate in April to explore whether the statewide assessment used for California public school students, known as Smarter Balanced, would be an appropriate replacement. Some educators were more open to using the state test over the SAT because it assesses how well 11th-graders learned California’s core curriculum.

But the Academic Senate committee’s conclusion: no go.

“The … assessment is not appropriate as an admissions test, required or optional, for the UC,” the report concluded. It said using the state test would “likely come at the same cost as the SAT,” mirroring the “inequities in opportunities to learn across California schools that are pronounced by race and socioeconomic status.”

The report did recommend, however, that the state test be explored as one of many measures used for placement in writing classes after students are enrolled at UC. And it suggested that UC work with Smarter Balanced officials and state educators to include more challenging test items in core subject areas and encourage all California high schools to use the assessment to help students evaluate their college preparedness.

In other words, despite all the dumbing down of the SAT from 1995 onward, it’s still the most valid predictor of UC performance available.

… UC’s decision to drop use of the SAT and ACT for admissions decisions — prompted by a lawsuit, the pandemic and skepticism about the test among many regents — was seen as a game-changer in the national debate over whether the tests discriminated against disadvantaged applicants and the extent to which they predict college success.

Dropping the test as an admission requirement was credited with boosting UC freshman applications to a record high of more than 200,000 for fall 2021.

In other words, getting into Berkeley or UCLA was more random this year than ever before.

UC admissions officers have said they were able to thoroughly evaluate the flood of applications without test scores, using 13 other factors in the system’s review process, such as a student’s high school grade-point average, the rigor of courses taken, special talents, essays and extracurricular activities.

Not according to the Academic Senator of the University of California.

Though using the state exam in admissions decisions could benefit some underrepresented students who test well but have lower grades, it would disproportionately favor Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and could reduce admission rates of Black, Latino and low-income applicants, the report found.

And that’s the bottom line.

At the same time, the assessment would add only “modest incremental value” in predicting UC first-year grades, the committee concluded.

“Modest incremental value” is pretty great when trying to predict the future, which, as I may have mentioned, is hard. As I reported from reading the Academic Senate’s report in 2020: “The SAT explains 21% of the variance in freshman grades at U of California campuses, compared to only 16% for high school grade point averages. … Combining high school GPA and SAT scores increases the variance “explained” to 26%.”

Back to the poor L.A. Times:

The state test, SAT and high school GPA all predict first-year grades at roughly the same level, although the SAT performed slightly better, the report found.

21/16th better or 31%. The SAT and HSGPA were 26/16th better, or 62.5% better. Whether 5.8ths better is “slightly better” is up to you to judge.

Using only high school GPA produced the most diverse pool of top UC applicants.

It’s almost as if Diverse high schools have easier grading standards.

In addition, the faculty committee concluded that using the state test for UC admission would probably lead to the development of a test prep industry that disadvantages those who can’t afford to pay for such lessons.

In other words, Asians would kick ass.

 
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  1. The predictive value of high school grades would be even lower if not for the fact that the thing they’re trying to predict is college grades. Let’s standardise the predictand, or at least make some straightforward statistical adjustments (like subtracting out the mean grade given by every department), and then run that horse race between the SAT and high school grades.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @International Jew

    Such as predicting GRE/LSAT/MCAT/GMAT/DCAT.

    Replies: @res

    , @Some Guy
    @International Jew


    The predictive value of high school grades would be even lower if not for the fact that the thing they’re trying to predict is college grades.
     
    And perhaps especially first-year grades. After all, if you're good student in the last year of high school, you're probably going to be a good student a few months later when you start college, right? But over 4 years away from your parents who knows how your habits and motivation change.

    Meanwhile SAT scores don't depend much on your current habits or motivation, so their predictiveness is probably more stable over time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @stillCARealist, @slumber_j

  2. A few years ago, the University of California Board of Regents, incensed that Asians are pulling away from blacks and Latinos on SAT scores, demanded than an expert panel of professors nominated by the UC Academic Senate study whether the SAT actually completed high school GPA in predicting whether students could survive the rigors of U. of California colleges.

    Complemented? Something else?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Polistra

    Thanks

  3. This is blaming the thermometer for the fever. Quotas are inevitable in a multiethnic society.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @Flip

    Everyone needs to learn the term "Fire Wall." It is a way selective universities protect themselves from quota or developmental admits. Just because a selective university admitted a student without an SAT/ACT score does not mean that student was automatically admitted to the College of Engineering or the College of Business Many schools have admission by college inside the university or even admission by major such as CalPoly-San Luis Obispo or Johns Hopkins. thus, most incoming freshmen was fire walled off from many of the highest paying majors.

    When the University of Michigan had a plus up for admission of black and Latino students (the famous 20 points), the plus up did not apply if the minority student wanted to major in engineering. UT-Austin has to admit students at the top of their high school class until 75% of the freshman class is filled. However, that does not mean that every student admitted using the Top Ten Percent rule can major is business or engineering.

    This is why counselors at the good schools know to advise students that they may be better off majoring in engineering at Michigan State or Texas Tech rather than majoring in sociology or communications at UT-Austin or UMich where they cannot get into the College of Engineering.

  4. I wonder if these people ever realise that implementing even the system that they’re trying to remove anywhere else would be seen, correctly, as a tool to implement some kind of unfairness and cause riots. Let alone the new one they want which is even more subjective.

    Only certain universities in the UK don’t just use exam test scores to determine admittance. Everywhere else in the world just uses exams.

    Similarly all the acrimony over voter ID. Every single country in Europe has rules for IDs including the most progressive ones.

    Of course, I’m not so sure that Steve and others are so wise in pure Who/Whom terms to try stopping this. I don’t know how many 2nd and over gen Asians they’ve met in America but the girls particularly are not your friends.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Altai


    I don’t know how many 2nd and over gen Asians they’ve met in America but the girls particularly are not your friends.
     
    Please elaborate?

    Replies: @SafeNow

    , @Hannah Katz
    @Altai

    My daughter earned a BS from Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo. It was a no nonsense school back then. No idea about now as we fled that state to Texas where she picked up a Masters.

    The Cal Poly entrance application was all about grades and SAT / ACT scores. For extracurricular activities, they had a Yes/No button. That was it. If you met a Cal Poly SLO graduate you knew you were dealing with a smart person.

    Betting the Cali Legislature has taken aim at Cal Poly. They often complained that the school was White, Christian and Republican. Like that was a bad thing... Her observation was that when she went there it was White and Asian, Christian and Jewish, and Republican and Independent.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

  5. Somewhat off-topic, yet another incident of white nazi supremacy.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @Polistra

    So....this woman holds some personal grudge against Hillel, Maimonides & Joseph Karo?

    Interesting ....

    , @Sick of Orcs
    @Polistra

    One of those rare instances a non-White is charged with a hate crime.

    , @Shel100
    @Polistra

    Just like all the black on Asian crimes - white supremacy made her do it.

    , @Cato
    @Polistra

    Isn't that a Louis Vuitton purse?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  6. @Polistra

    A few years ago, the University of California Board of Regents, incensed that Asians are pulling away from blacks and Latinos on SAT scores, demanded than an expert panel of professors nominated by the UC Academic Senate study whether the SAT actually completed high school GPA in predicting whether students could survive the rigors of U. of California colleges.
     
    Complemented? Something else?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks

  7. @International Jew
    The predictive value of high school grades would be even lower if not for the fact that the thing they're trying to predict is college grades. Let's standardise the predictand, or at least make some straightforward statistical adjustments (like subtracting out the mean grade given by every department), and then run that horse race between the SAT and high school grades.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Some Guy

    Such as predicting GRE/LSAT/MCAT/GMAT/DCAT.

    • Replies: @res
    @Steve Sailer

    If you are interesting in predicting GRE results from SAT results this 1991 ETS paper is useful.
    Differences Among Racial and Ethnic Groups in Mean Scores on the GRE and SAT: Longitudinal Comparisons
    https://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/RR-91-14-Pennock-Roman.pdf

    The data is old (1984-85 GRE test takers), but the use of longitudinal comparisons and analysis by race make it worth a look IMHO.

    Regression results by race for GRE subtests on SAT subtests are in Table 5.

    Replies: @Sparkylyle92, @BARRY J

  8. “… Asians would kick ass.”

    Maybe in terms of gaining admission. But can they stay in? My son shared a house as an undergrad, and there were four boys from China. Their favorite activities were getting blackout drunk, playing video games and vomiting.

    Two of them were recalled back to the Mainland at the end of the first semester.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Anon7

    Somewhere in China, two Tiger Moms cry. And scream.
    Sure hope they aren't lesbians.

    , @guest007
    @Anon7

    International students are different than Asian students. Since international students pay full tuition and fees plus an international student surcharge, universities do not mind admitting them and then flunking them out.

  9. @International Jew
    The predictive value of high school grades would be even lower if not for the fact that the thing they're trying to predict is college grades. Let's standardise the predictand, or at least make some straightforward statistical adjustments (like subtracting out the mean grade given by every department), and then run that horse race between the SAT and high school grades.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Some Guy

    The predictive value of high school grades would be even lower if not for the fact that the thing they’re trying to predict is college grades.

    And perhaps especially first-year grades. After all, if you’re good student in the last year of high school, you’re probably going to be a good student a few months later when you start college, right? But over 4 years away from your parents who knows how your habits and motivation change.

    Meanwhile SAT scores don’t depend much on your current habits or motivation, so their predictiveness is probably more stable over time.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Some Guy

    The Academic Senate looked at final college GPA.

    It's pretty severe.

    UC schools are rather hard and thus IQ matters.

    Replies: @Some Guy

    , @stillCARealist
    @Some Guy

    No, it's the other way around. Freshmen in college, especially in a challenging environment, get overwhelmed with the expectations and plenty drop out or take a time-out to assess their own abilities. By the time the students get to their senior year, all those who aren't capable have moved on.

    Honestly it's a lot more compassionate to only admit students who are likely to succeed. Why give strugglers a false sense of accomplishment and then have them crash and burn? The late bloomers, or those who handle the teen years gracelessly, should go to a CC for a year or two and catch up. There's no reason not to admit more from the CC's who prove themselves. I know some UC's are doing this on a guaranteed basis, but I don't know how it's working. We know one guy who has been trying to get in all his classes at a local CC, with all A's, so that he can go to UC Davis. with working full time and all the Covid nonsense it's a pretty dang slow process.

    , @slumber_j
    @Some Guy


    But over 4 years away from your parents who knows how your habits and motivation change.
     
    In retrospect and in the spirit of Stalino-Maoist self-criticism, it's apparent in my case that one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college. I didn't slack off entirely, but I'd never liked school that much and didn't want any more of it, so I didn't really apply myself as I might have.

    That was almost certainly a mistake on my part and probably indicates a character deficit, but it definitely happened. I probably should have taken time off before starting college--or as some people now say in the borrowed Briticism, taken a "gap year." (I guess that makes it sound less directionless?)

    Replies: @International Jew, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  10. Faculty were asked to examine whether an alternative test without those biases could be used beginning in 2025

    This all sounds like the eternal demand from control-happy politicians (who are otherwise a complete waste of perfectly good scarce resources) that “the cryptography community” please find encryption that is both “secure” and has a “backdoor”.

    Isn’t it all so tiresome, Madam TERESA WATANABE STAFF-WRITER?

    Smarter Balanced

    “Enhanced Subprime”

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @El Dato

    Special Price for You!

  11. Any test you come up with will either favor natural IQ or a willingness to grind, or both. So, apart from quotas, one solution I came up with: Surprise trivia tests.

    One year they could test NBA trivia. the next year “Hip Hop” trivia. The next year “Fast and Furious” franchise trivia, etc. That way, it could favor a particular ethnic group without giving Asians a chance to grind away at the unfamiliar material.

    • LOL: Redman
    • Replies: @Technite78
    @onetwothree

    If you really wanted to get "diversity", the surprise quizzes would include:

    1) How quickly you can duck and cover during a drive-by shooting.

    2) How much money you can make fencing a given amount of shoplifted goods.

    3) How many senior citizens you can knockout with a single punch, given a 10 block urban area.

    4) How many different partners have contributed to your children's DNA.

    etc.

  12. A few years ago, the University of California Board of Regents, incensed that Asians are pulling away from blacks and Latinos on SAT scores …

    Even when I attended, eons ago, UCLA was known as the University of Caucasians Lost among Asians. Most of us Whities were okay with that, because the Asian kids acted White and fit in. (And many of the Asian girls were cute, too!)

    Certain other groups deliberately did not “act White,” but that mostly meant that we didn’t encounter them in our classes. Too bad; they would have lowered the curve and made the rest of us in STEM majors look smarter.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Troll: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Deckin
    @Herp McDerp

    When I was at Cal, UCLA stood for “University of CA for Lower Achievers “

  13. Next up: UC Regents decide there’s no minimum GPA required to stay in and graduate from your UC school.

  14. The hard Left wants to turn the country over Blacks and Browns. The HBD world wants to turn it over to Asians.

    Why on earth would any young White man want to support this system? Get what you can, young White men, but don’t be gullible. And don’t volunteer for any dangerous work on behalf of anyone.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Maybe some young White guys have Yellow Fever as bad as Andrew Anglin?

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    In their defense, the HBD crowd around here is pretty smart so they assume that they personally will be able to compete with the Asians.

    This allows them to continue hiding under their peculiar brand of colorblind civic nationalism known as Citizenism. And remember, colorblind civic nationalism is a very enticing drug. It allows you to feel morally superior for doing nothing and throwing your own people - your extended family - under the bus.

    Naturally, the folks around here would dispute this. They don't look at whites as their "people." They're far too sophisticated for such an anachronism. Their people are other smart, interesting individuals regardless of race, embodied in Saint Thomas Sowell. Therefore, they're not throwing their people under the bus.

    (The fact that this is a club and not a people doesn't seem to dawn on them. Nor does it dawn on them that smart members of other races actually do have feelings for their own people.)

    What's more, they are against discrimination of whites, just as they are against discrimination against any individual for his or her race. This allows them to feel moral indignation against the Left.

    Of course, the idea of whites rallying as a group to fight back is abhorrent to our enlightened commentators and our host. Like any good Libertarian or someone suffering from Aspergers, they believe that we should only look at individuals as individuals, no need for feelings beyond oneself and immediate family. A lonely, atomized existence works best for them. This allows them to look down on ethno-nationalist such as yours truly.

    They get to look down on everyone while doing nothing. What more could you want?

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    , @El Dato
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship


    The HBD world wants to turn it over to Asians.
     
    That's a new one. And WHICH Asians?
  15. I’ve heard the same argument about interviews at tech companies: They aren’t very good at predicting who will actually thrive at the company.

    But the problem with this analysis is that only people who do well enough to get hired can be compared. That is, if you only hire people who get a rating of 8/10 or better, then you can only compare the 8s vs the 9s vs the 10s. So it’s not shocking that there isn’t a huge difference among them.

    Don’t get me wrong. Interviews are far from perfect, and one should always be aware of testing limitations. But they are useful. (And I bet tech interviews are better than most interviews, in the same way that IQ tests are better than personality tests. It’s hard to fake being smart.)

    • Replies: @e
    @megabar

    Look at who's been hired by the Big Techs, people trying to destroy us.

  16. @Some Guy
    @International Jew


    The predictive value of high school grades would be even lower if not for the fact that the thing they’re trying to predict is college grades.
     
    And perhaps especially first-year grades. After all, if you're good student in the last year of high school, you're probably going to be a good student a few months later when you start college, right? But over 4 years away from your parents who knows how your habits and motivation change.

    Meanwhile SAT scores don't depend much on your current habits or motivation, so their predictiveness is probably more stable over time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @stillCARealist, @slumber_j

    The Academic Senate looked at final college GPA.

    It’s pretty severe.

    UC schools are rather hard and thus IQ matters.

    • Thanks: Some Guy
    • Replies: @Some Guy
    @Steve Sailer

    Any prediction of what their reaction will be when black/hispanic college outcomes deteriorate the most after getting rid of the SAT?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

  17. @Polistra
    Somewhat off-topic, yet another incident of white nazi supremacy.

    https://i.ibb.co/DDX9j84/Screenshot-20211016-073805-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Sick of Orcs, @Shel100, @Cato

    So….this woman holds some personal grudge against Hillel, Maimonides & Joseph Karo?

    Interesting ….

  18. I cannot speak to the UC system, but aside from the fact that use of standardized tests reveals embarrassing truths about the capabilities of different groups, I feel a lot of what is behind their banishment is that applying actual standards would rule out lots of warm bodies that higher ed needs to take on student loans to finance the bloated administrative ranks at colleges and universities.

    The thing our politicians and certainly not higher ed wants a spotlight on is that the expanded access to college over the last 50 years has resulted in a huge amount of student debt, an average graduation rate of just over 60%, and the majority of people who do graduate taking 6 years for a 4 year degree. Obviously most of the increase in the share of the population that has attended college has been from people that had no business going to college in the first place, but their student loans have funded an orgy of higher ed spending that simply could not be sustained by an honest admissions standard.

    So wokeness over who gets in is a very convenient beard for the fact that higher ed is essentially a predatory industry that requires millions of minority marks annually to sustain itself.

    • Thanks: usNthem, Redneck farmer, Rob
    • Replies: @Gamecock
    @Arclight

    Agree. They really don't want standards, but feel compelled to act like they have some.

  19. In other words, Asians would kick ass.

    Only if someone had kicked ass before to show them how to do it.

    • LOL: Rob
  20. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:

    University admissions offices say, “The SAT doesn’t predict success, but we have developed a proprietary system that does.” This is like saying, “We don’t think that encryption standards like DES or AES are bulletproof, so our IT guy has made us a better system.” Ha ha ha.

    If an admissions office has such a great evaluation system, why not publish data on how predictive it is? In fact, why not NDA an external research team to study and evaluate it, anonymizing everything they publish?

    Remember, while UCLA law professor Richard Sander of the “mismatch” theory has had to repeatedly sue UC to obtain data on things like law school graduation rates by race, UC gave a woke graduate economics student access to Chetty-level data to product a tendentious report favoring affirmative action:

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-08-22/prop-209s-affirmative-action-ban-drove-down-black-and-latino-uc-enrollment-and-wages-study-finds

    One of the tricks in reading all the dueling studies is realizing that “success in college” can be defined in many different ways. An intellectually honest study would show all the results, but what happens is that researchers cherry pick. Here are some possibilities:

    — Completes first/second/third/fourth semester/quarter/year with passing/B/A grades/X GPA

    — Graduates in 4/5/6 years

    — Income X years after graduation

    You could add checks on course/major rigor (such as filtering out education, communications, and grievance studies majors)

    So you might have people claiming that the SAT (or HS GPA) is predictive or not based on people passing all their first semester classes, or graduating in 4 years with a B or higher average. These could be completely different results.

    • Agree: El Dato
  21. Academic Senate experts – a problem.
    No Academic Senate experts – no problem.

  22. I might have missed it in the above story, but if I remember, the high water mark for SAT scores was circa 1962, which is before they dumbed it down, and also when it was almost all White people who took the test–Ghookers were a rounding error in 1962 America.

    Gee, it’s almost like there was a concerted effort to sabotage Whites and make them soft, stupid, and shamed. Hard to believe.

  23. University of Toronto undergraduate is about as hard as a UC school. Only TOEFL or equivalent is required, no SAT or ACT, and it’s still full of Asians.

  24. Anon[853] • Disclaimer says:

    I was reading in a book that universities used to make classes like calculus a requirement for med students for the sole purpose of flunking out the dummies. They’d say you have to pass it even though you’d never use it because it’s a test of the problem-solving ability that’s required for a doctor to be any good. I wonder if they still do that.

    They really need to assign a weed-out class like that for first semester freshman year if they’re going to let the dummies in. It would at least flunk them out and let them know they’re not college material before they take on too much debt.

    Blacks and browns do not have a clue how hard college is if you’re taking regular courses and not just basket-weaving.

    • Replies: @Deckin
    @Anon

    I think Ancient Greek and Latin served that purpose as well.

  25. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    The hard Left wants to turn the country over Blacks and Browns. The HBD world wants to turn it over to Asians.

    Why on earth would any young White man want to support this system? Get what you can, young White men, but don't be gullible. And don't volunteer for any dangerous work on behalf of anyone.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @El Dato

    Maybe some young White guys have Yellow Fever as bad as Andrew Anglin?

  26. The left continues to bang its head against the steel door of the black “mind”, hoping against all hope that something will get those pea brain neurons fired up. One would expect that sooner rather than later, the banging would result in a fatal concussion and this ludicrous nonsense end once and for all. Doesn’t seem to be though. These insane jokers have got a damn hard noggin.

  27. @Altai
    I wonder if these people ever realise that implementing even the system that they're trying to remove anywhere else would be seen, correctly, as a tool to implement some kind of unfairness and cause riots. Let alone the new one they want which is even more subjective.

    Only certain universities in the UK don't just use exam test scores to determine admittance. Everywhere else in the world just uses exams.

    Similarly all the acrimony over voter ID. Every single country in Europe has rules for IDs including the most progressive ones.

    Of course, I'm not so sure that Steve and others are so wise in pure Who/Whom terms to try stopping this. I don't know how many 2nd and over gen Asians they've met in America but the girls particularly are not your friends.

    Replies: @Anon, @Hannah Katz

    I don’t know how many 2nd and over gen Asians they’ve met in America but the girls particularly are not your friends.

    Please elaborate?

    • Replies: @SafeNow
    @Anon


    “2nd and over gen Asians they’ve met in America but the girls particularly are not your friends.”
    Please elaborate?
     
    At the risk of being officious, I will take a crack at elaborating. I once read a study that looked at Asian-American women who married Caucasian men. What the gals had sought was termed “egalitarian knighthood.” (Yes, just like Chaucer’s “Wife of Bath’s Tale.” Bonus verbal SAT points for you if you picked up the Chaucer thing on your own right away.) In other words, an escape from patriarchal Asian culture, and, a rescuer and protector from threat (= from financial worry.) I think Asian gals are very highly tuned to look for egalitarian knighthood; if lacking a high score here, you would find it’s the not-my-friend wastebasket for you.
  28. @Steve Sailer
    @Some Guy

    The Academic Senate looked at final college GPA.

    It's pretty severe.

    UC schools are rather hard and thus IQ matters.

    Replies: @Some Guy

    Any prediction of what their reaction will be when black/hispanic college outcomes deteriorate the most after getting rid of the SAT?

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Some Guy


    Any prediction of what their reaction will be when black/hispanic college outcomes deteriorate the most after getting rid of the SAT?
     
    That's easy. The professors and courses themselves will be found to be racist and in need of "reform" (i.e., dumbed down to high school level). College grades will then be eliminated so everyone gets a participation certificate instead.

    The lefty elites are in a never-ending state of cognitive dissonance. On the one hand they worship elite credentialism because that's what supposedly makes them superior. But on the other hand their sacred blacks can't measure up on the same scale.

  29. @Anon7
    “… Asians would kick ass.”

    Maybe in terms of gaining admission. But can they stay in? My son shared a house as an undergrad, and there were four boys from China. Their favorite activities were getting blackout drunk, playing video games and vomiting.

    Two of them were recalled back to the Mainland at the end of the first semester.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @guest007

    Somewhere in China, two Tiger Moms cry. And scream.
    Sure hope they aren’t lesbians.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  30. Anon[107] • Disclaimer says:

    In addition, the faculty committee concluded that using the state test for UC admission would probably lead to the development of a test prep industry that disadvantages those who can’t afford to pay for such lessons.

    I understand that blaming test prep is to some extent a progressive cope for low non-Asian minority scores. But it’s also probably legit to some extent. It seems unlikely that the recent surge in Asian scores, which coincides with the redesign of the SAT, is purely a reflection of IQ differences.

    It would be useful to analyze how tests vary in terms of their vulnerability to prepping. Using the tests that are least vulnerable to prepping should maximize their usefulness in predicting intelligence, and would also reduce students’ inclination to engage in miserable, wasteful grinding.

    To use an old SAT-style analogy- Chess : Fischer Random Chess :: SAT : ??

    Of course, neither a maximally g-loaded test nor a maximally prepping-vulnerable test is likely to boost black and Latino admissions. Shifting from one to the other would probably just shift the proportions of Asian and white students somewhat.

    • Replies: @Rob
    @Anon

    The Coleman SAT is very vulnerable to prepping - intentionally so. Coleman revamped it from a “Scholastic Aptitude Test” to a “Scholastic Achievement Test” I italicized those words to highlight the difference here’s a quick googling’s worth of SAT changes since I took it, which was maybe 1994? I dunno. I really liked weed back then, ok?

    Here is an article on SAT changes over the decades. Terrible changes they made recently: Wrong answers are no worse than no answer, and a-d choices on multiple choice questions. Net result of those two changes: midwit strivers have to take the test over and over, hoping that this time, they’ll be a false positive for intelligence. Old SAT was designed to prevent false positives. But guess what? Having some high scores be dumb luck means there are some black high scorers!

    Not mentioned in the article above, the high end has been compressed. The old SAT distinguished, according to Pumpkin Person, who used to comment at Halfsigma, and now has her own blog with a worthless comment section, says Murray said the old SAT had a ceiling of +4σ, or 162 IQ, which is like 5/100,000 people. Now a “perfect score” is within reach of more people. Today, 1600 is closer to like, 125. Better? Maybe if you’re one of the 125s trying to sneak in. But how does someone with an actual 150 IQ distinguish himself? The answer is the same dreadful tedium the 125s have to do. Grades - which punish missed assignments with zeros, but have ceilings of 100 on the final. That’s fair, in a way. But is it really the best education for people with 150 IQ to be running the course of honorss? They could be learning so much more, and when their minds are young and supple. I am nowhere near 150, but my brain was rotted away with D&D and Vampire: The Masquerade. In an appropriate educational program, I would have done more useful stuff. Like read more sci if!

    Heck, looks like the redesign ain’t not a secret. Here is CollegeBoard on the new SAT


    The Importance of Practice
    Unlike an aptitude test, students taking the SAT can improve their scores by completing rigorous high school courses and practicing the skills they’ve learned in those courses. Sustained effort and practice on core reading, writing, and math topics are at the heart of the SAT.
     
    Offhand, and this is without a googling. I did well on the SAT, but it ain’t not a test of motivation or laziness.

    They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for. Also for having a large male advantage. That said, analogy tests can be done very well or very badly. Badly, if they test really hard vocabulary and simple ways things are analogous. That’s a vocabulary test. Which, come to think of it, are pretty g loaded. However, I heard a much richer English vocabulary than any Mexican fruit picker in California or Chinese immigrant kid in NYC did. I’ll bet none of them knows what higgledy-piggledy means. Explaining analogy tests can be done badly. I was checking out a Kaplan book on the GRE, just to get a sense of the test, and I read their analogy section. I’m making up the wrong answer that they said was right:

    Ballet Dancer : Pirouette as
    A…
    B Hockey Player : Puck
    C Fencer : Riposte

    The book said B was the right answer! Ostensibly because dance and hockey are both activities, and one has pirouette and the other has pucks. No! Fencer : Riposte is right. Dance and fencing are both activities, and pirouettes and ripostes are physical things that they do. I was tempted to email Kaplan and explain. Except, I am somewhat opposed to extensive test prep unless one has not had the subject in years, and I did not want to give any help to faceless competition. If the name brand test prep book writer did not understand analogy questions, what are the odds that 90 IQ inner city teachers can explain them well?

    If the analogy questions are biased to upper-middle class+ interests, then that is something they might work on? But in a sprawling, diverse country, there is no set of activities that everyone is involved in and does similarly. Not to mention, kids in the slums can read. I know about, I dunno, Dune not because I worked for House Harkonnen, but because I read the book. I don’t know when I learned to read, because my mom thought I was looking at pictures in the World Book enclyclopedia (for Millenials, that’s like Wikipedia, except they are not subject to trolls ruining articles. Like one, on gene expression, said some things use a ubiquitinylated lysine to initiate proteins. No! All methionine or a derivative. In an encyclopedia, a digression like this would have been edited out.) and I did not care enough about “See Jane Run” to remember whether Jane ran with a dog or sat on a cat, or whatever.

    They killed the math section that tested the mathiness of your brain. It had questions like, “in the equation 125x + 174y < 4000, what is the largest possible difference between x and y when both are integers?” Then the next question was like, what’s the smallest possible difference?“ I realize largest diff is easy to answer. Round the answer of 4000/125, so this is an easy one. But it takes smarter people less time to think of dividing by the smaller number gives a bigger answer, and the biggest did is when one is zero, and then just divide. But really smart people can do the division problem in their heads with less time and effort than I can put it in my calculator. The smallest diff is harder. Someone smart will answer it quickly, less smart? Maybe realize it’s harder and skip it. Even less smart? Waste time and get the wrong answer.

    The question I remember from my test, though I don’t know if I got the answer right, but maybe? “How many times does the digit nine appear in the list of integers between 1 and 10,000?
    The answers, and I am totally making them up without a care for getting anywhere close to the answer:

    A 9
    B 9,999
    C 1,0o7
    D 1008

    I really must re-state, those answers are all wrong! If you just read the problem, which is the real one, though maybe it was integers up to 1000. Two of the answers did differ by one, though.

    There were pages of questions like this! Drawn from a huge test bank. All gone. Replaced by trigonometry to make the test reflect the kinds of bath you have learned, perhaps by rote, without understanding any of the proofs or applications. New math is pages of high school math problems. The “test” is how fast you can guess the answers.

    Which sort of test do you imagine is harder to grind-cram from fifth or sixth grade on? Oh yeah, the statistical penalty for guessing ~unless you could eliminate one, but on quite a few, the right answer was the one less intelligent people would eliminate. They had decades of psychometrics on the test. On millions of takers. All lost. Maybe not lost, like maybe it still exists, but some of it is just in retired peoples’ heads, like all practical knowledge.

    Why did they change a test that was very difficult to study for into one that’s very easy to study for, and thereby ruin countless hours on studying that teenagers could spend chasing the opposite (or same!) sex, driving badly, smoking schwag, and drinking whatever alcohol they could get their on?

    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.

    The people criticizing the test being biased towards people whose parents could game the system were right, though. Giving extra time to a blind person who has to have everything read aloud to him is much different from giving able-bodied kids the same amount of extra time because a well-compensated psychologist said the kid had ADHD after the kid’s mom told him to rehearse this list of ADHD symptoms for the appointment. The solution to that is to only give extra time to people whose physical disability requires extra time to get the question read to them/fill in the bubble with their left foot, like Tiny Duck types, etc. If your mental difference keeps you from doing well on the SAT, then that fact should affect your score. Maybe, on the old SAT extra time did not matter. I always finished standardized tests early. But on a test designed to measure how many problems you can solve by rote in x minutes?

    I’d love to see a 200 point question on each section of the SAT

    Verbal: “Write a coherent paragraph that has never been written on the SAT before. The more students who pick your topic (example: “my cat” will be scored as a “my cat” paragraph, not as a unique description of your particular cat)

    Math: “Explain an equation, concept or proof in math using your own words. For full points, this explanation must not have appeared on any previous SAT answer. The more students who pick the same topic as you, and write essentially the same explanation, the lower your score will be. (Example: explaining the equation “17584 + 26486” will be scored as ‘long integer addition’“

    Really stress out the Asians! They cannot even collaborate.

    Oh, I forgot the essay! That was a thing for a while. Some poor kids cannot even compare their scores outside a few years, because their scores are out of 2400, not 1600. They added an essay section with notional equality to the other two sections. As far as I know, there was no validating thirty minute essays on random topics as measuring cognitive ability with any accuracy (though I did get the second highest, score category, an “S” on the MCAT essay section, scored J-T. They were essays on proto-woke subjects. I think so black kids could start their essays with “As a black…” for easier scoring and to eliminate conservative white guts who started with “As a white male..” Later analysis of SAT essays and scoring showed that length strongly correlated with score.

    As anyone who has read my comments knows, length does not mean quality! The humorous thing? In school, I don’t think I ever wrote an essay that hit the length requirement. In college I was all “…and then there’s the ten page hume paper!” What? I thought it was five!” “To write a five page paper, I have to try to write a ten page paper!”

    Congrats if you made it this far! I have no finale.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ralph L, @Corvinus, @bomag, @Hypnotoad666

  31. In my job we work in teams with team goal. Go figure. Resource depletion will end all that.

  32. Why don’t they start rewarding wrong answers and penalizing correct answers, but not tell anybody they are doing that? That would be easier than trying to create a new test and would get them the results they want.

    • LOL: Technite78
  33. @El Dato

    Faculty were asked to examine whether an alternative test without those biases could be used beginning in 2025
     
    This all sounds like the eternal demand from control-happy politicians (who are otherwise a complete waste of perfectly good scarce resources) that "the cryptography community" please find encryption that is both "secure" and has a "backdoor".

    Isn't it all so tiresome, Madam TERESA WATANABE STAFF-WRITER?


    Smarter Balanced
     
    "Enhanced Subprime"

    Replies: @Polistra

    Special Price for You!

  34. @onetwothree
    Any test you come up with will either favor natural IQ or a willingness to grind, or both. So, apart from quotas, one solution I came up with: Surprise trivia tests.

    One year they could test NBA trivia. the next year "Hip Hop" trivia. The next year "Fast and Furious" franchise trivia, etc. That way, it could favor a particular ethnic group without giving Asians a chance to grind away at the unfamiliar material.

    Replies: @Technite78

    If you really wanted to get “diversity”, the surprise quizzes would include:

    1) How quickly you can duck and cover during a drive-by shooting.

    2) How much money you can make fencing a given amount of shoplifted goods.

    3) How many senior citizens you can knockout with a single punch, given a 10 block urban area.

    4) How many different partners have contributed to your children’s DNA.

    etc.

  35. I’ll say it again: It’s not our country anymore. The institutions are run by people who hate non-woke white people.

    If whites want a college that doesn’t discriminate against them, we’ll need to build it ourselves. Of course, that would mean having our own communities. Whites must accept that we either carve out our own community within the larger white-hating society or we will be 2nd-class citizens forever.

    I realize that this isn’t a popular notion around here, what with Citizenism – and it’s long record of success – being the favored position. But it’s something you might think about.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
    • Replies: @rebel yell
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Separation, or "our own communities," boils down to capturing state governments. What the South did in 1860 with secession and tried again to do in the civil rights era with "massive resistance" is the template.
    Both these efforts failed, of course, but that does not mean that the next iteration of independence will also fail.
    But I see no plan or prospects that a populist movement will capture a state government, a movement that would be radical enough to openly defy federal laws, especially taking control of the national guard, non-payment of all federal taxes, and rejection of all federal court rulings - in other words, real secession.
    Change of that order has to wait for more unstable times.

    , @Anon
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    That college already exists. Hillsdale.

  36. LA Times Writer Flunks SAT?

  37. @Some Guy
    @International Jew


    The predictive value of high school grades would be even lower if not for the fact that the thing they’re trying to predict is college grades.
     
    And perhaps especially first-year grades. After all, if you're good student in the last year of high school, you're probably going to be a good student a few months later when you start college, right? But over 4 years away from your parents who knows how your habits and motivation change.

    Meanwhile SAT scores don't depend much on your current habits or motivation, so their predictiveness is probably more stable over time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @stillCARealist, @slumber_j

    No, it’s the other way around. Freshmen in college, especially in a challenging environment, get overwhelmed with the expectations and plenty drop out or take a time-out to assess their own abilities. By the time the students get to their senior year, all those who aren’t capable have moved on.

    Honestly it’s a lot more compassionate to only admit students who are likely to succeed. Why give strugglers a false sense of accomplishment and then have them crash and burn? The late bloomers, or those who handle the teen years gracelessly, should go to a CC for a year or two and catch up. There’s no reason not to admit more from the CC’s who prove themselves. I know some UC’s are doing this on a guaranteed basis, but I don’t know how it’s working. We know one guy who has been trying to get in all his classes at a local CC, with all A’s, so that he can go to UC Davis. with working full time and all the Covid nonsense it’s a pretty dang slow process.

  38. There already is a big test prep industry. I believe it started around the time they started rescaling the SAT downward to help students feel better about themselves.

    Boomers and millennials, and whites generally, tended to take these tests with a good faith effort that you study a little and do your best and the system would sort it out fairly. Asians scored high anyway but broke the system by prepping to break the curve. And activists for all the other POCs found ways to minimize the effect of the scores for their people. For their part, elite whites joined the test frenzy to keep up with Asians and wholeheartedly accepted the rhetoric of racism. Middle class whites got completely screwed from all sides.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @John Milton’s Ghost


    For their part, elite whites joined the test frenzy to keep up with Asians and wholeheartedly accepted the rhetoric of racism. Middle class whites got completely screwed from all sides.
     
    What do you mean that they “wholeheartedly accepted the rhetoric of racism”?
    , @El Dato
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Originally from the NYT:

    China targets costly tutoring classes. Parents want to save them

    Which parents?


    Zhang Hongchun worries that his 10-year-old daughter isn’t getting enough sleep. Between school, homework and after-school guitar, clarinet and calligraphy practice, most nights she doesn’t get to bed before 11. Some of her classmates keep going until midnight.

    “Everyone wants to follow suit,” Zhang said. “No one wants to lose at the starting line.”
     

    Nutters don't know that you need to specialize to excel.

    In China, the competitive pursuit of education — and the better life it promises — is relentless. So are the financial pressures it adds to families already dealing with climbing house prices, caring for aging parents and costly health care.

    The burden of this pursuit has caught the attention of officials who want couples to have more children. China’s ruling Communist Party has tried to slow the education treadmill. It has banned homework, curbed livestreaming hours of online tutors and created more coveted slots at top universities.

    Last week, it tried something bigger: barring private companies that offer after-school tutoring and targeting China’s $100 billion for-profit test-prep industry. The first limits are set to take place during the coming year, to be carried out by local governments.

    The move, which will require companies that offer curriculum tutoring to register as nonprofits, is aimed at making life easier for parents who are overwhelmed by the financial pressures of educating their children. Yet parents and experts are skeptical it will work. The wealthy, they point out, will simply hire expensive private tutors, making education even more competitive and ultimately widening China’s yawning wealth gap.
     

    I guess to close a "yawning wealth gap" one must hand over top dollar to private enterprise which rapes your kid and builds a house of cards out of his/her mind. Quite an american attitude.

    Parental focus on education in China can sometimes make American helicopter parenting seem quaint. Exam preparation courses begin in kindergarten. Young children are enrolled in “early MBA” courses. No expense is spared, whether the family is rich or poor. For Chinese students hoping to get a spot at a prestigious university, everything hinges on the gaokao, a single exam that many children are primed for before they even learn how to write.
     
    Nutters. Reminds me mainly of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beneath_the_Wheel

    Come on whitey, you have a chance.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  39. @John Milton’s Ghost
    There already is a big test prep industry. I believe it started around the time they started rescaling the SAT downward to help students feel better about themselves.

    Boomers and millennials, and whites generally, tended to take these tests with a good faith effort that you study a little and do your best and the system would sort it out fairly. Asians scored high anyway but broke the system by prepping to break the curve. And activists for all the other POCs found ways to minimize the effect of the scores for their people. For their part, elite whites joined the test frenzy to keep up with Asians and wholeheartedly accepted the rhetoric of racism. Middle class whites got completely screwed from all sides.

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato

    For their part, elite whites joined the test frenzy to keep up with Asians and wholeheartedly accepted the rhetoric of racism. Middle class whites got completely screwed from all sides.

    What do you mean that they “wholeheartedly accepted the rhetoric of racism”?

  40. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    The hard Left wants to turn the country over Blacks and Browns. The HBD world wants to turn it over to Asians.

    Why on earth would any young White man want to support this system? Get what you can, young White men, but don't be gullible. And don't volunteer for any dangerous work on behalf of anyone.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @El Dato

    In their defense, the HBD crowd around here is pretty smart so they assume that they personally will be able to compete with the Asians.

    This allows them to continue hiding under their peculiar brand of colorblind civic nationalism known as Citizenism. And remember, colorblind civic nationalism is a very enticing drug. It allows you to feel morally superior for doing nothing and throwing your own people – your extended family – under the bus.

    Naturally, the folks around here would dispute this. They don’t look at whites as their “people.” They’re far too sophisticated for such an anachronism. Their people are other smart, interesting individuals regardless of race, embodied in Saint Thomas Sowell. Therefore, they’re not throwing their people under the bus.

    (The fact that this is a club and not a people doesn’t seem to dawn on them. Nor does it dawn on them that smart members of other races actually do have feelings for their own people.)

    What’s more, they are against discrimination of whites, just as they are against discrimination against any individual for his or her race. This allows them to feel moral indignation against the Left.

    Of course, the idea of whites rallying as a group to fight back is abhorrent to our enlightened commentators and our host. Like any good Libertarian or someone suffering from Aspergers, they believe that we should only look at individuals as individuals, no need for feelings beyond oneself and immediate family. A lonely, atomized existence works best for them. This allows them to look down on ethno-nationalist such as yours truly.

    They get to look down on everyone while doing nothing. What more could you want?

    • Disagree: Corvinus
    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    The fact that this is a club and not a people doesn’t seem to dawn on them. Nor does it dawn on them that smart members of other races actually do have feelings for their own people
     
    Excellent point. Throughout history, those who put some club above their own nation (people) were known by the appropriate tag: traitor.

    It allows you to feel morally superior for doing nothing and throwing your own people – your extended family – under the bus.
     
    Some "smart fraction" White folks seem to have bitter memories of being mistreated as youths by other, less intelligent, Whites. Some of those reports may be true. But nonetheless, they aren't denying a lack of loyalty to their own people, they are just justifying it.
  41. OT: Another example of a McCloskey type MtF, aggressive ‘tech’ (Read get rich quick spivery) CEO who went full trans aged 38 with children after a divorce. This time profiled in Elle of all places.

    https://www.elle.com/life-love/a37507807/0106-0108-corporate-transition-october-2021/

    What’s amazing is the article spends a lot of time describing Natalie’s former male self as an ‘asshole’. A lot. I suppose putting on a wig and dress changed their personality… Of course, one is tempted to say that maybe going to work in a dress and demanding everyone call them ‘she’ and ‘Natalie’ might be just another kind of manifestation of their anti-social personality disorder…

    That was circa 2009, when she was “an asshole and a jerk,” Egan says. But that wasn’t the only thing that was different about Egan back then: She had been assigned male at birth and raised as a boy. Married with three children, Egan took pride in her college-frat bona fides and harsh management style. She was a tech bro—a successful one, raising \$7 million in investments for the tech-sales company she founded.

    I’ll bet he was successful circa 2009 in raising dumb VC money. My question is, did the company actually do something productive? Or was it just a company with a solution to a problem that wasn’t a problem? In other words the kind of snake oil stuff that aggressive ‘charismatic’ spivs are attracted to founding that VC money seemed only too happy to fund for 15 years assured they’d learned to be more discerning after the Dot Com crash. (Just like the IMF said it would never give Argentina another loan…)

    In 2009, after jobs in hospitality and tech, Egan started her own business, PeopleLinx, which helped companies use LinkedIn data to sell effectively. Tech start-ups then were “this culture that was rewarding toxic masculinity,” Egan says. And she ran it the way she’d seen other men run companies. She made decisions with little input, based on the idea that “representation and diverse perspectives slow things down,” she says. “I was like, ‘Go, go, go, we don’t have time for your opinion.’ ” If someone was late to a meeting, she’d publicly embarrass them. “It was, like, chest bumps and kegs,” Egan says. “Even as the company grew, we were having arm-wrestling competitions.”

    Her executive coach then and now, Russ Rosa, describes it this way: “There was a type of bullying masculinity that Natalie had that didn’t make her very popular.” But popularity didn’t matter; winning did. The company grew to 50 employees. High-profile clients signed on. Venture capital firms speculated that this could be a billion-dollar business. But then LinkedIn changed how it allowed other companies to access its data, endangering PeopleLinx’s core business. Egan appointed a friend as CEO so she could focus on sales, but the company was circling the drain. In 2015, the new CEO fired Egan, and she had no idea how to handle it. “It was the first time I wasn’t getting what I wanted,” she says.

    The culture was so toxic that ‘Natalie’ was fully able and willing to be a leader of such a company and set the tone. Also the company is one I’ve never heard of and the business idea sounds stupid. That might be why the atmosphere was like Wolf of Wallstreet, because it was a scam to get rich quick. And, of course, it was based on a flimsy situation of having access to another company’s API and completely imploded when said company made a decision that was inevitable and out of their control.

    The article tries to suggest that ‘Natalie’ is a perfect experimental sample for how women are treated in the workplace with people taking ‘Natalie’ less seriously than before for reasons that must have only to do with ‘sexism’. The other side of the experiment being the self-reported and tiny sample size studies which show FtMs report being treated better, also due to sexism. (It couldn’t have anything to do with innate human reactions to tiny early 20s women pretending to be men and giant middle aged men pretending to be women)

    The proud woman in question.

    Did any iSteve readers to school with ‘Natalie’ Egan?

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Altai

    Barf. One of the worse things of all about trannies is their awful taste. That man jaw and weird color of lipstick is absolutely bizarre. Barely a tranny alive knows how to dress and look good.

    I am beginning to be convinced this isn't about men wanting to be a tranny, but wanting to be a peacock.

    In pre-1800s era Europe, men who wanted to be fops could dress up and still look like their own gender. Styles for men gave them a lot of outlet for the urge to be a peacock. Nowadays, when they want to strut about, they can't do it in their own gender's clothes because today's clothes for men are a dull and dun-colored bore, so they dress like women--badly, so you notice them--because that's what catches the eye.

    Replies: @vinteuil

    , @El Dato
    @Altai

    That article is epically bicameral


    1) Venture capital firms speculated that this could be a billion-dollar business. 2) But then LinkedIn changed how it allowed other companies to access its data, endangering PeopleLinx’s core business.
     
    I guess I really dind't notice that you could "leverage" the VC greed and their containers of cash (maybe dropped of an Iraqi "payment" truck?) to such a degree. Sucks.

    Her executive coach then and now, Russ Rosa
     
    She coaches Lex Luthor.
    , @Colin Wright
    @Altai

    That's really not a very convincing woman. Take away the placement of the hands, and you've got a man in drag.

    , @Polistra
    @Altai


    But that wasn’t the only thing that was different about Egan back then: She had been assigned male at birth
     
    Sorry, no, it wasn't assigned anything at birth. It was recognized to be male (certain indicators you see) and then raised accordingly. Now it's no longer male, and it's certainly not female. It's just a freak, nothing more or less, and any self-respecting society would exile it to an island where there are no sharp knives.
    , @Sparkylyle92
    @Altai

    If you think that tranny looks bad, you ain't seen nothin'. Check out this one. Notice anything about the hand?
    https://generico.ru/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/337e81ff9cd26a9944d90ece4ca10306-800x445.jpg

    Replies: @res

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Altai


    Did any iSteve readers [go] to school with ‘Natalie’ Egan?
     
    No, but she looks awful familiar. I think I met her one time in a bar down in old Soho. I remember we drank champaign, and it tasted pretty much like Coca~Cola ... C-O-L-A Cola.
  42. @Steve Sailer
    @International Jew

    Such as predicting GRE/LSAT/MCAT/GMAT/DCAT.

    Replies: @res

    If you are interesting in predicting GRE results from SAT results this 1991 ETS paper is useful.
    Differences Among Racial and Ethnic Groups in Mean Scores on the GRE and SAT: Longitudinal Comparisons
    https://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/RR-91-14-Pennock-Roman.pdf

    The data is old (1984-85 GRE test takers), but the use of longitudinal comparisons and analysis by race make it worth a look IMHO.

    Regression results by race for GRE subtests on SAT subtests are in Table 5.

    • Thanks: Twinkie
    • Replies: @Sparkylyle92
    @res

    The old GRE tests had to have been more g-loaded than the SAT. There were many logic problems where they'd give you a bunch of conditions and ask about an implication. I don't see studying as helping much on these.

    , @BARRY J
    @res

    I would be interested in your (or anyone's) interpretation of that study. There was a lot of verbiage that obscured the plain meaning. Blacks seemed to do worse on the GRE than their SAT score would have predicted. The math part could be explained by few STEM students and high percentage of women. Was there an explanation of the verbal gap? Thanks.

    Replies: @res

  43. Someone will write an elegy like Ozymandias to the empty ruins of Berkeley some day in the not too distant future.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Escher

    "Someone will write an elegy like Ozymandias to the empty ruins of Berkeley some day in the not too distant future."

    Well, here's what you got right: there will be empty ruins of Berkeley (that is, if it does not come under literal, not just nominal, Chinese occupation like the rest of CA).

    But you're assuming that in the future, there will be anyone left who knows what an elegy is, who Ozymandias and Shelley were, or who even knows how to write.

  44. @Altai
    I wonder if these people ever realise that implementing even the system that they're trying to remove anywhere else would be seen, correctly, as a tool to implement some kind of unfairness and cause riots. Let alone the new one they want which is even more subjective.

    Only certain universities in the UK don't just use exam test scores to determine admittance. Everywhere else in the world just uses exams.

    Similarly all the acrimony over voter ID. Every single country in Europe has rules for IDs including the most progressive ones.

    Of course, I'm not so sure that Steve and others are so wise in pure Who/Whom terms to try stopping this. I don't know how many 2nd and over gen Asians they've met in America but the girls particularly are not your friends.

    Replies: @Anon, @Hannah Katz

    My daughter earned a BS from Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo. It was a no nonsense school back then. No idea about now as we fled that state to Texas where she picked up a Masters.

    The Cal Poly entrance application was all about grades and SAT / ACT scores. For extracurricular activities, they had a Yes/No button. That was it. If you met a Cal Poly SLO graduate you knew you were dealing with a smart person.

    Betting the Cali Legislature has taken aim at Cal Poly. They often complained that the school was White, Christian and Republican. Like that was a bad thing… Her observation was that when she went there it was White and Asian, Christian and Jewish, and Republican and Independent.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    @Hannah Katz

    I think you are being too cynical. Even California realizes that its technical schools have to meet certain standards.

    Cal Poly SLO counts three pretty bright successful guys as alumni: John Madden, Ozzie Smith, and Weird Al Yankovic.

  45. The answer to all this seems obvious: either build a new UC campus, a la the recent creation of UC Merced, or else commandeer UC Davis or Riverside, and dub it UC Wakanda: a test-free, standards-free, blacktopia where everyone majors in Hip Hop Poetics and How to Score With White Chicks. Everyone else can abide by SAT type standards and get a real education. The young Wakandanese scholars still get their ticket stamped with a prestige UC seal of approval. Problem solved.

    We could extrapolate this further: create a UC Aztlan and a UC Confucius and a UC Tel Aviv to filter out further annoying subpopulations, then give back the rest of the UC system to the people who created it in the first place, before all the moochers arrived.

    • Agree: Automatic Slim
  46. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    The hard Left wants to turn the country over Blacks and Browns. The HBD world wants to turn it over to Asians.

    Why on earth would any young White man want to support this system? Get what you can, young White men, but don't be gullible. And don't volunteer for any dangerous work on behalf of anyone.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @El Dato

    The HBD world wants to turn it over to Asians.

    That’s a new one. And WHICH Asians?

  47. Anon[853] • Disclaimer says:
    @Altai
    OT: Another example of a McCloskey type MtF, aggressive 'tech' (Read get rich quick spivery) CEO who went full trans aged 38 with children after a divorce. This time profiled in Elle of all places.

    https://www.elle.com/life-love/a37507807/0106-0108-corporate-transition-october-2021/

    What's amazing is the article spends a lot of time describing Natalie's former male self as an 'asshole'. A lot. I suppose putting on a wig and dress changed their personality... Of course, one is tempted to say that maybe going to work in a dress and demanding everyone call them 'she' and 'Natalie' might be just another kind of manifestation of their anti-social personality disorder...


    That was circa 2009, when she was “an asshole and a jerk,” Egan says. But that wasn’t the only thing that was different about Egan back then: She had been assigned male at birth and raised as a boy. Married with three children, Egan took pride in her college-frat bona fides and harsh management style. She was a tech bro—a successful one, raising $7 million in investments for the tech-sales company she founded.
     

    I'll bet he was successful circa 2009 in raising dumb VC money. My question is, did the company actually do something productive? Or was it just a company with a solution to a problem that wasn't a problem? In other words the kind of snake oil stuff that aggressive 'charismatic' spivs are attracted to founding that VC money seemed only too happy to fund for 15 years assured they'd learned to be more discerning after the Dot Com crash. (Just like the IMF said it would never give Argentina another loan...)

    In 2009, after jobs in hospitality and tech, Egan started her own business, PeopleLinx, which helped companies use LinkedIn data to sell effectively. Tech start-ups then were “this culture that was rewarding toxic masculinity,” Egan says. And she ran it the way she’d seen other men run companies. She made decisions with little input, based on the idea that “representation and diverse perspectives slow things down,” she says. “I was like, ‘Go, go, go, we don’t have time for your opinion.’ ” If someone was late to a meeting, she’d publicly embarrass them. “It was, like, chest bumps and kegs,” Egan says. “Even as the company grew, we were having arm-wrestling competitions.”

    Her executive coach then and now, Russ Rosa, describes it this way: “There was a type of bullying masculinity that Natalie had that didn’t make her very popular.” But popularity didn’t matter; winning did. The company grew to 50 employees. High-profile clients signed on. Venture capital firms speculated that this could be a billion-dollar business. But then LinkedIn changed how it allowed other companies to access its data, endangering PeopleLinx’s core business. Egan appointed a friend as CEO so she could focus on sales, but the company was circling the drain. In 2015, the new CEO fired Egan, and she had no idea how to handle it. “It was the first time I wasn’t getting what I wanted,” she says.

     

    The culture was so toxic that 'Natalie' was fully able and willing to be a leader of such a company and set the tone. Also the company is one I've never heard of and the business idea sounds stupid. That might be why the atmosphere was like Wolf of Wallstreet, because it was a scam to get rich quick. And, of course, it was based on a flimsy situation of having access to another company's API and completely imploded when said company made a decision that was inevitable and out of their control.

    The article tries to suggest that 'Natalie' is a perfect experimental sample for how women are treated in the workplace with people taking 'Natalie' less seriously than before for reasons that must have only to do with 'sexism'. The other side of the experiment being the self-reported and tiny sample size studies which show FtMs report being treated better, also due to sexism. (It couldn't have anything to do with innate human reactions to tiny early 20s women pretending to be men and giant middle aged men pretending to be women)

    The proud woman in question.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/elm100121ppnatalie-egan001-1634068501.jpg

    Did any iSteve readers to school with 'Natalie' Egan?

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato, @Colin Wright, @Polistra, @Sparkylyle92, @Achmed E. Newman

    Barf. One of the worse things of all about trannies is their awful taste. That man jaw and weird color of lipstick is absolutely bizarre. Barely a tranny alive knows how to dress and look good.

    I am beginning to be convinced this isn’t about men wanting to be a tranny, but wanting to be a peacock.

    In pre-1800s era Europe, men who wanted to be fops could dress up and still look like their own gender. Styles for men gave them a lot of outlet for the urge to be a peacock. Nowadays, when they want to strut about, they can’t do it in their own gender’s clothes because today’s clothes for men are a dull and dun-colored bore, so they dress like women–badly, so you notice them–because that’s what catches the eye.

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Anon


    One of the wors[t] things of all about trannies is their awful taste. That man jaw and weird color of lipstick is absolutely bizarre. Barely a tranny alive knows how to dress and look good.
     
    Well, there are trannies & then again there are trannies.

    Old school trannies were mostly effeminate homosexuals who really wished they could be women capable of attracting straight guys.

    New school trannies like this guy...they're something else entirely.

    You're right about his jawline - move over, Steve Reeves!
  48. @Altai
    OT: Another example of a McCloskey type MtF, aggressive 'tech' (Read get rich quick spivery) CEO who went full trans aged 38 with children after a divorce. This time profiled in Elle of all places.

    https://www.elle.com/life-love/a37507807/0106-0108-corporate-transition-october-2021/

    What's amazing is the article spends a lot of time describing Natalie's former male self as an 'asshole'. A lot. I suppose putting on a wig and dress changed their personality... Of course, one is tempted to say that maybe going to work in a dress and demanding everyone call them 'she' and 'Natalie' might be just another kind of manifestation of their anti-social personality disorder...


    That was circa 2009, when she was “an asshole and a jerk,” Egan says. But that wasn’t the only thing that was different about Egan back then: She had been assigned male at birth and raised as a boy. Married with three children, Egan took pride in her college-frat bona fides and harsh management style. She was a tech bro—a successful one, raising $7 million in investments for the tech-sales company she founded.
     

    I'll bet he was successful circa 2009 in raising dumb VC money. My question is, did the company actually do something productive? Or was it just a company with a solution to a problem that wasn't a problem? In other words the kind of snake oil stuff that aggressive 'charismatic' spivs are attracted to founding that VC money seemed only too happy to fund for 15 years assured they'd learned to be more discerning after the Dot Com crash. (Just like the IMF said it would never give Argentina another loan...)

    In 2009, after jobs in hospitality and tech, Egan started her own business, PeopleLinx, which helped companies use LinkedIn data to sell effectively. Tech start-ups then were “this culture that was rewarding toxic masculinity,” Egan says. And she ran it the way she’d seen other men run companies. She made decisions with little input, based on the idea that “representation and diverse perspectives slow things down,” she says. “I was like, ‘Go, go, go, we don’t have time for your opinion.’ ” If someone was late to a meeting, she’d publicly embarrass them. “It was, like, chest bumps and kegs,” Egan says. “Even as the company grew, we were having arm-wrestling competitions.”

    Her executive coach then and now, Russ Rosa, describes it this way: “There was a type of bullying masculinity that Natalie had that didn’t make her very popular.” But popularity didn’t matter; winning did. The company grew to 50 employees. High-profile clients signed on. Venture capital firms speculated that this could be a billion-dollar business. But then LinkedIn changed how it allowed other companies to access its data, endangering PeopleLinx’s core business. Egan appointed a friend as CEO so she could focus on sales, but the company was circling the drain. In 2015, the new CEO fired Egan, and she had no idea how to handle it. “It was the first time I wasn’t getting what I wanted,” she says.

     

    The culture was so toxic that 'Natalie' was fully able and willing to be a leader of such a company and set the tone. Also the company is one I've never heard of and the business idea sounds stupid. That might be why the atmosphere was like Wolf of Wallstreet, because it was a scam to get rich quick. And, of course, it was based on a flimsy situation of having access to another company's API and completely imploded when said company made a decision that was inevitable and out of their control.

    The article tries to suggest that 'Natalie' is a perfect experimental sample for how women are treated in the workplace with people taking 'Natalie' less seriously than before for reasons that must have only to do with 'sexism'. The other side of the experiment being the self-reported and tiny sample size studies which show FtMs report being treated better, also due to sexism. (It couldn't have anything to do with innate human reactions to tiny early 20s women pretending to be men and giant middle aged men pretending to be women)

    The proud woman in question.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/elm100121ppnatalie-egan001-1634068501.jpg

    Did any iSteve readers to school with 'Natalie' Egan?

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato, @Colin Wright, @Polistra, @Sparkylyle92, @Achmed E. Newman

    That article is epically bicameral

    1) Venture capital firms speculated that this could be a billion-dollar business. 2) But then LinkedIn changed how it allowed other companies to access its data, endangering PeopleLinx’s core business.

    I guess I really dind’t notice that you could “leverage” the VC greed and their containers of cash (maybe dropped of an Iraqi “payment” truck?) to such a degree. Sucks.

    Her executive coach then and now, Russ Rosa

    She coaches Lex Luthor.

  49. @megabar
    I've heard the same argument about interviews at tech companies: They aren't very good at predicting who will actually thrive at the company.

    But the problem with this analysis is that only people who do well enough to get hired can be compared. That is, if you only hire people who get a rating of 8/10 or better, then you can only compare the 8s vs the 9s vs the 10s. So it's not shocking that there isn't a huge difference among them.

    Don't get me wrong. Interviews are far from perfect, and one should always be aware of testing limitations. But they are useful. (And I bet tech interviews are better than most interviews, in the same way that IQ tests are better than personality tests. It's hard to fake being smart.)

    Replies: @e

    Look at who’s been hired by the Big Techs, people trying to destroy us.

  50. @John Milton’s Ghost
    There already is a big test prep industry. I believe it started around the time they started rescaling the SAT downward to help students feel better about themselves.

    Boomers and millennials, and whites generally, tended to take these tests with a good faith effort that you study a little and do your best and the system would sort it out fairly. Asians scored high anyway but broke the system by prepping to break the curve. And activists for all the other POCs found ways to minimize the effect of the scores for their people. For their part, elite whites joined the test frenzy to keep up with Asians and wholeheartedly accepted the rhetoric of racism. Middle class whites got completely screwed from all sides.

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato

    Originally from the NYT:

    China targets costly tutoring classes. Parents want to save them

    Which parents?

    Zhang Hongchun worries that his 10-year-old daughter isn’t getting enough sleep. Between school, homework and after-school guitar, clarinet and calligraphy practice, most nights she doesn’t get to bed before 11. Some of her classmates keep going until midnight.

    “Everyone wants to follow suit,” Zhang said. “No one wants to lose at the starting line.”

    Nutters don’t know that you need to specialize to excel.

    In China, the competitive pursuit of education — and the better life it promises — is relentless. So are the financial pressures it adds to families already dealing with climbing house prices, caring for aging parents and costly health care.

    The burden of this pursuit has caught the attention of officials who want couples to have more children. China’s ruling Communist Party has tried to slow the education treadmill. It has banned homework, curbed livestreaming hours of online tutors and created more coveted slots at top universities.

    Last week, it tried something bigger: barring private companies that offer after-school tutoring and targeting China’s \$100 billion for-profit test-prep industry. The first limits are set to take place during the coming year, to be carried out by local governments.

    The move, which will require companies that offer curriculum tutoring to register as nonprofits, is aimed at making life easier for parents who are overwhelmed by the financial pressures of educating their children. Yet parents and experts are skeptical it will work. The wealthy, they point out, will simply hire expensive private tutors, making education even more competitive and ultimately widening China’s yawning wealth gap.

    I guess to close a “yawning wealth gap” one must hand over top dollar to private enterprise which rapes your kid and builds a house of cards out of his/her mind. Quite an american attitude.

    Parental focus on education in China can sometimes make American helicopter parenting seem quaint. Exam preparation courses begin in kindergarten. Young children are enrolled in “early MBA” courses. No expense is spared, whether the family is rich or poor. For Chinese students hoping to get a spot at a prestigious university, everything hinges on the gaokao, a single exam that many children are primed for before they even learn how to write.

    Nutters. Reminds me mainly of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beneath_the_Wheel

    Come on whitey, you have a chance.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @El Dato


    The burden of this pursuit has caught the attention of officials who want couples to have more children. China’s ruling Communist Party has tried to slow the education treadmill. It has banned homework, curbed livestreaming hours of online tutors and created more coveted slots at top universities.
     
    When you think of it: it is ironic that the state, and particularly a totalitarian state, run by the Communist Party, tries to save you from yourself & to enable you to live a more humane life .....

    Replies: @J.Ross

  51. ‘It’s almost as if Diverse high schools have easier grading standards.’

    It’s even more complex than that.

    I was teaching high school in Los Angeles when the ‘C average’ rule came in. You couldn’t participate in extra-curricular activities unless you had a ‘C’ average.

    I remember noting at the time that the effect in white schools was fairly moderate: maybe 20% of those participating were suddenly ineligible. Ditto for black schools — in black schools, you get a ‘C’ merely for showing up and not causing trouble. Literally. So most blacks who had been participating in after school sports remained eligible as well.

    The effect in Hispanic schools — such as the one I taught at — was horrific! Fifty percent of the participants were suddenly ineligible.

    Why? Are Hispanics even worse students than blacks? Hardly.

    It’s because you can get Hispanics to work — but you have to grade like Genghis Khan with a hangover. There was one teacher at my school who failed 80% of her students — that was a bit much. But I had classes where I failed half, and no one commented.

    My impression was, the average Hispanic parent — at least around there, then — was satisfied as long as his kids were passing. No ‘an A-? Why the minus?’ No, if you wanted to get mommy’s attention, an ‘F’ was best. So an ‘F’ it was…and indeed, that would get the kids to work.

    But it made for a lousy eligibility rate for after-school sports.

  52. At some point, the U of C system will just hand out the degrees to the students the day they arrive on campus.

  53. @Altai
    OT: Another example of a McCloskey type MtF, aggressive 'tech' (Read get rich quick spivery) CEO who went full trans aged 38 with children after a divorce. This time profiled in Elle of all places.

    https://www.elle.com/life-love/a37507807/0106-0108-corporate-transition-october-2021/

    What's amazing is the article spends a lot of time describing Natalie's former male self as an 'asshole'. A lot. I suppose putting on a wig and dress changed their personality... Of course, one is tempted to say that maybe going to work in a dress and demanding everyone call them 'she' and 'Natalie' might be just another kind of manifestation of their anti-social personality disorder...


    That was circa 2009, when she was “an asshole and a jerk,” Egan says. But that wasn’t the only thing that was different about Egan back then: She had been assigned male at birth and raised as a boy. Married with three children, Egan took pride in her college-frat bona fides and harsh management style. She was a tech bro—a successful one, raising $7 million in investments for the tech-sales company she founded.
     

    I'll bet he was successful circa 2009 in raising dumb VC money. My question is, did the company actually do something productive? Or was it just a company with a solution to a problem that wasn't a problem? In other words the kind of snake oil stuff that aggressive 'charismatic' spivs are attracted to founding that VC money seemed only too happy to fund for 15 years assured they'd learned to be more discerning after the Dot Com crash. (Just like the IMF said it would never give Argentina another loan...)

    In 2009, after jobs in hospitality and tech, Egan started her own business, PeopleLinx, which helped companies use LinkedIn data to sell effectively. Tech start-ups then were “this culture that was rewarding toxic masculinity,” Egan says. And she ran it the way she’d seen other men run companies. She made decisions with little input, based on the idea that “representation and diverse perspectives slow things down,” she says. “I was like, ‘Go, go, go, we don’t have time for your opinion.’ ” If someone was late to a meeting, she’d publicly embarrass them. “It was, like, chest bumps and kegs,” Egan says. “Even as the company grew, we were having arm-wrestling competitions.”

    Her executive coach then and now, Russ Rosa, describes it this way: “There was a type of bullying masculinity that Natalie had that didn’t make her very popular.” But popularity didn’t matter; winning did. The company grew to 50 employees. High-profile clients signed on. Venture capital firms speculated that this could be a billion-dollar business. But then LinkedIn changed how it allowed other companies to access its data, endangering PeopleLinx’s core business. Egan appointed a friend as CEO so she could focus on sales, but the company was circling the drain. In 2015, the new CEO fired Egan, and she had no idea how to handle it. “It was the first time I wasn’t getting what I wanted,” she says.

     

    The culture was so toxic that 'Natalie' was fully able and willing to be a leader of such a company and set the tone. Also the company is one I've never heard of and the business idea sounds stupid. That might be why the atmosphere was like Wolf of Wallstreet, because it was a scam to get rich quick. And, of course, it was based on a flimsy situation of having access to another company's API and completely imploded when said company made a decision that was inevitable and out of their control.

    The article tries to suggest that 'Natalie' is a perfect experimental sample for how women are treated in the workplace with people taking 'Natalie' less seriously than before for reasons that must have only to do with 'sexism'. The other side of the experiment being the self-reported and tiny sample size studies which show FtMs report being treated better, also due to sexism. (It couldn't have anything to do with innate human reactions to tiny early 20s women pretending to be men and giant middle aged men pretending to be women)

    The proud woman in question.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/elm100121ppnatalie-egan001-1634068501.jpg

    Did any iSteve readers to school with 'Natalie' Egan?

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato, @Colin Wright, @Polistra, @Sparkylyle92, @Achmed E. Newman

    That’s really not a very convincing woman. Take away the placement of the hands, and you’ve got a man in drag.

  54. Smarter Balanced nixxed!?
    Speaking for The Shirtless-American Community, Fabio said, “I can’t believe it’s not better.”

  55. @Altai
    OT: Another example of a McCloskey type MtF, aggressive 'tech' (Read get rich quick spivery) CEO who went full trans aged 38 with children after a divorce. This time profiled in Elle of all places.

    https://www.elle.com/life-love/a37507807/0106-0108-corporate-transition-october-2021/

    What's amazing is the article spends a lot of time describing Natalie's former male self as an 'asshole'. A lot. I suppose putting on a wig and dress changed their personality... Of course, one is tempted to say that maybe going to work in a dress and demanding everyone call them 'she' and 'Natalie' might be just another kind of manifestation of their anti-social personality disorder...


    That was circa 2009, when she was “an asshole and a jerk,” Egan says. But that wasn’t the only thing that was different about Egan back then: She had been assigned male at birth and raised as a boy. Married with three children, Egan took pride in her college-frat bona fides and harsh management style. She was a tech bro—a successful one, raising $7 million in investments for the tech-sales company she founded.
     

    I'll bet he was successful circa 2009 in raising dumb VC money. My question is, did the company actually do something productive? Or was it just a company with a solution to a problem that wasn't a problem? In other words the kind of snake oil stuff that aggressive 'charismatic' spivs are attracted to founding that VC money seemed only too happy to fund for 15 years assured they'd learned to be more discerning after the Dot Com crash. (Just like the IMF said it would never give Argentina another loan...)

    In 2009, after jobs in hospitality and tech, Egan started her own business, PeopleLinx, which helped companies use LinkedIn data to sell effectively. Tech start-ups then were “this culture that was rewarding toxic masculinity,” Egan says. And she ran it the way she’d seen other men run companies. She made decisions with little input, based on the idea that “representation and diverse perspectives slow things down,” she says. “I was like, ‘Go, go, go, we don’t have time for your opinion.’ ” If someone was late to a meeting, she’d publicly embarrass them. “It was, like, chest bumps and kegs,” Egan says. “Even as the company grew, we were having arm-wrestling competitions.”

    Her executive coach then and now, Russ Rosa, describes it this way: “There was a type of bullying masculinity that Natalie had that didn’t make her very popular.” But popularity didn’t matter; winning did. The company grew to 50 employees. High-profile clients signed on. Venture capital firms speculated that this could be a billion-dollar business. But then LinkedIn changed how it allowed other companies to access its data, endangering PeopleLinx’s core business. Egan appointed a friend as CEO so she could focus on sales, but the company was circling the drain. In 2015, the new CEO fired Egan, and she had no idea how to handle it. “It was the first time I wasn’t getting what I wanted,” she says.

     

    The culture was so toxic that 'Natalie' was fully able and willing to be a leader of such a company and set the tone. Also the company is one I've never heard of and the business idea sounds stupid. That might be why the atmosphere was like Wolf of Wallstreet, because it was a scam to get rich quick. And, of course, it was based on a flimsy situation of having access to another company's API and completely imploded when said company made a decision that was inevitable and out of their control.

    The article tries to suggest that 'Natalie' is a perfect experimental sample for how women are treated in the workplace with people taking 'Natalie' less seriously than before for reasons that must have only to do with 'sexism'. The other side of the experiment being the self-reported and tiny sample size studies which show FtMs report being treated better, also due to sexism. (It couldn't have anything to do with innate human reactions to tiny early 20s women pretending to be men and giant middle aged men pretending to be women)

    The proud woman in question.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/elm100121ppnatalie-egan001-1634068501.jpg

    Did any iSteve readers to school with 'Natalie' Egan?

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato, @Colin Wright, @Polistra, @Sparkylyle92, @Achmed E. Newman

    But that wasn’t the only thing that was different about Egan back then: She had been assigned male at birth

    Sorry, no, it wasn’t assigned anything at birth. It was recognized to be male (certain indicators you see) and then raised accordingly. Now it’s no longer male, and it’s certainly not female. It’s just a freak, nothing more or less, and any self-respecting society would exile it to an island where there are no sharp knives.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Troll: Corvinus
  56. NAMs get lower grades, take easier courses, and drop out more frequently, right? How can a test have the same validity, ie predict grades, coursework, and dropout odds without being “biased” against NAMs?

    One of these days, an IQ test (what these are) maker will just cheat. Test everyone and add points to non-whites scores until they hit the white average. They will be lauded in the media for making an “unbiased” test. They will be feted by the academic administrator class. They will charge 200 bucks a test, and every minority-having high school will pay for all their students to take it,

    To put off getting caught, they will have rules like photo ID required and only one try in your life to keep the ruse going. Immediately, profs will notice that blacks seem dumber and less prepared than whites and Asians at any particular score. The profs will keep their mouths shut because they will blame their internalized racism for their assessment.

    in a few years, the admins will realize that black outcomes are much worse than their test scores predicted. Some smart admins will think,’ blacks perform 1.1σ below their test score. That’s interesting because, in the Before Time, black IQ was that much lower than white IQ. I should say something. Wait, that’s crimethink. I cannot admit I know that fact. Say nothing! Keep my job.

    Eventually, an Asian will manage to take the test as a black and break the curve. He’ll go to whoever, maybe the principal, maybe the media. He’ll tell them about the NAM score bonus. Then the prof our journalist will never tell anyone. Finally, right-wing media will pick up the story. It will then be a partisan issue.

    I could be wrong about the coming bioprog transition. Maybe progs will never accept lower black IQ. If they won’t, then the cheaty test will never be stopped or punished. The black score bump will be a “conspiracy theory” to college admins.

    The company that makes the cheating tests will make a freaking fortune. The zeitgeist will protect them from justice.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @Rob

    You've got an interesting and plausible plot and could put it together as a dystopian short story but with a hero who exposes the lie and finds a way to defeat the liars.

    Maybe you could enter it in this contest- I look forward to reading the winners:
    https://passageprize.com/



    A Note from the Editor


    Dear Reader,

    We live in an age of profound cultural rot. There is a stench of dying all around us. There is no life here. What passes for literature, film, drama, poetry, art of all kinds, is bloodless and barren, the agitprop for a regime of shrill Human Resource mediocrities.

    It is FAKE and GAY.

    Go read the novels short-listed for the big prizes. Whatever of poetry still even exists. The undifferentiated fare at your local theater. If your spirit has not been reduced already to zero, to NOTHING——and if you are reading this it must not be the case——what you will find will burn your eyes. You will feel like your veins have been scraped out with a rusted spoon.

    Whereas art is meant to inspire and edify, this culture is meant to demoralize. It is meant to turn you against yourself, to debase you into submission, to condition you to the pod. Enough!

    We do not have to accept this. Outside this longhouse of putrid moralism, a frontier awaits us, a new virgin territory. There are worlds yet to be discovered. Ways of being that do not reduce us to a state of meek, unrelenting surrender. There are portals. Enormous and powerful energies latent in the graves of pre-history, waiting for a hand, a mind, an imagination to retrieve and transform them into the creative spirit that will light a new way forward. It has always been thus, and will be again.

    We must EXIT FROM THE LONGHOUSE. We must seek, together, mutations and new possibilities. We must demonstrate through art, through story, through symbol and invention, what it means to leave this rotten place behind, to give life to a language and a temperament that is not afraid, that will not passively abide the cruel and craven bugmen who presume to rule us.

    This is a calling that transcends any partisan sniping, any lowly ideological pissing contest. Let us raise ourselves and each other above such things. Let us imagine a passage from this place to another one. Let us stake out the path. Let us dream it into existence. Join me. The only way out is through.

    -L0m3z
     
  57. I am loving the fact that all those tiger cubs, who obediently spent 13 years (before 2020) prepping, won’t gain any UC admission advantage from the effort.

    It’s really something how the Regents sign-off on a system whereby lectures, and breakout/TA sections, are mainly hosted (certainly not taught) by foreigners — usually Asian — with molasses-thick accents. (At my college, the foreign professors were excellent, English speakers. The US-born faculty members were the ones with horrible communication skills.)

    [MORE]

    Those who see admission to a four-year, state university, except for applied science applicants, should need to be nominated by a political official. Like they do at West Point. Then, when that admit proves itself to be a full-time leftist or jock, that nominator’s re-election challenger can turn the appointee into a campaign issue.

    • Replies: @Deckin
    @Abolish_public_education

    In my Math 1c class at Cal our TA, when teaching us about Taylor polynomial series’s would remind us how to “evalrate the serious “

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist

  58. @Polistra
    Somewhat off-topic, yet another incident of white nazi supremacy.

    https://i.ibb.co/DDX9j84/Screenshot-20211016-073805-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Sick of Orcs, @Shel100, @Cato

    One of those rare instances a non-White is charged with a hate crime.

  59. I’m afraid I see no easy solution to this kind of problem. Pro-SAT academics may win this round only to lose in the years ahead with further “dumbing down” of the SAT and such.

    Anyone else see a practical way forward?

  60. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    I'll say it again: It's not our country anymore. The institutions are run by people who hate non-woke white people.

    If whites want a college that doesn't discriminate against them, we'll need to build it ourselves. Of course, that would mean having our own communities. Whites must accept that we either carve out our own community within the larger white-hating society or we will be 2nd-class citizens forever.

    I realize that this isn't a popular notion around here, what with Citizenism - and it's long record of success - being the favored position. But it's something you might think about.

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Anon

    Separation, or “our own communities,” boils down to capturing state governments. What the South did in 1860 with secession and tried again to do in the civil rights era with “massive resistance” is the template.
    Both these efforts failed, of course, but that does not mean that the next iteration of independence will also fail.
    But I see no plan or prospects that a populist movement will capture a state government, a movement that would be radical enough to openly defy federal laws, especially taking control of the national guard, non-payment of all federal taxes, and rejection of all federal court rulings – in other words, real secession.
    Change of that order has to wait for more unstable times.

  61. anon[185] • Disclaimer says:

    I would say these tests are absolutely relevant, and that elite colleges should accept students with the lowest scores to turn them into geniuses since that’s what these elite colleges are supposed to be best at — turning out geniuses.

    Our elite colleges from the Ivies, MIT, Stanford to UCB, ULCA, have done nothing but propagate left wing ideology for the past 5 decades. Collectively they have played a major if not the biggest role in running the country to the ground. It’s time to make them 100% black and let them eat cake.

  62. @Arclight
    I cannot speak to the UC system, but aside from the fact that use of standardized tests reveals embarrassing truths about the capabilities of different groups, I feel a lot of what is behind their banishment is that applying actual standards would rule out lots of warm bodies that higher ed needs to take on student loans to finance the bloated administrative ranks at colleges and universities.

    The thing our politicians and certainly not higher ed wants a spotlight on is that the expanded access to college over the last 50 years has resulted in a huge amount of student debt, an average graduation rate of just over 60%, and the majority of people who do graduate taking 6 years for a 4 year degree. Obviously most of the increase in the share of the population that has attended college has been from people that had no business going to college in the first place, but their student loans have funded an orgy of higher ed spending that simply could not be sustained by an honest admissions standard.

    So wokeness over who gets in is a very convenient beard for the fact that higher ed is essentially a predatory industry that requires millions of minority marks annually to sustain itself.

    Replies: @Gamecock

    Agree. They really don’t want standards, but feel compelled to act like they have some.

  63. Philadelphia: woman raped on train while bystanders did nothing
    Philadelphia police chief: literally and appropriately named Outlaw
    https://apnews.com/article/business-arrests-pennsylvania-philadelphia-1d0c62ae547165eabfc40fc6a20f25be

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @J.Ross

    In wild outlaw country, you rape goat.
    In CultMarx America, sacred black goat rapes YOU.
    And it's on TikTok. Multiple times.

  64. At top UCals, some “holistic” admits and, worse, the children of overseas oligarchic looters who fake their SATs and ESLs, were already starting to interfere with instructional missions before the pandemic and abolition of the SAT. The issues cannot be publicly discussed.

    UC has long given some preference to low-income, first-generation, and top of local high school class students. Holistic review – http://admitguide.com/holistic-admission – used at the majority of campuses, formally has many worthy features.

    Every year, a university hires paid application readers to do holistic review of files. The process looks like it’s administratively sound – defined qualifications, training, testing, oversight, return hires.

    A state audit, however, showed that holistic review is open to abuse by the privileged:

    Our review found that campuses admitted 64 applicants—in addition to the two identified in the federal investigation—for academic years 2013–14 through 2018–19 on the basis of their families’ donations to campuses or their connections to campus staff, leadership, and donors.

    https://www.auditor.ca.gov/reports/2019-113/sections.html

    It’s likely that it is also abused to evade the legal prohibition on admission by racial quota, but any such abuse is also almost impossible to demonstrate. There is lots of emphasis on the diversity of hired readers, and from the very highest officials down to the lowly readers, there is palpable nudge-nudge, wink-wink atmosphere as to what is expected.

    If you are an analytic person, see if you can spot the sophistry in this Berkeley professor’s argument for the abolition of SAT. https://cshe.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/publications/rops.cshe_.4.16.geiser.satproposalberkeley.5.2.2016.pdf

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @New Dealer


    A state audit, however, showed that holistic review is open to abuse by the privileged
     
    Well, it is holistic, isn't it? Wads of mystery cash? Suits you, sir!

    If you are an analytic person, see if you can spot the sophistry
     
    Well then....

    Saul Geiser
     
    Hmmm. Ok, let's scroll to the last paragraph on the last page of 14.

    Berkeley is thus faced with a choice of some consequence. One option is to continue to employ an admissions criterion with known collateral effects on students of color, even while admissions officials are barred by law from acting on that knowledge. Continuing to use the SAT under the constraints of Proposition 209 means accepting some level of residual bias against black and Latino applicants beyond what can be justified by test validity.
     
    Yes, and?

    The alternative is to discontinue use of the SAT in admissions altogether. If Berkeley cannot consider race as a contextual factor in admissions, neither should it consider the SAT.
     
    Non sequitur. Throwing toys out of prams?
  65. Blast from the past (Sailer, 2013):

    Did Senator Schumer really get a perfect 1600 SAT score?
    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2013/06/did-senator-schumer-really-get-perfect.html

  66. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    I'll say it again: It's not our country anymore. The institutions are run by people who hate non-woke white people.

    If whites want a college that doesn't discriminate against them, we'll need to build it ourselves. Of course, that would mean having our own communities. Whites must accept that we either carve out our own community within the larger white-hating society or we will be 2nd-class citizens forever.

    I realize that this isn't a popular notion around here, what with Citizenism - and it's long record of success - being the favored position. But it's something you might think about.

    Replies: @rebel yell, @Anon

    That college already exists. Hillsdale.

  67. @Altai
    OT: Another example of a McCloskey type MtF, aggressive 'tech' (Read get rich quick spivery) CEO who went full trans aged 38 with children after a divorce. This time profiled in Elle of all places.

    https://www.elle.com/life-love/a37507807/0106-0108-corporate-transition-october-2021/

    What's amazing is the article spends a lot of time describing Natalie's former male self as an 'asshole'. A lot. I suppose putting on a wig and dress changed their personality... Of course, one is tempted to say that maybe going to work in a dress and demanding everyone call them 'she' and 'Natalie' might be just another kind of manifestation of their anti-social personality disorder...


    That was circa 2009, when she was “an asshole and a jerk,” Egan says. But that wasn’t the only thing that was different about Egan back then: She had been assigned male at birth and raised as a boy. Married with three children, Egan took pride in her college-frat bona fides and harsh management style. She was a tech bro—a successful one, raising $7 million in investments for the tech-sales company she founded.
     

    I'll bet he was successful circa 2009 in raising dumb VC money. My question is, did the company actually do something productive? Or was it just a company with a solution to a problem that wasn't a problem? In other words the kind of snake oil stuff that aggressive 'charismatic' spivs are attracted to founding that VC money seemed only too happy to fund for 15 years assured they'd learned to be more discerning after the Dot Com crash. (Just like the IMF said it would never give Argentina another loan...)

    In 2009, after jobs in hospitality and tech, Egan started her own business, PeopleLinx, which helped companies use LinkedIn data to sell effectively. Tech start-ups then were “this culture that was rewarding toxic masculinity,” Egan says. And she ran it the way she’d seen other men run companies. She made decisions with little input, based on the idea that “representation and diverse perspectives slow things down,” she says. “I was like, ‘Go, go, go, we don’t have time for your opinion.’ ” If someone was late to a meeting, she’d publicly embarrass them. “It was, like, chest bumps and kegs,” Egan says. “Even as the company grew, we were having arm-wrestling competitions.”

    Her executive coach then and now, Russ Rosa, describes it this way: “There was a type of bullying masculinity that Natalie had that didn’t make her very popular.” But popularity didn’t matter; winning did. The company grew to 50 employees. High-profile clients signed on. Venture capital firms speculated that this could be a billion-dollar business. But then LinkedIn changed how it allowed other companies to access its data, endangering PeopleLinx’s core business. Egan appointed a friend as CEO so she could focus on sales, but the company was circling the drain. In 2015, the new CEO fired Egan, and she had no idea how to handle it. “It was the first time I wasn’t getting what I wanted,” she says.

     

    The culture was so toxic that 'Natalie' was fully able and willing to be a leader of such a company and set the tone. Also the company is one I've never heard of and the business idea sounds stupid. That might be why the atmosphere was like Wolf of Wallstreet, because it was a scam to get rich quick. And, of course, it was based on a flimsy situation of having access to another company's API and completely imploded when said company made a decision that was inevitable and out of their control.

    The article tries to suggest that 'Natalie' is a perfect experimental sample for how women are treated in the workplace with people taking 'Natalie' less seriously than before for reasons that must have only to do with 'sexism'. The other side of the experiment being the self-reported and tiny sample size studies which show FtMs report being treated better, also due to sexism. (It couldn't have anything to do with innate human reactions to tiny early 20s women pretending to be men and giant middle aged men pretending to be women)

    The proud woman in question.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/elm100121ppnatalie-egan001-1634068501.jpg

    Did any iSteve readers to school with 'Natalie' Egan?

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato, @Colin Wright, @Polistra, @Sparkylyle92, @Achmed E. Newman

    If you think that tranny looks bad, you ain’t seen nothin’. Check out this one. Notice anything about the hand?

    • Replies: @res
    @Sparkylyle92

    2D:4D ratio?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digit_ratio
    Note that there is significant overlap between the male and female distributions (Cohen's d around two thirds).

    That would be an interesting way of testing the hypothesis that there are two distinct groups of MtF transgenders. Has that already been done? I see some papers on 2D:4D ratio and transgenderism, but the usual conclusion appears to be something like:
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40806-020-00247-9



    Mean 2D:4D of M→F and MtF individuals was higher (more “feminized”) than for M→M and natal males, respectively.
     
    But this paper has a suggestive comment (I do not see the scatterplot mentioned though).
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-72486-6

    When examining the scatterplot of 2D:4D and the GIDYQ score, an inverted U-shaped relationship emerged.
     
    Where GIDYQ is Gender Identity/Gender Dysphoria Questionnaire.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  68. @res
    @Steve Sailer

    If you are interesting in predicting GRE results from SAT results this 1991 ETS paper is useful.
    Differences Among Racial and Ethnic Groups in Mean Scores on the GRE and SAT: Longitudinal Comparisons
    https://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/RR-91-14-Pennock-Roman.pdf

    The data is old (1984-85 GRE test takers), but the use of longitudinal comparisons and analysis by race make it worth a look IMHO.

    Regression results by race for GRE subtests on SAT subtests are in Table 5.

    Replies: @Sparkylyle92, @BARRY J

    The old GRE tests had to have been more g-loaded than the SAT. There were many logic problems where they’d give you a bunch of conditions and ask about an implication. I don’t see studying as helping much on these.

  69. Ligaya Fabian  of  1631 El Camino Real #8 Tustin Ca 92780 submitted fake documents and bribed to obtain a driver’s license but DMV revoked. She did not disclose fraud she committed when she applied for a green card based on daughter Janice Souma petition. She can be reached at 714 881 6289

    Leticia olalia morales of 15501 Pasadena ave #h Tustin ca 92780 submitted fake documents and bribed toobtain a tourist and work Visa. She also claimed citizenship while working for target in Santa ana ca. She is now a citizen and has ss benefits. She can be reached at 714 884 3940 and 949 945 8155

    Ronald Bola of 12765 newport ave #d tustin ca 92780 married and paid Albina Danganan to get a green card and now a US citizen. Albina also married her cousin to get a green card.

    Carlos Olalia Morales III a chief radiologist tech at Sheridan County hospital submitted fake documents to obtain a tourist and work visa.

  70. @Flip
    This is blaming the thermometer for the fever. Quotas are inevitable in a multiethnic society.

    Replies: @guest007

    Everyone needs to learn the term “Fire Wall.” It is a way selective universities protect themselves from quota or developmental admits. Just because a selective university admitted a student without an SAT/ACT score does not mean that student was automatically admitted to the College of Engineering or the College of Business Many schools have admission by college inside the university or even admission by major such as CalPoly-San Luis Obispo or Johns Hopkins. thus, most incoming freshmen was fire walled off from many of the highest paying majors.

    When the University of Michigan had a plus up for admission of black and Latino students (the famous 20 points), the plus up did not apply if the minority student wanted to major in engineering. UT-Austin has to admit students at the top of their high school class until 75% of the freshman class is filled. However, that does not mean that every student admitted using the Top Ten Percent rule can major is business or engineering.

    This is why counselors at the good schools know to advise students that they may be better off majoring in engineering at Michigan State or Texas Tech rather than majoring in sociology or communications at UT-Austin or UMich where they cannot get into the College of Engineering.

  71. @Anon7
    “… Asians would kick ass.”

    Maybe in terms of gaining admission. But can they stay in? My son shared a house as an undergrad, and there were four boys from China. Their favorite activities were getting blackout drunk, playing video games and vomiting.

    Two of them were recalled back to the Mainland at the end of the first semester.

    Replies: @Ralph L, @guest007

    International students are different than Asian students. Since international students pay full tuition and fees plus an international student surcharge, universities do not mind admitting them and then flunking them out.

  72. anon[185] • Disclaimer says:

    I am of the mind that elite colleges should not exist, at all. Aside from being arrogant bastions of left wing ideology that are increasingly intolerant of dissent for the past 5 decades, they have also further perpetuated inequality by being country clubs for the liberal elite, who are busy pulling up the ladders for those they deem less holy or worthy than themselves for whatever reason, like holding dissenting political views or not Jewish/black/gay or otherwise oppressed enough.

    Education should not be a competition.
    It should be a place for people to seek knowledge, think, reflect, meet new people, debate new and old ideas. An education should be something one seeks to satisfy one’s own curiosity, desire to learn etc., not to satisfy or impress others. I think all universities should be open to all who wish to enroll, as long as they meet a minimum GPA requirement. Those oversubscribed should simply run a lottery among the qualified applicants. This would distribute talent equally to all universities, allow kids to attend the university closest to home to cut cost, or not go at all but simply attend a vocational/trade school.

    So I welcome any effort elite colleges put in to make themselves less elite. If the Asians don’t like it, they can always go back to dog-eat-dog, everything’s a competition Asia. Our elite universities wouldn’t have been half as elite if it weren’t for these unimaginative, over-eager, hyper-competitive Asians prostrating outside their doors en masse begging to be let in. They only further feed into the ego of the arrogant left wing hypocrites running these schools. I welcome ever more efforts to keep them out. It’ll be for their own good and ultimately, everyone’s.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @anon

    College prior to the 1960s was like this I believe. But then most people went to work after high school. If we want to restore some sanity to the system, we have to get back to that (and to vocational schools). We also need to make private colleges the guarantors of the government borrowing students undertake to attend their overpriced classes and to limit foreign student attendance at public schools. Do that and the numbers will drop enormously and nothing will be that “elite”. The best professors will spread out and best students will spread out

    , @Anon
    @anon

    The only way to pull the plug out of our colleges and drain them is to create a booming labor market of well-paying jobs you don't need a college degree to work.

    The problem is, colleges don't have competition.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Prester John
    @anon

    Not for coolie wages they won't. That's the problem.

    , @Prester John
    @anon

    Did Plato's Academy or Aristotle's Lyceum require SATs?

    I think not.

    From The Big Questions to The Big Bucks.

    We've come a long way, huh?

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @anon


    Education should not be a competition. It should be a place for people to seek knowledge, think, reflect, meet new people, debate new and old ideas.
     
    True. Unfortunately, there is an economic demand for a process that ranks people by a combination of intelligence and work ethic (aka tolerance for doing drudge work to get ahead). And formal education got hijacked for this second purpose.
  73. steve has still yet to release his SAT and GMAT and 23&me.

    sad.

    mine were 1560 and 770 (790 on the practice test) and 100% nw european. which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @anon


    mine were 1560 and 770 (790 on the practice test) and 100% nw european.
     
    Does “nw european” stand for “Northwest European” or “Northwestern European”?

    which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.
     
    It doesn’t make sense to exclude Germans. The English, Dutch, and Danes, maybe even the French, are Germanic.

    steve has still yet to release his SAT and GMAT and 23&me.
     
    Wasn’t Steve a National Merit Scholar? What more do you need to know?
    , @JLK
    @anon

    What year?

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @anon


    mine were 1560 and 770
     
    That's way more than the maximum of any real SAT.

    and 100% nw european. which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.
     
    Care to insult any more nationalities with lower-class lower-casing?

    Replies: @Curle

    , @res
    @anon

    For maximum bragging effect you need to include that being a pre-1995 SAT score.

    P.S. Why did you leave out your GRE scores?

  74. @Polistra
    Somewhat off-topic, yet another incident of white nazi supremacy.

    https://i.ibb.co/DDX9j84/Screenshot-20211016-073805-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Sick of Orcs, @Shel100, @Cato

    Just like all the black on Asian crimes – white supremacy made her do it.

    • Agree: Polistra
  75. @Herp McDerp
    A few years ago, the University of California Board of Regents, incensed that Asians are pulling away from blacks and Latinos on SAT scores ...

    Even when I attended, eons ago, UCLA was known as the University of Caucasians Lost among Asians. Most of us Whities were okay with that, because the Asian kids acted White and fit in. (And many of the Asian girls were cute, too!)

    Certain other groups deliberately did not "act White," but that mostly meant that we didn't encounter them in our classes. Too bad; they would have lowered the curve and made the rest of us in STEM majors look smarter.

    Replies: @Deckin

    When I was at Cal, UCLA stood for “University of CA for Lower Achievers “

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  76. @res
    @Steve Sailer

    If you are interesting in predicting GRE results from SAT results this 1991 ETS paper is useful.
    Differences Among Racial and Ethnic Groups in Mean Scores on the GRE and SAT: Longitudinal Comparisons
    https://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/RR-91-14-Pennock-Roman.pdf

    The data is old (1984-85 GRE test takers), but the use of longitudinal comparisons and analysis by race make it worth a look IMHO.

    Regression results by race for GRE subtests on SAT subtests are in Table 5.

    Replies: @Sparkylyle92, @BARRY J

    I would be interested in your (or anyone’s) interpretation of that study. There was a lot of verbiage that obscured the plain meaning. Blacks seemed to do worse on the GRE than their SAT score would have predicted. The math part could be explained by few STEM students and high percentage of women. Was there an explanation of the verbal gap? Thanks.

    • Replies: @res
    @BARRY J


    I would be interested in your (or anyone’s) interpretation of that study.
     
    I started to do that in my earlier comment, but concluded they did a pretty good job of obscuring things and punted.

    Blacks seemed to do worse on the GRE than their SAT score would have predicted.
     
    I think the three explanations they gave on page 3 are in play. Not sure of the balance. In particular, explanation 2. (roughly speaking, restricted range of GRE takers relative to SAT takers lowers GRE SDs thus increasing z-score gap) and explanation 3. (very roughly reinterpreted, affirmative action increases lower ability NAMs applying to grad school) seem relevant. They evaluate the three explanations on pp. 12-14 (and reject explanation 2.).

    The math part could be explained by few STEM students and high percentage of women. Was there an explanation of the verbal gap?
     
    I hadn't noticed the 66% of blacks being female on page 6. Thanks. I'm not sure of the causal direction to consider for STEM student proportion and the gaps. The B/W gaps seem fairly consistent with other data, so I don't see much need to search for deeper explanations.

    Replies: @epebble

  77. Lowell HS, the gem of San Francisco HSs can no longer test students for admission. NYC school system has eliminated all gifted and talented programs. Buffalo’s City honors HS is always under attack because..well you know why. I have an 18 month old grand daughter who knows some numbers, some colors and can recognize animals in story books. By the time she gets to kintergarten she will be way past a lot of her fellow students and that won’t be because she is uber smart, but because her parents and grandparents invest time in reading to her and talking to her. Sad that people don’t want to see anyone succeed if all can’t acheive at the same level.

    • Thanks: Redneck farmer, Corvinus
    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @Buffalo Joe

    Again, when the government sets up an exclusionary system, like AA, even one by competitive entrance exam, like G&T, it stigmatizes those who either can’t meet the standard, or else don’t care to try.

    Laws that punish the innocent is trial by legislature, i.e. an attainder. But what's the Bill of Rights compared to the societal engineering of public education?

  78. @El Dato
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Originally from the NYT:

    China targets costly tutoring classes. Parents want to save them

    Which parents?


    Zhang Hongchun worries that his 10-year-old daughter isn’t getting enough sleep. Between school, homework and after-school guitar, clarinet and calligraphy practice, most nights she doesn’t get to bed before 11. Some of her classmates keep going until midnight.

    “Everyone wants to follow suit,” Zhang said. “No one wants to lose at the starting line.”
     

    Nutters don't know that you need to specialize to excel.

    In China, the competitive pursuit of education — and the better life it promises — is relentless. So are the financial pressures it adds to families already dealing with climbing house prices, caring for aging parents and costly health care.

    The burden of this pursuit has caught the attention of officials who want couples to have more children. China’s ruling Communist Party has tried to slow the education treadmill. It has banned homework, curbed livestreaming hours of online tutors and created more coveted slots at top universities.

    Last week, it tried something bigger: barring private companies that offer after-school tutoring and targeting China’s $100 billion for-profit test-prep industry. The first limits are set to take place during the coming year, to be carried out by local governments.

    The move, which will require companies that offer curriculum tutoring to register as nonprofits, is aimed at making life easier for parents who are overwhelmed by the financial pressures of educating their children. Yet parents and experts are skeptical it will work. The wealthy, they point out, will simply hire expensive private tutors, making education even more competitive and ultimately widening China’s yawning wealth gap.
     

    I guess to close a "yawning wealth gap" one must hand over top dollar to private enterprise which rapes your kid and builds a house of cards out of his/her mind. Quite an american attitude.

    Parental focus on education in China can sometimes make American helicopter parenting seem quaint. Exam preparation courses begin in kindergarten. Young children are enrolled in “early MBA” courses. No expense is spared, whether the family is rich or poor. For Chinese students hoping to get a spot at a prestigious university, everything hinges on the gaokao, a single exam that many children are primed for before they even learn how to write.
     
    Nutters. Reminds me mainly of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beneath_the_Wheel

    Come on whitey, you have a chance.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    The burden of this pursuit has caught the attention of officials who want couples to have more children. China’s ruling Communist Party has tried to slow the education treadmill. It has banned homework, curbed livestreaming hours of online tutors and created more coveted slots at top universities.

    When you think of it: it is ironic that the state, and particularly a totalitarian state, run by the Communist Party, tries to save you from yourself & to enable you to live a more humane life …..

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The Asian Way is to look good on paper but do nothing but bully the weak and leave it to the rare truly responsible person to actually do two or three times as much work as they should so that the running water mostly runs.

  79. There’s a country in the East that doesn’t mentally or physically castrate its best & brightest young men. They just did this:

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Paperback Writer

    I'm offended! As Stalin once said, how many tranny cabarets do they command?

    , @epebble
    @Paperback Writer

    That is particularly impressive and very worrying. U.S. has been having lot of problems in developing Hypersonic technology when Russia, China (and others) have operational weapon systems.

    https://www.defensenews.com/smr/federal-budget/2020/02/10/the-air-force-just-canceled-one-of-its-hypersonic-weapons-programs/

    https://www.defensetech.org/2008/10/14/darpa-cancels-hypersonic-blackswift/

    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/39620/navy-mysteriously-cancels-plan-to-arm-jets-with-screaming-arrow-hypersonic-anti-ship-weapon

    https://www.thedefensepost.com/2021/07/08/us-navy-railgun/

    https://denvergazette.com/news/pentagon-says-hypersonic-weapons-are-too-expensive/article_92870642-9c95-507c-888d-08803eacc08d.html

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    , @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Paperback Writer


    There’s a country in the East that doesn’t mentally or physically castrate its best & brightest young men.
     
    Actually China was early forerunner in both.

    Mentally, by an extremely rigid form of the Imperial Exam, the eight-legged essays. Used for 600 years Ming and Qing, just as the West surpassed China.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-legged_essay

    Physically this was done both voluntary and involuntarily. The former was done as a "career" route to become an eunuch. Quite a few times the most powerful or wealthiest "ex-man" of the empire was a eunuch. This has so many ignominious examples that I'll spare you the details.

    The latter has a rather inspiring example. Sima Qian 司馬遷 (145–c.  86 BC) of Han dynasty for standing up for a someone based on integrity, was punished by castration.

    In 96 BC, on his release from prison, Sima chose to live on as a palace eunuch to complete his histories, rather than commit suicide as was expected of a gentleman-scholar who had been disgraced by being castrated.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sima_Qian#The_Li_Ling_affair

    He is considered the father of Chinese historiography for his Records of the Grand Historian 史记.
    https://imgur.com/ZHf5WMY

    Antiquity
    Xia 夏 dynasty (2070 – 1600 BC)
    Shang 商 dynasty (1600 – 1046 BC)
    Zhou 周 dynasty (1046 – 256 BC)
    Spring and Autumn 春秋 period (722 – 476 BC)
    Warring States 战国 period (476 – 221 BC)
    1st Empire
    Qin 秦 dynasty (221 – 206 BC)
    Han 汉 dynasty (206 BC – AD 220)
    Three Kingdoms 三国 (AD 220 – 280)
    Jin 晋 dynasty (AD 266 – 420)
    Northern and Southern dynasties 南北朝 (AD 420 – 589)
    2nd Empire
    Sui 隋 dynasty (AD 581 – 618)
    Tang 唐 dynasty (AD 618 – 907)
    Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms 五代十国 (AD 907 – 960)
    Song, Liao, Jin, and Western Xia dynasties 宋辽金夏 (AD 960 – 1279)
    3rd Empire
    Yuan 元 dynasty (AD 1271 – 1368)
    Ming 明 dynasty (AD 1368 – 1644)
    Qing 清 dynasty (AD 1644 – 1912)
    Modern
    Republic of China (AD 1912 – present)
    PRC (AD 1949 – present)

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  80. Special treat for Steve & his merry band:

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Paperback Writer

    Men, as of now. A simple question of paperwork if this proves to be a problem.

  81. Anon[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    steve has still yet to release his SAT and GMAT and 23&me.

    sad.

    mine were 1560 and 770 (790 on the practice test) and 100% nw european. which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.

    Replies: @Anon, @JLK, @Reg Cæsar, @res

    mine were 1560 and 770 (790 on the practice test) and 100% nw european.

    Does “nw european” stand for “Northwest European” or “Northwestern European”?

    which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.

    It doesn’t make sense to exclude Germans. The English, Dutch, and Danes, maybe even the French, are Germanic.

    steve has still yet to release his SAT and GMAT and 23&me.

    Wasn’t Steve a National Merit Scholar? What more do you need to know?

  82. twitSteve: Nobody has even attempted to debunk my insta-analysis that Pfizer shut down lab processing in the World’s Most Important Clinical Trial from late October to the day after the election to keep Trump’s successful Operation Warp Speed program from winning him re-election.

    The question is, was their pause motivated more by TDS or fear of Democrat reprisal?

  83. @Paperback Writer
    Special treat for Steve & his merry band:

    https://twitter.com/FT/status/1449397354013073423?s=20

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Men, as of now. A simple question of paperwork if this proves to be a problem.

  84. @Paperback Writer
    There's a country in the East that doesn't mentally or physically castrate its best & brightest young men. They just did this:

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1449467671506993159?s=20

    Replies: @J.Ross, @epebble, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    I’m offended! As Stalin once said, how many tranny cabarets do they command?

  85. @Bardon Kaldian
    @El Dato


    The burden of this pursuit has caught the attention of officials who want couples to have more children. China’s ruling Communist Party has tried to slow the education treadmill. It has banned homework, curbed livestreaming hours of online tutors and created more coveted slots at top universities.
     
    When you think of it: it is ironic that the state, and particularly a totalitarian state, run by the Communist Party, tries to save you from yourself & to enable you to live a more humane life .....

    Replies: @J.Ross

    The Asian Way is to look good on paper but do nothing but bully the weak and leave it to the rare truly responsible person to actually do two or three times as much work as they should so that the running water mostly runs.

  86. @Altai
    OT: Another example of a McCloskey type MtF, aggressive 'tech' (Read get rich quick spivery) CEO who went full trans aged 38 with children after a divorce. This time profiled in Elle of all places.

    https://www.elle.com/life-love/a37507807/0106-0108-corporate-transition-october-2021/

    What's amazing is the article spends a lot of time describing Natalie's former male self as an 'asshole'. A lot. I suppose putting on a wig and dress changed their personality... Of course, one is tempted to say that maybe going to work in a dress and demanding everyone call them 'she' and 'Natalie' might be just another kind of manifestation of their anti-social personality disorder...


    That was circa 2009, when she was “an asshole and a jerk,” Egan says. But that wasn’t the only thing that was different about Egan back then: She had been assigned male at birth and raised as a boy. Married with three children, Egan took pride in her college-frat bona fides and harsh management style. She was a tech bro—a successful one, raising $7 million in investments for the tech-sales company she founded.
     

    I'll bet he was successful circa 2009 in raising dumb VC money. My question is, did the company actually do something productive? Or was it just a company with a solution to a problem that wasn't a problem? In other words the kind of snake oil stuff that aggressive 'charismatic' spivs are attracted to founding that VC money seemed only too happy to fund for 15 years assured they'd learned to be more discerning after the Dot Com crash. (Just like the IMF said it would never give Argentina another loan...)

    In 2009, after jobs in hospitality and tech, Egan started her own business, PeopleLinx, which helped companies use LinkedIn data to sell effectively. Tech start-ups then were “this culture that was rewarding toxic masculinity,” Egan says. And she ran it the way she’d seen other men run companies. She made decisions with little input, based on the idea that “representation and diverse perspectives slow things down,” she says. “I was like, ‘Go, go, go, we don’t have time for your opinion.’ ” If someone was late to a meeting, she’d publicly embarrass them. “It was, like, chest bumps and kegs,” Egan says. “Even as the company grew, we were having arm-wrestling competitions.”

    Her executive coach then and now, Russ Rosa, describes it this way: “There was a type of bullying masculinity that Natalie had that didn’t make her very popular.” But popularity didn’t matter; winning did. The company grew to 50 employees. High-profile clients signed on. Venture capital firms speculated that this could be a billion-dollar business. But then LinkedIn changed how it allowed other companies to access its data, endangering PeopleLinx’s core business. Egan appointed a friend as CEO so she could focus on sales, but the company was circling the drain. In 2015, the new CEO fired Egan, and she had no idea how to handle it. “It was the first time I wasn’t getting what I wanted,” she says.

     

    The culture was so toxic that 'Natalie' was fully able and willing to be a leader of such a company and set the tone. Also the company is one I've never heard of and the business idea sounds stupid. That might be why the atmosphere was like Wolf of Wallstreet, because it was a scam to get rich quick. And, of course, it was based on a flimsy situation of having access to another company's API and completely imploded when said company made a decision that was inevitable and out of their control.

    The article tries to suggest that 'Natalie' is a perfect experimental sample for how women are treated in the workplace with people taking 'Natalie' less seriously than before for reasons that must have only to do with 'sexism'. The other side of the experiment being the self-reported and tiny sample size studies which show FtMs report being treated better, also due to sexism. (It couldn't have anything to do with innate human reactions to tiny early 20s women pretending to be men and giant middle aged men pretending to be women)

    The proud woman in question.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/elm100121ppnatalie-egan001-1634068501.jpg

    Did any iSteve readers to school with 'Natalie' Egan?

    Replies: @Anon, @El Dato, @Colin Wright, @Polistra, @Sparkylyle92, @Achmed E. Newman

    Did any iSteve readers [go] to school with ‘Natalie’ Egan?

    No, but she looks awful familiar. I think I met her one time in a bar down in old Soho. I remember we drank champaign, and it tasted pretty much like Coca~Cola … C-O-L-A Cola.

  87. @Buffalo Joe
    Lowell HS, the gem of San Francisco HSs can no longer test students for admission. NYC school system has eliminated all gifted and talented programs. Buffalo's City honors HS is always under attack because..well you know why. I have an 18 month old grand daughter who knows some numbers, some colors and can recognize animals in story books. By the time she gets to kintergarten she will be way past a lot of her fellow students and that won't be because she is uber smart, but because her parents and grandparents invest time in reading to her and talking to her. Sad that people don't want to see anyone succeed if all can't acheive at the same level.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    Again, when the government sets up an exclusionary system, like AA, even one by competitive entrance exam, like G&T, it stigmatizes those who either can’t meet the standard, or else don’t care to try.

    Laws that punish the innocent is trial by legislature, i.e. an attainder. But what’s the Bill of Rights compared to the societal engineering of public education?

  88. I read though the post and comments, and I think Anon-#185 put it as close to as I would say it in his comment above.

    I don’t doubt your numbers and conclusion, Steve. I just think everyone but a few here is missing the big picture. This country won’t go on like this. The half-century-long idea of more and more people going to college to get a big leg up or head start in life is no good anymore. Most colleges indoctrinate your kids into the Totalitarian ctrl-left. Do you want that? Will most of them really get better jobs and live happier lives by spending that 50 or 100 large, to be turned into a mortage-sized payment plan without the house?

    There are other ways to go. Things will have to change. Yes, the admissions process is pretty rigged and unfair to some, but maybe the question is “why participate in this farce?”

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The college bubble is bursting, and not just due to Covid or even rampant wokeness. It's just not sustainable.

    If I had teen-age kids who were not STEM whizzes I'd advise them to find some tradesman or even a white-collar type professional who can let them tag along, teach them some useful skills and get them some on-the-job training. I don't know, does that sound like a plan?

    Even journalism -- I can tell you what you need to know pretty quickly, you just need to find someone who will let you go out and do it. Remember that story with the woman who got a four-year degree in hotel management -- and $60,000 debt? Jeezus, just work the front desk somewhere, follow the manager around and work up from there.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Rob

  89. @Anon
    I was reading in a book that universities used to make classes like calculus a requirement for med students for the sole purpose of flunking out the dummies. They'd say you have to pass it even though you'd never use it because it's a test of the problem-solving ability that's required for a doctor to be any good. I wonder if they still do that.

    They really need to assign a weed-out class like that for first semester freshman year if they're going to let the dummies in. It would at least flunk them out and let them know they're not college material before they take on too much debt.

    Blacks and browns do not have a clue how hard college is if you're taking regular courses and not just basket-weaving.

    Replies: @Deckin

    I think Ancient Greek and Latin served that purpose as well.

  90. @Hannah Katz
    @Altai

    My daughter earned a BS from Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo. It was a no nonsense school back then. No idea about now as we fled that state to Texas where she picked up a Masters.

    The Cal Poly entrance application was all about grades and SAT / ACT scores. For extracurricular activities, they had a Yes/No button. That was it. If you met a Cal Poly SLO graduate you knew you were dealing with a smart person.

    Betting the Cali Legislature has taken aim at Cal Poly. They often complained that the school was White, Christian and Republican. Like that was a bad thing... Her observation was that when she went there it was White and Asian, Christian and Jewish, and Republican and Independent.

    Replies: @ScarletNumber

    I think you are being too cynical. Even California realizes that its technical schools have to meet certain standards.

    Cal Poly SLO counts three pretty bright successful guys as alumni: John Madden, Ozzie Smith, and Weird Al Yankovic.

  91. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    In their defense, the HBD crowd around here is pretty smart so they assume that they personally will be able to compete with the Asians.

    This allows them to continue hiding under their peculiar brand of colorblind civic nationalism known as Citizenism. And remember, colorblind civic nationalism is a very enticing drug. It allows you to feel morally superior for doing nothing and throwing your own people - your extended family - under the bus.

    Naturally, the folks around here would dispute this. They don't look at whites as their "people." They're far too sophisticated for such an anachronism. Their people are other smart, interesting individuals regardless of race, embodied in Saint Thomas Sowell. Therefore, they're not throwing their people under the bus.

    (The fact that this is a club and not a people doesn't seem to dawn on them. Nor does it dawn on them that smart members of other races actually do have feelings for their own people.)

    What's more, they are against discrimination of whites, just as they are against discrimination against any individual for his or her race. This allows them to feel moral indignation against the Left.

    Of course, the idea of whites rallying as a group to fight back is abhorrent to our enlightened commentators and our host. Like any good Libertarian or someone suffering from Aspergers, they believe that we should only look at individuals as individuals, no need for feelings beyond oneself and immediate family. A lonely, atomized existence works best for them. This allows them to look down on ethno-nationalist such as yours truly.

    They get to look down on everyone while doing nothing. What more could you want?

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    The fact that this is a club and not a people doesn’t seem to dawn on them. Nor does it dawn on them that smart members of other races actually do have feelings for their own people

    Excellent point. Throughout history, those who put some club above their own nation (people) were known by the appropriate tag: traitor.

    It allows you to feel morally superior for doing nothing and throwing your own people – your extended family – under the bus.

    Some “smart fraction” White folks seem to have bitter memories of being mistreated as youths by other, less intelligent, Whites. Some of those reports may be true. But nonetheless, they aren’t denying a lack of loyalty to their own people, they are just justifying it.

  92. We are so f*cked.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123


    We are so f*cked.

     

    Who is “we“? Seriously, why should any white American worry about this?
    , @Corvinus
    @JohnnyWalker123

    So what? If and when the next world war happens, it goes nuclear, and all it takes is 10 well placed bombs on several continents, and then the human race is on the road to extinction, and the trillions that America owes to China goes up in smoke.

    Don’t get sucked into Jack Probiotic’s scare tactics.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @El Dato
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Well, if it goes to space it's bound to be hypersonic.

    "Nuclear capabale" is a function of payload mass, and depends on how small those thermonuclear things can get.

    China has its own space station now, so of course they have around-the-globe delivery capabilities.

    What's the word for "Silbervogel" in Mandarin?

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  93. @Anon
    @Altai


    I don’t know how many 2nd and over gen Asians they’ve met in America but the girls particularly are not your friends.
     
    Please elaborate?

    Replies: @SafeNow

    “2nd and over gen Asians they’ve met in America but the girls particularly are not your friends.”
    Please elaborate?

    At the risk of being officious, I will take a crack at elaborating. I once read a study that looked at Asian-American women who married Caucasian men. What the gals had sought was termed “egalitarian knighthood.” (Yes, just like Chaucer’s “Wife of Bath’s Tale.” Bonus verbal SAT points for you if you picked up the Chaucer thing on your own right away.) In other words, an escape from patriarchal Asian culture, and, a rescuer and protector from threat (= from financial worry.) I think Asian gals are very highly tuned to look for egalitarian knighthood; if lacking a high score here, you would find it’s the not-my-friend wastebasket for you.

  94. This is some Illuminati-tier stuff.

  95. @Polistra
    Somewhat off-topic, yet another incident of white nazi supremacy.

    https://i.ibb.co/DDX9j84/Screenshot-20211016-073805-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @Sick of Orcs, @Shel100, @Cato

    Isn’t that a Louis Vuitton purse?

    • LOL: Polistra
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Cato

    Probably a knockoff. See https://www.1stdibs.com/blogs/the-study/fake-louis-vuitton/.

  96. @anon
    steve has still yet to release his SAT and GMAT and 23&me.

    sad.

    mine were 1560 and 770 (790 on the practice test) and 100% nw european. which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.

    Replies: @Anon, @JLK, @Reg Cæsar, @res

    What year?

  97. Anon[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    I am of the mind that elite colleges should not exist, at all. Aside from being arrogant bastions of left wing ideology that are increasingly intolerant of dissent for the past 5 decades, they have also further perpetuated inequality by being country clubs for the liberal elite, who are busy pulling up the ladders for those they deem less holy or worthy than themselves for whatever reason, like holding dissenting political views or not Jewish/black/gay or otherwise oppressed enough.

    Education should not be a competition.
    It should be a place for people to seek knowledge, think, reflect, meet new people, debate new and old ideas. An education should be something one seeks to satisfy one's own curiosity, desire to learn etc., not to satisfy or impress others. I think all universities should be open to all who wish to enroll, as long as they meet a minimum GPA requirement. Those oversubscribed should simply run a lottery among the qualified applicants. This would distribute talent equally to all universities, allow kids to attend the university closest to home to cut cost, or not go at all but simply attend a vocational/trade school.

    So I welcome any effort elite colleges put in to make themselves less elite. If the Asians don't like it, they can always go back to dog-eat-dog, everything's a competition Asia. Our elite universities wouldn't have been half as elite if it weren't for these unimaginative, over-eager, hyper-competitive Asians prostrating outside their doors en masse begging to be let in. They only further feed into the ego of the arrogant left wing hypocrites running these schools. I welcome ever more efforts to keep them out. It'll be for their own good and ultimately, everyone's.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Prester John, @Prester John, @Hypnotoad666

    College prior to the 1960s was like this I believe. But then most people went to work after high school. If we want to restore some sanity to the system, we have to get back to that (and to vocational schools). We also need to make private colleges the guarantors of the government borrowing students undertake to attend their overpriced classes and to limit foreign student attendance at public schools. Do that and the numbers will drop enormously and nothing will be that “elite”. The best professors will spread out and best students will spread out

  98. @Abolish_public_education
    I am loving the fact that all those tiger cubs, who obediently spent 13 years (before 2020) prepping, won't gain any UC admission advantage from the effort.

    It's really something how the Regents sign-off on a system whereby lectures, and breakout/TA sections, are mainly hosted (certainly not taught) by foreigners -- usually Asian -- with molasses-thick accents. (At my college, the foreign professors were excellent, English speakers. The US-born faculty members were the ones with horrible communication skills.)

    Those who see admission to a four-year, state university, except for applied science applicants, should need to be nominated by a political official. Like they do at West Point. Then, when that admit proves itself to be a full-time leftist or jock, that nominator's re-election challenger can turn the appointee into a campaign issue.

    Replies: @Deckin

    In my Math 1c class at Cal our TA, when teaching us about Taylor polynomial series’s would remind us how to “evalrate the serious “

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Deckin


    In my Math 1c class at Cal our TA, when teaching us about Taylor polynomial series’s would remind us how to “evalrate the serious “

     


    You've got to ac-cent-tchu-ate the positive
    E-lim-i-nate the negative
    Eval'rate the serious
    Don't mess with Mister In-Between
     
    https://youtu.be/f3jdbFOidds
    , @stillCARealist
    @Deckin

    I would say the number of American-born TA's I had in the math/science fields at Berkeley (in the 80's!) was less than half.

    I disagree with the long-held premise that the existence of our top universities is to educate the offspring of the foreign elite. In fact, for the UC's, I'd say no admittance unless your parents have been paying property taxes in CA for at least 6 years. Six, because that's how long plenty of students take to graduate. Only a handful of exceptions allowed.

  99. Lesbian Domestic Violence

    U. of California Academic Senate…

    Aren’t you repeating yourself?

    incensed that Asians are pulling away from blacks and Latinos on SAT scores

    …not to mention on street address numbers and entire ZIP codes.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about the Hmong?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Rahan

  100. @Reg Cæsar

    Lesbian Domestic Violence

    U. of California Academic Senate...

     
    Aren't you repeating yourself?

    incensed that Asians are pulling away from blacks and Latinos on SAT scores
     
    ...not to mention on street address numbers and entire ZIP codes.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    What about the Hmong?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That comment was intended for you. The * is meant to mean the attached word is foreign, not English.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Rahan
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Can someone redpill me on the Hmong?

  101. What about the Hmong?

    Case in point. There aren’t many blacks and latinos* between St Paul and Green Bay, the Hmong corridor. As for Fresno, check out this graphic:

    https://datausa.io/profile/geo/fresno-ca#demographics

  102. @Escher
    Someone will write an elegy like Ozymandias to the empty ruins of Berkeley some day in the not too distant future.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Someone will write an elegy like Ozymandias to the empty ruins of Berkeley some day in the not too distant future.”

    Well, here’s what you got right: there will be empty ruins of Berkeley (that is, if it does not come under literal, not just nominal, Chinese occupation like the rest of CA).

    But you’re assuming that in the future, there will be anyone left who knows what an elegy is, who Ozymandias and Shelley were, or who even knows how to write.

  103. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about the Hmong?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Rahan

    That comment was intended for you. The * is meant to mean the attached word is foreign, not English.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Do the Hmong second generation show the same upward mobility as the Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese boat people?

    Replies: @Foreign Expert, @Reg Cæsar

  104. @Cato
    @Polistra

    Isn't that a Louis Vuitton purse?

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    • Thanks: Cato
  105. @JohnnyWalker123
    We are so f*cked.

    https://twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/1449475759320539138

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Corvinus, @El Dato

    We are so f*cked.

    Who is “we“? Seriously, why should any white American worry about this?

  106. Maybe the UCs should admit half of each freshman class according to traditional measures like test scores, GPA, and recommendation letters and the other half according to holistic measures like lived experience, essays about personal hardship, and zip code. Applicants can choose how they wish to be evaluated so as not to run afoul of Prop 209. Objectively strong applicants will choose a traditional evaluation, while weaker applicants will choose a holistic evaluation. Cal and UCLA each have a freshman class nearly 4 times the size of an elite private school so together, with this split admissions method, they can still can crank out as many talented graduates as Harvard, Columbia, Princeton, and Yale combined.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JimB


    Maybe the UCs should admit half of each freshman class according to traditional measures like test scores, GPA, and recommendation letters and the other half according to holistic measures like lived experience, essays about personal hardship, and zip code.
     
    Just establish quotas based on each ethnic group’s share of the state population: Hispanic, White, Black, Asian-Pacific Islander, Jewish.

    This isn’t difficult.

    Replies: @JimB

    , @Corvinus
    @JimB

    Good stuff there. But I would argue that college today compared to 30 years ago is highly overrated.

    Replies: @JimB

  107. @Deckin
    @Abolish_public_education

    In my Math 1c class at Cal our TA, when teaching us about Taylor polynomial series’s would remind us how to “evalrate the serious “

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist

    In my Math 1c class at Cal our TA, when teaching us about Taylor polynomial series’s would remind us how to “evalrate the serious “

    You’ve got to ac-cent-tchu-ate the positive
    E-lim-i-nate the negative
    Eval’rate the serious
    Don’t mess with Mister In-Between

  108. @Some Guy
    @Steve Sailer

    Any prediction of what their reaction will be when black/hispanic college outcomes deteriorate the most after getting rid of the SAT?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    Any prediction of what their reaction will be when black/hispanic college outcomes deteriorate the most after getting rid of the SAT?

    That’s easy. The professors and courses themselves will be found to be racist and in need of “reform” (i.e., dumbed down to high school level). College grades will then be eliminated so everyone gets a participation certificate instead.

    The lefty elites are in a never-ending state of cognitive dissonance. On the one hand they worship elite credentialism because that’s what supposedly makes them superior. But on the other hand their sacred blacks can’t measure up on the same scale.

  109. @anon
    I am of the mind that elite colleges should not exist, at all. Aside from being arrogant bastions of left wing ideology that are increasingly intolerant of dissent for the past 5 decades, they have also further perpetuated inequality by being country clubs for the liberal elite, who are busy pulling up the ladders for those they deem less holy or worthy than themselves for whatever reason, like holding dissenting political views or not Jewish/black/gay or otherwise oppressed enough.

    Education should not be a competition.
    It should be a place for people to seek knowledge, think, reflect, meet new people, debate new and old ideas. An education should be something one seeks to satisfy one's own curiosity, desire to learn etc., not to satisfy or impress others. I think all universities should be open to all who wish to enroll, as long as they meet a minimum GPA requirement. Those oversubscribed should simply run a lottery among the qualified applicants. This would distribute talent equally to all universities, allow kids to attend the university closest to home to cut cost, or not go at all but simply attend a vocational/trade school.

    So I welcome any effort elite colleges put in to make themselves less elite. If the Asians don't like it, they can always go back to dog-eat-dog, everything's a competition Asia. Our elite universities wouldn't have been half as elite if it weren't for these unimaginative, over-eager, hyper-competitive Asians prostrating outside their doors en masse begging to be let in. They only further feed into the ego of the arrogant left wing hypocrites running these schools. I welcome ever more efforts to keep them out. It'll be for their own good and ultimately, everyone's.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Prester John, @Prester John, @Hypnotoad666

    The only way to pull the plug out of our colleges and drain them is to create a booming labor market of well-paying jobs you don’t need a college degree to work.

    The problem is, colleges don’t have competition.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anon


    The only way to pull the plug out of our colleges and drain them is to create a booming labor market of well-paying jobs you don’t need a college degree to work.
     
    We have a booming labor market. In case you haven’t noticed, there is a labor shortage RIGHT NOW.

    College- and high-school aged kids should be encouraged to get out there and WORK.
  110. @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That comment was intended for you. The * is meant to mean the attached word is foreign, not English.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Do the Hmong second generation show the same upward mobility as the Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese boat people?

    • Replies: @Foreign Expert
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Do the Hmong second generation show the same upward mobility as the Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese boat people?
     
    I taught Chinese, Vietnamese, and Hmong children in Laos. The Hmong were serious but noticeably less intelligent.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Do the Hmong second generation show the same upward mobility as the Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese boat people?
     
    More like sideways mobility. At least in the smaller cities. Which may be to them what Eden Prairie is to the Somalis, a place for the more competent to escape to.

    Replies: @Escher

  111. @anon
    steve has still yet to release his SAT and GMAT and 23&me.

    sad.

    mine were 1560 and 770 (790 on the practice test) and 100% nw european. which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.

    Replies: @Anon, @JLK, @Reg Cæsar, @res

    mine were 1560 and 770

    That’s way more than the maximum of any real SAT.

    and 100% nw european. which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.

    Care to insult any more nationalities with lower-class lower-casing?

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Reg Cæsar

    “ That’s way more than the maximum of any real SAT.”

    1560 for total is 99.59 percentile. 770 for math is 97th percentile.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @res

  112. Rob says:
    @Anon

    In addition, the faculty committee concluded that using the state test for UC admission would probably lead to the development of a test prep industry that disadvantages those who can’t afford to pay for such lessons.
     
    I understand that blaming test prep is to some extent a progressive cope for low non-Asian minority scores. But it's also probably legit to some extent. It seems unlikely that the recent surge in Asian scores, which coincides with the redesign of the SAT, is purely a reflection of IQ differences.

    It would be useful to analyze how tests vary in terms of their vulnerability to prepping. Using the tests that are least vulnerable to prepping should maximize their usefulness in predicting intelligence, and would also reduce students' inclination to engage in miserable, wasteful grinding.

    To use an old SAT-style analogy- Chess : Fischer Random Chess :: SAT : ??

    Of course, neither a maximally g-loaded test nor a maximally prepping-vulnerable test is likely to boost black and Latino admissions. Shifting from one to the other would probably just shift the proportions of Asian and white students somewhat.

    Replies: @Rob

    The Coleman SAT is very vulnerable to prepping – intentionally so. Coleman revamped it from a “Scholastic Aptitude Test” to a “Scholastic Achievement Test” I italicized those words to highlight the difference here’s a quick googling’s worth of SAT changes since I took it, which was maybe 1994? I dunno. I really liked weed back then, ok?

    Here is an article on SAT changes over the decades. Terrible changes they made recently: Wrong answers are no worse than no answer, and a-d choices on multiple choice questions. Net result of those two changes: midwit strivers have to take the test over and over, hoping that this time, they’ll be a false positive for intelligence. Old SAT was designed to prevent false positives. But guess what? Having some high scores be dumb luck means there are some black high scorers!

    [MORE]

    Not mentioned in the article above, the high end has been compressed. The old SAT distinguished, according to Pumpkin Person, who used to comment at Halfsigma, and now has her own blog with a worthless comment section, says Murray said the old SAT had a ceiling of +4σ, or 162 IQ, which is like 5/100,000 people. Now a “perfect score” is within reach of more people. Today, 1600 is closer to like, 125. Better? Maybe if you’re one of the 125s trying to sneak in. But how does someone with an actual 150 IQ distinguish himself? The answer is the same dreadful tedium the 125s have to do. Grades – which punish missed assignments with zeros, but have ceilings of 100 on the final. That’s fair, in a way. But is it really the best education for people with 150 IQ to be running the course of honorss? They could be learning so much more, and when their minds are young and supple. I am nowhere near 150, but my brain was rotted away with D&D and Vampire: The Masquerade. In an appropriate educational program, I would have done more useful stuff. Like read more sci if!

    Heck, looks like the redesign ain’t not a secret. Here is CollegeBoard on the new SAT

    The Importance of Practice
    Unlike an aptitude test, students taking the SAT can improve their scores by completing rigorous high school courses and practicing the skills they’ve learned in those courses. Sustained effort and practice on core reading, writing, and math topics are at the heart of the SAT.

    Offhand, and this is without a googling. I did well on the SAT, but it ain’t not a test of motivation or laziness.

    They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for. Also for having a large male advantage. That said, analogy tests can be done very well or very badly. Badly, if they test really hard vocabulary and simple ways things are analogous. That’s a vocabulary test. Which, come to think of it, are pretty g loaded. However, I heard a much richer English vocabulary than any Mexican fruit picker in California or Chinese immigrant kid in NYC did. I’ll bet none of them knows what higgledy-piggledy means. Explaining analogy tests can be done badly. I was checking out a Kaplan book on the GRE, just to get a sense of the test, and I read their analogy section. I’m making up the wrong answer that they said was right:

    Ballet Dancer : Pirouette as
    A…
    B Hockey Player : Puck
    C Fencer : Riposte

    The book said B was the right answer! Ostensibly because dance and hockey are both activities, and one has pirouette and the other has pucks. No! Fencer : Riposte is right. Dance and fencing are both activities, and pirouettes and ripostes are physical things that they do. I was tempted to email Kaplan and explain. Except, I am somewhat opposed to extensive test prep unless one has not had the subject in years, and I did not want to give any help to faceless competition. If the name brand test prep book writer did not understand analogy questions, what are the odds that 90 IQ inner city teachers can explain them well?

    If the analogy questions are biased to upper-middle class+ interests, then that is something they might work on? But in a sprawling, diverse country, there is no set of activities that everyone is involved in and does similarly. Not to mention, kids in the slums can read. I know about, I dunno, Dune not because I worked for House Harkonnen, but because I read the book. I don’t know when I learned to read, because my mom thought I was looking at pictures in the World Book enclyclopedia (for Millenials, that’s like Wikipedia, except they are not subject to trolls ruining articles. Like one, on gene expression, said some things use a ubiquitinylated lysine to initiate proteins. No! All methionine or a derivative. In an encyclopedia, a digression like this would have been edited out.) and I did not care enough about “See Jane Run” to remember whether Jane ran with a dog or sat on a cat, or whatever.

    They killed the math section that tested the mathiness of your brain. It had questions like, “in the equation 125x + 174y < 4000, what is the largest possible difference between x and y when both are integers?” Then the next question was like, what’s the smallest possible difference?“ I realize largest diff is easy to answer. Round the answer of 4000/125, so this is an easy one. But it takes smarter people less time to think of dividing by the smaller number gives a bigger answer, and the biggest did is when one is zero, and then just divide. But really smart people can do the division problem in their heads with less time and effort than I can put it in my calculator. The smallest diff is harder. Someone smart will answer it quickly, less smart? Maybe realize it’s harder and skip it. Even less smart? Waste time and get the wrong answer.

    The question I remember from my test, though I don’t know if I got the answer right, but maybe? “How many times does the digit nine appear in the list of integers between 1 and 10,000?
    The answers, and I am totally making them up without a care for getting anywhere close to the answer:

    A 9
    B 9,999
    C 1,0o7
    D 1008

    I really must re-state, those answers are all wrong! If you just read the problem, which is the real one, though maybe it was integers up to 1000. Two of the answers did differ by one, though.

    There were pages of questions like this! Drawn from a huge test bank. All gone. Replaced by trigonometry to make the test reflect the kinds of bath you have learned, perhaps by rote, without understanding any of the proofs or applications. New math is pages of high school math problems. The “test” is how fast you can guess the answers.

    Which sort of test do you imagine is harder to grind-cram from fifth or sixth grade on? Oh yeah, the statistical penalty for guessing ~unless you could eliminate one, but on quite a few, the right answer was the one less intelligent people would eliminate. They had decades of psychometrics on the test. On millions of takers. All lost. Maybe not lost, like maybe it still exists, but some of it is just in retired peoples’ heads, like all practical knowledge.

    Why did they change a test that was very difficult to study for into one that’s very easy to study for, and thereby ruin countless hours on studying that teenagers could spend chasing the opposite (or same!) sex, driving badly, smoking schwag, and drinking whatever alcohol they could get their on?

    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.

    The people criticizing the test being biased towards people whose parents could game the system were right, though. Giving extra time to a blind person who has to have everything read aloud to him is much different from giving able-bodied kids the same amount of extra time because a well-compensated psychologist said the kid had ADHD after the kid’s mom told him to rehearse this list of ADHD symptoms for the appointment. The solution to that is to only give extra time to people whose physical disability requires extra time to get the question read to them/fill in the bubble with their left foot, like Tiny Duck types, etc. If your mental difference keeps you from doing well on the SAT, then that fact should affect your score. Maybe, on the old SAT extra time did not matter. I always finished standardized tests early. But on a test designed to measure how many problems you can solve by rote in x minutes?

    I’d love to see a 200 point question on each section of the SAT

    Verbal: “Write a coherent paragraph that has never been written on the SAT before. The more students who pick your topic (example: “my cat” will be scored as a “my cat” paragraph, not as a unique description of your particular cat)

    Math: “Explain an equation, concept or proof in math using your own words. For full points, this explanation must not have appeared on any previous SAT answer. The more students who pick the same topic as you, and write essentially the same explanation, the lower your score will be. (Example: explaining the equation “17584 + 26486” will be scored as ‘long integer addition’“

    Really stress out the Asians! They cannot even collaborate.

    Oh, I forgot the essay! That was a thing for a while. Some poor kids cannot even compare their scores outside a few years, because their scores are out of 2400, not 1600. They added an essay section with notional equality to the other two sections. As far as I know, there was no validating thirty minute essays on random topics as measuring cognitive ability with any accuracy (though I did get the second highest, score category, an “S” on the MCAT essay section, scored J-T. They were essays on proto-woke subjects. I think so black kids could start their essays with “As a black…” for easier scoring and to eliminate conservative white guts who started with “As a white male..” Later analysis of SAT essays and scoring showed that length strongly correlated with score.

    As anyone who has read my comments knows, length does not mean quality! The humorous thing? In school, I don’t think I ever wrote an essay that hit the length requirement. In college I was all “…and then there’s the ten page hume paper!” What? I thought it was five!” “To write a five page paper, I have to try to write a ten page paper!”

    Congrats if you made it this far! I have no finale.

    • Thanks: El Dato
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Rob

    Thanks.

    , @Ralph L
    @Rob

    Round the answer of 4000/125, so this is an easy one.

    It's infinity if you include negative integers. Good thing you didn't write the test.

    , @Corvinus
    @Rob

    “They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for“

    It was only a measure of those school districts which focused on extensive vocabulary, which I did thank my instructors in high school for. However, how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @El Dato, @Rob, @bomag

    , @bomag
    @Rob


    Then the next question was like, what’s the smallest possible difference?“ ... The smallest diff is harder.
     
    As written, this seems trivial, as any x=y less than or equal to thirteen satisfies the equation and yields a difference of zero.

    I suspect it was a question to suss out who understood the less-than sign.
    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Rob


    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.
     
    Great post. I hadn't realized the g-loading of the SAT had been watered down that much. Less g-loading, rewarding subject-matter prep, and setting a relatively low cap on maximum scores, could definitely account for the otherwise inexplicable surge in Asian scores since the great re-centering.

    This Quora answer isn't sourced, but seems legit: "the correlation coefficient ("r") is 0.86 for scores prior to re-centering and 0.72 after re-centering." https://www.quora.com/Are-IQ-estimations-based-on-SAT-results-accurate-Has-anyone-verified-these-results-with-actual-results-from-multiple-tests

    .86 to .72 is a big difference.

    Replies: @res

  113. @Rob
    @Anon

    The Coleman SAT is very vulnerable to prepping - intentionally so. Coleman revamped it from a “Scholastic Aptitude Test” to a “Scholastic Achievement Test” I italicized those words to highlight the difference here’s a quick googling’s worth of SAT changes since I took it, which was maybe 1994? I dunno. I really liked weed back then, ok?

    Here is an article on SAT changes over the decades. Terrible changes they made recently: Wrong answers are no worse than no answer, and a-d choices on multiple choice questions. Net result of those two changes: midwit strivers have to take the test over and over, hoping that this time, they’ll be a false positive for intelligence. Old SAT was designed to prevent false positives. But guess what? Having some high scores be dumb luck means there are some black high scorers!

    Not mentioned in the article above, the high end has been compressed. The old SAT distinguished, according to Pumpkin Person, who used to comment at Halfsigma, and now has her own blog with a worthless comment section, says Murray said the old SAT had a ceiling of +4σ, or 162 IQ, which is like 5/100,000 people. Now a “perfect score” is within reach of more people. Today, 1600 is closer to like, 125. Better? Maybe if you’re one of the 125s trying to sneak in. But how does someone with an actual 150 IQ distinguish himself? The answer is the same dreadful tedium the 125s have to do. Grades - which punish missed assignments with zeros, but have ceilings of 100 on the final. That’s fair, in a way. But is it really the best education for people with 150 IQ to be running the course of honorss? They could be learning so much more, and when their minds are young and supple. I am nowhere near 150, but my brain was rotted away with D&D and Vampire: The Masquerade. In an appropriate educational program, I would have done more useful stuff. Like read more sci if!

    Heck, looks like the redesign ain’t not a secret. Here is CollegeBoard on the new SAT


    The Importance of Practice
    Unlike an aptitude test, students taking the SAT can improve their scores by completing rigorous high school courses and practicing the skills they’ve learned in those courses. Sustained effort and practice on core reading, writing, and math topics are at the heart of the SAT.
     
    Offhand, and this is without a googling. I did well on the SAT, but it ain’t not a test of motivation or laziness.

    They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for. Also for having a large male advantage. That said, analogy tests can be done very well or very badly. Badly, if they test really hard vocabulary and simple ways things are analogous. That’s a vocabulary test. Which, come to think of it, are pretty g loaded. However, I heard a much richer English vocabulary than any Mexican fruit picker in California or Chinese immigrant kid in NYC did. I’ll bet none of them knows what higgledy-piggledy means. Explaining analogy tests can be done badly. I was checking out a Kaplan book on the GRE, just to get a sense of the test, and I read their analogy section. I’m making up the wrong answer that they said was right:

    Ballet Dancer : Pirouette as
    A…
    B Hockey Player : Puck
    C Fencer : Riposte

    The book said B was the right answer! Ostensibly because dance and hockey are both activities, and one has pirouette and the other has pucks. No! Fencer : Riposte is right. Dance and fencing are both activities, and pirouettes and ripostes are physical things that they do. I was tempted to email Kaplan and explain. Except, I am somewhat opposed to extensive test prep unless one has not had the subject in years, and I did not want to give any help to faceless competition. If the name brand test prep book writer did not understand analogy questions, what are the odds that 90 IQ inner city teachers can explain them well?

    If the analogy questions are biased to upper-middle class+ interests, then that is something they might work on? But in a sprawling, diverse country, there is no set of activities that everyone is involved in and does similarly. Not to mention, kids in the slums can read. I know about, I dunno, Dune not because I worked for House Harkonnen, but because I read the book. I don’t know when I learned to read, because my mom thought I was looking at pictures in the World Book enclyclopedia (for Millenials, that’s like Wikipedia, except they are not subject to trolls ruining articles. Like one, on gene expression, said some things use a ubiquitinylated lysine to initiate proteins. No! All methionine or a derivative. In an encyclopedia, a digression like this would have been edited out.) and I did not care enough about “See Jane Run” to remember whether Jane ran with a dog or sat on a cat, or whatever.

    They killed the math section that tested the mathiness of your brain. It had questions like, “in the equation 125x + 174y < 4000, what is the largest possible difference between x and y when both are integers?” Then the next question was like, what’s the smallest possible difference?“ I realize largest diff is easy to answer. Round the answer of 4000/125, so this is an easy one. But it takes smarter people less time to think of dividing by the smaller number gives a bigger answer, and the biggest did is when one is zero, and then just divide. But really smart people can do the division problem in their heads with less time and effort than I can put it in my calculator. The smallest diff is harder. Someone smart will answer it quickly, less smart? Maybe realize it’s harder and skip it. Even less smart? Waste time and get the wrong answer.

    The question I remember from my test, though I don’t know if I got the answer right, but maybe? “How many times does the digit nine appear in the list of integers between 1 and 10,000?
    The answers, and I am totally making them up without a care for getting anywhere close to the answer:

    A 9
    B 9,999
    C 1,0o7
    D 1008

    I really must re-state, those answers are all wrong! If you just read the problem, which is the real one, though maybe it was integers up to 1000. Two of the answers did differ by one, though.

    There were pages of questions like this! Drawn from a huge test bank. All gone. Replaced by trigonometry to make the test reflect the kinds of bath you have learned, perhaps by rote, without understanding any of the proofs or applications. New math is pages of high school math problems. The “test” is how fast you can guess the answers.

    Which sort of test do you imagine is harder to grind-cram from fifth or sixth grade on? Oh yeah, the statistical penalty for guessing ~unless you could eliminate one, but on quite a few, the right answer was the one less intelligent people would eliminate. They had decades of psychometrics on the test. On millions of takers. All lost. Maybe not lost, like maybe it still exists, but some of it is just in retired peoples’ heads, like all practical knowledge.

    Why did they change a test that was very difficult to study for into one that’s very easy to study for, and thereby ruin countless hours on studying that teenagers could spend chasing the opposite (or same!) sex, driving badly, smoking schwag, and drinking whatever alcohol they could get their on?

    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.

    The people criticizing the test being biased towards people whose parents could game the system were right, though. Giving extra time to a blind person who has to have everything read aloud to him is much different from giving able-bodied kids the same amount of extra time because a well-compensated psychologist said the kid had ADHD after the kid’s mom told him to rehearse this list of ADHD symptoms for the appointment. The solution to that is to only give extra time to people whose physical disability requires extra time to get the question read to them/fill in the bubble with their left foot, like Tiny Duck types, etc. If your mental difference keeps you from doing well on the SAT, then that fact should affect your score. Maybe, on the old SAT extra time did not matter. I always finished standardized tests early. But on a test designed to measure how many problems you can solve by rote in x minutes?

    I’d love to see a 200 point question on each section of the SAT

    Verbal: “Write a coherent paragraph that has never been written on the SAT before. The more students who pick your topic (example: “my cat” will be scored as a “my cat” paragraph, not as a unique description of your particular cat)

    Math: “Explain an equation, concept or proof in math using your own words. For full points, this explanation must not have appeared on any previous SAT answer. The more students who pick the same topic as you, and write essentially the same explanation, the lower your score will be. (Example: explaining the equation “17584 + 26486” will be scored as ‘long integer addition’“

    Really stress out the Asians! They cannot even collaborate.

    Oh, I forgot the essay! That was a thing for a while. Some poor kids cannot even compare their scores outside a few years, because their scores are out of 2400, not 1600. They added an essay section with notional equality to the other two sections. As far as I know, there was no validating thirty minute essays on random topics as measuring cognitive ability with any accuracy (though I did get the second highest, score category, an “S” on the MCAT essay section, scored J-T. They were essays on proto-woke subjects. I think so black kids could start their essays with “As a black…” for easier scoring and to eliminate conservative white guts who started with “As a white male..” Later analysis of SAT essays and scoring showed that length strongly correlated with score.

    As anyone who has read my comments knows, length does not mean quality! The humorous thing? In school, I don’t think I ever wrote an essay that hit the length requirement. In college I was all “…and then there’s the ten page hume paper!” What? I thought it was five!” “To write a five page paper, I have to try to write a ten page paper!”

    Congrats if you made it this far! I have no finale.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ralph L, @Corvinus, @bomag, @Hypnotoad666

    Thanks.

  114. The verbal section of the test was much, much easier. They ripped off the ACT grammar section, and took all the difficulty out of the reading section without even the time constraints that the ACT uses.

    Meanwhile, the math section added years of content, moving from just algebra and geometry to algebra 2, trig, and precalc. But the questions themselves were far easier.

    The ACT does just fine with no wrong answer penalty; that doesn’t have much impact.

    One thing I can’t see mentioned: the specific reason for the SBAC rejection? You say that the Senate found the SAT more valid than the SBAC, but that’s not mentioned in the story that I can see, only that they found it would recreate the same inequities, not that it would be less valid. I couldn’t find a link to the actual report, did I miss it?

    I’d guess that the one time nature of the SBAC, to say nothing of the fact that it’s not taken outside of a few states would be a bigger strike against it. How could non-Californians–a huge source of income to the UCs–apply to the UCs? If they used the SAT, then the whole exercise was for nothing. And that bit about “the development of a test prep industry” seems imposed by the state itself–they don’t want Asians starting to prep for the SBAC. But I can’t see why the UCs would care about that.

  115. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimB
    Maybe the UCs should admit half of each freshman class according to traditional measures like test scores, GPA, and recommendation letters and the other half according to holistic measures like lived experience, essays about personal hardship, and zip code. Applicants can choose how they wish to be evaluated so as not to run afoul of Prop 209. Objectively strong applicants will choose a traditional evaluation, while weaker applicants will choose a holistic evaluation. Cal and UCLA each have a freshman class nearly 4 times the size of an elite private school so together, with this split admissions method, they can still can crank out as many talented graduates as Harvard, Columbia, Princeton, and Yale combined.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Corvinus

    Maybe the UCs should admit half of each freshman class according to traditional measures like test scores, GPA, and recommendation letters and the other half according to holistic measures like lived experience, essays about personal hardship, and zip code.

    Just establish quotas based on each ethnic group’s share of the state population: Hispanic, White, Black, Asian-Pacific Islander, Jewish.

    This isn’t difficult.

    • Replies: @JimB
    @Anonymous


    Just establish quotas based on each ethnic group’s share of the state population: Hispanic, White, Black, Asian-Pacific Islander, Jewish.

    This isn’t difficult.
     

    Quotas and split admissions would accomplish similar results at UC, but my approach would beat a challenge in the state court. Quotas would not.
  116. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    @anon

    The only way to pull the plug out of our colleges and drain them is to create a booming labor market of well-paying jobs you don't need a college degree to work.

    The problem is, colleges don't have competition.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The only way to pull the plug out of our colleges and drain them is to create a booming labor market of well-paying jobs you don’t need a college degree to work.

    We have a booming labor market. In case you haven’t noticed, there is a labor shortage RIGHT NOW.

    College- and high-school aged kids should be encouraged to get out there and WORK.

  117. @J.Ross
    Philadelphia: woman raped on train while bystanders did nothing
    Philadelphia police chief: literally and appropriately named Outlaw
    https://apnews.com/article/business-arrests-pennsylvania-philadelphia-1d0c62ae547165eabfc40fc6a20f25be

    Replies: @El Dato

    In wild outlaw country, you rape goat.
    In CultMarx America, sacred black goat rapes YOU.
    And it’s on TikTok. Multiple times.

  118. @New Dealer
    At top UCals, some “holistic” admits and, worse, the children of overseas oligarchic looters who fake their SATs and ESLs, were already starting to interfere with instructional missions before the pandemic and abolition of the SAT. The issues cannot be publicly discussed.

    UC has long given some preference to low-income, first-generation, and top of local high school class students. Holistic review - http://admitguide.com/holistic-admission - used at the majority of campuses, formally has many worthy features.

    Every year, a university hires paid application readers to do holistic review of files. The process looks like it’s administratively sound – defined qualifications, training, testing, oversight, return hires.

    A state audit, however, showed that holistic review is open to abuse by the privileged:

    Our review found that campuses admitted 64 applicants—in addition to the two identified in the federal investigation—for academic years 2013–14 through 2018–19 on the basis of their families’ donations to campuses or their connections to campus staff, leadership, and donors.
     
    https://www.auditor.ca.gov/reports/2019-113/sections.html

    It’s likely that it is also abused to evade the legal prohibition on admission by racial quota, but any such abuse is also almost impossible to demonstrate. There is lots of emphasis on the diversity of hired readers, and from the very highest officials down to the lowly readers, there is palpable nudge-nudge, wink-wink atmosphere as to what is expected.

    If you are an analytic person, see if you can spot the sophistry in this Berkeley professor’s argument for the abolition of SAT. https://cshe.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/publications/rops.cshe_.4.16.geiser.satproposalberkeley.5.2.2016.pdf

    Replies: @El Dato

    A state audit, however, showed that holistic review is open to abuse by the privileged

    Well, it is holistic, isn’t it? Wads of mystery cash? Suits you, sir!

    If you are an analytic person, see if you can spot the sophistry

    Well then….

    Saul Geiser

    Hmmm. Ok, let’s scroll to the last paragraph on the last page of 14.

    Berkeley is thus faced with a choice of some consequence. One option is to continue to employ an admissions criterion with known collateral effects on students of color, even while admissions officials are barred by law from acting on that knowledge. Continuing to use the SAT under the constraints of Proposition 209 means accepting some level of residual bias against black and Latino applicants beyond what can be justified by test validity.

    Yes, and?

    The alternative is to discontinue use of the SAT in admissions altogether. If Berkeley cannot consider race as a contextual factor in admissions, neither should it consider the SAT.

    Non sequitur. Throwing toys out of prams?

  119. @Rob
    @Anon

    The Coleman SAT is very vulnerable to prepping - intentionally so. Coleman revamped it from a “Scholastic Aptitude Test” to a “Scholastic Achievement Test” I italicized those words to highlight the difference here’s a quick googling’s worth of SAT changes since I took it, which was maybe 1994? I dunno. I really liked weed back then, ok?

    Here is an article on SAT changes over the decades. Terrible changes they made recently: Wrong answers are no worse than no answer, and a-d choices on multiple choice questions. Net result of those two changes: midwit strivers have to take the test over and over, hoping that this time, they’ll be a false positive for intelligence. Old SAT was designed to prevent false positives. But guess what? Having some high scores be dumb luck means there are some black high scorers!

    Not mentioned in the article above, the high end has been compressed. The old SAT distinguished, according to Pumpkin Person, who used to comment at Halfsigma, and now has her own blog with a worthless comment section, says Murray said the old SAT had a ceiling of +4σ, or 162 IQ, which is like 5/100,000 people. Now a “perfect score” is within reach of more people. Today, 1600 is closer to like, 125. Better? Maybe if you’re one of the 125s trying to sneak in. But how does someone with an actual 150 IQ distinguish himself? The answer is the same dreadful tedium the 125s have to do. Grades - which punish missed assignments with zeros, but have ceilings of 100 on the final. That’s fair, in a way. But is it really the best education for people with 150 IQ to be running the course of honorss? They could be learning so much more, and when their minds are young and supple. I am nowhere near 150, but my brain was rotted away with D&D and Vampire: The Masquerade. In an appropriate educational program, I would have done more useful stuff. Like read more sci if!

    Heck, looks like the redesign ain’t not a secret. Here is CollegeBoard on the new SAT


    The Importance of Practice
    Unlike an aptitude test, students taking the SAT can improve their scores by completing rigorous high school courses and practicing the skills they’ve learned in those courses. Sustained effort and practice on core reading, writing, and math topics are at the heart of the SAT.
     
    Offhand, and this is without a googling. I did well on the SAT, but it ain’t not a test of motivation or laziness.

    They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for. Also for having a large male advantage. That said, analogy tests can be done very well or very badly. Badly, if they test really hard vocabulary and simple ways things are analogous. That’s a vocabulary test. Which, come to think of it, are pretty g loaded. However, I heard a much richer English vocabulary than any Mexican fruit picker in California or Chinese immigrant kid in NYC did. I’ll bet none of them knows what higgledy-piggledy means. Explaining analogy tests can be done badly. I was checking out a Kaplan book on the GRE, just to get a sense of the test, and I read their analogy section. I’m making up the wrong answer that they said was right:

    Ballet Dancer : Pirouette as
    A…
    B Hockey Player : Puck
    C Fencer : Riposte

    The book said B was the right answer! Ostensibly because dance and hockey are both activities, and one has pirouette and the other has pucks. No! Fencer : Riposte is right. Dance and fencing are both activities, and pirouettes and ripostes are physical things that they do. I was tempted to email Kaplan and explain. Except, I am somewhat opposed to extensive test prep unless one has not had the subject in years, and I did not want to give any help to faceless competition. If the name brand test prep book writer did not understand analogy questions, what are the odds that 90 IQ inner city teachers can explain them well?

    If the analogy questions are biased to upper-middle class+ interests, then that is something they might work on? But in a sprawling, diverse country, there is no set of activities that everyone is involved in and does similarly. Not to mention, kids in the slums can read. I know about, I dunno, Dune not because I worked for House Harkonnen, but because I read the book. I don’t know when I learned to read, because my mom thought I was looking at pictures in the World Book enclyclopedia (for Millenials, that’s like Wikipedia, except they are not subject to trolls ruining articles. Like one, on gene expression, said some things use a ubiquitinylated lysine to initiate proteins. No! All methionine or a derivative. In an encyclopedia, a digression like this would have been edited out.) and I did not care enough about “See Jane Run” to remember whether Jane ran with a dog or sat on a cat, or whatever.

    They killed the math section that tested the mathiness of your brain. It had questions like, “in the equation 125x + 174y < 4000, what is the largest possible difference between x and y when both are integers?” Then the next question was like, what’s the smallest possible difference?“ I realize largest diff is easy to answer. Round the answer of 4000/125, so this is an easy one. But it takes smarter people less time to think of dividing by the smaller number gives a bigger answer, and the biggest did is when one is zero, and then just divide. But really smart people can do the division problem in their heads with less time and effort than I can put it in my calculator. The smallest diff is harder. Someone smart will answer it quickly, less smart? Maybe realize it’s harder and skip it. Even less smart? Waste time and get the wrong answer.

    The question I remember from my test, though I don’t know if I got the answer right, but maybe? “How many times does the digit nine appear in the list of integers between 1 and 10,000?
    The answers, and I am totally making them up without a care for getting anywhere close to the answer:

    A 9
    B 9,999
    C 1,0o7
    D 1008

    I really must re-state, those answers are all wrong! If you just read the problem, which is the real one, though maybe it was integers up to 1000. Two of the answers did differ by one, though.

    There were pages of questions like this! Drawn from a huge test bank. All gone. Replaced by trigonometry to make the test reflect the kinds of bath you have learned, perhaps by rote, without understanding any of the proofs or applications. New math is pages of high school math problems. The “test” is how fast you can guess the answers.

    Which sort of test do you imagine is harder to grind-cram from fifth or sixth grade on? Oh yeah, the statistical penalty for guessing ~unless you could eliminate one, but on quite a few, the right answer was the one less intelligent people would eliminate. They had decades of psychometrics on the test. On millions of takers. All lost. Maybe not lost, like maybe it still exists, but some of it is just in retired peoples’ heads, like all practical knowledge.

    Why did they change a test that was very difficult to study for into one that’s very easy to study for, and thereby ruin countless hours on studying that teenagers could spend chasing the opposite (or same!) sex, driving badly, smoking schwag, and drinking whatever alcohol they could get their on?

    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.

    The people criticizing the test being biased towards people whose parents could game the system were right, though. Giving extra time to a blind person who has to have everything read aloud to him is much different from giving able-bodied kids the same amount of extra time because a well-compensated psychologist said the kid had ADHD after the kid’s mom told him to rehearse this list of ADHD symptoms for the appointment. The solution to that is to only give extra time to people whose physical disability requires extra time to get the question read to them/fill in the bubble with their left foot, like Tiny Duck types, etc. If your mental difference keeps you from doing well on the SAT, then that fact should affect your score. Maybe, on the old SAT extra time did not matter. I always finished standardized tests early. But on a test designed to measure how many problems you can solve by rote in x minutes?

    I’d love to see a 200 point question on each section of the SAT

    Verbal: “Write a coherent paragraph that has never been written on the SAT before. The more students who pick your topic (example: “my cat” will be scored as a “my cat” paragraph, not as a unique description of your particular cat)

    Math: “Explain an equation, concept or proof in math using your own words. For full points, this explanation must not have appeared on any previous SAT answer. The more students who pick the same topic as you, and write essentially the same explanation, the lower your score will be. (Example: explaining the equation “17584 + 26486” will be scored as ‘long integer addition’“

    Really stress out the Asians! They cannot even collaborate.

    Oh, I forgot the essay! That was a thing for a while. Some poor kids cannot even compare their scores outside a few years, because their scores are out of 2400, not 1600. They added an essay section with notional equality to the other two sections. As far as I know, there was no validating thirty minute essays on random topics as measuring cognitive ability with any accuracy (though I did get the second highest, score category, an “S” on the MCAT essay section, scored J-T. They were essays on proto-woke subjects. I think so black kids could start their essays with “As a black…” for easier scoring and to eliminate conservative white guts who started with “As a white male..” Later analysis of SAT essays and scoring showed that length strongly correlated with score.

    As anyone who has read my comments knows, length does not mean quality! The humorous thing? In school, I don’t think I ever wrote an essay that hit the length requirement. In college I was all “…and then there’s the ten page hume paper!” What? I thought it was five!” “To write a five page paper, I have to try to write a ten page paper!”

    Congrats if you made it this far! I have no finale.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ralph L, @Corvinus, @bomag, @Hypnotoad666

    Round the answer of 4000/125, so this is an easy one.

    It’s infinity if you include negative integers. Good thing you didn’t write the test.

  120. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Do the Hmong second generation show the same upward mobility as the Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese boat people?

    Replies: @Foreign Expert, @Reg Cæsar

    Do the Hmong second generation show the same upward mobility as the Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese boat people?

    I taught Chinese, Vietnamese, and Hmong children in Laos. The Hmong were serious but noticeably less intelligent.

  121. @Deckin
    @Abolish_public_education

    In my Math 1c class at Cal our TA, when teaching us about Taylor polynomial series’s would remind us how to “evalrate the serious “

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @stillCARealist

    I would say the number of American-born TA’s I had in the math/science fields at Berkeley (in the 80’s!) was less than half.

    I disagree with the long-held premise that the existence of our top universities is to educate the offspring of the foreign elite. In fact, for the UC’s, I’d say no admittance unless your parents have been paying property taxes in CA for at least 6 years. Six, because that’s how long plenty of students take to graduate. Only a handful of exceptions allowed.

  122. @Some Guy
    @International Jew


    The predictive value of high school grades would be even lower if not for the fact that the thing they’re trying to predict is college grades.
     
    And perhaps especially first-year grades. After all, if you're good student in the last year of high school, you're probably going to be a good student a few months later when you start college, right? But over 4 years away from your parents who knows how your habits and motivation change.

    Meanwhile SAT scores don't depend much on your current habits or motivation, so their predictiveness is probably more stable over time.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @stillCARealist, @slumber_j

    But over 4 years away from your parents who knows how your habits and motivation change.

    In retrospect and in the spirit of Stalino-Maoist self-criticism, it’s apparent in my case that one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college. I didn’t slack off entirely, but I’d never liked school that much and didn’t want any more of it, so I didn’t really apply myself as I might have.

    That was almost certainly a mistake on my part and probably indicates a character deficit, but it definitely happened. I probably should have taken time off before starting college–or as some people now say in the borrowed Briticism, taken a “gap year.” (I guess that makes it sound less directionless?)

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @slumber_j


    one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college.
     
    In my case that meant no longer doing stupid extracurricular resume-building things and instead liberating my inner nerd.

    Replies: @Alice in Wonderland

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @slumber_j

    "one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college. "

    There's a dignified precedent for this phenomenon. It's called ToDai.

  123. @Rob
    @Anon

    The Coleman SAT is very vulnerable to prepping - intentionally so. Coleman revamped it from a “Scholastic Aptitude Test” to a “Scholastic Achievement Test” I italicized those words to highlight the difference here’s a quick googling’s worth of SAT changes since I took it, which was maybe 1994? I dunno. I really liked weed back then, ok?

    Here is an article on SAT changes over the decades. Terrible changes they made recently: Wrong answers are no worse than no answer, and a-d choices on multiple choice questions. Net result of those two changes: midwit strivers have to take the test over and over, hoping that this time, they’ll be a false positive for intelligence. Old SAT was designed to prevent false positives. But guess what? Having some high scores be dumb luck means there are some black high scorers!

    Not mentioned in the article above, the high end has been compressed. The old SAT distinguished, according to Pumpkin Person, who used to comment at Halfsigma, and now has her own blog with a worthless comment section, says Murray said the old SAT had a ceiling of +4σ, or 162 IQ, which is like 5/100,000 people. Now a “perfect score” is within reach of more people. Today, 1600 is closer to like, 125. Better? Maybe if you’re one of the 125s trying to sneak in. But how does someone with an actual 150 IQ distinguish himself? The answer is the same dreadful tedium the 125s have to do. Grades - which punish missed assignments with zeros, but have ceilings of 100 on the final. That’s fair, in a way. But is it really the best education for people with 150 IQ to be running the course of honorss? They could be learning so much more, and when their minds are young and supple. I am nowhere near 150, but my brain was rotted away with D&D and Vampire: The Masquerade. In an appropriate educational program, I would have done more useful stuff. Like read more sci if!

    Heck, looks like the redesign ain’t not a secret. Here is CollegeBoard on the new SAT


    The Importance of Practice
    Unlike an aptitude test, students taking the SAT can improve their scores by completing rigorous high school courses and practicing the skills they’ve learned in those courses. Sustained effort and practice on core reading, writing, and math topics are at the heart of the SAT.
     
    Offhand, and this is without a googling. I did well on the SAT, but it ain’t not a test of motivation or laziness.

    They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for. Also for having a large male advantage. That said, analogy tests can be done very well or very badly. Badly, if they test really hard vocabulary and simple ways things are analogous. That’s a vocabulary test. Which, come to think of it, are pretty g loaded. However, I heard a much richer English vocabulary than any Mexican fruit picker in California or Chinese immigrant kid in NYC did. I’ll bet none of them knows what higgledy-piggledy means. Explaining analogy tests can be done badly. I was checking out a Kaplan book on the GRE, just to get a sense of the test, and I read their analogy section. I’m making up the wrong answer that they said was right:

    Ballet Dancer : Pirouette as
    A…
    B Hockey Player : Puck
    C Fencer : Riposte

    The book said B was the right answer! Ostensibly because dance and hockey are both activities, and one has pirouette and the other has pucks. No! Fencer : Riposte is right. Dance and fencing are both activities, and pirouettes and ripostes are physical things that they do. I was tempted to email Kaplan and explain. Except, I am somewhat opposed to extensive test prep unless one has not had the subject in years, and I did not want to give any help to faceless competition. If the name brand test prep book writer did not understand analogy questions, what are the odds that 90 IQ inner city teachers can explain them well?

    If the analogy questions are biased to upper-middle class+ interests, then that is something they might work on? But in a sprawling, diverse country, there is no set of activities that everyone is involved in and does similarly. Not to mention, kids in the slums can read. I know about, I dunno, Dune not because I worked for House Harkonnen, but because I read the book. I don’t know when I learned to read, because my mom thought I was looking at pictures in the World Book enclyclopedia (for Millenials, that’s like Wikipedia, except they are not subject to trolls ruining articles. Like one, on gene expression, said some things use a ubiquitinylated lysine to initiate proteins. No! All methionine or a derivative. In an encyclopedia, a digression like this would have been edited out.) and I did not care enough about “See Jane Run” to remember whether Jane ran with a dog or sat on a cat, or whatever.

    They killed the math section that tested the mathiness of your brain. It had questions like, “in the equation 125x + 174y < 4000, what is the largest possible difference between x and y when both are integers?” Then the next question was like, what’s the smallest possible difference?“ I realize largest diff is easy to answer. Round the answer of 4000/125, so this is an easy one. But it takes smarter people less time to think of dividing by the smaller number gives a bigger answer, and the biggest did is when one is zero, and then just divide. But really smart people can do the division problem in their heads with less time and effort than I can put it in my calculator. The smallest diff is harder. Someone smart will answer it quickly, less smart? Maybe realize it’s harder and skip it. Even less smart? Waste time and get the wrong answer.

    The question I remember from my test, though I don’t know if I got the answer right, but maybe? “How many times does the digit nine appear in the list of integers between 1 and 10,000?
    The answers, and I am totally making them up without a care for getting anywhere close to the answer:

    A 9
    B 9,999
    C 1,0o7
    D 1008

    I really must re-state, those answers are all wrong! If you just read the problem, which is the real one, though maybe it was integers up to 1000. Two of the answers did differ by one, though.

    There were pages of questions like this! Drawn from a huge test bank. All gone. Replaced by trigonometry to make the test reflect the kinds of bath you have learned, perhaps by rote, without understanding any of the proofs or applications. New math is pages of high school math problems. The “test” is how fast you can guess the answers.

    Which sort of test do you imagine is harder to grind-cram from fifth or sixth grade on? Oh yeah, the statistical penalty for guessing ~unless you could eliminate one, but on quite a few, the right answer was the one less intelligent people would eliminate. They had decades of psychometrics on the test. On millions of takers. All lost. Maybe not lost, like maybe it still exists, but some of it is just in retired peoples’ heads, like all practical knowledge.

    Why did they change a test that was very difficult to study for into one that’s very easy to study for, and thereby ruin countless hours on studying that teenagers could spend chasing the opposite (or same!) sex, driving badly, smoking schwag, and drinking whatever alcohol they could get their on?

    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.

    The people criticizing the test being biased towards people whose parents could game the system were right, though. Giving extra time to a blind person who has to have everything read aloud to him is much different from giving able-bodied kids the same amount of extra time because a well-compensated psychologist said the kid had ADHD after the kid’s mom told him to rehearse this list of ADHD symptoms for the appointment. The solution to that is to only give extra time to people whose physical disability requires extra time to get the question read to them/fill in the bubble with their left foot, like Tiny Duck types, etc. If your mental difference keeps you from doing well on the SAT, then that fact should affect your score. Maybe, on the old SAT extra time did not matter. I always finished standardized tests early. But on a test designed to measure how many problems you can solve by rote in x minutes?

    I’d love to see a 200 point question on each section of the SAT

    Verbal: “Write a coherent paragraph that has never been written on the SAT before. The more students who pick your topic (example: “my cat” will be scored as a “my cat” paragraph, not as a unique description of your particular cat)

    Math: “Explain an equation, concept or proof in math using your own words. For full points, this explanation must not have appeared on any previous SAT answer. The more students who pick the same topic as you, and write essentially the same explanation, the lower your score will be. (Example: explaining the equation “17584 + 26486” will be scored as ‘long integer addition’“

    Really stress out the Asians! They cannot even collaborate.

    Oh, I forgot the essay! That was a thing for a while. Some poor kids cannot even compare their scores outside a few years, because their scores are out of 2400, not 1600. They added an essay section with notional equality to the other two sections. As far as I know, there was no validating thirty minute essays on random topics as measuring cognitive ability with any accuracy (though I did get the second highest, score category, an “S” on the MCAT essay section, scored J-T. They were essays on proto-woke subjects. I think so black kids could start their essays with “As a black…” for easier scoring and to eliminate conservative white guts who started with “As a white male..” Later analysis of SAT essays and scoring showed that length strongly correlated with score.

    As anyone who has read my comments knows, length does not mean quality! The humorous thing? In school, I don’t think I ever wrote an essay that hit the length requirement. In college I was all “…and then there’s the ten page hume paper!” What? I thought it was five!” “To write a five page paper, I have to try to write a ten page paper!”

    Congrats if you made it this far! I have no finale.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ralph L, @Corvinus, @bomag, @Hypnotoad666

    “They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for“

    It was only a measure of those school districts which focused on extensive vocabulary, which I did thank my instructors in high school for. However, how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Corvinus

    "how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words?"

    They're called "public libraries". Going to the library and reading on your own, without being ordered to, is in itself a sign of:

    a) intelligence
    b) multiculturalism
    c) regatta
    d) reggae

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @El Dato
    @Corvinus


    academic exercise
     
    Really.

    Making analogies is a rather big deal.

    It has been recognized as core element by the symbolic AI / good old-fashioned AI research community since the 80s. Still unsolved:

    The Computer Scientist Training AI to Think With Analogies

    Here we have a paper on Hofstaedter's Copycat of the 80s (NB for some reason, that paper appears in "Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena")

    And a book on Doug French's Tabletop.

    if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?
     
    So, how do you propose to fix those defective individuals so that they can handle that IQ test?

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Rob
    @Corvinus

    As I said, analogies can be done badly, with difficult vocabulary and simple or off analogies. A good test uses reasonable vocabulary, and the difficulty varies by having to figure out the way an answer pair is analogous to the question’s pair.

    One reason we know analogies are g-loaded is that studying for them does not make people better at them. People can learn vocabulary. The difference between vocabulary and analogies could be analogized to the difference between forwarding and backward digit span. “Knowing” it compared to thinking with it. Forward digit span is your ability to repeat a string of numbers after hearing it once. It tests memory. Backward digit span is your ability to hear a string of numbers and repeat it backward. It tests working memory. Your ability to manipulate data in your mind. Vocabulary and forward digit span both correlate with full-scale IQ and, statistically, with g. If you are good at vocabulary, you might be good at analogies. If you are good at analogies you probably have a high backward digit span. It is not necessarily so, some fairly smart people have some very specific deficits. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses, but smarter people have relative weaknesses. Most people who are a lot better at analogies than average are smart. Vocabulary? Maybe you just memorized definitions and cannot use it.

    I do tend to think vocabulary is overvalued, but it was a scholastic aptitude test, and how much aptitude one has for education is related to how much one reads serious writing, whether fiction or non-fiction. Once upon a time, college students were expected to do the reading.

    While the vocabulary in English lit may frequency be abjure and even super-ciliates, vocabulary in technical fields is important. Impulse and momentum are not the same. Physics is easier if you can keep them straight. The better one’s incoming vocabulary, the more likely one is to learn fine distinctions. Knowing the difference between a ribosome and a ribozyme is important in bio. If you know that the core catalytic function of the ribosome is performed by a ribozyme, then you know even more. It’s hard to appreciate the more when aren’t quite sure what either is and how exactly they differ from mRNA, which differs from tRNA. Similar terms, used in the same contexts. Different meanings. People with a greater knack for knowing that abjure is not related to obscure, and while superfluous and supercilious mean different things, both fit the context, so neither would be funny, super-ciliates is a pretty good result from a brain-wracking, and people who are better at keeping these words separate when the context does not provide many clues, have more scholastic aptitude.

    Even realizing that ((π*c)/d)*x - sin (k*x) = number is the same class of equation as sin(x) - x = 0, ie transcendental and no closed-form algebraic solution would have saved me a couple of hours spent banging my head against Matlab’s symbolic equation solver. If my working memory were better, I’d have seen it right away. My friend called, and I simplified it to explain it to him, and got thru “it’s a constant times sin(x) minus-It’s transcendental! Thanks, man, you saved me infinity time!” If I were smarter, I’d have simplified it earlier. Add up more and more things that take someone more time to figure out, and a two-hour problem set becomes a twenty-hour problem set. More likely, though, is that it becomes an unfinished problem set.

    The fact that people think that “I didn’t learn that at school” is a reason to think the SAT is “biased” fluctuates me (unless it flummoxes me. Who knows?). If they had more aptitude, they would have learned that in school. Should kids with higher ability be educated separately from very low ability, uninterested students who attend the same school? I think so, but the same people who complain that the SAT is biased have fought very hard against “stigmatizing” kids by putting them in lower tracks. The fact also remains that we are a very diverse, unequal country (no longer a nation), so there are schools where the student body averages, say 115 IQ, and schools where the student body averages 75. The solution is not busing. Higher ability parents move their kids out of busing range. “Affordable housing” built-in good areas does not help. People move, send their kids to private schools, or get all the black kids put in a remedial track, soon to have their separate entrance. I guess that the huge push to have every autistic kid have his own teacher was in response to white parents seeing their autistic kids treated terribly by, and picking up bad habits from, the African-American students in the low-ability classroom.

    I read a very sad essay in a Californian paper, by an Hispanic girl in a heavily Hispanic school who went to an SAT review session at a local(ish) university. By the way, both uses of an were correct. The TA or teacher or whatnot put an equation on the board that she had never seen as the most basic thing they were going to review. Later, white kids, blonds (they are always blond in these stories. I think blacks and Hispanics have looser criteria for blondness than whites) are the ones who answer all the hard vocabulary words correctly. Words she had never seen, of course. She laments that her school did not teach the same coursework rich and high-income schools used. Left unsaid was that the richer schools were not educating new Mixtec-speaking arrivals every week.

    As I said in my comment, I think the SAT was a better test back when 1100 was a good score, studying was much more difficult, and 3-4 people a year got perfect scores. I think the country was better when there were well-paying jobs available for people who were not good with symbols. When there were a hundred million fewer people in the country. Back when whites could imagine having a future. But the Hispanic girl above would not be here, lamenting that Hispanic girls of working-class parents do not have as good a chance of getting into the elite colleges as the children of the capitalists and rentiers who wanted her parents here to break the unions and drive down wages.

    The simple, heartbreaking fact is that there are lots of students who do not have academic potential. There is no realistic uplift scenario that has not already failed. There are not even any unrealistic scenarios that would work. How the country copes with that (or doesn’t) will be interesting times, in a Chinese sense, of course. I have also heard that that is not a Chinese proverb, at least not one that survived Mao. Right now, the elite’s plan, at least their daughters’ plan, is to make sure the dumbest person in every room is both black and in charge. Either the high-prestige institutions that are doing this will fail or the boards, foundations, or what-have-you that hire the CEO will have an “Executive Assistant CEO” whose job is CEOing, and the CEO’s job is being black in a suit. Likely, the new diversity push will not put anyone in an important position, but “drinking one’s own Kool-Aid” is a saying for a reason.

    A lot of people have gone all-in on only a country with a (predatory and parasitic) elite that looks like America is legitimate. That poor blacks, browns, and whites will be happy in penury as long as some people with their skin tones are among the predators. The viability of this strategy is uncertain. However, the lower classes have been well-oppressed in lots of countries. The new America will be poorer than the old. Not for the capitalists and landlords, of course. Their assets will do better than inflation because more people mean more money. When one sells toilet paper, more asses looks like economic growth. The same surveillance and non-state law enforcement currently applied to right-wingers will be turned on anyone who wants a better economy for the masses. The simple fact will be, though, that the majority non-white America liberals welcomed to defeat their hated enemy, conservatives, will have much degraded human capital relative to the human population. There will not be the 40K per capita (in 2018 dollars) in 2050, much less 2075 America, barring some biotech miracle, not be able to afford all the social programs liberals “knew” they could vote in when they hacked our elections with immigrants. They will have the votes. They just won’t have the economy.

    Killing the SAT hastened our decline, and arguing about it is just a distraction, really. Maybe i’m just a depressive?

    , @bomag
    @Corvinus


    ...how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?
     
    We've worked pretty hard to get everyone in school and exposed to all the proper words, yet the Gap remains.
  124. @JimB
    Maybe the UCs should admit half of each freshman class according to traditional measures like test scores, GPA, and recommendation letters and the other half according to holistic measures like lived experience, essays about personal hardship, and zip code. Applicants can choose how they wish to be evaluated so as not to run afoul of Prop 209. Objectively strong applicants will choose a traditional evaluation, while weaker applicants will choose a holistic evaluation. Cal and UCLA each have a freshman class nearly 4 times the size of an elite private school so together, with this split admissions method, they can still can crank out as many talented graduates as Harvard, Columbia, Princeton, and Yale combined.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Corvinus

    Good stuff there. But I would argue that college today compared to 30 years ago is highly overrated.

    • Replies: @JimB
    @Corvinus


    But I would argue that college today compared to 30 years ago is highly overrated.
     
    I think it depends on the student’s field of concentration, but I get your point. And Stanley Kaplan can probably teach Physics and engineering as well as Princeton so what’s so special about the elite schools?
  125. @Corvinus
    @Rob

    “They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for“

    It was only a measure of those school districts which focused on extensive vocabulary, which I did thank my instructors in high school for. However, how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @El Dato, @Rob, @bomag

    “how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words?”

    They’re called “public libraries”. Going to the library and reading on your own, without being ordered to, is in itself a sign of:

    a) intelligence
    b) multiculturalism
    c) regatta
    d) reggae

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    They’re called “public libraries”. Going to the library and reading on your own, without being ordered to, is in itself a sign of:

    a) intelligence
     
    Big city libraries have a gigantic selection of books to choose from. Those in small towns do not. Is Jatavious taking advantage of this gift?
  126. @JohnnyWalker123
    We are so f*cked.

    https://twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/1449475759320539138

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Corvinus, @El Dato

    So what? If and when the next world war happens, it goes nuclear, and all it takes is 10 well placed bombs on several continents, and then the human race is on the road to extinction, and the trillions that America owes to China goes up in smoke.

    Don’t get sucked into Jack Probiotic’s scare tactics.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    So what? If and when the next world war happens, it goes nuclear
     
    In 75 years, more than a dozen political parties have run governments with access to nuclear weaponry. Only one of those has ever used it-- and on women and children. Keep that party out of power and we are probably safe.


    Dropping any kid of bombs on crowds of civilians is a spectacular war crime.


    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/df682104d23247228fee1fba1dac9d70e7498130/0_293_4779_2867/master/4779.jpg?width=700&quality=45&auto=format&fit=max&dpr=2&s=e4023b17b4154f59e04f94fa39e3a5e8

    Replies: @Corvinus

  127. On the topic of declining civil order, Mercury Insurance reports a 40% YoY increase in comprehensive auto claims in California. Northern California has twice the rate as southern.

    If the daily frequency were graphed, it would likely show the same jump around May 25, 2020 as homicides did, so maybe the actual increase is understated at 40%.

    I see rate hikes in the near future.

    https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mercury-insurance-reports-a-40-spike-in-california-comprehensive-car-claims-301399735.html

  128. As a predictor for freshman GPA, SAT and HSGPA seem to be pretty even in terms of correlation with freshman GPA. I think whether SAT or HSGPA end up being the better predictor will depend on the sample/dataset as I think I’ve seen results that went the other way. In most datasets each variable individually seems to explain around 15-20% of the variance. And with a full model with SAT+HSGPA+other stuff you might get it up to 25-30% explained variance.

    The correlation of SAT with grades would be a lot higher if not for the fact that students are sorted into schools and classes by SAT score and this results in a restriction of range issue. At good schools, everyone on the campus is high scoring. And even at large state schools where there is more variance, within a particular class the range will tighten. If you were to assign students randomly to different schools and courses, you’d see far greater range and a much higher correlation with grades.

    Another thing that critiques of the SAT miss is the question of what is the right dependent variable. Ostensibly the test is used to estimate freshman performance. But really freshman GPA per se is not of such tremendous importance. If you go beyond that shallow metric and look at things like likeliness to earn a PHD or file a patent or publish a book then I think you’d see the SAT picks up something that is missed by HSGPA. (At least the traditional version of the test).

  129. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    Do the Hmong second generation show the same upward mobility as the Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese boat people?

    Replies: @Foreign Expert, @Reg Cæsar

    Do the Hmong second generation show the same upward mobility as the Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese boat people?

    More like sideways mobility. At least in the smaller cities. Which may be to them what Eden Prairie is to the Somalis, a place for the more competent to escape to.

    • Replies: @Escher
    @Reg Cæsar

    I guess it helps that in smaller towns they are living hmong whites.

  130. @Corvinus
    @JohnnyWalker123

    So what? If and when the next world war happens, it goes nuclear, and all it takes is 10 well placed bombs on several continents, and then the human race is on the road to extinction, and the trillions that America owes to China goes up in smoke.

    Don’t get sucked into Jack Probiotic’s scare tactics.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    So what? If and when the next world war happens, it goes nuclear

    In 75 years, more than a dozen political parties have run governments with access to nuclear weaponry. Only one of those has ever used it– and on women and children. Keep that party out of power and we are probably safe.

    Dropping any kid of bombs on crowds of civilians is a spectacular war crime.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Reg Cæsar

    “Only one of those has ever used it– and on women and children. Keep that party out of power and we are probably safe.“

    In a time of war as directed by national leaders of BOTH political parties. Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.

    More importantly, it’s tje Chinese now who are making the threat to invade Taiwan and use nukes as a cudgel.

    “Dropping any kid of bombs on crowds of civilians is a spectacular war crime.“

    Not if you win. You really think the rest of the white world was going to prosecute white Americans, especially when they thought they could get their mitts on that type of weapon?

    Pray tell, would have the same sympathy toward Jews if they were the group that got vaporized? Please show your work.

    Besides, it took out Nips, right? You couldn’t care less about any ethnic/racial group other than your own and whether they got/get wiped out, so don’t pretend you are compassionate.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

  131. While working to gut NYC’s gifted-and-talented program on his way out, DeBlasio was again blathering about how we need fewer tests and more “outreach” or whatnot because every student is gifted and talented at something

  132. @Achmed E. Newman
    I read though the post and comments, and I think Anon-#185 put it as close to as I would say it in his comment above.

    I don't doubt your numbers and conclusion, Steve. I just think everyone but a few here is missing the big picture. This country won't go on like this. The half-century-long idea of more and more people going to college to get a big leg up or head start in life is no good anymore. Most colleges indoctrinate your kids into the Totalitarian ctrl-left. Do you want that? Will most of them really get better jobs and live happier lives by spending that 50 or 100 large, to be turned into a mortage-sized payment plan without the house?

    There are other ways to go. Things will have to change. Yes, the admissions process is pretty rigged and unfair to some, but maybe the question is "why participate in this farce?"

    Replies: @Known Fact

    The college bubble is bursting, and not just due to Covid or even rampant wokeness. It’s just not sustainable.

    If I had teen-age kids who were not STEM whizzes I’d advise them to find some tradesman or even a white-collar type professional who can let them tag along, teach them some useful skills and get them some on-the-job training. I don’t know, does that sound like a plan?

    Even journalism — I can tell you what you need to know pretty quickly, you just need to find someone who will let you go out and do it. Remember that story with the woman who got a four-year degree in hotel management — and \$60,000 debt? Jeezus, just work the front desk somewhere, follow the manager around and work up from there.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Known Fact

    Agreed! Great comment, K.F.

    I will add that there is the student loan bubble too, as some have mentioned. Much of the unnecessary college attendance and/or that which will never pay off has been due to the Feral Government's having backed up school loans for a few decades.

    BTW, from my experience, Hotel/Restaurant Management is mostly a BS degree for the athletes to take.

    , @Rob
    @Known Fact

    I agree that college needs to be reformed and scaled back. There are problems with finding someone who will let you follow them around or “here’s the five-minute rundown. Now, go do it!” Is why should they ? Sometimes there’s a good answer. You are a cardiac surgeon and gave the editor of the newspaper his five (5!) stent operations for free. Maybe that’s extreme, but it’s in the ballpark. Someone gives your kid a shot because he owes you a favor.

    If you are like most adult Americans who aren’t the nth generation of big shots in your small to medium city who have been building up the family favor bank over the years, is that not a lot of people owe you big favors. No one me a huge favor, for example. Maybe if you are Warren Buffet, the Oklahoma City paper editor will do a multi-year favor for you on spec. From what I hear, that frequently does not work for the favor-doer. So many people do them favors on spec that it’s just the water they swim in. “Of course people do stuff for me. I’m great!” Maybe Buffet’s an exception.

    So that leaves your option being the universal favor medium: paying for education or training. Sound like a system we have now? For the GIs out of WWII college worked out well. For the boomers, too. The capitalists decided to outsource jobs and in-source labor, though. They sold this to us with “you’ll go to college, and get a great job!” Thing is, not everyone is college material. America’s college was social capital, built up over generations, from literally before this was a country. Like a lot of our social capital, it turned into someone’s fortune. In more democratic fields, it turned into a lot of peoples’ 40-year career of a nice life. But people respond to incentives, and no college president was going to let sweet, sweet federal student loan money go to that snotty Dean from Rival University! All his friends would laugh at him. His tenured profs would move to another school. His students would wonder why their high school buddies’ colleges had climbing walls in multimillion-dollar gyms, but he had a field that was snow for six of his nine months there every year.

    Then even colleges could not resist eating the seed corn. The Ph.D. glut meant they could hire adjuncts for nearly nothing. There are not many associate profs to replace the old ones as they die off. Some fields self-immolated as bright women found higher pay in corporate America. English literature being one. Those people who are supposed to help you or your kid turn his inchoate thoughts into logically valid and sound written language intended to inform, persuade, or at least clarify a position? That field is an unholy miasma of Foucault, Twitter leftism, and the worst writing you have ever seen. Bright women quit. Minority (not Asians) women abound. If they were not so obscure and were they not getting academic welfare in the form of required freshman composition classes, these people would not be employed anywhere near a computer keyboard that did not have pictures of value meals on it. English as an academic discipline will not survive the great college rethink coming up. There is nothing worth preserving in any “elite university” English Department.
    Here’s that More tag you’ve been waiting for!
    Anyway, from baby boomers on, demand for college was going up! So expand! Raise tuition! Raising tuition did not lower enrollment! Raise tuition again! Thing is, at the beginning of this process, there were lots of smart people languishing in jobs they were too smart for. They were there because their parents were immigrants, or they were fresh out of Appalachia, or they made a good living in blue-collar unions, but the beginning of the Great American Bust Out had, um, begun. Lots of people made a percent exporting some capital. They did not see unions as necessary… for them. The union guys saw the writing on the wall. Factories were moving out of the country. New ones weren’t being opened here, but they’d sunk money into the existing workers are were going to milk that investment until they (the investment) retired. But the kids could not get good union jobs. They went to college. What choice did they have?

    But now? No group in America is educated below its potential, except maybe the Amish. Schools are built to grow. But the market of real students is fully satisfied. The only people who are in the relevant age ranges, but not enrolled are icky white males, many of whom are smart enough to go, if schools want them (as if!), and minorities. Lots of schools want to do way with accurate testing so they can admit and graduate low-ability minorities without their SAT/ACT averages cratering. Are they going to rely on woke winning, so tons of blacks will get black in a suit jobs for decent salaries? Do they just know that the government will pay them, and leave Chinese creditors with the unplayable debt? As lucrative as getting x million from some number of incapable blacks to pay freight for two years before they drop out, they could make an extra 1.5x if the same students paid tuition for five years, instead. Damn, I just made some college prez richer. Eventually, blacks are going to wise up and realize they go to whatever school for a few years and never make enough to pay back the loan. They need those degrees! What does the school President care if the brand will be devalued? Is he going to live forever?

    College is a scam for a lot of people. They will wise up seeing older relatives (but so many only kids do not have an older sibling or cousins that they know) struggle with college debt for years. Massive college debt load has also created a big class of educated and “educated” people with a vested interest in seeing inflation inflate their debt away. That is if wages inflate along with prices. They do not have to. People can just get poorer. I wonder if Biden and the Democrats will escape “punishment” for inflation in the ‘22 and ‘24 elections? The Democrats are the party of the educated classes. They must know that a lot of their base benefits from debt being less of a burden. Is that a “conspiracy theory”? Seems like sensible policy in service of politics. Would that Trump had done as much for his voters.

    If we just had Mexico as the Outlands of Polluting Industry, Office Jobs for Everyone (who counts) would have been possible. Mexicans are, um, not academically gifted folk outside the small upper and middle classes. They have lots of helot labor and would need American managers, technicians, and business bureaucrats “helping” them run “their” factories foreverish. The Chinese? They just need a generation to learn, then parasitic American management, consultants, and young corporate high flyers sleeping their way through China’s (not plentiful enough) young lovelies will be shown the door with extreme prejudice. Chinese can manage themselves. Their cousins are already a disproportionate number of our techno class.

    Will China “rule the world?” They will have a good chunk of the physical capital, human capital, and maybe social capital in the world. They will certainly have more per capita (heh) than America. The jobs of the future? America is not getting smarter! The industrial revolution, and the auto revolution, and the IT revolution (phase I) there were lots of people smart enough to fill a new niche. The AI revolution? The robotics revolution (phase II)? If those happen, then there won’t be niches open for a huge chunk of people. Now, maybe a revolution in Green Tech, like Warren wanted (when she wasn’t waxing about having a random transwoman chose her Surgeon-General) that might take a lot of workers.

    Maybe I’m a Luddite, and everything will go well. Better fully automated factories mean cheaper goods. AI and robots mean every service is dirt cheap — a sex robot in every pot — green tech and thorium fission mean ever-increasing power per capita until deuterium-helium-3 fusion beats break even and we build robot ships to mine helium three on Saturn or even out of Uranus (sorry, I had too) and then von Neumann factories, and then von Neumann cities…

    But who will the cities be full of? De-realization has led to lunatic politics. Woke on the left. Pizzagate and its descendants on the dumb end of the right. Even the people having kids today are not the sort to build Our Transhuman Future. Maybe genetic engineering? I found a paper about an allele that causes heterozygous to go blind in their forties. They also have a 22 or so verbal IQ bump over uninflected relatives. Can that save us? Not if the only people left are the ones who think birth control is the devil (the breedy sort of free-range Protestant) bitches ain’t nothin’ but tricks and hoes (you know who I mean) let’s breed of welfare from the smart Jews! (the future of Israel), endless Africans who cannot produce a machine…and Let’s be organic farmers and depend on technology we will not use (the white future of the east coast)

    No nation with a national average IQ of 100 (or so) has replacement fertility in that demographic. The welfare Jews in Israel might, but they will not turn organic genius alleles into something mainstream whites will have engineered into their kids…

    God damn it! I meant to write about on-the-job training!

    So, what were things like before college became cancer? Well, the labor market was tighter. Companies used the labor glut to force the workers to take on the cost of education and training. Then they would hire you. Or not. But even with the tighter labor market, companies don’t like training their workers. If you do, you either have to pay them more or you are training your competitor’s new employees. Now, with testing (what could be done with testing) at least companies could be sure about the human natural resources they are turning into human capital, but lots of people would fall through the cracks, and work crap jobs until they were too old to be worth investing in. Maybe they do now.


    Given the elite as they are, what would happen if the feds stopped subsidizing college loans? Money for school would get tighter. Kushner would still go to Harvard. Kushner Kash would be even more important to colleges. Lots of colleges would die. I wonder how that process would play out at a school with x millions of dollars of real estate, maybe an endowment also in the millions, and no investors with rights to the assets, but no hope of staying alive? Would the President (mercenary fundraiser, not a lover of learning) preside over the school slowly dying over x years as the endowment was drawn down to subsidize students until the last class graduated on the day the last contractual employee’s contract expired, and the last pensioner’s widow drew her last check, or would something like Mozillo and Countrywide’s death go down at hundreds of schools? Is that even possible? Would trustees allow it?

    I guess schools would have to co-sign loans where parents could not? If the feds got out of college loans, and parents or someone else would be on the hook for a loan that could not be paid back, black enrollment would crater. Unless forced not to, lenders would look for, ahem, scholastic aptitude.

    Maybe the feds should get out of higher ed? Let the market equilibrium for a while. Think of it as shock therapy.

    This comment is too long, and I have a video game to play!

  133. @Paperback Writer
    There's a country in the East that doesn't mentally or physically castrate its best & brightest young men. They just did this:

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1449467671506993159?s=20

    Replies: @J.Ross, @epebble, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @epebble

    Thanks, epebble.

    Let's hope for once that the Derp State (did I get that right?) is lying and we are more advanced than they are letting on.

    But I don't think so.

    I think we really are as clownlike as we appear.

    An American female major general actually tweeted about her manicure. I don't have the heart to look for it. You'll just have to believe me.

    Replies: @epebble, @epebble

  134. @Sparkylyle92
    @Altai

    If you think that tranny looks bad, you ain't seen nothin'. Check out this one. Notice anything about the hand?
    https://generico.ru/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/337e81ff9cd26a9944d90ece4ca10306-800x445.jpg

    Replies: @res

    2D:4D ratio?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digit_ratio
    Note that there is significant overlap between the male and female distributions (Cohen’s d around two thirds).

    That would be an interesting way of testing the hypothesis that there are two distinct groups of MtF transgenders. Has that already been done? I see some papers on 2D:4D ratio and transgenderism, but the usual conclusion appears to be something like:
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40806-020-00247-9

    Mean 2D:4D of M→F and MtF individuals was higher (more “feminized”) than for M→M and natal males, respectively.

    But this paper has a suggestive comment (I do not see the scatterplot mentioned though).
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-72486-6

    When examining the scatterplot of 2D:4D and the GIDYQ score, an inverted U-shaped relationship emerged.

    Where GIDYQ is Gender Identity/Gender Dysphoria Questionnaire.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @res


    Has that already been done?

     

    Google Ray Blanchard and Michael Bailey. Steve's done a lot about the latter. Search this website. Mostly theory - dunno about quantification.

    Replies: @res

  135. @anon
    steve has still yet to release his SAT and GMAT and 23&me.

    sad.

    mine were 1560 and 770 (790 on the practice test) and 100% nw european. which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.

    Replies: @Anon, @JLK, @Reg Cæsar, @res

    For maximum bragging effect you need to include that being a pre-1995 SAT score.

    P.S. Why did you leave out your GRE scores?

  136. @BARRY J
    @res

    I would be interested in your (or anyone's) interpretation of that study. There was a lot of verbiage that obscured the plain meaning. Blacks seemed to do worse on the GRE than their SAT score would have predicted. The math part could be explained by few STEM students and high percentage of women. Was there an explanation of the verbal gap? Thanks.

    Replies: @res

    I would be interested in your (or anyone’s) interpretation of that study.

    I started to do that in my earlier comment, but concluded they did a pretty good job of obscuring things and punted.

    Blacks seemed to do worse on the GRE than their SAT score would have predicted.

    I think the three explanations they gave on page 3 are in play. Not sure of the balance. In particular, explanation 2. (roughly speaking, restricted range of GRE takers relative to SAT takers lowers GRE SDs thus increasing z-score gap) and explanation 3. (very roughly reinterpreted, affirmative action increases lower ability NAMs applying to grad school) seem relevant. They evaluate the three explanations on pp. 12-14 (and reject explanation 2.).

    The math part could be explained by few STEM students and high percentage of women. Was there an explanation of the verbal gap?

    I hadn’t noticed the 66% of blacks being female on page 6. Thanks. I’m not sure of the causal direction to consider for STEM student proportion and the gaps. The B/W gaps seem fairly consistent with other data, so I don’t see much need to search for deeper explanations.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @res

    Another factor is the demographic difference. GRE/GMAT are taken by many more international students (compared to SAT) who are much better than U.S. grads in Math. Most international grads who take GRE consider GRE Quant test to be laughably easy (they probably score in high 90s percentile without any preparation). Just a casual peek at grad STEM classes will reveal the mystery.

    https://math.mit.edu/images/grad-students-2018-2019-orig.jpg

    https://physics.mit.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/20200113_TEAMUP-report-aspect-ratio-516-475-1200x630-c-default.jpg

    https://caltech-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/main/images/students-in-dining-hall.2e16d0ba.fill-1600x900-c100.jpg

    https://physics.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj6226/f/styles/12-col-banner/public/prosepctive_0.jpg

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Hi There

  137. @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    So what? If and when the next world war happens, it goes nuclear
     
    In 75 years, more than a dozen political parties have run governments with access to nuclear weaponry. Only one of those has ever used it-- and on women and children. Keep that party out of power and we are probably safe.


    Dropping any kid of bombs on crowds of civilians is a spectacular war crime.


    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/df682104d23247228fee1fba1dac9d70e7498130/0_293_4779_2867/master/4779.jpg?width=700&quality=45&auto=format&fit=max&dpr=2&s=e4023b17b4154f59e04f94fa39e3a5e8

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Only one of those has ever used it– and on women and children. Keep that party out of power and we are probably safe.“

    In a time of war as directed by national leaders of BOTH political parties. Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.

    More importantly, it’s tje Chinese now who are making the threat to invade Taiwan and use nukes as a cudgel.

    “Dropping any kid of bombs on crowds of civilians is a spectacular war crime.“

    Not if you win. You really think the rest of the white world was going to prosecute white Americans, especially when they thought they could get their mitts on that type of weapon?

    Pray tell, would have the same sympathy toward Jews if they were the group that got vaporized? Please show your work.

    Besides, it took out Nips, right? You couldn’t care less about any ethnic/racial group other than your own and whether they got/get wiped out, so don’t pretend you are compassionate.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Corvinus


    Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.
     
    NOPE. Look up "demands for unconditional surrender" in the dictionary.

    Also, pretty sure you are still running around with a mask.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Whiskey

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    Not if you win.
     
    That picture was taken in London, which was bombed by the losers. I'm sure the families of the riders on that bus would consider it a war crime. Were the perpetrators prosecuted?
     
     
     

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.
     
    https://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/quote-the-ends-justifies-the-means-niccolo-machiavelli-40-57-73.jpg

    Replies: @David

  138. @JohnnyWalker123
    We are so f*cked.

    https://twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/1449475759320539138

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Corvinus, @El Dato

    Well, if it goes to space it’s bound to be hypersonic.

    “Nuclear capabale” is a function of payload mass, and depends on how small those thermonuclear things can get.

    China has its own space station now, so of course they have around-the-globe delivery capabilities.

    What’s the word for “Silbervogel” in Mandarin?

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @El Dato


    “Nuclear capabale” is a function of payload mass, and depends on how small those thermonuclear things can get.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davy_Crockett_(nuclear_device)
    Don't forget to duck after launch.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

  139. @Corvinus
    @Rob

    “They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for“

    It was only a measure of those school districts which focused on extensive vocabulary, which I did thank my instructors in high school for. However, how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @El Dato, @Rob, @bomag

    academic exercise

    Really.

    Making analogies is a rather big deal.

    It has been recognized as core element by the symbolic AI / good old-fashioned AI research community since the 80s. Still unsolved:

    The Computer Scientist Training AI to Think With Analogies

    Here we have a paper on Hofstaedter’s Copycat of the 80s (NB for some reason, that paper appears in “Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena”)

    And a book on Doug French’s Tabletop.

    if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?

    So, how do you propose to fix those defective individuals so that they can handle that IQ test?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @El Dato

    “Making analogies is a rather big deal.“

    Yep, whether it be it in the corporate boardroom or when making national economic policy or when developing a comprehensive infrastructure plan for a major city. It’s such an integral component.

    “It has been recognized as core element by the symbolic AI / good old-fashioned AI research community since the 80s.“

    Shouldn’t the briar been focusing on having four or more white kids rather than pursuing a career in what amounts to a male dominated field? I always knew you were a closet feminist.

    “So, how do you propose to fix those defective individuals so that they can handle that IQ test?”

    Teach to the test by hiring Tiger Moms who know how to game the system. We white people enjoy finding shortcuts. It’s in born.

  140. @Corvinus
    @Reg Cæsar

    “Only one of those has ever used it– and on women and children. Keep that party out of power and we are probably safe.“

    In a time of war as directed by national leaders of BOTH political parties. Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.

    More importantly, it’s tje Chinese now who are making the threat to invade Taiwan and use nukes as a cudgel.

    “Dropping any kid of bombs on crowds of civilians is a spectacular war crime.“

    Not if you win. You really think the rest of the white world was going to prosecute white Americans, especially when they thought they could get their mitts on that type of weapon?

    Pray tell, would have the same sympathy toward Jews if they were the group that got vaporized? Please show your work.

    Besides, it took out Nips, right? You couldn’t care less about any ethnic/racial group other than your own and whether they got/get wiped out, so don’t pretend you are compassionate.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.

    NOPE. Look up “demands for unconditional surrender” in the dictionary.

    Also, pretty sure you are still running around with a mask.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @El Dato

    The Japanese refused to take into serious consideration unconditional surrender.

    A proposed invasion of Japan would have likely resulted in a 500k to 1 million dead/wounded.

    , @Whiskey
    @El Dato

    There is no question that the two nuclear bombs prompted Japan's surrender. Otherwise, the War Cabinet was determined to fight it out as they figured enough casualties would prompt the US to negotiate and and offer far better terms including letting Japan keep some though not all of its conquests. In this they were probably correct.

    US War plans at the time had several options. The Navy wanted a blockade and figured that by 1949 Japan would surrender by sheer starvation. That was optimistic. While hunger would have been a major problem there was likely enough food to feed most though not all of Japan. The Army Air Force wanted to stage 10,000 plane bombing raids and firebomb the entire island chain killing tens of millions. This might have worked but civilian casualties would have been something along the lines of 20-30 million. With likely American losses even with degraded Japanese anti-Aircraft capability of about 50,000 dead. The Army wanted an series of invasions, the first due to weather in Spring 1946, in the south, followed by likely another invasion in the north near Tokyo in either 1947 or 1948. Casualties were estimated at 20 million civilian, and about 6-8 million US. The Japanese were well prepared for this and estimates were taken directly from the Battle of Okinawa.

    What the bombs did was give the War Cabinet an out. An excuse to surrender and end the war and fighting and dying. No Japanese fighting spirit could work against a nuclear bomb. It was something they could not fight and hence the surrender. Even then there was a junior officer attempt to stop the broadcast of the Emperor's surrender speech and continue fighting. There is simply no question that dropping the bomb was the correct decision and ended the war a few days later. Not dropping them would have required likely an extra two and possibly three years of war, with maybe 5-6 million US war dead. America would have been profoundly different, far more "Soviet" given that level of casualties.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Reg Cæsar, @Lagertha

  141. @Corvinus
    @Reg Cæsar

    “Only one of those has ever used it– and on women and children. Keep that party out of power and we are probably safe.“

    In a time of war as directed by national leaders of BOTH political parties. Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.

    More importantly, it’s tje Chinese now who are making the threat to invade Taiwan and use nukes as a cudgel.

    “Dropping any kid of bombs on crowds of civilians is a spectacular war crime.“

    Not if you win. You really think the rest of the white world was going to prosecute white Americans, especially when they thought they could get their mitts on that type of weapon?

    Pray tell, would have the same sympathy toward Jews if they were the group that got vaporized? Please show your work.

    Besides, it took out Nips, right? You couldn’t care less about any ethnic/racial group other than your own and whether they got/get wiped out, so don’t pretend you are compassionate.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    Not if you win.

    That picture was taken in London, which was bombed by the losers. I’m sure the families of the riders on that bus would consider it a war crime. Were the perpetrators prosecuted?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Reg Cæsar

    “Were the perpetrators prosecuted?“

    Yes.

    Now, do you have the same empathy for Jews when they were taken out in similar fashion? Or are you selective in your compassion? Please show your work.

  142. Rob says:
    @Corvinus
    @Rob

    “They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for“

    It was only a measure of those school districts which focused on extensive vocabulary, which I did thank my instructors in high school for. However, how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @El Dato, @Rob, @bomag

    As I said, analogies can be done badly, with difficult vocabulary and simple or off analogies. A good test uses reasonable vocabulary, and the difficulty varies by having to figure out the way an answer pair is analogous to the question’s pair.

    One reason we know analogies are g-loaded is that studying for them does not make people better at them. People can learn vocabulary. The difference between vocabulary and analogies could be analogized to the difference between forwarding and backward digit span. “Knowing” it compared to thinking with it. Forward digit span is your ability to repeat a string of numbers after hearing it once. It tests memory. Backward digit span is your ability to hear a string of numbers and repeat it backward. It tests working memory. Your ability to manipulate data in your mind. Vocabulary and forward digit span both correlate with full-scale IQ and, statistically, with g. If you are good at vocabulary, you might be good at analogies. If you are good at analogies you probably have a high backward digit span. It is not necessarily so, some fairly smart people have some very specific deficits. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses, but smarter people have relative weaknesses. Most people who are a lot better at analogies than average are smart. Vocabulary? Maybe you just memorized definitions and cannot use it.

    I do tend to think vocabulary is overvalued, but it was a scholastic aptitude test, and how much aptitude one has for education is related to how much one reads serious writing, whether fiction or non-fiction. Once upon a time, college students were expected to do the reading.

    While the vocabulary in English lit may frequency be abjure and even super-ciliates, vocabulary in technical fields is important. Impulse and momentum are not the same. Physics is easier if you can keep them straight. The better one’s incoming vocabulary, the more likely one is to learn fine distinctions. Knowing the difference between a ribosome and a ribozyme is important in bio. If you know that the core catalytic function of the ribosome is performed by a ribozyme, then you know even more. It’s hard to appreciate the more when aren’t quite sure what either is and how exactly they differ from mRNA, which differs from tRNA. Similar terms, used in the same contexts. Different meanings. People with a greater knack for knowing that abjure is not related to obscure, and while superfluous and supercilious mean different things, both fit the context, so neither would be funny, super-ciliates is a pretty good result from a brain-wracking, and people who are better at keeping these words separate when the context does not provide many clues, have more scholastic aptitude.

    Even realizing that ((π*c)/d)*x – sin (k*x) = number is the same class of equation as sin(x) – x = 0, ie transcendental and no closed-form algebraic solution would have saved me a couple of hours spent banging my head against Matlab’s symbolic equation solver. If my working memory were better, I’d have seen it right away. My friend called, and I simplified it to explain it to him, and got thru “it’s a constant times sin(x) minus-It’s transcendental! Thanks, man, you saved me infinity time!” If I were smarter, I’d have simplified it earlier. Add up more and more things that take someone more time to figure out, and a two-hour problem set becomes a twenty-hour problem set. More likely, though, is that it becomes an unfinished problem set.

    The fact that people think that “I didn’t learn that at school” is a reason to think the SAT is “biased” fluctuates me (unless it flummoxes me. Who knows?). If they had more aptitude, they would have learned that in school. Should kids with higher ability be educated separately from very low ability, uninterested students who attend the same school? I think so, but the same people who complain that the SAT is biased have fought very hard against “stigmatizing” kids by putting them in lower tracks. The fact also remains that we are a very diverse, unequal country (no longer a nation), so there are schools where the student body averages, say 115 IQ, and schools where the student body averages 75. The solution is not busing. Higher ability parents move their kids out of busing range. “Affordable housing” built-in good areas does not help. People move, send their kids to private schools, or get all the black kids put in a remedial track, soon to have their separate entrance. I guess that the huge push to have every autistic kid have his own teacher was in response to white parents seeing their autistic kids treated terribly by, and picking up bad habits from, the African-American students in the low-ability classroom.

    [MORE]

    I read a very sad essay in a Californian paper, by an Hispanic girl in a heavily Hispanic school who went to an SAT review session at a local(ish) university. By the way, both uses of an were correct. The TA or teacher or whatnot put an equation on the board that she had never seen as the most basic thing they were going to review. Later, white kids, blonds (they are always blond in these stories. I think blacks and Hispanics have looser criteria for blondness than whites) are the ones who answer all the hard vocabulary words correctly. Words she had never seen, of course. She laments that her school did not teach the same coursework rich and high-income schools used. Left unsaid was that the richer schools were not educating new Mixtec-speaking arrivals every week.

    As I said in my comment, I think the SAT was a better test back when 1100 was a good score, studying was much more difficult, and 3-4 people a year got perfect scores. I think the country was better when there were well-paying jobs available for people who were not good with symbols. When there were a hundred million fewer people in the country. Back when whites could imagine having a future. But the Hispanic girl above would not be here, lamenting that Hispanic girls of working-class parents do not have as good a chance of getting into the elite colleges as the children of the capitalists and rentiers who wanted her parents here to break the unions and drive down wages.

    The simple, heartbreaking fact is that there are lots of students who do not have academic potential. There is no realistic uplift scenario that has not already failed. There are not even any unrealistic scenarios that would work. How the country copes with that (or doesn’t) will be interesting times, in a Chinese sense, of course. I have also heard that that is not a Chinese proverb, at least not one that survived Mao. Right now, the elite’s plan, at least their daughters’ plan, is to make sure the dumbest person in every room is both black and in charge. Either the high-prestige institutions that are doing this will fail or the boards, foundations, or what-have-you that hire the CEO will have an “Executive Assistant CEO” whose job is CEOing, and the CEO’s job is being black in a suit. Likely, the new diversity push will not put anyone in an important position, but “drinking one’s own Kool-Aid” is a saying for a reason.

    A lot of people have gone all-in on only a country with a (predatory and parasitic) elite that looks like America is legitimate. That poor blacks, browns, and whites will be happy in penury as long as some people with their skin tones are among the predators. The viability of this strategy is uncertain. However, the lower classes have been well-oppressed in lots of countries. The new America will be poorer than the old. Not for the capitalists and landlords, of course. Their assets will do better than inflation because more people mean more money. When one sells toilet paper, more asses looks like economic growth. The same surveillance and non-state law enforcement currently applied to right-wingers will be turned on anyone who wants a better economy for the masses. The simple fact will be, though, that the majority non-white America liberals welcomed to defeat their hated enemy, conservatives, will have much degraded human capital relative to the human population. There will not be the 40K per capita (in 2018 dollars) in 2050, much less 2075 America, barring some biotech miracle, not be able to afford all the social programs liberals “knew” they could vote in when they hacked our elections with immigrants. They will have the votes. They just won’t have the economy.

    Killing the SAT hastened our decline, and arguing about it is just a distraction, really. Maybe i’m just a depressive?

  143. @res
    @BARRY J


    I would be interested in your (or anyone’s) interpretation of that study.
     
    I started to do that in my earlier comment, but concluded they did a pretty good job of obscuring things and punted.

    Blacks seemed to do worse on the GRE than their SAT score would have predicted.
     
    I think the three explanations they gave on page 3 are in play. Not sure of the balance. In particular, explanation 2. (roughly speaking, restricted range of GRE takers relative to SAT takers lowers GRE SDs thus increasing z-score gap) and explanation 3. (very roughly reinterpreted, affirmative action increases lower ability NAMs applying to grad school) seem relevant. They evaluate the three explanations on pp. 12-14 (and reject explanation 2.).

    The math part could be explained by few STEM students and high percentage of women. Was there an explanation of the verbal gap?
     
    I hadn't noticed the 66% of blacks being female on page 6. Thanks. I'm not sure of the causal direction to consider for STEM student proportion and the gaps. The B/W gaps seem fairly consistent with other data, so I don't see much need to search for deeper explanations.

    Replies: @epebble

    Another factor is the demographic difference. GRE/GMAT are taken by many more international students (compared to SAT) who are much better than U.S. grads in Math. Most international grads who take GRE consider GRE Quant test to be laughably easy (they probably score in high 90s percentile without any preparation). Just a casual peek at grad STEM classes will reveal the mystery.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @epebble

    The bottom image (the one showing lots of fair-skinned people) must be that of the graduate students in state u's Department of X Studies. A WM, engineering graduate student, at a large, US university, must feel more out-of-place than he would by playing on the basketball team.

    Replies: @epebble, @Hi There

    , @Hi There
    @epebble


    Most international grads who take GRE consider GRE Quant test to be laughably easy (they probably score in high 90s percentile without any preparation). Just a casual peek at grad STEM classes will reveal the mystery.
     
    Everyone who does higher level math/STEM got >=95% on math SAT/ACT/GRE with no preparation. Including me.

    If you can get a A or a B in a regular community college differential equations class, you can probably score >=95% on the SAT/ACT/GRE without any preparation effort.

    BTW, community college does open admission, where they accept anyone who wants to enroll. They offer "remedial" classes and they offer advanced "transfer" classes designed to be transferred into university. They also offer various trade school, job training programs.

    I prefer open admission. Especially for math. If someone wants to try advanced math and they have the prereqs, and they can pay tuition and show up to class, why not?

    Replies: @epebble, @Abolish_public_education, @res

  144. @El Dato
    @Corvinus


    Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.
     
    NOPE. Look up "demands for unconditional surrender" in the dictionary.

    Also, pretty sure you are still running around with a mask.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Whiskey

    The Japanese refused to take into serious consideration unconditional surrender.

    A proposed invasion of Japan would have likely resulted in a 500k to 1 million dead/wounded.

  145. @El Dato
    @Corvinus


    Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.
     
    NOPE. Look up "demands for unconditional surrender" in the dictionary.

    Also, pretty sure you are still running around with a mask.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Whiskey

    There is no question that the two nuclear bombs prompted Japan’s surrender. Otherwise, the War Cabinet was determined to fight it out as they figured enough casualties would prompt the US to negotiate and and offer far better terms including letting Japan keep some though not all of its conquests. In this they were probably correct.

    US War plans at the time had several options. The Navy wanted a blockade and figured that by 1949 Japan would surrender by sheer starvation. That was optimistic. While hunger would have been a major problem there was likely enough food to feed most though not all of Japan. The Army Air Force wanted to stage 10,000 plane bombing raids and firebomb the entire island chain killing tens of millions. This might have worked but civilian casualties would have been something along the lines of 20-30 million. With likely American losses even with degraded Japanese anti-Aircraft capability of about 50,000 dead. The Army wanted an series of invasions, the first due to weather in Spring 1946, in the south, followed by likely another invasion in the north near Tokyo in either 1947 or 1948. Casualties were estimated at 20 million civilian, and about 6-8 million US. The Japanese were well prepared for this and estimates were taken directly from the Battle of Okinawa.

    What the bombs did was give the War Cabinet an out. An excuse to surrender and end the war and fighting and dying. No Japanese fighting spirit could work against a nuclear bomb. It was something they could not fight and hence the surrender. Even then there was a junior officer attempt to stop the broadcast of the Emperor’s surrender speech and continue fighting. There is simply no question that dropping the bomb was the correct decision and ended the war a few days later. Not dropping them would have required likely an extra two and possibly three years of war, with maybe 5-6 million US war dead. America would have been profoundly different, far more “Soviet” given that level of casualties.

    • Agree: Peter Johnson
    • Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Whiskey

    The Supreme War Council (SWC) was still deadlocked after Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Soviet entry.

    SWC DOVES:
    Foreign Minister Togo (the leader of the doves)
    Prime Minister Admiral Suzuki (77 and very flaky)
    Navy Minister Admiral Yonai

    SWC HAWKS
    Army Minister General Anami (the leader of the hawks)
    Army Chief of Staff General Umezu
    Navy Chief of Staff Admiral Toyoda

    Until Hirohito intervenes on the part of the Doves. A coup by young hothead Army officers starts, to kill the Doves and kidnap Hirohito. Anami 阿南 惟幾, leader of the Hawks, stops the coup.

    Anami then returned home and committed seppuku, leaving the message,


    一死以て大罪を謝し奉る 神州不滅を確信しつつ

    I—with my death—humbly apologize to the Emperor for the great crime. While convinced that Shinshu* is immortal.
     

    *Shinshu 神州 Deital Prefecture is a poetic term used to refer to Japan. It’s borrowed from Chinese who used it, also poetically, to refer to China.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surrender_of_Japan#Attempted_coup_d'%C3%A9tat_(August_12%E2%80%9315)
    https://warbirdforum.com/end.htm

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Whiskey


    No Japanese fighting spirit could work against a nuclear bomb.
     
    Exactly. Note the hissy fits here over the recent magic show by the Chinese.

    It was something they could not fight and hence the surrender.
     
    Which would have been just as true had they been dropped a few miles from where they were, with a minimum of casualties. After all, Japan didn't bomb Honolulu.

    US War plans at the time had several options.
     
    One rarely mentioned of which was to consider the neutral (to Japan) USSR's offer to negotiate a truce, which would have saved more lives than anything. The Japanese had already signed on. I don't like the USSR anymore than you, but FDR sure did.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    , @Lagertha
    @Whiskey

    meh. No. Bombing Japan was 'Message Sent', which was: submit. Submit (NOT to the USA), but to the Central Banks of the world. It's always about money. Japan was not allowed to go cowboy and free, and, like develop anime and fun stuff like that 40 years later! hahahhahahhaaaaa! I mean, Atari, PacMan....I have so many good memories wasting my friends on PacMan!

  146. Per the policy at hand, there are likely fairly obvious outcomes.

    1. The UC and Cal State systems will simply be overloaded with high-fee paying foreign students, likely less Chinese now and more Vietnamese, Indian, Pakistani, and other children of elites of shambolic third world hell-holes, and unqualified blacks and Latinx or whatever. No Whites need apply.

    2. Technical excellence will simply collapse in the US Defense industry. Unlike Sputnik hating White men is the state religion, so our failure as the Chinese sink the US Navy in a couple of days with their new hypersonic weapons will result on doubling down of hating Whitey not a desperate scramble for smart White guys.

    3. Lower tier White elites will be pushed into the middle or lower class, you can already see this with the failure of Lori Laughlin and William H. Macy’s kids to get into even a lower tier university without cheating; meanwhile the Gates kid married some Muslim big shot and the gap between the High high high White elites and foreign elites (think Obama types) and the lower tier White elites will grow wide as the former get pushed down into us.

    4. The lower elites will turn nationalist and White Identity to try and prevent further loss of status. People are more loss averse than risk friendly. They won’t be marrying the Muslim big shot — with Coldplay performing in private. Loughlin’s kid will be lucky to be a makeup artist and the other actress’s kid (and Macy’s) will be lucky to be even that. That’s a revolutionary moment right there.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Whiskey

    The whole world will change, soon. Wonderful people will come in to help with the transition. There will be: NO CIVIL WAR. - the bad people want civil war; f*ck them, we are too tired and stubborn for that. And, we will hunt you down, strip you, and humiliate you...tickle you with feathers until you lose your shit - while we film it with 20 member crew! hahhahahahaaaa

    In some ways, I want retribution - I so want to hurt people who have hurt me or my family. In the end, however, that is just an ego trip.

    Hateful people will be spared, but they will live with a lifetime of trauma as to why they supported things (looked away/disengaged) like SRA and the child trafficking industry - billion dollar industry - what's in those containers!!! - children and young people are in those containers, for f*cks sake.

    To be fair, I must explain to people who do not understand what I am typing: kidnapped children, unaccompanied border children, Madeline McAnns, are beaten and traumatized so their blood is heightened because fear, and their adrenaline rises because of this fear. This blood is harvested because it is an elixir- Fountain of Youth to Hollywood actors & millionaires/billionaires/CEO's/athletes.. Just read Hunter Thompson's: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, starting on page 130...

  147. @Corvinus
    @JimB

    Good stuff there. But I would argue that college today compared to 30 years ago is highly overrated.

    Replies: @JimB

    But I would argue that college today compared to 30 years ago is highly overrated.

    I think it depends on the student’s field of concentration, but I get your point. And Stanley Kaplan can probably teach Physics and engineering as well as Princeton so what’s so special about the elite schools?

  148. @Rob
    @Anon

    The Coleman SAT is very vulnerable to prepping - intentionally so. Coleman revamped it from a “Scholastic Aptitude Test” to a “Scholastic Achievement Test” I italicized those words to highlight the difference here’s a quick googling’s worth of SAT changes since I took it, which was maybe 1994? I dunno. I really liked weed back then, ok?

    Here is an article on SAT changes over the decades. Terrible changes they made recently: Wrong answers are no worse than no answer, and a-d choices on multiple choice questions. Net result of those two changes: midwit strivers have to take the test over and over, hoping that this time, they’ll be a false positive for intelligence. Old SAT was designed to prevent false positives. But guess what? Having some high scores be dumb luck means there are some black high scorers!

    Not mentioned in the article above, the high end has been compressed. The old SAT distinguished, according to Pumpkin Person, who used to comment at Halfsigma, and now has her own blog with a worthless comment section, says Murray said the old SAT had a ceiling of +4σ, or 162 IQ, which is like 5/100,000 people. Now a “perfect score” is within reach of more people. Today, 1600 is closer to like, 125. Better? Maybe if you’re one of the 125s trying to sneak in. But how does someone with an actual 150 IQ distinguish himself? The answer is the same dreadful tedium the 125s have to do. Grades - which punish missed assignments with zeros, but have ceilings of 100 on the final. That’s fair, in a way. But is it really the best education for people with 150 IQ to be running the course of honorss? They could be learning so much more, and when their minds are young and supple. I am nowhere near 150, but my brain was rotted away with D&D and Vampire: The Masquerade. In an appropriate educational program, I would have done more useful stuff. Like read more sci if!

    Heck, looks like the redesign ain’t not a secret. Here is CollegeBoard on the new SAT


    The Importance of Practice
    Unlike an aptitude test, students taking the SAT can improve their scores by completing rigorous high school courses and practicing the skills they’ve learned in those courses. Sustained effort and practice on core reading, writing, and math topics are at the heart of the SAT.
     
    Offhand, and this is without a googling. I did well on the SAT, but it ain’t not a test of motivation or laziness.

    They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for. Also for having a large male advantage. That said, analogy tests can be done very well or very badly. Badly, if they test really hard vocabulary and simple ways things are analogous. That’s a vocabulary test. Which, come to think of it, are pretty g loaded. However, I heard a much richer English vocabulary than any Mexican fruit picker in California or Chinese immigrant kid in NYC did. I’ll bet none of them knows what higgledy-piggledy means. Explaining analogy tests can be done badly. I was checking out a Kaplan book on the GRE, just to get a sense of the test, and I read their analogy section. I’m making up the wrong answer that they said was right:

    Ballet Dancer : Pirouette as
    A…
    B Hockey Player : Puck
    C Fencer : Riposte

    The book said B was the right answer! Ostensibly because dance and hockey are both activities, and one has pirouette and the other has pucks. No! Fencer : Riposte is right. Dance and fencing are both activities, and pirouettes and ripostes are physical things that they do. I was tempted to email Kaplan and explain. Except, I am somewhat opposed to extensive test prep unless one has not had the subject in years, and I did not want to give any help to faceless competition. If the name brand test prep book writer did not understand analogy questions, what are the odds that 90 IQ inner city teachers can explain them well?

    If the analogy questions are biased to upper-middle class+ interests, then that is something they might work on? But in a sprawling, diverse country, there is no set of activities that everyone is involved in and does similarly. Not to mention, kids in the slums can read. I know about, I dunno, Dune not because I worked for House Harkonnen, but because I read the book. I don’t know when I learned to read, because my mom thought I was looking at pictures in the World Book enclyclopedia (for Millenials, that’s like Wikipedia, except they are not subject to trolls ruining articles. Like one, on gene expression, said some things use a ubiquitinylated lysine to initiate proteins. No! All methionine or a derivative. In an encyclopedia, a digression like this would have been edited out.) and I did not care enough about “See Jane Run” to remember whether Jane ran with a dog or sat on a cat, or whatever.

    They killed the math section that tested the mathiness of your brain. It had questions like, “in the equation 125x + 174y < 4000, what is the largest possible difference between x and y when both are integers?” Then the next question was like, what’s the smallest possible difference?“ I realize largest diff is easy to answer. Round the answer of 4000/125, so this is an easy one. But it takes smarter people less time to think of dividing by the smaller number gives a bigger answer, and the biggest did is when one is zero, and then just divide. But really smart people can do the division problem in their heads with less time and effort than I can put it in my calculator. The smallest diff is harder. Someone smart will answer it quickly, less smart? Maybe realize it’s harder and skip it. Even less smart? Waste time and get the wrong answer.

    The question I remember from my test, though I don’t know if I got the answer right, but maybe? “How many times does the digit nine appear in the list of integers between 1 and 10,000?
    The answers, and I am totally making them up without a care for getting anywhere close to the answer:

    A 9
    B 9,999
    C 1,0o7
    D 1008

    I really must re-state, those answers are all wrong! If you just read the problem, which is the real one, though maybe it was integers up to 1000. Two of the answers did differ by one, though.

    There were pages of questions like this! Drawn from a huge test bank. All gone. Replaced by trigonometry to make the test reflect the kinds of bath you have learned, perhaps by rote, without understanding any of the proofs or applications. New math is pages of high school math problems. The “test” is how fast you can guess the answers.

    Which sort of test do you imagine is harder to grind-cram from fifth or sixth grade on? Oh yeah, the statistical penalty for guessing ~unless you could eliminate one, but on quite a few, the right answer was the one less intelligent people would eliminate. They had decades of psychometrics on the test. On millions of takers. All lost. Maybe not lost, like maybe it still exists, but some of it is just in retired peoples’ heads, like all practical knowledge.

    Why did they change a test that was very difficult to study for into one that’s very easy to study for, and thereby ruin countless hours on studying that teenagers could spend chasing the opposite (or same!) sex, driving badly, smoking schwag, and drinking whatever alcohol they could get their on?

    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.

    The people criticizing the test being biased towards people whose parents could game the system were right, though. Giving extra time to a blind person who has to have everything read aloud to him is much different from giving able-bodied kids the same amount of extra time because a well-compensated psychologist said the kid had ADHD after the kid’s mom told him to rehearse this list of ADHD symptoms for the appointment. The solution to that is to only give extra time to people whose physical disability requires extra time to get the question read to them/fill in the bubble with their left foot, like Tiny Duck types, etc. If your mental difference keeps you from doing well on the SAT, then that fact should affect your score. Maybe, on the old SAT extra time did not matter. I always finished standardized tests early. But on a test designed to measure how many problems you can solve by rote in x minutes?

    I’d love to see a 200 point question on each section of the SAT

    Verbal: “Write a coherent paragraph that has never been written on the SAT before. The more students who pick your topic (example: “my cat” will be scored as a “my cat” paragraph, not as a unique description of your particular cat)

    Math: “Explain an equation, concept or proof in math using your own words. For full points, this explanation must not have appeared on any previous SAT answer. The more students who pick the same topic as you, and write essentially the same explanation, the lower your score will be. (Example: explaining the equation “17584 + 26486” will be scored as ‘long integer addition’“

    Really stress out the Asians! They cannot even collaborate.

    Oh, I forgot the essay! That was a thing for a while. Some poor kids cannot even compare their scores outside a few years, because their scores are out of 2400, not 1600. They added an essay section with notional equality to the other two sections. As far as I know, there was no validating thirty minute essays on random topics as measuring cognitive ability with any accuracy (though I did get the second highest, score category, an “S” on the MCAT essay section, scored J-T. They were essays on proto-woke subjects. I think so black kids could start their essays with “As a black…” for easier scoring and to eliminate conservative white guts who started with “As a white male..” Later analysis of SAT essays and scoring showed that length strongly correlated with score.

    As anyone who has read my comments knows, length does not mean quality! The humorous thing? In school, I don’t think I ever wrote an essay that hit the length requirement. In college I was all “…and then there’s the ten page hume paper!” What? I thought it was five!” “To write a five page paper, I have to try to write a ten page paper!”

    Congrats if you made it this far! I have no finale.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ralph L, @Corvinus, @bomag, @Hypnotoad666

    Then the next question was like, what’s the smallest possible difference?“ … The smallest diff is harder.

    As written, this seems trivial, as any x=y less than or equal to thirteen satisfies the equation and yields a difference of zero.

    I suspect it was a question to suss out who understood the less-than sign.

  149. @Corvinus
    @Rob

    “They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for“

    It was only a measure of those school districts which focused on extensive vocabulary, which I did thank my instructors in high school for. However, how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @El Dato, @Rob, @bomag

    …how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?

    We’ve worked pretty hard to get everyone in school and exposed to all the proper words, yet the Gap remains.

  150. @Anon
    @Altai

    Barf. One of the worse things of all about trannies is their awful taste. That man jaw and weird color of lipstick is absolutely bizarre. Barely a tranny alive knows how to dress and look good.

    I am beginning to be convinced this isn't about men wanting to be a tranny, but wanting to be a peacock.

    In pre-1800s era Europe, men who wanted to be fops could dress up and still look like their own gender. Styles for men gave them a lot of outlet for the urge to be a peacock. Nowadays, when they want to strut about, they can't do it in their own gender's clothes because today's clothes for men are a dull and dun-colored bore, so they dress like women--badly, so you notice them--because that's what catches the eye.

    Replies: @vinteuil

    One of the wors[t] things of all about trannies is their awful taste. That man jaw and weird color of lipstick is absolutely bizarre. Barely a tranny alive knows how to dress and look good.

    Well, there are trannies & then again there are trannies.

    Old school trannies were mostly effeminate homosexuals who really wished they could be women capable of attracting straight guys.

    New school trannies like this guy…they’re something else entirely.

    You’re right about his jawline – move over, Steve Reeves!

  151. @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    Not if you win.
     
    That picture was taken in London, which was bombed by the losers. I'm sure the families of the riders on that bus would consider it a war crime. Were the perpetrators prosecuted?
     
     
     

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Were the perpetrators prosecuted?“

    Yes.

    Now, do you have the same empathy for Jews when they were taken out in similar fashion? Or are you selective in your compassion? Please show your work.

  152. @El Dato
    @Corvinus


    academic exercise
     
    Really.

    Making analogies is a rather big deal.

    It has been recognized as core element by the symbolic AI / good old-fashioned AI research community since the 80s. Still unsolved:

    The Computer Scientist Training AI to Think With Analogies

    Here we have a paper on Hofstaedter's Copycat of the 80s (NB for some reason, that paper appears in "Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena")

    And a book on Doug French's Tabletop.

    if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words that the SAT expected high schoolers to be remotely familiar with?
     
    So, how do you propose to fix those defective individuals so that they can handle that IQ test?

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Making analogies is a rather big deal.“

    Yep, whether it be it in the corporate boardroom or when making national economic policy or when developing a comprehensive infrastructure plan for a major city. It’s such an integral component.

    “It has been recognized as core element by the symbolic AI / good old-fashioned AI research community since the 80s.“

    Shouldn’t the briar been focusing on having four or more white kids rather than pursuing a career in what amounts to a male dominated field? I always knew you were a closet feminist.

    “So, how do you propose to fix those defective individuals so that they can handle that IQ test?”

    Teach to the test by hiring Tiger Moms who know how to game the system. We white people enjoy finding shortcuts. It’s in born.

  153. @Known Fact
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The college bubble is bursting, and not just due to Covid or even rampant wokeness. It's just not sustainable.

    If I had teen-age kids who were not STEM whizzes I'd advise them to find some tradesman or even a white-collar type professional who can let them tag along, teach them some useful skills and get them some on-the-job training. I don't know, does that sound like a plan?

    Even journalism -- I can tell you what you need to know pretty quickly, you just need to find someone who will let you go out and do it. Remember that story with the woman who got a four-year degree in hotel management -- and $60,000 debt? Jeezus, just work the front desk somewhere, follow the manager around and work up from there.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Rob

    Agreed! Great comment, K.F.

    I will add that there is the student loan bubble too, as some have mentioned. Much of the unnecessary college attendance and/or that which will never pay off has been due to the Feral Government’s having backed up school loans for a few decades.

    BTW, from my experience, Hotel/Restaurant Management is mostly a BS degree for the athletes to take.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
  154. @Paperback Writer
    There's a country in the East that doesn't mentally or physically castrate its best & brightest young men. They just did this:

    https://twitter.com/disclosetv/status/1449467671506993159?s=20

    Replies: @J.Ross, @epebble, @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    There’s a country in the East that doesn’t mentally or physically castrate its best & brightest young men.

    Actually China was early forerunner in both.

    Mentally, by an extremely rigid form of the Imperial Exam, the eight-legged essays. Used for 600 years Ming and Qing, just as the West surpassed China.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-legged_essay

    Physically this was done both voluntary and involuntarily. The former was done as a “career” route to become an eunuch. Quite a few times the most powerful or wealthiest “ex-man” of the empire was a eunuch. This has so many ignominious examples that I’ll spare you the details.

    The latter has a rather inspiring example. Sima Qian 司馬遷 (145–c.  86 BC) of Han dynasty for standing up for a someone based on integrity, was punished by castration.

    In 96 BC, on his release from prison, Sima chose to live on as a palace eunuch to complete his histories, rather than commit suicide as was expected of a gentleman-scholar who had been disgraced by being castrated.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sima_Qian#The_Li_Ling_affair

    He is considered the father of Chinese historiography for his Records of the Grand Historian 史记.

    View post on imgur.com


    [MORE]

    Antiquity
    Xia 夏 dynasty (2070 – 1600 BC)
    Shang 商 dynasty (1600 – 1046 BC)
    Zhou 周 dynasty (1046 – 256 BC)
    Spring and Autumn 春秋 period (722 – 476 BC)
    Warring States 战国 period (476 – 221 BC)
    1st Empire
    Qin 秦 dynasty (221 – 206 BC)
    Han 汉 dynasty (206 BC – AD 220)
    Three Kingdoms 三国 (AD 220 – 280)
    Jin 晋 dynasty (AD 266 – 420)
    Northern and Southern dynasties 南北朝 (AD 420 – 589)
    2nd Empire
    Sui 隋 dynasty (AD 581 – 618)
    Tang 唐 dynasty (AD 618 – 907)
    Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms 五代十国 (AD 907 – 960)
    Song, Liao, Jin, and Western Xia dynasties 宋辽金夏 (AD 960 – 1279)
    3rd Empire
    Yuan 元 dynasty (AD 1271 – 1368)
    Ming 明 dynasty (AD 1368 – 1644)
    Qing 清 dynasty (AD 1644 – 1912)
    Modern
    Republic of China (AD 1912 – present)
    PRC (AD 1949 – present)

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    You got me there, bud.

    But what about recently?

  155. @Corvinus
    @Reg Cæsar

    “Only one of those has ever used it– and on women and children. Keep that party out of power and we are probably safe.“

    In a time of war as directed by national leaders of BOTH political parties. Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.

    More importantly, it’s tje Chinese now who are making the threat to invade Taiwan and use nukes as a cudgel.

    “Dropping any kid of bombs on crowds of civilians is a spectacular war crime.“

    Not if you win. You really think the rest of the white world was going to prosecute white Americans, especially when they thought they could get their mitts on that type of weapon?

    Pray tell, would have the same sympathy toward Jews if they were the group that got vaporized? Please show your work.

    Besides, it took out Nips, right? You couldn’t care less about any ethnic/racial group other than your own and whether they got/get wiped out, so don’t pretend you are compassionate.

    Replies: @El Dato, @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.

    • Replies: @David
    @Reg Cæsar

    Why is "ends" being treated as singular in that quote?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  156. @Whiskey
    @El Dato

    There is no question that the two nuclear bombs prompted Japan's surrender. Otherwise, the War Cabinet was determined to fight it out as they figured enough casualties would prompt the US to negotiate and and offer far better terms including letting Japan keep some though not all of its conquests. In this they were probably correct.

    US War plans at the time had several options. The Navy wanted a blockade and figured that by 1949 Japan would surrender by sheer starvation. That was optimistic. While hunger would have been a major problem there was likely enough food to feed most though not all of Japan. The Army Air Force wanted to stage 10,000 plane bombing raids and firebomb the entire island chain killing tens of millions. This might have worked but civilian casualties would have been something along the lines of 20-30 million. With likely American losses even with degraded Japanese anti-Aircraft capability of about 50,000 dead. The Army wanted an series of invasions, the first due to weather in Spring 1946, in the south, followed by likely another invasion in the north near Tokyo in either 1947 or 1948. Casualties were estimated at 20 million civilian, and about 6-8 million US. The Japanese were well prepared for this and estimates were taken directly from the Battle of Okinawa.

    What the bombs did was give the War Cabinet an out. An excuse to surrender and end the war and fighting and dying. No Japanese fighting spirit could work against a nuclear bomb. It was something they could not fight and hence the surrender. Even then there was a junior officer attempt to stop the broadcast of the Emperor's surrender speech and continue fighting. There is simply no question that dropping the bomb was the correct decision and ended the war a few days later. Not dropping them would have required likely an extra two and possibly three years of war, with maybe 5-6 million US war dead. America would have been profoundly different, far more "Soviet" given that level of casualties.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Reg Cæsar, @Lagertha

    The Supreme War Council (SWC) was still deadlocked after Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Soviet entry.

    SWC DOVES:
    Foreign Minister Togo (the leader of the doves)
    Prime Minister Admiral Suzuki (77 and very flaky)
    Navy Minister Admiral Yonai

    SWC HAWKS
    Army Minister General Anami (the leader of the hawks)
    Army Chief of Staff General Umezu
    Navy Chief of Staff Admiral Toyoda

    Until Hirohito intervenes on the part of the Doves. A coup by young hothead Army officers starts, to kill the Doves and kidnap Hirohito. Anami 阿南 惟幾, leader of the Hawks, stops the coup.

    Anami then returned home and committed seppuku, leaving the message,

    一死以て大罪を謝し奉る 神州不滅を確信しつつ

    I—with my death—humbly apologize to the Emperor for the great crime. While convinced that Shinshu* is immortal.

    *Shinshu 神州 Deital Prefecture is a poetic term used to refer to Japan. It’s borrowed from Chinese who used it, also poetically, to refer to China.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surrender_of_Japan#Attempted_coup_d’%C3%A9tat_(August_12%E2%80%9315)
    https://warbirdforum.com/end.htm

  157. @Whiskey
    @El Dato

    There is no question that the two nuclear bombs prompted Japan's surrender. Otherwise, the War Cabinet was determined to fight it out as they figured enough casualties would prompt the US to negotiate and and offer far better terms including letting Japan keep some though not all of its conquests. In this they were probably correct.

    US War plans at the time had several options. The Navy wanted a blockade and figured that by 1949 Japan would surrender by sheer starvation. That was optimistic. While hunger would have been a major problem there was likely enough food to feed most though not all of Japan. The Army Air Force wanted to stage 10,000 plane bombing raids and firebomb the entire island chain killing tens of millions. This might have worked but civilian casualties would have been something along the lines of 20-30 million. With likely American losses even with degraded Japanese anti-Aircraft capability of about 50,000 dead. The Army wanted an series of invasions, the first due to weather in Spring 1946, in the south, followed by likely another invasion in the north near Tokyo in either 1947 or 1948. Casualties were estimated at 20 million civilian, and about 6-8 million US. The Japanese were well prepared for this and estimates were taken directly from the Battle of Okinawa.

    What the bombs did was give the War Cabinet an out. An excuse to surrender and end the war and fighting and dying. No Japanese fighting spirit could work against a nuclear bomb. It was something they could not fight and hence the surrender. Even then there was a junior officer attempt to stop the broadcast of the Emperor's surrender speech and continue fighting. There is simply no question that dropping the bomb was the correct decision and ended the war a few days later. Not dropping them would have required likely an extra two and possibly three years of war, with maybe 5-6 million US war dead. America would have been profoundly different, far more "Soviet" given that level of casualties.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Reg Cæsar, @Lagertha

    No Japanese fighting spirit could work against a nuclear bomb.

    Exactly. Note the hissy fits here over the recent magic show by the Chinese.

    It was something they could not fight and hence the surrender.

    Which would have been just as true had they been dropped a few miles from where they were, with a minimum of casualties. After all, Japan didn’t bomb Honolulu.

    US War plans at the time had several options.

    One rarely mentioned of which was to consider the neutral (to Japan) USSR’s offer to negotiate a truce, which would have saved more lives than anything. The Japanese had already signed on. I don’t like the USSR anymore than you, but FDR sure did.

    • Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Reg Cæsar


    Which would have been just as true had they been dropped a few miles from where they were, with a minimum of casualties.
     
    Not exactly, the firebombs used by US at Tokyo were comparable in damage with the atom bombs. The US wouldn't have a third and fourth bomb ready till late Aug/Sep.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surrender_of_Japan#Discussions_of_surrender

    One rarely mentioned of which was to consider the neutral (to Japan) USSR’s offer to negotiate a truce, which would have saved more lives than anything.
     
    The Soviets had no interest in negotiating a truce. Stalin had in mind payback for Russo-Japanese War*, hence planned well ahead for Operation August Storm.

    * The Japanese-Soviet Neutrality Pact: A Diplomatic History, 1941-1945
    Boris Nikolaevich Slavinskiĭ
    https://books.google.com/books?id=rddhxSKGQ9oC

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  158. @epebble
    @res

    Another factor is the demographic difference. GRE/GMAT are taken by many more international students (compared to SAT) who are much better than U.S. grads in Math. Most international grads who take GRE consider GRE Quant test to be laughably easy (they probably score in high 90s percentile without any preparation). Just a casual peek at grad STEM classes will reveal the mystery.

    https://math.mit.edu/images/grad-students-2018-2019-orig.jpg

    https://physics.mit.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/20200113_TEAMUP-report-aspect-ratio-516-475-1200x630-c-default.jpg

    https://caltech-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/main/images/students-in-dining-hall.2e16d0ba.fill-1600x900-c100.jpg

    https://physics.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj6226/f/styles/12-col-banner/public/prosepctive_0.jpg

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Hi There

    The bottom image (the one showing lots of fair-skinned people) must be that of the graduate students in state u’s Department of X Studies. A WM, engineering graduate student, at a large, US university, must feel more out-of-place than he would by playing on the basketball team.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Abolish_public_education

    The bottommost picture is Physics grad students at Stanford. A large number of white grad students are usually from Europe, South America/Africa/Australia/Mexico etc.

    , @Hi There
    @Abolish_public_education


    The bottom image (the one showing lots of fair-skinned people) must be that of the graduate students in state u’s Department of X Studies. A WM, engineering graduate student, at a large, US university, must feel more out-of-place than he would by playing on the basketball team.
     
    I'm a white male, engineering grad student at a large US University. I got >95% on SAT/GRE math sections without any preparation, and it was insultingly easy.

    In high school, most of the kids who did math team or chess team for fun got >95% on SAT/GRE math sections without any preparation. And most normal kids would never want to do math team or chess team for fun.
  159. @Reg Cæsar
    @Whiskey


    No Japanese fighting spirit could work against a nuclear bomb.
     
    Exactly. Note the hissy fits here over the recent magic show by the Chinese.

    It was something they could not fight and hence the surrender.
     
    Which would have been just as true had they been dropped a few miles from where they were, with a minimum of casualties. After all, Japan didn't bomb Honolulu.

    US War plans at the time had several options.
     
    One rarely mentioned of which was to consider the neutral (to Japan) USSR's offer to negotiate a truce, which would have saved more lives than anything. The Japanese had already signed on. I don't like the USSR anymore than you, but FDR sure did.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms

    Which would have been just as true had they been dropped a few miles from where they were, with a minimum of casualties.

    Not exactly, the firebombs used by US at Tokyo were comparable in damage with the atom bombs. The US wouldn’t have a third and fourth bomb ready till late Aug/Sep.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surrender_of_Japan#Discussions_of_surrender

    One rarely mentioned of which was to consider the neutral (to Japan) USSR’s offer to negotiate a truce, which would have saved more lives than anything.

    The Soviets had no interest in negotiating a truce. Stalin had in mind payback for Russo-Japanese War*, hence planned well ahead for Operation August Storm.

    * The Japanese-Soviet Neutrality Pact: A Diplomatic History, 1941-1945
    Boris Nikolaevich Slavinskiĭ
    https://books.google.com/books?id=rddhxSKGQ9oC

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms


    Not exactly, the firebombs used by US at Tokyo were comparable in damage with the atom bombs.
     
    No, they were several times as deadly. Which strongly suggests it was the weapon itself and not the relatively small number of casualties which changed the enemy mind.

    The only argument for specifically civilian casualties is that it would show our moralistic platitudes to be bluster, and we were as amoral and vicious as they, and probably more.

    This point is a valid one, but it only works if the last part is true.
  160. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Reg Cæsar


    Which would have been just as true had they been dropped a few miles from where they were, with a minimum of casualties.
     
    Not exactly, the firebombs used by US at Tokyo were comparable in damage with the atom bombs. The US wouldn't have a third and fourth bomb ready till late Aug/Sep.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surrender_of_Japan#Discussions_of_surrender

    One rarely mentioned of which was to consider the neutral (to Japan) USSR’s offer to negotiate a truce, which would have saved more lives than anything.
     
    The Soviets had no interest in negotiating a truce. Stalin had in mind payback for Russo-Japanese War*, hence planned well ahead for Operation August Storm.

    * The Japanese-Soviet Neutrality Pact: A Diplomatic History, 1941-1945
    Boris Nikolaevich Slavinskiĭ
    https://books.google.com/books?id=rddhxSKGQ9oC

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Not exactly, the firebombs used by US at Tokyo were comparable in damage with the atom bombs.

    No, they were several times as deadly. Which strongly suggests it was the weapon itself and not the relatively small number of casualties which changed the enemy mind.

    The only argument for specifically civilian casualties is that it would show our moralistic platitudes to be bluster, and we were as amoral and vicious as they, and probably more.

    This point is a valid one, but it only works if the last part is true.

  161. @Reg Cæsar
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Do the Hmong second generation show the same upward mobility as the Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese boat people?
     
    More like sideways mobility. At least in the smaller cities. Which may be to them what Eden Prairie is to the Somalis, a place for the more competent to escape to.

    Replies: @Escher

    I guess it helps that in smaller towns they are living hmong whites.

  162. @Rob
    NAMs get lower grades, take easier courses, and drop out more frequently, right? How can a test have the same validity, ie predict grades, coursework, and dropout odds without being “biased” against NAMs?

    One of these days, an IQ test (what these are) maker will just cheat. Test everyone and add points to non-whites scores until they hit the white average. They will be lauded in the media for making an “unbiased” test. They will be feted by the academic administrator class. They will charge 200 bucks a test, and every minority-having high school will pay for all their students to take it,

    To put off getting caught, they will have rules like photo ID required and only one try in your life to keep the ruse going. Immediately, profs will notice that blacks seem dumber and less prepared than whites and Asians at any particular score. The profs will keep their mouths shut because they will blame their internalized racism for their assessment.

    in a few years, the admins will realize that black outcomes are much worse than their test scores predicted. Some smart admins will think,’ blacks perform 1.1σ below their test score. That’s interesting because, in the Before Time, black IQ was that much lower than white IQ. I should say something. Wait, that’s crimethink. I cannot admit I know that fact. Say nothing! Keep my job.

    Eventually, an Asian will manage to take the test as a black and break the curve. He’ll go to whoever, maybe the principal, maybe the media. He’ll tell them about the NAM score bonus. Then the prof our journalist will never tell anyone. Finally, right-wing media will pick up the story. It will then be a partisan issue.

    I could be wrong about the coming bioprog transition. Maybe progs will never accept lower black IQ. If they won’t, then the cheaty test will never be stopped or punished. The black score bump will be a “conspiracy theory” to college admins.

    The company that makes the cheating tests will make a freaking fortune. The zeitgeist will protect them from justice.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    You’ve got an interesting and plausible plot and could put it together as a dystopian short story but with a hero who exposes the lie and finds a way to defeat the liars.

    Maybe you could enter it in this contest- I look forward to reading the winners:
    https://passageprize.com/

    A Note from the Editor

    Dear Reader,

    We live in an age of profound cultural rot. There is a stench of dying all around us. There is no life here. What passes for literature, film, drama, poetry, art of all kinds, is bloodless and barren, the agitprop for a regime of shrill Human Resource mediocrities.

    It is FAKE and GAY.

    Go read the novels short-listed for the big prizes. Whatever of poetry still even exists. The undifferentiated fare at your local theater. If your spirit has not been reduced already to zero, to NOTHING——and if you are reading this it must not be the case——what you will find will burn your eyes. You will feel like your veins have been scraped out with a rusted spoon.

    Whereas art is meant to inspire and edify, this culture is meant to demoralize. It is meant to turn you against yourself, to debase you into submission, to condition you to the pod. Enough!

    We do not have to accept this. Outside this longhouse of putrid moralism, a frontier awaits us, a new virgin territory. There are worlds yet to be discovered. Ways of being that do not reduce us to a state of meek, unrelenting surrender. There are portals. Enormous and powerful energies latent in the graves of pre-history, waiting for a hand, a mind, an imagination to retrieve and transform them into the creative spirit that will light a new way forward. It has always been thus, and will be again.

    We must EXIT FROM THE LONGHOUSE. We must seek, together, mutations and new possibilities. We must demonstrate through art, through story, through symbol and invention, what it means to leave this rotten place behind, to give life to a language and a temperament that is not afraid, that will not passively abide the cruel and craven bugmen who presume to rule us.

    This is a calling that transcends any partisan sniping, any lowly ideological pissing contest. Let us raise ourselves and each other above such things. Let us imagine a passage from this place to another one. Let us stake out the path. Let us dream it into existence. Join me. The only way out is through.

    -L0m3z

  163. @Abolish_public_education
    @epebble

    The bottom image (the one showing lots of fair-skinned people) must be that of the graduate students in state u's Department of X Studies. A WM, engineering graduate student, at a large, US university, must feel more out-of-place than he would by playing on the basketball team.

    Replies: @epebble, @Hi There

    The bottommost picture is Physics grad students at Stanford. A large number of white grad students are usually from Europe, South America/Africa/Australia/Mexico etc.

  164. Rob says:
    @Known Fact
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The college bubble is bursting, and not just due to Covid or even rampant wokeness. It's just not sustainable.

    If I had teen-age kids who were not STEM whizzes I'd advise them to find some tradesman or even a white-collar type professional who can let them tag along, teach them some useful skills and get them some on-the-job training. I don't know, does that sound like a plan?

    Even journalism -- I can tell you what you need to know pretty quickly, you just need to find someone who will let you go out and do it. Remember that story with the woman who got a four-year degree in hotel management -- and $60,000 debt? Jeezus, just work the front desk somewhere, follow the manager around and work up from there.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Rob

    I agree that college needs to be reformed and scaled back. There are problems with finding someone who will let you follow them around or “here’s the five-minute rundown. Now, go do it!” Is why should they ? Sometimes there’s a good answer. You are a cardiac surgeon and gave the editor of the newspaper his five (5!) stent operations for free. Maybe that’s extreme, but it’s in the ballpark. Someone gives your kid a shot because he owes you a favor.

    If you are like most adult Americans who aren’t the nth generation of big shots in your small to medium city who have been building up the family favor bank over the years, is that not a lot of people owe you big favors. No one me a huge favor, for example. Maybe if you are Warren Buffet, the Oklahoma City paper editor will do a multi-year favor for you on spec. From what I hear, that frequently does not work for the favor-doer. So many people do them favors on spec that it’s just the water they swim in. “Of course people do stuff for me. I’m great!” Maybe Buffet’s an exception.

    So that leaves your option being the universal favor medium: paying for education or training. Sound like a system we have now? For the GIs out of WWII college worked out well. For the boomers, too. The capitalists decided to outsource jobs and in-source labor, though. They sold this to us with “you’ll go to college, and get a great job!” Thing is, not everyone is college material. America’s college was social capital, built up over generations, from literally before this was a country. Like a lot of our social capital, it turned into someone’s fortune. In more democratic fields, it turned into a lot of peoples’ 40-year career of a nice life. But people respond to incentives, and no college president was going to let sweet, sweet federal student loan money go to that snotty Dean from Rival University! All his friends would laugh at him. His tenured profs would move to another school. His students would wonder why their high school buddies’ colleges had climbing walls in multimillion-dollar gyms, but he had a field that was snow for six of his nine months there every year.

    Then even colleges could not resist eating the seed corn. The Ph.D. glut meant they could hire adjuncts for nearly nothing. There are not many associate profs to replace the old ones as they die off. Some fields self-immolated as bright women found higher pay in corporate America. English literature being one. Those people who are supposed to help you or your kid turn his inchoate thoughts into logically valid and sound written language intended to inform, persuade, or at least clarify a position? That field is an unholy miasma of Foucault, Twitter leftism, and the worst writing you have ever seen. Bright women quit. Minority (not Asians) women abound. If they were not so obscure and were they not getting academic welfare in the form of required freshman composition classes, these people would not be employed anywhere near a computer keyboard that did not have pictures of value meals on it. English as an academic discipline will not survive the great college rethink coming up. There is nothing worth preserving in any “elite university” English Department.
    Here’s that More tag you’ve been waiting for!

    [MORE]

    Anyway, from baby boomers on, demand for college was going up! So expand! Raise tuition! Raising tuition did not lower enrollment! Raise tuition again! Thing is, at the beginning of this process, there were lots of smart people languishing in jobs they were too smart for. They were there because their parents were immigrants, or they were fresh out of Appalachia, or they made a good living in blue-collar unions, but the beginning of the Great American Bust Out had, um, begun. Lots of people made a percent exporting some capital. They did not see unions as necessary… for them. The union guys saw the writing on the wall. Factories were moving out of the country. New ones weren’t being opened here, but they’d sunk money into the existing workers are were going to milk that investment until they (the investment) retired. But the kids could not get good union jobs. They went to college. What choice did they have?

    But now? No group in America is educated below its potential, except maybe the Amish. Schools are built to grow. But the market of real students is fully satisfied. The only people who are in the relevant age ranges, but not enrolled are icky white males, many of whom are smart enough to go, if schools want them (as if!), and minorities. Lots of schools want to do way with accurate testing so they can admit and graduate low-ability minorities without their SAT/ACT averages cratering. Are they going to rely on woke winning, so tons of blacks will get black in a suit jobs for decent salaries? Do they just know that the government will pay them, and leave Chinese creditors with the unplayable debt? As lucrative as getting x million from some number of incapable blacks to pay freight for two years before they drop out, they could make an extra 1.5x if the same students paid tuition for five years, instead. Damn, I just made some college prez richer. Eventually, blacks are going to wise up and realize they go to whatever school for a few years and never make enough to pay back the loan. They need those degrees! What does the school President care if the brand will be devalued? Is he going to live forever?

    College is a scam for a lot of people. They will wise up seeing older relatives (but so many only kids do not have an older sibling or cousins that they know) struggle with college debt for years. Massive college debt load has also created a big class of educated and “educated” people with a vested interest in seeing inflation inflate their debt away. That is if wages inflate along with prices. They do not have to. People can just get poorer. I wonder if Biden and the Democrats will escape “punishment” for inflation in the ‘22 and ‘24 elections? The Democrats are the party of the educated classes. They must know that a lot of their base benefits from debt being less of a burden. Is that a “conspiracy theory”? Seems like sensible policy in service of politics. Would that Trump had done as much for his voters.

    If we just had Mexico as the Outlands of Polluting Industry, Office Jobs for Everyone (who counts) would have been possible. Mexicans are, um, not academically gifted folk outside the small upper and middle classes. They have lots of helot labor and would need American managers, technicians, and business bureaucrats “helping” them run “their” factories foreverish. The Chinese? They just need a generation to learn, then parasitic American management, consultants, and young corporate high flyers sleeping their way through China’s (not plentiful enough) young lovelies will be shown the door with extreme prejudice. Chinese can manage themselves. Their cousins are already a disproportionate number of our techno class.

    Will China “rule the world?” They will have a good chunk of the physical capital, human capital, and maybe social capital in the world. They will certainly have more per capita (heh) than America. The jobs of the future? America is not getting smarter! The industrial revolution, and the auto revolution, and the IT revolution (phase I) there were lots of people smart enough to fill a new niche. The AI revolution? The robotics revolution (phase II)? If those happen, then there won’t be niches open for a huge chunk of people. Now, maybe a revolution in Green Tech, like Warren wanted (when she wasn’t waxing about having a random transwoman chose her Surgeon-General) that might take a lot of workers.

    Maybe I’m a Luddite, and everything will go well. Better fully automated factories mean cheaper goods. AI and robots mean every service is dirt cheap — a sex robot in every pot — green tech and thorium fission mean ever-increasing power per capita until deuterium-helium-3 fusion beats break even and we build robot ships to mine helium three on Saturn or even out of Uranus (sorry, I had too) and then von Neumann factories, and then von Neumann cities…

    But who will the cities be full of? De-realization has led to lunatic politics. Woke on the left. Pizzagate and its descendants on the dumb end of the right. Even the people having kids today are not the sort to build Our Transhuman Future. Maybe genetic engineering? I found a paper about an allele that causes heterozygous to go blind in their forties. They also have a 22 or so verbal IQ bump over uninflected relatives. Can that save us? Not if the only people left are the ones who think birth control is the devil (the breedy sort of free-range Protestant) bitches ain’t nothin’ but tricks and hoes (you know who I mean) let’s breed of welfare from the smart Jews! (the future of Israel), endless Africans who cannot produce a machine…and Let’s be organic farmers and depend on technology we will not use (the white future of the east coast)

    No nation with a national average IQ of 100 (or so) has replacement fertility in that demographic. The welfare Jews in Israel might, but they will not turn organic genius alleles into something mainstream whites will have engineered into their kids…

    God damn it! I meant to write about on-the-job training!

    So, what were things like before college became cancer? Well, the labor market was tighter. Companies used the labor glut to force the workers to take on the cost of education and training. Then they would hire you. Or not. But even with the tighter labor market, companies don’t like training their workers. If you do, you either have to pay them more or you are training your competitor’s new employees. Now, with testing (what could be done with testing) at least companies could be sure about the human natural resources they are turning into human capital, but lots of people would fall through the cracks, and work crap jobs until they were too old to be worth investing in. Maybe they do now.

    Given the elite as they are, what would happen if the feds stopped subsidizing college loans? Money for school would get tighter. Kushner would still go to Harvard. Kushner Kash would be even more important to colleges. Lots of colleges would die. I wonder how that process would play out at a school with x millions of dollars of real estate, maybe an endowment also in the millions, and no investors with rights to the assets, but no hope of staying alive? Would the President (mercenary fundraiser, not a lover of learning) preside over the school slowly dying over x years as the endowment was drawn down to subsidize students until the last class graduated on the day the last contractual employee’s contract expired, and the last pensioner’s widow drew her last check, or would something like Mozillo and Countrywide’s death go down at hundreds of schools? Is that even possible? Would trustees allow it?

    I guess schools would have to co-sign loans where parents could not? If the feds got out of college loans, and parents or someone else would be on the hook for a loan that could not be paid back, black enrollment would crater. Unless forced not to, lenders would look for, ahem, scholastic aptitude.

    Maybe the feds should get out of higher ed? Let the market equilibrium for a while. Think of it as shock therapy.

    This comment is too long, and I have a video game to play!

  165. @epebble
    @res

    Another factor is the demographic difference. GRE/GMAT are taken by many more international students (compared to SAT) who are much better than U.S. grads in Math. Most international grads who take GRE consider GRE Quant test to be laughably easy (they probably score in high 90s percentile without any preparation). Just a casual peek at grad STEM classes will reveal the mystery.

    https://math.mit.edu/images/grad-students-2018-2019-orig.jpg

    https://physics.mit.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/20200113_TEAMUP-report-aspect-ratio-516-475-1200x630-c-default.jpg

    https://caltech-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/main/images/students-in-dining-hall.2e16d0ba.fill-1600x900-c100.jpg

    https://physics.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj6226/f/styles/12-col-banner/public/prosepctive_0.jpg

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Hi There

    Most international grads who take GRE consider GRE Quant test to be laughably easy (they probably score in high 90s percentile without any preparation). Just a casual peek at grad STEM classes will reveal the mystery.

    Everyone who does higher level math/STEM got >=95% on math SAT/ACT/GRE with no preparation. Including me.

    If you can get a A or a B in a regular community college differential equations class, you can probably score >=95% on the SAT/ACT/GRE without any preparation effort.

    BTW, community college does open admission, where they accept anyone who wants to enroll. They offer “remedial” classes and they offer advanced “transfer” classes designed to be transferred into university. They also offer various trade school, job training programs.

    I prefer open admission. Especially for math. If someone wants to try advanced math and they have the prereqs, and they can pay tuition and show up to class, why not?

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Hi There

    Everyone who does higher level math/STEM got >=95% on math SAT/ACT/GRE with no preparation. Including me.

    If you can get a A or a B in a regular community college differential equations class, you can probably score >=95% on the SAT/ACT/GRE without any preparation effort.

    All true; with a crucial difference. International students who are not STEM can score much higher than U.S. non-STEM grads. When a U.S. non-STEM grad faces a basic math question (as in GRE), the answer is "I am not good in math". You will most likely not find an international student who takes pride in innumeracy.

    , @Abolish_public_education
    @Hi There

    [CC's] offer “remedial” classes ..

    How many times must taxpayers pony up to teach the 3Rs to young people?

    @#166

    I’m a white male, engineering grad student at a large US University.

    Are you part of the 15%, i.e. an out-of-placer? Anyways, congratulations!

    , @res
    @Hi There


    I prefer open admission. Especially for math. If someone wants to try advanced math and they have the prereqs, and they can pay tuition and show up to class, why not?
     
    I tend to agree with that, but the problem is that step 2 becomes "... group is failing disproportionately." Followed by all of the familiar responses to THAT.

    It is much easier to understand once one realizes they really want equality of outcomes not opportunity. Even better if the equal outcomes don't require any effort or ability.
  166. @Abolish_public_education
    @epebble

    The bottom image (the one showing lots of fair-skinned people) must be that of the graduate students in state u's Department of X Studies. A WM, engineering graduate student, at a large, US university, must feel more out-of-place than he would by playing on the basketball team.

    Replies: @epebble, @Hi There

    The bottom image (the one showing lots of fair-skinned people) must be that of the graduate students in state u’s Department of X Studies. A WM, engineering graduate student, at a large, US university, must feel more out-of-place than he would by playing on the basketball team.

    I’m a white male, engineering grad student at a large US University. I got >95% on SAT/GRE math sections without any preparation, and it was insultingly easy.

    In high school, most of the kids who did math team or chess team for fun got >95% on SAT/GRE math sections without any preparation. And most normal kids would never want to do math team or chess team for fun.

  167. @Reg Cæsar
    @anon


    mine were 1560 and 770
     
    That's way more than the maximum of any real SAT.

    and 100% nw european. which excludes germans but includes irish and basque and swiss in addition to the massively yuge english part.
     
    Care to insult any more nationalities with lower-class lower-casing?

    Replies: @Curle

    “ That’s way more than the maximum of any real SAT.”

    1560 for total is 99.59 percentile. 770 for math is 97th percentile.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Curle


    1560 for total is 99.59 percentile.
     
    Out of 1600 or 2400? They keep moving the goalposts.

    1560 is at the 59th percentile on the 2400. My score in the mid-70s was 97-98th, but only 93rd today. Is everyone smarter now?
    , @res
    @Curle


    1560 for total is 99.59 percentile. 770 for math is 97th percentile.
     
    What is your source for that 1560 total percentile? This page gives 99.95 for post-1995 SAT
    https://www.iqcomparisonsite.com/satiq.aspx
    and 99.997 for pre-1995 SAT (which is when I believe anon took it).
    https://www.iqcomparisonsite.com/oldSATIQ.aspx

    The 770 was for the GMAT (not "math"). Currently over 99th percentile (not sure what it would have been when anon took the test), but not impressive relative to a 1560 on the pre-1995 SAT.
    https://magoosh.com/gmat/gmat-score-percentiles/
  168. @Hi There
    @epebble


    Most international grads who take GRE consider GRE Quant test to be laughably easy (they probably score in high 90s percentile without any preparation). Just a casual peek at grad STEM classes will reveal the mystery.
     
    Everyone who does higher level math/STEM got >=95% on math SAT/ACT/GRE with no preparation. Including me.

    If you can get a A or a B in a regular community college differential equations class, you can probably score >=95% on the SAT/ACT/GRE without any preparation effort.

    BTW, community college does open admission, where they accept anyone who wants to enroll. They offer "remedial" classes and they offer advanced "transfer" classes designed to be transferred into university. They also offer various trade school, job training programs.

    I prefer open admission. Especially for math. If someone wants to try advanced math and they have the prereqs, and they can pay tuition and show up to class, why not?

    Replies: @epebble, @Abolish_public_education, @res

    Everyone who does higher level math/STEM got >=95% on math SAT/ACT/GRE with no preparation. Including me.

    If you can get a A or a B in a regular community college differential equations class, you can probably score >=95% on the SAT/ACT/GRE without any preparation effort.

    All true; with a crucial difference. International students who are not STEM can score much higher than U.S. non-STEM grads. When a U.S. non-STEM grad faces a basic math question (as in GRE), the answer is “I am not good in math”. You will most likely not find an international student who takes pride in innumeracy.

  169. @Curle
    @Reg Cæsar

    “ That’s way more than the maximum of any real SAT.”

    1560 for total is 99.59 percentile. 770 for math is 97th percentile.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @res

    1560 for total is 99.59 percentile.

    Out of 1600 or 2400? They keep moving the goalposts.

    1560 is at the 59th percentile on the 2400. My score in the mid-70s was 97-98th, but only 93rd today. Is everyone smarter now?

  170. @slumber_j
    @Some Guy


    But over 4 years away from your parents who knows how your habits and motivation change.
     
    In retrospect and in the spirit of Stalino-Maoist self-criticism, it's apparent in my case that one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college. I didn't slack off entirely, but I'd never liked school that much and didn't want any more of it, so I didn't really apply myself as I might have.

    That was almost certainly a mistake on my part and probably indicates a character deficit, but it definitely happened. I probably should have taken time off before starting college--or as some people now say in the borrowed Briticism, taken a "gap year." (I guess that makes it sound less directionless?)

    Replies: @International Jew, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college.

    In my case that meant no longer doing stupid extracurricular resume-building things and instead liberating my inner nerd.

    • Replies: @Alice in Wonderland
    @International Jew


    one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college.

     

    In my case that meant no longer doing stupid extracurricular resume-building things and instead liberating my inner nerd.

     

    This is an excellent point.

    Lots of students likely find themselves engaging in, well, time wasting activities, that don't actually help them grow and develop whatever talents they may have.

    I saw something kind of similar with my older son, as well. High school was so busy with so many different activities that he was just exhausted and couldn't focus on developing his abilities. In college, he was able to put more focus on what he wanted to achieve. He was definitely relieved to get out of so many demands on him and just choose what he actually wanted to put his effort into. Oh, and yeah, he was way more successful doing that.

  171. @JohnnyWalker123
    @Reg Cæsar

    What about the Hmong?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Rahan

    Can someone redpill me on the Hmong?

  172. @anon
    I am of the mind that elite colleges should not exist, at all. Aside from being arrogant bastions of left wing ideology that are increasingly intolerant of dissent for the past 5 decades, they have also further perpetuated inequality by being country clubs for the liberal elite, who are busy pulling up the ladders for those they deem less holy or worthy than themselves for whatever reason, like holding dissenting political views or not Jewish/black/gay or otherwise oppressed enough.

    Education should not be a competition.
    It should be a place for people to seek knowledge, think, reflect, meet new people, debate new and old ideas. An education should be something one seeks to satisfy one's own curiosity, desire to learn etc., not to satisfy or impress others. I think all universities should be open to all who wish to enroll, as long as they meet a minimum GPA requirement. Those oversubscribed should simply run a lottery among the qualified applicants. This would distribute talent equally to all universities, allow kids to attend the university closest to home to cut cost, or not go at all but simply attend a vocational/trade school.

    So I welcome any effort elite colleges put in to make themselves less elite. If the Asians don't like it, they can always go back to dog-eat-dog, everything's a competition Asia. Our elite universities wouldn't have been half as elite if it weren't for these unimaginative, over-eager, hyper-competitive Asians prostrating outside their doors en masse begging to be let in. They only further feed into the ego of the arrogant left wing hypocrites running these schools. I welcome ever more efforts to keep them out. It'll be for their own good and ultimately, everyone's.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Prester John, @Prester John, @Hypnotoad666

    Not for coolie wages they won’t. That’s the problem.

  173. @anon
    I am of the mind that elite colleges should not exist, at all. Aside from being arrogant bastions of left wing ideology that are increasingly intolerant of dissent for the past 5 decades, they have also further perpetuated inequality by being country clubs for the liberal elite, who are busy pulling up the ladders for those they deem less holy or worthy than themselves for whatever reason, like holding dissenting political views or not Jewish/black/gay or otherwise oppressed enough.

    Education should not be a competition.
    It should be a place for people to seek knowledge, think, reflect, meet new people, debate new and old ideas. An education should be something one seeks to satisfy one's own curiosity, desire to learn etc., not to satisfy or impress others. I think all universities should be open to all who wish to enroll, as long as they meet a minimum GPA requirement. Those oversubscribed should simply run a lottery among the qualified applicants. This would distribute talent equally to all universities, allow kids to attend the university closest to home to cut cost, or not go at all but simply attend a vocational/trade school.

    So I welcome any effort elite colleges put in to make themselves less elite. If the Asians don't like it, they can always go back to dog-eat-dog, everything's a competition Asia. Our elite universities wouldn't have been half as elite if it weren't for these unimaginative, over-eager, hyper-competitive Asians prostrating outside their doors en masse begging to be let in. They only further feed into the ego of the arrogant left wing hypocrites running these schools. I welcome ever more efforts to keep them out. It'll be for their own good and ultimately, everyone's.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Prester John, @Prester John, @Hypnotoad666

    Did Plato’s Academy or Aristotle’s Lyceum require SATs?

    I think not.

    From The Big Questions to The Big Bucks.

    We’ve come a long way, huh?

  174. For middle-class White and Asian families, one of the advantages of living in California was inexpensive access to the good quality UC system, with previously fair and objective admission standards. The UC system is funded by California state income taxes, levelled principally on middle class and higher income Californians (overwhelmingly Whites and Asians).

    These new, wildly subjective and inconsistent admissions criteria are unfair to bright children and their tuition-paying parents and will damage the UC system substantially. Very noisy admissions standards creates poor-quality universities so the damage runs deep. These new criteria are also impacting other universities through a copycat contagion infecting Woke administrators everywhere.

    A White or Asian parent in California with a high-SAT-scoring child, forced to pay out-of-state tuition plus travel expenses to avoid the UC system, is being duped for tens of thousands dollars by this crazy and unfair admissions system. That needs to be made clear to them.

  175. @Reg Cæsar
    @Corvinus


    Controversial as it was, it saved more lives.
     
    https://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/quote-the-ends-justifies-the-means-niccolo-machiavelli-40-57-73.jpg

    Replies: @David

    Why is “ends” being treated as singular in that quote?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @David


    Why is “ends” being treated as singular in that quote?

     

    As Todd Rundgren said on an album cut half a century ago, "This is the s-ound of b-ad editediting."



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoKSWejUJlA
  176. @El Dato
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Well, if it goes to space it's bound to be hypersonic.

    "Nuclear capabale" is a function of payload mass, and depends on how small those thermonuclear things can get.

    China has its own space station now, so of course they have around-the-globe delivery capabilities.

    What's the word for "Silbervogel" in Mandarin?

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    “Nuclear capabale” is a function of payload mass, and depends on how small those thermonuclear things can get.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davy_Crockett_(nuclear_device)
    Don’t forget to duck after launch.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Veteran Aryan

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xe2rZlKRWoY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zBhtFFkUDI

    EVERYTHING is "nuclear capable" with these babies. Even your regular F-16 fighter bomber is nuclear capable. The transistors used in, for example, the engine throttle servo control are NOT specified for use in nuclear combat; the system engineers design up the EMP protection for the plane.

  177. @International Jew
    @slumber_j


    one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college.
     
    In my case that meant no longer doing stupid extracurricular resume-building things and instead liberating my inner nerd.

    Replies: @Alice in Wonderland

    one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college.

    In my case that meant no longer doing stupid extracurricular resume-building things and instead liberating my inner nerd.

    This is an excellent point.

    Lots of students likely find themselves engaging in, well, time wasting activities, that don’t actually help them grow and develop whatever talents they may have.

    I saw something kind of similar with my older son, as well. High school was so busy with so many different activities that he was just exhausted and couldn’t focus on developing his abilities. In college, he was able to put more focus on what he wanted to achieve. He was definitely relieved to get out of so many demands on him and just choose what he actually wanted to put his effort into. Oh, and yeah, he was way more successful doing that.

  178. @Veteran Aryan
    @El Dato


    “Nuclear capabale” is a function of payload mass, and depends on how small those thermonuclear things can get.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davy_Crockett_(nuclear_device)
    Don't forget to duck after launch.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    EVERYTHING is “nuclear capable” with these babies. Even your regular F-16 fighter bomber is nuclear capable. The transistors used in, for example, the engine throttle servo control are NOT specified for use in nuclear combat; the system engineers design up the EMP protection for the plane.

  179. @epebble
    @Paperback Writer

    That is particularly impressive and very worrying. U.S. has been having lot of problems in developing Hypersonic technology when Russia, China (and others) have operational weapon systems.

    https://www.defensenews.com/smr/federal-budget/2020/02/10/the-air-force-just-canceled-one-of-its-hypersonic-weapons-programs/

    https://www.defensetech.org/2008/10/14/darpa-cancels-hypersonic-blackswift/

    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/39620/navy-mysteriously-cancels-plan-to-arm-jets-with-screaming-arrow-hypersonic-anti-ship-weapon

    https://www.thedefensepost.com/2021/07/08/us-navy-railgun/

    https://denvergazette.com/news/pentagon-says-hypersonic-weapons-are-too-expensive/article_92870642-9c95-507c-888d-08803eacc08d.html

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Thanks, epebble.

    Let’s hope for once that the Derp State (did I get that right?) is lying and we are more advanced than they are letting on.

    But I don’t think so.

    I think we really are as clownlike as we appear.

    An American female major general actually tweeted about her manicure. I don’t have the heart to look for it. You’ll just have to believe me.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Paperback Writer

    Looks like some people are really worried. The (almost) ground hugging and maneuverable hypersonic vehicle instantly obsoletes any missile defense investment that has been made.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/us-very-concerned-over-china-s-hypersonic-test/ar-AAPFp8C

    , @epebble
    @Paperback Writer

    https://twitter.com/joclyborne/status/1448821828164755463/photo/1

    I don't understand what she is trying to communicate. I am glad that I can't understand but sad that this is who my tax dollars are being spent on.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  180. @res
    @Sparkylyle92

    2D:4D ratio?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digit_ratio
    Note that there is significant overlap between the male and female distributions (Cohen's d around two thirds).

    That would be an interesting way of testing the hypothesis that there are two distinct groups of MtF transgenders. Has that already been done? I see some papers on 2D:4D ratio and transgenderism, but the usual conclusion appears to be something like:
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40806-020-00247-9



    Mean 2D:4D of M→F and MtF individuals was higher (more “feminized”) than for M→M and natal males, respectively.
     
    But this paper has a suggestive comment (I do not see the scatterplot mentioned though).
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-72486-6

    When examining the scatterplot of 2D:4D and the GIDYQ score, an inverted U-shaped relationship emerged.
     
    Where GIDYQ is Gender Identity/Gender Dysphoria Questionnaire.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Has that already been done?

    Google Ray Blanchard and Michael Bailey. Steve’s done a lot about the latter. Search this website. Mostly theory – dunno about quantification.

    • Replies: @res
    @Paperback Writer

    Thanks. I'm fairly familiar with the two types of MtF transgenders discussion. What I was asking about was whether the 2D:4D ratios appeared to support that idea. The U-shaped curve comment I quoted was suggestive (that's what you'd expect to see, with the two types being the opposite ends of the U), but that paper did not show the actual curve.

    Everything I have found in searches is either not quantitative or only looks for a linear association. Here is a 2020 metastudy which talks about Bailey and Blanchard's work at some length, but does not relate it to the 2D;4D ratio AFAICT.
    Gender Dysphoria and Transgender Identity Is Associated with Physiological and Psychological Masculinization: a Theoretical Integration of Findings, Supported by Systematic Reviews
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13178-020-00489-z

    And the referenced 2017 post from Bailey and Blanchard.
    https://4thwavenow.com/tag/autohomoerotic-gender-dysphoria/

    The basic problem is most people only look for linear associations, and I think Bailey and Blanchard's work is controversial enough that not many others will follow it up.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

  181. @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms
    @Paperback Writer


    There’s a country in the East that doesn’t mentally or physically castrate its best & brightest young men.
     
    Actually China was early forerunner in both.

    Mentally, by an extremely rigid form of the Imperial Exam, the eight-legged essays. Used for 600 years Ming and Qing, just as the West surpassed China.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-legged_essay

    Physically this was done both voluntary and involuntarily. The former was done as a "career" route to become an eunuch. Quite a few times the most powerful or wealthiest "ex-man" of the empire was a eunuch. This has so many ignominious examples that I'll spare you the details.

    The latter has a rather inspiring example. Sima Qian 司馬遷 (145–c.  86 BC) of Han dynasty for standing up for a someone based on integrity, was punished by castration.

    In 96 BC, on his release from prison, Sima chose to live on as a palace eunuch to complete his histories, rather than commit suicide as was expected of a gentleman-scholar who had been disgraced by being castrated.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sima_Qian#The_Li_Ling_affair

    He is considered the father of Chinese historiography for his Records of the Grand Historian 史记.
    https://imgur.com/ZHf5WMY

    Antiquity
    Xia 夏 dynasty (2070 – 1600 BC)
    Shang 商 dynasty (1600 – 1046 BC)
    Zhou 周 dynasty (1046 – 256 BC)
    Spring and Autumn 春秋 period (722 – 476 BC)
    Warring States 战国 period (476 – 221 BC)
    1st Empire
    Qin 秦 dynasty (221 – 206 BC)
    Han 汉 dynasty (206 BC – AD 220)
    Three Kingdoms 三国 (AD 220 – 280)
    Jin 晋 dynasty (AD 266 – 420)
    Northern and Southern dynasties 南北朝 (AD 420 – 589)
    2nd Empire
    Sui 隋 dynasty (AD 581 – 618)
    Tang 唐 dynasty (AD 618 – 907)
    Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms 五代十国 (AD 907 – 960)
    Song, Liao, Jin, and Western Xia dynasties 宋辽金夏 (AD 960 – 1279)
    3rd Empire
    Yuan 元 dynasty (AD 1271 – 1368)
    Ming 明 dynasty (AD 1368 – 1644)
    Qing 清 dynasty (AD 1644 – 1912)
    Modern
    Republic of China (AD 1912 – present)
    PRC (AD 1949 – present)

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    You got me there, bud.

    But what about recently?

  182. @Hi There
    @epebble


    Most international grads who take GRE consider GRE Quant test to be laughably easy (they probably score in high 90s percentile without any preparation). Just a casual peek at grad STEM classes will reveal the mystery.
     
    Everyone who does higher level math/STEM got >=95% on math SAT/ACT/GRE with no preparation. Including me.

    If you can get a A or a B in a regular community college differential equations class, you can probably score >=95% on the SAT/ACT/GRE without any preparation effort.

    BTW, community college does open admission, where they accept anyone who wants to enroll. They offer "remedial" classes and they offer advanced "transfer" classes designed to be transferred into university. They also offer various trade school, job training programs.

    I prefer open admission. Especially for math. If someone wants to try advanced math and they have the prereqs, and they can pay tuition and show up to class, why not?

    Replies: @epebble, @Abolish_public_education, @res

    [CC’s] offer “remedial” classes ..

    How many times must taxpayers pony up to teach the 3Rs to young people?

    @#166

    I’m a white male, engineering grad student at a large US University.

    Are you part of the 15%, i.e. an out-of-placer? Anyways, congratulations!

  183. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Corvinus

    "how is this academic exercise a measure of one’s intelligence if one was not even exposed to a myriad of words?"

    They're called "public libraries". Going to the library and reading on your own, without being ordered to, is in itself a sign of:

    a) intelligence
    b) multiculturalism
    c) regatta
    d) reggae

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    They’re called “public libraries”. Going to the library and reading on your own, without being ordered to, is in itself a sign of:

    a) intelligence

    Big city libraries have a gigantic selection of books to choose from. Those in small towns do not. Is Jatavious taking advantage of this gift?

  184. @David
    @Reg Cæsar

    Why is "ends" being treated as singular in that quote?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Why is “ends” being treated as singular in that quote?

    As Todd Rundgren said on an album cut half a century ago, “This is the s-ound of b-ad editediting.”

  185. @slumber_j
    @Some Guy


    But over 4 years away from your parents who knows how your habits and motivation change.
     
    In retrospect and in the spirit of Stalino-Maoist self-criticism, it's apparent in my case that one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college. I didn't slack off entirely, but I'd never liked school that much and didn't want any more of it, so I didn't really apply myself as I might have.

    That was almost certainly a mistake on my part and probably indicates a character deficit, but it definitely happened. I probably should have taken time off before starting college--or as some people now say in the borrowed Briticism, taken a "gap year." (I guess that makes it sound less directionless?)

    Replies: @International Jew, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “one change in motivation I experienced in college was no longer having to try to get into a good college. ”

    There’s a dignified precedent for this phenomenon. It’s called ToDai.

  186. @Paperback Writer
    @epebble

    Thanks, epebble.

    Let's hope for once that the Derp State (did I get that right?) is lying and we are more advanced than they are letting on.

    But I don't think so.

    I think we really are as clownlike as we appear.

    An American female major general actually tweeted about her manicure. I don't have the heart to look for it. You'll just have to believe me.

    Replies: @epebble, @epebble

    Looks like some people are really worried. The (almost) ground hugging and maneuverable hypersonic vehicle instantly obsoletes any missile defense investment that has been made.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/us-very-concerned-over-china-s-hypersonic-test/ar-AAPFp8C

  187. @Paperback Writer
    @epebble

    Thanks, epebble.

    Let's hope for once that the Derp State (did I get that right?) is lying and we are more advanced than they are letting on.

    But I don't think so.

    I think we really are as clownlike as we appear.

    An American female major general actually tweeted about her manicure. I don't have the heart to look for it. You'll just have to believe me.

    Replies: @epebble, @epebble

    https://twitter.com/joclyborne/status/1448821828164755463/photo/1

    I don’t understand what she is trying to communicate. I am glad that I can’t understand but sad that this is who my tax dollars are being spent on.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @epebble

    Yeah that's the one.

    She's a "major general."

    A part of me is praying that this is an elaborate facade and that our military is still competent.

    But I don't think so. It's a helluva way to keep up morale in troops that actually have to do the fighting.

    Then there's this (see tweet). It isn't that she's black that bothers me, although I'm probably in the minority here. We've had black drill sergeants for at least 40 years. It's that she's a woman, and drilling them to a cadence extolling MLK. (Also, the combination of black AND female is grating, although I'd be disgusted with any woman doing this.)

    And look at all those white guys trudging along to her shrill shrieking. Am I the only one who thinks they don't look like killers? They look like a bunch of drone-peasants slogging along.

    https://twitter.com/NotNateTaylor/status/1449936109463539713?s=20

    Replies: @epebble

  188. @anon
    I am of the mind that elite colleges should not exist, at all. Aside from being arrogant bastions of left wing ideology that are increasingly intolerant of dissent for the past 5 decades, they have also further perpetuated inequality by being country clubs for the liberal elite, who are busy pulling up the ladders for those they deem less holy or worthy than themselves for whatever reason, like holding dissenting political views or not Jewish/black/gay or otherwise oppressed enough.

    Education should not be a competition.
    It should be a place for people to seek knowledge, think, reflect, meet new people, debate new and old ideas. An education should be something one seeks to satisfy one's own curiosity, desire to learn etc., not to satisfy or impress others. I think all universities should be open to all who wish to enroll, as long as they meet a minimum GPA requirement. Those oversubscribed should simply run a lottery among the qualified applicants. This would distribute talent equally to all universities, allow kids to attend the university closest to home to cut cost, or not go at all but simply attend a vocational/trade school.

    So I welcome any effort elite colleges put in to make themselves less elite. If the Asians don't like it, they can always go back to dog-eat-dog, everything's a competition Asia. Our elite universities wouldn't have been half as elite if it weren't for these unimaginative, over-eager, hyper-competitive Asians prostrating outside their doors en masse begging to be let in. They only further feed into the ego of the arrogant left wing hypocrites running these schools. I welcome ever more efforts to keep them out. It'll be for their own good and ultimately, everyone's.

    Replies: @Anon, @Anon, @Prester John, @Prester John, @Hypnotoad666

    Education should not be a competition. It should be a place for people to seek knowledge, think, reflect, meet new people, debate new and old ideas.

    True. Unfortunately, there is an economic demand for a process that ranks people by a combination of intelligence and work ethic (aka tolerance for doing drudge work to get ahead). And formal education got hijacked for this second purpose.

  189. @Hi There
    @epebble


    Most international grads who take GRE consider GRE Quant test to be laughably easy (they probably score in high 90s percentile without any preparation). Just a casual peek at grad STEM classes will reveal the mystery.
     
    Everyone who does higher level math/STEM got >=95% on math SAT/ACT/GRE with no preparation. Including me.

    If you can get a A or a B in a regular community college differential equations class, you can probably score >=95% on the SAT/ACT/GRE without any preparation effort.

    BTW, community college does open admission, where they accept anyone who wants to enroll. They offer "remedial" classes and they offer advanced "transfer" classes designed to be transferred into university. They also offer various trade school, job training programs.

    I prefer open admission. Especially for math. If someone wants to try advanced math and they have the prereqs, and they can pay tuition and show up to class, why not?

    Replies: @epebble, @Abolish_public_education, @res

    I prefer open admission. Especially for math. If someone wants to try advanced math and they have the prereqs, and they can pay tuition and show up to class, why not?

    I tend to agree with that, but the problem is that step 2 becomes “… group is failing disproportionately.” Followed by all of the familiar responses to THAT.

    It is much easier to understand once one realizes they really want equality of outcomes not opportunity. Even better if the equal outcomes don’t require any effort or ability.

  190. @Curle
    @Reg Cæsar

    “ That’s way more than the maximum of any real SAT.”

    1560 for total is 99.59 percentile. 770 for math is 97th percentile.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @res

    1560 for total is 99.59 percentile. 770 for math is 97th percentile.

    What is your source for that 1560 total percentile? This page gives 99.95 for post-1995 SAT
    https://www.iqcomparisonsite.com/satiq.aspx
    and 99.997 for pre-1995 SAT (which is when I believe anon took it).
    https://www.iqcomparisonsite.com/oldSATIQ.aspx

    The 770 was for the GMAT (not “math”). Currently over 99th percentile (not sure what it would have been when anon took the test), but not impressive relative to a 1560 on the pre-1995 SAT.
    https://magoosh.com/gmat/gmat-score-percentiles/

  191. @Paperback Writer
    @res


    Has that already been done?

     

    Google Ray Blanchard and Michael Bailey. Steve's done a lot about the latter. Search this website. Mostly theory - dunno about quantification.

    Replies: @res

    Thanks. I’m fairly familiar with the two types of MtF transgenders discussion. What I was asking about was whether the 2D:4D ratios appeared to support that idea. The U-shaped curve comment I quoted was suggestive (that’s what you’d expect to see, with the two types being the opposite ends of the U), but that paper did not show the actual curve.

    Everything I have found in searches is either not quantitative or only looks for a linear association. Here is a 2020 metastudy which talks about Bailey and Blanchard’s work at some length, but does not relate it to the 2D;4D ratio AFAICT.
    Gender Dysphoria and Transgender Identity Is Associated with Physiological and Psychological Masculinization: a Theoretical Integration of Findings, Supported by Systematic Reviews
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13178-020-00489-z

    And the referenced 2017 post from Bailey and Blanchard.
    https://4thwavenow.com/tag/autohomoerotic-gender-dysphoria/

    The basic problem is most people only look for linear associations, and I think Bailey and Blanchard’s work is controversial enough that not many others will follow it up.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @res

    OK - I didn't read your comment carefully, sorry.

    It's an interesting conjecture. Yes, controversial (i.e., embarrassingly revealing) studies aren't being done, especially with respect to male homosexuality. This has now spread to anything to do with transgenders, and soon will spread to the other hard sciences.

    The two MtF types are so different I'd be shocked if there wasn't a relationship between 2D:4D ratios.

    I'd also love to see this research on FtMs. They tend to be way less aggressive than the macho trannies, but I'd still like to see it.

  192. @Whiskey
    @El Dato

    There is no question that the two nuclear bombs prompted Japan's surrender. Otherwise, the War Cabinet was determined to fight it out as they figured enough casualties would prompt the US to negotiate and and offer far better terms including letting Japan keep some though not all of its conquests. In this they were probably correct.

    US War plans at the time had several options. The Navy wanted a blockade and figured that by 1949 Japan would surrender by sheer starvation. That was optimistic. While hunger would have been a major problem there was likely enough food to feed most though not all of Japan. The Army Air Force wanted to stage 10,000 plane bombing raids and firebomb the entire island chain killing tens of millions. This might have worked but civilian casualties would have been something along the lines of 20-30 million. With likely American losses even with degraded Japanese anti-Aircraft capability of about 50,000 dead. The Army wanted an series of invasions, the first due to weather in Spring 1946, in the south, followed by likely another invasion in the north near Tokyo in either 1947 or 1948. Casualties were estimated at 20 million civilian, and about 6-8 million US. The Japanese were well prepared for this and estimates were taken directly from the Battle of Okinawa.

    What the bombs did was give the War Cabinet an out. An excuse to surrender and end the war and fighting and dying. No Japanese fighting spirit could work against a nuclear bomb. It was something they could not fight and hence the surrender. Even then there was a junior officer attempt to stop the broadcast of the Emperor's surrender speech and continue fighting. There is simply no question that dropping the bomb was the correct decision and ended the war a few days later. Not dropping them would have required likely an extra two and possibly three years of war, with maybe 5-6 million US war dead. America would have been profoundly different, far more "Soviet" given that level of casualties.

    Replies: @China Japan and Korea Bromance of Three Kingdoms, @Reg Cæsar, @Lagertha

    meh. No. Bombing Japan was ‘Message Sent’, which was: submit. Submit (NOT to the USA), but to the Central Banks of the world. It’s always about money. Japan was not allowed to go cowboy and free, and, like develop anime and fun stuff like that 40 years later! hahahhahahhaaaaa! I mean, Atari, PacMan….I have so many good memories wasting my friends on PacMan!

  193. @Rob
    @Anon

    The Coleman SAT is very vulnerable to prepping - intentionally so. Coleman revamped it from a “Scholastic Aptitude Test” to a “Scholastic Achievement Test” I italicized those words to highlight the difference here’s a quick googling’s worth of SAT changes since I took it, which was maybe 1994? I dunno. I really liked weed back then, ok?

    Here is an article on SAT changes over the decades. Terrible changes they made recently: Wrong answers are no worse than no answer, and a-d choices on multiple choice questions. Net result of those two changes: midwit strivers have to take the test over and over, hoping that this time, they’ll be a false positive for intelligence. Old SAT was designed to prevent false positives. But guess what? Having some high scores be dumb luck means there are some black high scorers!

    Not mentioned in the article above, the high end has been compressed. The old SAT distinguished, according to Pumpkin Person, who used to comment at Halfsigma, and now has her own blog with a worthless comment section, says Murray said the old SAT had a ceiling of +4σ, or 162 IQ, which is like 5/100,000 people. Now a “perfect score” is within reach of more people. Today, 1600 is closer to like, 125. Better? Maybe if you’re one of the 125s trying to sneak in. But how does someone with an actual 150 IQ distinguish himself? The answer is the same dreadful tedium the 125s have to do. Grades - which punish missed assignments with zeros, but have ceilings of 100 on the final. That’s fair, in a way. But is it really the best education for people with 150 IQ to be running the course of honorss? They could be learning so much more, and when their minds are young and supple. I am nowhere near 150, but my brain was rotted away with D&D and Vampire: The Masquerade. In an appropriate educational program, I would have done more useful stuff. Like read more sci if!

    Heck, looks like the redesign ain’t not a secret. Here is CollegeBoard on the new SAT


    The Importance of Practice
    Unlike an aptitude test, students taking the SAT can improve their scores by completing rigorous high school courses and practicing the skills they’ve learned in those courses. Sustained effort and practice on core reading, writing, and math topics are at the heart of the SAT.
     
    Offhand, and this is without a googling. I did well on the SAT, but it ain’t not a test of motivation or laziness.

    They killed analogies. Analogies were the most g-loaded and hardest to study for. Indeed, they were eliminated in part because they were hard to study for. Also for having a large male advantage. That said, analogy tests can be done very well or very badly. Badly, if they test really hard vocabulary and simple ways things are analogous. That’s a vocabulary test. Which, come to think of it, are pretty g loaded. However, I heard a much richer English vocabulary than any Mexican fruit picker in California or Chinese immigrant kid in NYC did. I’ll bet none of them knows what higgledy-piggledy means. Explaining analogy tests can be done badly. I was checking out a Kaplan book on the GRE, just to get a sense of the test, and I read their analogy section. I’m making up the wrong answer that they said was right:

    Ballet Dancer : Pirouette as
    A…
    B Hockey Player : Puck
    C Fencer : Riposte

    The book said B was the right answer! Ostensibly because dance and hockey are both activities, and one has pirouette and the other has pucks. No! Fencer : Riposte is right. Dance and fencing are both activities, and pirouettes and ripostes are physical things that they do. I was tempted to email Kaplan and explain. Except, I am somewhat opposed to extensive test prep unless one has not had the subject in years, and I did not want to give any help to faceless competition. If the name brand test prep book writer did not understand analogy questions, what are the odds that 90 IQ inner city teachers can explain them well?

    If the analogy questions are biased to upper-middle class+ interests, then that is something they might work on? But in a sprawling, diverse country, there is no set of activities that everyone is involved in and does similarly. Not to mention, kids in the slums can read. I know about, I dunno, Dune not because I worked for House Harkonnen, but because I read the book. I don’t know when I learned to read, because my mom thought I was looking at pictures in the World Book enclyclopedia (for Millenials, that’s like Wikipedia, except they are not subject to trolls ruining articles. Like one, on gene expression, said some things use a ubiquitinylated lysine to initiate proteins. No! All methionine or a derivative. In an encyclopedia, a digression like this would have been edited out.) and I did not care enough about “See Jane Run” to remember whether Jane ran with a dog or sat on a cat, or whatever.

    They killed the math section that tested the mathiness of your brain. It had questions like, “in the equation 125x + 174y < 4000, what is the largest possible difference between x and y when both are integers?” Then the next question was like, what’s the smallest possible difference?“ I realize largest diff is easy to answer. Round the answer of 4000/125, so this is an easy one. But it takes smarter people less time to think of dividing by the smaller number gives a bigger answer, and the biggest did is when one is zero, and then just divide. But really smart people can do the division problem in their heads with less time and effort than I can put it in my calculator. The smallest diff is harder. Someone smart will answer it quickly, less smart? Maybe realize it’s harder and skip it. Even less smart? Waste time and get the wrong answer.

    The question I remember from my test, though I don’t know if I got the answer right, but maybe? “How many times does the digit nine appear in the list of integers between 1 and 10,000?
    The answers, and I am totally making them up without a care for getting anywhere close to the answer:

    A 9
    B 9,999
    C 1,0o7
    D 1008

    I really must re-state, those answers are all wrong! If you just read the problem, which is the real one, though maybe it was integers up to 1000. Two of the answers did differ by one, though.

    There were pages of questions like this! Drawn from a huge test bank. All gone. Replaced by trigonometry to make the test reflect the kinds of bath you have learned, perhaps by rote, without understanding any of the proofs or applications. New math is pages of high school math problems. The “test” is how fast you can guess the answers.

    Which sort of test do you imagine is harder to grind-cram from fifth or sixth grade on? Oh yeah, the statistical penalty for guessing ~unless you could eliminate one, but on quite a few, the right answer was the one less intelligent people would eliminate. They had decades of psychometrics on the test. On millions of takers. All lost. Maybe not lost, like maybe it still exists, but some of it is just in retired peoples’ heads, like all practical knowledge.

    Why did they change a test that was very difficult to study for into one that’s very easy to study for, and thereby ruin countless hours on studying that teenagers could spend chasing the opposite (or same!) sex, driving badly, smoking schwag, and drinking whatever alcohol they could get their on?

    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.

    The people criticizing the test being biased towards people whose parents could game the system were right, though. Giving extra time to a blind person who has to have everything read aloud to him is much different from giving able-bodied kids the same amount of extra time because a well-compensated psychologist said the kid had ADHD after the kid’s mom told him to rehearse this list of ADHD symptoms for the appointment. The solution to that is to only give extra time to people whose physical disability requires extra time to get the question read to them/fill in the bubble with their left foot, like Tiny Duck types, etc. If your mental difference keeps you from doing well on the SAT, then that fact should affect your score. Maybe, on the old SAT extra time did not matter. I always finished standardized tests early. But on a test designed to measure how many problems you can solve by rote in x minutes?

    I’d love to see a 200 point question on each section of the SAT

    Verbal: “Write a coherent paragraph that has never been written on the SAT before. The more students who pick your topic (example: “my cat” will be scored as a “my cat” paragraph, not as a unique description of your particular cat)

    Math: “Explain an equation, concept or proof in math using your own words. For full points, this explanation must not have appeared on any previous SAT answer. The more students who pick the same topic as you, and write essentially the same explanation, the lower your score will be. (Example: explaining the equation “17584 + 26486” will be scored as ‘long integer addition’“

    Really stress out the Asians! They cannot even collaborate.

    Oh, I forgot the essay! That was a thing for a while. Some poor kids cannot even compare their scores outside a few years, because their scores are out of 2400, not 1600. They added an essay section with notional equality to the other two sections. As far as I know, there was no validating thirty minute essays on random topics as measuring cognitive ability with any accuracy (though I did get the second highest, score category, an “S” on the MCAT essay section, scored J-T. They were essays on proto-woke subjects. I think so black kids could start their essays with “As a black…” for easier scoring and to eliminate conservative white guts who started with “As a white male..” Later analysis of SAT essays and scoring showed that length strongly correlated with score.

    As anyone who has read my comments knows, length does not mean quality! The humorous thing? In school, I don’t think I ever wrote an essay that hit the length requirement. In college I was all “…and then there’s the ten page hume paper!” What? I thought it was five!” “To write a five page paper, I have to try to write a ten page paper!”

    Congrats if you made it this far! I have no finale.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Ralph L, @Corvinus, @bomag, @Hypnotoad666

    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.

    Great post. I hadn’t realized the g-loading of the SAT had been watered down that much. Less g-loading, rewarding subject-matter prep, and setting a relatively low cap on maximum scores, could definitely account for the otherwise inexplicable surge in Asian scores since the great re-centering.

    This Quora answer isn’t sourced, but seems legit: “the correlation coefficient (“r”) is 0.86 for scores prior to re-centering and 0.72 after re-centering.” https://www.quora.com/Are-IQ-estimations-based-on-SAT-results-accurate-Has-anyone-verified-these-results-with-actual-results-from-multiple-tests

    .86 to .72 is a big difference.

    • Replies: @res
    @Hypnotoad666

    Thanks for that link. Good answer and comments. The correlations are sourced (but not linked) in a comment there. They come from Frey and Detterman 2004.
    Scholastic Assessment or g?
    The Relationship Between the Scholastic Assessment Test and General Cognitive Ability

    https://www.gwern.net/docs/iq/2004-frey.pdf

    Abstract:


    There is little evidence showing the relationship between the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and g (general intelligence). This research established the relationship between SAT and g, as well as the appropriateness of the SAT as a measure of g, and examined the SAT as a premorbid measure of intelligence. In Study 1, we used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Measures of g were extracted from the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery and correlated with SAT scores of 917 participants. The resulting correlation was .82 (.86 corrected for nonlinearity). Study 2 investigated the correlation between revised and recentered SAT scores and scores on the Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices among 104 undergraduates. The resulting correlation was .483 (.72 corrected for restricted range). These studies indicate that the SAT is mainly a test of g. We provide equations for converting SAT scores to estimated IQs; such conversion could be useful for estimating premorbid IQ or conducting individual difference
    research with college students.
     
    Note that both correlations given were corrected from the raw values. And the restricted range correction was substantial.

    This 2006 paper came up with a 0.426 correlation corrected to 0.583. Table 2 has details for both studies.
    Validation of the Frey and Detterman (2004) IQ prediction equations using the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales
    http://www.myschoolpsychology.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/RIAS-pred-SAT-study-beaujean2006.pdf

    P.S. Note that there were significant changes to the SAT in 2005 and 2016. Anyone know of data for IQ/SAT correlations of the newer versions?
  194. @Whiskey
    Per the policy at hand, there are likely fairly obvious outcomes.

    1. The UC and Cal State systems will simply be overloaded with high-fee paying foreign students, likely less Chinese now and more Vietnamese, Indian, Pakistani, and other children of elites of shambolic third world hell-holes, and unqualified blacks and Latinx or whatever. No Whites need apply.

    2. Technical excellence will simply collapse in the US Defense industry. Unlike Sputnik hating White men is the state religion, so our failure as the Chinese sink the US Navy in a couple of days with their new hypersonic weapons will result on doubling down of hating Whitey not a desperate scramble for smart White guys.

    3. Lower tier White elites will be pushed into the middle or lower class, you can already see this with the failure of Lori Laughlin and William H. Macy's kids to get into even a lower tier university without cheating; meanwhile the Gates kid married some Muslim big shot and the gap between the High high high White elites and foreign elites (think Obama types) and the lower tier White elites will grow wide as the former get pushed down into us.

    4. The lower elites will turn nationalist and White Identity to try and prevent further loss of status. People are more loss averse than risk friendly. They won't be marrying the Muslim big shot -- with Coldplay performing in private. Loughlin's kid will be lucky to be a makeup artist and the other actress's kid (and Macy's) will be lucky to be even that. That's a revolutionary moment right there.

    Replies: @Lagertha

    The whole world will change, soon. Wonderful people will come in to help with the transition. There will be: NO CIVIL WAR. – the bad people want civil war; f*ck them, we are too tired and stubborn for that. And, we will hunt you down, strip you, and humiliate you…tickle you with feathers until you lose your shit – while we film it with 20 member crew! hahhahahahaaaa

    In some ways, I want retribution – I so want to hurt people who have hurt me or my family. In the end, however, that is just an ego trip.

    Hateful people will be spared, but they will live with a lifetime of trauma as to why they supported things (looked away/disengaged) like SRA and the child trafficking industry – billion dollar industry – what’s in those containers!!! – children and young people are in those containers, for f*cks sake.

    To be fair, I must explain to people who do not understand what I am typing: kidnapped children, unaccompanied border children, Madeline McAnns, are beaten and traumatized so their blood is heightened because fear, and their adrenaline rises because of this fear. This blood is harvested because it is an elixir– Fountain of Youth to Hollywood actors & millionaires/billionaires/CEO’s/athletes.. Just read Hunter Thompson’s: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, starting on page 130…

  195. @Anonymous
    @JimB


    Maybe the UCs should admit half of each freshman class according to traditional measures like test scores, GPA, and recommendation letters and the other half according to holistic measures like lived experience, essays about personal hardship, and zip code.
     
    Just establish quotas based on each ethnic group’s share of the state population: Hispanic, White, Black, Asian-Pacific Islander, Jewish.

    This isn’t difficult.

    Replies: @JimB

    Just establish quotas based on each ethnic group’s share of the state population: Hispanic, White, Black, Asian-Pacific Islander, Jewish.

    This isn’t difficult.

    Quotas and split admissions would accomplish similar results at UC, but my approach would beat a challenge in the state court. Quotas would not.

  196. @Hypnotoad666
    @Rob


    So black girls could get better scores! They thought that they’d be the grinders. Guess they’d never met an Asian.
     
    Great post. I hadn't realized the g-loading of the SAT had been watered down that much. Less g-loading, rewarding subject-matter prep, and setting a relatively low cap on maximum scores, could definitely account for the otherwise inexplicable surge in Asian scores since the great re-centering.

    This Quora answer isn't sourced, but seems legit: "the correlation coefficient ("r") is 0.86 for scores prior to re-centering and 0.72 after re-centering." https://www.quora.com/Are-IQ-estimations-based-on-SAT-results-accurate-Has-anyone-verified-these-results-with-actual-results-from-multiple-tests

    .86 to .72 is a big difference.

    Replies: @res

    Thanks for that link. Good answer and comments. The correlations are sourced (but not linked) in a comment there. They come from Frey and Detterman 2004.
    Scholastic Assessment or g?
    The Relationship Between the Scholastic Assessment Test and General Cognitive Ability

    https://www.gwern.net/docs/iq/2004-frey.pdf

    Abstract:

    There is little evidence showing the relationship between the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and g (general intelligence). This research established the relationship between SAT and g, as well as the appropriateness of the SAT as a measure of g, and examined the SAT as a premorbid measure of intelligence. In Study 1, we used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Measures of g were extracted from the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery and correlated with SAT scores of 917 participants. The resulting correlation was .82 (.86 corrected for nonlinearity). Study 2 investigated the correlation between revised and recentered SAT scores and scores on the Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices among 104 undergraduates. The resulting correlation was .483 (.72 corrected for restricted range). These studies indicate that the SAT is mainly a test of g. We provide equations for converting SAT scores to estimated IQs; such conversion could be useful for estimating premorbid IQ or conducting individual difference
    research with college students.

    Note that both correlations given were corrected from the raw values. And the restricted range correction was substantial.

    This 2006 paper came up with a 0.426 correlation corrected to 0.583. Table 2 has details for both studies.
    Validation of the Frey and Detterman (2004) IQ prediction equations using the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales
    http://www.myschoolpsychology.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/RIAS-pred-SAT-study-beaujean2006.pdf

    P.S. Note that there were significant changes to the SAT in 2005 and 2016. Anyone know of data for IQ/SAT correlations of the newer versions?

  197. @res
    @Paperback Writer

    Thanks. I'm fairly familiar with the two types of MtF transgenders discussion. What I was asking about was whether the 2D:4D ratios appeared to support that idea. The U-shaped curve comment I quoted was suggestive (that's what you'd expect to see, with the two types being the opposite ends of the U), but that paper did not show the actual curve.

    Everything I have found in searches is either not quantitative or only looks for a linear association. Here is a 2020 metastudy which talks about Bailey and Blanchard's work at some length, but does not relate it to the 2D;4D ratio AFAICT.
    Gender Dysphoria and Transgender Identity Is Associated with Physiological and Psychological Masculinization: a Theoretical Integration of Findings, Supported by Systematic Reviews
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13178-020-00489-z

    And the referenced 2017 post from Bailey and Blanchard.
    https://4thwavenow.com/tag/autohomoerotic-gender-dysphoria/

    The basic problem is most people only look for linear associations, and I think Bailey and Blanchard's work is controversial enough that not many others will follow it up.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    OK – I didn’t read your comment carefully, sorry.

    It’s an interesting conjecture. Yes, controversial (i.e., embarrassingly revealing) studies aren’t being done, especially with respect to male homosexuality. This has now spread to anything to do with transgenders, and soon will spread to the other hard sciences.

    The two MtF types are so different I’d be shocked if there wasn’t a relationship between 2D:4D ratios.

    I’d also love to see this research on FtMs. They tend to be way less aggressive than the macho trannies, but I’d still like to see it.

  198. @epebble
    @Paperback Writer

    https://twitter.com/joclyborne/status/1448821828164755463/photo/1

    I don't understand what she is trying to communicate. I am glad that I can't understand but sad that this is who my tax dollars are being spent on.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Yeah that’s the one.

    She’s a “major general.”

    A part of me is praying that this is an elaborate facade and that our military is still competent.

    But I don’t think so. It’s a helluva way to keep up morale in troops that actually have to do the fighting.

    Then there’s this (see tweet). It isn’t that she’s black that bothers me, although I’m probably in the minority here. We’ve had black drill sergeants for at least 40 years. It’s that she’s a woman, and drilling them to a cadence extolling MLK. (Also, the combination of black AND female is grating, although I’d be disgusted with any woman doing this.)

    And look at all those white guys trudging along to her shrill shrieking. Am I the only one who thinks they don’t look like killers? They look like a bunch of drone-peasants slogging along.

    https://twitter.com/NotNateTaylor/status/1449936109463539713?s=20

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Paperback Writer

    Somehow it gives the vibes of a school picnic of giant K-5 graders singing and walking in a park rather than a U.S. military drill. Sound of Music designed by a military.

  199. @Paperback Writer
    @epebble

    Yeah that's the one.

    She's a "major general."

    A part of me is praying that this is an elaborate facade and that our military is still competent.

    But I don't think so. It's a helluva way to keep up morale in troops that actually have to do the fighting.

    Then there's this (see tweet). It isn't that she's black that bothers me, although I'm probably in the minority here. We've had black drill sergeants for at least 40 years. It's that she's a woman, and drilling them to a cadence extolling MLK. (Also, the combination of black AND female is grating, although I'd be disgusted with any woman doing this.)

    And look at all those white guys trudging along to her shrill shrieking. Am I the only one who thinks they don't look like killers? They look like a bunch of drone-peasants slogging along.

    https://twitter.com/NotNateTaylor/status/1449936109463539713?s=20

    Replies: @epebble

    Somehow it gives the vibes of a school picnic of giant K-5 graders singing and walking in a park rather than a U.S. military drill. Sound of Music designed by a military.

  200. The American advantage in war has long been its technological superiority. But if China can narrow the gap to the point where intangible factors – such as esprit de corps, or willingness to die for a cause – come into play, then the United States is in a bad place. The destruction of standards, the open discirmination against white males in terms of entry into various institutions, the jewification of the country, have weakened the United States and attenuated the spiritual and metaphysical bonds that once bound people in fidelity to American ideals, and to America itself. America today serves a tiny cabal at the very top, and industriously discriminates against ambitious and talented white males who are not members of the tribe. Affirmative action in the SATs, designed to get the jew’s house ni ggers into elite institutions, is just another tool for undermining whites while elevating the least productive and most violent members of society. White men no longer have a compelling interest in fighting for this country, but they may find themselves having to fight against it in order to survive. Hold onto your money, save as much as possible, and be prepared to use lawfare, or even more potent tools, in the near future. Never give your money to a jew unless it’s at the point of a gun. And it would help if white men would stand together. One or a few white men won’t be able to turn this thing around, but several million determined white men might.

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