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Turkish Motto: Those Who Conspire First, Laugh Last.
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As we all know in the United States, conspiracies couldn’t possibly happen because of Reasons, so anybody accused of being a conspiracy theorist must be low class (unless you are black, such as Ta-Nehisi Coates, whose conspiracy theory about why his having been beaten up so much by the other black boys was actually the fault of “those who think they are white” made him a MacArthur Genius).

But as everybody knows in Turkey, the more complicated the conspiracy theory you concoct, the smarter you are. Thus from the New York Times news section:

The Conspiracy Threatening a $360 Million TV Deal

A feud between a top Turkish soccer team and the league’s broadcaster is rooted in taped chants, time stamps and club rivalry. But the fight’s cost could be enormous.

By Tariq Panja, March 10, 2021, 6:30 a.m. ET

The offending chant had been broadcast during Turkish league matches for months before anyone noticed it. The refrain, a variation of which is often heard in stadiums around Turkey, ends with a profanity directed at Fenerbahce, one of the country’s biggest and richest clubs.

For months, it had been included in the prerecorded crowd noise that has become the soundtrack to live sports in empty stadiums in the coronavirus era. And for months, no one in Turkey said a thing — until January, when a keen-eared observer noticed the chant in the background of games involving one of the league’s smallest teams.

Now, it is the latest flash point in an increasingly bitter dispute pitting Fenerbahce — a Turkish soccer team which has millions of passionate fans and is led by one of Turkey’s richest men — against beIN Media Group, one of the world’s largest buyers of sports rights.

Fenerbahce has seized on the revelation about the chants as proof of its long-held belief that the Qatar-based broadcaster, through its beIN Sports Turkey subsidiary, had an agenda against the club. The fight has sabotaged interviews and played out in on-field protests, perceived injustices and, most recently, a lawsuit in a Turkish court. It could have serious financial consequences for the entire league, and the club is showing no sign it will relent. …

“Conspiracy and paranoia is part of the culture in Turkey,” said Emre Sarigul, a co-founder of Turkish Football, the largest English website solely devoted to Turkish soccer.

The Turkish motto ought to be, “Those who conspire first, laugh last.”

… Fenerbahce’s response was laced with the language of conspiracy theory. “If our arguments are considered individually, they would not make much sense,” said Kizilhan, the general secretary, “but seeing them as the parts of a puzzle, it shows the big picture clearly.”

Kizilhan acknowledged that some of the nuances of the fight would be difficult to understand for anyone “without having clear understanding and knowledge of local intricacies and ingredients of Turkish football.”

So I’m not going to recount any of the details.

Turkey, with its non-Indo-European language, may seem alien to the West, but it interacts with Western thinking. For example, I picked up the concept of the “Deep State” about a dozen years ago, which had originated in Turkish leftist critiques of the ruling Kemalist apparatus. It implies, among much else, that even people who are seemingly retired from government office maintain a web that is hard for outsiders to overcome.

When I was in Turkey in 2009, I ran into a personal problem and asked the hotel management for advice in finding out what I needed to know about somebody’s movements within Turkey. They sent me their hotel detective, a grizzled older man, with fervent assurances that he had been in “Security,” and that he had a son and daughter who currently work in “Security.” He almost immediately found the information I needed. Since he didn’t speak English, I couldn’t ask him how he did it after everybody else I had asked had failed. So I asked the hotel manager how the man from Security had done it: “Government computers,” he replied.

Today, of course, you are not supposed to say the term “deep state.” You are supposed to say the incantation “systemic racism” as often as possible.

One important difference between the kind of conspiracy theorizing that grew out of the Fertile Crescent versus today’s conspiracy theorizing rampant in sub-Saharan Africa (and increasingly in America) is over intentionality. In the temperate world, witchcraft is assumed to depend upon malign actions, such as making the Evil Eye. But as anthropologist Henry Harpending discovered during his years of research in Africa, in Sub-Saharan Africa, however, witchcraft is assumed to depend merely upon unfortunate thoughts, which can project malign forces across great distances, even if you resist acting upon those thoughts. In other words, African theories of witchcraft resemble African-American academic theories of implicit and systemic racism in which malign forces are propagated by bad thoughts across vast distances of time and space without any specific mechanism needing to be identified.

 
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  1. Oedipal versus pre-Oedipal conspiracy theorising

    • Agree: Not Raul
  2. In other words, African theories of witchcraft resemble African-American academic theories of implicit and systemic racism in which malign forces are propagated by bad thoughts across vast distances of time and space without any specific mechanism needing to be identified.

    Very interesting on that topic: Nigel Barley, A Plague of Caterpillars – A Return to the African Bush – I would love to know what witchcraft can do against racism. – sorcerers – what’s up? any ideas on how to help out Meghan, Duchess of Sussex?

    Btw. – I loved reading Henry Hapending’s text Hunting the Great Cape Buffalo which unfortunately seems to be no longer online – could somebody please prove me wrong here?

    • Replies: @hooodathunkit
    @Dieter Kief

    This it? Great funny story even if it isn't though.
    https://web.archive.org/web/20170105231156/http://the10000yearexplosion.com/henry-and-the-cape-buffalo/

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  3. I picked up the concept of the “Deep State” about a dozen years ago, which had originated in Turkish leftist critiques of the ruling Kemalist apparatus. It implies, among much else, that even people who are seemingly retired from government office maintain a web that is hard for outsiders to overcome.

    That’s the whole premise of the classic British sitcom ‘Yes, Minister’. The name comes from the minister constantly trying to do something and getting stopped by his cabinet secretary who, as a civil servant is part of the ‘permanent government’.

    • Agree: Some Guy
    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
    @Altai

    Note that Sir Arnold's tie is the Eton Old Boy's tie.

  4. “Is it better for a man to have chosen evil than to have good imposed upon him?”
    ― Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Anon

    • OOF: BenKenobi

  5. Anonymous[739] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    In Sapir-Whorf news:

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-56334369

    Amanda Gorman’s The Hill We Climb stole the show at Joe Biden’s presidential inauguration but when a renowned Dutch author was asked to translate her work there was an outcry because the translator is not black.

    Critics said it was not just about skin colour but identity too. This was not simply about translation but whether Gorman’s poetry could be accurately reflected, interpreted by someone of a different ethnicity, genre, and mother tongue.

  6. Susceptibility to voodoo would obviously fall under strong negative selection in evolutionary theory. Why are blacks so tragically susceptible and everyone else so totally immune?

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Trelane

    Your second sentence begs the question raised by the first.

    Perhaps it should be "Why have blacks survived when the other true believers have died out?"

    And maybe the answer to is that White civilization got to them in time.

    , @Kratoklastes
    @Trelane

    Cotton Mather didn't think he and his ilk were immune.

    Voodoo is a kind of suggested belief in possession - at least in that case there's a pharmacological contributor... tetratotoxin. However Mather and his ilk just believed that the entire world abounded with supernatural entities that possessed people (and took the form of the accused if the accused had an alibi)

    In case you think that's ancient history, and wypipo aren't that retarded anymore...

    In 2007 a Pew Poll found that 68% of Americans 'completely agree or mostly agree' with the notion that angels and demons are active in the world; only 14% of respondents outright rejected the idea.

    TL;DR: don't assume that deeply-held belief in retarded primitive bullshit is purely the province of our duskier brethren.

    A shitload of white folks believe in the literal truth of a book that makes it clear that their Messiah believed in demonic possession (e.g., the swine that were possessed when GodMan cast out the Gadarene demoniac). Seems highly weird that a GodMan would believe in such obvious horse-shit, but it's right in there - several times. Then again, the Old Nonsense is full of that sort of shit as well.

    The major flavours of the Jesus cult declare the inerrancy of their silly storybook (especially the Catholics, who still believe that any fact that disagrees with the styorybook is #FakeNews).

    Given that Jeebus firmly believed that demonic possession was a thing - firmly enough to think that he could 'cast them out' when they infected someone - Jeebus-freaks are almost obliged to believe the same.

    What's that thing that the mythical GodMan was supposed to have said?

    Something about motes in others' eyes, (alternatively casting the first stone) and that sort of shit.

  7. “In other words, African theories of witchcraft resemble African-American academic theories of implicit and systemic racism in which malign forces are propagated by bad thoughts across vast distances of time and space without any specific mechanism needing to be identified.”

    In the West, this is called Voo Doo, practiced mainly by….the predominantly African nation Haiti.

  8. It’s not due to systemic racism.

    It’s due to SBS, Systemic Black Stupidity.

    Here’s the necessary disclaimer: of course not all Africans are stupid. A few are fairly intellegent. It’s just that the majority of Blacks possess low IQ and other destructive gene-based traits, and hence are unsuccessful in a modern, liberal, technical society.

  9. Anonymous[359] • Disclaimer says:

    Off topic but I-Stevey:

    The Los Angeles County Bar Association today issued a press release condemning the rise in attacks on Asian-Americans.

    You’ll never guess what’s missing from the release. Apparently, these attacks have no known perpetrators.

    LACBA Statement On Increase In Hate Incidents

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Anonymous

    And in Utah today one of our major news orgs warned us that Asians are "wary" that Asian-targeted violence could be starting up any minute now.

    Golly, I wonder why it hasn't happened yet? It's a riddle wrapped inside an engima wrapped inside a mystery wrapped inside a thought crime.

    Replies: @Cortes

    , @Pericles
    @Anonymous

    I saw the LA Dodgers issued various press releases on the topic. I guess the asians have hired a good PR rep.

    https://www.mlb.com/dodgers/news/dodgers-condemn-anti-asian-racism
    https://www.mlb.com/dodgers/news/dave-roberts-speaks-out-against-anti-asian-racism

    (NB: Roberts is apparently half-black, half-asian.)

  10. Anytime I read about Turkey I can’t help but think about that movie from the Seventies with the cool theme song. Cue: Chase ( Theme From Midnight Express) by one Giorgio Moroder* whoever he is or maybe was. Hit it maestro. Btw, IF Turkey is like that, “than I just as soon stay home.”

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Trinity


    Cue: Chase ( Theme From Midnight Express)
     
    The jailmate of prisoner Billy Hayes was a mulatto who attended Hyde Park HS in Chicago: Ron Emmons.

    Fear has a way of locking your emotions inside, making it impossible to fully relate to those around you.

    This is the way it had been for Ron Emmons. Ten years of his life had been locked up. Since those nightmarish four years he had spent in Turkish prisons, the horror had been locked within him. He had been unable to speak of it to even his closest friends.

    But as he sat in a darkened movie theater watching a film called "Midnight Express" Ron Emmons was being purged of all the fear, all the regret.

    "Midnight Express," which is fast becoming a cult film for the young, tells the story of a young American, Billy Hayes, who was held prisoner in a Turkish prison for five years. It reveals the unspeakable conditions, the beatings, the torture.

    Ron Emmons was a cellmate of Hayes for more than a year. Although he is not portrayed in the film, Emmons sat there alone in that theater with beads of perspiration on his forehead.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1979/03/11/ten-years-locked-up/98de988b-22a1-42b5-a227-c63e7a130c64/
     

    , @Blade
    @Trinity

    Turkish prisons at the time were probably safer than American ones, as violent crimes were even lower (still lower than the US), no gangs, and fewer psychos. The guy in the movie was caught transporting illicit drugs, I believe heroine. Went to jail and found it uncomfortable. I highly doubt he would be tortured given conditions (I might believe if he was a member of a communist militant group though) but then no one would read a book or watch a movie about a drug dealer who stayed in an uncomfortable prison in Turkey for a while. Also, no, Turkey is still safer than the US. You are less safe in almost all major American cities as far as the statistics go.

  11. A few White women believe in the “thoughts make reality stuff” too. The Law of Attraction concept. Actually, I’ve known a few White guys who fall for a version of it. Usually, in the form of “write down your goals” which seems more practical, yet it’s often underpinned by quasi-magical thinking.

    But for sure most White people don’t have a clue how the minds of Africans differ from ours. They can be quicker in the interpersonal moment as I believe Steve has pointed, but not as good with abstract concepts. And it’s not due to a lack of education or the wrong culture (for all the assimilationists out there).

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @RichardTaylor

    "I’ve known a few White guys who fall for a version of it."


    Emerson, Blake, Plotinus, William James, Jung, dumbasses like that.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @RichardTaylor


    A few White women believe in the “thoughts make reality stuff” too.
     
    Yeah, I see what Steve is saying with this genealogy of morals from the dark continent to our continent, but it just doesn't fit my personal experience very well. I grew up around a lot of black people—okay, Af-ri-can Ah-MEHR-i-cans (jeez, when did that become mandatory, btw?) and I don't remember anyone dusky having this outlook. It was much more prevalent among the hippie-dippie white middle class dropout types. Maybe I was too young and oblivious to see it everywhere though.

    As far as becoming part of the meta-jurisprudence of the ruling class, I first noticed it not among the brothas but among the neo-lib administrative class in relatively negro-less Canada when I was hearing about their Star Chamber-esque Human Rights Commissions a couple decades back. These kangaroo courts routinely prosecuted based on "tone" or "what is in the heart" of the transgressors of neo-lib ideology they persecuted. They were typically run by middle aged white women or occasionally Jews. (The Commissions were invented and originally heavily staffed by Jews, but they seemed to lose interest once their ethnic enemies had been eliminated, so the machinery fell to bourgeois white women, homosexuals and other assorted malcontents as a way to force their thoughts onto everyone else's reality.)

    Beside the Law of Attraction stuff you mention, there was The Secret and slew of similar titles where "your thoughts make reality", all authored by, read by and believed by New Age-y white women, as far as I could tell. Certainly my personal experience is that white women are the most zealous practitioners of the "thought-is-action" ontology and its bastard offspring "your speech is violence" and "our violence is speech". Jews may use it as a tool, but they're not foolish enough actually to believe it. And blacks such as Mr. Coates, just say whatever their editor thinks will sell in their book.

    I mean, Steve has a point that it turns up a lot nowadays in the prestige press, especially from the pens of Tennessee Totes or that X. Kendi guy or whichever black the (generally Jewish) editors and producers have appointed to speak on behalf of all black people, but the main consumers of this tripe are middle class white women.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

  12. Off Topic:

    My off topic story is about conspiracies, too.

    I was reading a story at Yahoo about Covid-19 anti-vaccine conspiracies being spread through Hispanic churches and their ministers. In the midst of reading about b.s. conspiracies the article quotes a frustrated Hispanic doctor and professor who proceeds to pass on his own conspiracy theory!

    “Dr. Olveen Carrasquillo, chief of general internal medicine at the University of Miami, said he has been watching in fear as patients come to him with wild theories about the vaccines. Carrasquillo, whose research has focused on combating racial and ethnic health disparities, believes it’s part of a well-organized and concerted effort to create fear about the vaccines.

    “What I’m really worried about is that somebody is doing this really well. They know exactly how to get to our communities,” said Carrasquillo, one of the principal investigators for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine trial. “They know that for many people, the faith leaders are the gatekeepers of what people think, and they’re going through them,” Carrasquillo said.”

    How did a conspiracy theorist get put in charge of testing vaccines?

    https://news.yahoo.com/latino-churches-push-covid-vaccine-113901789.html?soc_src=community&soc_trk=ma

    • Replies: @epebble
    @notsaying

    The Dr. is not passing a conspiracy theory.

    The Spiritual Problem at the Heart of Christian Vaccine Refusal

    https://frenchpress.thedispatch.com/p/the-spiritual-problem-at-the-heart

    Replies: @notsaying

    , @AndrewR
    @notsaying

    I hate journalists so much. It's not even a secret that the vaccine developers used fetal cell lines during testing. But this fake news pusher calls that "false."

    Up is down. In is out. White is black.

  13. Anonymous[302] • Disclaimer says:

    There’s a variety of witchcraft styles in the sub-Saharan countries. The Beng in the Ivory Coast ban it as a topic of chat, perhaps closer to the European attitude. On the other hand they accept its existence more or less, and the king is supposed to know how to wield it. It’s mandatory to hex some number of unlucky chaps from his matriline upon assuming power, like a mafia initiation.

    By contrast, the Congo “witchcraft” per E.E. Evans-Pritchard is both more New Agey (i.e. giving off bad energy in close proximity) and faintly junior-high in its social flavor. In the West, you might get beat up out by the lockers, or girls might spread rumors/humiliating photos targeting other girls, whereas the Zande way of settling of beefs is run past fortunetellers and the village medicine man. It isn’t defined according to moral valence, it’s just a dynamic for turning down the temperature a bit.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous

    There’s a variety of witchcraft styles in the sub-Saharan countries.

    Yes, including penis theft. This article is from 2008, but nothing has changed.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-congo-democratic-witchcraft-idusl2290323220080422

  14. I think the Turks can’t hold a candle to their nemesis, the Greeks, who wrote the Book of Revelations, the Gold Standard in Conspiracy theorizing.

    • Replies: @Agathoklis
    @epebble

    John the Apostle, the one who supposedly wrote the Book of Revelation, was not ethnically Greek. His parents were Zebedee and Salome, they are definitely not Greek names. Arguably, he was partially Hellenised as he supposedly wrote John, the Epistles of John and the Book of Revelations in Greek; although, modern scholars dispute that one person wrote all these works given the difference in Greek. Putting aside his non-Greek ethnicity, the Book of Revelation is very unGreek in style in terms of subject matter.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  15. The concept of the Deep State goes way back further than modern Turkey as the concept is found in ancient Greek i.e. κράτος ἐν κράτει and Latin imperium in imperio used by Spinoza.

    • Replies: @Blade
    @Agathoklis

    I could be slightly irritated if what you said wasn't tragically stupid (or Antiturkic). You are so racist that you cannot even accept that a silly term being originated from Turkey. It is the term that is referred here; yet concept is also not exact equivalent of state within state.

    You should focus on appropriating food and other stuff, and keep telling yourself everything Turks have is Greek (truth is that Greeks were a small minority, most their culture gone by the time Turks conquered Anatolia; thanks to Turks you were able to flourish and live in peace for almost a thousand year. So what you call Greek culture today is basically Baptized Turkish culture since Greeks in Peloponnese didn't have much for culture and Anatolians consisted almost half the population after the population exchange [12% to 15% of them were 100% Turkish Christians who didn't even know a word of Greek]; your state was so worried that it could eventually fall under Turkish rule again that it did everything to hide that connection; the result is you: a people whose sole reason of existence in this world is to defame the Turks).

  16. @notsaying
    Off Topic:

    My off topic story is about conspiracies, too.

    I was reading a story at Yahoo about Covid-19 anti-vaccine conspiracies being spread through Hispanic churches and their ministers. In the midst of reading about b.s. conspiracies the article quotes a frustrated Hispanic doctor and professor who proceeds to pass on his own conspiracy theory!

    "Dr. Olveen Carrasquillo, chief of general internal medicine at the University of Miami, said he has been watching in fear as patients come to him with wild theories about the vaccines. Carrasquillo, whose research has focused on combating racial and ethnic health disparities, believes it’s part of a well-organized and concerted effort to create fear about the vaccines.

    “What I'm really worried about is that somebody is doing this really well. They know exactly how to get to our communities,” said Carrasquillo, one of the principal investigators for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine trial. “They know that for many people, the faith leaders are the gatekeepers of what people think, and they're going through them," Carrasquillo said."

    How did a conspiracy theorist get put in charge of testing vaccines?

    https://news.yahoo.com/latino-churches-push-covid-vaccine-113901789.html?soc_src=community&soc_trk=ma

    Replies: @epebble, @AndrewR

    The Dr. is not passing a conspiracy theory.

    The Spiritual Problem at the Heart of Christian Vaccine Refusal

    https://frenchpress.thedispatch.com/p/the-spiritual-problem-at-the-heart

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @epebble

    What exactly do you think the doctor is doing then?

    Your linked article is about White evangelicals making a decision for themselves to get vaccinated or not. How does it apply to a high level Hispanic medical professional saying that there's "a well-organized and concerted effort to create fear about the vaccines" within Hispanic church members?

    Replies: @epebble

  17. My favorite conspiracy is Sandy Hook.I truly believe that was a psyop which gratefully involved no kids actually dying.

    • Troll: Muggles
  18. Those poor, primitive and deluded Turks and Italians and Spaniards &c who believe in conspiracies. (Shakes head in wonderment)

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Cortes

    Yeah, it's not like the deep state, the media and DNC could plot to steal an entire presidential election and get away with it scot free. C'mon man, that's just ridiculous fear mongering. Oh, they did it before with some sort of invented conspiracy of the president with Russia? Never heard of it. You need to get your head straight, man. C'mon man.

  19. In other words, African theories of witchcraft resemble African-American academic theories of implicit and systemic racism in which malign forces are propagated by bad thoughts across vast distances of time and space without any specific mechanism needing to be identified.

    Very interesting, maybe that’s caused by whatever the underlying cognitive difference that gives blacks very high rates of schizophrenia is.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Some Guy

    Interesting.

  20. Happy to report that Ann C. is on board with who/whom:

    A governing principle of the Democratic Party is to ask, “Who is in the dock?” before deciding whether to enforce the law.

    https://vdare.com/articles/ann-coulter-on-unequal-justice-rule-by-left-wing-lunatics

    At least in the witch trials of the Middle Ages, you could prove you weren’t a witch by drowning after being tied up and heaved into a nearby body of water. Today, the “white supremacist” hex is indelible. The accusation is the proof.

    As a commenter here observed recently, the ‘white supremacist’ slur is essentially the n-word for white people. Only: except for being punished for hurling it, you get rewarded and your target gets punished.

  21. Istanbul was Constantinople
    Now it’s Istanbul, not Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Now it’s Turkish delight on a moonlit night

    Every gal in Constantinople
    Lives in Istanbul, not Constantinople
    So if you’ve a date in Constantinople
    She’ll be waiting in Istanbul

    Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
    Why they changed it I can’t say
    People just liked it better that way
    So, take me back to Constantinople

    No, you can’t go back to Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Why did Constantinople get the works?
    That’s nobody’s business but the Turks

    • Thanks: Alden, Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @John Up North
    @Peterike

    They Might Be Giants?

    Replies: @Wilkey

    , @wren
    @Peterike

    Shhh. Don't tell anyone. Secret info from patriots.win:

    When Rome collapsed, the empire split. The new capitol survived, while the old empire crumbled.

    https://media.patriots.win/post/7zRGdkFg.gif

    , @R.G. Camara
    @Peterike

    My favorite etymology from the ancient world is "Istanbul." The phrase literally means "The City", because for a long time in the Roman and Christian world Constantinople was so central and important that, after Rome fell, it was referred to as "The City" in the same way we might refer to DC as "The Capital." So eventually, it got renamed "The City", likely in part by certain folks wishing to purge the Roman and Christian roots from the place.

    Replies: @Agathoklis

  22. Turkey, with its non-Indo-European language, may seem alien to the West, but it interacts with Western thinking.

    Turkey was actually home to the first Indo-European peoples to enter the historical record – the Hittites (see Uriah the Hittite, done in by David for his hot wife, Bathsheba). Somehow, Anatolia – ahem, excuse me, Turkey – is no longer occupied by speakers of an Indo-European language. I wonder how that came to be.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Wilkey


    Turkey was actually home to the first Indo-European peoples to enter the historical record – the Hittites (see Uriah the Hittite, done in by David for his hot wife, Bathsheba).
     
    Different “Hittites”.

    https://archive.org/details/genesis0000unse_j2t1/page/172/mode/2up
    , @orionyx
    @Wilkey

    Although speaking Turkish, most inhabitants of Turkey are not ethnic Turks, but almost indistinguishable from ethnic Greeks.

    , @Blade
    @Wilkey

    Somehow -ahem- Americas is no longer occupied by natives, somehow -ahem- Australia is no longer occupied by Aborigines, somehow -ahem- Crimea is no longer occupied by Turks. Somehow -ahem- there are no longer any Neanderthals in Europe (they were there first, what have you done to them assholes?). Somehow, some people, always manage to find a way to sound stupid. I wonder how that's possible?

  23. @Anonymous
    Off topic but I-Stevey:

    The Los Angeles County Bar Association today issued a press release condemning the rise in attacks on Asian-Americans.

    You'll never guess what's missing from the release. Apparently, these attacks have no known perpetrators.

    LACBA Statement On Increase In Hate Incidents

    Replies: @Wilkey, @Pericles

    And in Utah today one of our major news orgs warned us that Asians are “wary” that Asian-targeted violence could be starting up any minute now.

    Golly, I wonder why it hasn’t happened yet? It’s a riddle wrapped inside an engima wrapped inside a mystery wrapped inside a thought crime.

    • LOL: wren
    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Wilkey

    Superb!

    Many thanks.

  24. @Wilkey

    Turkey, with its non-Indo-European language, may seem alien to the West, but it interacts with Western thinking.
     
    Turkey was actually home to the first Indo-European peoples to enter the historical record - the Hittites (see Uriah the Hittite, done in by David for his hot wife, Bathsheba). Somehow, Anatolia - ahem, excuse me, Turkey - is no longer occupied by speakers of an Indo-European language. I wonder how that came to be.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @orionyx, @Blade

    Turkey was actually home to the first Indo-European peoples to enter the historical record – the Hittites (see Uriah the Hittite, done in by David for his hot wife, Bathsheba).

    Different “Hittites”.

    https://archive.org/details/genesis0000unse_j2t1/page/172/mode/2up

  25. @Wilkey
    @Anonymous

    And in Utah today one of our major news orgs warned us that Asians are "wary" that Asian-targeted violence could be starting up any minute now.

    Golly, I wonder why it hasn't happened yet? It's a riddle wrapped inside an engima wrapped inside a mystery wrapped inside a thought crime.

    Replies: @Cortes

    Superb!

    Many thanks.

  26. Wait a minute! “Unz” Is that Turkish? That’d explain a lot!

  27. I watch Law and Order. Obviously black crime is overstated.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Mike Tre

    You are not allowed to commit a murder in Manhattan unless you are a White Trust Fund baby.

    Now if only they could make that rule stick in Baltimore, St Louis etc.

    Someone call Dick Wolf.

  28. @Trinity
    Anytime I read about Turkey I can't help but think about that movie from the Seventies with the cool theme song. Cue: Chase ( Theme From Midnight Express) by one Giorgio Moroder* whoever he is or maybe was. Hit it maestro. Btw, IF Turkey is like that, "than I just as soon stay home."

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Blade

    Cue: Chase ( Theme From Midnight Express)

    The jailmate of prisoner Billy Hayes was a mulatto who attended Hyde Park HS in Chicago: Ron Emmons.

    Fear has a way of locking your emotions inside, making it impossible to fully relate to those around you.

    This is the way it had been for Ron Emmons. Ten years of his life had been locked up. Since those nightmarish four years he had spent in Turkish prisons, the horror had been locked within him. He had been unable to speak of it to even his closest friends.

    But as he sat in a darkened movie theater watching a film called “Midnight Express” Ron Emmons was being purged of all the fear, all the regret.

    “Midnight Express,” which is fast becoming a cult film for the young, tells the story of a young American, Billy Hayes, who was held prisoner in a Turkish prison for five years. It reveals the unspeakable conditions, the beatings, the torture.

    Ron Emmons was a cellmate of Hayes for more than a year. Although he is not portrayed in the film, Emmons sat there alone in that theater with beads of perspiration on his forehead.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1979/03/11/ten-years-locked-up/98de988b-22a1-42b5-a227-c63e7a130c64/

    • Thanks: Trinity
  29. All those James Bond movies set in Turkey were on to something: the Turks love the idea of switching allegiances, double-dealing, and secret spycraft. They were the center of the Spice Road and were a contested front in the Cold War. They understand as a society that government official statements mean nothing.

    I’m also reminded of Golden Earring’s hit 80’s song “Twilight Zone” which most people think is called “When the Bullet Hits the Bone”, since that’s the repeated refrain. The song is actually about spies and assassinations, and references in the chorus “my beacon’s been moved under moon and star”, a reference to the spy meeting someone in Turkey—because the Turkish flag was a moon and star.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @R.G. Camara

    The first of the Evan Tanner series by Lawrence Block (The Thief Who Couldn’t Sleep), cosy spy nonsense piggybacking on the Bond craze of the original films, begins and climaxes in Turkey. Lots of great jokes.

    , @Polistra
    @R.G. Camara


    I’m also reminded of Golden Earring’s hit 80’s song “Twilight Zone” which most people think is called “When the Bullet Hits the Bone”
     
    Most people are idiots, and marketers have to defer to that. I'm dismayed to learn that the Icicle Works' "Birds Fly" has been retitled "Whisper to a Scream" and Elton John's "Rocket Man" is now called "I Think it's Going to Be a Long Long Time"

    Wiki's "Rocket Man" page has been rewritten by fans of one Elizabeth Rosenthal. Something similar has happened with a million other wiki pages.

    , @James J O'Meara
    @R.G. Camara

    "All those James Bond movies set in Turkey ..."

    You mean, that one that was?

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @R.G. Camara

    Thanks for that explanation of the lyrics from Twilight Zone, Mr. Camara. It's such a great tune and sound that I really never payed attention to them.

    BTW, Dutch band Golden Earring had their 1970s hit Radar Love, then Twilight Zone for the 1980s. They are getting a little behind on their once-per-decade top singles. No '90s one, no '00s one, and no '10s one. Up your game, Golden Earring! (If you people are still alive, that is.)

    Our patience for last 3 decadal Golden Earring songs is wearing thin.

  30. I’m all aboard and full steam ahead with the conspiracies and the conspirers!

    I was bummed out when I watched all the swing state blue city polls shut down in the middle of the night when Trump was so far ahead, and when twitter shut me down for sharing non-fake news about hunter, etc. Here we go, I thought.

    But now I’m psyched that Trump conspired first with operations Octagon, Freejack and Zodiac, and that we are in a period of clandestine military control devolution.

    This was what Chris Miller was talking about with Pence as “the most complex military operations in history,” that they had worked on together. This is why I now see humvees driving around town here all the time and military helicopters flying overhead in formations of five regularly.

    I’ve never seen this kind of thing in decades of living here.

    I have no idea why the capitol looks like the Baghdad green zone, but suspect it is connected.

    I’m hoping to laugh last, but this is all soooo clandestine that the world may never know that it even took place.

    So I will have to laugh clandestinely and conspiratorially, secretly knowing that I got the last laugh.

    And I will never love big brother.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @wren


    I’m all aboard and full steam ahead with the conspiracies and the conspirers!
     
    We do seem to be entering a golden age of conspiracy theories. My current favorite is the conspiracy to fake a conspiracy to stage an "insurrection." The FBI is currently pretending in all seriousness to be looking for a guy who left bi-partisan "pipe bombs" at both the RNC and DNC. The "bombs" themselves are hilariously fake looking, with a big egg timer attached to a pipe, but no apparent detonation device. The pipes supposedly contained "homemade blackpowder," which I suppose the FBI would define as any powder that is black (maybe crushed up charcoal briquettes, who knows).

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/fbi-releases-images-dc-pipe-bomb-suspect/story?id=76341036

    Replies: @wren

  31. @R.G. Camara
    All those James Bond movies set in Turkey were on to something: the Turks love the idea of switching allegiances, double-dealing, and secret spycraft. They were the center of the Spice Road and were a contested front in the Cold War. They understand as a society that government official statements mean nothing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfQYN19_LTU

    I'm also reminded of Golden Earring's hit 80's song "Twilight Zone" which most people think is called "When the Bullet Hits the Bone", since that's the repeated refrain. The song is actually about spies and assassinations, and references in the chorus "my beacon's been moved under moon and star", a reference to the spy meeting someone in Turkey---because the Turkish flag was a moon and star.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIaaBuGNwNw

    Replies: @Cortes, @Polistra, @James J O'Meara, @Achmed E. Newman

    The first of the Evan Tanner series by Lawrence Block (The Thief Who Couldn’t Sleep), cosy spy nonsense piggybacking on the Bond craze of the original films, begins and climaxes in Turkey. Lots of great jokes.

  32. @Peterike
    Istanbul was Constantinople
    Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Now it's Turkish delight on a moonlit night

    Every gal in Constantinople
    Lives in Istanbul, not Constantinople
    So if you've a date in Constantinople
    She'll be waiting in Istanbul

    Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
    Why they changed it I can't say
    People just liked it better that way
    So, take me back to Constantinople

    No, you can't go back to Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Why did Constantinople get the works?
    That's nobody's business but the Turks

    Replies: @John Up North, @wren, @R.G. Camara

    They Might Be Giants?

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @John Up North

    It's an old Tin Pan Alley song. They Might Be Giants just recorded a cover.

    Replies: @John Up North

  33. The Turks come about their conspiring and fighting over sports honestly. In the Byzantine Empire, the clubs supporting different chariot racing teams morphed into competing political parties/gangs that had a mini-civil war in 532 A.D. that almost deposed the Emperor Justinian and destroyed about half of Constantinople.

    The ancient Roman and Byzantine empires had well-developed associations, known as demes,[2] which supported the different factions (or teams) under which competitors in certain sporting events took part; this was particularly true of chariot racing. There were initially four major factional teams of chariot racing, differentiated by the colour of the uniform in which they competed; the colours were also worn by their supporters. These were the Blues (Veneti), the Greens (Prasini), the Reds (Russati), and the Whites (Albati),[3] although by the Byzantine era the only teams with any influence were the Blues and Greens. Emperor Justinian I was a supporter of the Blues.

    The team associations had become a focus for various social and political issues for which the general Byzantine population lacked other forms of outlet.[4] They combined aspects of street gangs and political parties, taking positions on current issues, notably theological problems or claimants to the throne. They frequently tried to affect the policy of the emperors by shouting political demands between races. The imperial forces and guards in the city could not keep order without the cooperation of the circus factions which were in turn backed by the aristocratic families of the city; these included some families who believed they had a more rightful claim to the throne than Justinian.[citation needed]

  34. @epebble
    @notsaying

    The Dr. is not passing a conspiracy theory.

    The Spiritual Problem at the Heart of Christian Vaccine Refusal

    https://frenchpress.thedispatch.com/p/the-spiritual-problem-at-the-heart

    Replies: @notsaying

    What exactly do you think the doctor is doing then?

    Your linked article is about White evangelicals making a decision for themselves to get vaccinated or not. How does it apply to a high level Hispanic medical professional saying that there’s “a well-organized and concerted effort to create fear about the vaccines” within Hispanic church members?

    • Replies: @epebble
    @notsaying

    I do not know anything about Hispanic churches per se; but there is a subtle movement to define the vaccines as sinful by creating irrational associations with abortion.

    For example:


    GA Pro-Life Group Says It Opposes COVID-19 Vaccine Development, Production

    https://allongeorgia.com/georgia-state-politics/ga-pro-life-group-says-it-opposes-covid-19-vaccine-development-production/

    Archdiocese of New Orleans calls J&J COVID-19 vaccine 'morally compromising'

    https://www.wdsu.com/article/archdiocese-of-new-orleans-calls-jandj-covid-19-vaccine-morally-compromising/35686477


    St. Louis Archdiocese: Examine Moral and Ethical Concerns

    https://www.emissourian.com/covid19/st-louis-archdiocese-examine-moral-and-ethical-concerns/article_bdd4d2a2-7ba3-11eb-bb3b-a7f31fc31c3c.html

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

  35. @epebble
    I think the Turks can't hold a candle to their nemesis, the Greeks, who wrote the Book of Revelations, the Gold Standard in Conspiracy theorizing.

    Replies: @Agathoklis

    John the Apostle, the one who supposedly wrote the Book of Revelation, was not ethnically Greek. His parents were Zebedee and Salome, they are definitely not Greek names. Arguably, he was partially Hellenised as he supposedly wrote John, the Epistles of John and the Book of Revelations in Greek; although, modern scholars dispute that one person wrote all these works given the difference in Greek. Putting aside his non-Greek ethnicity, the Book of Revelation is very unGreek in style in terms of subject matter.

    • Thanks: epebble
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Agathoklis

    Is that the Zebedee from the BBC's Magic Roundabout ?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZTBDnj0Cgc

  36. @Peterike
    Istanbul was Constantinople
    Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Now it's Turkish delight on a moonlit night

    Every gal in Constantinople
    Lives in Istanbul, not Constantinople
    So if you've a date in Constantinople
    She'll be waiting in Istanbul

    Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
    Why they changed it I can't say
    People just liked it better that way
    So, take me back to Constantinople

    No, you can't go back to Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Why did Constantinople get the works?
    That's nobody's business but the Turks

    Replies: @John Up North, @wren, @R.G. Camara

    Shhh. Don’t tell anyone. Secret info from patriots.win:

    When Rome collapsed, the empire split. The new capitol survived, while the old empire crumbled.

    • LOL: Almost Missouri
  37. @wren
    I'm all aboard and full steam ahead with the conspiracies and the conspirers!

    I was bummed out when I watched all the swing state blue city polls shut down in the middle of the night when Trump was so far ahead, and when twitter shut me down for sharing non-fake news about hunter, etc. Here we go, I thought.

    But now I'm psyched that Trump conspired first with operations Octagon, Freejack and Zodiac, and that we are in a period of clandestine military control devolution.

    This was what Chris Miller was talking about with Pence as "the most complex military operations in history," that they had worked on together. This is why I now see humvees driving around town here all the time and military helicopters flying overhead in formations of five regularly.

    I've never seen this kind of thing in decades of living here.

    I have no idea why the capitol looks like the Baghdad green zone, but suspect it is connected.

    I'm hoping to laugh last, but this is all soooo clandestine that the world may never know that it even took place.

    So I will have to laugh clandestinely and conspiratorially, secretly knowing that I got the last laugh.

    And I will never love big brother.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    I’m all aboard and full steam ahead with the conspiracies and the conspirers!

    We do seem to be entering a golden age of conspiracy theories. My current favorite is the conspiracy to fake a conspiracy to stage an “insurrection.” The FBI is currently pretending in all seriousness to be looking for a guy who left bi-partisan “pipe bombs” at both the RNC and DNC. The “bombs” themselves are hilariously fake looking, with a big egg timer attached to a pipe, but no apparent detonation device. The pipes supposedly contained “homemade blackpowder,” which I suppose the FBI would define as any powder that is black (maybe crushed up charcoal briquettes, who knows).

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/fbi-releases-images-dc-pipe-bomb-suspect/story?id=76341036

    • Replies: @wren
    @Hypnotoad666

    Yeah!

    https://media.patriots.win/post/XhVZkXCR.png

    https://media.patriots.win/post/stD0JCpZ.png

  38. @R.G. Camara
    All those James Bond movies set in Turkey were on to something: the Turks love the idea of switching allegiances, double-dealing, and secret spycraft. They were the center of the Spice Road and were a contested front in the Cold War. They understand as a society that government official statements mean nothing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfQYN19_LTU

    I'm also reminded of Golden Earring's hit 80's song "Twilight Zone" which most people think is called "When the Bullet Hits the Bone", since that's the repeated refrain. The song is actually about spies and assassinations, and references in the chorus "my beacon's been moved under moon and star", a reference to the spy meeting someone in Turkey---because the Turkish flag was a moon and star.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIaaBuGNwNw

    Replies: @Cortes, @Polistra, @James J O'Meara, @Achmed E. Newman

    I’m also reminded of Golden Earring’s hit 80’s song “Twilight Zone” which most people think is called “When the Bullet Hits the Bone”

    Most people are idiots, and marketers have to defer to that. I’m dismayed to learn that the Icicle Works’ “Birds Fly” has been retitled “Whisper to a Scream” and Elton John’s “Rocket Man” is now called “I Think it’s Going to Be a Long Long Time”

    Wiki’s “Rocket Man” page has been rewritten by fans of one Elizabeth Rosenthal. Something similar has happened with a million other wiki pages.

  39. @Hypnotoad666
    @wren


    I’m all aboard and full steam ahead with the conspiracies and the conspirers!
     
    We do seem to be entering a golden age of conspiracy theories. My current favorite is the conspiracy to fake a conspiracy to stage an "insurrection." The FBI is currently pretending in all seriousness to be looking for a guy who left bi-partisan "pipe bombs" at both the RNC and DNC. The "bombs" themselves are hilariously fake looking, with a big egg timer attached to a pipe, but no apparent detonation device. The pipes supposedly contained "homemade blackpowder," which I suppose the FBI would define as any powder that is black (maybe crushed up charcoal briquettes, who knows).

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/fbi-releases-images-dc-pipe-bomb-suspect/story?id=76341036

    Replies: @wren

    Yeah!

  40. @notsaying
    @epebble

    What exactly do you think the doctor is doing then?

    Your linked article is about White evangelicals making a decision for themselves to get vaccinated or not. How does it apply to a high level Hispanic medical professional saying that there's "a well-organized and concerted effort to create fear about the vaccines" within Hispanic church members?

    Replies: @epebble

    I do not know anything about Hispanic churches per se; but there is a subtle movement to define the vaccines as sinful by creating irrational associations with abortion.

    For example:

    GA Pro-Life Group Says It Opposes COVID-19 Vaccine Development, Production

    https://allongeorgia.com/georgia-state-politics/ga-pro-life-group-says-it-opposes-covid-19-vaccine-development-production/

    Archdiocese of New Orleans calls J&J COVID-19 vaccine ‘morally compromising’

    https://www.wdsu.com/article/archdiocese-of-new-orleans-calls-jandj-covid-19-vaccine-morally-compromising/35686477

    St. Louis Archdiocese: Examine Moral and Ethical Concerns

    https://www.emissourian.com/covid19/st-louis-archdiocese-examine-moral-and-ethical-concerns/article_bdd4d2a2-7ba3-11eb-bb3b-a7f31fc31c3c.html

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @epebble

    It's not a wild unproven idea that these vaccines were created using body parts and cells of children murdered by abortion. This is plain from the research. Objections to a vaccine based on that are a huge moral question.

    Merely because you don't object to women murdering their children and then the dead child carcasses being harvested for Big Pharma's profit doesn't squat and says more about you and your dehumanization of murdered babies than it says about any "conspiracy theorist" straw men you attack.

    Replies: @epebble

  41. @epebble
    @notsaying

    I do not know anything about Hispanic churches per se; but there is a subtle movement to define the vaccines as sinful by creating irrational associations with abortion.

    For example:


    GA Pro-Life Group Says It Opposes COVID-19 Vaccine Development, Production

    https://allongeorgia.com/georgia-state-politics/ga-pro-life-group-says-it-opposes-covid-19-vaccine-development-production/

    Archdiocese of New Orleans calls J&J COVID-19 vaccine 'morally compromising'

    https://www.wdsu.com/article/archdiocese-of-new-orleans-calls-jandj-covid-19-vaccine-morally-compromising/35686477


    St. Louis Archdiocese: Examine Moral and Ethical Concerns

    https://www.emissourian.com/covid19/st-louis-archdiocese-examine-moral-and-ethical-concerns/article_bdd4d2a2-7ba3-11eb-bb3b-a7f31fc31c3c.html

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    It’s not a wild unproven idea that these vaccines were created using body parts and cells of children murdered by abortion. This is plain from the research. Objections to a vaccine based on that are a huge moral question.

    Merely because you don’t object to women murdering their children and then the dead child carcasses being harvested for Big Pharma’s profit doesn’t squat and says more about you and your dehumanization of murdered babies than it says about any “conspiracy theorist” straw men you attack.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @R.G. Camara

    This

    vaccines were created using body parts....

    is completely untrue. The nearest any one can make is some cell lines derived from fetus around 1978 were used in research. Catholic church has green lighted the vaccines. It is the retail entrepreneurial faith "leaders" that are dissuading the flock from life saving vaccines.

    https://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_20201221_nota-vaccini-anticovid_en.html

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

  42. @Peterike
    Istanbul was Constantinople
    Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Now it's Turkish delight on a moonlit night

    Every gal in Constantinople
    Lives in Istanbul, not Constantinople
    So if you've a date in Constantinople
    She'll be waiting in Istanbul

    Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
    Why they changed it I can't say
    People just liked it better that way
    So, take me back to Constantinople

    No, you can't go back to Constantinople
    Been a long time gone, Constantinople
    Why did Constantinople get the works?
    That's nobody's business but the Turks

    Replies: @John Up North, @wren, @R.G. Camara

    My favorite etymology from the ancient world is “Istanbul.” The phrase literally means “The City”, because for a long time in the Roman and Christian world Constantinople was so central and important that, after Rome fell, it was referred to as “The City” in the same way we might refer to DC as “The Capital.” So eventually, it got renamed “The City”, likely in part by certain folks wishing to purge the Roman and Christian roots from the place.

    • Replies: @Agathoklis
    @R.G. Camara

    More accurately, Istanbul comes from εις την Πόλιν which is Greek for 'to the city'. Many Turkish cities such as Ismir, Iznik. Ismir and Konya are corruptions of the Greek names. Constantinople was not called The City to purge it of its Roman and Christian roots but simply because it was so predominant. Most modern Greeks still refer to it as Konstantinoupolis or just i Poli (the City). Greek cuisine from that region, which some restaurants in Athens and Thessaloniki specialise, is called Politiki kouzina (food from the City).

    Here is choice of those restaurants in Athens but not sure if they have survived the last 12 months.

    https://www.bovary.gr/taste/3442/ta-6-kalytera-stekia-stin-athina-gia-politiki-koyzina-gia-meraklides-poy-xeroyn-apo-kalo

    Replies: @Anonymouse

  43. @John Up North
    @Peterike

    They Might Be Giants?

    Replies: @Wilkey

    It’s an old Tin Pan Alley song. They Might Be Giants just recorded a cover.

    • Replies: @John Up North
    @Wilkey

    Thanks

  44. @R.G. Camara
    @epebble

    It's not a wild unproven idea that these vaccines were created using body parts and cells of children murdered by abortion. This is plain from the research. Objections to a vaccine based on that are a huge moral question.

    Merely because you don't object to women murdering their children and then the dead child carcasses being harvested for Big Pharma's profit doesn't squat and says more about you and your dehumanization of murdered babies than it says about any "conspiracy theorist" straw men you attack.

    Replies: @epebble

    This

    vaccines were created using body parts….

    is completely untrue. The nearest any one can make is some cell lines derived from fetus around 1978 were used in research. Catholic church has green lighted the vaccines. It is the retail entrepreneurial faith “leaders” that are dissuading the flock from life saving vaccines.

    https://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_20201221_nota-vaccini-anticovid_en.html

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @epebble

    lol.


    The nearest any one can make is some cell lines derived from fetus around 1978 were used in research
     
    .

    So you agree: dead baby body parts were used in creating the vaccine.

    Catholic church has green lighted the vaccines
     
    Some of the CC leadership have, and some others have emphasized the baby-killing-tainted nature of this vaccine.

    What else are you going to lie about next, baby killer?
  45. @Anon
    “Is it better for a man to have chosen evil than to have good imposed upon him?”
    ― Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange


    http://www.thesmokinggun.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/670xX/photos/clockworkorangexxc.jpg

     

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    • OOF: BenKenobi

  46. @notsaying
    Off Topic:

    My off topic story is about conspiracies, too.

    I was reading a story at Yahoo about Covid-19 anti-vaccine conspiracies being spread through Hispanic churches and their ministers. In the midst of reading about b.s. conspiracies the article quotes a frustrated Hispanic doctor and professor who proceeds to pass on his own conspiracy theory!

    "Dr. Olveen Carrasquillo, chief of general internal medicine at the University of Miami, said he has been watching in fear as patients come to him with wild theories about the vaccines. Carrasquillo, whose research has focused on combating racial and ethnic health disparities, believes it’s part of a well-organized and concerted effort to create fear about the vaccines.

    “What I'm really worried about is that somebody is doing this really well. They know exactly how to get to our communities,” said Carrasquillo, one of the principal investigators for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine trial. “They know that for many people, the faith leaders are the gatekeepers of what people think, and they're going through them," Carrasquillo said."

    How did a conspiracy theorist get put in charge of testing vaccines?

    https://news.yahoo.com/latino-churches-push-covid-vaccine-113901789.html?soc_src=community&soc_trk=ma

    Replies: @epebble, @AndrewR

    I hate journalists so much. It’s not even a secret that the vaccine developers used fetal cell lines during testing. But this fake news pusher calls that “false.”

    Up is down. In is out. White is black.

  47. @Some Guy

    In other words, African theories of witchcraft resemble African-American academic theories of implicit and systemic racism in which malign forces are propagated by bad thoughts across vast distances of time and space without any specific mechanism needing to be identified.
     
    Very interesting, maybe that's caused by whatever the underlying cognitive difference that gives blacks very high rates of schizophrenia is.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Interesting.

  48. @RichardTaylor
    A few White women believe in the "thoughts make reality stuff" too. The Law of Attraction concept. Actually, I've known a few White guys who fall for a version of it. Usually, in the form of "write down your goals" which seems more practical, yet it's often underpinned by quasi-magical thinking.

    But for sure most White people don't have a clue how the minds of Africans differ from ours. They can be quicker in the interpersonal moment as I believe Steve has pointed, but not as good with abstract concepts. And it's not due to a lack of education or the wrong culture (for all the assimilationists out there).

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Almost Missouri

    “I’ve known a few White guys who fall for a version of it.”

    Emerson, Blake, Plotinus, William James, Jung, dumbasses like that.

  49. @R.G. Camara
    All those James Bond movies set in Turkey were on to something: the Turks love the idea of switching allegiances, double-dealing, and secret spycraft. They were the center of the Spice Road and were a contested front in the Cold War. They understand as a society that government official statements mean nothing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfQYN19_LTU

    I'm also reminded of Golden Earring's hit 80's song "Twilight Zone" which most people think is called "When the Bullet Hits the Bone", since that's the repeated refrain. The song is actually about spies and assassinations, and references in the chorus "my beacon's been moved under moon and star", a reference to the spy meeting someone in Turkey---because the Turkish flag was a moon and star.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIaaBuGNwNw

    Replies: @Cortes, @Polistra, @James J O'Meara, @Achmed E. Newman

    “All those James Bond movies set in Turkey …”

    You mean, that one that was?

  50. …African theories of witchcraft resemble African-American academic theories of implicit and systemic racism in which malign forces are propagated by bad thoughts across vast distances of time and space without any specific mechanism needing to be identified.

    “Tips for minorities when dealing with telepathic whites”

  51. @Altai

    I picked up the concept of the “Deep State” about a dozen years ago, which had originated in Turkish leftist critiques of the ruling Kemalist apparatus. It implies, among much else, that even people who are seemingly retired from government office maintain a web that is hard for outsiders to overcome.
     
    That's the whole premise of the classic British sitcom 'Yes, Minister'. The name comes from the minister constantly trying to do something and getting stopped by his cabinet secretary who, as a civil servant is part of the 'permanent government'.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qa2DW4aXVaw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIYfiRyPi3o

    Replies: @Stebbing Heuer

    Note that Sir Arnold’s tie is the Eton Old Boy’s tie.

  52. @R.G. Camara
    @Peterike

    My favorite etymology from the ancient world is "Istanbul." The phrase literally means "The City", because for a long time in the Roman and Christian world Constantinople was so central and important that, after Rome fell, it was referred to as "The City" in the same way we might refer to DC as "The Capital." So eventually, it got renamed "The City", likely in part by certain folks wishing to purge the Roman and Christian roots from the place.

    Replies: @Agathoklis

    More accurately, Istanbul comes from εις την Πόλιν which is Greek for ‘to the city’. Many Turkish cities such as Ismir, Iznik. Ismir and Konya are corruptions of the Greek names. Constantinople was not called The City to purge it of its Roman and Christian roots but simply because it was so predominant. Most modern Greeks still refer to it as Konstantinoupolis or just i Poli (the City). Greek cuisine from that region, which some restaurants in Athens and Thessaloniki specialise, is called Politiki kouzina (food from the City).

    Here is choice of those restaurants in Athens but not sure if they have survived the last 12 months.

    https://www.bovary.gr/taste/3442/ta-6-kalytera-stekia-stin-athina-gia-politiki-koyzina-gia-meraklides-poy-xeroyn-apo-kalo

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @Agathoklis

    In the outer boroughs of New York City, a trip to Manhattan is announced as "I'm going to the City." So it was in my childhood 80 years ago and so it is today as reported to me by a non-New Yorker professor teaching at Brooklyn College. He expressed surprise at the locution.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  53. In Turkish soap operas none of the actresses wear hijabs and burqas, giving Turkish soap operas a very Western look. When there is no visible signs of Islam present Turkish women look indistinguishable in phenotype from Greek women!

  54. They sent me their hotel detective

    TIL hotel detectives are still a thing, at least in Turkey.

  55. @Agathoklis
    @R.G. Camara

    More accurately, Istanbul comes from εις την Πόλιν which is Greek for 'to the city'. Many Turkish cities such as Ismir, Iznik. Ismir and Konya are corruptions of the Greek names. Constantinople was not called The City to purge it of its Roman and Christian roots but simply because it was so predominant. Most modern Greeks still refer to it as Konstantinoupolis or just i Poli (the City). Greek cuisine from that region, which some restaurants in Athens and Thessaloniki specialise, is called Politiki kouzina (food from the City).

    Here is choice of those restaurants in Athens but not sure if they have survived the last 12 months.

    https://www.bovary.gr/taste/3442/ta-6-kalytera-stekia-stin-athina-gia-politiki-koyzina-gia-meraklides-poy-xeroyn-apo-kalo

    Replies: @Anonymouse

    In the outer boroughs of New York City, a trip to Manhattan is announced as “I’m going to the City.” So it was in my childhood 80 years ago and so it is today as reported to me by a non-New Yorker professor teaching at Brooklyn College. He expressed surprise at the locution.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Anonymouse

    80 years ago was only 30 years after Manhattan literally was, to inhabitants of Brooklyn, New York City. The Mistake of '98 was well within living memory for most of them.

  56. The smallish law firm I once worked for once sent me to do a project at a much larger firm they were sharing a case with. At one point we needed to track some guy down to serve him (this was just around the time that everything was starting to appear online, so it wasn’t so easy as it might be in 2021), and the larger firm had their own private detective on staff. We gave him the name, and a half hour later he was back with a slip of paper with an address written on it. “Give me something hard next time,” he replied to our thanks. That’s when I found out that some citizens have…access to information that other citizens don’t.

  57. @Trelane
    Susceptibility to voodoo would obviously fall under strong negative selection in evolutionary theory. Why are blacks so tragically susceptible and everyone else so totally immune?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Kratoklastes

    Your second sentence begs the question raised by the first.

    Perhaps it should be “Why have blacks survived when the other true believers have died out?”

    And maybe the answer to is that White civilization got to them in time.

  58. @Mike Tre
    I watch Law and Order. Obviously black crime is overstated.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    You are not allowed to commit a murder in Manhattan unless you are a White Trust Fund baby.

    Now if only they could make that rule stick in Baltimore, St Louis etc.

    Someone call Dick Wolf.

  59. @Agathoklis
    @epebble

    John the Apostle, the one who supposedly wrote the Book of Revelation, was not ethnically Greek. His parents were Zebedee and Salome, they are definitely not Greek names. Arguably, he was partially Hellenised as he supposedly wrote John, the Epistles of John and the Book of Revelations in Greek; although, modern scholars dispute that one person wrote all these works given the difference in Greek. Putting aside his non-Greek ethnicity, the Book of Revelation is very unGreek in style in terms of subject matter.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Is that the Zebedee from the BBC’s Magic Roundabout ?

  60. @Anonymous
    Off topic but I-Stevey:

    The Los Angeles County Bar Association today issued a press release condemning the rise in attacks on Asian-Americans.

    You'll never guess what's missing from the release. Apparently, these attacks have no known perpetrators.

    LACBA Statement On Increase In Hate Incidents

    Replies: @Wilkey, @Pericles

    I saw the LA Dodgers issued various press releases on the topic. I guess the asians have hired a good PR rep.

    https://www.mlb.com/dodgers/news/dodgers-condemn-anti-asian-racism
    https://www.mlb.com/dodgers/news/dave-roberts-speaks-out-against-anti-asian-racism

    (NB: Roberts is apparently half-black, half-asian.)

  61. @Cortes
    Those poor, primitive and deluded Turks and Italians and Spaniards &c who believe in conspiracies. (Shakes head in wonderment)

    Replies: @Pericles

    Yeah, it’s not like the deep state, the media and DNC could plot to steal an entire presidential election and get away with it scot free. C’mon man, that’s just ridiculous fear mongering. Oh, they did it before with some sort of invented conspiracy of the president with Russia? Never heard of it. You need to get your head straight, man. C’mon man.

  62. @RichardTaylor
    A few White women believe in the "thoughts make reality stuff" too. The Law of Attraction concept. Actually, I've known a few White guys who fall for a version of it. Usually, in the form of "write down your goals" which seems more practical, yet it's often underpinned by quasi-magical thinking.

    But for sure most White people don't have a clue how the minds of Africans differ from ours. They can be quicker in the interpersonal moment as I believe Steve has pointed, but not as good with abstract concepts. And it's not due to a lack of education or the wrong culture (for all the assimilationists out there).

    Replies: @James J O'Meara, @Almost Missouri

    A few White women believe in the “thoughts make reality stuff” too.

    Yeah, I see what Steve is saying with this genealogy of morals from the dark continent to our continent, but it just doesn’t fit my personal experience very well. I grew up around a lot of black people—okay, Af-ri-can Ah-MEHR-i-cans (jeez, when did that become mandatory, btw?) and I don’t remember anyone dusky having this outlook. It was much more prevalent among the hippie-dippie white middle class dropout types. Maybe I was too young and oblivious to see it everywhere though.

    As far as becoming part of the meta-jurisprudence of the ruling class, I first noticed it not among the brothas but among the neo-lib administrative class in relatively negro-less Canada when I was hearing about their Star Chamber-esque Human Rights Commissions a couple decades back. These kangaroo courts routinely prosecuted based on “tone” or “what is in the heart” of the transgressors of neo-lib ideology they persecuted. They were typically run by middle aged white women or occasionally Jews. (The Commissions were invented and originally heavily staffed by Jews, but they seemed to lose interest once their ethnic enemies had been eliminated, so the machinery fell to bourgeois white women, homosexuals and other assorted malcontents as a way to force their thoughts onto everyone else’s reality.)

    Beside the Law of Attraction stuff you mention, there was The Secret and slew of similar titles where “your thoughts make reality”, all authored by, read by and believed by New Age-y white women, as far as I could tell. Certainly my personal experience is that white women are the most zealous practitioners of the “thought-is-action” ontology and its bastard offspring “your speech is violence” and “our violence is speech”. Jews may use it as a tool, but they’re not foolish enough actually to believe it. And blacks such as Mr. Coates, just say whatever their editor thinks will sell in their book.

    I mean, Steve has a point that it turns up a lot nowadays in the prestige press, especially from the pens of Tennessee Totes or that X. Kendi guy or whichever black the (generally Jewish) editors and producers have appointed to speak on behalf of all black people, but the main consumers of this tripe are middle class white women.

    • Thanks: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Almost Missouri

    Great analysis here, AM.

    There are gnostic glints emanting from many of these phenomena.

  63. @Wilkey

    Turkey, with its non-Indo-European language, may seem alien to the West, but it interacts with Western thinking.
     
    Turkey was actually home to the first Indo-European peoples to enter the historical record - the Hittites (see Uriah the Hittite, done in by David for his hot wife, Bathsheba). Somehow, Anatolia - ahem, excuse me, Turkey - is no longer occupied by speakers of an Indo-European language. I wonder how that came to be.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @orionyx, @Blade

    Although speaking Turkish, most inhabitants of Turkey are not ethnic Turks, but almost indistinguishable from ethnic Greeks.

  64. @Anonymouse
    @Agathoklis

    In the outer boroughs of New York City, a trip to Manhattan is announced as "I'm going to the City." So it was in my childhood 80 years ago and so it is today as reported to me by a non-New Yorker professor teaching at Brooklyn College. He expressed surprise at the locution.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    80 years ago was only 30 years after Manhattan literally was, to inhabitants of Brooklyn, New York City. The Mistake of ’98 was well within living memory for most of them.

  65. anon[246] • Disclaimer says:

    “Those who conspire first, laugh last.”

    How prescient that is. Who has been conspiring for two millennia to get Europeans to fight with and hate on one another? Who benefited the most from all the wars these past two millennia?

    Read Niall Ferguson’s The House of Rothschild on how the family attained their wealth and power. Much of it was by being the middleman banker between all warring parties of Europe, especially in the last five hundred years but even before. And look at the state of the Western world today.

    Curse the Romans for creating the diaspora. They brought this curse upon Western civilization.

  66. @Wilkey
    @John Up North

    It's an old Tin Pan Alley song. They Might Be Giants just recorded a cover.

    Replies: @John Up North

    Thanks

  67. @Dieter Kief

    In other words, African theories of witchcraft resemble African-American academic theories of implicit and systemic racism in which malign forces are propagated by bad thoughts across vast distances of time and space without any specific mechanism needing to be identified.
     
    Very interesting on that topic: Nigel Barley, A Plague of Caterpillars - A Return to the African Bush - I would love to know what witchcraft can do against racism. - sorcerers - what's up? any ideas on how to help out Meghan, Duchess of Sussex?

    Btw. - I loved reading Henry Hapending's text Hunting the Great Cape Buffalo which unfortunately seems to be no longer online - could somebody please prove me wrong here?

    Replies: @hooodathunkit

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @hooodathunkit

    Might be it. The version I remember was much longer, but that could be an intensity-deception of my memory.

    Thanks a lot, hooodathankit.

  68. @Almost Missouri
    @RichardTaylor


    A few White women believe in the “thoughts make reality stuff” too.
     
    Yeah, I see what Steve is saying with this genealogy of morals from the dark continent to our continent, but it just doesn't fit my personal experience very well. I grew up around a lot of black people—okay, Af-ri-can Ah-MEHR-i-cans (jeez, when did that become mandatory, btw?) and I don't remember anyone dusky having this outlook. It was much more prevalent among the hippie-dippie white middle class dropout types. Maybe I was too young and oblivious to see it everywhere though.

    As far as becoming part of the meta-jurisprudence of the ruling class, I first noticed it not among the brothas but among the neo-lib administrative class in relatively negro-less Canada when I was hearing about their Star Chamber-esque Human Rights Commissions a couple decades back. These kangaroo courts routinely prosecuted based on "tone" or "what is in the heart" of the transgressors of neo-lib ideology they persecuted. They were typically run by middle aged white women or occasionally Jews. (The Commissions were invented and originally heavily staffed by Jews, but they seemed to lose interest once their ethnic enemies had been eliminated, so the machinery fell to bourgeois white women, homosexuals and other assorted malcontents as a way to force their thoughts onto everyone else's reality.)

    Beside the Law of Attraction stuff you mention, there was The Secret and slew of similar titles where "your thoughts make reality", all authored by, read by and believed by New Age-y white women, as far as I could tell. Certainly my personal experience is that white women are the most zealous practitioners of the "thought-is-action" ontology and its bastard offspring "your speech is violence" and "our violence is speech". Jews may use it as a tool, but they're not foolish enough actually to believe it. And blacks such as Mr. Coates, just say whatever their editor thinks will sell in their book.

    I mean, Steve has a point that it turns up a lot nowadays in the prestige press, especially from the pens of Tennessee Totes or that X. Kendi guy or whichever black the (generally Jewish) editors and producers have appointed to speak on behalf of all black people, but the main consumers of this tripe are middle class white women.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Great analysis here, AM.

    There are gnostic glints emanting from many of these phenomena.

  69. @Anonymous
    There's a variety of witchcraft styles in the sub-Saharan countries. The Beng in the Ivory Coast ban it as a topic of chat, perhaps closer to the European attitude. On the other hand they accept its existence more or less, and the king is supposed to know how to wield it. It's mandatory to hex some number of unlucky chaps from his matriline upon assuming power, like a mafia initiation.

    By contrast, the Congo "witchcraft" per E.E. Evans-Pritchard is both more New Agey (i.e. giving off bad energy in close proximity) and faintly junior-high in its social flavor. In the West, you might get beat up out by the lockers, or girls might spread rumors/humiliating photos targeting other girls, whereas the Zande way of settling of beefs is run past fortunetellers and the village medicine man. It isn't defined according to moral valence, it's just a dynamic for turning down the temperature a bit.

    Replies: @anon

    There’s a variety of witchcraft styles in the sub-Saharan countries.

    Yes, including penis theft. This article is from 2008, but nothing has changed.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-congo-democratic-witchcraft-idusl2290323220080422

  70. @hooodathunkit
    @Dieter Kief

    This it? Great funny story even if it isn't though.
    https://web.archive.org/web/20170105231156/http://the10000yearexplosion.com/henry-and-the-cape-buffalo/

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Might be it. The version I remember was much longer, but that could be an intensity-deception of my memory.

    Thanks a lot, hooodathankit.

  71. John says: • Website

    Was there anything at all to this post or to the “news” “story” that inspired it? I checked Haberturk and Takvim as well as Turkish Football, and also did a search for fenerbahce sarkisi and while I did find mention of a chant, with lyrics included, which gave offense to a team from Rize, which is a small town near the Georgian border, that was years ago, and not at all related to what supposedly has been going on lately. Wild guess, based on no information: a telecast was indeed overdubbed with a modified chant, and it somehow compared Fenerbahce to black people, and that would totally explain why details are unmentionable. Talk about conspiracy theories!

    Not that I much do. Just because a country has an unfamiliar language and is in an unpleasant part of the world, you can’t assume what’s going on around you is not merely cryptic but sinister. Actually, the more you learn that language, the more you find what is uttered in it is prosaic. I once met a Turk on a train who said he’d written Michael Jackson a letter, and got a reply. He was very pleased. To my great surprise, he called Jackson garip, which I thought meant weird, but that’s not how he meant it. Maybe exotic. Foreigners like that.

    On the other hand, I once got interested in whether Turks thought their own surnames were weird, and discovered I was not the first to wonder: I started to type garip soyadi and Google autocompleted it at the s. The articles told me that what Turks found weird, or exotic, or something, were combinations of first and last names. Which seemed less odd to me. By the way, Emre Sarigul’s surname means yellow rose. And no one would laugh even if he weren’t a sportswriter.

    I am far from expert with Turkish, indeed I like it mostly for the mental exercise. I believe you can actually say “because reasons” in Turkish – sebepler sebebiyle – and “you can’t miss it” – bulunamamaz. I find these euphonious but I have no idea if Turks do. I regret that their language lacks the word dotorgluluk, which if it existed would mean dot-orgliness, which they should have because Turkey does have dot-orgs, as earnest as any you can find in the West. It also has a constitution and a civil code, searchable online, and once I looked for the word “if”. Turkish uses a standalone Persian one, plentifully, but it mainly favors a native suffix which would be hard to sift out. I did have the idea of looking for yoksa, literally “if there isn’t”, figuratively “otherwise”. And that word is reasonably conspicuous. I find it reassuring that a body of law admits there are circumstances under which it no longer applies.

    Anyway, the country just isn’t that mysterious.

  72. @epebble
    @R.G. Camara

    This

    vaccines were created using body parts....

    is completely untrue. The nearest any one can make is some cell lines derived from fetus around 1978 were used in research. Catholic church has green lighted the vaccines. It is the retail entrepreneurial faith "leaders" that are dissuading the flock from life saving vaccines.

    https://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_20201221_nota-vaccini-anticovid_en.html

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    lol.

    The nearest any one can make is some cell lines derived from fetus around 1978 were used in research

    .

    So you agree: dead baby body parts were used in creating the vaccine.

    Catholic church has green lighted the vaccines

    Some of the CC leadership have, and some others have emphasized the baby-killing-tainted nature of this vaccine.

    What else are you going to lie about next, baby killer?

  73. @R.G. Camara
    All those James Bond movies set in Turkey were on to something: the Turks love the idea of switching allegiances, double-dealing, and secret spycraft. They were the center of the Spice Road and were a contested front in the Cold War. They understand as a society that government official statements mean nothing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfQYN19_LTU

    I'm also reminded of Golden Earring's hit 80's song "Twilight Zone" which most people think is called "When the Bullet Hits the Bone", since that's the repeated refrain. The song is actually about spies and assassinations, and references in the chorus "my beacon's been moved under moon and star", a reference to the spy meeting someone in Turkey---because the Turkish flag was a moon and star.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIaaBuGNwNw

    Replies: @Cortes, @Polistra, @James J O'Meara, @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks for that explanation of the lyrics from Twilight Zone, Mr. Camara. It’s such a great tune and sound that I really never payed attention to them.

    BTW, Dutch band Golden Earring had their 1970s hit Radar Love, then Twilight Zone for the 1980s. They are getting a little behind on their once-per-decade top singles. No ’90s one, no ’00s one, and no ’10s one. Up your game, Golden Earring! (If you people are still alive, that is.)

    Our patience for last 3 decadal Golden Earring songs is wearing thin.

  74. @Trelane
    Susceptibility to voodoo would obviously fall under strong negative selection in evolutionary theory. Why are blacks so tragically susceptible and everyone else so totally immune?

    Replies: @Bill Jones, @Kratoklastes

    Cotton Mather didn’t think he and his ilk were immune.

    Voodoo is a kind of suggested belief in possession – at least in that case there’s a pharmacological contributor… tetratotoxin. However Mather and his ilk just believed that the entire world abounded with supernatural entities that possessed people (and took the form of the accused if the accused had an alibi)

    In case you think that’s ancient history, and wypipo aren’t that retarded anymore…

    In 2007 a Pew Poll found that 68% of Americans ‘completely agree or mostly agree’ with the notion that angels and demons are active in the world; only 14% of respondents outright rejected the idea.

    TL;DR: don’t assume that deeply-held belief in retarded primitive bullshit is purely the province of our duskier brethren.

    A shitload of white folks believe in the literal truth of a book that makes it clear that their Messiah believed in demonic possession (e.g., the swine that were possessed when GodMan cast out the Gadarene demoniac). Seems highly weird that a GodMan would believe in such obvious horse-shit, but it’s right in there – several times. Then again, the Old Nonsense is full of that sort of shit as well.

    The major flavours of the Jesus cult declare the inerrancy of their silly storybook (especially the Catholics, who still believe that any fact that disagrees with the styorybook is #FakeNews).

    Given that Jeebus firmly believed that demonic possession was a thing – firmly enough to think that he could ‘cast them out’ when they infected someone – Jeebus-freaks are almost obliged to believe the same.

    What’s that thing that the mythical GodMan was supposed to have said?

    Something about motes in others’ eyes, (alternatively casting the first stone) and that sort of shit.

  75. @Trinity
    Anytime I read about Turkey I can't help but think about that movie from the Seventies with the cool theme song. Cue: Chase ( Theme From Midnight Express) by one Giorgio Moroder* whoever he is or maybe was. Hit it maestro. Btw, IF Turkey is like that, "than I just as soon stay home."

    Replies: @Joe Stalin, @Blade

    Turkish prisons at the time were probably safer than American ones, as violent crimes were even lower (still lower than the US), no gangs, and fewer psychos. The guy in the movie was caught transporting illicit drugs, I believe heroine. Went to jail and found it uncomfortable. I highly doubt he would be tortured given conditions (I might believe if he was a member of a communist militant group though) but then no one would read a book or watch a movie about a drug dealer who stayed in an uncomfortable prison in Turkey for a while. Also, no, Turkey is still safer than the US. You are less safe in almost all major American cities as far as the statistics go.

  76. @Agathoklis
    The concept of the Deep State goes way back further than modern Turkey as the concept is found in ancient Greek i.e. κράτος ἐν κράτει and Latin imperium in imperio used by Spinoza.

    Replies: @Blade

    I could be slightly irritated if what you said wasn’t tragically stupid (or Antiturkic). You are so racist that you cannot even accept that a silly term being originated from Turkey. It is the term that is referred here; yet concept is also not exact equivalent of state within state.

    You should focus on appropriating food and other stuff, and keep telling yourself everything Turks have is Greek (truth is that Greeks were a small minority, most their culture gone by the time Turks conquered Anatolia; thanks to Turks you were able to flourish and live in peace for almost a thousand year. So what you call Greek culture today is basically Baptized Turkish culture since Greeks in Peloponnese didn’t have much for culture and Anatolians consisted almost half the population after the population exchange [12% to 15% of them were 100% Turkish Christians who didn’t even know a word of Greek]; your state was so worried that it could eventually fall under Turkish rule again that it did everything to hide that connection; the result is you: a people whose sole reason of existence in this world is to defame the Turks).

  77. @Wilkey

    Turkey, with its non-Indo-European language, may seem alien to the West, but it interacts with Western thinking.
     
    Turkey was actually home to the first Indo-European peoples to enter the historical record - the Hittites (see Uriah the Hittite, done in by David for his hot wife, Bathsheba). Somehow, Anatolia - ahem, excuse me, Turkey - is no longer occupied by speakers of an Indo-European language. I wonder how that came to be.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @orionyx, @Blade

    Somehow -ahem- Americas is no longer occupied by natives, somehow -ahem- Australia is no longer occupied by Aborigines, somehow -ahem- Crimea is no longer occupied by Turks. Somehow -ahem- there are no longer any Neanderthals in Europe (they were there first, what have you done to them assholes?). Somehow, some people, always manage to find a way to sound stupid. I wonder how that’s possible?

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