The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Turkey Becomes Central to Brexit Debate
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Here’s an amusing example of how New York Times articles are increasingly written upside down with the real news buried late in the article after much politically correct expounding.

Britain’s ‘Brexit’ Debate Inflamed by Worries That Turkey Will Join E.U.

By STEVEN ERLANGER

Erlanger isn’t an idiot, but his readers tend to be very touchy about what is served up to them. Reporters need to sneak in the actual news after the politically correct subscribers have stopped reading. Hence …

JUNE 13, 2016

LONDON — With nine days left before Britain votes on whether to remain in the European Union, the possibility of Turkey’s becoming a member of the bloc has inflamed the debate, injecting divisive issues of race, religion and tolerance openly into the campaign.

Supporters of a British exit from the European Union say allowing Turkey in would leave Britain exposed to a new wave of Muslim immigration and more vulnerable to Islamic radicals. While Turkey has been pushing for membership, it faces considerable hurdles, and its entry, if it ever happens, would be many years, if not decades, away. …

The emphasis on the supposedly imminent membership of Turkey, however, adds a new and darker aspect to the arguments for Britain’s leaving: Turkey would be the bloc’s second-largest country after Germany, and it is poor, is Muslim and borders Syria, where young British Muslims radicalized by the Islamic State travel to enter the netherworld of terrorism.

The debate is happening when attacks like the one in Orlando, Fla., have raised concerns about both Islamic radicalism and Islamophobia. An unofficial group advocating Britain’s departure from the European Union posted a controversial message on Twitter on Monday, warning of “Islamist extremism” and urging an exit from the bloc “before we see an Orlando-style atrocity here before too long.” After immediate criticism, the message was deleted.

In the Vote Leave campaign’s official leaflet, which will go to some 40 million Britons, Turkish accession is a prominent theme, and a map shows how Turkish membership would mean a European Union border with Syria and Iraq. Vote Leave has also asserted that Turkey has higher levels of criminality, gun ownership and gangsterism. …

“None of this needs decoding,” Philip Stephens, a columnist for The Financial Times, wrote, arguing that the implicit calls to racism have become explicit. “The dog whistle has made way for the klaxon. E.U. membership talks with Turkey, we are to understand, will soon see Britain overrun by millions of (Muslim) Turks — most of them thugs or welfare-scroungers.”

Tim Farron, the leader of the opposition Liberal Democrats, said that “coded nudges and winks like this are utterly horrific.” He added, “Vote Leave is just playing the politics of division, and it has no place in British society.”

… Ms. Cooper said the discussion was “utterly shameful,” since both men know that Turkey is many years away from joining the European Union. Any member nation also could veto the country’s entry, including historical enemies like Cyprus and Greece.

In other words, it’s racist for Brits to worry about Turkish accession to the European Union because we can always rely on Cyprus and Greece to be racist for us.

In the past, Mr. Cameron, who is the leader of the Remain campaign, has said it is government policy to support Turkish membership in the bloc when the country qualifies, a position that Mr. Johnson himself, whose great-grandfather was Turkish, also embraced enthusiastically at one point.

“Now,” Mr. Stephens wrote, “Mr. Johnson lets the Islamophobia hang in the air.”

So, let me get this straight, we shouldn’t worry about Turkish accession even though it is Her Majesty’s Government’s policy to support Turkish accession?

What could possibly go wrong?

Mr. Cameron and his deputy, George Osborne, the chancellor of the Exchequer, have pointed out that Turkey’s membership is unlikely to happen and would be decades away even if Cyprus and Greece went along. The authoritarian shift of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is driving away even Turkey’s previous allies in Europe.

“I don’t think it’s going to happen in my lifetime,” said Mr. Osborne, who has just turned 45. “Is it going to be a member of the European Union? No, it’s not.”

Asked about Mr. Cameron’s past support for Turkish membership, Mr. Osborne said: “Turkey has gone backwards. There are concerns about democracy and human rights there. British government policy is that it should not join the European Union today.”

But it is British government policy that Turkey should join after today. And that opposition to Turkey joining is racist.

… In response, the Leave campaign denied charges of racism and said: “The government must now urgently clarify whether its policy on Turkey has changed. Is it now promising to veto Turkish membership?”

So, finally we get to the news in the article:

On Sunday, the visa issue surfaced again with some leaked British diplomatic cables in The Sunday Times of London discussing the debate over whether to grant Turkey European Union visa liberalization in return for its efforts to house and control Syrian refugees.

One cable from a British diplomat in Ankara, Turkey’s capital, discussed whether Britain might itself grant visa-free status to 1.5 million “Turkish special passport holders,” who are mostly civil servants, as a “significant and symbolic gesture to Turkey,” in part to keep Mr. Erdogan from carrying out “his threat to ‘open the floodgates’ to Europe for migrants.”

So Erdogan is blackmailing the EU with refugees.

You know, it kind of sounds like Turkey holds the whip hand here, because Europe developing some kind of perimeter self defense defense system against being inundated by refugees allowed through Turkey would be racist.

The government responded by calling the article “selectively leaked quotes” that are “designed to give a completely false impression that the U.K. is considering granting visa liberalization to some Turkish citizens.”

Both Mr. Cameron and Mr. Osborne have suggested that the Leave campaign has devolved from a more high-minded discussion of Britain’s role in the world and its sovereignty to the anti-immigration theme that has been the calling card of the U.K. Independence Party and its leader, Nigel Farage.

Mr. Osborne called Mr. Farage’s vision of Britain “mean” and “divisive.”

Mr. Farage, in a television debate last week, said British women could be at risk of sexual assaults from immigrants if Britain voted to remain in the European Union. Referring to reports of sexual assaults by migrants on German women in Cologne on New Year’s Eve in 2015, Mr. Farage called this “the nuclear bomb” of the referendum campaign.

The real threat to British women, as we all know, is Sir Haven Monahan, Esquire.

You know, one way to defend the European Union is to point out that Turkey is mostly not in Europe. But E.U. defenders can’t seem to bring themselves to do that. It’s almost as if very soon they will be denouncing anybody who objects to Turkish accession as Islamophobes.

Mr. Gove said the European Union should be protesting Turkey’s “erosion of democratic freedoms” instead of granting it concessions.

The referendum on June 23, Mr. Gove said, is “the only chance” for Britons to have their say on the free movement of Turks.

“With the terrorism threat we face only growing, it is hard to see how it could possibly be in our security interests to open visa-free travel to 77 million Turkish citizens and to create a border-free zone from Iraq, Iran and Syria to the English Channel,” he said.

Talk about burying the lede …

In very recent news, from the AP:

EU Envoy to Turkey Resigns After Less Than a Year
ISTANBUL — Jun 14, 2016, 5:40 AM ET

The European Union’s envoy to Turkey has resigned less than a year into the job, according to his office.

The EU delegation in Ankara confirmed that Hansjoerg Haber was leaving his post, without giving any reason.

… The resignation comes at a sensitive time in EU-Turkish relations as the bloc recently brokered a deal with Turkey to curb illegal migration.

 
Hide 195 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. We are constantly harangued with the phrase “that is not who we are” but we are not allowed to ask “who they are” and “what they think we are”.

    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @artichoke
    It used to be that the government protected you and took on those unpopular positions on your behalf. Now the government kneecaps you whenever you try to protect yourself.
  2. It is noticeable that Marxists always start slinging insults around instead of engaging in rational debate. As Socrates said ““When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser.”

    • Replies: @anonn
    The notion that anyone in this article, or anyone of importance in this debate are Marxist is risible. The EU is a bunch of neoliberal capitalists, and Erdogan is a "moderate" Islamist. I don't know how you can expect to be taken seriously if you either don't know the first thing about the insult you're using, or you care so little about the meaning of words that you label Eurocrat crony capitalists as "Marxists."
  3. “allowing Turkey in would leave Britain exposed to a new wave of Muslim immigration and more vulnerable to Islamic radicals.”

    Totally unfair, all the islamic radicals in Turkey are British nationals traveling to the Caliphate.

  4. How does it feel? Knowing that ” your” countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    • Replies: @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.
    , @Anonymous

    How does it feel? Knowing that ” your” countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT
     

    I feel for sorry for the dogs/animals in the future, who will face brutal mistreatment by the savages. The animals had no part in voting or promoting a multicultural world.
    , @Anonymous
    Most Western Europeans will have a non-white member in the family sometime this century but mostly other minorities than Muslims.
    , @biz

    Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.
     
    It's true - Muslim men are loud. When I've been to the Middle East I always wonder why don't they just cross the street to talk to someone rather than carrying on a conversation by shouting.
    , @SPMoore8
    Since you are again OT, it's worth trumping your OT: It now is being argued that the shooter, Mateen, was himself gay. This I did not expect; that the narrative is now turning towards a self-hating gay massacre. Of course, this means that it is ultimately the straight world's fault for making him a killer.
    , @Danindc
    I have lived what you warn about Tiny Duck. The family was driving through Vienna, Virginia and near a mosque with the windows rolled down. We heard the wailing and moaning of those prostrate Mohammedians. Truly terrifying. I rolled the windows up for the rest of our drive to the country club.

    Question for you - Why do they present their asses to Allah? Wouldn't they want to get away from the whole "we screw goats and boys for pleasure" stereotype?
    , @Pericles
    Zero ducks given, since you asked.
    , @Olorin

    Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.
     
    Well, my daughters indeed have the sense of hearing of accomplished huntresses.

    And the children of Muslim men do in fact tend to be noisy and disorderly hellions.

    So on this one point alone I will agree with the indefatiguably moronic Tiny Duck.

    , @Eric Novak
    Ar ar, Earth humor!
    , @Jean Cocteausten
    Can you please try to be more subtle? I hate trolls, but they should at least be entertaining.
  5. [Mr. Johnson himself, whose great-grandfather was Turkish]

    So he only had one great-grandparent? Or only one who counts?

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    "So he only had one great-grandparent? "

    Ah, the notorious Islamic interbreeding, I see.
    , @dearieme
    "Mr. Johnson himself, whose great-grandfather was Turkish": said great grand pappy was torn to pieces by a mob. You couldn't make it up.
  6. You know, it kind of sounds like Turkey holds the whip hand here, because Europe developing some kind of perimeter self defense defense system against being inundated by refugees allowed through Turkey would be racist.

    Yup. The kind of problem that results from allowing ideologues to influence policy.

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession? Only the very same Boris Johnson, media-appointed senior spokesperson of the Brexit camp, and likely next Prime Minister:

    Boris Johnson, too, has spoken in favour of Turkey’s accession to the EU. “We would be crazy to reject Turkey,” wrote Boris Johnson in his book ‘The Dream of Rome’, “which is not only the former heartland of the Roman empire but also, I see, one of the leading suppliers of British fridges.”

    Johnson is presumably only advocating Britain leaving the EU for personally opportunist reasons (he expects to be successor to Cameron as “Conservative” Party leader and Prime Minister, and needs the backing of his party’s mostly Eurosceptic membership). He’s doing good work in that good cause, but I for one wouldn’t trust him as far as I could throw him (and he’s not a small man), as far as the problems we face with social liberalism, military interventionism in the service of Washington, and open borders globalism are concerned.

    From the Wikipedia article on the man:

    Johnson has Circassian, English, French, German, Swiss and Turkish ancestry on his father’s side. From his mother he is of English and Russian Jewish descent

    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don’t know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Michael Bloomberg suggested that Boris Johnson succeed him as mayor of New York.
    , @PiltdownMan

    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don’t know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).
     
    I'm not sure if he has actually followed through. There are exit taxes, which can be substantial if you have a net worth exceeding about $600k, including nasty surprises such a bill for on-the-spot payment of the tax on all of your future pension income if you are on a defined benefit pension plan.

    What triggered Boris Johnson's fury was that he has never lived in the US after age 5, and was presented a bill for about $150k tax out of the blue by the IRS for the capital gains on the sale of an apartment he inherited in London and subsequently sold.

    , @5371
    "Circassian" seems to be an invention, and he has the same amount of Jew in his ancestry as he does of Turk.
    , @PiltdownMan

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession?
     
    Yeah, his direct patrilineal great-grandfather, Ali Kemal Bey was an Ottoman Empire journalist and sometime official who died at the hands of a mob. I don't get the impression that that's going to make a Brexiter, Euroskeptic, Etonian upper-crust Brit open the doors to a Turkish horde.

    The Bey's death was sensational and the description is evocative of Turkey at that time. Or perhaps even today, thanks to Erodogan, for all I know.

    From Wikipedia

    On 4 November 1922, Ali Kemal was kidnapped from a barber shop at Tokatliyan Hotel in Istanbul, and was carried to the Asiatic side of the city by a motor boat en route to Ankara for a trial on charges of treason. On 6 November 1922, the party was intercepted at İzmit by General Nureddin Pasha, then the Commander of the First Army which was aligned with Mustafa Kemal Pasha. Ali Kemal was attacked and lynched by a mob set up by the General with sticks, stones and knives, and hanged from a tree. His head was smashed by cudgels and he was stoned to death. As described by Nureddin personally to Dr. Riza Nur, who with Ismet Inönü was on his way to Lausanne to negotiate peace with the Allies, "his blood-covered body was subsequently hanged with an epitaph across his chest which read, "Artin Kemal"". This bestowal of a fictitious Armenian name administered a final indignity to the victim.

    , @This Is Our Home
    Not sure what is wrong with changing your mind? It seems rather sensible actually.
    , @Nico
    If you have another nationality, renouncing U.S. citizenship and nationality is fairly straightforward and it is not reversible in most cases. However, it does come with a nice hefty administrative price tag - something like $2500 - if you want to get the coveted Certificate of Loss of Nationality which thanks to FATCA since 2011 is necessary to prove to any credible bank outside the U.S. that they are not opening a can of worms by granting you an account. Also if your net worth is over $650000 you will have to show that you have declared your worldwide income, regardless of where you have resided, to the goombas in the IRS for the past five fiscal years or you will be hunted down for a hefty Exit Tax (basically the Death Tax for the living) and depending on the country you have expatriated to your new government (a NATO government in particular is not trustworthy on this point) might be complicit in helping them garnish your bank accounts. And if your net worth is over $2 million, as is certainly the case for Mr. Johnson, avoiding the Exit Tax gets even trickier.
    , @Anonymous Nephew
    The definitive Johnson quote is from his former editor at the Telegraph, Max Hastings.

    "Most politicians are ambitious and ruthless, but Boris is a gold medal egomaniac. I would not trust him with my wife nor – from painful experience – my wallet. It is unnecessary to take any moral view about his almost crazed infidelities, but it is hard to believe that any man so conspicuously incapable of controlling his own libido is fit to be trusted with controlling the country.

    His chaotic public persona is not an act – he is, indeed, manically disorganised about everything except his own image management. He is also a far more ruthless, and frankly nastier, figure than the public appreciates."
     

    On the other hand David Lloyd George was a pretty fair WWI leader despite being nicknamed "the Goat" for his promiscuity. Kennedy and Clinton may not always have been chaste either.

    Boris's first wife Allegra Mostyn-Owen ("the Zuleika Dobson of her generation") from their golden student days, married a Muslim half her age and does good works for her new community.

    (Allegra's mum is writer Gaia Servadio.)

    George Osborne's brother also married a Muslim (and has just been struck off as a doctor - don't think there's a connection between those two events).

  7. I cannot see any justification for Brexit. The big argument for Brexit boils down to 2 things:

    1) Immigration control
    2) Control of our own laws.

    Previously I seemed to think that these were 2 pretty reasonable things to want to be able to control within our country, within the power of an electable government. Now after looking at it, I don’t think either of those things would even be achievable with Brexit. Most leavers are suggesting we sign up to a Norwegian model of european integreation. The problem there is that Norway has had to sign up to pretty much the same immigration rules we have now to be in the EEC, and also submit to a number of laws from Europe, except that now they have far less input into the creation of those laws.

    So even if the primary objective of Brexit was a sensible one (which I don’t think it even is), leaving wouldn’t actually achieve it, worse, the risk of economic catastrophe is still reasonably high enough that I can’t see why we would bother taking such a risk, for no real benefit.

    • Replies: @Thea
    It is my understanding that if Britain goes the eu loses its teeth.

    They can't bully Norway any more. Nor any other rich countries, who will follow suit.

    EU will be history.
    , @This Is Our Home
    Where Britain goes so does everyone else. We are the cork and when we pop the ship will sink. We will be merrily bobbing along though.
    , @Thomas Fuller
    No, the big argument for Brexit is regaining control of our affairs. At present they are in the hands of Goldman Sachs and their ilk, as you will see if you watch this extremely instructive and disturbing 2012 film to the end:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMuUEd6w54E&feature=youtu.be&t=1458

    Not that they'll relinquish control without a foul fight, as other commenters have noted.

    , @Buffalo Joe
    Kevin, Liberals never see their failed policies as failures, just something that needs to be tweaked. School policies in the US have lead to utter failure in many major school districts. Not to worry, just give the policy a new name ,an infusion of cash and carry on. Their argument always includes the thought that if we end something now there will be worse failure. What could be worse than failing at everything you try?
    , @celt darnell
    Pure Remainder tripe.

    In the first place if we took the so-called Norway option (EEA membership), the amount of EU legislation we'd have to enact would amount to around 25% of the current total (and we'd be free of disastrous policies such as the Common Fisheries and Common Agricultural policies). Not only that, that 25% would mostly pertain to product standards, most of which, as the indefatigable Richard North has demonstrated -- and the Adam Smith Institute has confirmed -- are negotiated at the international level above the EU. That's right: most EU legislation Norway enacts has been previously negotiated by Norway in international bodies above the EU.

    Norway accepts free movement because it's a member of Schengen -- we're not and wouldn't be. Not only that, Article 112 of the EEA Agreement allows for restrictions of EU nationals as "an emergency brake" one which EEA members have used in the past. We have no such emergency brake as an EU member state.

    For those interested in the advantages of the Norway option, visit Richard North's page at eureferendum.com

    As for you, Mr. Silver, you use the term "we" as if you were British.

    Funny how it's always the non-indigenous Britons who are so opposed to regaining our national sovereignty. You'd almost think your loyalties lie elsewhere....
  8. @Randal

    You know, it kind of sounds like Turkey holds the whip hand here, because Europe developing some kind of perimeter self defense defense system against being inundated by refugees allowed through Turkey would be racist.
     
    Yup. The kind of problem that results from allowing ideologues to influence policy.

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession? Only the very same Boris Johnson, media-appointed senior spokesperson of the Brexit camp, and likely next Prime Minister:

    Boris Johnson, too, has spoken in favour of Turkey's accession to the EU. “We would be crazy to reject Turkey,” wrote Boris Johnson in his book 'The Dream of Rome', “which is not only the former heartland of the Roman empire but also, I see, one of the leading suppliers of British fridges.”

    Johnson is presumably only advocating Britain leaving the EU for personally opportunist reasons (he expects to be successor to Cameron as "Conservative" Party leader and Prime Minister, and needs the backing of his party's mostly Eurosceptic membership). He's doing good work in that good cause, but I for one wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw him (and he's not a small man), as far as the problems we face with social liberalism, military interventionism in the service of Washington, and open borders globalism are concerned.

    From the Wikipedia article on the man:


    Johnson has Circassian, English, French, German, Swiss and Turkish ancestry on his father's side. From his mother he is of English and Russian Jewish descent
     
    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don't know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).

    Michael Bloomberg suggested that Boris Johnson succeed him as mayor of New York.

    • Replies: @Randal
    Really? What a great idea. That would be an excellent way to get him out of our hair. I mean, a great thing for the great city of New York, of course, although he'd have to change his self-deprecating, bumbling scruff persona tailored to ingratiating himself with British high society more towards the more bombastic New York style. Unless maybe he could use the former to give himself some exotic foreign appeal to jaded New Yorkers, at least until the novelty wore off?

    An idea of Bloomberg's I can honestly get behind for once.

    , @Pericles
    Maybe he could run for mayor of Istanbul?
    , @Olorin
    I always suspected Mike of dynastic pretensions. This seals it.
  9. @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    Just ban him already, Sailer. He’s run out of things to say.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    I wish he'd go and comment in the UK Daily Mail, Mirror, and Express. We need all the Brexit votes we can get.
    , @Lurker
    It's obviously one of our guys trolling us, shitlord style. But it's pointless, we can read crap like that at any of a thousand sites. Or just get it direct from the MSM. I don't know why he's bothering here, I think we all see the picture he's painting already.
    , @Clyde

    @Tiny Duck
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He’s run out of things to say.
     
    Trolls run out of gas. Get rid of this guy and let a new troll fill his space. We are done with this tiny duck affirmative action incompetent. He is stuttering like Obama did yesterday
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Has Steve ever banned anybody? He lets a lot of stuff through that I wouldn't.
    , @antipater_1
    Tiny Dick Duck is actually Steve Sailer himself! He is trolling for additional comments. That's why Steve doesn't ban him. He would be banning himself! Steve also uses the name Sick Dick Duck, Golden Flowers and who knows what else?

    Steve also works for the Bernie Sanders campaign and is a member of the Moslem Brotherhood! If only Obama knew!

    , @fish
    He should apprentice to "Million Dollar Bonus" over at zero hedge. That is some high quality trolling!
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    I think Steve keeps Duck around because it’s amazing that regular commenters actually respond. It’s a lighthearted little sideshow to see who can’t resist taking the bait. (Could it be Steve himself ? Ohhhh sheeeeii....)

    Some commenters recently were asking Unz to add an LOL button. Juvenile for most comments, but it would be funny to see Tiny Duck with dozens of auto-LOLs and no responding comments.
    , @Jack D
    Silence is the best treatment for troll infestations. They thrive on attention.

    As of now, I'm taking the pledge and I hope you all do too:

    NO MATTER WHAT TINY DUCK WRITES, DO NOT RESPOND IN ANY WAY.
    , @Anonymous
    He'd leave on his own if people would just stop paying attention to him for once. This place is paradise for lazy trolls. They don't have to try at all.
  10. EU membership in some distant future isn’t the problem. The EU may not survive long enough to admit Turkey. The issue is this ‘visa free travel’ coming into force now! This would allow Turks to enter the UK as freely as a Dutch or French citizen. As with other migrants, once in it becomes almost impossible to get them out.

    • Agree: NickG, tbraton
  11. @Steve Sailer
    Michael Bloomberg suggested that Boris Johnson succeed him as mayor of New York.

    Really? What a great idea. That would be an excellent way to get him out of our hair. I mean, a great thing for the great city of New York, of course, although he’d have to change his self-deprecating, bumbling scruff persona tailored to ingratiating himself with British high society more towards the more bombastic New York style. Unless maybe he could use the former to give himself some exotic foreign appeal to jaded New Yorkers, at least until the novelty wore off?

    An idea of Bloomberg’s I can honestly get behind for once.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    Nah. Although he's got the rather rackety background that US politics seems to require, he's too obviously intelligent to succeed there.
    , @Abe

    That would be an excellent way to get him out of our hair. I mean, a great thing for the great city of New York, of course, although he’d have to change his self-deprecating, bumbling scruff persona tailored to ingratiating himself with British high society more towards the more bombastic New York style. Unless maybe he could use the former to give himself some exotic foreign appeal to jaded New Yorkers, at least until the novelty wore off?
     
    I think rather than an ersatz New Yorker, Johnson should go the other way and, yes, use his foreign appeal to woo jaded New Yorkers. I've watched him on TV a few times and based on what little of his demeanor I've seen, he could pull off being Steven Coogan.
  12. It seems like the Turkey/EU angle is not unlike Mexico/US. Both countries have huge numbers of uneducated and unskilled citizens that are of more benefit to their home nations if they leave for richer nations and pump up the home economy through remittances rather than staying put. Also, Turkey and Mexico get to accuse host countries of being racist if elements of their population have the temerity to say out loud this doesn’t seem to be such a great deal for them.

    Obviously if Turkey or Mexico thought the large numbers of emigrants was hurting their pool of human capital they’d take a different stance, so their enthusiasm for out-migration tells you all you really need to know about who wins and who loses with an open borders policy.

    • Agree: Clyde
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    True. And both Mexico and Turkey are basically ruled by well-educated, intelligent local elites, the inheritors of a legacy of high cultural achievement and conquest, and who consider themselves in every way the cultural equals of, if not superiors to, their Western counterparts. Both countries are saddled with a large population of low IQ peasants, mostly descended from the very people the elites conquered. Both elites have a difficult time reconciling how powerful and rich their countries and ancestors were in the 17th and 18th centuries with their subservient positions today. I suspect this bitterness is why Erdogan, despite being a peasant, has not been seriously challenged by Turkish elites. Erdogan may be an illiterate embarassment, but he is also giving the West the finger in a way no Turkish leader has dared in centuries.
  13. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    How does it feel? Knowing that ” your” countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    I feel for sorry for the dogs/animals in the future, who will face brutal mistreatment by the savages. The animals had no part in voting or promoting a multicultural world.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    "I feel for sorry for the dogs/animals in the future, who will face brutal mistreatment by the savages. The animals had no part in voting or promoting a multicultural world."

    The dogs/animals of the present already face brutal mistreatment by the savages.
    , @Blobby5
    So true and very often overlooked completely.
  14. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    This is but one instance where, legitimately, David Cameron can be called a ‘big fat shameless liar’ right up to his face.

    Cameron has gone on the record, on many many occasions, as fully supporting Turkey’s EU membership, which he has clearly and explicitly stated on numerous occasions should be sooner rather than later. In fact all recent UK governments have rooted strongly for Turkish accession – it’s been – for whatever reason – a bedrock of UK foreign policy.

    Yet the other day, panicking due to unfavorable brexit polling Cameron tried to claim that Turkish accession ‘won’t happen in 3000 years’.

    Either it’s one or the other, Mr. Cameron.

  15. @Randal

    You know, it kind of sounds like Turkey holds the whip hand here, because Europe developing some kind of perimeter self defense defense system against being inundated by refugees allowed through Turkey would be racist.
     
    Yup. The kind of problem that results from allowing ideologues to influence policy.

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession? Only the very same Boris Johnson, media-appointed senior spokesperson of the Brexit camp, and likely next Prime Minister:

    Boris Johnson, too, has spoken in favour of Turkey's accession to the EU. “We would be crazy to reject Turkey,” wrote Boris Johnson in his book 'The Dream of Rome', “which is not only the former heartland of the Roman empire but also, I see, one of the leading suppliers of British fridges.”

    Johnson is presumably only advocating Britain leaving the EU for personally opportunist reasons (he expects to be successor to Cameron as "Conservative" Party leader and Prime Minister, and needs the backing of his party's mostly Eurosceptic membership). He's doing good work in that good cause, but I for one wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw him (and he's not a small man), as far as the problems we face with social liberalism, military interventionism in the service of Washington, and open borders globalism are concerned.

    From the Wikipedia article on the man:


    Johnson has Circassian, English, French, German, Swiss and Turkish ancestry on his father's side. From his mother he is of English and Russian Jewish descent
     
    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don't know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).

    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don’t know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).

    I’m not sure if he has actually followed through. There are exit taxes, which can be substantial if you have a net worth exceeding about $600k, including nasty surprises such a bill for on-the-spot payment of the tax on all of your future pension income if you are on a defined benefit pension plan.

    What triggered Boris Johnson’s fury was that he has never lived in the US after age 5, and was presented a bill for about $150k tax out of the blue by the IRS for the capital gains on the sale of an apartment he inherited in London and subsequently sold.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    Wow! The IRS knows no shame it would seem.

    And to think the US owes it's birth to some tax irregularities in the 1700s.
    , @Wilkey
    I don't object to the IRS charging an exit tax. Pensions earned while in the US were earned while benefitting from the US economy. To pile up wealth and then hightail it to a tax haven before paying taxes on it is basically theft. Most of the people who try to do that will be immigrants just headed back to their birth country after they retire, not native born Americans.

    It *should* bother us that a guy like Eduardo Saverin, an immigrant from Brazil, can earn billions while in the US then leave for Singapore without paying a goddamned dime in taxes. If he hadn't been living in America he wouldn't have become a billionaire.

    Our taxes fund infrastructure that enables the creation of wealth. Just because that wealth is in some instrument on which taxes can be delayed - stocks or pensions - doesn't mean people should be free from paying taxes to the country which helped them earn it.
  16. @Arclight
    It seems like the Turkey/EU angle is not unlike Mexico/US. Both countries have huge numbers of uneducated and unskilled citizens that are of more benefit to their home nations if they leave for richer nations and pump up the home economy through remittances rather than staying put. Also, Turkey and Mexico get to accuse host countries of being racist if elements of their population have the temerity to say out loud this doesn't seem to be such a great deal for them.

    Obviously if Turkey or Mexico thought the large numbers of emigrants was hurting their pool of human capital they'd take a different stance, so their enthusiasm for out-migration tells you all you really need to know about who wins and who loses with an open borders policy.

    True. And both Mexico and Turkey are basically ruled by well-educated, intelligent local elites, the inheritors of a legacy of high cultural achievement and conquest, and who consider themselves in every way the cultural equals of, if not superiors to, their Western counterparts. Both countries are saddled with a large population of low IQ peasants, mostly descended from the very people the elites conquered. Both elites have a difficult time reconciling how powerful and rich their countries and ancestors were in the 17th and 18th centuries with their subservient positions today. I suspect this bitterness is why Erdogan, despite being a peasant, has not been seriously challenged by Turkish elites. Erdogan may be an illiterate embarassment, but he is also giving the West the finger in a way no Turkish leader has dared in centuries.

    • Replies: @Lurker

    he is also giving the West the finger in a way no Turkish leader has dared in centuries.
     
    The Ottomans were giving the west the finger as recently as the 1800s.
    , @syonredux
    Mexico's elite are a very mediocre bunch:

    In Mexico, the PAN government's of the last decade has been trying to get parents to keep their kids in school longer. Here's PISA document congratulating Mexico for getting its act together over the last decade.

    The really striking thing about Mexico's performance on the 2009 PISA school achievement tests is the lack of very high scorers. For example, on reading, 9.9% of Americans score at the 5th level or 6th level on a 0 to 6 scale. In contrast, only 0.4% of Mexicans score that high. That's really bad.

    In comparison, 1.9% of Turks score in the top two levels: not great, but several times the fraction in Mexico, suggesting that in Turkey there are small cultures of elites here and there who impress it upon their kids to hit the books hard. When I was in Bodrum, Turkey for Hans-Herman Hoppe's conference, I was impressed by the books on sale at the supermarket across the street. Granted, Bodrum is kind of like Santa Barbara and this was an upscale supermarket in a chain headquartered in Switzerland in a nice neighborhood in a resort town, but, still, it was nice to see serious books on sale somewhere.

    That suggests to me, not for the first time, that much of the blame for Mexico's cultural malaise stems from Mexico's rich not setting a good example for the masses, such as by not studying hard.
     
    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2010/12/pisa-and-mexico.html
  17. The refugee weapon is far more powerful than nuclear weapons. Instead of spending a lot of money on deveoping nuclear and missile capabilities Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.

    • Replies: @27 year old
    Being that North Koreans are also 100% ethnically Korean (more Korean than SK for sure), I expect they would just integrate immediately and be very happy, if marginally less productive, citizens. South Korea would be fine with that
    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    That actually wouldn't be too bad for South Korea in the long run. For all the crap going on in their country, North Koreans are still Koreans.
    , @Frau Katze
    It's my understanding that China props up the Kim regime because they fear a huge outflow of poor North Koreans to China.

    (But I'd take those North Koreans over Mexicans or Turkish peasants.)
    , @iSteveFan
    Likewise if Putin were really interested in taking over Europe, he would have his soldiers drop their weapons and unis and just bumrush the border requesting asylum from the evil dictator.
    , @Anonymous
    Actually, there's nothing that the south Koreans would more wish for.

    Now, if Bangladesh threatened to flood south Korea with refugees, *that* would be a different story.
    , @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.
     
    I think Kim Jong-Un (or whomever holds the whip in North Korea) is smart enough to know that the future of the regime would be in question, once such a whirlwind had been unleashed.
    , @Travis
    South Korean men have been importing Vietnamese , Philippine and Chinese brides for decades because of the shortage of female Koreans. They would probably rathe have North Korean brides, since the children would be treated better.
  18. @Randal

    You know, it kind of sounds like Turkey holds the whip hand here, because Europe developing some kind of perimeter self defense defense system against being inundated by refugees allowed through Turkey would be racist.
     
    Yup. The kind of problem that results from allowing ideologues to influence policy.

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession? Only the very same Boris Johnson, media-appointed senior spokesperson of the Brexit camp, and likely next Prime Minister:

    Boris Johnson, too, has spoken in favour of Turkey's accession to the EU. “We would be crazy to reject Turkey,” wrote Boris Johnson in his book 'The Dream of Rome', “which is not only the former heartland of the Roman empire but also, I see, one of the leading suppliers of British fridges.”

    Johnson is presumably only advocating Britain leaving the EU for personally opportunist reasons (he expects to be successor to Cameron as "Conservative" Party leader and Prime Minister, and needs the backing of his party's mostly Eurosceptic membership). He's doing good work in that good cause, but I for one wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw him (and he's not a small man), as far as the problems we face with social liberalism, military interventionism in the service of Washington, and open borders globalism are concerned.

    From the Wikipedia article on the man:


    Johnson has Circassian, English, French, German, Swiss and Turkish ancestry on his father's side. From his mother he is of English and Russian Jewish descent
     
    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don't know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).

    “Circassian” seems to be an invention, and he has the same amount of Jew in his ancestry as he does of Turk.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Perhaps he originates from the periphery of 'Circassia'.
    A 'Circum- Circassian' if you will.
    , @anowow
    There is a large amount of Caucasus blood in Turks because of resettlement of Muslims fleeing Orthodox Russian rule , economic migration during Ottoman times and harem girls. Erdogan's family were from near Batumi. His closest genetic relatives are Mingrelians and Georgians, certainly not Kazakhs.

    Johnson's great-grandfather looked neither Middle Eastern nor Central Asian. Like many "Turks", particularly Western Turkish elites, he was probably only tangentially related to Osman's Turkoman followers.

  19. The debate is happening when attacks like the one in Orlando, Fla., have raised concerns about both Islamic radicalism and Islamophobia.

    At what point does Muslim mass murder of non-Muslims rise to a level where a phobia about Islam is not concerning? 3,000 on September 11 was not enough, not for George Bush.

    How about 15,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adana_massacre

    How about 20,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicosia#Ottoman_rule

    How about 52,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chios_massacre

    How about 150,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assyrian_genocide

    How about 450,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_genocide

    How about a million? Would Islamophobia be OK for an Armenian in 1920?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Genocide

    • Agree: syonredux, Travis
    • Replies: @Daniel Williams

    At what point does Muslim mass murder of non-Muslims rise to a level where a phobia about Islam is not concerning? 3,000 on September 11 was not enough, not for George Bush.
     
    I think we're supposed to believe that the rub is the percentage of Muslims committing the crimes within the larger "community", i.e. Islamophobia is irrational because not all Muslims are terrorists. Same with blacks and street crime. Can't tar the good ones with the same brush as the bad, right? Of course, I knock wasps' nests down from my patio before the wasps sting anyone...

    Once every Muslim on earth has participated in a terror attack, then it'll stop being racist and hateful—indeed, Islamophobic—to notice that they always seemed to have a predilection for that sort of thing.

  20. @5371
    [Mr. Johnson himself, whose great-grandfather was Turkish]

    So he only had one great-grandparent? Or only one who counts?

    “So he only had one great-grandparent? ”

    Ah, the notorious Islamic interbreeding, I see.

    • Replies: @DodderingNewYorker

    “So he only had one great-grandparent? ”

    Ah, the notorious Islamic interbreeding, I see.
     
    Excellent!
  21. @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.

    I wish he’d go and comment in the UK Daily Mail, Mirror, and Express. We need all the Brexit votes we can get.

  22. Any member nation also could veto the country’s entry, including historical enemies like Cyprus and Greece.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_invasion_of_Cyprus

    In August 1974 further Turkish invasion resulted in the capture of approximately 40% of the island. The ceasefire line from August 1974 became the United Nations Buffer Zone in Cyprus and is commonly referred to as the Green Line.

    More than one quarter of the population of Cyprus (one-third of the Greek Cypriot population was expelled from the occupied northern part of the island where Greek Cypriots constituted 80% of the population.

    Ancient history!

  23. @Bill Jones
    "So he only had one great-grandparent? "

    Ah, the notorious Islamic interbreeding, I see.

    “So he only had one great-grandparent? ”

    Ah, the notorious Islamic interbreeding, I see.

    Excellent!

  24. Mr. Cameron and his deputy, George Osborne, the chancellor of the Exchequer, have pointed out that Turkey’s membership is unlikely to happen and would be decades away

    It might take 20 or 30 years for Turkey to formally become an EU member, but that doesn’t mean the Germans can’t just force an open-border treaty between Turkey and the EU onto the UK. Right now, 2016, the Germans are demanding that countries that do not accept enough Syrian migrants pay financial penalties.

  25. http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/13/asia/philippines-canada-abu-sayyaf/

    It would be wrong for the remaining two Canadian hostages to be Islamophobic.

  26. @Randal

    You know, it kind of sounds like Turkey holds the whip hand here, because Europe developing some kind of perimeter self defense defense system against being inundated by refugees allowed through Turkey would be racist.
     
    Yup. The kind of problem that results from allowing ideologues to influence policy.

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession? Only the very same Boris Johnson, media-appointed senior spokesperson of the Brexit camp, and likely next Prime Minister:

    Boris Johnson, too, has spoken in favour of Turkey's accession to the EU. “We would be crazy to reject Turkey,” wrote Boris Johnson in his book 'The Dream of Rome', “which is not only the former heartland of the Roman empire but also, I see, one of the leading suppliers of British fridges.”

    Johnson is presumably only advocating Britain leaving the EU for personally opportunist reasons (he expects to be successor to Cameron as "Conservative" Party leader and Prime Minister, and needs the backing of his party's mostly Eurosceptic membership). He's doing good work in that good cause, but I for one wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw him (and he's not a small man), as far as the problems we face with social liberalism, military interventionism in the service of Washington, and open borders globalism are concerned.

    From the Wikipedia article on the man:


    Johnson has Circassian, English, French, German, Swiss and Turkish ancestry on his father's side. From his mother he is of English and Russian Jewish descent
     
    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don't know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession?

    Yeah, his direct patrilineal great-grandfather, Ali Kemal Bey was an Ottoman Empire journalist and sometime official who died at the hands of a mob. I don’t get the impression that that’s going to make a Brexiter, Euroskeptic, Etonian upper-crust Brit open the doors to a Turkish horde.

    The Bey’s death was sensational and the description is evocative of Turkey at that time. Or perhaps even today, thanks to Erodogan, for all I know.

    From Wikipedia

    On 4 November 1922, Ali Kemal was kidnapped from a barber shop at Tokatliyan Hotel in Istanbul, and was carried to the Asiatic side of the city by a motor boat en route to Ankara for a trial on charges of treason. On 6 November 1922, the party was intercepted at İzmit by General Nureddin Pasha, then the Commander of the First Army which was aligned with Mustafa Kemal Pasha. Ali Kemal was attacked and lynched by a mob set up by the General with sticks, stones and knives, and hanged from a tree. His head was smashed by cudgels and he was stoned to death. As described by Nureddin personally to Dr. Riza Nur, who with Ismet Inönü was on his way to Lausanne to negotiate peace with the Allies, “his blood-covered body was subsequently hanged with an epitaph across his chest which read, “Artin Kemal””. This bestowal of a fictitious Armenian name administered a final indignity to the victim.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Evidently, life was full of interest in Constantinople in 1922.
    , @Randal

    I don’t get the impression that that’s going to make a Brexiter, Euroskeptic, Etonian upper-crust Brit open the doors to a Turkish horde.
     
    You might have noticed from my own comment that I treat claims that Johnson is meaningfully a Brexiter or a Eurosceptic with a hefty pinch of salt. Seems to me he's a confirmed globalist but also a competent politician, which means a professional liar, who has seen which way the wind is currently blowing on that issue in his own party, at least. And as I noted, he has in the past advocated Turkish entry, and I suspect he would again in slightly less disadvantageous circumstances for his own career for doing so.

    I certainly would not trust him to be any less treasonous once in office than the rest of his Eton chums have proved to be.

    That said, as noted, he's doing sterling work for the "save British sovereignty" campaign at the moment, even if he is just an ally of convenience.
  27. BREAKIN’ NEWS: Steve Sailer honored for NYT-Reading Improvement!

    It’s the second time I follow Steve Sailer analysing the upside-down writing strategy in The NYT.
    The first time was his striking anaylsis of the “Pygmies”-article – a thoroughly fun ‘n’ interesting piece too, explaining, why pygmies don’t really fit in the NYT anymore and no: He’s not making fun of short people – unless they’re staff-writers of bespoke publication, being short of arguments to defend their idiosyncratic writing style. Now – enough is enough! Therefor:

    I, as the creator of The Universal Enlightenment Prize for Cross-Racial Citizenship as well as All-Gender and All-Subjects Reading-Competence Improvement – : – I award this Prize at the14th of June 2016 herewith in all earthly honor at my command exclusively to:

    iSteve = STEVE SAILER, RoWm*

    *Refreshing old Wise men – (Expression protected by THE Intern’l LAW – misleading use of this term is not allowed from here to eternity; shall be prosecuted on earth and in space way behind the sun).

    Mr. Steve, please be assured: – This prize comes for you at No Cost – and just in case you wouldn’t want to give the acceptence-speech in the Smuggler-Bay at the Lake of Constance – to which you are herewith invited! – it still was your prize, anyway, be thereof heartfully assured by a grateful and deeply and truely impressed reader!
    PS: The ceremony is set to be opened by a reading of the poem The Rabbit in the Data Center by Hans-Magnus Enzensberger. For further details, everybody is invited To Ask Alice, After Bathin’ in – – Meersburg and/or RomansHorn – tuuuuut…tuuuuuut…tuuuuuuuuut!

  28. to open visa-free travel to 77 million Turkish citizens and to create a border-free zone from Iraq, Iran and Syria to the English Channel

    Long term EU policy in a nutshell.

    • Replies: @BB753
    I think Erdogan's plan all along was to get rid of as many refugees and Turks of Kurdish background and dump them on the EU.
    But I really see no gain for any of the EU members in Turkey joining the Union. It has to be some policy pushed by the USA establishment and our globalist overlords.
  29. Yeah, you gotta love an article that starts with “it’s racist to oppose Turkish EU membership” and ends with “but don’t worry, ’cause Turkey will never be admitted, anyway.”

    But as we’ve seen, Turkish membership in the EU doesn’t even have to happen for the Turks to flood the EU with immivaders. If it’s this bad when Syria and Afghanistan are at war, what will happen if Turkey ever has a civil war which, given Erdogan’s increasingly Islamist and dictatorial ways, seems ever more likely to happen? 30 million Turkish refugees would pour into Europe almost overnight, whether or not Turkey was in the EU.

    Nothing the EU has done thus far suggests it would even try to stop them.

  30. @Peter Akuleyev
    True. And both Mexico and Turkey are basically ruled by well-educated, intelligent local elites, the inheritors of a legacy of high cultural achievement and conquest, and who consider themselves in every way the cultural equals of, if not superiors to, their Western counterparts. Both countries are saddled with a large population of low IQ peasants, mostly descended from the very people the elites conquered. Both elites have a difficult time reconciling how powerful and rich their countries and ancestors were in the 17th and 18th centuries with their subservient positions today. I suspect this bitterness is why Erdogan, despite being a peasant, has not been seriously challenged by Turkish elites. Erdogan may be an illiterate embarassment, but he is also giving the West the finger in a way no Turkish leader has dared in centuries.

    he is also giving the West the finger in a way no Turkish leader has dared in centuries.

    The Ottomans were giving the west the finger as recently as the 1800s.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    It's 100 years and five months since the Dardanelles peninsula was abandoned by the British & Empire troops.
  31. @PiltdownMan

    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don’t know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).
     
    I'm not sure if he has actually followed through. There are exit taxes, which can be substantial if you have a net worth exceeding about $600k, including nasty surprises such a bill for on-the-spot payment of the tax on all of your future pension income if you are on a defined benefit pension plan.

    What triggered Boris Johnson's fury was that he has never lived in the US after age 5, and was presented a bill for about $150k tax out of the blue by the IRS for the capital gains on the sale of an apartment he inherited in London and subsequently sold.

    Wow! The IRS knows no shame it would seem.

    And to think the US owes it’s birth to some tax irregularities in the 1700s.

    • Replies: @jimbo
    I remember an old Monty Python sketch which had various "men on the street" opining about what they would tax in order to increase revenue. One said "For the good of the country, I would tax all foreigners living abroad".

    Seems like the IRS took that as inspiration...
    , @Nico
    See my reply above. The real problem is Congress and the State Department, both of which have a fundamental problem with the notion that Americans might want to live abroad. The notion that America is the greatest country in the world and can do no wrong seems benign enough in the minds of ignorant country bumpkin denizens, until you realize that not only do our highest officials share this belief, but they also understand "America" to mean something rather different from what ordinary Americans (NB: by "ordinary folk" I mean not Mexican peon wage slaves or racist Brahmin Hindu H1-B holders) do.

    The IRS is just a band of functionary drones doing what they are ordered to do: squeeze every last drop of the goods from every possible nook and cranny.

  32. @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.

    It’s obviously one of our guys trolling us, shitlord style. But it’s pointless, we can read crap like that at any of a thousand sites. Or just get it direct from the MSM. I don’t know why he’s bothering here, I think we all see the picture he’s painting already.

  33. @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    Most Western Europeans will have a non-white member in the family sometime this century but mostly other minorities than Muslims.

  34. @PiltdownMan

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession?
     
    Yeah, his direct patrilineal great-grandfather, Ali Kemal Bey was an Ottoman Empire journalist and sometime official who died at the hands of a mob. I don't get the impression that that's going to make a Brexiter, Euroskeptic, Etonian upper-crust Brit open the doors to a Turkish horde.

    The Bey's death was sensational and the description is evocative of Turkey at that time. Or perhaps even today, thanks to Erodogan, for all I know.

    From Wikipedia

    On 4 November 1922, Ali Kemal was kidnapped from a barber shop at Tokatliyan Hotel in Istanbul, and was carried to the Asiatic side of the city by a motor boat en route to Ankara for a trial on charges of treason. On 6 November 1922, the party was intercepted at İzmit by General Nureddin Pasha, then the Commander of the First Army which was aligned with Mustafa Kemal Pasha. Ali Kemal was attacked and lynched by a mob set up by the General with sticks, stones and knives, and hanged from a tree. His head was smashed by cudgels and he was stoned to death. As described by Nureddin personally to Dr. Riza Nur, who with Ismet Inönü was on his way to Lausanne to negotiate peace with the Allies, "his blood-covered body was subsequently hanged with an epitaph across his chest which read, "Artin Kemal"". This bestowal of a fictitious Armenian name administered a final indignity to the victim.

    Evidently, life was full of interest in Constantinople in 1922.

  35. @Lurker
    Wow! The IRS knows no shame it would seem.

    And to think the US owes it's birth to some tax irregularities in the 1700s.

    I remember an old Monty Python sketch which had various “men on the street” opining about what they would tax in order to increase revenue. One said “For the good of the country, I would tax all foreigners living abroad”.

    Seems like the IRS took that as inspiration…

  36. @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    It’s true – Muslim men are loud. When I’ve been to the Middle East I always wonder why don’t they just cross the street to talk to someone rather than carrying on a conversation by shouting.

    • Replies: @Marcus
    Too lazy
  37. For our Brit readers: is this whole Brexit debate as much of a Kabuki play as it seems to me? You just know that, no matter what the voters say, the eurocrats aren’t going to let the U.K. leave. There will either be out and out fraud in the election, or if they can’t get away with that they will find some reason or another to ignore a leave vote. Am I wrong about this?

    • Replies: @Lurker
    Probably not.

    And of course the same people will still be in charge in the UK, so even if there is Brexit, they will find ways around the problem.

    , @Peter Johnson
    In some (many?) EU countries that is what would happen -- the Eurocrats would essentially tell the national electorate that they had voted the wrong way and needed to do it again and get it right, or the Eurocrats would just ignore the national vote. That strategem is more difficult in the context of the British political tradition -- they will probably have to honor the pledge and arrange an EU exit. But perhaps you are correct and the EU elites will find some escape route from an Leave vote (if it happens). The betting markets are still trading at 64%/36% in favor of Remain winning.
    , @Randal

    Am I wrong about this?
     
    Probably not, but what alternative is available to us but to play the game with the rigged deck and hope for the best?

    With any luck, the Eurocrats will overplay their hand.
    , @Ed
    "For our Brit readers: is this whole Brexit debate as much of a Kabuki play as it seems to me? You just know that, no matter what the voters say, the eurocrats aren’t going to let the U.K. leave. There will either be out and out fraud in the election, or if they can’t get away with that they will find some reason or another to ignore a leave vote. Am I wrong about this?"

    That is my take too.

    Electoral fraud is somewhat more difficult to accomplish in the UK (or for that matter, quite a few other countries) than the US. Its possible -Cameron's party is under investigation for cheating in 2015. But it looks like the margin for exit will be too big.

    However, the referendum is only advisory! All the relevant legislation, including dealing with forty years of Brussels-made law inflicted on/ accepted by the British, has to go through Parliament in Westminster. Most current MPs are pro-EU. There is already talk about sabotaging any legislation to get the UK to actually leave that is introduced by the government, which wants to stay in anyway. This is why if "leave" wins the vote, they have to make sure Cameron is replaced with someone who at least has publically committed to leaving.

    (one irony of this is that Johnson is campaigning to leave but probably really wants to stay in, while the Labour leader, Corbyn, is pro-Remain in public but its pretty obvious he is more sympathetic to the "leave" side)

    So my guess is that "Leave" will be allowed to win, but the relevant laws to make that happen won't get through Parliament for one reason or another. Also keep in mind that one of the houses of Parliament isn't even elected. Of course this will be a gift to the UKIP candidates running in 2020.
    , @anon
    It was certainly meant to be kabuki however when the EU ignored earlier referenda the edifice was more solid whereas now it's creaking like crazy.
  38. @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    Since you are again OT, it’s worth trumping your OT: It now is being argued that the shooter, Mateen, was himself gay. This I did not expect; that the narrative is now turning towards a self-hating gay massacre. Of course, this means that it is ultimately the straight world’s fault for making him a killer.

    • Replies: @Eric Novak
    The current storytelling is based on this new information: a gay co-worker of Mateen claims Mateen asked him out on a "romantic date", and Mateen's first wife said Mateen's father called him a queer. Both instances have problems in ascertaining the guy's orientation: queers always think that everything's about them and their queerness and that everyone has some queer in them, if only for a "romantic date"; the ex-wife probably cannot recognize that typical slurs such as "fag" thrown at assimilating Muslim men by other Muslim men, who aren't keen on the track-suit wearing narcissism of selfies on social media, are not anything other than common guy insults. The lefty gay narrative is part of the atmosphere, however, and is unconsciously accepted and regurgitated by those who knew Mateen and who now see it all come together now-he was gay all along. Yawn. Let's talk to one of his romantic partners first.
  39. Not only is most of Turkey not in Europe, but the part that is is the result of military conquest in comparatively recent (modern?) times (1453).

  40. @Tiny Duck
    I cannot see any justification for Brexit. The big argument for Brexit boils down to 2 things:

    1) Immigration control
    2) Control of our own laws.

    Previously I seemed to think that these were 2 pretty reasonable things to want to be able to control within our country, within the power of an electable government. Now after looking at it, I don't think either of those things would even be achievable with Brexit. Most leavers are suggesting we sign up to a Norwegian model of european integreation. The problem there is that Norway has had to sign up to pretty much the same immigration rules we have now to be in the EEC, and also submit to a number of laws from Europe, except that now they have far less input into the creation of those laws.

    So even if the primary objective of Brexit was a sensible one (which I don't think it even is), leaving wouldn't actually achieve it, worse, the risk of economic catastrophe is still reasonably high enough that I can't see why we would bother taking such a risk, for no real benefit.

    It is my understanding that if Britain goes the eu loses its teeth.

    They can’t bully Norway any more. Nor any other rich countries, who will follow suit.

    EU will be history.

  41. @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.


    Just ban him already, Sailer. He’s run out of things to say.

    Trolls run out of gas. Get rid of this guy and let a new troll fill his space. We are done with this tiny duck affirmative action incompetent. He is stuttering like Obama did yesterday

  42. @biz

    Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.
     
    It's true - Muslim men are loud. When I've been to the Middle East I always wonder why don't they just cross the street to talk to someone rather than carrying on a conversation by shouting.

    Too lazy

  43. @Jim
    The refugee weapon is far more powerful than nuclear weapons. Instead of spending a lot of money on deveoping nuclear and missile capabilities Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.

    Being that North Koreans are also 100% ethnically Korean (more Korean than SK for sure), I expect they would just integrate immediately and be very happy, if marginally less productive, citizens. South Korea would be fine with that

  44. The immediate threat are the Merkel Jugend. They’ll be getting their EU passports in a few years.

    Most of the Somalis given asylum in Holland are now living in England.

  45. @Jim
    The refugee weapon is far more powerful than nuclear weapons. Instead of spending a lot of money on deveoping nuclear and missile capabilities Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.

    That actually wouldn’t be too bad for South Korea in the long run. For all the crap going on in their country, North Koreans are still Koreans.

    • Replies: @swede55
    Especially since the South Koreans aren't adaquately reproducing themselves.
  46. “Sir Haven Monahan, Bart.” would be better. Not that the future Sharia law would care one way or the other.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Don't most baronets prefer the abbreviation "Bt." these days?
  47. Europe: We are all sick men now.

  48. @5371
    [Mr. Johnson himself, whose great-grandfather was Turkish]

    So he only had one great-grandparent? Or only one who counts?

    “Mr. Johnson himself, whose great-grandfather was Turkish”: said great grand pappy was torn to pieces by a mob. You couldn’t make it up.

  49. @Randal
    Really? What a great idea. That would be an excellent way to get him out of our hair. I mean, a great thing for the great city of New York, of course, although he'd have to change his self-deprecating, bumbling scruff persona tailored to ingratiating himself with British high society more towards the more bombastic New York style. Unless maybe he could use the former to give himself some exotic foreign appeal to jaded New Yorkers, at least until the novelty wore off?

    An idea of Bloomberg's I can honestly get behind for once.

    Nah. Although he’s got the rather rackety background that US politics seems to require, he’s too obviously intelligent to succeed there.

  50. @jimbo
    For our Brit readers: is this whole Brexit debate as much of a Kabuki play as it seems to me? You just know that, no matter what the voters say, the eurocrats aren't going to let the U.K. leave. There will either be out and out fraud in the election, or if they can't get away with that they will find some reason or another to ignore a leave vote. Am I wrong about this?

    Probably not.

    And of course the same people will still be in charge in the UK, so even if there is Brexit, they will find ways around the problem.

  51. Abe says: • Website
    @Randal
    Really? What a great idea. That would be an excellent way to get him out of our hair. I mean, a great thing for the great city of New York, of course, although he'd have to change his self-deprecating, bumbling scruff persona tailored to ingratiating himself with British high society more towards the more bombastic New York style. Unless maybe he could use the former to give himself some exotic foreign appeal to jaded New Yorkers, at least until the novelty wore off?

    An idea of Bloomberg's I can honestly get behind for once.

    That would be an excellent way to get him out of our hair. I mean, a great thing for the great city of New York, of course, although he’d have to change his self-deprecating, bumbling scruff persona tailored to ingratiating himself with British high society more towards the more bombastic New York style. Unless maybe he could use the former to give himself some exotic foreign appeal to jaded New Yorkers, at least until the novelty wore off?

    I think rather than an ersatz New Yorker, Johnson should go the other way and, yes, use his foreign appeal to woo jaded New Yorkers. I’ve watched him on TV a few times and based on what little of his demeanor I’ve seen, he could pull off being Steven Coogan.

    • Replies: @Randal
    You're probably right.

    On the other hand he is very intelligent and he does have that seemingly natural and effortless expertise of the lower-upper-middle class social climber in an aristocratic society, at ingratiating himself. If that would translate to New York politics, he could probably pull off either option, given time and motivation. If only one would work, he'd probably sniff the right one out and adopt it, anyway.
  52. Ot but university of Wisconsin is adding a required course in cultural sensitivity ( I.e. white people suck) http://eagnews.org/university-of-wisconsin-students-to-undergo-mandatory-cultural-competency-training/

    To combat this, college students could have meetings where they discuss Greek philosophy & the roots of Western Civilization. White students could form inormal groups, in private residence using their forefathers techniques. Socrates offers ideas to combat ad hominem attacks.

    They could also develop Techniques to protect themselves: travel in groups, anything you say to a sjw or “student of color” will be used against you ( blm have created an environment in which whites cannot trust any member of a complaining group.) Discuss forbidden topics of I interest (campus “rape”, hate hoaxes, shake down for diversity positions)

  53. This is a brilliant column today by Steve Sailer.

    The “Leave” vote is now polling a bit better than the “Remain” vote, and the main reason is clearly immigration. Economic arguments tend to go the other way, but immigration Trumps economics, at least according to a few recent opinion polls. It will hurt a bit economically, at least in the short run.

    The British government’s two-faced policy/non-policy on proposed UK open borders with Turkey is very instructive.

    Thanks for this superb article.

  54. @Randal

    You know, it kind of sounds like Turkey holds the whip hand here, because Europe developing some kind of perimeter self defense defense system against being inundated by refugees allowed through Turkey would be racist.
     
    Yup. The kind of problem that results from allowing ideologues to influence policy.

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession? Only the very same Boris Johnson, media-appointed senior spokesperson of the Brexit camp, and likely next Prime Minister:

    Boris Johnson, too, has spoken in favour of Turkey's accession to the EU. “We would be crazy to reject Turkey,” wrote Boris Johnson in his book 'The Dream of Rome', “which is not only the former heartland of the Roman empire but also, I see, one of the leading suppliers of British fridges.”

    Johnson is presumably only advocating Britain leaving the EU for personally opportunist reasons (he expects to be successor to Cameron as "Conservative" Party leader and Prime Minister, and needs the backing of his party's mostly Eurosceptic membership). He's doing good work in that good cause, but I for one wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw him (and he's not a small man), as far as the problems we face with social liberalism, military interventionism in the service of Washington, and open borders globalism are concerned.

    From the Wikipedia article on the man:


    Johnson has Circassian, English, French, German, Swiss and Turkish ancestry on his father's side. From his mother he is of English and Russian Jewish descent
     
    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don't know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).

    Not sure what is wrong with changing your mind? It seems rather sensible actually.

    • Replies: @Randal
    Depends whether or not you believe in the honesty of the claimed change of mind.

    We are talking about a professional politician here.

    But clearly, there's no certainty in such an opinion about someone. Either of us might be right in the different and contradicting conclusions we have drawn about Johnson.
  55. @Tiny Duck
    I cannot see any justification for Brexit. The big argument for Brexit boils down to 2 things:

    1) Immigration control
    2) Control of our own laws.

    Previously I seemed to think that these were 2 pretty reasonable things to want to be able to control within our country, within the power of an electable government. Now after looking at it, I don't think either of those things would even be achievable with Brexit. Most leavers are suggesting we sign up to a Norwegian model of european integreation. The problem there is that Norway has had to sign up to pretty much the same immigration rules we have now to be in the EEC, and also submit to a number of laws from Europe, except that now they have far less input into the creation of those laws.

    So even if the primary objective of Brexit was a sensible one (which I don't think it even is), leaving wouldn't actually achieve it, worse, the risk of economic catastrophe is still reasonably high enough that I can't see why we would bother taking such a risk, for no real benefit.

    Where Britain goes so does everyone else. We are the cork and when we pop the ship will sink. We will be merrily bobbing along though.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    "Where Britain goes so does everyone else. We are the cork and when we pop the ship will sink. We will be merrily bobbing along though."

    The late Lawrence Auster called present-day Britain "the Isle of the Dead".

    Your isle may go merrily bobbing along. But it will still be populated by the dead.
  56. @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    I have lived what you warn about Tiny Duck. The family was driving through Vienna, Virginia and near a mosque with the windows rolled down. We heard the wailing and moaning of those prostrate Mohammedians. Truly terrifying. I rolled the windows up for the rest of our drive to the country club.

    Question for you – Why do they present their asses to Allah? Wouldn’t they want to get away from the whole “we screw goats and boys for pleasure” stereotype?

  57. @Jim
    The refugee weapon is far more powerful than nuclear weapons. Instead of spending a lot of money on deveoping nuclear and missile capabilities Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.

    It’s my understanding that China props up the Kim regime because they fear a huge outflow of poor North Koreans to China.

    (But I’d take those North Koreans over Mexicans or Turkish peasants.)

    • Replies: @Lurker
    But surely they would seal the border? And if they cut of the aid then surely a South Korean take over wouldn't be far behind?
    , @Sean
    N. Korea plays China off against the West just as the Hermit Kingdom once played various powers off . When Japan succeeded in its Imperialist designs in Korea it led to the Russo Japanese war, which led to the 1905 Revolution which knocked Russia out off the balance of power and started the countdown to ww1 and its replay. If there is a WW3, events in Korea will quite possibly spark it.
  58. @PiltdownMan

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession?
     
    Yeah, his direct patrilineal great-grandfather, Ali Kemal Bey was an Ottoman Empire journalist and sometime official who died at the hands of a mob. I don't get the impression that that's going to make a Brexiter, Euroskeptic, Etonian upper-crust Brit open the doors to a Turkish horde.

    The Bey's death was sensational and the description is evocative of Turkey at that time. Or perhaps even today, thanks to Erodogan, for all I know.

    From Wikipedia

    On 4 November 1922, Ali Kemal was kidnapped from a barber shop at Tokatliyan Hotel in Istanbul, and was carried to the Asiatic side of the city by a motor boat en route to Ankara for a trial on charges of treason. On 6 November 1922, the party was intercepted at İzmit by General Nureddin Pasha, then the Commander of the First Army which was aligned with Mustafa Kemal Pasha. Ali Kemal was attacked and lynched by a mob set up by the General with sticks, stones and knives, and hanged from a tree. His head was smashed by cudgels and he was stoned to death. As described by Nureddin personally to Dr. Riza Nur, who with Ismet Inönü was on his way to Lausanne to negotiate peace with the Allies, "his blood-covered body was subsequently hanged with an epitaph across his chest which read, "Artin Kemal"". This bestowal of a fictitious Armenian name administered a final indignity to the victim.

    I don’t get the impression that that’s going to make a Brexiter, Euroskeptic, Etonian upper-crust Brit open the doors to a Turkish horde.

    You might have noticed from my own comment that I treat claims that Johnson is meaningfully a Brexiter or a Eurosceptic with a hefty pinch of salt. Seems to me he’s a confirmed globalist but also a competent politician, which means a professional liar, who has seen which way the wind is currently blowing on that issue in his own party, at least. And as I noted, he has in the past advocated Turkish entry, and I suspect he would again in slightly less disadvantageous circumstances for his own career for doing so.

    I certainly would not trust him to be any less treasonous once in office than the rest of his Eton chums have proved to be.

    That said, as noted, he’s doing sterling work for the “save British sovereignty” campaign at the moment, even if he is just an ally of convenience.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    A number of years ago, Boris Johnson gave the most IQ supremacist/globalist speech any politician this side of Singapore ever gave.

    In general, British politicians are a lot more intellectually agile than American politicians. The kind of pivot due to new circumstances that Pat Buchanan made at the end of the Cold War is pretty common among British politicians.

    , @5371
    Boris's father Stanley has been a Euro- and indeed a world government-enthusiast for fifty years.
  59. @Lurker

    he is also giving the West the finger in a way no Turkish leader has dared in centuries.
     
    The Ottomans were giving the west the finger as recently as the 1800s.

    It’s 100 years and five months since the Dardanelles peninsula was abandoned by the British & Empire troops.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    And French!

    However that was in the context of Turkey allying itself with Germany, so not quite full-spectrum finger giving.

    Go back to the Crimean War and it's Turkey + Britain + France vs Russia. So we have to go further back still.
  60. @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.

    Has Steve ever banned anybody? He lets a lot of stuff through that I wouldn’t.

    • Replies: @Gross Terry
    He bans crazy people, especially if they seem violent. Don't really want that sort of publicity.
    , @Eric Novak
    Steve enjoys smart-alecky replies. Keeps the mind sharp.
  61. @jimbo
    For our Brit readers: is this whole Brexit debate as much of a Kabuki play as it seems to me? You just know that, no matter what the voters say, the eurocrats aren't going to let the U.K. leave. There will either be out and out fraud in the election, or if they can't get away with that they will find some reason or another to ignore a leave vote. Am I wrong about this?

    In some (many?) EU countries that is what would happen — the Eurocrats would essentially tell the national electorate that they had voted the wrong way and needed to do it again and get it right, or the Eurocrats would just ignore the national vote. That strategem is more difficult in the context of the British political tradition — they will probably have to honor the pledge and arrange an EU exit. But perhaps you are correct and the EU elites will find some escape route from an Leave vote (if it happens). The betting markets are still trading at 64%/36% in favor of Remain winning.

  62. I’m still skeptical but the Brits appear to get it. Well the English atleast.

    Judging by the screeching today to Trump’s speech America has a ways to go though.

  63. @jimbo
    For our Brit readers: is this whole Brexit debate as much of a Kabuki play as it seems to me? You just know that, no matter what the voters say, the eurocrats aren't going to let the U.K. leave. There will either be out and out fraud in the election, or if they can't get away with that they will find some reason or another to ignore a leave vote. Am I wrong about this?

    Am I wrong about this?

    Probably not, but what alternative is available to us but to play the game with the rigged deck and hope for the best?

    With any luck, the Eurocrats will overplay their hand.

  64. Ed says:
    @jimbo
    For our Brit readers: is this whole Brexit debate as much of a Kabuki play as it seems to me? You just know that, no matter what the voters say, the eurocrats aren't going to let the U.K. leave. There will either be out and out fraud in the election, or if they can't get away with that they will find some reason or another to ignore a leave vote. Am I wrong about this?

    “For our Brit readers: is this whole Brexit debate as much of a Kabuki play as it seems to me? You just know that, no matter what the voters say, the eurocrats aren’t going to let the U.K. leave. There will either be out and out fraud in the election, or if they can’t get away with that they will find some reason or another to ignore a leave vote. Am I wrong about this?”

    That is my take too.

    Electoral fraud is somewhat more difficult to accomplish in the UK (or for that matter, quite a few other countries) than the US. Its possible -Cameron’s party is under investigation for cheating in 2015. But it looks like the margin for exit will be too big.

    However, the referendum is only advisory! All the relevant legislation, including dealing with forty years of Brussels-made law inflicted on/ accepted by the British, has to go through Parliament in Westminster. Most current MPs are pro-EU. There is already talk about sabotaging any legislation to get the UK to actually leave that is introduced by the government, which wants to stay in anyway. This is why if “leave” wins the vote, they have to make sure Cameron is replaced with someone who at least has publically committed to leaving.

    (one irony of this is that Johnson is campaigning to leave but probably really wants to stay in, while the Labour leader, Corbyn, is pro-Remain in public but its pretty obvious he is more sympathetic to the “leave” side)

    So my guess is that “Leave” will be allowed to win, but the relevant laws to make that happen won’t get through Parliament for one reason or another. Also keep in mind that one of the houses of Parliament isn’t even elected. Of course this will be a gift to the UKIP candidates running in 2020.

  65. @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.

    Tiny Dick Duck is actually Steve Sailer himself! He is trolling for additional comments. That’s why Steve doesn’t ban him. He would be banning himself! Steve also uses the name Sick Dick Duck, Golden Flowers and who knows what else?

    Steve also works for the Bernie Sanders campaign and is a member of the Moslem Brotherhood! If only Obama knew!

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Whoops. Should have refreshed my browser before making my other comment. Yeah, it would be hilarious if if was Steve. At the very least, Steve is a whimsical “partner in crime” with his pet Duck.
  66. @Abe

    That would be an excellent way to get him out of our hair. I mean, a great thing for the great city of New York, of course, although he’d have to change his self-deprecating, bumbling scruff persona tailored to ingratiating himself with British high society more towards the more bombastic New York style. Unless maybe he could use the former to give himself some exotic foreign appeal to jaded New Yorkers, at least until the novelty wore off?
     
    I think rather than an ersatz New Yorker, Johnson should go the other way and, yes, use his foreign appeal to woo jaded New Yorkers. I've watched him on TV a few times and based on what little of his demeanor I've seen, he could pull off being Steven Coogan.

    You’re probably right.

    On the other hand he is very intelligent and he does have that seemingly natural and effortless expertise of the lower-upper-middle class social climber in an aristocratic society, at ingratiating himself. If that would translate to New York politics, he could probably pull off either option, given time and motivation. If only one would work, he’d probably sniff the right one out and adopt it, anyway.

  67. Macedonia and Bulgaria closed their borders to the Musselman hordes.

    Do those lines still hold?

    As a backup to the Greeks, how many Slavic countries would vetoed Turkish entry into Europe?

    If things play out right the Turks will be expelled from Europe and Constaninople will once again be Christian.

  68. @Tiny Duck
    I cannot see any justification for Brexit. The big argument for Brexit boils down to 2 things:

    1) Immigration control
    2) Control of our own laws.

    Previously I seemed to think that these were 2 pretty reasonable things to want to be able to control within our country, within the power of an electable government. Now after looking at it, I don't think either of those things would even be achievable with Brexit. Most leavers are suggesting we sign up to a Norwegian model of european integreation. The problem there is that Norway has had to sign up to pretty much the same immigration rules we have now to be in the EEC, and also submit to a number of laws from Europe, except that now they have far less input into the creation of those laws.

    So even if the primary objective of Brexit was a sensible one (which I don't think it even is), leaving wouldn't actually achieve it, worse, the risk of economic catastrophe is still reasonably high enough that I can't see why we would bother taking such a risk, for no real benefit.

    No, the big argument for Brexit is regaining control of our affairs. At present they are in the hands of Goldman Sachs and their ilk, as you will see if you watch this extremely instructive and disturbing 2012 film to the end:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMuUEd6w54E&feature=youtu.be&t=1458

    Not that they’ll relinquish control without a foul fight, as other commenters have noted.

  69. @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.

    He should apprentice to “Million Dollar Bonus” over at zero hedge. That is some high quality trolling!

  70. @Randal

    You know, it kind of sounds like Turkey holds the whip hand here, because Europe developing some kind of perimeter self defense defense system against being inundated by refugees allowed through Turkey would be racist.
     
    Yup. The kind of problem that results from allowing ideologues to influence policy.

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession? Only the very same Boris Johnson, media-appointed senior spokesperson of the Brexit camp, and likely next Prime Minister:

    Boris Johnson, too, has spoken in favour of Turkey's accession to the EU. “We would be crazy to reject Turkey,” wrote Boris Johnson in his book 'The Dream of Rome', “which is not only the former heartland of the Roman empire but also, I see, one of the leading suppliers of British fridges.”

    Johnson is presumably only advocating Britain leaving the EU for personally opportunist reasons (he expects to be successor to Cameron as "Conservative" Party leader and Prime Minister, and needs the backing of his party's mostly Eurosceptic membership). He's doing good work in that good cause, but I for one wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw him (and he's not a small man), as far as the problems we face with social liberalism, military interventionism in the service of Washington, and open borders globalism are concerned.

    From the Wikipedia article on the man:


    Johnson has Circassian, English, French, German, Swiss and Turkish ancestry on his father's side. From his mother he is of English and Russian Jewish descent
     
    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don't know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).

    If you have another nationality, renouncing U.S. citizenship and nationality is fairly straightforward and it is not reversible in most cases. However, it does come with a nice hefty administrative price tag – something like $2500 – if you want to get the coveted Certificate of Loss of Nationality which thanks to FATCA since 2011 is necessary to prove to any credible bank outside the U.S. that they are not opening a can of worms by granting you an account. Also if your net worth is over $650000 you will have to show that you have declared your worldwide income, regardless of where you have resided, to the goombas in the IRS for the past five fiscal years or you will be hunted down for a hefty Exit Tax (basically the Death Tax for the living) and depending on the country you have expatriated to your new government (a NATO government in particular is not trustworthy on this point) might be complicit in helping them garnish your bank accounts. And if your net worth is over $2 million, as is certainly the case for Mr. Johnson, avoiding the Exit Tax gets even trickier.

  71. @Randal

    I don’t get the impression that that’s going to make a Brexiter, Euroskeptic, Etonian upper-crust Brit open the doors to a Turkish horde.
     
    You might have noticed from my own comment that I treat claims that Johnson is meaningfully a Brexiter or a Eurosceptic with a hefty pinch of salt. Seems to me he's a confirmed globalist but also a competent politician, which means a professional liar, who has seen which way the wind is currently blowing on that issue in his own party, at least. And as I noted, he has in the past advocated Turkish entry, and I suspect he would again in slightly less disadvantageous circumstances for his own career for doing so.

    I certainly would not trust him to be any less treasonous once in office than the rest of his Eton chums have proved to be.

    That said, as noted, he's doing sterling work for the "save British sovereignty" campaign at the moment, even if he is just an ally of convenience.

    A number of years ago, Boris Johnson gave the most IQ supremacist/globalist speech any politician this side of Singapore ever gave.

    In general, British politicians are a lot more intellectually agile than American politicians. The kind of pivot due to new circumstances that Pat Buchanan made at the end of the Cold War is pretty common among British politicians.

    • Replies: @Randal

    A number of years ago, Boris Johnson gave the most IQ supremacist/globalist speech any politician this side of Singapore ever gave.
     
    That's interesting (I wasn't aware of it). I doubt he'd repeat it today, if it is unduly politically incorrect, though. He does seem to have drifted towards social liberalism and metropolitan respectability in recent years.

    But as I conceded above, he is undoubtedly highly intelligent (and very well educated).

    In general, British politicians are a lot more intellectually agile than American politicians. The kind of pivot due to new circumstances that Pat Buchanan made at the end of the Cold War is pretty common among British politicians.
     
    Is that another aspect of the advantages of the close adversarial nature of our parliamentary politics, do you think? I recall that being argued convincingly as one of the reasons George Galloway made such fools of the US Senators who made the mistake of taking him on a few years ago.
    , @Anonymous
    As the Duke of Wellington himself said 'the battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton'.
    , @LondonBob
    Every so often Boris does something, such as praising the Russians liberating Palmyra for example, that makes you think there is something interesting there. Of course the guy is an opportunist, but being pragmatic is no bad thing. He has clearly deployed some Trump style arguments in the Brexit campaign.
  72. @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.

    I think Steve keeps Duck around because it’s amazing that regular commenters actually respond. It’s a lighthearted little sideshow to see who can’t resist taking the bait. (Could it be Steve himself ? Ohhhh sheeeeii….)

    Some commenters recently were asking Unz to add an LOL button. Juvenile for most comments, but it would be funny to see Tiny Duck with dozens of auto-LOLs and no responding comments.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    Pish posh - we have fun right back with him. It's a game within a game.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    How about a DownVote button? TD would be in negative 3 figures in 2 hours flat.
  73. @Lurker
    Wow! The IRS knows no shame it would seem.

    And to think the US owes it's birth to some tax irregularities in the 1700s.

    See my reply above. The real problem is Congress and the State Department, both of which have a fundamental problem with the notion that Americans might want to live abroad. The notion that America is the greatest country in the world and can do no wrong seems benign enough in the minds of ignorant country bumpkin denizens, until you realize that not only do our highest officials share this belief, but they also understand “America” to mean something rather different from what ordinary Americans (NB: by “ordinary folk” I mean not Mexican peon wage slaves or racist Brahmin Hindu H1-B holders) do.

    The IRS is just a band of functionary drones doing what they are ordered to do: squeeze every last drop of the goods from every possible nook and cranny.

  74. @This Is Our Home
    Not sure what is wrong with changing your mind? It seems rather sensible actually.

    Depends whether or not you believe in the honesty of the claimed change of mind.

    We are talking about a professional politician here.

    But clearly, there’s no certainty in such an opinion about someone. Either of us might be right in the different and contradicting conclusions we have drawn about Johnson.

    • Replies: @This Is Our Home
    He wrote an article referencing Submission and certainly praised it with faint damns. It was good reading and came before his Brexit intervention.

    I know this is a very thin sliver of evidence but it works for me.
  75. @Peter Akuleyev
    True. And both Mexico and Turkey are basically ruled by well-educated, intelligent local elites, the inheritors of a legacy of high cultural achievement and conquest, and who consider themselves in every way the cultural equals of, if not superiors to, their Western counterparts. Both countries are saddled with a large population of low IQ peasants, mostly descended from the very people the elites conquered. Both elites have a difficult time reconciling how powerful and rich their countries and ancestors were in the 17th and 18th centuries with their subservient positions today. I suspect this bitterness is why Erdogan, despite being a peasant, has not been seriously challenged by Turkish elites. Erdogan may be an illiterate embarassment, but he is also giving the West the finger in a way no Turkish leader has dared in centuries.

    Mexico’s elite are a very mediocre bunch:

    In Mexico, the PAN government’s of the last decade has been trying to get parents to keep their kids in school longer. Here’s PISA document congratulating Mexico for getting its act together over the last decade.

    The really striking thing about Mexico’s performance on the 2009 PISA school achievement tests is the lack of very high scorers. For example, on reading, 9.9% of Americans score at the 5th level or 6th level on a 0 to 6 scale. In contrast, only 0.4% of Mexicans score that high. That’s really bad.

    In comparison, 1.9% of Turks score in the top two levels: not great, but several times the fraction in Mexico, suggesting that in Turkey there are small cultures of elites here and there who impress it upon their kids to hit the books hard. When I was in Bodrum, Turkey for Hans-Herman Hoppe’s conference, I was impressed by the books on sale at the supermarket across the street. Granted, Bodrum is kind of like Santa Barbara and this was an upscale supermarket in a chain headquartered in Switzerland in a nice neighborhood in a resort town, but, still, it was nice to see serious books on sale somewhere.

    That suggests to me, not for the first time, that much of the blame for Mexico’s cultural malaise stems from Mexico’s rich not setting a good example for the masses, such as by not studying hard.

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2010/12/pisa-and-mexico.html

    • Replies: @Marcus
    Unsurprising, Spain is pretty moribund, think of where it would be without tourism. The Spanish colonial system was always feudalism, capitalism (or even mercantilism) didn't develop there, nor in Spain itself.
    , @Jack D
    I don't think it has much to do with setting an example. Mexican's elite (like America's future elite) is , for the most part, genetically distinct from its brown masses.

    Amerindians come up on genetic tests as Asian because they crossed over from Asia in relatively modern times (circa 13,000 years) but they were apparently from Central Asia (where the modern day 'stans are) and are not particularly bright. Most Mexicans also have some European admixture but on average they come out pretty mediocre - they can operate a supermarket scanner but they ain't gonna INVENT a supermarket scanner.

    Turkey's Europeanized elite is just that - European. The Ottomans brought in a lot of European talent over the centuries which rose to be the cream of Turkish society. The Anatolian peasants way out east are no great shakes.
  76. @Steve Sailer
    A number of years ago, Boris Johnson gave the most IQ supremacist/globalist speech any politician this side of Singapore ever gave.

    In general, British politicians are a lot more intellectually agile than American politicians. The kind of pivot due to new circumstances that Pat Buchanan made at the end of the Cold War is pretty common among British politicians.

    A number of years ago, Boris Johnson gave the most IQ supremacist/globalist speech any politician this side of Singapore ever gave.

    That’s interesting (I wasn’t aware of it). I doubt he’d repeat it today, if it is unduly politically incorrect, though. He does seem to have drifted towards social liberalism and metropolitan respectability in recent years.

    But as I conceded above, he is undoubtedly highly intelligent (and very well educated).

    In general, British politicians are a lot more intellectually agile than American politicians. The kind of pivot due to new circumstances that Pat Buchanan made at the end of the Cold War is pretty common among British politicians.

    Is that another aspect of the advantages of the close adversarial nature of our parliamentary politics, do you think? I recall that being argued convincingly as one of the reasons George Galloway made such fools of the US Senators who made the mistake of taking him on a few years ago.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I've mentioned before watching John Major do Question Time or whatever it's called in the early 1990s and thinking, wow, I heard this guy was a zero, but he's much better than American politicians at this.

    The gladiatorial system in Parliament is clearly a better school, but I also suspect that going into Parliament is more attractive to the best individuals in Britain than running for Congress is in America. Britain and Israel have had more impressive politicians than America. Israel is small enough so that everybody who goes into the military the same year gets to know who is the best among your cohort. In the U.S., the country is so big that guys like the Bush Brothers can seem like top guys for awhile, mostly through misunderstandings.

    , @PiltdownMan
    George Galloway demolishing Norm Coleman is fun to watch but for the purposes of this thread it is worth noting that Galloway is about the most pro-Muslim-immigrant politician there is in the UK. His former constituency was heavily immigrant Pakistani, and he often represented Saddamist interests, which was the reason for his being in that Congressional hearing.

    If it was up to him, he'd move all of Syria and Iraq to Britain.
  77. I just realized this is the third attacked to leave behind an “American” child. Boston, San Bernadino & Orlando have all given us the gift of future jihadi.

  78. @Jim
    The refugee weapon is far more powerful than nuclear weapons. Instead of spending a lot of money on deveoping nuclear and missile capabilities Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.

    Likewise if Putin were really interested in taking over Europe, he would have his soldiers drop their weapons and unis and just bumrush the border requesting asylum from the evil dictator.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    What!

    Do you really seriously think that the EU bosses would show the merest hint of kindness and understanding to white people?
    Expect machine gun nests to be erected the next day.

    But, conversely, as I said with south Korea, if it was Bangladeshis gatecrashing the EU border, *that* would be a different story.
    Only it would be kid gloves instead of tactical nukes.
  79. @Anonymous

    How does it feel? Knowing that ” your” countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT
     

    I feel for sorry for the dogs/animals in the future, who will face brutal mistreatment by the savages. The animals had no part in voting or promoting a multicultural world.

    “I feel for sorry for the dogs/animals in the future, who will face brutal mistreatment by the savages. The animals had no part in voting or promoting a multicultural world.”

    The dogs/animals of the present already face brutal mistreatment by the savages.

  80. @Randal

    A number of years ago, Boris Johnson gave the most IQ supremacist/globalist speech any politician this side of Singapore ever gave.
     
    That's interesting (I wasn't aware of it). I doubt he'd repeat it today, if it is unduly politically incorrect, though. He does seem to have drifted towards social liberalism and metropolitan respectability in recent years.

    But as I conceded above, he is undoubtedly highly intelligent (and very well educated).

    In general, British politicians are a lot more intellectually agile than American politicians. The kind of pivot due to new circumstances that Pat Buchanan made at the end of the Cold War is pretty common among British politicians.
     
    Is that another aspect of the advantages of the close adversarial nature of our parliamentary politics, do you think? I recall that being argued convincingly as one of the reasons George Galloway made such fools of the US Senators who made the mistake of taking him on a few years ago.

    I’ve mentioned before watching John Major do Question Time or whatever it’s called in the early 1990s and thinking, wow, I heard this guy was a zero, but he’s much better than American politicians at this.

    The gladiatorial system in Parliament is clearly a better school, but I also suspect that going into Parliament is more attractive to the best individuals in Britain than running for Congress is in America. Britain and Israel have had more impressive politicians than America. Israel is small enough so that everybody who goes into the military the same year gets to know who is the best among your cohort. In the U.S., the country is so big that guys like the Bush Brothers can seem like top guys for awhile, mostly through misunderstandings.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    but I also suspect that going into Parliament is more attractive to the best individuals in Britain than running for Congress is in America.
     
    Lord Bryce had similar notions:

    Why Great Men Are Not Chosen Presidents

    Europeans often ask, and Americans do not always explain, how it happens that this great office, the greatest in the world, unless we except the papacy, to which anyone can rise by his own merits, is not more frequently filled by great and striking men. In America, which is beyond all other countries the country of a “career open to talents,” a country, moreover, in which political life is unusually keen and political ambition widely diffused, it might be expected that the highest place would always be won by a man of brilliant gifts. But from the time when the heroes of the Revolution died out with Jefferson and Adams and Madison, no person except General Grant, had, down till the end of last century, reached the chair whose name would have been remembered had he not been president, and no president except Abraham Lincoln had displayed rare or striking qualities in the chair. Who now knows or cares to know anything about the personality of James K. Polk or Franklin Pierce? The only thing remarkable about them is that being so commonplace they should have climbed so high.

     

    Several reasons may be suggested for the fact, which Americans are themselves the first to admit.

    One is that the proportion of first-rate ability drawn into politics is smaller in America than in most European countries. This is a phenomenon whose causes must be elucidated later: in the meantime it is enough to say that in France, where the half-revolutionary conditions that lasted for some time after 1870, made public life exciting and accessible; in Germany, where an admirably organized civil service cultivates and develops statecraft with unusual success; in England, where many persons of wealth and leisure seek to enter the political arena, while burning questions touch the interests of all classes and make men eager observers of the combatants, the total quantity of talent devoted to parliamentary or administrative work has been larger, relatively to the population, than in America, where much of the best ability, both for thought and for action, for planning and for executing, rushes into a field which is comparatively narrow in Europe, the business of developing the material resources of the country.

    Another is that the methods and habits of Congress, and indeed of political life generally, seem to give fewer opportunities for personal distinction, fewer modes in which a man may commend himself to his countrymen by eminent capacity in thought, in speech, or in administration, than is the case in the free countries of Europe. This is a point to be explained in later chapters. I merely note here in passing what will there be dwelt on.

    A third reason is that eminent men make more enemies, and give those enemies more assailable points, than obscure men do. They are therefore in so far less desirable candidates. It is true that the eminent man has also made more friends, that his name is more widely known, and may be greeted with louder cheers. Other things being equal, the famous man is preferable. But other things never are equal. The famous man has probably attacked some leaders in his own party, has supplanted others, has expressed his dislike to the crotchet of some active section, has perhaps committed errors which are capable of being magnified into offences. No man stands long before the public and bears a part in great affairs without giving openings to censorious criticism. Fiercer far than the light which beats upon a throne is the light which beats upon a presidential candidate, searching out all the recesses of his past life. Hence, when the choice lies between a brilliant man and a safe man, the safe man is preferred. Party feeling, strong enough to carry in on its back a man without conspicuous positive merits, is not always strong enough to procure forgiveness for a man with positive faults.

    A European finds that this phenomenon needs in its turn to be explained, for in the free countries of Europe brilliancy, be it eloquence in speech, or some striking achievement in war or administration, or the power through whatever means of somehow impressing the popular imagination, is what makes a leader triumphant. Why should it be otherwise in America? Because in America party loyalty and party organization have been hitherto so perfect that anyone put forward by the party will get the full party vote if his character is good and his “record,” as they call it, unstained. The safe candidate may not draw in quite so many votes from the moderate men of the other side as the brilliant one would, but he will not lose nearly so many from his own ranks. Even those who admit his mediocrity will vote straight when the moment for voting comes. Besides, the ordinary American voter does not object to mediocrity. He has a lower conception of the qualities requisite to make a statesman than those who direct public opinion in Europe have. He likes his candidate to be sensible, vigorous, and, above all, what he calls “magnetic,” and does not value, because he sees no need for, originality or profundity, a fine culture or a wide knowledge. Candidates are selected to be run for nomination by knots of persons who, however expert as party tacticians, are usually commonplace men; and the choice between those selected for nomination is made by a very large body, an assembly of nearly a thousand delegates from the local party organizations over the country, who are certainly no better than ordinary citizens. How this process works will be seen more fully when I come to speak of those nominating conventions which are so notable a feature in American politics.

     

    http://files.libertyfund.org/pll/quotes/42.html
    , @Anonymous
    Obviously, you've never heard of Harriett Harman, David Blunkett, Jack Straw, Jackie Smith, Margaret Beckett or indeed most of the New Labour cabinet including the distinctly unimpressive Gordon Brown.
    , @Anonymous
    Then again, Christopher Hitchens was always dismissive of that kind of glib superiority.


    He conceded that George W. couldn't have handled Prime Minister's Questions but said Bill Clinton would have done great, so who really cares?


    Btw, if you want to see what happens when a British politician meets our Congress in combat then you must watch George Galloway's visit. Oh, boy. They had no idea what was coming.


    http://www.counterpunch.org/2005/05/18/thusly-i-humiliated-norm-coleman-and-christopher-hitchens/


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5u1skEoqLs
  81. @antipater_1
    Tiny Dick Duck is actually Steve Sailer himself! He is trolling for additional comments. That's why Steve doesn't ban him. He would be banning himself! Steve also uses the name Sick Dick Duck, Golden Flowers and who knows what else?

    Steve also works for the Bernie Sanders campaign and is a member of the Moslem Brotherhood! If only Obama knew!

    Whoops. Should have refreshed my browser before making my other comment. Yeah, it would be hilarious if if was Steve. At the very least, Steve is a whimsical “partner in crime” with his pet Duck.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    “if [it] was Steve” … The edit clock lied to me! Hate when that happens.
  82. @Randal
    Depends whether or not you believe in the honesty of the claimed change of mind.

    We are talking about a professional politician here.

    But clearly, there's no certainty in such an opinion about someone. Either of us might be right in the different and contradicting conclusions we have drawn about Johnson.

    He wrote an article referencing Submission and certainly praised it with faint damns. It was good reading and came before his Brexit intervention.

    I know this is a very thin sliver of evidence but it works for me.

  83. @Steve Sailer
    I've mentioned before watching John Major do Question Time or whatever it's called in the early 1990s and thinking, wow, I heard this guy was a zero, but he's much better than American politicians at this.

    The gladiatorial system in Parliament is clearly a better school, but I also suspect that going into Parliament is more attractive to the best individuals in Britain than running for Congress is in America. Britain and Israel have had more impressive politicians than America. Israel is small enough so that everybody who goes into the military the same year gets to know who is the best among your cohort. In the U.S., the country is so big that guys like the Bush Brothers can seem like top guys for awhile, mostly through misunderstandings.

    but I also suspect that going into Parliament is more attractive to the best individuals in Britain than running for Congress is in America.

    Lord Bryce had similar notions:

    Why Great Men Are Not Chosen Presidents

    Europeans often ask, and Americans do not always explain, how it happens that this great office, the greatest in the world, unless we except the papacy, to which anyone can rise by his own merits, is not more frequently filled by great and striking men. In America, which is beyond all other countries the country of a “career open to talents,” a country, moreover, in which political life is unusually keen and political ambition widely diffused, it might be expected that the highest place would always be won by a man of brilliant gifts. But from the time when the heroes of the Revolution died out with Jefferson and Adams and Madison, no person except General Grant, had, down till the end of last century, reached the chair whose name would have been remembered had he not been president, and no president except Abraham Lincoln had displayed rare or striking qualities in the chair. Who now knows or cares to know anything about the personality of James K. Polk or Franklin Pierce? The only thing remarkable about them is that being so commonplace they should have climbed so high.

    Several reasons may be suggested for the fact, which Americans are themselves the first to admit.

    One is that the proportion of first-rate ability drawn into politics is smaller in America than in most European countries. This is a phenomenon whose causes must be elucidated later: in the meantime it is enough to say that in France, where the half-revolutionary conditions that lasted for some time after 1870, made public life exciting and accessible; in Germany, where an admirably organized civil service cultivates and develops statecraft with unusual success; in England, where many persons of wealth and leisure seek to enter the political arena, while burning questions touch the interests of all classes and make men eager observers of the combatants, the total quantity of talent devoted to parliamentary or administrative work has been larger, relatively to the population, than in America, where much of the best ability, both for thought and for action, for planning and for executing, rushes into a field which is comparatively narrow in Europe, the business of developing the material resources of the country.

    Another is that the methods and habits of Congress, and indeed of political life generally, seem to give fewer opportunities for personal distinction, fewer modes in which a man may commend himself to his countrymen by eminent capacity in thought, in speech, or in administration, than is the case in the free countries of Europe. This is a point to be explained in later chapters. I merely note here in passing what will there be dwelt on.

    A third reason is that eminent men make more enemies, and give those enemies more assailable points, than obscure men do. They are therefore in so far less desirable candidates. It is true that the eminent man has also made more friends, that his name is more widely known, and may be greeted with louder cheers. Other things being equal, the famous man is preferable. But other things never are equal. The famous man has probably attacked some leaders in his own party, has supplanted others, has expressed his dislike to the crotchet of some active section, has perhaps committed errors which are capable of being magnified into offences. No man stands long before the public and bears a part in great affairs without giving openings to censorious criticism. Fiercer far than the light which beats upon a throne is the light which beats upon a presidential candidate, searching out all the recesses of his past life. Hence, when the choice lies between a brilliant man and a safe man, the safe man is preferred. Party feeling, strong enough to carry in on its back a man without conspicuous positive merits, is not always strong enough to procure forgiveness for a man with positive faults.

    A European finds that this phenomenon needs in its turn to be explained, for in the free countries of Europe brilliancy, be it eloquence in speech, or some striking achievement in war or administration, or the power through whatever means of somehow impressing the popular imagination, is what makes a leader triumphant. Why should it be otherwise in America? Because in America party loyalty and party organization have been hitherto so perfect that anyone put forward by the party will get the full party vote if his character is good and his “record,” as they call it, unstained. The safe candidate may not draw in quite so many votes from the moderate men of the other side as the brilliant one would, but he will not lose nearly so many from his own ranks. Even those who admit his mediocrity will vote straight when the moment for voting comes. Besides, the ordinary American voter does not object to mediocrity. He has a lower conception of the qualities requisite to make a statesman than those who direct public opinion in Europe have. He likes his candidate to be sensible, vigorous, and, above all, what he calls “magnetic,” and does not value, because he sees no need for, originality or profundity, a fine culture or a wide knowledge. Candidates are selected to be run for nomination by knots of persons who, however expert as party tacticians, are usually commonplace men; and the choice between those selected for nomination is made by a very large body, an assembly of nearly a thousand delegates from the local party organizations over the country, who are certainly no better than ordinary citizens. How this process works will be seen more fully when I come to speak of those nominating conventions which are so notable a feature in American politics.

    http://files.libertyfund.org/pll/quotes/42.html

    • Replies: @map
    That's a fig leaf explanation. Basically, what you're saying is British and Continental life was embroiled in politics. There was nothing worth doing...except politics.

    For much of US history, men of merit could do other things besides becoming politicians that were far more prestigious and profitable. Thus, the presence of the lower quality American politician.

    And it's a good thing, too. It's how America became the industrial powerhouse of the world up until the 1980's. Had Americans been the kind of glib poofters you find in Parliament, much of the vaunted German Civil Service would've been running England instead.
  84. @This Is Our Home
    Where Britain goes so does everyone else. We are the cork and when we pop the ship will sink. We will be merrily bobbing along though.

    “Where Britain goes so does everyone else. We are the cork and when we pop the ship will sink. We will be merrily bobbing along though.”

    The late Lawrence Auster called present-day Britain “the Isle of the Dead”.

    Your isle may go merrily bobbing along. But it will still be populated by the dead.

  85. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Whoops. Should have refreshed my browser before making my other comment. Yeah, it would be hilarious if if was Steve. At the very least, Steve is a whimsical “partner in crime” with his pet Duck.

    “if [it] was Steve” … The edit clock lied to me! Hate when that happens.

  86. @Expletive Deleted
    It's 100 years and five months since the Dardanelles peninsula was abandoned by the British & Empire troops.

    And French!

    However that was in the context of Turkey allying itself with Germany, so not quite full-spectrum finger giving.

    Go back to the Crimean War and it’s Turkey + Britain + France vs Russia. So we have to go further back still.

  87. @Frau Katze
    It's my understanding that China props up the Kim regime because they fear a huge outflow of poor North Koreans to China.

    (But I'd take those North Koreans over Mexicans or Turkish peasants.)

    But surely they would seal the border? And if they cut of the aid then surely a South Korean take over wouldn’t be far behind?

  88. @Jim
    The refugee weapon is far more powerful than nuclear weapons. Instead of spending a lot of money on deveoping nuclear and missile capabilities Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.

    Actually, there’s nothing that the south Koreans would more wish for.

    Now, if Bangladesh threatened to flood south Korea with refugees, *that* would be a different story.

  89. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @iSteveFan
    Likewise if Putin were really interested in taking over Europe, he would have his soldiers drop their weapons and unis and just bumrush the border requesting asylum from the evil dictator.

    What!

    Do you really seriously think that the EU bosses would show the merest hint of kindness and understanding to white people?
    Expect machine gun nests to be erected the next day.

    But, conversely, as I said with south Korea, if it was Bangladeshis gatecrashing the EU border, *that* would be a different story.
    Only it would be kid gloves instead of tactical nukes.

    • Replies: @Blitzstat
    Scratch a Russian and you'll find a Tatar and all that jazz.
  90. @Steve Sailer
    I've mentioned before watching John Major do Question Time or whatever it's called in the early 1990s and thinking, wow, I heard this guy was a zero, but he's much better than American politicians at this.

    The gladiatorial system in Parliament is clearly a better school, but I also suspect that going into Parliament is more attractive to the best individuals in Britain than running for Congress is in America. Britain and Israel have had more impressive politicians than America. Israel is small enough so that everybody who goes into the military the same year gets to know who is the best among your cohort. In the U.S., the country is so big that guys like the Bush Brothers can seem like top guys for awhile, mostly through misunderstandings.

    Obviously, you’ve never heard of Harriett Harman, David Blunkett, Jack Straw, Jackie Smith, Margaret Beckett or indeed most of the New Labour cabinet including the distinctly unimpressive Gordon Brown.

  91. Did Boris Johnson pay the IRS?

    Were London lawyers superior to IRS lawyers?

    Did he register with Selective Service?

  92. @jim jones
    It is noticeable that Marxists always start slinging insults around instead of engaging in rational debate. As Socrates said "“When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser.”

    The notion that anyone in this article, or anyone of importance in this debate are Marxist is risible. The EU is a bunch of neoliberal capitalists, and Erdogan is a “moderate” Islamist. I don’t know how you can expect to be taken seriously if you either don’t know the first thing about the insult you’re using, or you care so little about the meaning of words that you label Eurocrat crony capitalists as “Marxists.”

  93. @5371
    "Circassian" seems to be an invention, and he has the same amount of Jew in his ancestry as he does of Turk.

    Perhaps he originates from the periphery of ‘Circassia’.
    A ‘Circum- Circassian’ if you will.

  94. @Steve Sailer
    A number of years ago, Boris Johnson gave the most IQ supremacist/globalist speech any politician this side of Singapore ever gave.

    In general, British politicians are a lot more intellectually agile than American politicians. The kind of pivot due to new circumstances that Pat Buchanan made at the end of the Cold War is pretty common among British politicians.

    As the Duke of Wellington himself said ‘the battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton’.

    • Replies: @Lot
    No, Napolean lost for exactly the reason Hitler did. Bad idea to invade Russia while fighting most of the rest of Europe.
  95. My friend is convinced that it won’t be a honest vote. That no matter what the actual results are the gov’t will say “Oh, wow! Remain won! Too bad, Leave voters.”

    I think that they will have an honest vote, but the gov’t won’t follow through: Most likely scenario a vote of no-confidence in Cameron and then a pro-EU Labor coalition wins the next election and the BrExit is never heard from again.

    • Replies: @al gore rhythms

    I think that they will have an honest vote, but the gov’t won’t follow through: Most likely scenario a vote of no-confidence in Cameron and then a pro-EU Labor coalition wins the next election and the BrExit is never heard from again.
     
    The leaving process can take two years. I was wondering if, in the event of a vote to leave, there will be a heavy doom-and-gloom propaganda campaign in the British media followed by a final 'are you really sure?' referendum at the end of the two years.
    , @Travis
    I agree

    Remember when the people of Ireland rejected the Lisbon Treaty which amended the Maastricht Treaty. they made Ireland vote again til they voted correctly. Ireland was the only nation which allowed its citizens to vote on the new EU treaty. A rejection meant Lisbon would never go in effect. So they forced Ireland to vote again.
  96. @Lot

    The debate is happening when attacks like the one in Orlando, Fla., have raised concerns about both Islamic radicalism and Islamophobia.
     
    At what point does Muslim mass murder of non-Muslims rise to a level where a phobia about Islam is not concerning? 3,000 on September 11 was not enough, not for George Bush.

    How about 15,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adana_massacre

    How about 20,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicosia#Ottoman_rule

    How about 52,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chios_massacre

    How about 150,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assyrian_genocide

    How about 450,000?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_genocide

    How about a million? Would Islamophobia be OK for an Armenian in 1920?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Genocide

    At what point does Muslim mass murder of non-Muslims rise to a level where a phobia about Islam is not concerning? 3,000 on September 11 was not enough, not for George Bush.

    I think we’re supposed to believe that the rub is the percentage of Muslims committing the crimes within the larger “community”, i.e. Islamophobia is irrational because not all Muslims are terrorists. Same with blacks and street crime. Can’t tar the good ones with the same brush as the bad, right? Of course, I knock wasps’ nests down from my patio before the wasps sting anyone…

    Once every Muslim on earth has participated in a terror attack, then it’ll stop being racist and hateful—indeed, Islamophobic—to notice that they always seemed to have a predilection for that sort of thing.

  97. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I've mentioned before watching John Major do Question Time or whatever it's called in the early 1990s and thinking, wow, I heard this guy was a zero, but he's much better than American politicians at this.

    The gladiatorial system in Parliament is clearly a better school, but I also suspect that going into Parliament is more attractive to the best individuals in Britain than running for Congress is in America. Britain and Israel have had more impressive politicians than America. Israel is small enough so that everybody who goes into the military the same year gets to know who is the best among your cohort. In the U.S., the country is so big that guys like the Bush Brothers can seem like top guys for awhile, mostly through misunderstandings.

    Then again, Christopher Hitchens was always dismissive of that kind of glib superiority.

    He conceded that George W. couldn’t have handled Prime Minister’s Questions but said Bill Clinton would have done great, so who really cares?

    Btw, if you want to see what happens when a British politician meets our Congress in combat then you must watch George Galloway’s visit. Oh, boy. They had no idea what was coming.

    http://www.counterpunch.org/2005/05/18/thusly-i-humiliated-norm-coleman-and-christopher-hitchens/

    • Replies: @anonymous
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJrWFoq2GIQ

    Mr. Galloway clip as added perspective and context. A very sane lad , indeed .
  98. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    I think Steve keeps Duck around because it’s amazing that regular commenters actually respond. It’s a lighthearted little sideshow to see who can’t resist taking the bait. (Could it be Steve himself ? Ohhhh sheeeeii....)

    Some commenters recently were asking Unz to add an LOL button. Juvenile for most comments, but it would be funny to see Tiny Duck with dozens of auto-LOLs and no responding comments.

    Pish posh – we have fun right back with him. It’s a game within a game.

  99. @Lurker

    to open visa-free travel to 77 million Turkish citizens and to create a border-free zone from Iraq, Iran and Syria to the English Channel
     
    Long term EU policy in a nutshell.

    I think Erdogan’s plan all along was to get rid of as many refugees and Turks of Kurdish background and dump them on the EU.
    But I really see no gain for any of the EU members in Turkey joining the Union. It has to be some policy pushed by the USA establishment and our globalist overlords.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Is this a rare case of Turkey voting for Christmas?
  100. @Jim Don Bob
    Has Steve ever banned anybody? He lets a lot of stuff through that I wouldn't.

    He bans crazy people, especially if they seem violent. Don’t really want that sort of publicity.

  101. How am I a troll? What do I say that is any different from the mainstream?

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Whoa— Never break character !!!

    This was covered last conference call, ya goof !

    , @anonymous
    I like you .I think you are a very sensible leftist . I think you should volunteer yourself as a Bacha Bazzi to our immigrants. A sort of thank you gesture for allowing us more islamic immigration .It will be soooooooo tolerant of you and the virtue signaling will be thru the roof !!!!!!
  102. @Jim
    The refugee weapon is far more powerful than nuclear weapons. Instead of spending a lot of money on deveoping nuclear and missile capabilities Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.

    Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.

    I think Kim Jong-Un (or whomever holds the whip in North Korea) is smart enough to know that the future of the regime would be in question, once such a whirlwind had been unleashed.

  103. @Tiny Duck
    I cannot see any justification for Brexit. The big argument for Brexit boils down to 2 things:

    1) Immigration control
    2) Control of our own laws.

    Previously I seemed to think that these were 2 pretty reasonable things to want to be able to control within our country, within the power of an electable government. Now after looking at it, I don't think either of those things would even be achievable with Brexit. Most leavers are suggesting we sign up to a Norwegian model of european integreation. The problem there is that Norway has had to sign up to pretty much the same immigration rules we have now to be in the EEC, and also submit to a number of laws from Europe, except that now they have far less input into the creation of those laws.

    So even if the primary objective of Brexit was a sensible one (which I don't think it even is), leaving wouldn't actually achieve it, worse, the risk of economic catastrophe is still reasonably high enough that I can't see why we would bother taking such a risk, for no real benefit.

    Kevin, Liberals never see their failed policies as failures, just something that needs to be tweaked. School policies in the US have lead to utter failure in many major school districts. Not to worry, just give the policy a new name ,an infusion of cash and carry on. Their argument always includes the thought that if we end something now there will be worse failure. What could be worse than failing at everything you try?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Right. The failure of liberal/socialist programs is always because:
    1) the smartest people, like HRC, were not in charge. they will do better next time, promise.
    2) there was not enough money

    Can't disprove a negative. And they believe this s**t. Human nature is infinitely malleable to them, not with standing thousands of years of history. I blame Rousseau.
  104. @Randal

    I don’t get the impression that that’s going to make a Brexiter, Euroskeptic, Etonian upper-crust Brit open the doors to a Turkish horde.
     
    You might have noticed from my own comment that I treat claims that Johnson is meaningfully a Brexiter or a Eurosceptic with a hefty pinch of salt. Seems to me he's a confirmed globalist but also a competent politician, which means a professional liar, who has seen which way the wind is currently blowing on that issue in his own party, at least. And as I noted, he has in the past advocated Turkish entry, and I suspect he would again in slightly less disadvantageous circumstances for his own career for doing so.

    I certainly would not trust him to be any less treasonous once in office than the rest of his Eton chums have proved to be.

    That said, as noted, he's doing sterling work for the "save British sovereignty" campaign at the moment, even if he is just an ally of convenience.

    Boris’s father Stanley has been a Euro- and indeed a world government-enthusiast for fifty years.

  105. @5371
    "Circassian" seems to be an invention, and he has the same amount of Jew in his ancestry as he does of Turk.

    There is a large amount of Caucasus blood in Turks because of resettlement of Muslims fleeing Orthodox Russian rule , economic migration during Ottoman times and harem girls. Erdogan’s family were from near Batumi. His closest genetic relatives are Mingrelians and Georgians, certainly not Kazakhs.

    Johnson’s great-grandfather looked neither Middle Eastern nor Central Asian. Like many “Turks”, particularly Western Turkish elites, he was probably only tangentially related to Osman’s Turkoman followers.

  106. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    I think Steve keeps Duck around because it’s amazing that regular commenters actually respond. It’s a lighthearted little sideshow to see who can’t resist taking the bait. (Could it be Steve himself ? Ohhhh sheeeeii....)

    Some commenters recently were asking Unz to add an LOL button. Juvenile for most comments, but it would be funny to see Tiny Duck with dozens of auto-LOLs and no responding comments.

    How about a DownVote button? TD would be in negative 3 figures in 2 hours flat.

  107. I love the term “welfare scroungers” in the Times article. I would like to see a study that showed the preferred country of choice for immigrants….a country with lots of job opportunities or a country with liberal welfare benefits. I think I know the answer.

  108. @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    Zero ducks given, since you asked.

  109. @Steve Sailer
    Michael Bloomberg suggested that Boris Johnson succeed him as mayor of New York.

    Maybe he could run for mayor of Istanbul?

  110. @PiltdownMan

    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don’t know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).
     
    I'm not sure if he has actually followed through. There are exit taxes, which can be substantial if you have a net worth exceeding about $600k, including nasty surprises such a bill for on-the-spot payment of the tax on all of your future pension income if you are on a defined benefit pension plan.

    What triggered Boris Johnson's fury was that he has never lived in the US after age 5, and was presented a bill for about $150k tax out of the blue by the IRS for the capital gains on the sale of an apartment he inherited in London and subsequently sold.

    I don’t object to the IRS charging an exit tax. Pensions earned while in the US were earned while benefitting from the US economy. To pile up wealth and then hightail it to a tax haven before paying taxes on it is basically theft. Most of the people who try to do that will be immigrants just headed back to their birth country after they retire, not native born Americans.

    It *should* bother us that a guy like Eduardo Saverin, an immigrant from Brazil, can earn billions while in the US then leave for Singapore without paying a goddamned dime in taxes. If he hadn’t been living in America he wouldn’t have become a billionaire.

    Our taxes fund infrastructure that enables the creation of wealth. Just because that wealth is in some instrument on which taxes can be delayed – stocks or pensions – doesn’t mean people should be free from paying taxes to the country which helped them earn it.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    Eduardo Saverin actually did pay an exit tax of about $700 million on the capital gains on his Facebook stock until the moment of exit. What he avoided was any capital gains tax in the future and estate taxes.

    Your argument is fine insofar as the the US tax code differentiates between US source and foreign source income. It does not, for all practical purposes. Boris Johnson has never made a penny of earnings in the US, and has not depended on our "taxes funding infrastructure" to earn his living or money. Yet he wrote the IRS a check for $150k. And he'll be liable for any UK Government pension amounts before receipt if he chooses to give up citizenship.

    Outliers like Eduardo Saverin are atypical. There are many more like Johnson, caught in the intricacies of poorly designed law.
  111. @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    Well, my daughters indeed have the sense of hearing of accomplished huntresses.

    And the children of Muslim men do in fact tend to be noisy and disorderly hellions.

    So on this one point alone I will agree with the indefatiguably moronic Tiny Duck.

  112. @Steve Sailer
    Michael Bloomberg suggested that Boris Johnson succeed him as mayor of New York.

    I always suspected Mike of dynastic pretensions. This seals it.

  113. Turkey is not European, it is Asian. It should never be allowed in the EU. They might as well let China and India into the European Union.

    • Agree: Travis
  114. @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    Ar ar, Earth humor!

  115. @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.

    Silence is the best treatment for troll infestations. They thrive on attention.

    As of now, I’m taking the pledge and I hope you all do too:

    NO MATTER WHAT TINY DUCK WRITES, DO NOT RESPOND IN ANY WAY.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I responded to TD once and that was it. To quote someone or other, "You can't fix stupid".
  116. Abe says: • Website

    So Merkel’s Boner has not only implanted ~1 million “Syrians” into the heart of Europe (and gosh knows how many Syrian children, wives, aged parents, etc. once family reunification finally plays out), but it has now actually lead to the dissolution of the EU? And Turkey will now have free rein to blackmail the rump EU in perpetuity and at any moment of its choosing by relaxing its border controls, in ADDITION to gaining the right (someday soon) to, in perpetuity, spread Turkish colonies all over Europe (“Oh to be like an Ataturk in France”)?

    Well, I guess Germany had no choice, since only Turkey’s world-class army and navy (did you know the canon on the M1A1 tank is leased from a Turkish design?) have the capability to stop an unarmed rabble armed only with smartphones. Which, now that I think about it, is literally true. Europe had to outsource beaning mean to economic migrants (just as the U.S. effectively outsources being mean to Central American economic migrants) so that images of drowned babies, crying children, and 6’2″, 220 lb. “boys” who look like that hunky character on GAME OF THRONES (“no, not the one who rides a horse and ended up being hung by The Hound, the one who rides a hound and is hung like a…”) do not go viral on European TV and Facebook and so overload the emotional circuitry of European women that they’re too upset to have sex with European men for the rest of the fiscal quarter. If Turkey were to present an itemized invoice to the EU for all the services rendered it would include:

    * seizing and/or smashing migrants’ smart phones
    * stealing migrants’ jewelry, cash, designer clothing, and athletic shoes
    * roughing up migrants with judiciously administered baton blows to knees, elbows, or skulls
    * synchronized unit maneuvers involving, at precisely 21:45, turning 180 degrees in-place and then cupping hands over ears so that sexual assaults in the refugee camps can proceed unseen/unheard
    * running a cordon to keep local press out
    * running a live-ammo cordon to keep international press out
    * running a combined arms, live-ammo cordon of air-land-sea units to keep George Clooney out
    * “accidentally” jailing Amnesty International activists who sneak in anyway (“I swear, your honor, that 19 year old college girl from Minnesota was the spitting image of the notorious Kurdish terrorist ‘Moustache’ Ali”)

    Germany took the world by storm after TRIUMPH OF THE WILL. America announced its arrival with GONE WITH THE WIND. Who knew the germs of Turkey’s revival would start in the 70’s with MIDNIGHT EXPRESS?

    • Replies: @Lurker

    did you know the canon on the M1A1 tank is leased from a Turkish design?
     
    No!

    The 12omm gun used in the M1 Abrams is a German gun developed for the German Leopard 2 tank, Turkey also uses the Leopard 2 and is building it's own indigenous tank using the same 120mm gun. That doesn't make it a Turkish design.

    The Leopard 1 and and the old M60 Patton tank carried the British L7 105mm gun, also used on late model M48s and the first M1 models. So US tanks have carried European originated guns for well over 50 years right up to today.
  117. @syonredux
    Mexico's elite are a very mediocre bunch:

    In Mexico, the PAN government's of the last decade has been trying to get parents to keep their kids in school longer. Here's PISA document congratulating Mexico for getting its act together over the last decade.

    The really striking thing about Mexico's performance on the 2009 PISA school achievement tests is the lack of very high scorers. For example, on reading, 9.9% of Americans score at the 5th level or 6th level on a 0 to 6 scale. In contrast, only 0.4% of Mexicans score that high. That's really bad.

    In comparison, 1.9% of Turks score in the top two levels: not great, but several times the fraction in Mexico, suggesting that in Turkey there are small cultures of elites here and there who impress it upon their kids to hit the books hard. When I was in Bodrum, Turkey for Hans-Herman Hoppe's conference, I was impressed by the books on sale at the supermarket across the street. Granted, Bodrum is kind of like Santa Barbara and this was an upscale supermarket in a chain headquartered in Switzerland in a nice neighborhood in a resort town, but, still, it was nice to see serious books on sale somewhere.

    That suggests to me, not for the first time, that much of the blame for Mexico's cultural malaise stems from Mexico's rich not setting a good example for the masses, such as by not studying hard.
     
    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2010/12/pisa-and-mexico.html

    Unsurprising, Spain is pretty moribund, think of where it would be without tourism. The Spanish colonial system was always feudalism, capitalism (or even mercantilism) didn’t develop there, nor in Spain itself.

  118. @SPMoore8
    Since you are again OT, it's worth trumping your OT: It now is being argued that the shooter, Mateen, was himself gay. This I did not expect; that the narrative is now turning towards a self-hating gay massacre. Of course, this means that it is ultimately the straight world's fault for making him a killer.

    The current storytelling is based on this new information: a gay co-worker of Mateen claims Mateen asked him out on a “romantic date”, and Mateen’s first wife said Mateen’s father called him a queer. Both instances have problems in ascertaining the guy’s orientation: queers always think that everything’s about them and their queerness and that everyone has some queer in them, if only for a “romantic date”; the ex-wife probably cannot recognize that typical slurs such as “fag” thrown at assimilating Muslim men by other Muslim men, who aren’t keen on the track-suit wearing narcissism of selfies on social media, are not anything other than common guy insults. The lefty gay narrative is part of the atmosphere, however, and is unconsciously accepted and regurgitated by those who knew Mateen and who now see it all come together now-he was gay all along. Yawn. Let’s talk to one of his romantic partners first.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    There are many more hints than just what you say.

    http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2016/06/omar-mateen-gay-orlando-shooting

    Some of the clues, such as Mateen being seen in the club before, could have just been him scouting the place out, but others, if true, are pretty sure markers. I would say 99.9% of people who have gay dating apps on their phones are gay.

    It is somewhat plausible (if not yet proven) that Mateen was so conflicted between his Muslim identity and his gay identity that he decided to end it in this way.

    This only reinforces Trump's point. When you put a 7th century society in contact with a 21st century society, something has to give. When Qutb, the intellectual father of modern radical Islamism visited small town, G-rated Greeley, Colorado from Egypt in the late '40s, he went nuts (probably especially because said American girls wanted nothing to do with a short brown foreigner) : "The American girl is well acquainted with her body's seductive capacity," he wrote in an article titled "The America I Have Seen." "She knows seductiveness lies in the round breasts, the full buttocks and in the shapely thighs, sleek legs and she shows all this and does not hide it." (Remember this is the late '40s when American women still wore skirts down to mid-calf) . He did not mean this as a compliment, nor is he writing soft core porn (though it sure sounds that way) - rather he is trying to express his extreme disapproval of American society where women's sexuality is not controlled by their family (he had a point, actually). If he had visited America 2016 where we have descended 5 levels closer to utter debauchery, his head would have exploded as indeed Mateen's actually did.

    , @Anonymous
    One guy, or even 2 or 3, could be lying or confused. But way more than that have come forward now.
  119. @Anonymous

    How does it feel? Knowing that ” your” countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT
     

    I feel for sorry for the dogs/animals in the future, who will face brutal mistreatment by the savages. The animals had no part in voting or promoting a multicultural world.

    So true and very often overlooked completely.

  120. @Frau Katze
    It's my understanding that China props up the Kim regime because they fear a huge outflow of poor North Koreans to China.

    (But I'd take those North Koreans over Mexicans or Turkish peasants.)

    N. Korea plays China off against the West just as the Hermit Kingdom once played various powers off . When Japan succeeded in its Imperialist designs in Korea it led to the Russo Japanese war, which led to the 1905 Revolution which knocked Russia out off the balance of power and started the countdown to ww1 and its replay. If there is a WW3, events in Korea will quite possibly spark it.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    That Kim regime is incredibly toxic.

    At the time of the Korean War, with the US involved, the war was extremely unpopular. Yet if not for the US, would the Kim family be running all of Korea?

    I'm not very well read on that war, but saving South Korea from Kim would be a very creditable achievement.

  121. @Jim Don Bob
    Has Steve ever banned anybody? He lets a lot of stuff through that I wouldn't.

    Steve enjoys smart-alecky replies. Keeps the mind sharp.

  122. @IHTG
    Just ban him already, Sailer. He's run out of things to say.

    He’d leave on his own if people would just stop paying attention to him for once. This place is paradise for lazy trolls. They don’t have to try at all.

  123. @Jack D
    Silence is the best treatment for troll infestations. They thrive on attention.

    As of now, I'm taking the pledge and I hope you all do too:

    NO MATTER WHAT TINY DUCK WRITES, DO NOT RESPOND IN ANY WAY.

    I responded to TD once and that was it. To quote someone or other, “You can’t fix stupid”.

  124. @syonredux
    Mexico's elite are a very mediocre bunch:

    In Mexico, the PAN government's of the last decade has been trying to get parents to keep their kids in school longer. Here's PISA document congratulating Mexico for getting its act together over the last decade.

    The really striking thing about Mexico's performance on the 2009 PISA school achievement tests is the lack of very high scorers. For example, on reading, 9.9% of Americans score at the 5th level or 6th level on a 0 to 6 scale. In contrast, only 0.4% of Mexicans score that high. That's really bad.

    In comparison, 1.9% of Turks score in the top two levels: not great, but several times the fraction in Mexico, suggesting that in Turkey there are small cultures of elites here and there who impress it upon their kids to hit the books hard. When I was in Bodrum, Turkey for Hans-Herman Hoppe's conference, I was impressed by the books on sale at the supermarket across the street. Granted, Bodrum is kind of like Santa Barbara and this was an upscale supermarket in a chain headquartered in Switzerland in a nice neighborhood in a resort town, but, still, it was nice to see serious books on sale somewhere.

    That suggests to me, not for the first time, that much of the blame for Mexico's cultural malaise stems from Mexico's rich not setting a good example for the masses, such as by not studying hard.
     
    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2010/12/pisa-and-mexico.html

    I don’t think it has much to do with setting an example. Mexican’s elite (like America’s future elite) is , for the most part, genetically distinct from its brown masses.

    Amerindians come up on genetic tests as Asian because they crossed over from Asia in relatively modern times (circa 13,000 years) but they were apparently from Central Asia (where the modern day ‘stans are) and are not particularly bright. Most Mexicans also have some European admixture but on average they come out pretty mediocre – they can operate a supermarket scanner but they ain’t gonna INVENT a supermarket scanner.

    Turkey’s Europeanized elite is just that – European. The Ottomans brought in a lot of European talent over the centuries which rose to be the cream of Turkish society. The Anatolian peasants way out east are no great shakes.

  125. How is Racism involved in the UK’s leaving the EU, or Turkey’s joining? The Turkish population is somewhat mixed, but mostly Caucasian. Major ethnic, social, or religious differences exist between Turkey and the current EU countries, but minimal racial differences. In fact, with the recent influx of immigrants into the EU, Turkey may well be more Caucasian.

    • Replies: @anon
    It's not.

    "Racism" is a bullying tactic which only works when it's not true.

    If White people go back to full blown racism as the only viable survival option they'll ignore it.
    , @Fredrik
    Racism is the wrong word but there is certainly xenophobia among sections of the Leave voters.

    What puzzles me, and many other on the continent, is why so many English obviously dislike other Europeans but don't have a problem with their Asians and Blacks. Especially since the English white working class is so obviously crazy. But maybe that's why...
  126. Both Cameron and Johnson are in favour of Turkey joining, as are all the Labour Party.

    Today’s FT – “Britain clears path to further Turkey EU membership talks”

    “Turkey’s EU membership talks are set to be given a boost within a fortnight, after Britain abandoned its attempt to freeze the process of opening a new “negotiating chapter” with Ankara until after its EU referendum.

    Although the step is largely a symbolic political concession to Ankara agreed as part of its migration deal with the EU, the process has taken on extreme sensitivity for London because of the referendum campaign, where Leave campaigners have attempted to raise fears of a new wave of migration prompted by Turkish accession.

    At a meeting of diplomats on Tuesday morning, Britain was the only member state to refuse to give its consent for talks to begin with Ankara on financial and budgetary issues, in spite of its traditional standing as one of the biggest champions of Turkish membership talks.

    However, London’s resistance only lasted a few hours”

  127. @Milo Minderbinder
    My friend is convinced that it won't be a honest vote. That no matter what the actual results are the gov't will say "Oh, wow! Remain won! Too bad, Leave voters."

    I think that they will have an honest vote, but the gov't won't follow through: Most likely scenario a vote of no-confidence in Cameron and then a pro-EU Labor coalition wins the next election and the BrExit is never heard from again.

    I think that they will have an honest vote, but the gov’t won’t follow through: Most likely scenario a vote of no-confidence in Cameron and then a pro-EU Labor coalition wins the next election and the BrExit is never heard from again.

    The leaving process can take two years. I was wondering if, in the event of a vote to leave, there will be a heavy doom-and-gloom propaganda campaign in the British media followed by a final ‘are you really sure?’ referendum at the end of the two years.

    • Replies: @Fredrik
    There is some discussion of Britain getting a Norway or Switzerland deal.

    What Leavers are failing to notice(or more to the point failing to mention) is that access to the single market includes "free movement of persons", i.e. immigration of whites.

    What some on the Leave side are trying to do is just to take away Britain's voting rights but keep the actual parts of the membership that the voters want to quit for.
  128. @Hapalong Cassidy
    That actually wouldn't be too bad for South Korea in the long run. For all the crap going on in their country, North Koreans are still Koreans.

    Especially since the South Koreans aren’t adaquately reproducing themselves.

  129. @Eric Novak
    The current storytelling is based on this new information: a gay co-worker of Mateen claims Mateen asked him out on a "romantic date", and Mateen's first wife said Mateen's father called him a queer. Both instances have problems in ascertaining the guy's orientation: queers always think that everything's about them and their queerness and that everyone has some queer in them, if only for a "romantic date"; the ex-wife probably cannot recognize that typical slurs such as "fag" thrown at assimilating Muslim men by other Muslim men, who aren't keen on the track-suit wearing narcissism of selfies on social media, are not anything other than common guy insults. The lefty gay narrative is part of the atmosphere, however, and is unconsciously accepted and regurgitated by those who knew Mateen and who now see it all come together now-he was gay all along. Yawn. Let's talk to one of his romantic partners first.

    There are many more hints than just what you say.

    http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2016/06/omar-mateen-gay-orlando-shooting

    Some of the clues, such as Mateen being seen in the club before, could have just been him scouting the place out, but others, if true, are pretty sure markers. I would say 99.9% of people who have gay dating apps on their phones are gay.

    It is somewhat plausible (if not yet proven) that Mateen was so conflicted between his Muslim identity and his gay identity that he decided to end it in this way.

    This only reinforces Trump’s point. When you put a 7th century society in contact with a 21st century society, something has to give. When Qutb, the intellectual father of modern radical Islamism visited small town, G-rated Greeley, Colorado from Egypt in the late ’40s, he went nuts (probably especially because said American girls wanted nothing to do with a short brown foreigner) : “The American girl is well acquainted with her body’s seductive capacity,” he wrote in an article titled “The America I Have Seen.” “She knows seductiveness lies in the round breasts, the full buttocks and in the shapely thighs, sleek legs and she shows all this and does not hide it.” (Remember this is the late ’40s when American women still wore skirts down to mid-calf) . He did not mean this as a compliment, nor is he writing soft core porn (though it sure sounds that way) – rather he is trying to express his extreme disapproval of American society where women’s sexuality is not controlled by their family (he had a point, actually). If he had visited America 2016 where we have descended 5 levels closer to utter debauchery, his head would have exploded as indeed Mateen’s actually did.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @cwhatfuture
    What Qutb hated about America was its success, its obvious material superiority over the Muslim world, despite the fact that it was Christian. This superiority directly contradicts Islamic teaching, which promises the best material goods to the Muslim. Qutb had to create an America, in his mind, that was debauched, and spiritually empty, even though in those days, it was no such thing. (The town he was in was even "dry"!). America had to be inferior to the Muslim world in some way, because the Koran said so - so he imagined that inferior America. Qutb also had to create a Muslim perfect world, a fantasyland, that never existed and could never exist, as the counter-example to the very real failures of the actual Muslim world. When the Muslims implemented true Islam, the fantasy, then they would exceed the West. Naturally it did not occur to him that it is Islam itself which was retarding the Muslim world. His prescription of more Islam merely puts them further and further behind the West- which naturally results in a calls for... more Islam! This is the cycle Qutb bestowed upon his nation.
    , @Jefferson
    The Egyptian Muslim Qutb thought women in 1940s Colorado showed way too much skin in public. Imagine what he would think if he saw how much skin women show in public in the beach towns of Honolulu, Myrtle Beach, Virginia Beach, Miami, Santa Monica, The Jersey Shore, etc in 2016.
  130. @Eric Novak
    The current storytelling is based on this new information: a gay co-worker of Mateen claims Mateen asked him out on a "romantic date", and Mateen's first wife said Mateen's father called him a queer. Both instances have problems in ascertaining the guy's orientation: queers always think that everything's about them and their queerness and that everyone has some queer in them, if only for a "romantic date"; the ex-wife probably cannot recognize that typical slurs such as "fag" thrown at assimilating Muslim men by other Muslim men, who aren't keen on the track-suit wearing narcissism of selfies on social media, are not anything other than common guy insults. The lefty gay narrative is part of the atmosphere, however, and is unconsciously accepted and regurgitated by those who knew Mateen and who now see it all come together now-he was gay all along. Yawn. Let's talk to one of his romantic partners first.

    One guy, or even 2 or 3, could be lying or confused. But way more than that have come forward now.

  131. @Steve Sailer
    A number of years ago, Boris Johnson gave the most IQ supremacist/globalist speech any politician this side of Singapore ever gave.

    In general, British politicians are a lot more intellectually agile than American politicians. The kind of pivot due to new circumstances that Pat Buchanan made at the end of the Cold War is pretty common among British politicians.

    Every so often Boris does something, such as praising the Russians liberating Palmyra for example, that makes you think there is something interesting there. Of course the guy is an opportunist, but being pragmatic is no bad thing. He has clearly deployed some Trump style arguments in the Brexit campaign.

  132. @BB753
    I think Erdogan's plan all along was to get rid of as many refugees and Turks of Kurdish background and dump them on the EU.
    But I really see no gain for any of the EU members in Turkey joining the Union. It has to be some policy pushed by the USA establishment and our globalist overlords.

    Is this a rare case of Turkey voting for Christmas?

  133. @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that " your" countries will soon be non-white?

    The Orlando incident was caused by right wing hate speech and gun laxness not Islam

    Islam is the future. Your daughters will hear the children of Muslim men.

    GET OVER IT

    Can you please try to be more subtle? I hate trolls, but they should at least be entertaining.

  134. @Randal

    You know, it kind of sounds like Turkey holds the whip hand here, because Europe developing some kind of perimeter self defense defense system against being inundated by refugees allowed through Turkey would be racist.
     
    Yup. The kind of problem that results from allowing ideologues to influence policy.

    And on the subject of favourable treatment for Turkey, guess who has Turkish ancestry and has spoken out in favour of Turkish EU accession? Only the very same Boris Johnson, media-appointed senior spokesperson of the Brexit camp, and likely next Prime Minister:

    Boris Johnson, too, has spoken in favour of Turkey's accession to the EU. “We would be crazy to reject Turkey,” wrote Boris Johnson in his book 'The Dream of Rome', “which is not only the former heartland of the Roman empire but also, I see, one of the leading suppliers of British fridges.”

    Johnson is presumably only advocating Britain leaving the EU for personally opportunist reasons (he expects to be successor to Cameron as "Conservative" Party leader and Prime Minister, and needs the backing of his party's mostly Eurosceptic membership). He's doing good work in that good cause, but I for one wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw him (and he's not a small man), as far as the problems we face with social liberalism, military interventionism in the service of Washington, and open borders globalism are concerned.

    From the Wikipedia article on the man:


    Johnson has Circassian, English, French, German, Swiss and Turkish ancestry on his father's side. From his mother he is of English and Russian Jewish descent
     
    He also had US citizenship, by virtue of being born in New York, until he renounced it (I don't know how irrevocable such renunciations are in the US case).

    The definitive Johnson quote is from his former editor at the Telegraph, Max Hastings.

    “Most politicians are ambitious and ruthless, but Boris is a gold medal egomaniac. I would not trust him with my wife nor – from painful experience – my wallet. It is unnecessary to take any moral view about his almost crazed infidelities, but it is hard to believe that any man so conspicuously incapable of controlling his own libido is fit to be trusted with controlling the country.

    His chaotic public persona is not an act – he is, indeed, manically disorganised about everything except his own image management. He is also a far more ruthless, and frankly nastier, figure than the public appreciates.”

    On the other hand David Lloyd George was a pretty fair WWI leader despite being nicknamed “the Goat” for his promiscuity. Kennedy and Clinton may not always have been chaste either.

    Boris’s first wife Allegra Mostyn-Owen (“the Zuleika Dobson of her generation”) from their golden student days, married a Muslim half her age and does good works for her new community.

    (Allegra’s mum is writer Gaia Servadio.)

    George Osborne’s brother also married a Muslim (and has just been struck off as a doctor – don’t think there’s a connection between those two events).

    • Replies: @Jack D

    Kennedy and Clinton may not always have been UNchaste either.
     
    But on most days they were, at least once.

    FIFY
  135. Term ‘racist’ will continue to have all the magic white people give it.

  136. …And, as long as we’re on the sideline subject of media chicanery, can’t help but notice how a story of Muslim terrorism became one of murderous homophobia. World throws the Narrative a curve ball, and media calls it a basket.

  137. @Milo Minderbinder
    My friend is convinced that it won't be a honest vote. That no matter what the actual results are the gov't will say "Oh, wow! Remain won! Too bad, Leave voters."

    I think that they will have an honest vote, but the gov't won't follow through: Most likely scenario a vote of no-confidence in Cameron and then a pro-EU Labor coalition wins the next election and the BrExit is never heard from again.

    I agree

    Remember when the people of Ireland rejected the Lisbon Treaty which amended the Maastricht Treaty. they made Ireland vote again til they voted correctly. Ireland was the only nation which allowed its citizens to vote on the new EU treaty. A rejection meant Lisbon would never go in effect. So they forced Ireland to vote again.

  138. @Anonymous Nephew
    The definitive Johnson quote is from his former editor at the Telegraph, Max Hastings.

    "Most politicians are ambitious and ruthless, but Boris is a gold medal egomaniac. I would not trust him with my wife nor – from painful experience – my wallet. It is unnecessary to take any moral view about his almost crazed infidelities, but it is hard to believe that any man so conspicuously incapable of controlling his own libido is fit to be trusted with controlling the country.

    His chaotic public persona is not an act – he is, indeed, manically disorganised about everything except his own image management. He is also a far more ruthless, and frankly nastier, figure than the public appreciates."
     

    On the other hand David Lloyd George was a pretty fair WWI leader despite being nicknamed "the Goat" for his promiscuity. Kennedy and Clinton may not always have been chaste either.

    Boris's first wife Allegra Mostyn-Owen ("the Zuleika Dobson of her generation") from their golden student days, married a Muslim half her age and does good works for her new community.

    (Allegra's mum is writer Gaia Servadio.)

    George Osborne's brother also married a Muslim (and has just been struck off as a doctor - don't think there's a connection between those two events).

    Kennedy and Clinton may not always have been UNchaste either.

    But on most days they were, at least once.

    FIFY

  139. @Jim
    The refugee weapon is far more powerful than nuclear weapons. Instead of spending a lot of money on deveoping nuclear and missile capabilities Kim Un Jong should just threaten to flood South Korea with millions of refugees. South Korea would have no choice but pay Kim billions to prevent this.

    South Korean men have been importing Vietnamese , Philippine and Chinese brides for decades because of the shortage of female Koreans. They would probably rathe have North Korean brides, since the children would be treated better.

  140. @Sean
    N. Korea plays China off against the West just as the Hermit Kingdom once played various powers off . When Japan succeeded in its Imperialist designs in Korea it led to the Russo Japanese war, which led to the 1905 Revolution which knocked Russia out off the balance of power and started the countdown to ww1 and its replay. If there is a WW3, events in Korea will quite possibly spark it.

    That Kim regime is incredibly toxic.

    At the time of the Korean War, with the US involved, the war was extremely unpopular. Yet if not for the US, would the Kim family be running all of Korea?

    I’m not very well read on that war, but saving South Korea from Kim would be a very creditable achievement.

  141. @Wilkey
    I don't object to the IRS charging an exit tax. Pensions earned while in the US were earned while benefitting from the US economy. To pile up wealth and then hightail it to a tax haven before paying taxes on it is basically theft. Most of the people who try to do that will be immigrants just headed back to their birth country after they retire, not native born Americans.

    It *should* bother us that a guy like Eduardo Saverin, an immigrant from Brazil, can earn billions while in the US then leave for Singapore without paying a goddamned dime in taxes. If he hadn't been living in America he wouldn't have become a billionaire.

    Our taxes fund infrastructure that enables the creation of wealth. Just because that wealth is in some instrument on which taxes can be delayed - stocks or pensions - doesn't mean people should be free from paying taxes to the country which helped them earn it.

    Eduardo Saverin actually did pay an exit tax of about $700 million on the capital gains on his Facebook stock until the moment of exit. What he avoided was any capital gains tax in the future and estate taxes.

    Your argument is fine insofar as the the US tax code differentiates between US source and foreign source income. It does not, for all practical purposes. Boris Johnson has never made a penny of earnings in the US, and has not depended on our “taxes funding infrastructure” to earn his living or money. Yet he wrote the IRS a check for $150k. And he’ll be liable for any UK Government pension amounts before receipt if he chooses to give up citizenship.

    Outliers like Eduardo Saverin are atypical. There are many more like Johnson, caught in the intricacies of poorly designed law.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    "Outliers like Eduardo Saverin are atypical. There are many more like Johnson, caught in the intricacies of poorly designed law."

    If the law did not exist these people would not be outliers. There would be tens or even hundreds of thousands of such cases a year. Some would be Americans looking for some place cheaper to spend their retirement. Most would be immigrants returning to their home countries for cultural reasons AND to avoid taxes. We just opened the immigration floodgates in 1965. The number of immigrant retirees is about to skyrocket. Of the few thousand Americans who renounce their citizenship each year, the vast majority are immigrants, often retirees, returning to their native country.
  142. @Anonymous
    As the Duke of Wellington himself said 'the battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton'.

    No, Napolean lost for exactly the reason Hitler did. Bad idea to invade Russia while fighting most of the rest of Europe.

  143. It’s obviously one of our guys trolling us, shitlord style. But it’s pointless, we can read crap like that at any of a thousand sites. Or just get it direct from the MSM. I don’t know why he’s bothering here, I think we all see the picture he’s painting already.

    Because he’s off his rocker? Sick in the head? Nobody remotely right in the head does that. Complete, basement-dwelling, gimp-mask-wearing freak.

  144. Imagine what a complete weirdo you have to be to troll like that, several times a day. Mentally sound people can’t do that. Could you?

    • Replies: @Bert
    Most of Steve's comment box is made up of old folks who probably have nothing better to do. See Jefferson.
  145. Just ban him already, Sailer. He’s run out of things to say.

    God yes. Please ban him. If we all ask nicely, will you ban that piece of shit? Have I ever asked you to ban anyone? What does that tell you?

    Some realities are just too ugly to have to think about. I don’t like to look at car wrecks, either.

    • Replies: @The Undiscovered Jew
    Eeeeeeeegore, tell us:

    Is (((Stephen Miller))) Joooo or not-Joooo?
  146. I could take a liberal who genuinely believed in that creepiness and wanted it to come to pass. It’s a valid, if insanely destructive and malicious position. But not a sicko who pretends to believe it, day in, day out, never once breaking character. Waaaaay too creepy to live. Makes my skin crawl thinking about what kind of sicko does that.

  147. He is stuttering like Obama did yesterday

    Seriously, he was stuttering again yesterday? Because it wasn’t too long ago he went on an epic Porky Pig session while trying to diss Trump (really; it was like “h-h-h-h-h–h-hope ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-change”). I hope it winds up in a campaign ad.

    NO MATTER WHAT TINY DUCK WRITES, DO NOT RESPOND IN ANY WAY.

    I’d agree, because you’re right, silence will bore him and drive him away. Unfortunately, someone will always respond.

  148. @Randal

    A number of years ago, Boris Johnson gave the most IQ supremacist/globalist speech any politician this side of Singapore ever gave.
     
    That's interesting (I wasn't aware of it). I doubt he'd repeat it today, if it is unduly politically incorrect, though. He does seem to have drifted towards social liberalism and metropolitan respectability in recent years.

    But as I conceded above, he is undoubtedly highly intelligent (and very well educated).

    In general, British politicians are a lot more intellectually agile than American politicians. The kind of pivot due to new circumstances that Pat Buchanan made at the end of the Cold War is pretty common among British politicians.
     
    Is that another aspect of the advantages of the close adversarial nature of our parliamentary politics, do you think? I recall that being argued convincingly as one of the reasons George Galloway made such fools of the US Senators who made the mistake of taking him on a few years ago.

    George Galloway demolishing Norm Coleman is fun to watch but for the purposes of this thread it is worth noting that Galloway is about the most pro-Muslim-immigrant politician there is in the UK. His former constituency was heavily immigrant Pakistani, and he often represented Saddamist interests, which was the reason for his being in that Congressional hearing.

    If it was up to him, he’d move all of Syria and Iraq to Britain.

  149. @berserker
    We are constantly harangued with the phrase "that is not who we are" but we are not allowed to ask "who they are" and "what they think we are".

    It used to be that the government protected you and took on those unpopular positions on your behalf. Now the government kneecaps you whenever you try to protect yourself.

  150. Well, the Brexit crowd has some reasonable issues. The PM said he’d reduce immigration to 100k / year. It’s 3 times that.

    One of the arguments I’ve been reading is that Brexit won’t make England any more able to control immigration. Nothing to be done. It’s just a fact, like the weather.

    A country can’t even conceive of controlling who becomes their new citizens? The people who live there can’t be a bit perturbed by this?

    Another thing I read was that Labor voters were for it at 44%, the MP’s – 4%.

    Interesting democracy that.

  151. @Buffalo Joe
    Kevin, Liberals never see their failed policies as failures, just something that needs to be tweaked. School policies in the US have lead to utter failure in many major school districts. Not to worry, just give the policy a new name ,an infusion of cash and carry on. Their argument always includes the thought that if we end something now there will be worse failure. What could be worse than failing at everything you try?

    Right. The failure of liberal/socialist programs is always because:
    1) the smartest people, like HRC, were not in charge. they will do better next time, promise.
    2) there was not enough money

    Can’t disprove a negative. And they believe this s**t. Human nature is infinitely malleable to them, not with standing thousands of years of history. I blame Rousseau.

  152. @Jack D
    There are many more hints than just what you say.

    http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2016/06/omar-mateen-gay-orlando-shooting

    Some of the clues, such as Mateen being seen in the club before, could have just been him scouting the place out, but others, if true, are pretty sure markers. I would say 99.9% of people who have gay dating apps on their phones are gay.

    It is somewhat plausible (if not yet proven) that Mateen was so conflicted between his Muslim identity and his gay identity that he decided to end it in this way.

    This only reinforces Trump's point. When you put a 7th century society in contact with a 21st century society, something has to give. When Qutb, the intellectual father of modern radical Islamism visited small town, G-rated Greeley, Colorado from Egypt in the late '40s, he went nuts (probably especially because said American girls wanted nothing to do with a short brown foreigner) : "The American girl is well acquainted with her body's seductive capacity," he wrote in an article titled "The America I Have Seen." "She knows seductiveness lies in the round breasts, the full buttocks and in the shapely thighs, sleek legs and she shows all this and does not hide it." (Remember this is the late '40s when American women still wore skirts down to mid-calf) . He did not mean this as a compliment, nor is he writing soft core porn (though it sure sounds that way) - rather he is trying to express his extreme disapproval of American society where women's sexuality is not controlled by their family (he had a point, actually). If he had visited America 2016 where we have descended 5 levels closer to utter debauchery, his head would have exploded as indeed Mateen's actually did.

    What Qutb hated about America was its success, its obvious material superiority over the Muslim world, despite the fact that it was Christian. This superiority directly contradicts Islamic teaching, which promises the best material goods to the Muslim. Qutb had to create an America, in his mind, that was debauched, and spiritually empty, even though in those days, it was no such thing. (The town he was in was even “dry”!). America had to be inferior to the Muslim world in some way, because the Koran said so – so he imagined that inferior America. Qutb also had to create a Muslim perfect world, a fantasyland, that never existed and could never exist, as the counter-example to the very real failures of the actual Muslim world. When the Muslims implemented true Islam, the fantasy, then they would exceed the West. Naturally it did not occur to him that it is Islam itself which was retarding the Muslim world. His prescription of more Islam merely puts them further and further behind the West- which naturally results in a calls for… more Islam! This is the cycle Qutb bestowed upon his nation.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    A whole lot of ideologies in this world are the result of a high aggression young man feeling his status threatened by empirical realities.
    , @PiltdownMan
    Sayyid Qutb and his Muslim Brotherhood were well controlled by the secular Nasser, as indeed were the other Islamists around the region by like minded secular strongmen such as Assad and Saddam Hussein--even Gaddafi, after he foreswore nukes. It is never redundant to remind our amnesiac selves that our singular foreign policy failure in the Middle East has our failure to realize that they were assets and to have foolishly undermined them for a variety of quixotic reasons.

    I think it's been posted before but here's Nasser recounting his negotiations with Qutb and his colleagues, a few years after Qutb's Midwestern epiphany at a church dance.

    http://youtu.be/TX4RK8bj2W0
    , @Jim Don Bob
    The psychological term is cognitive dissonance. Your beliefs (Islam) tells you that the Islamic world must be superior, but your lying eyes tell you differently. What to do? Blame it on the Great Satan (the USA) which warps the minds of the faithful. More than a few of the 911 hijackers were educated men.
  153. @cwhatfuture
    What Qutb hated about America was its success, its obvious material superiority over the Muslim world, despite the fact that it was Christian. This superiority directly contradicts Islamic teaching, which promises the best material goods to the Muslim. Qutb had to create an America, in his mind, that was debauched, and spiritually empty, even though in those days, it was no such thing. (The town he was in was even "dry"!). America had to be inferior to the Muslim world in some way, because the Koran said so - so he imagined that inferior America. Qutb also had to create a Muslim perfect world, a fantasyland, that never existed and could never exist, as the counter-example to the very real failures of the actual Muslim world. When the Muslims implemented true Islam, the fantasy, then they would exceed the West. Naturally it did not occur to him that it is Islam itself which was retarding the Muslim world. His prescription of more Islam merely puts them further and further behind the West- which naturally results in a calls for... more Islam! This is the cycle Qutb bestowed upon his nation.

    A whole lot of ideologies in this world are the result of a high aggression young man feeling his status threatened by empirical realities.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    A whole lot of ideologies in this world are the result of a high aggression young man feeling his status threatened by empirical realities.
     
    Ideology: the ultimate weapon in the never-ending war against troublesome facts.
    , @syonredux
    Another try

    A whole lot of ideologies in this world are the result of a high aggression young man feeling his status threatened by empirical realities.
     
    Ideology: the ultimate weapon in the never-ending war against troublesome facts.
  154. @Svigor

    Just ban him already, Sailer. He’s run out of things to say.
     
    God yes. Please ban him. If we all ask nicely, will you ban that piece of shit? Have I ever asked you to ban anyone? What does that tell you?

    Some realities are just too ugly to have to think about. I don't like to look at car wrecks, either.

    Eeeeeeeegore, tell us:

    Is (((Stephen Miller))) Joooo or not-Joooo?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    By the way, are Trump's guy Stephen Miller and National Review's Stephen L. Miller different people?

    http://www.nationalreview.com/author/1518323/archive/2016

  155. Huge problem here, the EU and US made deals with Turkey in exchange for letting the “broke Western looter governments” carve up, loot, and and destabilize Iraq and turn Turkey into a Balkanized ghetto.

    Granting Kurds their own state screwed Turkey, and make no mistake Kurds are nutcase Islamo-fascists that burka their women, now they have a huge oil revenue stream and advanced weapons and Turkey cant ignore the kurd mob anymore, they’re not broke and are heavily armed.

    Turkey is stuck with no place to hide, they need the EU relief valve or they explode too.

    • Replies: @anon
    The people trying to destroy Europe want Turkey destroyed also.

    So what if more of Erdogan's supporters leave than Kurds?

    Burying Europe and shifting the demographic balance within Turkey could kill two birds with one stone.

    My guess is Erdogan's gut feel is this is a trap and he's probably right.
  156. @The Undiscovered Jew
    Eeeeeeeegore, tell us:

    Is (((Stephen Miller))) Joooo or not-Joooo?

    By the way, are Trump’s guy Stephen Miller and National Review’s Stephen L. Miller different people?

    http://www.nationalreview.com/author/1518323/archive/2016

    • Replies: @The Undiscovered Jew
    By the way, are Trump’s guy Stephen Miller and National Review’s Stephen L. Miller different people?

    I have no idea about NRO's Miller. I stopped reading NRO years ago because they suck.

    Trump's Miller, apparently, doesn't suck. Which is good because it's long overdue for competent immigration restriction leadership pick up the cause after watching decades of incompetence by Brimelow, Buchanan, and the other loser, but sacred (or is it sanctimonious?) dinosaurs of paleoconservatism fail to make headway on the topic.

    PS: Brilliant Senate campaign, Unz.
    , @PiltdownMan
    It doesn't look like they are. Stephen L. Miller, the National Review writer, lives in Brooklyn, according to his bio.

    Trump 's Stephen Miller used to be a staffer for Sen. Jeff Sessions, I think, which would make him a Washingtonian.
  157. @Jack D
    There are many more hints than just what you say.

    http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2016/06/omar-mateen-gay-orlando-shooting

    Some of the clues, such as Mateen being seen in the club before, could have just been him scouting the place out, but others, if true, are pretty sure markers. I would say 99.9% of people who have gay dating apps on their phones are gay.

    It is somewhat plausible (if not yet proven) that Mateen was so conflicted between his Muslim identity and his gay identity that he decided to end it in this way.

    This only reinforces Trump's point. When you put a 7th century society in contact with a 21st century society, something has to give. When Qutb, the intellectual father of modern radical Islamism visited small town, G-rated Greeley, Colorado from Egypt in the late '40s, he went nuts (probably especially because said American girls wanted nothing to do with a short brown foreigner) : "The American girl is well acquainted with her body's seductive capacity," he wrote in an article titled "The America I Have Seen." "She knows seductiveness lies in the round breasts, the full buttocks and in the shapely thighs, sleek legs and she shows all this and does not hide it." (Remember this is the late '40s when American women still wore skirts down to mid-calf) . He did not mean this as a compliment, nor is he writing soft core porn (though it sure sounds that way) - rather he is trying to express his extreme disapproval of American society where women's sexuality is not controlled by their family (he had a point, actually). If he had visited America 2016 where we have descended 5 levels closer to utter debauchery, his head would have exploded as indeed Mateen's actually did.

    The Egyptian Muslim Qutb thought women in 1940s Colorado showed way too much skin in public. Imagine what he would think if he saw how much skin women show in public in the beach towns of Honolulu, Myrtle Beach, Virginia Beach, Miami, Santa Monica, The Jersey Shore, etc in 2016.

  158. @cwhatfuture
    What Qutb hated about America was its success, its obvious material superiority over the Muslim world, despite the fact that it was Christian. This superiority directly contradicts Islamic teaching, which promises the best material goods to the Muslim. Qutb had to create an America, in his mind, that was debauched, and spiritually empty, even though in those days, it was no such thing. (The town he was in was even "dry"!). America had to be inferior to the Muslim world in some way, because the Koran said so - so he imagined that inferior America. Qutb also had to create a Muslim perfect world, a fantasyland, that never existed and could never exist, as the counter-example to the very real failures of the actual Muslim world. When the Muslims implemented true Islam, the fantasy, then they would exceed the West. Naturally it did not occur to him that it is Islam itself which was retarding the Muslim world. His prescription of more Islam merely puts them further and further behind the West- which naturally results in a calls for... more Islam! This is the cycle Qutb bestowed upon his nation.

    Sayyid Qutb and his Muslim Brotherhood were well controlled by the secular Nasser, as indeed were the other Islamists around the region by like minded secular strongmen such as Assad and Saddam Hussein–even Gaddafi, after he foreswore nukes. It is never redundant to remind our amnesiac selves that our singular foreign policy failure in the Middle East has our failure to realize that they were assets and to have foolishly undermined them for a variety of quixotic reasons.

    I think it’s been posted before but here’s Nasser recounting his negotiations with Qutb and his colleagues, a few years after Qutb’s Midwestern epiphany at a church dance.

    http://youtu.be/TX4RK8bj2W0

  159. @Tiny Duck
    How am I a troll? What do I say that is any different from the mainstream?

    Whoa— Never break character !!!

    This was covered last conference call, ya goof !

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Yes, he is outing himself as playing the character of the "mainstream liberal" . Actual mainstream liberals don't think of themselves as mainstream liberals - this would imply that other, possibly legitimate points of view exist. One of the characteristics of liberalism is that they have no self awareness or sense of irony at all. They think of themselves as merely "right" (correct) and so of course everyone, except for a few rednecks, agrees with them. You are not mainstream or not mainstream, you are either right or wrong and they are right.
  160. @Abe
    So Merkel's Boner has not only implanted ~1 million "Syrians" into the heart of Europe (and gosh knows how many Syrian children, wives, aged parents, etc. once family reunification finally plays out), but it has now actually lead to the dissolution of the EU? And Turkey will now have free rein to blackmail the rump EU in perpetuity and at any moment of its choosing by relaxing its border controls, in ADDITION to gaining the right (someday soon) to, in perpetuity, spread Turkish colonies all over Europe ("Oh to be like an Ataturk in France")?

    Well, I guess Germany had no choice, since only Turkey's world-class army and navy (did you know the canon on the M1A1 tank is leased from a Turkish design?) have the capability to stop an unarmed rabble armed only with smartphones. Which, now that I think about it, is literally true. Europe had to outsource beaning mean to economic migrants (just as the U.S. effectively outsources being mean to Central American economic migrants) so that images of drowned babies, crying children, and 6'2", 220 lb. "boys" who look like that hunky character on GAME OF THRONES ("no, not the one who rides a horse and ended up being hung by The Hound, the one who rides a hound and is hung like a...") do not go viral on European TV and Facebook and so overload the emotional circuitry of European women that they're too upset to have sex with European men for the rest of the fiscal quarter. If Turkey were to present an itemized invoice to the EU for all the services rendered it would include:

    * seizing and/or smashing migrants' smart phones
    * stealing migrants' jewelry, cash, designer clothing, and athletic shoes
    * roughing up migrants with judiciously administered baton blows to knees, elbows, or skulls
    * synchronized unit maneuvers involving, at precisely 21:45, turning 180 degrees in-place and then cupping hands over ears so that sexual assaults in the refugee camps can proceed unseen/unheard
    * running a cordon to keep local press out
    * running a live-ammo cordon to keep international press out
    * running a combined arms, live-ammo cordon of air-land-sea units to keep George Clooney out
    * "accidentally" jailing Amnesty International activists who sneak in anyway ("I swear, your honor, that 19 year old college girl from Minnesota was the spitting image of the notorious Kurdish terrorist 'Moustache' Ali")

    Germany took the world by storm after TRIUMPH OF THE WILL. America announced its arrival with GONE WITH THE WIND. Who knew the germs of Turkey's revival would start in the 70's with MIDNIGHT EXPRESS?

    did you know the canon on the M1A1 tank is leased from a Turkish design?

    No!

    The 12omm gun used in the M1 Abrams is a German gun developed for the German Leopard 2 tank, Turkey also uses the Leopard 2 and is building it’s own indigenous tank using the same 120mm gun. That doesn’t make it a Turkish design.

    The Leopard 1 and and the old M60 Patton tank carried the British L7 105mm gun, also used on late model M48s and the first M1 models. So US tanks have carried European originated guns for well over 50 years right up to today.

  161. @cwhatfuture
    What Qutb hated about America was its success, its obvious material superiority over the Muslim world, despite the fact that it was Christian. This superiority directly contradicts Islamic teaching, which promises the best material goods to the Muslim. Qutb had to create an America, in his mind, that was debauched, and spiritually empty, even though in those days, it was no such thing. (The town he was in was even "dry"!). America had to be inferior to the Muslim world in some way, because the Koran said so - so he imagined that inferior America. Qutb also had to create a Muslim perfect world, a fantasyland, that never existed and could never exist, as the counter-example to the very real failures of the actual Muslim world. When the Muslims implemented true Islam, the fantasy, then they would exceed the West. Naturally it did not occur to him that it is Islam itself which was retarding the Muslim world. His prescription of more Islam merely puts them further and further behind the West- which naturally results in a calls for... more Islam! This is the cycle Qutb bestowed upon his nation.

    The psychological term is cognitive dissonance. Your beliefs (Islam) tells you that the Islamic world must be superior, but your lying eyes tell you differently. What to do? Blame it on the Great Satan (the USA) which warps the minds of the faithful. More than a few of the 911 hijackers were educated men.

  162. @Steve Sailer
    By the way, are Trump's guy Stephen Miller and National Review's Stephen L. Miller different people?

    http://www.nationalreview.com/author/1518323/archive/2016

    By the way, are Trump’s guy Stephen Miller and National Review’s Stephen L. Miller different people?

    I have no idea about NRO’s Miller. I stopped reading NRO years ago because they suck.

    Trump’s Miller, apparently, doesn’t suck. Which is good because it’s long overdue for competent immigration restriction leadership pick up the cause after watching decades of incompetence by Brimelow, Buchanan, and the other loser, but sacred (or is it sanctimonious?) dinosaurs of paleoconservatism fail to make headway on the topic.

    PS: Brilliant Senate campaign, Unz.

  163. @Steve Sailer
    A whole lot of ideologies in this world are the result of a high aggression young man feeling his status threatened by empirical realities.

    A whole lot of ideologies in this world are the result of a high aggression young man feeling his status threatened by empirical realities.

    Ideology: the ultimate weapon in the never-ending war against troublesome facts.

  164. @Anonymous
    Then again, Christopher Hitchens was always dismissive of that kind of glib superiority.


    He conceded that George W. couldn't have handled Prime Minister's Questions but said Bill Clinton would have done great, so who really cares?


    Btw, if you want to see what happens when a British politician meets our Congress in combat then you must watch George Galloway's visit. Oh, boy. They had no idea what was coming.


    http://www.counterpunch.org/2005/05/18/thusly-i-humiliated-norm-coleman-and-christopher-hitchens/


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5u1skEoqLs

    Mr. Galloway clip as added perspective and context. A very sane lad , indeed .

  165. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Tiny Duck
    How am I a troll? What do I say that is any different from the mainstream?

    I like you .I think you are a very sensible leftist . I think you should volunteer yourself as a Bacha Bazzi to our immigrants. A sort of thank you gesture for allowing us more islamic immigration .It will be soooooooo tolerant of you and the virtue signaling will be thru the roof !!!!!!

  166. @Steve Sailer
    A whole lot of ideologies in this world are the result of a high aggression young man feeling his status threatened by empirical realities.

    Another try

    A whole lot of ideologies in this world are the result of a high aggression young man feeling his status threatened by empirical realities.

    Ideology: the ultimate weapon in the never-ending war against troublesome facts.

  167. @PiltdownMan
    Eduardo Saverin actually did pay an exit tax of about $700 million on the capital gains on his Facebook stock until the moment of exit. What he avoided was any capital gains tax in the future and estate taxes.

    Your argument is fine insofar as the the US tax code differentiates between US source and foreign source income. It does not, for all practical purposes. Boris Johnson has never made a penny of earnings in the US, and has not depended on our "taxes funding infrastructure" to earn his living or money. Yet he wrote the IRS a check for $150k. And he'll be liable for any UK Government pension amounts before receipt if he chooses to give up citizenship.

    Outliers like Eduardo Saverin are atypical. There are many more like Johnson, caught in the intricacies of poorly designed law.

    “Outliers like Eduardo Saverin are atypical. There are many more like Johnson, caught in the intricacies of poorly designed law.”

    If the law did not exist these people would not be outliers. There would be tens or even hundreds of thousands of such cases a year. Some would be Americans looking for some place cheaper to spend their retirement. Most would be immigrants returning to their home countries for cultural reasons AND to avoid taxes. We just opened the immigration floodgates in 1965. The number of immigrant retirees is about to skyrocket. Of the few thousand Americans who renounce their citizenship each year, the vast majority are immigrants, often retirees, returning to their native country.

    • Replies: @Nico
    Most of the "wealth" created through venture capital in the States, nowadays, is fake. Part of the reason we have a problem is that with such large long-running trade deficits real wealth, which is easier to prevent from leaving the country, has run down.
  168. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Whoa— Never break character !!!

    This was covered last conference call, ya goof !

    Yes, he is outing himself as playing the character of the “mainstream liberal” . Actual mainstream liberals don’t think of themselves as mainstream liberals – this would imply that other, possibly legitimate points of view exist. One of the characteristics of liberalism is that they have no self awareness or sense of irony at all. They think of themselves as merely “right” (correct) and so of course everyone, except for a few rednecks, agrees with them. You are not mainstream or not mainstream, you are either right or wrong and they are right.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    True that. Duck had a good run, tho. Ruffled some feathers. *sniffle*

    RIP, homie. *pour beer on ground*

    , @Jefferson
    "They think of themselves as merely “right” (correct) and so of course everyone, except for a few rednecks, agrees with them."

    Does that mean Dr. Ben Carson and Milo Yiannopoulos are Rednecks? Can Blacks and Gays be Rednecks?
  169. @Jack D
    Yes, he is outing himself as playing the character of the "mainstream liberal" . Actual mainstream liberals don't think of themselves as mainstream liberals - this would imply that other, possibly legitimate points of view exist. One of the characteristics of liberalism is that they have no self awareness or sense of irony at all. They think of themselves as merely "right" (correct) and so of course everyone, except for a few rednecks, agrees with them. You are not mainstream or not mainstream, you are either right or wrong and they are right.

    True that. Duck had a good run, tho. Ruffled some feathers. *sniffle*

    RIP, homie. *pour beer on ground*

  170. Yes, he is outing himself as playing the character of the “mainstream liberal” .

    As seen through the eyes of a wacko WN, maybe. Liberals don’t think the way he thinks they do. Which makes sense, because wacko. The only liberals who think the way he portrays them are a tiny handful of true wackos. Which makes perfect sense, because also wacko (ran into one of these nutjobs once, Jewish fellow at Alternet calls himself “yellow.” I’ll never forget that psycho).

    Vast majority of liberals would swear up and down that they don’t care enough about race to want it destroyed. They’d object to the very idea that a race exists to an extent that it can be destroyed. They might make a one-off TDSF comment in a fit of pique, but they’d never sustain it.

    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    Yeah, I'm the "wacko"

    At least I don't engage in weird conspiracy theories about the Jewish peoples like you do
  171. map says:
    @syonredux

    but I also suspect that going into Parliament is more attractive to the best individuals in Britain than running for Congress is in America.
     
    Lord Bryce had similar notions:

    Why Great Men Are Not Chosen Presidents

    Europeans often ask, and Americans do not always explain, how it happens that this great office, the greatest in the world, unless we except the papacy, to which anyone can rise by his own merits, is not more frequently filled by great and striking men. In America, which is beyond all other countries the country of a “career open to talents,” a country, moreover, in which political life is unusually keen and political ambition widely diffused, it might be expected that the highest place would always be won by a man of brilliant gifts. But from the time when the heroes of the Revolution died out with Jefferson and Adams and Madison, no person except General Grant, had, down till the end of last century, reached the chair whose name would have been remembered had he not been president, and no president except Abraham Lincoln had displayed rare or striking qualities in the chair. Who now knows or cares to know anything about the personality of James K. Polk or Franklin Pierce? The only thing remarkable about them is that being so commonplace they should have climbed so high.

     

    Several reasons may be suggested for the fact, which Americans are themselves the first to admit.

    One is that the proportion of first-rate ability drawn into politics is smaller in America than in most European countries. This is a phenomenon whose causes must be elucidated later: in the meantime it is enough to say that in France, where the half-revolutionary conditions that lasted for some time after 1870, made public life exciting and accessible; in Germany, where an admirably organized civil service cultivates and develops statecraft with unusual success; in England, where many persons of wealth and leisure seek to enter the political arena, while burning questions touch the interests of all classes and make men eager observers of the combatants, the total quantity of talent devoted to parliamentary or administrative work has been larger, relatively to the population, than in America, where much of the best ability, both for thought and for action, for planning and for executing, rushes into a field which is comparatively narrow in Europe, the business of developing the material resources of the country.

    Another is that the methods and habits of Congress, and indeed of political life generally, seem to give fewer opportunities for personal distinction, fewer modes in which a man may commend himself to his countrymen by eminent capacity in thought, in speech, or in administration, than is the case in the free countries of Europe. This is a point to be explained in later chapters. I merely note here in passing what will there be dwelt on.

    A third reason is that eminent men make more enemies, and give those enemies more assailable points, than obscure men do. They are therefore in so far less desirable candidates. It is true that the eminent man has also made more friends, that his name is more widely known, and may be greeted with louder cheers. Other things being equal, the famous man is preferable. But other things never are equal. The famous man has probably attacked some leaders in his own party, has supplanted others, has expressed his dislike to the crotchet of some active section, has perhaps committed errors which are capable of being magnified into offences. No man stands long before the public and bears a part in great affairs without giving openings to censorious criticism. Fiercer far than the light which beats upon a throne is the light which beats upon a presidential candidate, searching out all the recesses of his past life. Hence, when the choice lies between a brilliant man and a safe man, the safe man is preferred. Party feeling, strong enough to carry in on its back a man without conspicuous positive merits, is not always strong enough to procure forgiveness for a man with positive faults.

    A European finds that this phenomenon needs in its turn to be explained, for in the free countries of Europe brilliancy, be it eloquence in speech, or some striking achievement in war or administration, or the power through whatever means of somehow impressing the popular imagination, is what makes a leader triumphant. Why should it be otherwise in America? Because in America party loyalty and party organization have been hitherto so perfect that anyone put forward by the party will get the full party vote if his character is good and his “record,” as they call it, unstained. The safe candidate may not draw in quite so many votes from the moderate men of the other side as the brilliant one would, but he will not lose nearly so many from his own ranks. Even those who admit his mediocrity will vote straight when the moment for voting comes. Besides, the ordinary American voter does not object to mediocrity. He has a lower conception of the qualities requisite to make a statesman than those who direct public opinion in Europe have. He likes his candidate to be sensible, vigorous, and, above all, what he calls “magnetic,” and does not value, because he sees no need for, originality or profundity, a fine culture or a wide knowledge. Candidates are selected to be run for nomination by knots of persons who, however expert as party tacticians, are usually commonplace men; and the choice between those selected for nomination is made by a very large body, an assembly of nearly a thousand delegates from the local party organizations over the country, who are certainly no better than ordinary citizens. How this process works will be seen more fully when I come to speak of those nominating conventions which are so notable a feature in American politics.

     

    http://files.libertyfund.org/pll/quotes/42.html

    That’s a fig leaf explanation. Basically, what you’re saying is British and Continental life was embroiled in politics. There was nothing worth doing…except politics.

    For much of US history, men of merit could do other things besides becoming politicians that were far more prestigious and profitable. Thus, the presence of the lower quality American politician.

    And it’s a good thing, too. It’s how America became the industrial powerhouse of the world up until the 1980’s. Had Americans been the kind of glib poofters you find in Parliament, much of the vaunted German Civil Service would’ve been running England instead.

  172. @Jack D
    Yes, he is outing himself as playing the character of the "mainstream liberal" . Actual mainstream liberals don't think of themselves as mainstream liberals - this would imply that other, possibly legitimate points of view exist. One of the characteristics of liberalism is that they have no self awareness or sense of irony at all. They think of themselves as merely "right" (correct) and so of course everyone, except for a few rednecks, agrees with them. You are not mainstream or not mainstream, you are either right or wrong and they are right.

    “They think of themselves as merely “right” (correct) and so of course everyone, except for a few rednecks, agrees with them.”

    Does that mean Dr. Ben Carson and Milo Yiannopoulos are Rednecks? Can Blacks and Gays be Rednecks?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    No, but they can be Uncle Toms.
  173. @jimbo
    For our Brit readers: is this whole Brexit debate as much of a Kabuki play as it seems to me? You just know that, no matter what the voters say, the eurocrats aren't going to let the U.K. leave. There will either be out and out fraud in the election, or if they can't get away with that they will find some reason or another to ignore a leave vote. Am I wrong about this?

    It was certainly meant to be kabuki however when the EU ignored earlier referenda the edifice was more solid whereas now it’s creaking like crazy.

  174. @Dave Shanken
    How is Racism involved in the UK's leaving the EU, or Turkey's joining? The Turkish population is somewhat mixed, but mostly Caucasian. Major ethnic, social, or religious differences exist between Turkey and the current EU countries, but minimal racial differences. In fact, with the recent influx of immigrants into the EU, Turkey may well be more Caucasian.

    It’s not.

    “Racism” is a bullying tactic which only works when it’s not true.

    If White people go back to full blown racism as the only viable survival option they’ll ignore it.

  175. @Svigor
    Imagine what a complete weirdo you have to be to troll like that, several times a day. Mentally sound people can't do that. Could you?

    Most of Steve’s comment box is made up of old folks who probably have nothing better to do. See Jefferson.

  176. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Smitty
    Huge problem here, the EU and US made deals with Turkey in exchange for letting the "broke Western looter governments" carve up, loot, and and destabilize Iraq and turn Turkey into a Balkanized ghetto.

    Granting Kurds their own state screwed Turkey, and make no mistake Kurds are nutcase Islamo-fascists that burka their women, now they have a huge oil revenue stream and advanced weapons and Turkey cant ignore the kurd mob anymore, they're not broke and are heavily armed.

    Turkey is stuck with no place to hide, they need the EU relief valve or they explode too.

    The people trying to destroy Europe want Turkey destroyed also.

    So what if more of Erdogan’s supporters leave than Kurds?

    Burying Europe and shifting the demographic balance within Turkey could kill two birds with one stone.

    My guess is Erdogan’s gut feel is this is a trap and he’s probably right.

  177. @Steve Sailer
    By the way, are Trump's guy Stephen Miller and National Review's Stephen L. Miller different people?

    http://www.nationalreview.com/author/1518323/archive/2016

    It doesn’t look like they are. Stephen L. Miller, the National Review writer, lives in Brooklyn, according to his bio.

    Trump ‘s Stephen Miller used to be a staffer for Sen. Jeff Sessions, I think, which would make him a Washingtonian.

  178. @dearieme
    "Sir Haven Monahan, Bart." would be better. Not that the future Sharia law would care one way or the other.

    Don’t most baronets prefer the abbreviation “Bt.” these days?

  179. @Tiny Duck
    I cannot see any justification for Brexit. The big argument for Brexit boils down to 2 things:

    1) Immigration control
    2) Control of our own laws.

    Previously I seemed to think that these were 2 pretty reasonable things to want to be able to control within our country, within the power of an electable government. Now after looking at it, I don't think either of those things would even be achievable with Brexit. Most leavers are suggesting we sign up to a Norwegian model of european integreation. The problem there is that Norway has had to sign up to pretty much the same immigration rules we have now to be in the EEC, and also submit to a number of laws from Europe, except that now they have far less input into the creation of those laws.

    So even if the primary objective of Brexit was a sensible one (which I don't think it even is), leaving wouldn't actually achieve it, worse, the risk of economic catastrophe is still reasonably high enough that I can't see why we would bother taking such a risk, for no real benefit.

    Pure Remainder tripe.

    In the first place if we took the so-called Norway option (EEA membership), the amount of EU legislation we’d have to enact would amount to around 25% of the current total (and we’d be free of disastrous policies such as the Common Fisheries and Common Agricultural policies). Not only that, that 25% would mostly pertain to product standards, most of which, as the indefatigable Richard North has demonstrated — and the Adam Smith Institute has confirmed — are negotiated at the international level above the EU. That’s right: most EU legislation Norway enacts has been previously negotiated by Norway in international bodies above the EU.

    Norway accepts free movement because it’s a member of Schengen — we’re not and wouldn’t be. Not only that, Article 112 of the EEA Agreement allows for restrictions of EU nationals as “an emergency brake” one which EEA members have used in the past. We have no such emergency brake as an EU member state.

    For those interested in the advantages of the Norway option, visit Richard North’s page at eureferendum.com

    As for you, Mr. Silver, you use the term “we” as if you were British.

    Funny how it’s always the non-indigenous Britons who are so opposed to regaining our national sovereignty. You’d almost think your loyalties lie elsewhere….

    • Replies: @Fredrik
    Complete nonsense. Norway accepts free movement because it's a member of the EEA(and single market). Just like Britain.

    I'm constantly arguing that even though I in principle support Brexit I'm appalled by the types of arguments I hear from Leavers.
  180. Now, panicky George Osborne is threatening £30 billion worth of ’emergency’ government spending cuts on a successful ‘leave’ vote.

    £30 billion? – why that’s just over 3 years’ worth of UK EU contributions.
    Try another bogey man story, George.

  181. @Jefferson
    "They think of themselves as merely “right” (correct) and so of course everyone, except for a few rednecks, agrees with them."

    Does that mean Dr. Ben Carson and Milo Yiannopoulos are Rednecks? Can Blacks and Gays be Rednecks?

    No, but they can be Uncle Toms.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    I think Milo would prefer Auntie Tom.
  182. @Jack D
    No, but they can be Uncle Toms.

    I think Milo would prefer Auntie Tom.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Milo says his Indian name is "SleepsWithBlackMen". You should check out some of his podcasts at Breitbart.com. The one with Ann Coulter is pretty funny.
  183. @Brutusale
    I think Milo would prefer Auntie Tom.

    Milo says his Indian name is “SleepsWithBlackMen”. You should check out some of his podcasts at Breitbart.com. The one with Ann Coulter is pretty funny.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Well, we are talking about a guy who hired a black male porn star to be his "bodyguard".
  184. @Wilkey
    "Outliers like Eduardo Saverin are atypical. There are many more like Johnson, caught in the intricacies of poorly designed law."

    If the law did not exist these people would not be outliers. There would be tens or even hundreds of thousands of such cases a year. Some would be Americans looking for some place cheaper to spend their retirement. Most would be immigrants returning to their home countries for cultural reasons AND to avoid taxes. We just opened the immigration floodgates in 1965. The number of immigrant retirees is about to skyrocket. Of the few thousand Americans who renounce their citizenship each year, the vast majority are immigrants, often retirees, returning to their native country.

    Most of the “wealth” created through venture capital in the States, nowadays, is fake. Part of the reason we have a problem is that with such large long-running trade deficits real wealth, which is easier to prevent from leaving the country, has run down.

  185. @Svigor

    Yes, he is outing himself as playing the character of the “mainstream liberal” .
     
    As seen through the eyes of a wacko WN, maybe. Liberals don't think the way he thinks they do. Which makes sense, because wacko. The only liberals who think the way he portrays them are a tiny handful of true wackos. Which makes perfect sense, because also wacko (ran into one of these nutjobs once, Jewish fellow at Alternet calls himself "yellow." I'll never forget that psycho).

    Vast majority of liberals would swear up and down that they don't care enough about race to want it destroyed. They'd object to the very idea that a race exists to an extent that it can be destroyed. They might make a one-off TDSF comment in a fit of pique, but they'd never sustain it.

    Yeah, I’m the “wacko”

    At least I don’t engage in weird conspiracy theories about the Jewish peoples like you do

  186. @al gore rhythms

    I think that they will have an honest vote, but the gov’t won’t follow through: Most likely scenario a vote of no-confidence in Cameron and then a pro-EU Labor coalition wins the next election and the BrExit is never heard from again.
     
    The leaving process can take two years. I was wondering if, in the event of a vote to leave, there will be a heavy doom-and-gloom propaganda campaign in the British media followed by a final 'are you really sure?' referendum at the end of the two years.

    There is some discussion of Britain getting a Norway or Switzerland deal.

    What Leavers are failing to notice(or more to the point failing to mention) is that access to the single market includes “free movement of persons”, i.e. immigration of whites.

    What some on the Leave side are trying to do is just to take away Britain’s voting rights but keep the actual parts of the membership that the voters want to quit for.

  187. @Dave Shanken
    How is Racism involved in the UK's leaving the EU, or Turkey's joining? The Turkish population is somewhat mixed, but mostly Caucasian. Major ethnic, social, or religious differences exist between Turkey and the current EU countries, but minimal racial differences. In fact, with the recent influx of immigrants into the EU, Turkey may well be more Caucasian.

    Racism is the wrong word but there is certainly xenophobia among sections of the Leave voters.

    What puzzles me, and many other on the continent, is why so many English obviously dislike other Europeans but don’t have a problem with their Asians and Blacks. Especially since the English white working class is so obviously crazy. But maybe that’s why…

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    The iSteve word is "citizenist". It's an understanding that there are many "cultures" inimical to their own.

    Why is it OK for the entire non-Anglophone world to be xenophobes, but not them?
  188. @celt darnell
    Pure Remainder tripe.

    In the first place if we took the so-called Norway option (EEA membership), the amount of EU legislation we'd have to enact would amount to around 25% of the current total (and we'd be free of disastrous policies such as the Common Fisheries and Common Agricultural policies). Not only that, that 25% would mostly pertain to product standards, most of which, as the indefatigable Richard North has demonstrated -- and the Adam Smith Institute has confirmed -- are negotiated at the international level above the EU. That's right: most EU legislation Norway enacts has been previously negotiated by Norway in international bodies above the EU.

    Norway accepts free movement because it's a member of Schengen -- we're not and wouldn't be. Not only that, Article 112 of the EEA Agreement allows for restrictions of EU nationals as "an emergency brake" one which EEA members have used in the past. We have no such emergency brake as an EU member state.

    For those interested in the advantages of the Norway option, visit Richard North's page at eureferendum.com

    As for you, Mr. Silver, you use the term "we" as if you were British.

    Funny how it's always the non-indigenous Britons who are so opposed to regaining our national sovereignty. You'd almost think your loyalties lie elsewhere....

    Complete nonsense. Norway accepts free movement because it’s a member of the EEA(and single market). Just like Britain.

    I’m constantly arguing that even though I in principle support Brexit I’m appalled by the types of arguments I hear from Leavers.

  189. EU envoy to Turkey? What is the function of that role? Does he get to call himself “Ambassador” (or “His Excellency,” as they do in that part of the world) and enjoy all of the perqs of such a job? Is there an EU envoy to the U.S.? I hope that the State Department would refuse to deal with such idiocy.

  190. @Jim Don Bob
    Milo says his Indian name is "SleepsWithBlackMen". You should check out some of his podcasts at Breitbart.com. The one with Ann Coulter is pretty funny.

    Well, we are talking about a guy who hired a black male porn star to be his “bodyguard”.

  191. @Fredrik
    Racism is the wrong word but there is certainly xenophobia among sections of the Leave voters.

    What puzzles me, and many other on the continent, is why so many English obviously dislike other Europeans but don't have a problem with their Asians and Blacks. Especially since the English white working class is so obviously crazy. But maybe that's why...

    The iSteve word is “citizenist”. It’s an understanding that there are many “cultures” inimical to their own.

    Why is it OK for the entire non-Anglophone world to be xenophobes, but not them?

    • Replies: @Fredrik
    Who said that was OK?
  192. @Anonymous
    What!

    Do you really seriously think that the EU bosses would show the merest hint of kindness and understanding to white people?
    Expect machine gun nests to be erected the next day.

    But, conversely, as I said with south Korea, if it was Bangladeshis gatecrashing the EU border, *that* would be a different story.
    Only it would be kid gloves instead of tactical nukes.

    Scratch a Russian and you’ll find a Tatar and all that jazz.

  193. @Brutusale
    The iSteve word is "citizenist". It's an understanding that there are many "cultures" inimical to their own.

    Why is it OK for the entire non-Anglophone world to be xenophobes, but not them?

    Who said that was OK?

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
Our Reigning Political Puppets, Dancing to Invisible Strings