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Tucker Takes on the Racial Wreckening on the Roads
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Tucker Carlson did a segment tonight on the remarkable surge in black traffic fatalities after George Floyd’s death on May 25, 2020, a subject I’ve been trying to bring to broader attention since June 8, 2021.

Below are Random Critical Analysis’s follow-up graphs to my posting on Monday Mary Pat Campbell’s graph of black and white road deaths since the 1960s by breaking out the data by age.

In the top tweet, 2019 is the graph on the left and 2020 on the right, with blacks in red and whites in blue(ish). The death rate for 20-something whites barely went up, but the death rate for 20-something blacks soared. This fits in with my hunch that black exuberance during the “racial reckoning” contributed to the high murder and road death numbers for 2020.

In the second tweet are the death rates by age for 2019 (red) and 2020 (blue) for blacks (left graph) and whites (right).

Deaths were up near 50% for 20ish blacks, vs. ~10% for young whites.

Interestingly, while whites have a problem with elderly white codgers getting themselves (and maybe other people) killed in traffic accidents, blacks do not.

I want to thank everybody who has contributed to my April fundraiser so far.

Here are nine ways for you to contribute to the April fundraiser:

First: Most banks now allow fee-free money transfers via Zelle.

Zelle is really a good system: easy to use and the fees are nonexistent.

If you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay/Zelle. Just tell WF SurePay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) Please note, there is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Zelle contributions are not tax deductible.

Second: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay/Zelle (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay/Zelle to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with Paypal or Google Wallet, so this is also good for large contributions.

Third, Zelle might work with other banks too. Here’s a Zelle link for CitiBank. And Bank of America.

Fourth: You can use Paypal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. Paypal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. (Monthly is nice.)

Fifth: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617

I have no idea why somebody carefully hung this empty picture frame from a tree alongside the Fryman Canyon hiking trail, but I appreciate it, like I appreciate your support.

Sixth: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here.

Please don’t forget to click my name at the VDARE site so the money goes to me: first, click on “Earmark your donation,” then click on “Steve Sailer:”

This is not to say that you shouldn’t click on John’s fund too, but, please, make sure there’s a blue dot next to my name.

VDARE has been kiboshed from use of Paypal for being, I dunno, EVIL. But you can give via credit cards, Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin, check, money order, or stock.

Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Eight: You can send me Bitcoin. Bitcoin payments are not tax deductible.

Here’s my Bitcoin address:

1EkuvRNR86uJzpopquxdnmF23iA3vzdDuc

Here’s the OCR

Please let me know if this works, ideally by sending me Bitcoin. Or let me know what else you’d like to send me.

If you’re sending to a crypto address that belongs to another Coinbase user who has opted into Instant sends in their privacy settings, you can send your funds instantly to them with no transaction fees. This transaction will not be sent on chain, and is similar to sending to an email address.

Learn more about sending and receiving crypto.

Send off-chain funds

Mobile

  1. Tap at the bottom
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  3. Tap your selected asset and enter the amount of crypto you’d like to send
  4. Enter the Receiver’s crypto address or scan their crypto QR code to see if the address belongs to a Coinbase user

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  2. Click Send at the top right

  3. Click your selected asset and enter the amount of crypto you’d like to send

  4. Enter the Receiver’s crypto address or scan their crypto QR code to see if the address belongs to a Coinbase user

Obsolete: Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. But these don’t work anymore. I will try to fix them. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Ninth: I added Square [which is now Block] as a fundraising medium, although I’m vague on how it works. If you want to use Square, send me an email telling me how much to send you an invoice for. Or, if you know an easier way for us to use Square, please let me know.

 
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  1. because he can. He is not exactly D’Artgnan..but he is all we got! hahahahhahahhahaaaa

    • Agree: Calvin Hobbes
  2. He can’t exactly “spread enough dirt,” but, shit, yeah. Tucker, of all Connecticut College people, is a player on the world chess board.

  3. “Tucker: Something really dark is going on”

  4. White liberals will say that you are racist for saying this.

    Eric Bryan Stone blames white cops and says that people should take out the cops.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CCtxIvHH3PC/

    • Replies: @Jon
    @Gore 2004


    White liberals will say that you are racist for saying this.
     
    And yet, if you quietly support it, you're also racist. Damned if you do, damned if you don't ...
    , @George Rockwell
    @Gore 2004

    Hey ericstone shill, no one cares about this wigger's takes other than you.

    Replies: @Gore 2004

    , @William Badwhite
    @Gore 2004


    Eric Bryan Stone blames white cops and says that people should take out the cops.
     
    Sam Thompson from Peoria blames sun spots. Just post under your own name Stone.
  5. If only the Department of Transportation had access to Youtube. They might notice what the hell is going on.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @clifford brown

    The Hellcat is way way OTT but the Challenger is still about the hottest thing on wheels in CYA.

    It's also the best of the muscle-car reboots IMHO. Though I've never owned a muscle car (or been tempted to) so my opinion may not count for much.


    https://i.ibb.co/Fg99ZPG/2010-dodge-challenger-srt-8.jpg

    Replies: @Up2Drew

  6. Great job, Steve! You’ve been running something like a year or so ahead on this story.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Great job, Steve! You’ve been running something like a year or so ahead on this story.
     
    He's speeding. On the wrong side of the road.

    He's the Rodney King of sociology!
    , @al gore rhythms
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Maybe this IS Steve's story? Was anyone in America talking about this before him?

  7. a subject I’ve been trying to bring to broader attention since June 8, 2021.

    I heard Tucker. He attributed the noticing of this trend to an analyst deep in the bowels of the transportation department, last summer. And now, drum roll, Tucker, would give it the proper attention it deserves. Of course I thought of Steve, and the “inglorious Milton” of Gray’s “Elegy written in a country Churchyard.” For those of you who studied English lit after it was “refreshed” and so missed this poem: Gray contrasts the fate of a deserved-to-be Milton, who grew-up in the obscurity of the San Fernando Valley, and therefore, was consigned to relative obscurity.

    • LOL: Inquiring Mind
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @SafeNow


    I heard Tucker. He attributed the noticing of this trend to an analyst deep in the bowels of the transportation department, last summer.
     
    Steve's not out here for the credit. He just wants people to notice, have an accurate picture of the world and make better political and personal decisions. Well that and buy dog food.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

  8. It’s racist to point out that blacks are dying in greater numbers than before.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Yancey Ward


    It’s racist to point out that blacks are dying in greater numbers than before.

     

    Perhaps, but it also breathes some hope into Schadenfreude.
    , @Bard of Bumperstickers
    @Yancey Ward

    Blacktop-on-black violence?

  9. Anon[770] • Disclaimer says:

    I love the elaborate parallel construction/evidence laundering that Tucker goes through to make it look like, “No?, what?, Sailer?, never heard of the guy, my government document research team came up with this story.”

    Last summer, deep in the bowels of the Transportation Agency in Washington, some nameless federal analysts came across a highly puzzling trend …

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_construction

    A graph of traffic death trends would have made the story more real and understandable for most viewers.

    • Replies: @Cato
    @Anon

    We should be grateful to Tucker for talking about this. And we should not expect Tucker to cite his actual sources: he is not an academic under a stringent obligation to cite properly, he is an influencer, who will mention sources only if it strengthens his influence. And, to be fair, he need not have directly gotten this from Steve, he could have gotten it from someone "deep in the bowels" of D.C., maybe a data geek playing with R, or maybe somebody who had been tipped off by reading Steve or listening to the podcast with Steve and Charles Murray. Nevertheless, Steve deserves a lot of credit for noticing this nearly a year before it comes out on Tucker.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  10. I bet Tucker reads your articles. He seems to borrow a lot of material from you and from our comment section.

    Hopefully, he becomes president and appoints you to an advisory position.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Vice President Sailer.

    , @Barnard
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Blake Neff was a writer on Tucker's show who had to resign for posting comments deemed racist a couple of years ago. I would guess most of his staffers read writers across the dissident right and rarely read stuff from Conservatism, Inc. legacy sites unless they are looking for someone to mock.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  11. Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Hypnotoad666


    Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.
     
    If that's the case, then they should look at this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Ped-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    and this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Cyclist-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly. Are his writers going to accept a broader discussion on these topics or will they only focus on race, like most of US discourse these days? America was broken even before the current crisis. The debate should reflect that.

    Replies: @Polistra, @International Jew, @Mike Tre, @Anon, @Muggles

    , @Bill Jones
    @Hypnotoad666

    I suspect a few of the ubermensch (in their own minds) stop by.

  12. In any normal society people can speak openly–even negatively–about the differences in the behavior of minorities from their own. Which is necessary to have an accurate–or at least adequate–picture of the world and interact with it safely, sanely, appropriately.

    This, unfortunately, is no longer a normal society.

  13. Tucker has used the “something very dark is going on” line on numerous occasions. Still he always plays the non-racial card of the cuckservative. Whenever he wants to criticize black criminality he trots out one of the house negroes (Candace Owens, Jason Whitlock, etc.) to tell us white people that most blacks hate N-words also.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    @ArthurBiggs

    Tell Mr Whitlock that he is a house negro to his face. That would be Fearless.

  14. Everybody reads STEVE. . . But no one can admit to it.

    • Replies: @additionalMike
    @Tim

    The problem there is that if Carlson admitted he was influenced by Mr. Sailor, that would tie him to Unz Review as well. I admire Unz's openmindedness, but his blog frequently features ugly racist and (more frequently) anti-Semetic content. There seems to be no filter on Unz at all.
    That would not be a good move on Carlson's part.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  15. Some of his writers read The Unz Review. They read Steve. And they definitely read my comments. Sometimes they’re clearly talking directly to me through the TV screen. You know what I’m talking about. I can’t take all the credit, though, fam. We’re the guys behind the guys behind the guys.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @JimDandy

    I know how Steve feels. He steals my ideas all the time as well. :)

    Replies: @JimDandy

  16. @SafeNow

    a subject I’ve been trying to bring to broader attention since June 8, 2021.

     

    I heard Tucker. He attributed the noticing of this trend to an analyst deep in the bowels of the transportation department, last summer. And now, drum roll, Tucker, would give it the proper attention it deserves. Of course I thought of Steve, and the “inglorious Milton” of Gray’s “Elegy written in a country Churchyard.” For those of you who studied English lit after it was “refreshed” and so missed this poem: Gray contrasts the fate of a deserved-to-be Milton, who grew-up in the obscurity of the San Fernando Valley, and therefore, was consigned to relative obscurity.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    I heard Tucker. He attributed the noticing of this trend to an analyst deep in the bowels of the transportation department, last summer.

    Steve’s not out here for the credit. He just wants people to notice, have an accurate picture of the world and make better political and personal decisions. Well that and buy dog food.

    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @AnotherDad


    Steve’s not out here for the credit.
     
    LOL
  17. @AnotherDad
    @SafeNow


    I heard Tucker. He attributed the noticing of this trend to an analyst deep in the bowels of the transportation department, last summer.
     
    Steve's not out here for the credit. He just wants people to notice, have an accurate picture of the world and make better political and personal decisions. Well that and buy dog food.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Steve’s not out here for the credit.

    LOL

  18. @Hypnotoad666
    Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Bill Jones

    Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.

    If that’s the case, then they should look at this:

    and this:

    Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly. Are his writers going to accept a broader discussion on these topics or will they only focus on race, like most of US discourse these days? America was broken even before the current crisis. The debate should reflect that.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Thulean Friend

    The USA has, um, extenuating circumstances which affect its results. Europe, not so much, though they are trying their darndest to catch up.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-msm-tries-to-explain-the-racial-wreckening-on-the-roads/#comment-4737556

    , @International Jew
    @Thulean Friend

    Troubling as these numbers are, they don't necessarily imply that American motorists are more reckless. Our higher rate of pedestrian fatalities could reflect mostly the kind of walking Americans do. Instead of long recreational strolls on sidewalks and urban trails (as I picture Swedes doing (wearing socks inside their orthopedic sandals)), Americans do much of their walking in short bursts between their car and a store, across a parking lot full of cars maneuvering and going every which way.

    As for bicyclist fatalities, I suspect the US bicyclist population is younger — children who can't yet drive a car.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Franz

    , @Mike Tre
    @Thulean Friend

    "Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly."

    Completely inaccurate. Get into one of inner cities one day and see what little regard "pedestrians" and cyclists have for traffic rules and etiquette.

    And where are these "pedestrian" fatalities occurring? On the sidewalk? Crosswalk? My purely observational guess is that most of them are killed while jaywalking.

    Cyclists are simply oblivious ignorant fools and are almost always responsible for there own deaths. Maybe if they stopped at stop signs and stop lights and didn't weave in and out of live lanes on the wrong side of the road they wouldn't die so much. I have no sympathy for them.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnnyphiladelphia

    , @Anon
    @Thulean Friend

    "primitive country that was far too car-dependent"

    "Primitive" for using 20th century technology (cars) instead of 19th century technologies (rail, bicycle)? What a strange choice of words.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    , @Muggles
    @Thulean Friend


    Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly.
     
    *Sigh*

    Again, a clueless European (assume) who has never visited America or looked closely at a map.

    The continental USA is larger than Europe as whole. Europe is much more densely populated and of course cities, roads, etc. much older.

    Most American cities grew large post 19th century. European countries each are dominated by one or two very old, very dense cities whose populations have always been large relative to total national size.

    So America is post pedestrian, and largely post railroad (for passengers). European cities mostly all have metros underground and extensive bus systems. Europeans tend to be fitter since they walk more, because they have to. Americans drive.

    So more cars here, which rule the roads, unlike car scarce Europe.

    Americans (especially blacks for some reason) get killed walking in streets. In rural roads walking or biking is very dangerous. Also fewer blacks ambling in streets in Europe.

    Vast distances and rough hilly mountainous and non dense population make rail uneconomic for passengers except in dense corridors on the East Coast.

    These are valid reasons why apples vs. oranges in these metrics.
  19. @clifford brown
    If only the Department of Transportation had access to Youtube. They might notice what the hell is going on.

    https://youtu.be/8tRNWKA66Mc?t=144

    Replies: @HammerJack

    The Hellcat is way way OTT but the Challenger is still about the hottest thing on wheels in CYA.

    It’s also the best of the muscle-car reboots IMHO. Though I’ve never owned a muscle car (or been tempted to) so my opinion may not count for much.

    • Agree: clifford brown
    • Replies: @Up2Drew
    @HammerJack

    Why are manufacturers allowed to build street vehicles that can top 150 mph? I mean, I've been a muscle car junkie since I was a kid, but what purpose is being served?

    Replies: @HammerJack

  20. What’s with the two year disparity in the peak death rate between negroes and honkies? Urban versus suburban?

    What’s with the rapid decline in death rate from newborn to nine year olds? Car seats versus seat belts or young mothers maturing?

    What’s going on at 56? Another peak. Is this guys finally getting enough money to buy that Harley they always wanted or men and women divorcing after a few years of empty nest syndrome?

    Inquiring Minds.

    PS: I’m a retired EE from Silicon Valley. Data I cannot ignore.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Hunky Dory Honky

    Those all sound plausible enough. Maybe also, kids becoming less fragile as they get older and that an infant can't flee a burning car on his/her own.

    But now what about whites getting more and more crashy in their seventies and eighties? That's pretty striking (and frankly the one feature of these graphs that surprised me).

  21. What’s wrong with the oven cleaning itself?

  22. anonymous[410] • Disclaimer says:

    Carlson just keeps on stealing your ideas without attribution. One time he even copied your post nearly word for word hours after you published it.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @anonymous

    Which post?

    Link?

    Replies: @anonymous

    , @Inquiring Mind
    @anonymous

    Back in the day of the Birth of Television Punditry, I thought that Jeanne Kirkpatrick, Bobby Inman and Colin Powell were the same person.

    Think about it. All three had the same arch-of-eyebrow, the same faux gravitas, and you never saw more than one of the three interviewed by Ted Koppel at the same time? OK, they are of different genders and a different race, but if we are talking the deepest of the deep staters of their day, that doesn't mean anything.

    In the same vein, are Tucker and iSteve really the same person? It is a clever strategy on the part of Tucker, iSteve in disguise, to not get doxxed?

  23. @Thulean Friend
    @Hypnotoad666


    Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.
     
    If that's the case, then they should look at this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Ped-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    and this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Cyclist-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly. Are his writers going to accept a broader discussion on these topics or will they only focus on race, like most of US discourse these days? America was broken even before the current crisis. The debate should reflect that.

    Replies: @Polistra, @International Jew, @Mike Tre, @Anon, @Muggles

    The USA has, um, extenuating circumstances which affect its results. Europe, not so much, though they are trying their darndest to catch up.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-msm-tries-to-explain-the-racial-wreckening-on-the-roads/#comment-4737556

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  24. @Thulean Friend
    @Hypnotoad666


    Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.
     
    If that's the case, then they should look at this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Ped-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    and this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Cyclist-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly. Are his writers going to accept a broader discussion on these topics or will they only focus on race, like most of US discourse these days? America was broken even before the current crisis. The debate should reflect that.

    Replies: @Polistra, @International Jew, @Mike Tre, @Anon, @Muggles

    Troubling as these numbers are, they don’t necessarily imply that American motorists are more reckless. Our higher rate of pedestrian fatalities could reflect mostly the kind of walking Americans do. Instead of long recreational strolls on sidewalks and urban trails (as I picture Swedes doing (wearing socks inside their orthopedic sandals)), Americans do much of their walking in short bursts between their car and a store, across a parking lot full of cars maneuvering and going every which way.

    As for bicyclist fatalities, I suspect the US bicyclist population is younger — children who can’t yet drive a car.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @International Jew

    Don't forget the habit of walking on the road/street with, instead of against, traffic.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Franz
    @International Jew


    As for bicyclist fatalities, I suspect the US bicyclist population is younger — children who can’t yet drive a car.
     
    Bunk, sorry.

    I was well into middle age when I was run off the road on my bike by a BUS.

    American drivers are mad as hatters. The country has a deep pathological hate of anyone using muscles for locomotion (cars, bikes) and this is a fact.

    Parts of Los Angeles has no pedestrian sidewalks. A person on foot is seen as suspicious. As to bikes, people in motorized vehicles really do get the urge to kill and sometimes act on it.

    I was lucky. The bus missed. A podiatrist in town was unlucky and him and his ten speed was nailed DOA by a truck.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  25. @Hunky Dory Honky
    What's with the two year disparity in the peak death rate between negroes and honkies? Urban versus suburban?

    What's with the rapid decline in death rate from newborn to nine year olds? Car seats versus seat belts or young mothers maturing?

    What's going on at 56? Another peak. Is this guys finally getting enough money to buy that Harley they always wanted or men and women divorcing after a few years of empty nest syndrome?

    Inquiring Minds.

    PS: I'm a retired EE from Silicon Valley. Data I cannot ignore.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Those all sound plausible enough. Maybe also, kids becoming less fragile as they get older and that an infant can’t flee a burning car on his/her own.

    But now what about whites getting more and more crashy in their seventies and eighties? That’s pretty striking (and frankly the one feature of these graphs that surprised me).

  26. @anonymous
    Carlson just keeps on stealing your ideas without attribution. One time he even copied your post nearly word for word hours after you published it.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Inquiring Mind

    Which post?

    Link?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/biden-youve-got-nice-country-here-americans-it-would-be-a-shame-if-something-happened-to-it/

    https://video.foxnews.com/v/6186424701001/

    CARLSON: Oh, you think there’ll be less violence if he is reelected? Got it. It is a nice country you have here. It would be a shame if something were to happen to it.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  27. @JohnnyWalker123
    I bet Tucker reads your articles. He seems to borrow a lot of material from you and from our comment section.

    Hopefully, he becomes president and appoints you to an advisory position.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Barnard

    Vice President Sailer.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
  28. @International Jew
    @Thulean Friend

    Troubling as these numbers are, they don't necessarily imply that American motorists are more reckless. Our higher rate of pedestrian fatalities could reflect mostly the kind of walking Americans do. Instead of long recreational strolls on sidewalks and urban trails (as I picture Swedes doing (wearing socks inside their orthopedic sandals)), Americans do much of their walking in short bursts between their car and a store, across a parking lot full of cars maneuvering and going every which way.

    As for bicyclist fatalities, I suspect the US bicyclist population is younger — children who can't yet drive a car.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Franz

    Don’t forget the habit of walking on the road/street with, instead of against, traffic.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Redneck farmer

    Or walking right down the middle. (Now does that count as walking with, or against, the traffic??)

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Redneck farmer

    Right! Peak Stupidity notices stuff too - "Stuff a 10 year-old used to know - lost to history or lost to stupidity?" I really think a lot of common sense had been lost. If it's not on an app, then it's not real, apparently.

  29. Clearly he or someone over there has been reading this blog. This isn’t the first time he seemed to be picking up one of your themes within a day or two.
    So when’s he going to give you one of his in-depth interviews on Tucker Carlson Today? https://nation.foxnews.com/tucker-carlson-today/

    I honestly think he eventually will interview Sailer if he doesn’t get cancelled. If it isn’t going to happen it sure could be made to happen. There’s probably somebody here now who could help. You there, from Fox News, yeah you, this could be great for your career!

    Get your flannel ready Steve. The aesthetic is casual/rustic.

  30. @International Jew
    @Thulean Friend

    Troubling as these numbers are, they don't necessarily imply that American motorists are more reckless. Our higher rate of pedestrian fatalities could reflect mostly the kind of walking Americans do. Instead of long recreational strolls on sidewalks and urban trails (as I picture Swedes doing (wearing socks inside their orthopedic sandals)), Americans do much of their walking in short bursts between their car and a store, across a parking lot full of cars maneuvering and going every which way.

    As for bicyclist fatalities, I suspect the US bicyclist population is younger — children who can't yet drive a car.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Franz

    As for bicyclist fatalities, I suspect the US bicyclist population is younger — children who can’t yet drive a car.

    Bunk, sorry.

    I was well into middle age when I was run off the road on my bike by a BUS.

    American drivers are mad as hatters. The country has a deep pathological hate of anyone using muscles for locomotion (cars, bikes) and this is a fact.

    Parts of Los Angeles has no pedestrian sidewalks. A person on foot is seen as suspicious. As to bikes, people in motorized vehicles really do get the urge to kill and sometimes act on it.

    I was lucky. The bus missed. A podiatrist in town was unlucky and him and his ten speed was nailed DOA by a truck.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Franz

    I rode my bike to school everyday in 1972-1974 and only got hit by a car once. I used to ride a lot on the Santa Monica-Venice beach bikepath in 1981-82, and the Chicago lakefront bikepath in 1982-2000. But after moving back to the San Fernando Valley in 2000, I cut down on bike riding. Without a dedicated right-of-way separate from cars, it doesn't seem safe.

    Is it less safe than in the 1970s? I dunno. But a lot of things are dramatically safer today than in the 1970s, such as commercial airline travel and car travel. Bicycling on city streets is, at best, marginally safer than 50 years ago -- I bought my first helmet in 1983, LEDs are better nightlights, and I am told that new bikes have better brakes.

    But, clearly, bike riding hasn't improved in safety as much over the last half-century as most other forms of transportation. And it wasn't all that safe when I got knocked down by a very nice guy driving a car who couldn't see me in the setting sun around the Autumnal equinox in 1972. They really haven't come up with a solution for the setting sun shining right down east-west grid streets during the equinoxes, have they?

    Replies: @International Jew, @Achmed E. Newman

  31. Mr Musk nails the Zeitgeist.

  32. @Hypnotoad666
    Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Bill Jones

    I suspect a few of the ubermensch (in their own minds) stop by.

  33. @Franz
    @International Jew


    As for bicyclist fatalities, I suspect the US bicyclist population is younger — children who can’t yet drive a car.
     
    Bunk, sorry.

    I was well into middle age when I was run off the road on my bike by a BUS.

    American drivers are mad as hatters. The country has a deep pathological hate of anyone using muscles for locomotion (cars, bikes) and this is a fact.

    Parts of Los Angeles has no pedestrian sidewalks. A person on foot is seen as suspicious. As to bikes, people in motorized vehicles really do get the urge to kill and sometimes act on it.

    I was lucky. The bus missed. A podiatrist in town was unlucky and him and his ten speed was nailed DOA by a truck.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I rode my bike to school everyday in 1972-1974 and only got hit by a car once. I used to ride a lot on the Santa Monica-Venice beach bikepath in 1981-82, and the Chicago lakefront bikepath in 1982-2000. But after moving back to the San Fernando Valley in 2000, I cut down on bike riding. Without a dedicated right-of-way separate from cars, it doesn’t seem safe.

    Is it less safe than in the 1970s? I dunno. But a lot of things are dramatically safer today than in the 1970s, such as commercial airline travel and car travel. Bicycling on city streets is, at best, marginally safer than 50 years ago — I bought my first helmet in 1983, LEDs are better nightlights, and I am told that new bikes have better brakes.

    But, clearly, bike riding hasn’t improved in safety as much over the last half-century as most other forms of transportation. And it wasn’t all that safe when I got knocked down by a very nice guy driving a car who couldn’t see me in the setting sun around the Autumnal equinox in 1972. They really haven’t come up with a solution for the setting sun shining right down east-west grid streets during the equinoxes, have they?

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Steve Sailer

    Cell phones have been bad for bicycle safety — distracted motorists and (maybe even more) bicyclists checking their phones on the go. I've stared in wonder at cyclists rolling by engaged with their phones for a hundred yards.

    In the countryside (where it's the lycra-clad sports riders) I see more cyclists stopped at the side of the road checking their phones, than I see cyclists actually advancing down the road. It's a wonder some of them ever get anywhere. But at least they've pulled over.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @Steve Sailer

    Forgive me if I'm remembering wrong, but aren't you one of the guys giving bicyclists grief on here about more "muh bike paths" and that they are a menace? Yeah, some cities in America have a few good, safe place to ride.

    OTOH, if you want to ride for that exercise and other benefits (such as no parking hassles) you gotta to do what you gotta do, to be safe. The includes riding on sidewalks, running red lights to get AWAY from the cars, and plenty of other stuff*. Safety come first over law.

    About the sun, you were too young to understand that the drivers couldn't see you. When I was 10, I thought that if I could see a car at night, the driver could see me!


    .

    * Ha, one time a cop stopped me on my bike for one or two violations, but honestly, I could easily have come up with 6. Thing is, they were all done to have the safest ride, and probably 200 times the same way. After that, I did nothing differently on that route but take a good look for that particular cop car.

  34. They really haven’t come up with a solution for the setting sun shining right down east-west grid streets during the equinoxes, have they?

    Never.

    The worst of it in my case is the wife blames me no matter what.

    Bus, bike… She just goes, “You shouldn’t have been there.” Female logic.

  35. @JimDandy
    Some of his writers read The Unz Review. They read Steve. And they definitely read my comments. Sometimes they're clearly talking directly to me through the TV screen. You know what I'm talking about. I can't take all the credit, though, fam. We're the guys behind the guys behind the guys.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    I know how Steve feels. He steals my ideas all the time as well. 🙂

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Mike Tre

    Dude. I've started putting "Writer for the Tucker Carlson Show writers" on my resume.

  36. @Thulean Friend
    @Hypnotoad666


    Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.
     
    If that's the case, then they should look at this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Ped-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    and this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Cyclist-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly. Are his writers going to accept a broader discussion on these topics or will they only focus on race, like most of US discourse these days? America was broken even before the current crisis. The debate should reflect that.

    Replies: @Polistra, @International Jew, @Mike Tre, @Anon, @Muggles

    “Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly.”

    Completely inaccurate. Get into one of inner cities one day and see what little regard “pedestrians” and cyclists have for traffic rules and etiquette.

    And where are these “pedestrian” fatalities occurring? On the sidewalk? Crosswalk? My purely observational guess is that most of them are killed while jaywalking.

    Cyclists are simply oblivious ignorant fools and are almost always responsible for there own deaths. Maybe if they stopped at stop signs and stop lights and didn’t weave in and out of live lanes on the wrong side of the road they wouldn’t die so much. I have no sympathy for them.

    • Disagree: Muggles
    • Replies: @kpkinsunnnyphiladelphia
    @Mike Tre


    Cyclists are simply oblivious ignorant fools and are almost always responsible for there own deaths. Maybe if they stopped at stop signs and stop lights and didn’t weave in and out of live lanes on the wrong side of the road they wouldn’t die so much. I have no sympathy for them
     
    Couldn't agree more.

    One day this past winter I was driving down a dark basically deserted residential street at night and suddenly was on top of a bicyclist who had no lights at all or reflective clothing!

    I swerved out of his way, but slowed down so he caught up to me, then rolled down my passenger window, and told him. "Hey, asshole, if you don't get some illumination on your bike, you have a future as hamburger."

    Of course, had I hit him, it would have been all my fault.

  37. @Steve Sailer
    @Franz

    I rode my bike to school everyday in 1972-1974 and only got hit by a car once. I used to ride a lot on the Santa Monica-Venice beach bikepath in 1981-82, and the Chicago lakefront bikepath in 1982-2000. But after moving back to the San Fernando Valley in 2000, I cut down on bike riding. Without a dedicated right-of-way separate from cars, it doesn't seem safe.

    Is it less safe than in the 1970s? I dunno. But a lot of things are dramatically safer today than in the 1970s, such as commercial airline travel and car travel. Bicycling on city streets is, at best, marginally safer than 50 years ago -- I bought my first helmet in 1983, LEDs are better nightlights, and I am told that new bikes have better brakes.

    But, clearly, bike riding hasn't improved in safety as much over the last half-century as most other forms of transportation. And it wasn't all that safe when I got knocked down by a very nice guy driving a car who couldn't see me in the setting sun around the Autumnal equinox in 1972. They really haven't come up with a solution for the setting sun shining right down east-west grid streets during the equinoxes, have they?

    Replies: @International Jew, @Achmed E. Newman

    Cell phones have been bad for bicycle safety — distracted motorists and (maybe even more) bicyclists checking their phones on the go. I’ve stared in wonder at cyclists rolling by engaged with their phones for a hundred yards.

    In the countryside (where it’s the lycra-clad sports riders) I see more cyclists stopped at the side of the road checking their phones, than I see cyclists actually advancing down the road. It’s a wonder some of them ever get anywhere. But at least they’ve pulled over.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  38. @Redneck farmer
    @International Jew

    Don't forget the habit of walking on the road/street with, instead of against, traffic.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Achmed E. Newman

    Or walking right down the middle. (Now does that count as walking with, or against, the traffic??)

    • Thanks: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @International Jew

    How many of these killed pedestrians are inebriated homeless? A friend of a friend just struck and killed one of these junkies who wandered suddenly into the road. Another friend, years ago, crashed her car trying to avoid hitting a drunken, transient wastrel.

    That said, we all need to pay close attention to our driving. It's terribly simple to blame everybody else when something random happens.

  39. @Yancey Ward
    It's racist to point out that blacks are dying in greater numbers than before.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Bard of Bumperstickers

    It’s racist to point out that blacks are dying in greater numbers than before.

    Perhaps, but it also breathes some hope into Schadenfreude.

  40. @Yancey Ward
    It's racist to point out that blacks are dying in greater numbers than before.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Blacktop-on-black violence?

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  41. @Tim
    Everybody reads STEVE. . . But no one can admit to it.

    Replies: @additionalMike

    The problem there is that if Carlson admitted he was influenced by Mr. Sailor, that would tie him to Unz Review as well. I admire Unz’s openmindedness, but his blog frequently features ugly racist and (more frequently) anti-Semetic content. There seems to be no filter on Unz at all.
    That would not be a good move on Carlson’s part.

    • Agree: Veteran Aryan
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @additionalMike


    I admire Unz’s openmindedness, but his blog frequently features ugly racist and (more frequently) anti-Semetic content. There seems to be no filter on Unz at all.
     
    It wasn't that long ago when readers were expected to d0 their own filtering by making up their own minds about what they would retain and what they would discard. It was called "discernment," and it could do with a comeback.

    Ron Unz' blog allows him to put ideas in front of readers and determine if they hold up under examination and discussion; sometimes they do, sometimes they do not. In the event a reader takes exception to what he writes, the solution is simple: he/she can stop reading it.

    We cannot work out what is true and what is not unless people write about it first. I do not like much of what I find on this site, but I recognise that people have to be allowed to write about whatever they wish because writing is the only way we have of distinguishing truth from falsehood.

    ( This is why leftists are so keen on censorship.)

    The whole, "you can't write that because I disagree with it" business is getting old. On the plus side, an increasing number of people are beginning to recognise that when something is derided as "racist" or "anti-semitic," that's often code for, "Hey, this is true, and I don't want it getting around."

    The fact that there is no filter on this site is the very thing that makes it worth reading. I don't say everything on the site is worth a look, only that the lack of a filter is a strength, not a weakness.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  42. @anonymous
    Carlson just keeps on stealing your ideas without attribution. One time he even copied your post nearly word for word hours after you published it.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Inquiring Mind

    Back in the day of the Birth of Television Punditry, I thought that Jeanne Kirkpatrick, Bobby Inman and Colin Powell were the same person.

    Think about it. All three had the same arch-of-eyebrow, the same faux gravitas, and you never saw more than one of the three interviewed by Ted Koppel at the same time? OK, they are of different genders and a different race, but if we are talking the deepest of the deep staters of their day, that doesn’t mean anything.

    In the same vein, are Tucker and iSteve really the same person? It is a clever strategy on the part of Tucker, iSteve in disguise, to not get doxxed?

  43. @Gore 2004
    White liberals will say that you are racist for saying this.

    Eric Bryan Stone blames white cops and says that people should take out the cops.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CCtxIvHH3PC/

    Replies: @Jon, @George Rockwell, @William Badwhite

    White liberals will say that you are racist for saying this.

    And yet, if you quietly support it, you’re also racist. Damned if you do, damned if you don’t …

    • Agree: Gore 2004
  44. @International Jew
    @Redneck farmer

    Or walking right down the middle. (Now does that count as walking with, or against, the traffic??)

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    How many of these killed pedestrians are inebriated homeless? A friend of a friend just struck and killed one of these junkies who wandered suddenly into the road. Another friend, years ago, crashed her car trying to avoid hitting a drunken, transient wastrel.

    That said, we all need to pay close attention to our driving. It’s terribly simple to blame everybody else when something random happens.

  45. @Achmed E. Newman
    Great job, Steve! You've been running something like a year or so ahead on this story.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @al gore rhythms

    Great job, Steve! You’ve been running something like a year or so ahead on this story.

    He’s speeding. On the wrong side of the road.

    He’s the Rodney King of sociology!

  46. @Redneck farmer
    @International Jew

    Don't forget the habit of walking on the road/street with, instead of against, traffic.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Achmed E. Newman

    Right! Peak Stupidity notices stuff too – “Stuff a 10 year-old used to know – lost to history or lost to stupidity?” I really think a lot of common sense had been lost. If it’s not on an app, then it’s not real, apparently.

  47. @Steve Sailer
    @Franz

    I rode my bike to school everyday in 1972-1974 and only got hit by a car once. I used to ride a lot on the Santa Monica-Venice beach bikepath in 1981-82, and the Chicago lakefront bikepath in 1982-2000. But after moving back to the San Fernando Valley in 2000, I cut down on bike riding. Without a dedicated right-of-way separate from cars, it doesn't seem safe.

    Is it less safe than in the 1970s? I dunno. But a lot of things are dramatically safer today than in the 1970s, such as commercial airline travel and car travel. Bicycling on city streets is, at best, marginally safer than 50 years ago -- I bought my first helmet in 1983, LEDs are better nightlights, and I am told that new bikes have better brakes.

    But, clearly, bike riding hasn't improved in safety as much over the last half-century as most other forms of transportation. And it wasn't all that safe when I got knocked down by a very nice guy driving a car who couldn't see me in the setting sun around the Autumnal equinox in 1972. They really haven't come up with a solution for the setting sun shining right down east-west grid streets during the equinoxes, have they?

    Replies: @International Jew, @Achmed E. Newman

    Forgive me if I’m remembering wrong, but aren’t you one of the guys giving bicyclists grief on here about more “muh bike paths” and that they are a menace? Yeah, some cities in America have a few good, safe place to ride.

    OTOH, if you want to ride for that exercise and other benefits (such as no parking hassles) you gotta to do what you gotta do, to be safe. The includes riding on sidewalks, running red lights to get AWAY from the cars, and plenty of other stuff*. Safety come first over law.

    About the sun, you were too young to understand that the drivers couldn’t see you. When I was 10, I thought that if I could see a car at night, the driver could see me!

    .

    * Ha, one time a cop stopped me on my bike for one or two violations, but honestly, I could easily have come up with 6. Thing is, they were all done to have the safest ride, and probably 200 times the same way. After that, I did nothing differently on that route but take a good look for that particular cop car.

  48. “Interestingly, while whites have a problem with elderly white codgers getting themselves (and maybe other people) killed in traffic accidents, blacks do not.”

    Maybe, but if the per 100,000 is 100,000 over all blacks rather than per 100,000 blacks over 75, this might just be an artifact of fewer elderly blacks relative to whites

  49. Also might be a problem here if young blacks tend to have more people in the car on average. One car accident causing 6 deaths vs another causing 1…

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Erik L

    That's because it takes 6 Blacks to come up with one with a valid DL and no outstanding warrants.

  50. Speaking of Tucker, he was mocking CNN+ last night. As he was doing so the chyron read, “Unlike Toobin, CNN+ did not have a happy ending.”

    I was like, “Damn!”

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    Kristi Noem, the Rino governor of South Dakota, tweeted that.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  51. @JohnnyWalker123
    I bet Tucker reads your articles. He seems to borrow a lot of material from you and from our comment section.

    Hopefully, he becomes president and appoints you to an advisory position.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @Barnard

    Blake Neff was a writer on Tucker’s show who had to resign for posting comments deemed racist a couple of years ago. I would guess most of his staffers read writers across the dissident right and rarely read stuff from Conservatism, Inc. legacy sites unless they are looking for someone to mock.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Barnard

    Neff's "offensive" comments seemed remarkably anodyne to me. I see more inflammatory comments on virtually every thread on this site. I lost most of my respect for Tucker after that incident. He probably could have fought harder for Neff, and he definitely could have resigned in solidarity if the Fox execs really tried to force the issue. If I were Tucker I would have said:


    I don't condone everything Blake wrote on that site, but his job is to research things for me and write first drafts. Whatever non-violent things he may have said ten years ago on a pseudonymous internet forum do not invalidate the work he does for this show. And one has to wonder how many offensive things that staffers for MSNBC, CNN, Washington Post, etc have written. In the case of Sarah Jeong of the NYT, her extremely racist tweets against white people were publicly revealed, to absolutely no detriment to her career. Besides being objectively more inflammatory than Blake's posts, she posted publicly while Blake posted anonymously. Her excuse was that she was "mimicking the language of her harassers" but it's safe to say that a white male who "mimicked the language of" anti-white and anti-male bigots would not be allowed to work at NYT or any corporation anywhere. In fact we know that, because of what the NYT did to Quinn Norton, whose offenses were notably less severe than Jeong's.

    Blake regrets what he wrote, and I have admonished him for his ignorant comments. But he is a great asset to this show and a good man. He isn't going anywhere, as much as my enemies may cry about it. Thank you and good night.
     

    I realize it is easy for me to criticize a man for not throwing away an eight figure salary in order to defend the right to make silly tweets on anonymous accounts, but

    1) he could have a lucrative career doing lots of things, even if blacklisted from Fox

    2) he's such an important asset to Fox that it's hard to imagine they really would have forced Tucker out

    3) he's already loaded beyond what 99.9% of Americans will ever experience, so I don't think his kids would have gone hungry

    4) cowardice is cowardice at the end of the day

    Replies: @res

  52. @Mike Tre
    @JimDandy

    I know how Steve feels. He steals my ideas all the time as well. :)

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Dude. I’ve started putting “Writer for the Tucker Carlson Show writers” on my resume.

    • LOL: Mike Tre
  53. anonymous[410] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    @anonymous

    Which post?

    Link?

    Replies: @anonymous

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/biden-youve-got-nice-country-here-americans-it-would-be-a-shame-if-something-happened-to-it/

    https://video.foxnews.com/v/6186424701001/

    CARLSON: Oh, you think there’ll be less violence if he is reelected? Got it. It is a nice country you have here. It would be a shame if something were to happen to it.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @anonymous

    Thanks.

    2:40-3:05.

    Almost word for word.

  54. @Thulean Friend
    @Hypnotoad666


    Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.
     
    If that's the case, then they should look at this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Ped-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    and this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Cyclist-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly. Are his writers going to accept a broader discussion on these topics or will they only focus on race, like most of US discourse these days? America was broken even before the current crisis. The debate should reflect that.

    Replies: @Polistra, @International Jew, @Mike Tre, @Anon, @Muggles

    “primitive country that was far too car-dependent”

    “Primitive” for using 20th century technology (cars) instead of 19th century technologies (rail, bicycle)? What a strange choice of words.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Anon

    I think you are responding to sarcasm, bro.

  55. Things will have to get still worse – remember that no matter what people say in polls about crime being their top priority, to makes cities safer Dem politicians will have to support the vigorous prosecution of a key segment of their base.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Arclight

    But their masters installed the Dem city leaders with specific orders to do the opposite of that.

  56. @Achmed E. Newman
    Great job, Steve! You've been running something like a year or so ahead on this story.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @al gore rhythms

    Maybe this IS Steve’s story? Was anyone in America talking about this before him?

  57. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot looks so much like a zombie corpse I typed ‘zombie lightfoot’ into google fully expecting to find this was already a meme, and am somewhat surprised that it came up with nothing Maybe google removed them?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @al gore rhythms

    She's doing the job she was told to do by her masters, and she will be rewarded down the road. I think she's just weary of having to go through the motions of acting like she gives a shit when one of her constituents occasionally gets up on his hind legs and barks ugly facts at her.

    After she said the following, all of the usual suspects from Snopes to USA Today to Reuters and beyond "fact checked" her quote and said it was being taken out of context by crazy conspiracy theorists. As proof, they offered the full quote:

    “The way that aldermanic prerogative works is there’s got to be compliance with the executive branch, because otherwise it doesn’t work. So, you’ve got to eliminate that compliance, and you make it a mandate. And then you do training, particularly in the city licensing departments whether it’s zoning, buildings, housing will be impacted by it, planning certainly, and you pick the people who run those agencies and the deputies that are pledging allegiance to ‘the new world order’ and good governance."

    I don't see how the full context diminishes the oddness of such specific word choice. I'm going to continue to give myself license to consider it very telling.

    , @J.Ross
    @al gore rhythms

    The joke with her is comparison to the ent character Groot from Guardians of the Galaxy.

  58. John Hinderaker, at Powerline, reads and quotes Steve.

  59. @Gore 2004
    White liberals will say that you are racist for saying this.

    Eric Bryan Stone blames white cops and says that people should take out the cops.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CCtxIvHH3PC/

    Replies: @Jon, @George Rockwell, @William Badwhite

    Hey ericstone shill, no one cares about this wigger’s takes other than you.

    • Disagree: Gore 2004
    • Replies: @Gore 2004
    @George Rockwell

    Eric will force you to care if you don't get your head out of the sand and realize that white liberals are powerful and control the country's apparatus.

    Wake the hell up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TczeEEgbMx4&t=1966s

  60. When I heard Tucker’s opening yesterday, I thought,

    “Holy shit! Tucker’s reading Sailer!!”

  61. @Thulean Friend
    @Hypnotoad666


    Tucker (or one of his writers) clearly reads iSteve.
     
    If that's the case, then they should look at this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Ped-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    and this:

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/10/Cyclist-fatality-rate-per-100km.png

    Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly. Are his writers going to accept a broader discussion on these topics or will they only focus on race, like most of US discourse these days? America was broken even before the current crisis. The debate should reflect that.

    Replies: @Polistra, @International Jew, @Mike Tre, @Anon, @Muggles

    Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly.

    *Sigh*

    Again, a clueless European (assume) who has never visited America or looked closely at a map.

    The continental USA is larger than Europe as whole. Europe is much more densely populated and of course cities, roads, etc. much older.

    Most American cities grew large post 19th century. European countries each are dominated by one or two very old, very dense cities whose populations have always been large relative to total national size.

    So America is post pedestrian, and largely post railroad (for passengers). European cities mostly all have metros underground and extensive bus systems. Europeans tend to be fitter since they walk more, because they have to. Americans drive.

    So more cars here, which rule the roads, unlike car scarce Europe.

    Americans (especially blacks for some reason) get killed walking in streets. In rural roads walking or biking is very dangerous. Also fewer blacks ambling in streets in Europe.

    Vast distances and rough hilly mountainous and non dense population make rail uneconomic for passengers except in dense corridors on the East Coast.

    These are valid reasons why apples vs. oranges in these metrics.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  62. @Mike Tre
    @Thulean Friend

    "Even before the 2020 spike, America was a primitive country that was far too car-dependent and thus inescapably too deadly."

    Completely inaccurate. Get into one of inner cities one day and see what little regard "pedestrians" and cyclists have for traffic rules and etiquette.

    And where are these "pedestrian" fatalities occurring? On the sidewalk? Crosswalk? My purely observational guess is that most of them are killed while jaywalking.

    Cyclists are simply oblivious ignorant fools and are almost always responsible for there own deaths. Maybe if they stopped at stop signs and stop lights and didn't weave in and out of live lanes on the wrong side of the road they wouldn't die so much. I have no sympathy for them.

    Replies: @kpkinsunnnyphiladelphia

    Cyclists are simply oblivious ignorant fools and are almost always responsible for there own deaths. Maybe if they stopped at stop signs and stop lights and didn’t weave in and out of live lanes on the wrong side of the road they wouldn’t die so much. I have no sympathy for them

    Couldn’t agree more.

    One day this past winter I was driving down a dark basically deserted residential street at night and suddenly was on top of a bicyclist who had no lights at all or reflective clothing!

    I swerved out of his way, but slowed down so he caught up to me, then rolled down my passenger window, and told him. “Hey, asshole, if you don’t get some illumination on your bike, you have a future as hamburger.”

    Of course, had I hit him, it would have been all my fault.

    • Thanks: Mike Tre
  63. Steve, is there anyone you’d consider to be the ‘Steve Sailer of the left?’

    I find it hard to even identify any public intellectuals worth taking seriously. Ibram X is obviously not extremely bright, Genius Coates is no genius, and the few potentially interesting voices over there engage in too much crimestop to ever say anything interesting. Chomsky is superannuated in style and demeanor, and he’s never been much interested in the culture wars anyway.

    Jimmy Dore is not a public intellectual, he’s a comedian, but one of the few people of the left I find to be sincere and willing to call out the admin state/war party/oligarch/race baiter alliance that congealed in reaction to Trumpism. Am I forgetting someone?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I think Bret Weinstein is a lefty public intellectual worth taking seriously, as opposed to his moron idiot assclown brother.

    , @Corvinus
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    David Chappelle amd Chris Rock, for starters.

    , @mikeInThe716
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Sam Harris definitely tilts left. But he's a noticer in many areas.

    , @J.Ross
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Charles Murray.

    , @Negrolphin Pool
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    Chomsky is superannuated in style and demeanor
     
    Yes. I began finding Chomsky grating to the point of unlistenability in the late 2000s. Even worse, I believe that his ultra-sotto-voce delivery, perhaps affected to mask the emasculated horseness of old age, began being widely mimiced across the left in both live and prerecorded performances due to Chomsky's demigod status in those circle jerks.

    For examples, see the maddening menopausal drone of "The Corporation" or virtually any male guest on Democracy Now from that period.

  64. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Steve, is there anyone you'd consider to be the 'Steve Sailer of the left?'

    I find it hard to even identify any public intellectuals worth taking seriously. Ibram X is obviously not extremely bright, Genius Coates is no genius, and the few potentially interesting voices over there engage in too much crimestop to ever say anything interesting. Chomsky is superannuated in style and demeanor, and he's never been much interested in the culture wars anyway.

    Jimmy Dore is not a public intellectual, he's a comedian, but one of the few people of the left I find to be sincere and willing to call out the admin state/war party/oligarch/race baiter alliance that congealed in reaction to Trumpism. Am I forgetting someone?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Corvinus, @mikeInThe716, @J.Ross, @Negrolphin Pool

    I think Bret Weinstein is a lefty public intellectual worth taking seriously, as opposed to his moron idiot assclown brother.

  65. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Steve, is there anyone you'd consider to be the 'Steve Sailer of the left?'

    I find it hard to even identify any public intellectuals worth taking seriously. Ibram X is obviously not extremely bright, Genius Coates is no genius, and the few potentially interesting voices over there engage in too much crimestop to ever say anything interesting. Chomsky is superannuated in style and demeanor, and he's never been much interested in the culture wars anyway.

    Jimmy Dore is not a public intellectual, he's a comedian, but one of the few people of the left I find to be sincere and willing to call out the admin state/war party/oligarch/race baiter alliance that congealed in reaction to Trumpism. Am I forgetting someone?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Corvinus, @mikeInThe716, @J.Ross, @Negrolphin Pool

    David Chappelle amd Chris Rock, for starters.

  66. Question for Steve: Did you ever consider becoming an actuary? You seem to have the mind for it, but I know that normally MBA’s don’t become actuaries, as actuaries generally don’t attend grad school.

    Also, I remember when Mary Pat Campbell used to post over at Half Sigma, back when that was a popular blog. She might be one of us.

  67. @HammerJack
    @clifford brown

    The Hellcat is way way OTT but the Challenger is still about the hottest thing on wheels in CYA.

    It's also the best of the muscle-car reboots IMHO. Though I've never owned a muscle car (or been tempted to) so my opinion may not count for much.


    https://i.ibb.co/Fg99ZPG/2010-dodge-challenger-srt-8.jpg

    Replies: @Up2Drew

    Why are manufacturers allowed to build street vehicles that can top 150 mph? I mean, I’ve been a muscle car junkie since I was a kid, but what purpose is being served?

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Up2Drew

    These are good questions. I think the answer to your first one is "freedom" and to your second, "bragging rights."

    The automotive journalism establishment certainly doesn't help, by treating whichever car is fastest as clearly superior, and I can't help but notice that acceleration figures are prominently touted even (or especially) for electrics such as the Tesla.

    Personally, while I definitely appreciate good handling, I seek smoothness, safety and comfort rather than electrifying acceleration. But then I'm over 40.

  68. @Arclight
    Things will have to get still worse - remember that no matter what people say in polls about crime being their top priority, to makes cities safer Dem politicians will have to support the vigorous prosecution of a key segment of their base.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    But their masters installed the Dem city leaders with specific orders to do the opposite of that.

  69. @al gore rhythms
    Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot looks so much like a zombie corpse I typed 'zombie lightfoot' into google fully expecting to find this was already a meme, and am somewhat surprised that it came up with nothing Maybe google removed them?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @J.Ross

    She’s doing the job she was told to do by her masters, and she will be rewarded down the road. I think she’s just weary of having to go through the motions of acting like she gives a shit when one of her constituents occasionally gets up on his hind legs and barks ugly facts at her.

    After she said the following, all of the usual suspects from Snopes to USA Today to Reuters and beyond “fact checked” her quote and said it was being taken out of context by crazy conspiracy theorists. As proof, they offered the full quote:

    “The way that aldermanic prerogative works is there’s got to be compliance with the executive branch, because otherwise it doesn’t work. So, you’ve got to eliminate that compliance, and you make it a mandate. And then you do training, particularly in the city licensing departments whether it’s zoning, buildings, housing will be impacted by it, planning certainly, and you pick the people who run those agencies and the deputies that are pledging allegiance to ‘the new world order’ and good governance.

    I don’t see how the full context diminishes the oddness of such specific word choice. I’m going to continue to give myself license to consider it very telling.

  70. @Gore 2004
    White liberals will say that you are racist for saying this.

    Eric Bryan Stone blames white cops and says that people should take out the cops.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CCtxIvHH3PC/

    Replies: @Jon, @George Rockwell, @William Badwhite

    Eric Bryan Stone blames white cops and says that people should take out the cops.

    Sam Thompson from Peoria blames sun spots. Just post under your own name Stone.

  71. @anonymous
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/biden-youve-got-nice-country-here-americans-it-would-be-a-shame-if-something-happened-to-it/

    https://video.foxnews.com/v/6186424701001/

    CARLSON: Oh, you think there’ll be less violence if he is reelected? Got it. It is a nice country you have here. It would be a shame if something were to happen to it.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Thanks.

    2:40-3:05.

    Almost word for word.

  72. @Cool Daddy Jimbo
    Speaking of Tucker, he was mocking CNN+ last night. As he was doing so the chyron read, "Unlike Toobin, CNN+ did not have a happy ending."

    I was like, "Damn!"

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Kristi Noem, the Rino governor of South Dakota, tweeted that.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Jim Don Bob

    Wrong!

    https://instapundit.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/kristi_noem_cnn_keystone_pipeline_workers_04-22-2022.jpg

  73. @George Rockwell
    @Gore 2004

    Hey ericstone shill, no one cares about this wigger's takes other than you.

    Replies: @Gore 2004

    Eric will force you to care if you don’t get your head out of the sand and realize that white liberals are powerful and control the country’s apparatus.

    Wake the hell up.

  74. @al gore rhythms
    Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot looks so much like a zombie corpse I typed 'zombie lightfoot' into google fully expecting to find this was already a meme, and am somewhat surprised that it came up with nothing Maybe google removed them?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @J.Ross

    The joke with her is comparison to the ent character Groot from Guardians of the Galaxy.

  75. @Up2Drew
    @HammerJack

    Why are manufacturers allowed to build street vehicles that can top 150 mph? I mean, I've been a muscle car junkie since I was a kid, but what purpose is being served?

    Replies: @HammerJack

    These are good questions. I think the answer to your first one is “freedom” and to your second, “bragging rights.”

    The automotive journalism establishment certainly doesn’t help, by treating whichever car is fastest as clearly superior, and I can’t help but notice that acceleration figures are prominently touted even (or especially) for electrics such as the Tesla.

    Personally, while I definitely appreciate good handling, I seek smoothness, safety and comfort rather than electrifying acceleration. But then I’m over 40.

  76. I would really consider caring if I weren’t a Karen for doing so. I may consider caring except that I will be doxed again and humiliated for considering or even thinking about the topic. The police will hide cameras in my home along with their antifa affiliates to humiliate me. I’ll spend hours looking around my home for hidden cameras and bugs. I have been trying to buy stock in tinfoil. The left hurts people endlessly, in every thing they do. They are viscous, ruthless and cruel even to those who did nothing. May the left rot forever.

  77. @Anon
    I love the elaborate parallel construction/evidence laundering that Tucker goes through to make it look like, "No?, what?, Sailer?, never heard of the guy, my government document research team came up with this story."

    Last summer, deep in the bowels of the Transportation Agency in Washington, some nameless federal analysts came across a highly puzzling trend ...
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_construction

    A graph of traffic death trends would have made the story more real and understandable for most viewers.

    Replies: @Cato

    We should be grateful to Tucker for talking about this. And we should not expect Tucker to cite his actual sources: he is not an academic under a stringent obligation to cite properly, he is an influencer, who will mention sources only if it strengthens his influence. And, to be fair, he need not have directly gotten this from Steve, he could have gotten it from someone “deep in the bowels” of D.C., maybe a data geek playing with R, or maybe somebody who had been tipped off by reading Steve or listening to the podcast with Steve and Charles Murray. Nevertheless, Steve deserves a lot of credit for noticing this nearly a year before it comes out on Tucker.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Cato


    We should be grateful to Tucker for talking about this. And we should not expect Tucker to cite his actual sources: he is not an academic under a stringent obligation to cite properly, he is an influencer, who will mention sources only if it strengthens his influence.

     

    I imagine Tucker has tried to thank Steve at some point, but Steve would have none of it…

    https://youtu.be/ZYAK_OigPoE
  78. Not completely OT: The NY Times has an “investigative” article about why the Florida government chose not to allow schools to purchase certain textbooks in mathematics. The NY Times “investigation” displays completely harmless pages from these books (not the pages you have seen on twitter feeds) and says “look at these harmless pages, this is why this stupid Republican-led state government banned these books”. They ignore the pages about CRT none of which are shown in their “investigative” article. It is a classic bait-and-switch. NY Times readers are left with an entirely false impression. That is why Tucker Carlson is important – to highlight that type of bait-and-switch, control the narrative deception by the mainstream media.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/22/us/florida-rejected-textbooks.html

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Peter Johnson

    Anyone who actually reads and believes the NYT after all they have done deserves what they get.

  79. @ArthurBiggs
    Tucker has used the "something very dark is going on" line on numerous occasions. Still he always plays the non-racial card of the cuckservative. Whenever he wants to criticize black criminality he trots out one of the house negroes (Candace Owens, Jason Whitlock, etc.) to tell us white people that most blacks hate N-words also.

    Replies: @Ron Mexico

    Tell Mr Whitlock that he is a house negro to his face. That would be Fearless.

  80. @Barnard
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Blake Neff was a writer on Tucker's show who had to resign for posting comments deemed racist a couple of years ago. I would guess most of his staffers read writers across the dissident right and rarely read stuff from Conservatism, Inc. legacy sites unless they are looking for someone to mock.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Neff’s “offensive” comments seemed remarkably anodyne to me. I see more inflammatory comments on virtually every thread on this site. I lost most of my respect for Tucker after that incident. He probably could have fought harder for Neff, and he definitely could have resigned in solidarity if the Fox execs really tried to force the issue. If I were Tucker I would have said:

    I don’t condone everything Blake wrote on that site, but his job is to research things for me and write first drafts. Whatever non-violent things he may have said ten years ago on a pseudonymous internet forum do not invalidate the work he does for this show. And one has to wonder how many offensive things that staffers for MSNBC, CNN, Washington Post, etc have written. In the case of Sarah Jeong of the NYT, her extremely racist tweets against white people were publicly revealed, to absolutely no detriment to her career. Besides being objectively more inflammatory than Blake’s posts, she posted publicly while Blake posted anonymously. Her excuse was that she was “mimicking the language of her harassers” but it’s safe to say that a white male who “mimicked the language of” anti-white and anti-male bigots would not be allowed to work at NYT or any corporation anywhere. In fact we know that, because of what the NYT did to Quinn Norton, whose offenses were notably less severe than Jeong’s.

    Blake regrets what he wrote, and I have admonished him for his ignorant comments. But he is a great asset to this show and a good man. He isn’t going anywhere, as much as my enemies may cry about it. Thank you and good night.

    I realize it is easy for me to criticize a man for not throwing away an eight figure salary in order to defend the right to make silly tweets on anonymous accounts, but

    1) he could have a lucrative career doing lots of things, even if blacklisted from Fox

    2) he’s such an important asset to Fox that it’s hard to imagine they really would have forced Tucker out

    3) he’s already loaded beyond what 99.9% of Americans will ever experience, so I don’t think his kids would have gone hungry

    4) cowardice is cowardice at the end of the day

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @res
    @AndrewR


    4) cowardice is cowardice at the end of the day
     
    The line between cowardice and choosing your battles wisely can be complicated. A statement like that has much more credibility from a commenter who uses an identity attributable to someone (himself!) in the real world.
  81. Anonymous[510] • Disclaimer says:
    @additionalMike
    @Tim

    The problem there is that if Carlson admitted he was influenced by Mr. Sailor, that would tie him to Unz Review as well. I admire Unz's openmindedness, but his blog frequently features ugly racist and (more frequently) anti-Semetic content. There seems to be no filter on Unz at all.
    That would not be a good move on Carlson's part.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I admire Unz’s openmindedness, but his blog frequently features ugly racist and (more frequently) anti-Semetic content. There seems to be no filter on Unz at all.

    It wasn’t that long ago when readers were expected to d0 their own filtering by making up their own minds about what they would retain and what they would discard. It was called “discernment,” and it could do with a comeback.

    Ron Unz’ blog allows him to put ideas in front of readers and determine if they hold up under examination and discussion; sometimes they do, sometimes they do not. In the event a reader takes exception to what he writes, the solution is simple: he/she can stop reading it.

    We cannot work out what is true and what is not unless people write about it first. I do not like much of what I find on this site, but I recognise that people have to be allowed to write about whatever they wish because writing is the only way we have of distinguishing truth from falsehood.

    ( This is why leftists are so keen on censorship.)

    The whole, “you can’t write that because I disagree with it” business is getting old. On the plus side, an increasing number of people are beginning to recognise that when something is derided as “racist” or “anti-semitic,” that’s often code for, “Hey, this is true, and I don’t want it getting around.”

    The fact that there is no filter on this site is the very thing that makes it worth reading. I don’t say everything on the site is worth a look, only that the lack of a filter is a strength, not a weakness.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Anonymous

    No filter? LOL. My posts have about a .300 "batting average" of actually getting posted.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  82. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Steve, is there anyone you'd consider to be the 'Steve Sailer of the left?'

    I find it hard to even identify any public intellectuals worth taking seriously. Ibram X is obviously not extremely bright, Genius Coates is no genius, and the few potentially interesting voices over there engage in too much crimestop to ever say anything interesting. Chomsky is superannuated in style and demeanor, and he's never been much interested in the culture wars anyway.

    Jimmy Dore is not a public intellectual, he's a comedian, but one of the few people of the left I find to be sincere and willing to call out the admin state/war party/oligarch/race baiter alliance that congealed in reaction to Trumpism. Am I forgetting someone?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Corvinus, @mikeInThe716, @J.Ross, @Negrolphin Pool

    Sam Harris definitely tilts left. But he’s a noticer in many areas.

  83. @Anon
    @Thulean Friend

    "primitive country that was far too car-dependent"

    "Primitive" for using 20th century technology (cars) instead of 19th century technologies (rail, bicycle)? What a strange choice of words.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    I think you are responding to sarcasm, bro.

  84. @Erik L
    Also might be a problem here if young blacks tend to have more people in the car on average. One car accident causing 6 deaths vs another causing 1...

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    That’s because it takes 6 Blacks to come up with one with a valid DL and no outstanding warrants.

  85. @Jim Don Bob
    @Cool Daddy Jimbo

    Kristi Noem, the Rino governor of South Dakota, tweeted that.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Wrong!

  86. @Anonymous
    @additionalMike


    I admire Unz’s openmindedness, but his blog frequently features ugly racist and (more frequently) anti-Semetic content. There seems to be no filter on Unz at all.
     
    It wasn't that long ago when readers were expected to d0 their own filtering by making up their own minds about what they would retain and what they would discard. It was called "discernment," and it could do with a comeback.

    Ron Unz' blog allows him to put ideas in front of readers and determine if they hold up under examination and discussion; sometimes they do, sometimes they do not. In the event a reader takes exception to what he writes, the solution is simple: he/she can stop reading it.

    We cannot work out what is true and what is not unless people write about it first. I do not like much of what I find on this site, but I recognise that people have to be allowed to write about whatever they wish because writing is the only way we have of distinguishing truth from falsehood.

    ( This is why leftists are so keen on censorship.)

    The whole, "you can't write that because I disagree with it" business is getting old. On the plus side, an increasing number of people are beginning to recognise that when something is derided as "racist" or "anti-semitic," that's often code for, "Hey, this is true, and I don't want it getting around."

    The fact that there is no filter on this site is the very thing that makes it worth reading. I don't say everything on the site is worth a look, only that the lack of a filter is a strength, not a weakness.

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    No filter? LOL. My posts have about a .300 “batting average” of actually getting posted.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @AceDeuce

    That makes you all star caliber, my friend!

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  87. Anonymous[350] • Disclaimer says:
    @Cato
    @Anon

    We should be grateful to Tucker for talking about this. And we should not expect Tucker to cite his actual sources: he is not an academic under a stringent obligation to cite properly, he is an influencer, who will mention sources only if it strengthens his influence. And, to be fair, he need not have directly gotten this from Steve, he could have gotten it from someone "deep in the bowels" of D.C., maybe a data geek playing with R, or maybe somebody who had been tipped off by reading Steve or listening to the podcast with Steve and Charles Murray. Nevertheless, Steve deserves a lot of credit for noticing this nearly a year before it comes out on Tucker.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    We should be grateful to Tucker for talking about this. And we should not expect Tucker to cite his actual sources: he is not an academic under a stringent obligation to cite properly, he is an influencer, who will mention sources only if it strengthens his influence.

    I imagine Tucker has tried to thank Steve at some point, but Steve would have none of it…

  88. @AndrewR
    @Barnard

    Neff's "offensive" comments seemed remarkably anodyne to me. I see more inflammatory comments on virtually every thread on this site. I lost most of my respect for Tucker after that incident. He probably could have fought harder for Neff, and he definitely could have resigned in solidarity if the Fox execs really tried to force the issue. If I were Tucker I would have said:


    I don't condone everything Blake wrote on that site, but his job is to research things for me and write first drafts. Whatever non-violent things he may have said ten years ago on a pseudonymous internet forum do not invalidate the work he does for this show. And one has to wonder how many offensive things that staffers for MSNBC, CNN, Washington Post, etc have written. In the case of Sarah Jeong of the NYT, her extremely racist tweets against white people were publicly revealed, to absolutely no detriment to her career. Besides being objectively more inflammatory than Blake's posts, she posted publicly while Blake posted anonymously. Her excuse was that she was "mimicking the language of her harassers" but it's safe to say that a white male who "mimicked the language of" anti-white and anti-male bigots would not be allowed to work at NYT or any corporation anywhere. In fact we know that, because of what the NYT did to Quinn Norton, whose offenses were notably less severe than Jeong's.

    Blake regrets what he wrote, and I have admonished him for his ignorant comments. But he is a great asset to this show and a good man. He isn't going anywhere, as much as my enemies may cry about it. Thank you and good night.
     

    I realize it is easy for me to criticize a man for not throwing away an eight figure salary in order to defend the right to make silly tweets on anonymous accounts, but

    1) he could have a lucrative career doing lots of things, even if blacklisted from Fox

    2) he's such an important asset to Fox that it's hard to imagine they really would have forced Tucker out

    3) he's already loaded beyond what 99.9% of Americans will ever experience, so I don't think his kids would have gone hungry

    4) cowardice is cowardice at the end of the day

    Replies: @res

    4) cowardice is cowardice at the end of the day

    The line between cowardice and choosing your battles wisely can be complicated. A statement like that has much more credibility from a commenter who uses an identity attributable to someone (himself!) in the real world.

  89. @Peter Johnson
    Not completely OT: The NY Times has an "investigative" article about why the Florida government chose not to allow schools to purchase certain textbooks in mathematics. The NY Times "investigation" displays completely harmless pages from these books (not the pages you have seen on twitter feeds) and says "look at these harmless pages, this is why this stupid Republican-led state government banned these books". They ignore the pages about CRT none of which are shown in their "investigative" article. It is a classic bait-and-switch. NY Times readers are left with an entirely false impression. That is why Tucker Carlson is important - to highlight that type of bait-and-switch, control the narrative deception by the mainstream media.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/22/us/florida-rejected-textbooks.html

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Anyone who actually reads and believes the NYT after all they have done deserves what they get.

    • Agree: JimDandy
  90. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Steve, is there anyone you'd consider to be the 'Steve Sailer of the left?'

    I find it hard to even identify any public intellectuals worth taking seriously. Ibram X is obviously not extremely bright, Genius Coates is no genius, and the few potentially interesting voices over there engage in too much crimestop to ever say anything interesting. Chomsky is superannuated in style and demeanor, and he's never been much interested in the culture wars anyway.

    Jimmy Dore is not a public intellectual, he's a comedian, but one of the few people of the left I find to be sincere and willing to call out the admin state/war party/oligarch/race baiter alliance that congealed in reaction to Trumpism. Am I forgetting someone?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Corvinus, @mikeInThe716, @J.Ross, @Negrolphin Pool

    Charles Murray.

  91. @AceDeuce
    @Anonymous

    No filter? LOL. My posts have about a .300 "batting average" of actually getting posted.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    That makes you all star caliber, my friend!

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Mike Tre

    LOL. I have to deal with it I guess. I've been banned from pretty much everywhere else.

  92. @Mike Tre
    @AceDeuce

    That makes you all star caliber, my friend!

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    LOL. I have to deal with it I guess. I’ve been banned from pretty much everywhere else.

  93. The real data point here is October. Blacks and Non-Blacks have scant correlation of outcomes the rest of the time, but in October they become twins. What the heck happens in October that makes them have the same outcomes? Yes, it could be random variance, an aberration.

    But, seasonal and behavioral trends are apparent in the data. Non-blacks trend to smaller increases and larger decreases in all other months, and then in October they are equal? What the heck happens in October??

    A less diplomatic way of putting it: what happens in October that causes non-blacks to die in traffic just the same as blacks?

    I have SOLVED racism! Make every month October 🙂

  94. Anonymous[339] • Disclaimer says:

    Blacks know any car accident can involve a big payday, while whites aren’t as greedy in engaging in the wretched enterprise of shaking down insurance companies. Also, blacks aren’t as mentally tough as white people generally.

    Because of their lack of functional fathers in their lives, blacks, either male or female, tend to develop the and overall narcissism of a 13 year old girl. Wailing at the least bit of perceived slight.

    I wonder if the numbers don’t skew to that somewhat…

  95. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Steve, is there anyone you'd consider to be the 'Steve Sailer of the left?'

    I find it hard to even identify any public intellectuals worth taking seriously. Ibram X is obviously not extremely bright, Genius Coates is no genius, and the few potentially interesting voices over there engage in too much crimestop to ever say anything interesting. Chomsky is superannuated in style and demeanor, and he's never been much interested in the culture wars anyway.

    Jimmy Dore is not a public intellectual, he's a comedian, but one of the few people of the left I find to be sincere and willing to call out the admin state/war party/oligarch/race baiter alliance that congealed in reaction to Trumpism. Am I forgetting someone?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Corvinus, @mikeInThe716, @J.Ross, @Negrolphin Pool

    Chomsky is superannuated in style and demeanor

    Yes. I began finding Chomsky grating to the point of unlistenability in the late 2000s. Even worse, I believe that his ultra-sotto-voce delivery, perhaps affected to mask the emasculated horseness of old age, began being widely mimiced across the left in both live and prerecorded performances due to Chomsky’s demigod status in those circle jerks.

    For examples, see the maddening menopausal drone of “The Corporation” or virtually any male guest on Democracy Now from that period.

  96. North County is the black side of St. Louis

    https://archive.ph/Cj9XU

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Father Coughlin

    Thanks, I'll post.

  97. @Father Coughlin
    North County is the black side of St. Louis



    https://archive.ph/Cj9XU


     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Thanks, I’ll post.

  98. Steve Sailer Retweeted:


    https://vdare.com/articles/vdare-com-s-james-fulford-the-msm-wants-to-lie-to-you-we-won-t-let-them

    More recently, Steve Sailer has been talking about the Racial Wreckening on the roads since July of 2021. There are a lot of car crashes out there. Car crashes are caused by people driving too fast. We have police who are supposed to do traffic stops to discourage this. And it turns out that traffic stops became evil sometime in 2020. So they stopped happening.

    And while Steve is one of the few people mentioning it, the story recently appeared on Tucker Carlson.

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