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From Politico:

How women took over the military-industrial complex

For the first time, the nation’s defense hierarchy is no longer dominated by men.

By DAVID BROWN 01/02/2019 05:08 AM EST

From the executive leadership of top weapons-makers, to the senior government officials designing and purchasing the nation’s military arsenal, the United States’ national defense hierarchy is, for the first time, largely run by women.

As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors — Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics and the defense arm of Boeing — are now women. And across the negotiating table, the Pentagon’s top weapons buyer and the chief overseer of the nation’s nuclear stockpile now join other women in some of the most influential national security posts, such as the nation’s top arms control negotiator and the secretary of the Air Force.

Therefore, Eisenhower was wrong to warn us about the military-industrial complex. We never needed to be skeptical of giant defense companies, we just needed the huge defense contractors to be headed by female CEOs. Now everything is nice. Trust women!

 
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  1. Pretty cool information from MiniWar. I will have a toast of Victory Gin.

    the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors — Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics and the defense arm of Boeing — are now women.

    What happens when the gals get together for a little discussion with about fomenting a war to increase sales? Shurely beats “Desperate Housewives”. (And would that be a “Killerware Party”?). “Do you want to have some cake? I made it myself. It’s a real bomb!”

    Next up: Work camps run by women show that even in fascist, racist societies, progress cannot be stopped. After this message for Raytheon….

    • Replies: @Prester John
    Main concern: Are they post-menopausal?
  2. The Military-Industrial Complex (not to mention the Funeral-Industrial Complex) outlived not only Ike, but Mamie:

    http://www.marksverylarge.com/2006/10/12/104/

    And yes, someone who remembers the old National Lampoon is just about due for a dirt nap.

    • Replies: @Bard of Bumperstickers
    The menstrual-industrial complex. Now includes academia, politics, "education" [sic], psychopharmacology, "justice" [sic] system, soy-griculture, and weaponized MSM.
  3. As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors… are now women

    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany’s Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:


    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children


    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children


    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)


    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    • Replies: @tsotha
    That means we're still doing better than the Europeans, whose leaders don't mind inviting people from incompatible cultures because they'll have no grandchildren to hate them for it.
    , @Mr McKenna
    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe...

    https://theuglytruth.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/defense-minister.jpg
    , @LondonBob
    Theresa May and her husband can't have children, they did try, apparently.
    , @Twinkie
    Why is it often the childless woman who looks unhinged?
    , @DFH
    Look at those jaws! Physiognomy is real
    , @Nathan
    And another thing! For all of this bleating about STEM, it looks like only one of these women (Warden) has any background in science at all, and only a BS in computer science at that. No, the real way to the top is still a Harvard/Wharton MBA.
    , @Mitleser
    Still below replacement fertility.
    Thanks Caret.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    Wow, Leanne Caret looks like she was just presented with that three-carat engagement ring she's been dreaming of!
    , @tyrone
    Woman's traditional weapon: POISON! danger!,danger!
    , @Cortes
    Caret is well named (lacks).
    , @Nathan
    Ok, people it's late in the thread. Let's get down to brass tacks.

    1.) Would.
    2.) ...eh. Pass.
    3.) Probably 20 years ago. Not bad for 62.
    4.) Would, but give a fake number, and change the locks afterwards.
  4. I’ve worked as an engineer in both civilian high-tech and in the defense industry.

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

    The female engineers I knew in the defense industry were, to put it diplomatically, inadequate. I assumed that this was due to the heavy pressure for affirmative action in government contractors.

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.

    • Replies: @bomag

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.
     
    As you indicated, the culture of a place is more important than any one individual.

    But CEO is kinda important.
    , @Dr. X
    Right -- I'll bet that naming all of these females as CEOs is merely for the purpose of gaming the Federal contracting system, so that the major defense contractors don't lose bids to the minority/female business enterprises that are required set-asides in Federal procurement proposals.
    , @Anonymous

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.
     
    Why would this be the case?
    , @Johnny Smoggins
    "The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male."


    No need to cuck out here man, no one's going to tattle on you. And I think we managed to scare Rosie off so you're not getting a piece of that either.
    , @Bill H

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.
     
    Two words: Carly Fiorina.
  5. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    That means we’re still doing better than the Europeans, whose leaders don’t mind inviting people from incompatible cultures because they’ll have no grandchildren to hate them for it.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @anon
    all civilization is founded and maintained on organized superior violence and later threat of it, the first step is patriarchy the very first step in a civilization is to control the bitches nothing can be done until that is out of the way
  6. This Depilatory-Menstrual Complex will be the death of us all. No wonder Russia’s weapons are so superior.

    • LOL: The Anti-Gnostic
  7. Guys, it doesn’t make any difference. The process had stopped working years before women took it over.

    In fact, the process not working was an essential precursor to women taking over.

    This has been going on for a _very_ long time, at least since WW I, when a blockage of war production by the NAACP in St. Louis MO led to hiring many NAACP approved people to local war industries, just so production could resume. Fighting people arguably _died_ because of this. The action clearly demonstrated that the defense industry was a source of patronage jobs even for, to be blunt, murderers. (Justification: the work stoppage was illegal, the people who organized and executed it new that stopping production would cause combat deaths. That’s murder, 1st degree, and that would be just one of the offenses.)

    The WW II decision to only deal with large corporation meant, sure as anything, a goodly number of patronage jobs within the corporations — and a good number of patronage contracts _to_ the corporations. This is just from first principles, mind you.

    Eventually the whole thing became a farce. That’s why the US has lost its research edge. But a silver lining: it doesn’t matter who runs a farce, so there are _many more_ patronage jobs now!!!! _Anybody_ can take any job! Contractors will do the real work. Let’s throw a party!

    (According the the author of _Systemantics_, the ancient Egyptians had two people assigned to every job: a member of the aristocracy, and the person who actually did the job. Sort of like the old ship’s captain and the ship’s sailing master used in some naval forces back in the 1700s. The author of the book was quite complimentary about ancient Egyptian practice, apparently on the grounds that at least _somebody_ was selected on work related qualifications. I never bothered to confirm that.)

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @CJ

    _Anybody_ can take any job! Contractors will do the real work.
     
    This describes large parts of the public sector today. I've worked for agencies of the U.S. federal government and Canadian municipal, provincial, and federal governments. It wasn't this way 40 years ago but now it's epidemic. It started with contractors doing high-level specialized tech work, and continued with contractors doing low-level cleaning and maintenance. Then it shifted into outsourcing functions like payroll, so now the permanent employees have virtually no essential functions. When the Orange Man "shuts down the government" ...
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Very interesting stuff, CI, especially the Egyptian business (at least they were honest about how things were going to work). I'm still mulling over your post on the carbon-fiber/epoxy negative-spring-component structure. Don't get me wrong, I understand how it works from your good description, although you need to realize you have both a downward force and a moment exerted onto the hollow shaft, so I'm not sure you're covering the torque reaction of the tube.

    However, maybe the prof you talked to assumed you meant a spring constant for a material itself, not a specific structure. The tube/lever combination does indeed sound like a negative-spring constant STRUCTURE. I have to think about it more (just read it a few minutes ago) and also I want to think on whether a structure made of homogeneous material can still do this. Think of a hollow-triangular CS tube - it will not twist while keeping former parallel CS's still parallel - there will be a displacement of any lever/handle in the direction parallel to the tube axis. This is why most shafts are round, whether hollow or solid - everything else is hard to analyze (at least was before sophisticated FE software).
    , @Intelligent Dasein

    (According the the author of _Systemantics_, the ancient Egyptians had two people assigned to every job: a member of the aristocracy, and the person who actually did the job.
     
    This isn't really a bad thing, though. In fact, it's actually an essential and integral component of any sort of higher social organization.

    In order to fully run and integrate a large department of society---say, defense, agriculture, sanitation, or something like that---you will need an "ops manager" who oversees the day-to-day operations of the enterprise. But you will also need a "Minister of Thus-and-So" to liaison with the government and who, as a member of the ruling class, represents that particular organ of society therein and integrates it with the political power center. Failing this, the department would become a rebel faction, a separate political power of its own, and would lose its sanction to operate lawfully.

    There is a sort of libertarian fantasy, quite current nowadays, which holds that the political side of life is unnecessary, and that if the political power disappeared the "ops" side of life would go on functioning just as well without it; but this is not true. Although most people do not like to admit it and may not even be aware of it, we all need and seek a sanction for our activities. In the full scope of life, "can" is not enough to motivate action, to contextualize it, or to place it into the higher social, psychological, and spiritual gestalt in which deeds acquire meaning. We also need the "must" of moral imperative, the absence of which is decadence, shame, and disgrace. One the vital functions of government is to provide the sanctioning authority that blesses and condemns activities as the case my be, and that doles out honors and punishments accordingly.

    The problem with these female CEOs and minority contractors is not that these are political posts as opposed to ops posts, but that the political power is being distributed amongst the unworthies.
  8. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe…

    • Replies: @bomag
    "...worth a thousand words."
    , @Jack Strocchi
    I repectfully disagree.

    Sergey Shoygu sounds like the kind of guy you want to share a foxhole with. And perhaps a future President of Russia.

    But militarism has not served the Russian people well over the past century or so. They would be better off if they followed the Nordic example of putting an attractive woman in charge of defence.

    Better to put Alpha males like Shoygu in charge of border protection and population policy. The future belongs to people who can heed the lessons of Malthus and Galton.
    , @istevefan
    In fairness to the German Defense Minister, Ursula von der Leyen, she does have 7 children. I don't know how she found time to have 7 kids. She is a medical doctor and has been in politics long enough to get herself picked as defense minister. But along the way she was able to have enough kids to offset Merkel's big ZERO.
    , @tyrone
    Guess which one has been in a fist fight?
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Fight 'em, then f**k 'em.
    , @Alfa158
    To paraphrase the old saying; The battle goes not always to the Mongols, but that’s how the smart money bets.
    , @Ibound1
    Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Germany - all wealthy countries - barely have defense forces. Besides for the 1% of GNP spending:

    Germany has 4 Eurofighter jets ready for deployment. Four.

    https://www.thelocal.de/20180502/german-luftwaffe-only-has-four-operation-ready-eurofighter-jets-report

    Sweden can't even get enough troops to maintain the very small army they do fund
    https://taskandpurpose.com/sweden-military-retention

    You can learn all you need to learn about Norway from the accident report on the sinking of one of its very few Naval vessels which crashed into a tanker due to its own pathetic negligence and couldn't even be retrieved due to even more pathetic negligence. https://news.usni.org/2018/11/30/norwegian-frigate-helge-ingstad-accident-report

    Netherlands: They cannot even meet the most minimal commitments to NATO
    https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/75484

    Uncle Sucker defends these countries. Trump at least sees it and is getting tired of it but when he raised the issue of leaving NATO, you might have thought from the outrage he just said he was dissolving Congress. The DC Party is insane.

    We need to get out of NATO and only spend what we need for our own defense.
    , @Counterinsurgency
    The Defense Minister of Russia has the same expression as the Man in the Golden Helmet
    https://www.wikiart.org/en/rembrandt/man-in-a-golden-helmet-1669
    Same sort of troop leading experiences, I'd imagine. The painting was completed c.a. AD 1650, just after the AD 1648 negotiated end to the 30 Years War. There would have been quite a few troop leaders still alive to serve as models.

    Counterinsurgency

  9. anon[338] • Disclaimer says:

    The biggest threat posed by the military-industrial complex is mental laziness. Expect more rail guns, stealth fighters, “tanks of the future”, etc. Basically, weapons fit for the 1980’s. After all, there is a lot of money and jobs in boondoggles.

    Meanwhile, the first country that effectively uses autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds, could cover several square miles, creating a kill zone for any men or equipment stuck in it. Impossible to detect with radar and no way to return fire.

    Compare the cost of expendable drones to the cost of current military (air support, troops, logistics, etc) to achieve a comparable goal. Many orders of magnitude difference in cost. It’s also obvious that many “next generation” US weapons have not factored in this scenario at all and would be useless in such an environment. Perhaps it is too painful to consider? Much in the same way chariot-based armies of the late Bronze Age could not / would not plan for cheap hoplite armies?

    • Replies: @bomag

    autonomous microdrones
     
    To date, machines have always proved to be more expensive than men. Autonomous drones will be turning the tide of battle about the time we harness fusion power.
    , @Vendetta
    Passenger pigeons got wiped out of existence using 19th century technology. And no missile you could mount on a bird would be capable of knocking out a tank.

    Drone swarms will undoubtedly have a place on the battlefield once the technology becomes sophisticated enough, but just as another component of combined arms. They won’t be an unstoppable wonder weapon that displaces everything else.

    Simple, low tech solutions like a .50 cal quad mount or a 25mm autocannon spraying flak would disperse these swarms quite handily.
    , @ThreeCranes
    "autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds"

    Lead weighs 708 lbs per cubic foot. What battery powered motor could lift enough ammunition in a small bird package to make such a weapon even get off the ground?

    I suppose they could use soap bubbles for ammo.

    , @Simply Simon
    Good grief! You are giving away top secret DOD information. Await the knock on your door.
    , @Nathan
    What are these bird-sized drones supposed to kill you with? How much can a bird-sized drone carry? A couple of 5.56 rounds? Is it a kamikaze vehicle? If you have a few thousand, you'll run out pretty quick. And then there's weather.
    , @donut
    Hoplite armies were made up of citizens who provided their own equipment . A well armed militia you might say .
    , @Counterinsurgency
    Fact is, this can be done. I turned in a proposal to DARPA on this c.a. AD 2000, which they never followed up. I didn't have the business experience, they said. They were right, of course, but the basic system worked in simulation. With the right approach, you can have a coordinated mix of heavy and light platforms that coordinate. Not even very difficult from a software standpoint, although it will work better now that it would have back then thanks to lower power processors. From a countermeasures standpoint, you'd have to use spread spectrum communications.

    The drones amount to a low cost, rapidly deployed mine field. They would have the usual problem of (a) you only have so many mines, and (b) if the enemy can't move through, neither can you. Drones have another problem: eventually they run out of fuel, drop to the ground, and then what? Is the ground dangerous for the next decade or two from unexploded munitions? Still, these are minor problems as compared to losing the war.

    Counterinsurgency
  10. Anon[422] • Disclaimer says:

    Boeing’s Caret is famous for pushing for Neocon space wars, which would be pretty cool, I think. That chank lander on the dark side of the moon?: A Boeing Defense rocket-powered tactical space nuke could take it out nicely.

    We need to start blowing things up in space. And then hire outfits like Boeing to clean up all the pieces of blown-up stuff orbiting at 5,000 mph around the earth taking out satellites an space stations. Make America Great Again. Trump can just announce that we withdraw from space treaties, a la Paris. Bring defense jobs back to Southern California and elbow out the Hollywood types and the illegals.

    • Replies: @DFH

    Neocon space wars
     
    Bringing freedom to the people(?) of Alpha Centauri?
    , @Hail

    Boeing’s Caret is famous for pushing for Neocon space wars
     

    Neocon
     
    What's this about?

    Is it that Our Greatest Ally has run the numbers and determined a vital strategic interest in preventing a Palestinian foothold on the Moon? Or is it a Baathist space station that must be pre-empted?

    ("Why Boeing's CEO of Defense Takes Trump's Idea of a Space Force Seriously," Fortune [featuring video interview], Oct 2018)
    , @Anonymous

    We need to start blowing things up in space. And then hire outfits like Boeing to clean up all the pieces of blown-up stuff orbiting at 5,000 mph around the earth taking out satellites an space stations.
     
    Given the problem of trash pollution in space, blowing stuff up and creating more trash seems like a really really bad idea.
  11. It’s funny funny that the article is titled HOW women took over the military industrial complex, but doesn’t actually include any information about the government’s aggressive policies of awarding contracts first to women and minority owned businesses. There’s nothing about how Dodd-frank dictates how contractors must implement affirmative action in their workforce-

    http://www.fdic.gov/about/diversity/fairinclusion.html

    And for of all that ra-ra feminism, there’s no mention of how DoD acquisitions is a total dumpster fire. The F35 is a boondoggle, unless it’s a woman in charge of it. It’s costs must be the result of sexism. Likewise the littoral combat ship, DCGS, Future Soldier, that personnel carrier for the Marines… I had better stop remembering all of this with my male brain. Might get me into trouble.

    • Replies: @Major7
    THAT explains the $500 hammers. Hardware men see these women coming and they start rubbing their hands together. Everyone knows women are terrible negotiators. Except for shoes.
  12. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    Theresa May and her husband can’t have children, they did try, apparently.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Correct. Not a fair target. Merkel, fire away.
    , @Hail
    Teresa May
    1956: born in Sussex
    1977-1983: works at Bank of England
    1980: marriage
    1985-1997: works "as a financial consultant and senior advisor in International Affairs at the Association for Payment Clearing Services"
    1986-1994: "councillor for Durnsford ward, London Borough of Merton"
    1997: is elected to Parliament for the first time; turns 41 five months later

    Theresa May has revealed her heartbreaking struggle to have children which left both her and her husband "affected"

    [3 JUL 2016]
     

    Mrs May, hot favourite to take to the helm of the Tory party in the leadership battle, was speaking candidly for the first time about the issue in an interview with the Mail on Sunday.
     

    Mrs May said they wanted to have children but found they could not, adding: "It just didn't happen, so you know, it's one of those things." (Link)
     
    There are several possible interpretations of this claim.

    One is inevitably suspicious, of course, of the timing: This was what she told the press (note "for the firs time") while poised to take the helm of the Conservative Party in 2016 . Still, without better information, we can only take her at her word; even the claim alone is better than nothing or the opposite (something like "I hate children") for mothers' and would-be-mothers' morale.

    I still would ask: if the pair were as committed to having children as this implies, could not they have used a surrogate? IVF (practical in the UK in the 1980s)?
  13. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    Why is it often the childless woman who looks unhinged?

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Curiously, she looks more feminine than the other women.
  14. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    Look at those jaws! Physiognomy is real

  15. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    And another thing! For all of this bleating about STEM, it looks like only one of these women (Warden) has any background in science at all, and only a BS in computer science at that. No, the real way to the top is still a Harvard/Wharton MBA.

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    Don't worry. When the Chinese come we'll network our way out of it.
    , @Bragadocious
    Yep, these are all publicly-traded companies. These CEOs are hired for one thing, to manage quarterly conference calls with analysts. We should actually be glad they're not engineers or science geeks because they won't interfere with those departments. Now, if one of them hired Elizabeth Holmes to be head of R&D, then it's time to worry.
    , @Kyle
    Theres only one CEO of lockheed martin. If you want to build things with your hands science is important. Look at Elon Musk, all he does is engineering. Electrical, mechanical, chemical, phsical.
  16. @Twinkie
    Why is it often the childless woman who looks unhinged?

    Curiously, she looks more feminine than the other women.

  17. “Therefore, Eisenhower was wrong to warn us about the military-industrial complex. We never needed to be skeptical of giant defense companies, we just needed the huge defense contractors to be headed by female CEOs. Now everything is nice. Trust women!”

    How badly out of date you are, Steve. How 2008.

    The Nirvana will come only when all five are non-white and homosexual and/or trans. But with Jewish control of stocks.

  18. @Mr McKenna
    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe...

    https://theuglytruth.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/defense-minister.jpg

    “…worth a thousand words.”

  19. I worked in a similar field in the 70’s-90’s. Many of the government research executives were similar women. The men were much more interested in actually doing the work. Feynman famously never served on a committee at Caltech.

  20. @Anon
    Boeing's Caret is famous for pushing for Neocon space wars, which would be pretty cool, I think. That chank lander on the dark side of the moon?: A Boeing Defense rocket-powered tactical space nuke could take it out nicely.

    We need to start blowing things up in space. And then hire outfits like Boeing to clean up all the pieces of blown-up stuff orbiting at 5,000 mph around the earth taking out satellites an space stations. Make America Great Again. Trump can just announce that we withdraw from space treaties, a la Paris. Bring defense jobs back to Southern California and elbow out the Hollywood types and the illegals.

    Neocon space wars

    Bringing freedom to the people(?) of Alpha Centauri?

  21. @PhysicistDave
    I've worked as an engineer in both civilian high-tech and in the defense industry.

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

    The female engineers I knew in the defense industry were, to put it diplomatically, inadequate. I assumed that this was due to the heavy pressure for affirmative action in government contractors.

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.

    As you indicated, the culture of a place is more important than any one individual.

    But CEO is kinda important.

  22. @anon
    The biggest threat posed by the military-industrial complex is mental laziness. Expect more rail guns, stealth fighters, "tanks of the future", etc. Basically, weapons fit for the 1980's. After all, there is a lot of money and jobs in boondoggles.

    Meanwhile, the first country that effectively uses autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds, could cover several square miles, creating a kill zone for any men or equipment stuck in it. Impossible to detect with radar and no way to return fire.

    Compare the cost of expendable drones to the cost of current military (air support, troops, logistics, etc) to achieve a comparable goal. Many orders of magnitude difference in cost. It's also obvious that many "next generation" US weapons have not factored in this scenario at all and would be useless in such an environment. Perhaps it is too painful to consider? Much in the same way chariot-based armies of the late Bronze Age could not / would not plan for cheap hoplite armies?

    autonomous microdrones

    To date, machines have always proved to be more expensive than men. Autonomous drones will be turning the tide of battle about the time we harness fusion power.

  23. @Nathan
    And another thing! For all of this bleating about STEM, it looks like only one of these women (Warden) has any background in science at all, and only a BS in computer science at that. No, the real way to the top is still a Harvard/Wharton MBA.

    Don’t worry. When the Chinese come we’ll network our way out of it.

    • Agree: Kyle
    • LOL: Nathan
  24. @reactionry
    The Military-Industrial Complex (not to mention the Funeral-Industrial Complex) outlived not only Ike, but Mamie:

    http://www.marksverylarge.com/2006/10/12/104/


    And yes, someone who remembers the old National Lampoon is just about due for a dirt nap.

    The menstrual-industrial complex. Now includes academia, politics, “education” [sic], psychopharmacology, “justice” [sic] system, soy-griculture, and weaponized MSM.

  25. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    Still below replacement fertility.
    Thanks Caret.

  26. @El Dato
    Pretty cool information from MiniWar. I will have a toast of Victory Gin.

    the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors — Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics and the defense arm of Boeing — are now women.
     
    What happens when the gals get together for a little discussion with about fomenting a war to increase sales? Shurely beats "Desperate Housewives". (And would that be a "Killerware Party"?). "Do you want to have some cake? I made it myself. It's a real bomb!"

    Next up: Work camps run by women show that even in fascist, racist societies, progress cannot be stopped. After this message for Raytheon....

    Main concern: Are they post-menopausal?

    • LOL: Dtbb
  27. @Mr McKenna
    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe...

    https://theuglytruth.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/defense-minister.jpg

    I repectfully disagree.

    Sergey Shoygu sounds like the kind of guy you want to share a foxhole with. And perhaps a future President of Russia.

    But militarism has not served the Russian people well over the past century or so. They would be better off if they followed the Nordic example of putting an attractive woman in charge of defence.

    Better to put Alpha males like Shoygu in charge of border protection and population policy. The future belongs to people who can heed the lessons of Malthus and Galton.

    • Replies: @jbwilson24
    "Sergey Shoygu sounds like the kind of guy you want to share a foxhole with"

    He's not well liked in Russia. Apparently didn't have much of a service track record.
  28. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    Wow, Leanne Caret looks like she was just presented with that three-carat engagement ring she’s been dreaming of!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Is 3 carets good? I don't know, and I'm a whole lot richer for not knowing!
    , @LittleNano
    "Wow, Leanne Caret looks like she was just presented with that three-carat engagement ring she’s been dreaming of!"

    That or a DoD contract.
  29. @PhysicistDave
    I've worked as an engineer in both civilian high-tech and in the defense industry.

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

    The female engineers I knew in the defense industry were, to put it diplomatically, inadequate. I assumed that this was due to the heavy pressure for affirmative action in government contractors.

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.

    Right — I’ll bet that naming all of these females as CEOs is merely for the purpose of gaming the Federal contracting system, so that the major defense contractors don’t lose bids to the minority/female business enterprises that are required set-asides in Federal procurement proposals.

  30. OT, but Steve occasionally insinuates that Michelle doesn’t think Barack is “all that.” Of course, she enjoys confirming that impression, as in this interview about the former First Family’s new Washington, DC home. (https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/real-estate/news/g2535/obama-new-house-photos/)

    Former First Lady Michelle Obama joked with Ellen DeGeneres on her television show, saying that Barack Obama isn’t happy with the living situation: “He got so short-changed on this whole deal. He doesn’t have enough closet space—sorry. He’s got the smallest room for his office.”

    Meanwhile, the couple’s 16-year-old daughter, Sasha, “actually killed in this house,” Obama told DeGeneres. “She has this two-room suite—it’s all decked out. She’s got a living room area and bedroom, and he designed it. So he’s really hating on her.”

    BTW, a lot of mockery of Trump for saying the Obamas built a 10-foot wall around their new house, accompanied by photos that show the front of the house with only a retaining wall. I assume those were old photos, presumably from the real estate listing. More recent photos in the Daily Mail show workers erecting high brick pillars atop that low wall, obviously as supports for fence sections that will be installed between them. So, when the job is finished in a month or so, will the MSM return to the story and admit they were wrong? I suppose they’ll say it’s a fence, not a wall, and it’s only eight-feet high, not ten, so there.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6540747/Obamas-wall-home-Trump-uses-former-couple-argue-border-barrier.html

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    Did Mrs. Obama really say of her husband and their new house -- on national television, no less -- that "[he] doesn't have enough closet space?" Paging Dr. Freud...

    She has less respect for him than Hillary has for Bill.
  31. From the executive leadership of top weapons-makers, to the senior government officials designing and purchasing the nation’s military arsenal, the United States’ national defense hierarchy is, for the first time, largely run by women.

    So much for the feminist claptrap that if women were in power, there would be no more wars…

    • Replies: @Kylie
    "So much for the feminist claptrap that if women were in power, there would be no more wars…"

    These must be oppressed women, not empowered women, still chafing under the rule of the warmongering white cishet patriarchy.
  32. @anon
    The biggest threat posed by the military-industrial complex is mental laziness. Expect more rail guns, stealth fighters, "tanks of the future", etc. Basically, weapons fit for the 1980's. After all, there is a lot of money and jobs in boondoggles.

    Meanwhile, the first country that effectively uses autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds, could cover several square miles, creating a kill zone for any men or equipment stuck in it. Impossible to detect with radar and no way to return fire.

    Compare the cost of expendable drones to the cost of current military (air support, troops, logistics, etc) to achieve a comparable goal. Many orders of magnitude difference in cost. It's also obvious that many "next generation" US weapons have not factored in this scenario at all and would be useless in such an environment. Perhaps it is too painful to consider? Much in the same way chariot-based armies of the late Bronze Age could not / would not plan for cheap hoplite armies?

    Passenger pigeons got wiped out of existence using 19th century technology. And no missile you could mount on a bird would be capable of knocking out a tank.

    Drone swarms will undoubtedly have a place on the battlefield once the technology becomes sophisticated enough, but just as another component of combined arms. They won’t be an unstoppable wonder weapon that displaces everything else.

    Simple, low tech solutions like a .50 cal quad mount or a 25mm autocannon spraying flak would disperse these swarms quite handily.

    • Replies: @anon
    A small drone spread out every thousand feet means soldiers are shooting back at the air, and any response by close air support is blowing up dirt. It doesn't take a swarm, just a single shot or explosion at close range to maim a soldier and pin down everyone else.

    Similarly, a micro drone that attaches itself to a tank, can become a homing device, no longer requiring direct line of sight by a guided anti-tank missile, converting said tank to a $10M mobile coffin. Similarly, a small explosion in an Apache's weak points will bring it down, and so on.

    Useful thought exercise is to ask what would our experience have been like in Afghanistan or Iraq, if the insurgents had a small but steady supply of such hypothetical technology? Then ask how long is it before such technology is here in the crude forms described above? (Willing to bet by the end of the 2020's).

    Has US military thought about this? Judging from the same repeated and identical failures in Vietnam, Iraq 2 and Afghanistan, then probably not in any meaningful sense. If they are, it's geared towards building Michael Crichton-like skunkworks vaporware, and less geared around defending soldiers against small IED's that can fly and crawl.

  33. @anon
    The biggest threat posed by the military-industrial complex is mental laziness. Expect more rail guns, stealth fighters, "tanks of the future", etc. Basically, weapons fit for the 1980's. After all, there is a lot of money and jobs in boondoggles.

    Meanwhile, the first country that effectively uses autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds, could cover several square miles, creating a kill zone for any men or equipment stuck in it. Impossible to detect with radar and no way to return fire.

    Compare the cost of expendable drones to the cost of current military (air support, troops, logistics, etc) to achieve a comparable goal. Many orders of magnitude difference in cost. It's also obvious that many "next generation" US weapons have not factored in this scenario at all and would be useless in such an environment. Perhaps it is too painful to consider? Much in the same way chariot-based armies of the late Bronze Age could not / would not plan for cheap hoplite armies?

    “autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds”

    Lead weighs 708 lbs per cubic foot. What battery powered motor could lift enough ammunition in a small bird package to make such a weapon even get off the ground?

    I suppose they could use soap bubbles for ammo.

  34. It is curious that while women moan about inequality in wages they don’t seem to mind inequality in combat casualties even as they join the armed forces in increasing numbers. Maybe the Pentagon needs to apply a little Title 7 to the infantry.

    As to women dominating our defense industry you’ll find the same problem in our dying industrial corporations. Mary Barra at GM, Gina Rometty at IBM and, until recently, a two-fer, Ursula Burns at Xerox. It would be mighty interesting to have a look at the share prices of big corporations who had a woman or negro as CEO. I don’t think progressives or investors would be happy with the results.

    • Replies: @Chief Seattle
    You can bet that someone has done the math. That you haven't heard the media gloating about it tells you which way the numbers went.
    , @Autochthon
    We needn't imagine; we do know what happens when these people take the helm. Look to recent events at McDonald's and Hewlett-Packard, to name but two.
    , @Dr. X

    It is curious that while women moan about inequality in wages they don’t seem to mind inequality in combat casualties even as they join the armed forces in increasing numbers.
     
    Feminism is not, and never has been, about equality. It's always been about power and money. The "equality" line feminists use is merely a Trojan horse to sucker stupid men into letting the feminists take control after the men put forth all the blood, sweat, and tears necessary to create a prosperous society.
  35. Very related:
    https://www.bofaml.com/content/dam/boamlimages/documents/articles/ID18_0710/transcript_part1_why_are_women_the_x_factor.pdf

    This is the head of Global Research for BOFA Merrill Lynch “interviewing” the head of US Equity and Quantitative Strategy (both women). The conclusion of the research is that women should have all the jobs. Genuinely shockingly, this line is in there: “Assets in U.S. funds and ETFs that are focused on
    gender diversity or equality have grown at a staggering 80% annualized rate over the last three years. “. This is a bald faced lie.

    • LOL: Kyle
  36. Or it’s all just a distraction to divert attention away from how white defense contractors are.

    • Replies: @rufus
    Its to prevent lawsuits from diversity racket shakedown operators.
  37. @Counterinsurgency
    Guys, it doesn't make any difference. The process had stopped working years before women took it over.

    In fact, the process not working was an essential precursor to women taking over.

    This has been going on for a _very_ long time, at least since WW I, when a blockage of war production by the NAACP in St. Louis MO led to hiring many NAACP approved people to local war industries, just so production could resume. Fighting people arguably _died_ because of this. The action clearly demonstrated that the defense industry was a source of patronage jobs even for, to be blunt, murderers. (Justification: the work stoppage was illegal, the people who organized and executed it new that stopping production would cause combat deaths. That's murder, 1st degree, and that would be just one of the offenses.)

    The WW II decision to only deal with large corporation meant, sure as anything, a goodly number of patronage jobs within the corporations -- and a good number of patronage contracts _to_ the corporations. This is just from first principles, mind you.

    Eventually the whole thing became a farce. That's why the US has lost its research edge. But a silver lining: it doesn't matter who runs a farce, so there are _many more_ patronage jobs now!!!! _Anybody_ can take any job! Contractors will do the real work. Let's throw a party!

    (According the the author of _Systemantics_, the ancient Egyptians had two people assigned to every job: a member of the aristocracy, and the person who actually did the job. Sort of like the old ship's captain and the ship's sailing master used in some naval forces back in the 1700s. The author of the book was quite complimentary about ancient Egyptian practice, apparently on the grounds that at least _somebody_ was selected on work related qualifications. I never bothered to confirm that.)

    Counterinsurgency

    _Anybody_ can take any job! Contractors will do the real work.

    This describes large parts of the public sector today. I’ve worked for agencies of the U.S. federal government and Canadian municipal, provincial, and federal governments. It wasn’t this way 40 years ago but now it’s epidemic. It started with contractors doing high-level specialized tech work, and continued with contractors doing low-level cleaning and maintenance. Then it shifted into outsourcing functions like payroll, so now the permanent employees have virtually no essential functions. When the Orange Man “shuts down the government” …

    • Agree: bomag
  38. @tsotha
    That means we're still doing better than the Europeans, whose leaders don't mind inviting people from incompatible cultures because they'll have no grandchildren to hate them for it.

    all civilization is founded and maintained on organized superior violence and later threat of it, the first step is patriarchy the very first step in a civilization is to control the bitches nothing can be done until that is out of the way

  39. @Counterinsurgency
    Guys, it doesn't make any difference. The process had stopped working years before women took it over.

    In fact, the process not working was an essential precursor to women taking over.

    This has been going on for a _very_ long time, at least since WW I, when a blockage of war production by the NAACP in St. Louis MO led to hiring many NAACP approved people to local war industries, just so production could resume. Fighting people arguably _died_ because of this. The action clearly demonstrated that the defense industry was a source of patronage jobs even for, to be blunt, murderers. (Justification: the work stoppage was illegal, the people who organized and executed it new that stopping production would cause combat deaths. That's murder, 1st degree, and that would be just one of the offenses.)

    The WW II decision to only deal with large corporation meant, sure as anything, a goodly number of patronage jobs within the corporations -- and a good number of patronage contracts _to_ the corporations. This is just from first principles, mind you.

    Eventually the whole thing became a farce. That's why the US has lost its research edge. But a silver lining: it doesn't matter who runs a farce, so there are _many more_ patronage jobs now!!!! _Anybody_ can take any job! Contractors will do the real work. Let's throw a party!

    (According the the author of _Systemantics_, the ancient Egyptians had two people assigned to every job: a member of the aristocracy, and the person who actually did the job. Sort of like the old ship's captain and the ship's sailing master used in some naval forces back in the 1700s. The author of the book was quite complimentary about ancient Egyptian practice, apparently on the grounds that at least _somebody_ was selected on work related qualifications. I never bothered to confirm that.)

    Counterinsurgency

    Very interesting stuff, CI, especially the Egyptian business (at least they were honest about how things were going to work). I’m still mulling over your post on the carbon-fiber/epoxy negative-spring-component structure. Don’t get me wrong, I understand how it works from your good description, although you need to realize you have both a downward force and a moment exerted onto the hollow shaft, so I’m not sure you’re covering the torque reaction of the tube.

    However, maybe the prof you talked to assumed you meant a spring constant for a material itself, not a specific structure. The tube/lever combination does indeed sound like a negative-spring constant STRUCTURE. I have to think about it more (just read it a few minutes ago) and also I want to think on whether a structure made of homogeneous material can still do this. Think of a hollow-triangular CS tube – it will not twist while keeping former parallel CS’s still parallel – there will be a displacement of any lever/handle in the direction parallel to the tube axis. This is why most shafts are round, whether hollow or solid – everything else is hard to analyze (at least was before sophisticated FE software).

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    This device could not exist as described. If the end of the lever were to move up, there would be no downward force acting on the fixed tube to begin with.

    This is kind of like saying that I could levitate by holding up with my arms the two ends of hammock and then sitting in it.

    , @Counterinsurgency
    Achmed

    Maybe my description wasn't that good. I meant to say that only a tube that has been spiral wrapped with carbon fibers (same pattern as the red stripe a barber pole, except there are many carbon fibers, not just one or two) will twist in the way indicated when it is deflected downwards. You're right, cylinders with an asymmetric cross-section can also twist. I'm not sure whether they could be made to mimic the behavior of the spiral wound carbon fiber tube, or at least not enough to actually push the lever end up enough to notice. The crucial thing about the carbon tube is that the spiral fibers, for all practical purposes, have a constant length under the full range of working stress.

    The professor could have said "show me" or "wrong model" or "that's interesting". In short, if he didn't know, he could have asked (0r ignored the comment). I was only trying to say something interesting and complementary about his school's research / engineering efforts. He did nothing like that. I later found that this wasn't particularly unusual at this particular institution.

    There was the time when, after a faculty general meeting, a senior professor who had been given a public award for teaching completely lost it after the meeting, and started screaming uncontrollably in the middle of most of the faculty as they walked back to the main engineering building. The general sense of his screaming was that the Administration (which notoriously heavy handed) had been threatening to fire him for decades for teaching and not bringing in research money, and now had the blind gall to give him an award for teaching. He was calmed down, and there were no repercussions _that I saw_. I could tell a couple of other stories of the same sort.

    That particular institution wasn't all that favorable an environment for research, if only because the administration continually threatened, as a means of controlling faculty, to revoke permission to conduct research. This sort of thing wasn't all that uncommon, back in c.a. AD 1980, and I suspect it isn't all that uncommon now.

    Ron Unz wasn't kidding that there is a good deal of pravda in the USA.

    Counterinsurgency
  40. @LondonBob
    Theresa May and her husband can't have children, they did try, apparently.

    Correct. Not a fair target. Merkel, fire away.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar


    Theresa May and her husband can’t have children, they did try, apparently.
     
    Correct. Not a fair target. Merkel, fire away.
     
    A notable US example is the Pat Buchanans. That may explain his obsession with demography.

    It's really fascinating how many prominent eugenicists as well as their equally prominent critics left no children. I guess infertility "concentrates the mind".
  41. @Harry Baldwin
    Wow, Leanne Caret looks like she was just presented with that three-carat engagement ring she's been dreaming of!

    Is 3 carets good? I don’t know, and I’m a whole lot richer for not knowing!

  42. Mother do you think you’ll drop the bomb?

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt

    Mother do you think you’ll drop the bomb?

     

    The lovable Irish wacko nut and Levon Helm -- wonderful!
  43. Many miles away something crawls from the slime

    At the bottom of a dark Scottish lake.

    Many miles away something crawls to the surface

    Of a dark Scottish loch.

    Many miles away there’s a shadow on the door

    Of a cottage on the shore

    Of a dark Scottish lake

    Many miles away, Marillyn Hewson proves what we knew all along

    That women are just as money-grubbing and conniving as men

    In their own way, many miles away, many miles away, many miles away…

    https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/police/synchronicityii.html

  44. Wait, so non-Jews can be in control of a globally important industry which affects and in some ways controls all our lives? Those non-Jews can corruptly enrich themselves at the rest of our expenses? Why have I never heard this before? Oh right, it’s not a big deal because these are “regular people”. Oh, except now they are women “regular people” so that’s at least kind of problem.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Why have I never heard this before?
     
    Because you're an idiot?

    Yeah, the MIC is news - late breaking.
  45. I wrote this in September of 2018:

    Military Keynesianism is welfare no different than KooKoo checks or BooBoo checks.

    The recipients of that military Keynesianism welfare will come close to killing you to keep their military Keynesianism gravy train going. That money-grubbing distaff slob named Hewson at Lockheed likes her millions of dollars that she got by being a welfare queen rip off artist war budget thief.

    My idea is to just say screw it, and double the war budget in one big binge before the global financial implosion hits again.

    It is unfortunate that sleazebags such as that General George Casey guy who played the crybaby game about “diversity” possibly becoming a casualty of the Fort Hood Islamic Terror Attack are allowed to retire with full pensions. I’d like to send that General Casey scumbag into exile in the middle of Africa. Let that Casey dirtbag enjoy some real “diversity.”

  46. “But battles are ugly when women fight.” – C.S. Lewis

  47. I’m getting a feeling of Carly Fiorina and HP.

  48. Il y a une femme dans toutes les affaires; aussitôt qu’on me fait un rapport, je dis: «Cherchez la femme !»

    No matter what the problem, a woman is often the root cause.

  49. @Mr McKenna
    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe...

    https://theuglytruth.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/defense-minister.jpg

    In fairness to the German Defense Minister, Ursula von der Leyen, she does have 7 children. I don’t know how she found time to have 7 kids. She is a medical doctor and has been in politics long enough to get herself picked as defense minister. But along the way she was able to have enough kids to offset Merkel’s big ZERO.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    But along the way she was able to have enough kids to offset Merkel’s big ZERO.
     
    How do we know that she is not being cloned down in S. America? I can see a scary sequel coming, The Girls from Brazil, that our host would probably review for us.
    , @Charles Pewitt
    Frauke Petry has 5 children and a degree in chemistry from University of Reading in the UK and she got a doctorate from the University of Gottingen. Got it?

    Frauke Petry was a leader of the Alternative for Deutschland(AfD) political party in Germany.

    She is a somewhat short German lady who looks like she could be a shapely wood nymph from some East German forest. You could add that in addition to looking like a German wood nymph, she is built like a brick something or other. The idea to keep attractive women as the front face of right wing populist movements in Europe is a good one.

    https://twitter.com/OuchikhKarim/status/618002879568347136
    , @Hail
    Ursula von der Leyen Biography
    - 1958: Born in Brussels as Ursula Albrecht; has retained lifelong ties to the Hanover region
    - is one of six children (five brothers)
    - her 19th-century ancestry is North German; she is a descendant of Ludwig Knoop (1821-1894), a cotton king with ties to Russia and one of the richest men of his time.
    - Lifelong Lutheran (affiliated with the EKD para-church body of Germany)
    - 1960s to 1971: father is a European bureaucrat in Brussels and she is raised largely in Brussels through age 13
    - 1971 to 1976: attends a Gymnasium [upper-end high school] in Hanover
    - 1978: releases a record of folk songs with her father and brothers
    - late 1970s to 1980s: in university, eventually in Medicine
    - 1986: marries into aristocratic von der Leyen family; husband a doctor
    - 1987: earns her medical license and begins to practice on limited scale
    - 1987-1999: seven children born (see pic), of which one set of twins.
    - 1990: joins the CDU (same year as Angela Merkel, b.1954)
    - 1991: graduates with a doctorate in Medicine; later [2015] accused of plagiarizing part of her dissertation and then cleared [2016], with the investigation finding that the "thesis did contain plagiarised material, but there had been no intent to deceive"
    - 1990s: raises family
    - 2001: is elected to city council of Sehnde, a town in the Hanover region, where she would be chosen to chair the CDU party-group
    - 2000s: rises in German politics
    - 2009: first elected to German Bundestag
    - Dec. 2013 to Present: Defense Minister; high-level pro-EU voice, central Merkel ally and CDU loyalist through the disastrous Merkel Refugee Crisis [2015-];
    - 2017: makes international news for calls to crack down on Nazi legacy and on purported far right tendencies in present-day German armed forces

    Early 2000s family pic, with husband and children:
    https://bilder2.n-tv.de/img/incoming/origs902873/2432731618-w1000-h960/3991212.jpg

    (The average German TFR in the era her children were born range from 1.25 to 1.4; Ursula von der Leyen and husband have a more than a 5x greater genetic contribution to the next generation than the average Germans of their time.)
  50. @Nathan
    And another thing! For all of this bleating about STEM, it looks like only one of these women (Warden) has any background in science at all, and only a BS in computer science at that. No, the real way to the top is still a Harvard/Wharton MBA.

    Yep, these are all publicly-traded companies. These CEOs are hired for one thing, to manage quarterly conference calls with analysts. We should actually be glad they’re not engineers or science geeks because they won’t interfere with those departments. Now, if one of them hired Elizabeth Holmes to be head of R&D, then it’s time to worry.

    • Agree: Nathan
  51. @istevefan
    In fairness to the German Defense Minister, Ursula von der Leyen, she does have 7 children. I don't know how she found time to have 7 kids. She is a medical doctor and has been in politics long enough to get herself picked as defense minister. But along the way she was able to have enough kids to offset Merkel's big ZERO.

    But along the way she was able to have enough kids to offset Merkel’s big ZERO.

    How do we know that she is not being cloned down in S. America? I can see a scary sequel coming, The Girls from Brazil, that our host would probably review for us.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
  52. @Mr McKenna
    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe...

    https://theuglytruth.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/defense-minister.jpg

    Guess which one has been in a fist fight?

    • LOL: Trevor H.
  53. @Mr McKenna
    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe...

    https://theuglytruth.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/defense-minister.jpg

    Fight ’em, then f**k ’em.

  54. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    Woman’s traditional weapon: POISON! danger!,danger!

  55. @Nathan
    It's funny funny that the article is titled HOW women took over the military industrial complex, but doesn't actually include any information about the government's aggressive policies of awarding contracts first to women and minority owned businesses. There's nothing about how Dodd-frank dictates how contractors must implement affirmative action in their workforce-

    www.fdic.gov/about/diversity/fairinclusion.html

    And for of all that ra-ra feminism, there's no mention of how DoD acquisitions is a total dumpster fire. The F35 is a boondoggle, unless it's a woman in charge of it. It's costs must be the result of sexism. Likewise the littoral combat ship, DCGS, Future Soldier, that personnel carrier for the Marines... I had better stop remembering all of this with my male brain. Might get me into trouble.

    THAT explains the $500 hammers. Hardware men see these women coming and they start rubbing their hands together. Everyone knows women are terrible negotiators. Except for shoes.

  56. @istevefan
    In fairness to the German Defense Minister, Ursula von der Leyen, she does have 7 children. I don't know how she found time to have 7 kids. She is a medical doctor and has been in politics long enough to get herself picked as defense minister. But along the way she was able to have enough kids to offset Merkel's big ZERO.

    Frauke Petry has 5 children and a degree in chemistry from University of Reading in the UK and she got a doctorate from the University of Gottingen. Got it?

    Frauke Petry was a leader of the Alternative for Deutschland(AfD) political party in Germany.

    She is a somewhat short German lady who looks like she could be a shapely wood nymph from some East German forest. You could add that in addition to looking like a German wood nymph, she is built like a brick something or other. The idea to keep attractive women as the front face of right wing populist movements in Europe is a good one.

    • Agree: Hail
    • Replies: @Lot
    Shorter women have higher TFR.
  57. @istevefan
    In fairness to the German Defense Minister, Ursula von der Leyen, she does have 7 children. I don't know how she found time to have 7 kids. She is a medical doctor and has been in politics long enough to get herself picked as defense minister. But along the way she was able to have enough kids to offset Merkel's big ZERO.

    Ursula von der Leyen Biography
    1958: Born in Brussels as Ursula Albrecht; has retained lifelong ties to the Hanover region
    – is one of six children (five brothers)
    – her 19th-century ancestry is North German; she is a descendant of Ludwig Knoop (1821-1894), a cotton king with ties to Russia and one of the richest men of his time.
    – Lifelong Lutheran (affiliated with the EKD para-church body of Germany)
    1960s to 1971: father is a European bureaucrat in Brussels and she is raised largely in Brussels through age 13
    1971 to 1976: attends a Gymnasium [upper-end high school] in Hanover
    1978: releases a record of folk songs with her father and brothers
    late 1970s to 1980s: in university, eventually in Medicine
    1986: marries into aristocratic von der Leyen family; husband a doctor
    1987: earns her medical license and begins to practice on limited scale
    1987-1999: seven children born (see pic), of which one set of twins.
    1990: joins the CDU (same year as Angela Merkel, b.1954)
    1991: graduates with a doctorate in Medicine; later [2015] accused of plagiarizing part of her dissertation and then cleared [2016], with the investigation finding that the “thesis did contain plagiarised material, but there had been no intent to deceive”
    1990s: raises family
    2001: is elected to city council of Sehnde, a town in the Hanover region, where she would be chosen to chair the CDU party-group
    2000s: rises in German politics
    2009: first elected to German Bundestag
    Dec. 2013 to Present: Defense Minister; high-level pro-EU voice, central Merkel ally and CDU loyalist through the disastrous Merkel Refugee Crisis [2015-];
    2017: makes international news for calls to crack down on Nazi legacy and on purported far right tendencies in present-day German armed forces

    Early 2000s family pic, with husband and children:

    (The average German TFR in the era her children were born range from 1.25 to 1.4; Ursula von der Leyen and husband have a more than a 5x greater genetic contribution to the next generation than the average Germans of their time.)

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    She can crack down on the Nazis all she wants, but with that brood, if I was a Nazi I wouldn’t be able to stay mad at her for long. (I do like to pretend that Germans are just northern, really northern, Italians).
    , @istevefan
    Ursula should be award an Iron Cross.
    , @Corn
    Kudos to her and her husband for their fecundity. I wonder why they had so many children? Are they devout Christians? Or do they just like children?
    , @Redneck farmer
    Uh, do we REALLY want a German Defense Minister who understands the importance of Lesbenraum?
  58. @Harry Baldwin
    Wow, Leanne Caret looks like she was just presented with that three-carat engagement ring she's been dreaming of!

    “Wow, Leanne Caret looks like she was just presented with that three-carat engagement ring she’s been dreaming of!”

    That or a DoD contract.

  59. @Mr McKenna
    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe...

    https://theuglytruth.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/defense-minister.jpg

    To paraphrase the old saying; The battle goes not always to the Mongols, but that’s how the smart money bets.

  60. @Hail
    Ursula von der Leyen Biography
    - 1958: Born in Brussels as Ursula Albrecht; has retained lifelong ties to the Hanover region
    - is one of six children (five brothers)
    - her 19th-century ancestry is North German; she is a descendant of Ludwig Knoop (1821-1894), a cotton king with ties to Russia and one of the richest men of his time.
    - Lifelong Lutheran (affiliated with the EKD para-church body of Germany)
    - 1960s to 1971: father is a European bureaucrat in Brussels and she is raised largely in Brussels through age 13
    - 1971 to 1976: attends a Gymnasium [upper-end high school] in Hanover
    - 1978: releases a record of folk songs with her father and brothers
    - late 1970s to 1980s: in university, eventually in Medicine
    - 1986: marries into aristocratic von der Leyen family; husband a doctor
    - 1987: earns her medical license and begins to practice on limited scale
    - 1987-1999: seven children born (see pic), of which one set of twins.
    - 1990: joins the CDU (same year as Angela Merkel, b.1954)
    - 1991: graduates with a doctorate in Medicine; later [2015] accused of plagiarizing part of her dissertation and then cleared [2016], with the investigation finding that the "thesis did contain plagiarised material, but there had been no intent to deceive"
    - 1990s: raises family
    - 2001: is elected to city council of Sehnde, a town in the Hanover region, where she would be chosen to chair the CDU party-group
    - 2000s: rises in German politics
    - 2009: first elected to German Bundestag
    - Dec. 2013 to Present: Defense Minister; high-level pro-EU voice, central Merkel ally and CDU loyalist through the disastrous Merkel Refugee Crisis [2015-];
    - 2017: makes international news for calls to crack down on Nazi legacy and on purported far right tendencies in present-day German armed forces

    Early 2000s family pic, with husband and children:
    https://bilder2.n-tv.de/img/incoming/origs902873/2432731618-w1000-h960/3991212.jpg

    (The average German TFR in the era her children were born range from 1.25 to 1.4; Ursula von der Leyen and husband have a more than a 5x greater genetic contribution to the next generation than the average Germans of their time.)

    She can crack down on the Nazis all she wants, but with that brood, if I was a Nazi I wouldn’t be able to stay mad at her for long. (I do like to pretend that Germans are just northern, really northern, Italians).

  61. @Mr McKenna
    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe...

    https://theuglytruth.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/defense-minister.jpg

    Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Germany – all wealthy countries – barely have defense forces. Besides for the 1% of GNP spending:

    Germany has 4 Eurofighter jets ready for deployment. Four.

    https://www.thelocal.de/20180502/german-luftwaffe-only-has-four-operation-ready-eurofighter-jets-report

    Sweden can’t even get enough troops to maintain the very small army they do fund
    https://taskandpurpose.com/sweden-military-retention

    You can learn all you need to learn about Norway from the accident report on the sinking of one of its very few Naval vessels which crashed into a tanker due to its own pathetic negligence and couldn’t even be retrieved due to even more pathetic negligence. https://news.usni.org/2018/11/30/norwegian-frigate-helge-ingstad-accident-report

    Netherlands: They cannot even meet the most minimal commitments to NATO
    https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/75484

    Uncle Sucker defends these countries. Trump at least sees it and is getting tired of it but when he raised the issue of leaving NATO, you might have thought from the outrage he just said he was dissolving Congress. The DC Party is insane.

    We need to get out of NATO and only spend what we need for our own defense.

    • Agree: Prodigal son
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Germany – all wealthy countries – barely have defense forces.
     
    And the fighting spirit of those negligible forces is dubious at best. Basically, they are pacifist cucks in uniform.

    The pathetic performance we could expect when the shooting starts is illustrated by the experience of the European forces in the Bosnian conflict of the 1990s.

    As just one example, Dutch armed forces charged with protecting Bosnian civilians at Srebrenicia cut a deal with Serb militia forces to surrender their weapons to the Serbs in return for safe passage out of the combat zone and a solemn "promise" that the civilians would not be harmed. The civilians were immediately massacred when the Euro forces bugged out. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Srebrenica_massacre#4_June_and_6%E2%80%9311_July_1995:_Serb_take-over_of_Srebrenica

    I also remember hearing reports about some of the token Euro forces sent to Afghanistan (I think they were Italian). Basically, their M.O. was to immediately cut a mutual non-aggression pact with the local Taliban forces and never leave their base. So their sectors looked "pacified" but were actually "safe zones" for the Taliban to retreat and regroup for attacks on the Americans.

    Basically, it's only the Anglophone countries (and maybe the French), who have any martial spirit left at all.
    , @Kyle
    Leaving NATO? Thats preposterous. Didn't you look at the maps in your geography text books from first grade. The Warsaw Pact countries border many of our NATO allies. NATO is necessary in repelling those damn dirty reds.
    , @anon
    America play the fool because it wants to. NATO allows Washington to exercise political control over Europe and safeguard Israel.
  62. @Nathan
    And another thing! For all of this bleating about STEM, it looks like only one of these women (Warden) has any background in science at all, and only a BS in computer science at that. No, the real way to the top is still a Harvard/Wharton MBA.

    Theres only one CEO of lockheed martin. If you want to build things with your hands science is important. Look at Elon Musk, all he does is engineering. Electrical, mechanical, chemical, phsical.

  63. First Female Dictator Hailed As Step Forward For Women

    This Vice Media sendup is pretty good too:

    • LOL: Hypnotoad666
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    The future is female . . . and authoritarian.
  64. @anon
    The biggest threat posed by the military-industrial complex is mental laziness. Expect more rail guns, stealth fighters, "tanks of the future", etc. Basically, weapons fit for the 1980's. After all, there is a lot of money and jobs in boondoggles.

    Meanwhile, the first country that effectively uses autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds, could cover several square miles, creating a kill zone for any men or equipment stuck in it. Impossible to detect with radar and no way to return fire.

    Compare the cost of expendable drones to the cost of current military (air support, troops, logistics, etc) to achieve a comparable goal. Many orders of magnitude difference in cost. It's also obvious that many "next generation" US weapons have not factored in this scenario at all and would be useless in such an environment. Perhaps it is too painful to consider? Much in the same way chariot-based armies of the late Bronze Age could not / would not plan for cheap hoplite armies?

    Good grief! You are giving away top secret DOD information. Await the knock on your door.

  65. @Anon
    Mother do you think you'll drop the bomb?

    Mother do you think you’ll drop the bomb?

    The lovable Irish wacko nut and Levon Helm — wonderful!

  66. • Replies: @Kyle
    Striving for happiness. He sounds a lot like Jordan Peterson.
  67. @LondonBob
    Theresa May and her husband can't have children, they did try, apparently.

    Teresa May
    1956: born in Sussex
    1977-1983: works at Bank of England
    1980: marriage
    1985-1997: works “as a financial consultant and senior advisor in International Affairs at the Association for Payment Clearing Services”
    1986-1994: “councillor for Durnsford ward, London Borough of Merton”
    1997: is elected to Parliament for the first time; turns 41 five months later

    Theresa May has revealed her heartbreaking struggle to have children which left both her and her husband “affected”

    [3 JUL 2016]

    Mrs May, hot favourite to take to the helm of the Tory party in the leadership battle, was speaking candidly for the first time about the issue in an interview with the Mail on Sunday.

    Mrs May said they wanted to have children but found they could not, adding: “It just didn’t happen, so you know, it’s one of those things.” (Link)

    There are several possible interpretations of this claim.

    One is inevitably suspicious, of course, of the timing: This was what she told the press (note “for the firs time”) while poised to take the helm of the Conservative Party in 2016 . Still, without better information, we can only take her at her word; even the claim alone is better than nothing or the opposite (something like “I hate children”) for mothers’ and would-be-mothers’ morale.

    I still would ask: if the pair were as committed to having children as this implies, could not they have used a surrogate? IVF (practical in the UK in the 1980s)?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I still would ask: if the pair were as committed to having children as this implies, could not they have used a surrogate? IVF (practical in the UK in the 1980s)?
     
    How amoral do you want your "Conservative" leaders?

    And do you know which of them has the physiological problem?
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    When David Cameron resigned after the referendum (having previously said he'd stay on to implement the result however the vote went) there was an election for a new Conservative Party leader. AFAIK only MPs voted.

    One candidate MP, Andrea Leadsom, queried whether a candidate who had no children and therefore no deep visceral interest in Britain's future - one with no skin in the game when it came to what a 2050 Britain might be like - could best lead the country.

    This is IMHO a reasonable argument, though I can think of at least one counter-argument - Elizabeth I. But it provoked a torrent of outrage from the massed ranks of female opinion journalists - among whom the childless are over-represented.

    I detest Mrs May and have done ever since she insulted her own party ("the nasty party") to get a few Guardian headlines. Yet if she leads us out of the EU and out of the Single Market (aka "cliff-edge Brexit") I will think of her as Karlsefni thought of Freydis when she put the Skraelings to flight.

    "This is a woman. She has done evil things, but I for one will honour her from this day forward."
  68. @Counterinsurgency
    Guys, it doesn't make any difference. The process had stopped working years before women took it over.

    In fact, the process not working was an essential precursor to women taking over.

    This has been going on for a _very_ long time, at least since WW I, when a blockage of war production by the NAACP in St. Louis MO led to hiring many NAACP approved people to local war industries, just so production could resume. Fighting people arguably _died_ because of this. The action clearly demonstrated that the defense industry was a source of patronage jobs even for, to be blunt, murderers. (Justification: the work stoppage was illegal, the people who organized and executed it new that stopping production would cause combat deaths. That's murder, 1st degree, and that would be just one of the offenses.)

    The WW II decision to only deal with large corporation meant, sure as anything, a goodly number of patronage jobs within the corporations -- and a good number of patronage contracts _to_ the corporations. This is just from first principles, mind you.

    Eventually the whole thing became a farce. That's why the US has lost its research edge. But a silver lining: it doesn't matter who runs a farce, so there are _many more_ patronage jobs now!!!! _Anybody_ can take any job! Contractors will do the real work. Let's throw a party!

    (According the the author of _Systemantics_, the ancient Egyptians had two people assigned to every job: a member of the aristocracy, and the person who actually did the job. Sort of like the old ship's captain and the ship's sailing master used in some naval forces back in the 1700s. The author of the book was quite complimentary about ancient Egyptian practice, apparently on the grounds that at least _somebody_ was selected on work related qualifications. I never bothered to confirm that.)

    Counterinsurgency

    (According the the author of _Systemantics_, the ancient Egyptians had two people assigned to every job: a member of the aristocracy, and the person who actually did the job.

    This isn’t really a bad thing, though. In fact, it’s actually an essential and integral component of any sort of higher social organization.

    In order to fully run and integrate a large department of society—say, defense, agriculture, sanitation, or something like that—you will need an “ops manager” who oversees the day-to-day operations of the enterprise. But you will also need a “Minister of Thus-and-So” to liaison with the government and who, as a member of the ruling class, represents that particular organ of society therein and integrates it with the political power center. Failing this, the department would become a rebel faction, a separate political power of its own, and would lose its sanction to operate lawfully.

    There is a sort of libertarian fantasy, quite current nowadays, which holds that the political side of life is unnecessary, and that if the political power disappeared the “ops” side of life would go on functioning just as well without it; but this is not true. Although most people do not like to admit it and may not even be aware of it, we all need and seek a sanction for our activities. In the full scope of life, “can” is not enough to motivate action, to contextualize it, or to place it into the higher social, psychological, and spiritual gestalt in which deeds acquire meaning. We also need the “must” of moral imperative, the absence of which is decadence, shame, and disgrace. One the vital functions of government is to provide the sanctioning authority that blesses and condemns activities as the case my be, and that doles out honors and punishments accordingly.

    The problem with these female CEOs and minority contractors is not that these are political posts as opposed to ops posts, but that the political power is being distributed amongst the unworthies.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
    Excellent points! If you try to eliminate politics, you get thugs. Polished thugs, sometimes, but thugs.

    Counterinsurgency

  69. @Anon
    Boeing's Caret is famous for pushing for Neocon space wars, which would be pretty cool, I think. That chank lander on the dark side of the moon?: A Boeing Defense rocket-powered tactical space nuke could take it out nicely.

    We need to start blowing things up in space. And then hire outfits like Boeing to clean up all the pieces of blown-up stuff orbiting at 5,000 mph around the earth taking out satellites an space stations. Make America Great Again. Trump can just announce that we withdraw from space treaties, a la Paris. Bring defense jobs back to Southern California and elbow out the Hollywood types and the illegals.

    Boeing’s Caret is famous for pushing for Neocon space wars

    Neocon

    What’s this about?

    Is it that Our Greatest Ally has run the numbers and determined a vital strategic interest in preventing a Palestinian foothold on the Moon? Or is it a Baathist space station that must be pre-empted?

    (“Why Boeing’s CEO of Defense Takes Trump’s Idea of a Space Force Seriously,” Fortune [featuring video interview], Oct 2018)

    • Replies: @Kyle
    Is that what this tv advert is all about?
    It's always disturbing to me to see tv adverts for large corporations which don't actually sell anything to the average person. the audience for this can't be more than 100 people. Very disturbing that spending money on this could possibly be worth it.
    https://www.ispot.tv/ad/dJ2v/boeing-the-future-is-built-here
  70. @anon
    The biggest threat posed by the military-industrial complex is mental laziness. Expect more rail guns, stealth fighters, "tanks of the future", etc. Basically, weapons fit for the 1980's. After all, there is a lot of money and jobs in boondoggles.

    Meanwhile, the first country that effectively uses autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds, could cover several square miles, creating a kill zone for any men or equipment stuck in it. Impossible to detect with radar and no way to return fire.

    Compare the cost of expendable drones to the cost of current military (air support, troops, logistics, etc) to achieve a comparable goal. Many orders of magnitude difference in cost. It's also obvious that many "next generation" US weapons have not factored in this scenario at all and would be useless in such an environment. Perhaps it is too painful to consider? Much in the same way chariot-based armies of the late Bronze Age could not / would not plan for cheap hoplite armies?

    What are these bird-sized drones supposed to kill you with? How much can a bird-sized drone carry? A couple of 5.56 rounds? Is it a kamikaze vehicle? If you have a few thousand, you’ll run out pretty quick. And then there’s weather.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    People have been killing birds on the wing with shotguns for hundreds of years, so killing bird-sized drones with shotguns doesn't sound too impossible.
    , @anon
    A hypothetical but suppose it is a drone carrying a small amount of explosive and has the size and speed of a large hummingbird. When activated, it zooms towards a soldier, from behind, and blows up at close range, targeting the legs.

    Would your modern day infantry squad have any chance against this? For more than a few drones, simultaneously, probably not.

    Currently, this would cost maybe a few thousand dollars to make, with a bulk of the cost on the hardware and electronics. How much would this cost in 10 years? Maybe $100-200, if falling consumer electronics prices are any guide. The AI behind it could be less sophisticated than many consumer apps as well.

    For perspective, 2015 consumer technology at work...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsxyV-kgfio

    , @donut
    How about chemical or biological weapons ?
    , @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FI--wFfipvA

    Of course, BATF could ban it by claiming a stream of electrical pulses to the trigger could convert a handgun to a machine gun.
  71. @Erik L
    Wait, so non-Jews can be in control of a globally important industry which affects and in some ways controls all our lives? Those non-Jews can corruptly enrich themselves at the rest of our expenses? Why have I never heard this before? Oh right, it's not a big deal because these are "regular people". Oh, except now they are women "regular people" so that's at least kind of problem.

    Why have I never heard this before?

    Because you’re an idiot?

    Yeah, the MIC is news – late breaking.

  72. I wonder what all these Real Housewives of the Military Industrial Complex would think if they saw graphic pictures of all the people – including children – who are turned into burned and shredded meat by their products.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    Saint-Exupéry I can take or leave. He had a passage in one of his books; probably Wind, Sand, and Stars, however, which has stayed with me for decades.
    In the passage he points out that in the newsreel footage of whatever conflict was then current, the smoke seen rising from bombed out cities inevitably marked the burning bodies of dead children.
    I can still remember the sense of scales falling from my eyes when I first read that passage.
  73. @PhysicistDave
    I've worked as an engineer in both civilian high-tech and in the defense industry.

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

    The female engineers I knew in the defense industry were, to put it diplomatically, inadequate. I assumed that this was due to the heavy pressure for affirmative action in government contractors.

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

    Why would this be the case?

    • Replies: @J1234

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

     


    Why would this be the case?
     
    I worked at an engineering firm for several years and it was my impression that about a third of the men fit the male engineering stereotype in that they believed people skills had absolutely nothing to with job performance. Another third were actually pretty good at interacting with others and the remainder were somewhere on a gradient between those two approaches.

    The few women engineers we had actually weren't that effective at their jobs, but this was 25 years ago and it seemed to me that they were terrified of making mistakes around so many men. They did have people skills, though (relatively speaking), so I'm guessing things have changed a bit since then.

    , @PhysicistDave
    Anonymous[205]:


    [Dave]The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.
     
    [Anon.205]Why would this be the case?
     
    I don't know. Could've just been a statistical fluctuation. As I mentioned, the engineer who got our whole manufacturing operation going was female, so she raised the female average a lot. Also, since our firm did not engage in affirmative action but aggressively tried to hire bright engineers of whatever sex or ethnicity, maybe we got the cream of female engineers.
  74. @J1234
    Or it's all just a distraction to divert attention away from how white defense contractors are.

    Its to prevent lawsuits from diversity racket shakedown operators.

  75. Anonymous[205] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Boeing's Caret is famous for pushing for Neocon space wars, which would be pretty cool, I think. That chank lander on the dark side of the moon?: A Boeing Defense rocket-powered tactical space nuke could take it out nicely.

    We need to start blowing things up in space. And then hire outfits like Boeing to clean up all the pieces of blown-up stuff orbiting at 5,000 mph around the earth taking out satellites an space stations. Make America Great Again. Trump can just announce that we withdraw from space treaties, a la Paris. Bring defense jobs back to Southern California and elbow out the Hollywood types and the illegals.

    We need to start blowing things up in space. And then hire outfits like Boeing to clean up all the pieces of blown-up stuff orbiting at 5,000 mph around the earth taking out satellites an space stations.

    Given the problem of trash pollution in space, blowing stuff up and creating more trash seems like a really really bad idea.

  76. “A woman is presumed economically disadvantaged if she has a personal net worth of less than $750,000, her adjusted gross yearly income averaged over the three years preceding the certification does not exceed $350,000, and the fair market value of all her assets (including her primary residence and the value of the business concern) does not exceed $6 million.”

    • LOL: Autochthon
  77. We are so doomed!

  78. @Hail
    Ursula von der Leyen Biography
    - 1958: Born in Brussels as Ursula Albrecht; has retained lifelong ties to the Hanover region
    - is one of six children (five brothers)
    - her 19th-century ancestry is North German; she is a descendant of Ludwig Knoop (1821-1894), a cotton king with ties to Russia and one of the richest men of his time.
    - Lifelong Lutheran (affiliated with the EKD para-church body of Germany)
    - 1960s to 1971: father is a European bureaucrat in Brussels and she is raised largely in Brussels through age 13
    - 1971 to 1976: attends a Gymnasium [upper-end high school] in Hanover
    - 1978: releases a record of folk songs with her father and brothers
    - late 1970s to 1980s: in university, eventually in Medicine
    - 1986: marries into aristocratic von der Leyen family; husband a doctor
    - 1987: earns her medical license and begins to practice on limited scale
    - 1987-1999: seven children born (see pic), of which one set of twins.
    - 1990: joins the CDU (same year as Angela Merkel, b.1954)
    - 1991: graduates with a doctorate in Medicine; later [2015] accused of plagiarizing part of her dissertation and then cleared [2016], with the investigation finding that the "thesis did contain plagiarised material, but there had been no intent to deceive"
    - 1990s: raises family
    - 2001: is elected to city council of Sehnde, a town in the Hanover region, where she would be chosen to chair the CDU party-group
    - 2000s: rises in German politics
    - 2009: first elected to German Bundestag
    - Dec. 2013 to Present: Defense Minister; high-level pro-EU voice, central Merkel ally and CDU loyalist through the disastrous Merkel Refugee Crisis [2015-];
    - 2017: makes international news for calls to crack down on Nazi legacy and on purported far right tendencies in present-day German armed forces

    Early 2000s family pic, with husband and children:
    https://bilder2.n-tv.de/img/incoming/origs902873/2432731618-w1000-h960/3991212.jpg

    (The average German TFR in the era her children were born range from 1.25 to 1.4; Ursula von der Leyen and husband have a more than a 5x greater genetic contribution to the next generation than the average Germans of their time.)

    Ursula should be award an Iron Cross.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    iSteve, The Third Reich awarded the Mother's Cross to moms who provided sons for the slaughter.
    , @Gordo

    Ursula should be award an Iron Cross.
     
    Mother's Cross in Silver, you needed 8 children for Gold.
  79. @Dr. X

    From the executive leadership of top weapons-makers, to the senior government officials designing and purchasing the nation’s military arsenal, the United States’ national defense hierarchy is, for the first time, largely run by women.
     
    So much for the feminist claptrap that if women were in power, there would be no more wars...

    “So much for the feminist claptrap that if women were in power, there would be no more wars…”

    These must be oppressed women, not empowered women, still chafing under the rule of the warmongering white cishet patriarchy.

  80. @Achmed E. Newman
    Very interesting stuff, CI, especially the Egyptian business (at least they were honest about how things were going to work). I'm still mulling over your post on the carbon-fiber/epoxy negative-spring-component structure. Don't get me wrong, I understand how it works from your good description, although you need to realize you have both a downward force and a moment exerted onto the hollow shaft, so I'm not sure you're covering the torque reaction of the tube.

    However, maybe the prof you talked to assumed you meant a spring constant for a material itself, not a specific structure. The tube/lever combination does indeed sound like a negative-spring constant STRUCTURE. I have to think about it more (just read it a few minutes ago) and also I want to think on whether a structure made of homogeneous material can still do this. Think of a hollow-triangular CS tube - it will not twist while keeping former parallel CS's still parallel - there will be a displacement of any lever/handle in the direction parallel to the tube axis. This is why most shafts are round, whether hollow or solid - everything else is hard to analyze (at least was before sophisticated FE software).

    This device could not exist as described. If the end of the lever were to move up, there would be no downward force acting on the fixed tube to begin with.

    This is kind of like saying that I could levitate by holding up with my arms the two ends of hammock and then sitting in it.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yes, you are right, as I have to go back to my roots. Here's the thing, a force applied in the opposite direction as the deformation is the definition of negative work. It's almost the opposite of a perpetual-motion machine - you do mechanical work and end up with needing to do more to maintain position. It's thermodynamically impossible, and I think this would be better thought about using "virtual work" methods.

    Think about a torsion spring wrapped around the tube and secured at one side at the tube and another at the end of the lever. As soon as you put the load on, the load would increase as the lever twisted, increasing the deformation of the spring, increasing the load more ... it would break into pieces.

    Nah, as you said, it's not possible to have any structure with negative spring constant. I enjoyed this thought discussion though.

    Next up, can you have a material with negative Poisson's ratio? YES, I think there are materials like this.
  81. SPLC hit by sixty separate lawsuits; ADL-level misconduct revealed

    https://pjmedia.com/trending/update-on-the-60-separate-defamation-lawsuits-against-the-splc-under-consideration/

    At one point they infiltrated a targeted law office and flat out stole things.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    At one point they infiltrated a targeted law office and flat out stole things.

    Wow, and here I thought the SPLC didn't do anything but send out fund-raising letters and park the proceeds in off-shore banks.
  82. Assuming equivalent opportunity for violence, are women more or less favorable toward violence (direct and indirect) than men, or equally so?

  83. As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors — Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics and the defense arm of Boeing — are now women.

    According to some of the other commentators these female CEOs don’t seem to have real engineering or military backgrounds. But when you think about it, why should they?

    The key competency for defense contracting is politics. Women are good at politics.

    • Agree: Ibound1
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Women are good at politics.

    I'm going to jump in and say it differently. Women are good at social networking but are horrible at politics. Politics is the art of balancing rival factions and finding mutually agreeable terms of coexistence with sharply differing people. Women are horrible at this. Women are unrivalled within the domain of personal palace intrigues but they're a danger to themselves and others out past the walls of the palace.

    Watch Hillary Clinton in an interview and you see how skilled she is as the dowager empress of the DNC. Watch her out in the wider world and see her wheels come off. Trump is her opposite in this. I don't just mean electoral politics, I mean the whole art of alliance bulding. That's why he's losing against the indoor Swamp of Washington.

  84. @istevefan
    Ursula should be award an Iron Cross.

    iSteve, The Third Reich awarded the Mother’s Cross to moms who provided sons for the slaughter.

  85. @istevefan
    Ursula should be award an Iron Cross.

    Ursula should be award an Iron Cross.

    Mother’s Cross in Silver, you needed 8 children for Gold.

  86. @Hail
    Ursula von der Leyen Biography
    - 1958: Born in Brussels as Ursula Albrecht; has retained lifelong ties to the Hanover region
    - is one of six children (five brothers)
    - her 19th-century ancestry is North German; she is a descendant of Ludwig Knoop (1821-1894), a cotton king with ties to Russia and one of the richest men of his time.
    - Lifelong Lutheran (affiliated with the EKD para-church body of Germany)
    - 1960s to 1971: father is a European bureaucrat in Brussels and she is raised largely in Brussels through age 13
    - 1971 to 1976: attends a Gymnasium [upper-end high school] in Hanover
    - 1978: releases a record of folk songs with her father and brothers
    - late 1970s to 1980s: in university, eventually in Medicine
    - 1986: marries into aristocratic von der Leyen family; husband a doctor
    - 1987: earns her medical license and begins to practice on limited scale
    - 1987-1999: seven children born (see pic), of which one set of twins.
    - 1990: joins the CDU (same year as Angela Merkel, b.1954)
    - 1991: graduates with a doctorate in Medicine; later [2015] accused of plagiarizing part of her dissertation and then cleared [2016], with the investigation finding that the "thesis did contain plagiarised material, but there had been no intent to deceive"
    - 1990s: raises family
    - 2001: is elected to city council of Sehnde, a town in the Hanover region, where she would be chosen to chair the CDU party-group
    - 2000s: rises in German politics
    - 2009: first elected to German Bundestag
    - Dec. 2013 to Present: Defense Minister; high-level pro-EU voice, central Merkel ally and CDU loyalist through the disastrous Merkel Refugee Crisis [2015-];
    - 2017: makes international news for calls to crack down on Nazi legacy and on purported far right tendencies in present-day German armed forces

    Early 2000s family pic, with husband and children:
    https://bilder2.n-tv.de/img/incoming/origs902873/2432731618-w1000-h960/3991212.jpg

    (The average German TFR in the era her children were born range from 1.25 to 1.4; Ursula von der Leyen and husband have a more than a 5x greater genetic contribution to the next generation than the average Germans of their time.)

    Kudos to her and her husband for their fecundity. I wonder why they had so many children? Are they devout Christians? Or do they just like children?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Kudos to her and her husband for their fecundity. I wonder why they had so many children? Are they devout Christians? Or do they just like children?
     
    Lucy Kellaway and David Goodhart had four children She once wrote a column for the FT about bumping into other high-placed women with large broods. One also had seven.

    Sadly, however, the Goodharts split once the children were grown.

    Goodhart is one of seven children himself. His grandfather was Arthur Lehman Goodhart, grandson of Meyer Lehman, of those brothers. He's also the grandnephew of John Gilbert Winant, governor of New Hampshire and ambassador to the UK during the war. He and Ike are the only Americans to be awarded the Order of Merit.
  87. @Ibound1
    Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Germany - all wealthy countries - barely have defense forces. Besides for the 1% of GNP spending:

    Germany has 4 Eurofighter jets ready for deployment. Four.

    https://www.thelocal.de/20180502/german-luftwaffe-only-has-four-operation-ready-eurofighter-jets-report

    Sweden can't even get enough troops to maintain the very small army they do fund
    https://taskandpurpose.com/sweden-military-retention

    You can learn all you need to learn about Norway from the accident report on the sinking of one of its very few Naval vessels which crashed into a tanker due to its own pathetic negligence and couldn't even be retrieved due to even more pathetic negligence. https://news.usni.org/2018/11/30/norwegian-frigate-helge-ingstad-accident-report

    Netherlands: They cannot even meet the most minimal commitments to NATO
    https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/75484

    Uncle Sucker defends these countries. Trump at least sees it and is getting tired of it but when he raised the issue of leaving NATO, you might have thought from the outrage he just said he was dissolving Congress. The DC Party is insane.

    We need to get out of NATO and only spend what we need for our own defense.

    Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Germany – all wealthy countries – barely have defense forces.

    And the fighting spirit of those negligible forces is dubious at best. Basically, they are pacifist cucks in uniform.

    The pathetic performance we could expect when the shooting starts is illustrated by the experience of the European forces in the Bosnian conflict of the 1990s.

    As just one example, Dutch armed forces charged with protecting Bosnian civilians at Srebrenicia cut a deal with Serb militia forces to surrender their weapons to the Serbs in return for safe passage out of the combat zone and a solemn “promise” that the civilians would not be harmed. The civilians were immediately massacred when the Euro forces bugged out. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Srebrenica_massacre#4_June_and_6%E2%80%9311_July_1995:_Serb_take-over_of_Srebrenica

    I also remember hearing reports about some of the token Euro forces sent to Afghanistan (I think they were Italian). Basically, their M.O. was to immediately cut a mutual non-aggression pact with the local Taliban forces and never leave their base. So their sectors looked “pacified” but were actually “safe zones” for the Taliban to retreat and regroup for attacks on the Americans.

    Basically, it’s only the Anglophone countries (and maybe the French), who have any martial spirit left at all.

    • Replies: @Anonnu
    But why fight for nato when you have food & hot chicks at home?
  88. @Mr. Anon
    First Female Dictator Hailed As Step Forward For Women

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEtw3XJoJrE

    This Vice Media sendup is pretty good too:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DH6TBdN-lJc

    The future is female . . . and authoritarian.

  89. @unit472
    It is curious that while women moan about inequality in wages they don't seem to mind inequality in combat casualties even as they join the armed forces in increasing numbers. Maybe the Pentagon needs to apply a little Title 7 to the infantry.

    As to women dominating our defense industry you'll find the same problem in our dying industrial corporations. Mary Barra at GM, Gina Rometty at IBM and, until recently, a two-fer, Ursula Burns at Xerox. It would be mighty interesting to have a look at the share prices of big corporations who had a woman or negro as CEO. I don't think progressives or investors would be happy with the results.

    You can bet that someone has done the math. That you haven’t heard the media gloating about it tells you which way the numbers went.

  90. @anon
    The biggest threat posed by the military-industrial complex is mental laziness. Expect more rail guns, stealth fighters, "tanks of the future", etc. Basically, weapons fit for the 1980's. After all, there is a lot of money and jobs in boondoggles.

    Meanwhile, the first country that effectively uses autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds, could cover several square miles, creating a kill zone for any men or equipment stuck in it. Impossible to detect with radar and no way to return fire.

    Compare the cost of expendable drones to the cost of current military (air support, troops, logistics, etc) to achieve a comparable goal. Many orders of magnitude difference in cost. It's also obvious that many "next generation" US weapons have not factored in this scenario at all and would be useless in such an environment. Perhaps it is too painful to consider? Much in the same way chariot-based armies of the late Bronze Age could not / would not plan for cheap hoplite armies?

    Hoplite armies were made up of citizens who provided their own equipment . A well armed militia you might say .

  91. The women of the military industrial surveillance state complex will be joined by the women of the Green New Deal complex.

    Some excerpts of the proposed rules for a new:

    ESTABLISHMENT.—There is hereby established a Select Committee For A Green New Deal (hereinafter in this section referred to as the “select committee”).

    (A) LEGISLATIVE JURISDICTION.—

    The select committee shall have authority to develop a detailed national, industrial, economic mobilization plan (hereinafter in this section referred to as the “Plan for a Green New Deal” or the “Plan”) for the transition of the United States economy to become greenhouse gas emissions neutral and to significantly draw down greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and oceans and to promote economic and environmental justice and equality.

    (e) additionally, be responsive to, and in accordance with, the goals and guidelines relating to social, economic, racial, regional and gender-based justice and equality set forth in paragraph (6).

    (6) SCOPE OF THE PLAN FOR A GREEN NEW DEAL AND THE DRAFT LEGISLATION.

    (A) The Plan for a Green New Deal (and the draft legislation) shall be developed with the objective of reaching the following outcomes within the target window of 10 years from the start of execution of the Plan.

    (B) The Plan for a Green New Deal (and the draft legislation) shall recognize that a national, industrial, economic mobilization of this scope and scale is a historic opportunity to virtually eliminate poverty in the United States and to make prosperity, wealth and economic security available to everyone participating in the transformation. In furtherance of the foregoing, the Plan (and the draft legislation) shall:

    mitigate deeply entrenched racial, regional and gender-based inequalities in income and wealth (including, without limitation, ensuring that federal and other investment will be equitably distributed to historically impoverished, low income, deindustrialized or other marginalized communities in such a way that builds wealth and ownership at the community level);

    include additional measures such as basic income programs, universal health care programs and any others as the select committee may deem appropriate….

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jxUzp9SZ6-VB-4wSm8sselVMsqWZrSrYpYC9slHKLzo/mobilebasic

    An global intersectional utopia awaits.

  92. anon[196] • Disclaimer says:
    @Vendetta
    Passenger pigeons got wiped out of existence using 19th century technology. And no missile you could mount on a bird would be capable of knocking out a tank.

    Drone swarms will undoubtedly have a place on the battlefield once the technology becomes sophisticated enough, but just as another component of combined arms. They won’t be an unstoppable wonder weapon that displaces everything else.

    Simple, low tech solutions like a .50 cal quad mount or a 25mm autocannon spraying flak would disperse these swarms quite handily.

    A small drone spread out every thousand feet means soldiers are shooting back at the air, and any response by close air support is blowing up dirt. It doesn’t take a swarm, just a single shot or explosion at close range to maim a soldier and pin down everyone else.

    Similarly, a micro drone that attaches itself to a tank, can become a homing device, no longer requiring direct line of sight by a guided anti-tank missile, converting said tank to a $10M mobile coffin. Similarly, a small explosion in an Apache’s weak points will bring it down, and so on.

    Useful thought exercise is to ask what would our experience have been like in Afghanistan or Iraq, if the insurgents had a small but steady supply of such hypothetical technology? Then ask how long is it before such technology is here in the crude forms described above? (Willing to bet by the end of the 2020’s).

    Has US military thought about this? Judging from the same repeated and identical failures in Vietnam, Iraq 2 and Afghanistan, then probably not in any meaningful sense. If they are, it’s geared towards building Michael Crichton-like skunkworks vaporware, and less geared around defending soldiers against small IED’s that can fly and crawl.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
    Mass market drones advertise their ability to follow individual people. Shouldn't be that hard to get them to follow individual vehicles.

    Counterinsurgency
    , @CJ
    What you describe will likely happen once. After that robots will fight the drones.
  93. This is the same “Mental health counselor” who celebrated Trump tower being on fire.

  94. @Hail
    Ursula von der Leyen Biography
    - 1958: Born in Brussels as Ursula Albrecht; has retained lifelong ties to the Hanover region
    - is one of six children (five brothers)
    - her 19th-century ancestry is North German; she is a descendant of Ludwig Knoop (1821-1894), a cotton king with ties to Russia and one of the richest men of his time.
    - Lifelong Lutheran (affiliated with the EKD para-church body of Germany)
    - 1960s to 1971: father is a European bureaucrat in Brussels and she is raised largely in Brussels through age 13
    - 1971 to 1976: attends a Gymnasium [upper-end high school] in Hanover
    - 1978: releases a record of folk songs with her father and brothers
    - late 1970s to 1980s: in university, eventually in Medicine
    - 1986: marries into aristocratic von der Leyen family; husband a doctor
    - 1987: earns her medical license and begins to practice on limited scale
    - 1987-1999: seven children born (see pic), of which one set of twins.
    - 1990: joins the CDU (same year as Angela Merkel, b.1954)
    - 1991: graduates with a doctorate in Medicine; later [2015] accused of plagiarizing part of her dissertation and then cleared [2016], with the investigation finding that the "thesis did contain plagiarised material, but there had been no intent to deceive"
    - 1990s: raises family
    - 2001: is elected to city council of Sehnde, a town in the Hanover region, where she would be chosen to chair the CDU party-group
    - 2000s: rises in German politics
    - 2009: first elected to German Bundestag
    - Dec. 2013 to Present: Defense Minister; high-level pro-EU voice, central Merkel ally and CDU loyalist through the disastrous Merkel Refugee Crisis [2015-];
    - 2017: makes international news for calls to crack down on Nazi legacy and on purported far right tendencies in present-day German armed forces

    Early 2000s family pic, with husband and children:
    https://bilder2.n-tv.de/img/incoming/origs902873/2432731618-w1000-h960/3991212.jpg

    (The average German TFR in the era her children were born range from 1.25 to 1.4; Ursula von der Leyen and husband have a more than a 5x greater genetic contribution to the next generation than the average Germans of their time.)

    Uh, do we REALLY want a German Defense Minister who understands the importance of Lesbenraum?

    • Replies: @Hail
    German Defense Ministers, 1933-1945:

    - Werner von Blomberg (1933-1938) [Baltic German]: Five children.
    - General Wilhelm Keitel (1938-1945) [North German] (his assignment to this post meant the Defense Ministry was compromised, as it meant a military official was taking over the civilian ministry): Six children; five survived to adulthood; of which, one son died in the war and another son held as a POW in a Soviet gulag until 1956.

    So anti-Nazi activist Ursula (seven kids) beat both Nazis. That'll show 'em.
  95. @Hypnotoad666

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors — Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics and the defense arm of Boeing — are now women.
     
    According to some of the other commentators these female CEOs don't seem to have real engineering or military backgrounds. But when you think about it, why should they?

    The key competency for defense contracting is politics. Women are good at politics.

    Women are good at politics.

    I’m going to jump in and say it differently. Women are good at social networking but are horrible at politics. Politics is the art of balancing rival factions and finding mutually agreeable terms of coexistence with sharply differing people. Women are horrible at this. Women are unrivalled within the domain of personal palace intrigues but they’re a danger to themselves and others out past the walls of the palace.

    Watch Hillary Clinton in an interview and you see how skilled she is as the dowager empress of the DNC. Watch her out in the wider world and see her wheels come off. Trump is her opposite in this. I don’t just mean electoral politics, I mean the whole art of alliance bulding. That’s why he’s losing against the indoor Swamp of Washington.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I have heard from both strangers and acquaintances that have met Hillary that there's nothing ideological, but the dealbreaker is that she always has to be the one with the biggest swinging object in the room, and has to make sure everyone separately understands that.
    , @Anonymous

    Women are unrivalled within the domain of personal palace intrigues
     
    Doesn't that make them a danger to the palace, as well?
  96. @Achmed E. Newman
    Very interesting stuff, CI, especially the Egyptian business (at least they were honest about how things were going to work). I'm still mulling over your post on the carbon-fiber/epoxy negative-spring-component structure. Don't get me wrong, I understand how it works from your good description, although you need to realize you have both a downward force and a moment exerted onto the hollow shaft, so I'm not sure you're covering the torque reaction of the tube.

    However, maybe the prof you talked to assumed you meant a spring constant for a material itself, not a specific structure. The tube/lever combination does indeed sound like a negative-spring constant STRUCTURE. I have to think about it more (just read it a few minutes ago) and also I want to think on whether a structure made of homogeneous material can still do this. Think of a hollow-triangular CS tube - it will not twist while keeping former parallel CS's still parallel - there will be a displacement of any lever/handle in the direction parallel to the tube axis. This is why most shafts are round, whether hollow or solid - everything else is hard to analyze (at least was before sophisticated FE software).

    Achmed

    Maybe my description wasn’t that good. I meant to say that only a tube that has been spiral wrapped with carbon fibers (same pattern as the red stripe a barber pole, except there are many carbon fibers, not just one or two) will twist in the way indicated when it is deflected downwards. You’re right, cylinders with an asymmetric cross-section can also twist. I’m not sure whether they could be made to mimic the behavior of the spiral wound carbon fiber tube, or at least not enough to actually push the lever end up enough to notice. The crucial thing about the carbon tube is that the spiral fibers, for all practical purposes, have a constant length under the full range of working stress.

    The professor could have said “show me” or “wrong model” or “that’s interesting”. In short, if he didn’t know, he could have asked (0r ignored the comment). I was only trying to say something interesting and complementary about his school’s research / engineering efforts. He did nothing like that. I later found that this wasn’t particularly unusual at this particular institution.

    There was the time when, after a faculty general meeting, a senior professor who had been given a public award for teaching completely lost it after the meeting, and started screaming uncontrollably in the middle of most of the faculty as they walked back to the main engineering building. The general sense of his screaming was that the Administration (which notoriously heavy handed) had been threatening to fire him for decades for teaching and not bringing in research money, and now had the blind gall to give him an award for teaching. He was calmed down, and there were no repercussions _that I saw_. I could tell a couple of other stories of the same sort.

    That particular institution wasn’t all that favorable an environment for research, if only because the administration continually threatened, as a means of controlling faculty, to revoke permission to conduct research. This sort of thing wasn’t all that uncommon, back in c.a. AD 1980, and I suspect it isn’t all that uncommon now.

    Ron Unz wasn’t kidding that there is a good deal of pravda in the USA.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Something there bugged me to think harder on the composite tube (besides what I'm going to write to I.D.). No, there will always be a displacement, no matter how small, of all the components together, unless there is slippage, meaning failure of the material. The compliance (inverse of stiffness) of a composite will be mostly a function of the of the least compliant parts (the carbon, in this case) in the same way that resistance is mostly a function of the lowest resistance.

    Yes, the deformation will be weird, but a negative spring constant of a structure can't really exist in my determination either, the more I go back to my roots (roots engineering here). I'll write more in a short reply to I.D.

    At least I'm not out there screaming about it, right? ;-} Actually, in response to the rest of your post, I agree with the prof who has been teaching his ass off with no reward (or threat of firing). Is this not what the students are paying for, good teaching vs. research and teaching by un-understandable profs. that are teaching one class a year because they have to by law? I don't agree with the screaming, and I don't agree with a guy blowing you off with a mean remark. I would try to give you an explanation such as ID's or my reply coming in a few minutes.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Ron Unz wasn’t kidding that there is a good deal of pravda in the USA.
     
    I think you mean Pravda. The newspaper.

    Russians used to joke that in the news (Isvestia), there is no truth (pravda), and in the truth, there is no news.
  97. It is now a solid “refugee” tradition to riot on New Year’s. This is Brussels but there were incidents all over, notably in Germany. No deaths or rapes reported yet, but they normally sit on those for a few months.

  98. @anon
    A small drone spread out every thousand feet means soldiers are shooting back at the air, and any response by close air support is blowing up dirt. It doesn't take a swarm, just a single shot or explosion at close range to maim a soldier and pin down everyone else.

    Similarly, a micro drone that attaches itself to a tank, can become a homing device, no longer requiring direct line of sight by a guided anti-tank missile, converting said tank to a $10M mobile coffin. Similarly, a small explosion in an Apache's weak points will bring it down, and so on.

    Useful thought exercise is to ask what would our experience have been like in Afghanistan or Iraq, if the insurgents had a small but steady supply of such hypothetical technology? Then ask how long is it before such technology is here in the crude forms described above? (Willing to bet by the end of the 2020's).

    Has US military thought about this? Judging from the same repeated and identical failures in Vietnam, Iraq 2 and Afghanistan, then probably not in any meaningful sense. If they are, it's geared towards building Michael Crichton-like skunkworks vaporware, and less geared around defending soldiers against small IED's that can fly and crawl.

    Mass market drones advertise their ability to follow individual people. Shouldn’t be that hard to get them to follow individual vehicles.

    Counterinsurgency

  99. @Mr McKenna
    Similarly, the famous meme from Europe...

    https://theuglytruth.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/defense-minister.jpg

    The Defense Minister of Russia has the same expression as the Man in the Golden Helmet
    https://www.wikiart.org/en/rembrandt/man-in-a-golden-helmet-1669
    Same sort of troop leading experiences, I’d imagine. The painting was completed c.a. AD 1650, just after the AD 1648 negotiated end to the 30 Years War. There would have been quite a few troop leaders still alive to serve as models.

    Counterinsurgency

  100. @Hail
    Teresa May
    1956: born in Sussex
    1977-1983: works at Bank of England
    1980: marriage
    1985-1997: works "as a financial consultant and senior advisor in International Affairs at the Association for Payment Clearing Services"
    1986-1994: "councillor for Durnsford ward, London Borough of Merton"
    1997: is elected to Parliament for the first time; turns 41 five months later

    Theresa May has revealed her heartbreaking struggle to have children which left both her and her husband "affected"

    [3 JUL 2016]
     

    Mrs May, hot favourite to take to the helm of the Tory party in the leadership battle, was speaking candidly for the first time about the issue in an interview with the Mail on Sunday.
     

    Mrs May said they wanted to have children but found they could not, adding: "It just didn't happen, so you know, it's one of those things." (Link)
     
    There are several possible interpretations of this claim.

    One is inevitably suspicious, of course, of the timing: This was what she told the press (note "for the firs time") while poised to take the helm of the Conservative Party in 2016 . Still, without better information, we can only take her at her word; even the claim alone is better than nothing or the opposite (something like "I hate children") for mothers' and would-be-mothers' morale.

    I still would ask: if the pair were as committed to having children as this implies, could not they have used a surrogate? IVF (practical in the UK in the 1980s)?

    I still would ask: if the pair were as committed to having children as this implies, could not they have used a surrogate? IVF (practical in the UK in the 1980s)?

    How amoral do you want your “Conservative” leaders?

    And do you know which of them has the physiological problem?

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    I don’t know that surrogacy is immoral. But your point is well taken as to IVF: it necessarily involves creating human beings and then discarding them, as only one of the numerous embryos is implanted.
    , @Hail

    do you know which of them has the physiological problem?
     
    From available information, are we even sure there was such a problem? Maybe someone reading this knows; I don't. Her interview with the press quoted above was ambiguous.

    What we do know is that she had a solid career for most her most fertile years, then the coup de grace, so to speak, was a national-level political career falling on her lap towards the end of her 30s (first ran for parliament seat in the 1992 general election; she was 35). She was already a local elected official by age 29 or 30, previously at the Bank of England.

    Perhaps there is a physiological problem, but she does fit the profile of high-powered career woman who waited too long, unfortunately.
  101. @J.Ross
    SPLC hit by sixty separate lawsuits; ADL-level misconduct revealed

    https://pjmedia.com/trending/update-on-the-60-separate-defamation-lawsuits-against-the-splc-under-consideration/

    At one point they infiltrated a targeted law office and flat out stole things.

    At one point they infiltrated a targeted law office and flat out stole things.

    Wow, and here I thought the SPLC didn’t do anything but send out fund-raising letters and park the proceeds in off-shore banks.

  102. @TomSchmidt
    Correct. Not a fair target. Merkel, fire away.

    Theresa May and her husband can’t have children, they did try, apparently.

    Correct. Not a fair target. Merkel, fire away.

    A notable US example is the Pat Buchanans. That may explain his obsession with demography.

    It’s really fascinating how many prominent eugenicists as well as their equally prominent critics left no children. I guess infertility “concentrates the mind”.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Learn something new every day. Given Buchanan's Catholicism, there must be some personal tragedy there, like with May.
  103. @Nathan
    What are these bird-sized drones supposed to kill you with? How much can a bird-sized drone carry? A couple of 5.56 rounds? Is it a kamikaze vehicle? If you have a few thousand, you'll run out pretty quick. And then there's weather.

    People have been killing birds on the wing with shotguns for hundreds of years, so killing bird-sized drones with shotguns doesn’t sound too impossible.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Does anyone want drone scares to justify "New Year's Eve in Detroit"? What blue metropolis will allow that? They'll do what they do already with terror deaths -- ignore, censor, deny, downplay. They believe sincerely in the devil's democracy that the seriousness of a situation is a function of the number affected, and terror drones will never compete with traffic deaths.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    Shotguns are very short range weapons. With shot, they're deadly to about 40 yards.
    , @Intelligent Dasein
    The general point is valid, viz. that there exist decentralized, low-cost countermeasures that could be employed with success against American heavy ordinance. It doesn't even have to be drones. A swarm of a hundred Iranians with speedboats and jet skis, each one carrying a 40lb shaped charge, could sink an aircraft carrier in the Strait of Hormuz, especially if they weren't averse to dying in the process. The only reason something like this hasn't been tried yet is because America still possesses major conventional and nuclear deterrents, and could invade in force any country that had such audacity

    But eventually the deterrent isn't going to work. Someday somebody will be fed up enough and crazy enough that they'll just say "Fuck it!" and they'll sink the carrier. Then we'll have to actually invade in force, and the effort will reveal just how broke and pathetic we really are, bringing about the end of the American empire.

    , @Nathan
    It certainly isn't impossible, and just a cursory thought about the physics involved will give you a good grasp on the problem of drone swarms. Force equals mass times acceleration, so either bird sized drones produce a lot of acceleration, or they don't do too much to a hard target. Not having a lot of mass, the drones will be highly susceptable to the force produced by accelerating wind. Since the drones will be autonomous, a significant portion of their mass will be dedicated to communication/information processing. This limits payload and the mass you have to produce power and move the drone.
  104. @anon
    A small drone spread out every thousand feet means soldiers are shooting back at the air, and any response by close air support is blowing up dirt. It doesn't take a swarm, just a single shot or explosion at close range to maim a soldier and pin down everyone else.

    Similarly, a micro drone that attaches itself to a tank, can become a homing device, no longer requiring direct line of sight by a guided anti-tank missile, converting said tank to a $10M mobile coffin. Similarly, a small explosion in an Apache's weak points will bring it down, and so on.

    Useful thought exercise is to ask what would our experience have been like in Afghanistan or Iraq, if the insurgents had a small but steady supply of such hypothetical technology? Then ask how long is it before such technology is here in the crude forms described above? (Willing to bet by the end of the 2020's).

    Has US military thought about this? Judging from the same repeated and identical failures in Vietnam, Iraq 2 and Afghanistan, then probably not in any meaningful sense. If they are, it's geared towards building Michael Crichton-like skunkworks vaporware, and less geared around defending soldiers against small IED's that can fly and crawl.

    What you describe will likely happen once. After that robots will fight the drones.

  105. @Steve Sailer
    People have been killing birds on the wing with shotguns for hundreds of years, so killing bird-sized drones with shotguns doesn't sound too impossible.

    Does anyone want drone scares to justify “New Year’s Eve in Detroit”? What blue metropolis will allow that? They’ll do what they do already with terror deaths — ignore, censor, deny, downplay. They believe sincerely in the devil’s democracy that the seriousness of a situation is a function of the number affected, and terror drones will never compete with traffic deaths.

  106. @anon
    The biggest threat posed by the military-industrial complex is mental laziness. Expect more rail guns, stealth fighters, "tanks of the future", etc. Basically, weapons fit for the 1980's. After all, there is a lot of money and jobs in boondoggles.

    Meanwhile, the first country that effectively uses autonomous microdrones will end up owning the battlefield entirely. Perhaps a few thousand ground and aerial drones, the size of small birds, could cover several square miles, creating a kill zone for any men or equipment stuck in it. Impossible to detect with radar and no way to return fire.

    Compare the cost of expendable drones to the cost of current military (air support, troops, logistics, etc) to achieve a comparable goal. Many orders of magnitude difference in cost. It's also obvious that many "next generation" US weapons have not factored in this scenario at all and would be useless in such an environment. Perhaps it is too painful to consider? Much in the same way chariot-based armies of the late Bronze Age could not / would not plan for cheap hoplite armies?

    Fact is, this can be done. I turned in a proposal to DARPA on this c.a. AD 2000, which they never followed up. I didn’t have the business experience, they said. They were right, of course, but the basic system worked in simulation. With the right approach, you can have a coordinated mix of heavy and light platforms that coordinate. Not even very difficult from a software standpoint, although it will work better now that it would have back then thanks to lower power processors. From a countermeasures standpoint, you’d have to use spread spectrum communications.

    The drones amount to a low cost, rapidly deployed mine field. They would have the usual problem of (a) you only have so many mines, and (b) if the enemy can’t move through, neither can you. Drones have another problem: eventually they run out of fuel, drop to the ground, and then what? Is the ground dangerous for the next decade or two from unexploded munitions? Still, these are minor problems as compared to losing the war.

    Counterinsurgency

  107. @Counterinsurgency
    Achmed

    Maybe my description wasn't that good. I meant to say that only a tube that has been spiral wrapped with carbon fibers (same pattern as the red stripe a barber pole, except there are many carbon fibers, not just one or two) will twist in the way indicated when it is deflected downwards. You're right, cylinders with an asymmetric cross-section can also twist. I'm not sure whether they could be made to mimic the behavior of the spiral wound carbon fiber tube, or at least not enough to actually push the lever end up enough to notice. The crucial thing about the carbon tube is that the spiral fibers, for all practical purposes, have a constant length under the full range of working stress.

    The professor could have said "show me" or "wrong model" or "that's interesting". In short, if he didn't know, he could have asked (0r ignored the comment). I was only trying to say something interesting and complementary about his school's research / engineering efforts. He did nothing like that. I later found that this wasn't particularly unusual at this particular institution.

    There was the time when, after a faculty general meeting, a senior professor who had been given a public award for teaching completely lost it after the meeting, and started screaming uncontrollably in the middle of most of the faculty as they walked back to the main engineering building. The general sense of his screaming was that the Administration (which notoriously heavy handed) had been threatening to fire him for decades for teaching and not bringing in research money, and now had the blind gall to give him an award for teaching. He was calmed down, and there were no repercussions _that I saw_. I could tell a couple of other stories of the same sort.

    That particular institution wasn't all that favorable an environment for research, if only because the administration continually threatened, as a means of controlling faculty, to revoke permission to conduct research. This sort of thing wasn't all that uncommon, back in c.a. AD 1980, and I suspect it isn't all that uncommon now.

    Ron Unz wasn't kidding that there is a good deal of pravda in the USA.

    Counterinsurgency

    Something there bugged me to think harder on the composite tube (besides what I’m going to write to I.D.). No, there will always be a displacement, no matter how small, of all the components together, unless there is slippage, meaning failure of the material. The compliance (inverse of stiffness) of a composite will be mostly a function of the of the least compliant parts (the carbon, in this case) in the same way that resistance is mostly a function of the lowest resistance.

    Yes, the deformation will be weird, but a negative spring constant of a structure can’t really exist in my determination either, the more I go back to my roots (roots engineering here). I’ll write more in a short reply to I.D.

    At least I’m not out there screaming about it, right? ;-} Actually, in response to the rest of your post, I agree with the prof who has been teaching his ass off with no reward (or threat of firing). Is this not what the students are paying for, good teaching vs. research and teaching by un-understandable profs. that are teaching one class a year because they have to by law? I don’t agree with the screaming, and I don’t agree with a guy blowing you off with a mean remark. I would try to give you an explanation such as ID’s or my reply coming in a few minutes.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
    a) Carbon fiber tube and negative spring constant.
    I really need a video here, but I can't find one.

    A spiral wound carbon fiber tube, with circular cross-section, is anisotropic with respect to the axis of the carbon fiber. Push the end of a cantilevered tube down and the tube end does go down, as you would expect. However, the tube also twists along its length, so that the end rotates around the tubes axis. If the end drops x mm from an initial position of x0 mm, then the cylinder we will consider twists by c*(x0-x) radians. Note that pushing own decreases x.
    Rigidly attach a rod horizontally to the tube such that the resulting structure forms a "T" shape, (the axis of the rod is perpendicular to that of the tube, the two axes meet at one point, that point being the center of mass of the tube). Push the end of the cylinder down and hold it. The rod will rotate by some fixed amount, theta

    So far, all is as expected: push down on cylinder, rod twists.

    OK, so now you move your finger along the rod, away from the tube end so that the finger is move up along the rod. Keep the finger's force constant, and thus keeping the cylinder end stationary. _If_ the carbon tube is properly spiral wound with highly rigid carbon fiber, _then_ the tube will not rotate _and_ your finger will rise as you get further from the cylinder end. Eventually, your finger will rise above the cylinder end's initial position.

    Now take your finger off the rod. Note that the rod will drop out from under your finger. If you press the rod down again, displacing the tube end same as before, your finger will rise.

    What's happening: When you press the rod down, your finger exerts a torque on the cylinder. That torque will establish a stress field within the cylinder. The stress field will have principle tension direction something like the stripes on a barber pole, and the cylinder's material will stretch along the stripes.
    For an isometric (same in all 3 spatial directions) substance, the stretch from the torque produced by your finger will usually (I won't say always) tend to counter any rotation of the cylinder end. (For some cross-sectional cylinder shapes, pushing down above the cylinder axis will cause cylinder end to rotate about the cylinder's axis.)
    If the cylinder cross-section is like a circle, and you reinforced the cylinder so that the carbon fiber was wound along the principle tension direction at every point. forming a continuous spiral pattern like a barber's pole with thousands of stripes, then the principle tension would be on the long axis of the carbon fiber. The fiber is very rigid, and won't lengthen detectably for the force you can exert with your finger. The composite tube will rotate as before (a little but less, but not detectably), the rod will rise. If your finger is far enough from the cylinder center, then your finger will rise.
    And it didn't rise just a little, it rose a lot, while the tube bent a lot more yet.
    Material behavior often doesn't conform to common sense.

    Now, the problem is to fit this into existing mathematics. I never tried, haven't yet, and haven't seen what other people have done. My work was in a quite different field. I will point out, however, that the existence of the phenomenon doesn't depend on the mathematics that describe it; it's more the other way around.

    It turns out that you can make a composite structure with zero Poisson ratio, and this is common for solid fuel rockets. If the rocket casing were to change dimensions due to pressure from the burning propellant, so would the solid fuel, and that would induce cracks in the solid fuel. The cracks would become combustion surfaces and the rocket would malfunction energetically.

    There is a commonly accessible book on this, J. E. Gordon _Structures: or why things don't fall down_. Gordon an English mechanical engineer, most active during WW II, but still active when carbon composites were developed. He spends a book describing the semi-intuitive methods used by British MEs during his professional lifetime. He wrote a second book, _The New Science of Strong Materials_, which rehashes _Structures_ and has bit more about composites.
    , @Counterinsurgency
    Second subject: the screaming.

    The professor involved didn't choose to start screaming, any more than he would have chosen to fall if pushed off a cliff. He'd just been pushed too far. Happened to me once, you don't have any choices when that happens. This is even recognized under US law: people can lose control of themselves.
    The faculty eventually won that fight, though. They'd destroyed the career of something like the previous three University presidents. The one responsible for the teaching award, though, they killed. Essentially, they ignored him and let him work himself to death, which he did. He might have lived, but tripped while out jogging when completely exhausted, was hospitalized, developed cancer (from stress?) and died within a few months. The whole thing was catalyzed by an exceptionally brutal and stupid (no joke, they looked and acted like members of organized crime) administrative layer at that particular school, which made for a bad working environment and a general bloody mindedness.

    The point is that it is easy to make universities unproductive, and difficult to get research done. Research universities are under political pressure to stop research and start doing almost anything else. That's bad.

    I've heard the "teaching is what students want" argument, even worked at a school that believed it (which was very like a high school). The problem is that people who don't work with a subject can't teach it. They end up either teaching the textbook (very unpopular with students, as it means actually learning the textbook material) or, more often, spouting nonsense that sounds good and giving tests that contain questions the students could answer in previous years. What else, after all, _could_ they do? One gets courses full of problem solving, but without meaningful content. That's why people ordinarily say that they forget what they learned within six months, or that the course has "no practical application". To get through those courses, you need a memory like a sponge: soak up course content, squeeze it out into the test, and you have an empty sponge waiting for the next round of nonsense. That's hyperbole, of course, intended to illustrate a concept.

    So: ending research won't just shut down research, it will also, eventually, shut down teaching, reducing classes to teaching rituals with little relation to reality, and professions consisting of learning standard practice in the field (rather like medicine prior to, say, the invention of antibiotics). School becomes a test of IQ and ability to tolerate ritual, eventually a test only of ability to tolerate ritual. Which several authors at this site have already commented on.

    What is apparently happening
    Science was started as part of religions, a way to know more about the Christian God, who ruled by faithfulness to His own word. From this, rules for the physical universe that God created. The bible is in the form of a history, the Acts of God. Physics is much the same, except that it has the acts in front of it.
    And the motivation for science is unchanged since then.
    Christianity is the _only_ religion that believes in a physical universe governed by unchanging laws. Nobody else does. Some say that the universe creator can change his mind at any time, some say society is the ultimate reality, some say everything is caused by local spirits, some say they don't know and don't care because they are too busy social climbing. And not one of them, Christians included, could prove their position objectively.
    Remove religion from science and you get the soft sciences, which are simply careers, much like fiction writing in day to day work. People in those fields find themselves writing morality stories, with nothing to study, and end up as propagandists simply to keep their self respect.
    Physics and mathematics could go the same way. If defended, they must be defended on religious grounds. Failure to realize or admit that means that physics and mathematics are largely undefended now, which is why the attacks against them (and against engineering as well) are now succeeding.

    Counterinsurgency
    , @Counterinsurgency
    After some thought, you might try the following approach:

    The anomalous behavior is due to the highly anisotropic behavior of carbon fibers. Their spring constant k is much higher for axial stresses than they are from transverse stresses (perpendicular to their axis) and, of course, to torques.


    * First approach, using energy stored within the system:
    Use minimum energy for the system, and use the equipartition of energy idea from physics. For a static mechanical system, the energy associated with carbon fiber longitudinal stress (neglecting epoxy matrix) should equal the energy associated with stresses within epoxy matrix transverse to the carbon fiber. The added condition might make the analysis feasible.

    * Second approach, using force rather than energy:
    During operation, the carbon fiber tube drops considerably more than the lever end rises. I believe that tube deflection was in the 30 to 40 degree range (from anchor to tip). I was a bit concerned over accidentally breaking the tube. It's evident to me that considerably more energy was being stored in the tube than returned to my finger, more as I pushed harder.
    This suggests an analysis of a mechanism drawn as a free body, with torques and forces at the anchor and forces at the finger application point. If you assume the thumb is stationary and energy comes from varying anchor torque and forces, the structure makes a deal more sense. Since mechanism deflection is independent of coordinate system, the "stationary thumb" view must be valid for the "moving thumb" view.

    Good luck. I'm not really a mechanical engineer anymore, so I can't do it myself.

    Counterinsurgency
  108. @Intelligent Dasein
    This device could not exist as described. If the end of the lever were to move up, there would be no downward force acting on the fixed tube to begin with.

    This is kind of like saying that I could levitate by holding up with my arms the two ends of hammock and then sitting in it.

    Yes, you are right, as I have to go back to my roots. Here’s the thing, a force applied in the opposite direction as the deformation is the definition of negative work. It’s almost the opposite of a perpetual-motion machine – you do mechanical work and end up with needing to do more to maintain position. It’s thermodynamically impossible, and I think this would be better thought about using “virtual work” methods.

    Think about a torsion spring wrapped around the tube and secured at one side at the tube and another at the end of the lever. As soon as you put the load on, the load would increase as the lever twisted, increasing the deformation of the spring, increasing the load more … it would break into pieces.

    Nah, as you said, it’s not possible to have any structure with negative spring constant. I enjoyed this thought discussion though.

    Next up, can you have a material with negative Poisson’s ratio? YES, I think there are materials like this.

  109. @Corn
    Kudos to her and her husband for their fecundity. I wonder why they had so many children? Are they devout Christians? Or do they just like children?

    Kudos to her and her husband for their fecundity. I wonder why they had so many children? Are they devout Christians? Or do they just like children?

    Lucy Kellaway and David Goodhart had four children She once wrote a column for the FT about bumping into other high-placed women with large broods. One also had seven.

    Sadly, however, the Goodharts split once the children were grown.

    Goodhart is one of seven children himself. His grandfather was Arthur Lehman Goodhart, grandson of Meyer Lehman, of those brothers. He’s also the grandnephew of John Gilbert Winant, governor of New Hampshire and ambassador to the UK during the war. He and Ike are the only Americans to be awarded the Order of Merit.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Goodhart is one of seven children himself. His grandfather was Arthur Lehman Goodhart, grandson of Meyer Lehman, of those brothers.

    Was he the guy they named the citrus fruit after?
  110. @Steve Sailer
    People have been killing birds on the wing with shotguns for hundreds of years, so killing bird-sized drones with shotguns doesn't sound too impossible.

    Shotguns are very short range weapons. With shot, they’re deadly to about 40 yards.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    With rifles the same advantages and problems persist: yes it's doable but no the blue metropoli will never allow it.
  111. @Cagey Beast
    Women are good at politics.

    I'm going to jump in and say it differently. Women are good at social networking but are horrible at politics. Politics is the art of balancing rival factions and finding mutually agreeable terms of coexistence with sharply differing people. Women are horrible at this. Women are unrivalled within the domain of personal palace intrigues but they're a danger to themselves and others out past the walls of the palace.

    Watch Hillary Clinton in an interview and you see how skilled she is as the dowager empress of the DNC. Watch her out in the wider world and see her wheels come off. Trump is her opposite in this. I don't just mean electoral politics, I mean the whole art of alliance bulding. That's why he's losing against the indoor Swamp of Washington.

    I have heard from both strangers and acquaintances that have met Hillary that there’s nothing ideological, but the dealbreaker is that she always has to be the one with the biggest swinging object in the room, and has to make sure everyone separately understands that.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Yes she seems like the kind of woman who would be dangerous to cross under any regime and in any era, apart from one of anarchy and petty warlords. She's a killing machine that only operates on a carpeted surface or on hardwood flooring.
  112. @Harry Baldwin
    Shotguns are very short range weapons. With shot, they're deadly to about 40 yards.

    With rifles the same advantages and problems persist: yes it’s doable but no the blue metropoli will never allow it.

  113. anon[196] • Disclaimer says:
    @Nathan
    What are these bird-sized drones supposed to kill you with? How much can a bird-sized drone carry? A couple of 5.56 rounds? Is it a kamikaze vehicle? If you have a few thousand, you'll run out pretty quick. And then there's weather.

    A hypothetical but suppose it is a drone carrying a small amount of explosive and has the size and speed of a large hummingbird. When activated, it zooms towards a soldier, from behind, and blows up at close range, targeting the legs.

    Would your modern day infantry squad have any chance against this? For more than a few drones, simultaneously, probably not.

    Currently, this would cost maybe a few thousand dollars to make, with a bulk of the cost on the hardware and electronics. How much would this cost in 10 years? Maybe $100-200, if falling consumer electronics prices are any guide. The AI behind it could be less sophisticated than many consumer apps as well.

    For perspective, 2015 consumer technology at work…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    There is a recent video of a drone being knocked out of the sky at a soccer game by a fan throwing a roll of toilet paper at it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jm6a3QXG_qI

    , @Nathan
    Counterpoint:

    https://cdn.thewirecutter.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/leafblowers-lowres-0166.jpg

    Oh, unless you want the drones to be easily hackable/jamable, they'll need to freq hop. That adds weight that will further reduce payload. Also, they'll really need to be sure that it's Soldiers that they're blowing up, or else you'll have a lot of dead deer and other wildlife. And civilians. Dead civilians always go over well...
  114. Anon[194] • Disclaimer says:

    The point of putting these women is charge is not that they’re going to make or develop weapons. All the men working below them know that. They’re there to sell them. Period. That’s why they almost all have MBAs.

    2nd and 3rd world leaders find it harder to say no to a woman. 2nd and 3rd world leaders have always been intimidated and resentful of aggressive Western males, especially salesmen. They feel pushed around by them. But women? No. They’re much more open to be sold things by a woman who is oozing up to them, flattering them and promising them they will become big and powerful leaders and can destroy their enemies if they buy this particular weapons system. The technique works. It’s the Lady MacBeth technique.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    They’re there to sell them. Period. That’s why they almost all have MBAs.
     
    Mighty buxom asses?
    , @J.Ross
    I don't believe this (I also question how much choice developing world leaders have in their purchasing, or how much personal schmoozing CEOs directly do in a sale). The irresistable value of women to organizations is that they are innate cultists.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The point of putting these women is charge is not that they’re going to make or develop weapons. All the men working below them know that. They’re there to sell them.
     
    The left has made similar charges against even moderately patriotic leaders such as Marine Le Pen and Pia Kjærsgaard. They soften the message.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/02/world/europe/political-strategy-for-europes-far-right-female-leaders-wooing-female-voters.html

    Noteworthy excerpt:


    Men are neither more “nativist” nor “authoritarian,” compared with women, the study found, nor do women evince less “discontent” with their governments. Women by and large were deterred from voting for the radical right by other things, including the populist right’s “political style, occasional association with historic violence, stigmatization by parts of the elite and the general public” — in other words, their outlier-ness.
     
  115. @anon
    A hypothetical but suppose it is a drone carrying a small amount of explosive and has the size and speed of a large hummingbird. When activated, it zooms towards a soldier, from behind, and blows up at close range, targeting the legs.

    Would your modern day infantry squad have any chance against this? For more than a few drones, simultaneously, probably not.

    Currently, this would cost maybe a few thousand dollars to make, with a bulk of the cost on the hardware and electronics. How much would this cost in 10 years? Maybe $100-200, if falling consumer electronics prices are any guide. The AI behind it could be less sophisticated than many consumer apps as well.

    For perspective, 2015 consumer technology at work...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsxyV-kgfio

    There is a recent video of a drone being knocked out of the sky at a soccer game by a fan throwing a roll of toilet paper at it:

    • Troll: Tiny Duck.
    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Toilet roll hit the drone in stride like a good quarterback dropping one over the linebackers to a receiver.

    I bet the guy who threw it had beers bought for him in celebration. People like to give thanks to adventurous souls who win the day.
  116. @Steve Sailer
    There is a recent video of a drone being knocked out of the sky at a soccer game by a fan throwing a roll of toilet paper at it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jm6a3QXG_qI

    Toilet roll hit the drone in stride like a good quarterback dropping one over the linebackers to a receiver.

    I bet the guy who threw it had beers bought for him in celebration. People like to give thanks to adventurous souls who win the day.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I didn't think soccer fans in Argentina had enough practicing throwing stuff to do that. If Lionel Messi kicked a soccer ball and knocked a drone out of the sky, I could believe it, but some random Argentinian making like Mike Trout throwing out a baserunner from centerfield was surprising.
  117. Just what do CEOs of public companies do? I suspect they occupy themselves mostly with Human Resources, not technical issues. They are there to provide a SJW beard for defense companies subpoenaed by Congress to explain why there aren’t more women and transgenders designing new area denial weapon systems and hyper-sonic missiles.

  118. https://www.syracuse.com/state/2019/01/jewish-cult-members-allegedly-kidnap-hudson-valley-children.html

    An extremist cult called Lev Tahor is allegedly kidnapping and abusing children. They would appear to be open borders types:

    Children in the group have been subjected to physical, sexual and emotional abuse, authorities said in a court complaint, according to the [NewYork] Times.

    The children and their mother previously lived with the group in Guatemala, according to the New York Post.

    The kids were taken in December and were last seen getting into a vehicle in front of their home. Authorities eventually found the children in a Mexican town with the help of authorities there.

    Officials are planning to return the children to the United States and reunite them with their mother.

    They are an abusive New York-based child-kidnapping cult that tried to hide in Mexico, but not the first; that would be NXIVM. Do you think the Democrats crying about tear-gassed children at the border would think differently if they heard more about border-crossing kidnap cults? This morning NPR had a “report” about heroic Antifa medics saving people, who had been tear-gassed at the border, with their infamous Antifa medical knowledge. They specifically named Antifa and openly relied on them as a source.

  119. @Anon
    The point of putting these women is charge is not that they're going to make or develop weapons. All the men working below them know that. They're there to sell them. Period. That's why they almost all have MBAs.

    2nd and 3rd world leaders find it harder to say no to a woman. 2nd and 3rd world leaders have always been intimidated and resentful of aggressive Western males, especially salesmen. They feel pushed around by them. But women? No. They're much more open to be sold things by a woman who is oozing up to them, flattering them and promising them they will become big and powerful leaders and can destroy their enemies if they buy this particular weapons system. The technique works. It's the Lady MacBeth technique.

    They’re there to sell them. Period. That’s why they almost all have MBAs.

    Mighty buxom asses?

  120. @Hypnotoad666

    Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Germany – all wealthy countries – barely have defense forces.
     
    And the fighting spirit of those negligible forces is dubious at best. Basically, they are pacifist cucks in uniform.

    The pathetic performance we could expect when the shooting starts is illustrated by the experience of the European forces in the Bosnian conflict of the 1990s.

    As just one example, Dutch armed forces charged with protecting Bosnian civilians at Srebrenicia cut a deal with Serb militia forces to surrender their weapons to the Serbs in return for safe passage out of the combat zone and a solemn "promise" that the civilians would not be harmed. The civilians were immediately massacred when the Euro forces bugged out. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Srebrenica_massacre#4_June_and_6%E2%80%9311_July_1995:_Serb_take-over_of_Srebrenica

    I also remember hearing reports about some of the token Euro forces sent to Afghanistan (I think they were Italian). Basically, their M.O. was to immediately cut a mutual non-aggression pact with the local Taliban forces and never leave their base. So their sectors looked "pacified" but were actually "safe zones" for the Taliban to retreat and regroup for attacks on the Americans.

    Basically, it's only the Anglophone countries (and maybe the French), who have any martial spirit left at all.

    But why fight for nato when you have food & hot chicks at home?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    But why fight for nato when you have food & hot chicks at home?

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FECOMdLIcBo

    The Norman Podhoretz cover lacks a little something. Like humor.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Podhoretz#American_history

  121. @Anon
    The point of putting these women is charge is not that they're going to make or develop weapons. All the men working below them know that. They're there to sell them. Period. That's why they almost all have MBAs.

    2nd and 3rd world leaders find it harder to say no to a woman. 2nd and 3rd world leaders have always been intimidated and resentful of aggressive Western males, especially salesmen. They feel pushed around by them. But women? No. They're much more open to be sold things by a woman who is oozing up to them, flattering them and promising them they will become big and powerful leaders and can destroy their enemies if they buy this particular weapons system. The technique works. It's the Lady MacBeth technique.

    I don’t believe this (I also question how much choice developing world leaders have in their purchasing, or how much personal schmoozing CEOs directly do in a sale). The irresistable value of women to organizations is that they are innate cultists.

  122. @Charles Pewitt
    Toilet roll hit the drone in stride like a good quarterback dropping one over the linebackers to a receiver.

    I bet the guy who threw it had beers bought for him in celebration. People like to give thanks to adventurous souls who win the day.

    I didn’t think soccer fans in Argentina had enough practicing throwing stuff to do that. If Lionel Messi kicked a soccer ball and knocked a drone out of the sky, I could believe it, but some random Argentinian making like Mike Trout throwing out a baserunner from centerfield was surprising.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I didn’t think soccer fans in Argentina had enough practicing throwing stuff to do that. If Lionel Messi kicked a soccer ball and knocked a drone out of the sky, I could believe it,
     
    Lionel would attribute it to the Hand of God.

    Argentina is full of rugby nuts, as are many other hostile-to-England lands. Perhaps the man threw it underhand and to his rear!
  123. Could it be affirmative action in practice? Could it be front-facing your “leader” to win contracts? Will this have an affect on leadership and procurement quality?

  124. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    Caret is well named (lacks).

  125. @Steve Sailer
    I didn't think soccer fans in Argentina had enough practicing throwing stuff to do that. If Lionel Messi kicked a soccer ball and knocked a drone out of the sky, I could believe it, but some random Argentinian making like Mike Trout throwing out a baserunner from centerfield was surprising.

    I didn’t think soccer fans in Argentina had enough practicing throwing stuff to do that. If Lionel Messi kicked a soccer ball and knocked a drone out of the sky, I could believe it,

    Lionel would attribute it to the Hand of God.

    Argentina is full of rugby nuts, as are many other hostile-to-England lands. Perhaps the man threw it underhand and to his rear!

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    Argentina is full of rugby nuts,
     
    Is Argentina full of people who just happen to carry rolls of toilet paper in their pockets when they go to a soccer game? Are the bathrooms really that bad there?
  126. @Hail

    As of Jan. 1, the CEOs of four of the nation’s five biggest defense contractors... are now women
     
    I assumed they would be high-powered types too busy and important to have ever had children (cf. the child count of the Federal Republic of Germany's Worst-Ever Chancellor and the current Prime Ministrix of the UK), but not so:

    http://cms.ipressroom.com.s3.amazonaws.com/295/files/201610/582c9a022cfac21c9cff877f_warden_kathy_lg/warden_kathy_lg_mid.jpg
    Kathy Warden (b. ca.1970)
    CEO, Northrop Grumman
    2 children

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/content/dam/lockheed-martin/eo/photo/portraits/marillyn-hewson-280.jpg.pc-adaptive.1920.medium.jpeg
    Marillyn Hewson (b.1954)
    CEO, Lockheed Martin
    2 children

    https://fortunedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/mpwnovakovic1.jpg
    Phebe Novakovic (b.1957)
    CEO, General Dynamics
    3 children (had two kids upon graduating from Wharton in 1988, and was pregnant with a third)

    https://speakerdata2.s3.amazonaws.com/photo/image/897061/CcAmMJNUMAA7fir.jpg
    Leanne Caret (b.1966)
    CEO, Boeing Defense
    0 children

    Their collective lifetime fertility (1.75) about equals the average for White women of their generations. (n=4, but still.)

    Ok, people it’s late in the thread. Let’s get down to brass tacks.

    1.) Would.
    2.) …eh. Pass.
    3.) Probably 20 years ago. Not bad for 62.
    4.) Would, but give a fake number, and change the locks afterwards.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
  127. Toilet roll hitting drone.

    Football perfectly thrown.

    Spear tipped by sharpened bone.

    Cave people and all people like things well thrown.

    Cave guy spear thrower was hero of tribe eating meat around fire.

    Lockheed woman no arm but she a millionaire, cave man no like it.

  128. @Reg Cæsar


    Theresa May and her husband can’t have children, they did try, apparently.
     
    Correct. Not a fair target. Merkel, fire away.
     
    A notable US example is the Pat Buchanans. That may explain his obsession with demography.

    It's really fascinating how many prominent eugenicists as well as their equally prominent critics left no children. I guess infertility "concentrates the mind".

    Learn something new every day. Given Buchanan’s Catholicism, there must be some personal tragedy there, like with May.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Always wondered about that, and felt bad for Pat B. His sister Bay (Angela) has three children.
  129. @unit472
    It is curious that while women moan about inequality in wages they don't seem to mind inequality in combat casualties even as they join the armed forces in increasing numbers. Maybe the Pentagon needs to apply a little Title 7 to the infantry.

    As to women dominating our defense industry you'll find the same problem in our dying industrial corporations. Mary Barra at GM, Gina Rometty at IBM and, until recently, a two-fer, Ursula Burns at Xerox. It would be mighty interesting to have a look at the share prices of big corporations who had a woman or negro as CEO. I don't think progressives or investors would be happy with the results.

    We needn’t imagine; we do know what happens when these people take the helm. Look to recent events at McDonald’s and Hewlett-Packard, to name but two.

  130. @Steve Sailer
    People have been killing birds on the wing with shotguns for hundreds of years, so killing bird-sized drones with shotguns doesn't sound too impossible.

    The general point is valid, viz. that there exist decentralized, low-cost countermeasures that could be employed with success against American heavy ordinance. It doesn’t even have to be drones. A swarm of a hundred Iranians with speedboats and jet skis, each one carrying a 40lb shaped charge, could sink an aircraft carrier in the Strait of Hormuz, especially if they weren’t averse to dying in the process. The only reason something like this hasn’t been tried yet is because America still possesses major conventional and nuclear deterrents, and could invade in force any country that had such audacity

    But eventually the deterrent isn’t going to work. Someday somebody will be fed up enough and crazy enough that they’ll just say “Fuck it!” and they’ll sink the carrier. Then we’ll have to actually invade in force, and the effort will reveal just how broke and pathetic we really are, bringing about the end of the American empire.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Jet skis and speedboats? Seriously? You're a hoot. Tell another joke.

    https://youtu.be/Zsf38NYzo5Q

    (If you're following along with the home game, that's seventy-five rounds per second with a range of two miles; the Phalanx is being, basically, dicked around with manually, by the way. And, yes, they've already been tested and proben to effectively pulverise incoming drones.)

    I'd also note once again (why ia this silly fetish such a recurrent one here?!), like the economist's proverbial can-opener, you seem to conveniently presume carriers operate alone, in littoral waters, with no BARCAP and without escort – Friend, if a carrier is within your wildest dreams of striking distance by your speedboats and jet-skis, rest assured your that carrier is not your priority: the marines and their accompanying aircraft pouring off of that amphibious assult ship over there are.

    Now, sneak attacks and sabatoge against incautioua crews like what happened to the Cole are another matter. But by definition you cannot defend against that kind of thing except to be more chary about pulling into ports full of Mohammedans....
  131. @Reg Cæsar

    I didn’t think soccer fans in Argentina had enough practicing throwing stuff to do that. If Lionel Messi kicked a soccer ball and knocked a drone out of the sky, I could believe it,
     
    Lionel would attribute it to the Hand of God.

    Argentina is full of rugby nuts, as are many other hostile-to-England lands. Perhaps the man threw it underhand and to his rear!

    Argentina is full of rugby nuts,

    Is Argentina full of people who just happen to carry rolls of toilet paper in their pockets when they go to a soccer game? Are the bathrooms really that bad there?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    This is normal in China and probably in many places. You simply cannot leave a "public" item out in much of the world, especially the southern half. It will be stolen by the next person who finds it. The parodic forcememe "We live in a society" is unintentionally wise: we North-Western and Confucian queue-formers live in something that can reasonably be called a society, whereas most humans live in a chaos of bitter competition.
  132. @Mr. Anon
    I wonder what all these Real Housewives of the Military Industrial Complex would think if they saw graphic pictures of all the people - including children - who are turned into burned and shredded meat by their products.

    Saint-Exupéry I can take or leave. He had a passage in one of his books; probably Wind, Sand, and Stars, however, which has stayed with me for decades.
    In the passage he points out that in the newsreel footage of whatever conflict was then current, the smoke seen rising from bombed out cities inevitably marked the burning bodies of dead children.
    I can still remember the sense of scales falling from my eyes when I first read that passage.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    In the passage he points out that in the newsreel footage of whatever conflict was then current, the smoke seen rising from bombed out cities inevitably marked the burning bodies of dead children.
     
    Inevitably? Hardly.
  133. @Steve Sailer
    People have been killing birds on the wing with shotguns for hundreds of years, so killing bird-sized drones with shotguns doesn't sound too impossible.

    It certainly isn’t impossible, and just a cursory thought about the physics involved will give you a good grasp on the problem of drone swarms. Force equals mass times acceleration, so either bird sized drones produce a lot of acceleration, or they don’t do too much to a hard target. Not having a lot of mass, the drones will be highly susceptable to the force produced by accelerating wind. Since the drones will be autonomous, a significant portion of their mass will be dedicated to communication/information processing. This limits payload and the mass you have to produce power and move the drone.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Couldn’t the drone release poison gas?
    Could it explode near and over the enemy, like a navigable flying bunch of grenades?

    People with actual knowledge in these areas — I.e. not me — can tell us whether drones could be a useful combat instrument even if they have to be light for the reasons mentioned.
  134. @anon
    A hypothetical but suppose it is a drone carrying a small amount of explosive and has the size and speed of a large hummingbird. When activated, it zooms towards a soldier, from behind, and blows up at close range, targeting the legs.

    Would your modern day infantry squad have any chance against this? For more than a few drones, simultaneously, probably not.

    Currently, this would cost maybe a few thousand dollars to make, with a bulk of the cost on the hardware and electronics. How much would this cost in 10 years? Maybe $100-200, if falling consumer electronics prices are any guide. The AI behind it could be less sophisticated than many consumer apps as well.

    For perspective, 2015 consumer technology at work...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsxyV-kgfio

    Counterpoint:

    Oh, unless you want the drones to be easily hackable/jamable, they’ll need to freq hop. That adds weight that will further reduce payload. Also, they’ll really need to be sure that it’s Soldiers that they’re blowing up, or else you’ll have a lot of dead deer and other wildlife. And civilians. Dead civilians always go over well…

    • Replies: @donut
    I think the sight of dead civilians will get a yawn here . The outcry if any would be over the dead forest creatures .
    , @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bP3IrTGZ1ZE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hii3vDKhG3w

    Of course, that assumes the general range of frequencies is known; lots of engineers work for your OPFOR.
  135. White women mostly with kids. No wonder everyone here is against them. This man was much better: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madison_Grant

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    White, great. Kids, excellent. Profiting massively from utterly unnecessary non defensive wars that get OUR children killed, not so good. This isn’t complicated.
  136. @J.Ross
    I have heard from both strangers and acquaintances that have met Hillary that there's nothing ideological, but the dealbreaker is that she always has to be the one with the biggest swinging object in the room, and has to make sure everyone separately understands that.

    Yes she seems like the kind of woman who would be dangerous to cross under any regime and in any era, apart from one of anarchy and petty warlords. She’s a killing machine that only operates on a carpeted surface or on hardwood flooring.

  137. Women have taught me to trust them without fail: trust that they’ll conduct themselves like women, without fail.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Women have taught me to trust them without fail: trust that they’ll conduct themselves like women, without fail.
     
    And how do women conduct themselves?
  138. @Intelligent Dasein

    Argentina is full of rugby nuts,
     
    Is Argentina full of people who just happen to carry rolls of toilet paper in their pockets when they go to a soccer game? Are the bathrooms really that bad there?

    This is normal in China and probably in many places. You simply cannot leave a “public” item out in much of the world, especially the southern half. It will be stolen by the next person who finds it. The parodic forcememe “We live in a society” is unintentionally wise: we North-Western and Confucian queue-formers live in something that can reasonably be called a society, whereas most humans live in a chaos of bitter competition.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Hence in 1985 you could pretty much go into any buisness and use the restroom, often even the telephone, as a matter of common courtesy.

    Now the polyglot Hellholes require a code and purchase if you are lucky. Often as not, it's just "No Public Restroom."
    , @Anonymous

    we North-Western and Confucian queue-formers
     
    Didn't you just write above that the Chinese are NOT like this?
  139. @Harry Baldwin
    OT, but Steve occasionally insinuates that Michelle doesn't think Barack is "all that." Of course, she enjoys confirming that impression, as in this interview about the former First Family's new Washington, DC home. (https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/real-estate/news/g2535/obama-new-house-photos/)

    Former First Lady Michelle Obama joked with Ellen DeGeneres on her television show, saying that Barack Obama isn't happy with the living situation: "He got so short-changed on this whole deal. He doesn’t have enough closet space—sorry. He’s got the smallest room for his office."

    Meanwhile, the couple's 16-year-old daughter, Sasha, "actually killed in this house," Obama told DeGeneres. "She has this two-room suite—it’s all decked out. She’s got a living room area and bedroom, and he designed it. So he’s really hating on her."
     

    BTW, a lot of mockery of Trump for saying the Obamas built a 10-foot wall around their new house, accompanied by photos that show the front of the house with only a retaining wall. I assume those were old photos, presumably from the real estate listing. More recent photos in the Daily Mail show workers erecting high brick pillars atop that low wall, obviously as supports for fence sections that will be installed between them. So, when the job is finished in a month or so, will the MSM return to the story and admit they were wrong? I suppose they'll say it's a fence, not a wall, and it's only eight-feet high, not ten, so there.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6540747/Obamas-wall-home-Trump-uses-former-couple-argue-border-barrier.html

    Did Mrs. Obama really say of her husband and their new house — on national television, no less — that “[he] doesn’t have enough closet space?” Paging Dr. Freud…

    She has less respect for him than Hillary has for Bill.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    that “[he] doesn’t have enough closet space?” Paging Dr. Freud…

     

    Or Dr Kinsley.


    She calls to mind Mrs Eric Gill, who tolerated, and enabled, her husband's distributist sex farm for ages. She got her revenge after his death by giving his very explicit diaries to UCLA. Even then, they weren't made public until almost fifty years and two or three biographies later.


    Other Moral ‘Pearls’ of Eric Gill
  140. @Reg Cæsar

    Kudos to her and her husband for their fecundity. I wonder why they had so many children? Are they devout Christians? Or do they just like children?
     
    Lucy Kellaway and David Goodhart had four children She once wrote a column for the FT about bumping into other high-placed women with large broods. One also had seven.

    Sadly, however, the Goodharts split once the children were grown.

    Goodhart is one of seven children himself. His grandfather was Arthur Lehman Goodhart, grandson of Meyer Lehman, of those brothers. He's also the grandnephew of John Gilbert Winant, governor of New Hampshire and ambassador to the UK during the war. He and Ike are the only Americans to be awarded the Order of Merit.

    Goodhart is one of seven children himself. His grandfather was Arthur Lehman Goodhart, grandson of Meyer Lehman, of those brothers.

    Was he the guy they named the citrus fruit after?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Was he the guy they named the citrus fruit after?
     
    David's Goodharts were New York City Jews, not known for dabbling in fruit farms in California or Michigan.

    David's uncle, though, has a law of economics named for him:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodhart%27s_law

    "When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure."

    Sounds a lot like Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle.
  141. @unit472
    It is curious that while women moan about inequality in wages they don't seem to mind inequality in combat casualties even as they join the armed forces in increasing numbers. Maybe the Pentagon needs to apply a little Title 7 to the infantry.

    As to women dominating our defense industry you'll find the same problem in our dying industrial corporations. Mary Barra at GM, Gina Rometty at IBM and, until recently, a two-fer, Ursula Burns at Xerox. It would be mighty interesting to have a look at the share prices of big corporations who had a woman or negro as CEO. I don't think progressives or investors would be happy with the results.

    It is curious that while women moan about inequality in wages they don’t seem to mind inequality in combat casualties even as they join the armed forces in increasing numbers.

    Feminism is not, and never has been, about equality. It’s always been about power and money. The “equality” line feminists use is merely a Trojan horse to sucker stupid men into letting the feminists take control after the men put forth all the blood, sweat, and tears necessary to create a prosperous society.

  142. @PhysicistDave
    I've worked as an engineer in both civilian high-tech and in the defense industry.

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

    The female engineers I knew in the defense industry were, to put it diplomatically, inadequate. I assumed that this was due to the heavy pressure for affirmative action in government contractors.

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.

    “The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.”

    No need to cuck out here man, no one’s going to tattle on you. And I think we managed to scare Rosie off so you’re not getting a piece of that either.

    • Agree: L Woods
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    Johnny Smoggins wrote to me:


    [Dave]“The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.”
     
    [JS]No need to cuck out here man, no one’s going to tattle on you.
     
    Nope. One of those female engineers was my office mate for a year or so -- she actually got the whole manufacturing operation going. She was probably the single most valuable engineer in the company. Number two and three top engineers were two guys who were my successive supervisors, both males (better engineers than supervisors -- a bit of the Peter Principle).

    All three were immigrants from East Asia, though we did also have some extremely bright (but younger and less experienced) Caucasian engineers.

    You can draw what conclusions you wish: this is just anecdotal information. But, I was very well-positioned to judge these three individuals' abilities as engineers.
  143. @Intelligent Dasein
    The general point is valid, viz. that there exist decentralized, low-cost countermeasures that could be employed with success against American heavy ordinance. It doesn't even have to be drones. A swarm of a hundred Iranians with speedboats and jet skis, each one carrying a 40lb shaped charge, could sink an aircraft carrier in the Strait of Hormuz, especially if they weren't averse to dying in the process. The only reason something like this hasn't been tried yet is because America still possesses major conventional and nuclear deterrents, and could invade in force any country that had such audacity

    But eventually the deterrent isn't going to work. Someday somebody will be fed up enough and crazy enough that they'll just say "Fuck it!" and they'll sink the carrier. Then we'll have to actually invade in force, and the effort will reveal just how broke and pathetic we really are, bringing about the end of the American empire.

    Jet skis and speedboats? Seriously? You’re a hoot. Tell another joke.

    (If you’re following along with the home game, that’s seventy-five rounds per second with a range of two miles; the Phalanx is being, basically, dicked around with manually, by the way. And, yes, they’ve already been tested and proben to effectively pulverise incoming drones.)

    I’d also note once again (why ia this silly fetish such a recurrent one here?!), like the economist’s proverbial can-opener, you seem to conveniently presume carriers operate alone, in littoral waters, with no BARCAP and without escort – Friend, if a carrier is within your wildest dreams of striking distance by your speedboats and jet-skis, rest assured your that carrier is not your priority: the marines and their accompanying aircraft pouring off of that amphibious assult ship over there are.

    Now, sneak attacks and sabatoge against incautioua crews like what happened to the Cole are another matter. But by definition you cannot defend against that kind of thing except to be more chary about pulling into ports full of Mohammedans….

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    The Phalanx has enough ammunition for about 30 seconds of continuous fire. It can easily be overwhelmed by multiple inbound threats on multiple approach vectors. This isn't even controversial. Close-in weapons systems are considered measures of last resort against anti-ship missiles or artillery rounds. They are not designed to handle, and cannot handle, swarming surface attacks.

    you seem to conveniently presume carriers operate alone, in littoral waters,
     
    I am not presuming anything, and you're being way too literal in the littoral. Substitute any ship in the fleet for "aircraft carrier," and the same dynamic applies. The point is that there are relatively cheap, asymmetrical ways to destroy expensive American military hardware.
  144. @J.Ross
    This is normal in China and probably in many places. You simply cannot leave a "public" item out in much of the world, especially the southern half. It will be stolen by the next person who finds it. The parodic forcememe "We live in a society" is unintentionally wise: we North-Western and Confucian queue-formers live in something that can reasonably be called a society, whereas most humans live in a chaos of bitter competition.

    Hence in 1985 you could pretty much go into any buisness and use the restroom, often even the telephone, as a matter of common courtesy.

    Now the polyglot Hellholes require a code and purchase if you are lucky. Often as not, it’s just “No Public Restroom.”

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Or here, in a white area, the gas stations will let you use their restroom (which will be clean), and in other areas you know to not even ask.
  145. @Anonnu
    But why fight for nato when you have food & hot chicks at home?

    But why fight for nato when you have food & hot chicks at home?

    The Norman Podhoretz cover lacks a little something. Like humor.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Podhoretz#American_history

  146. @Nathan
    What are these bird-sized drones supposed to kill you with? How much can a bird-sized drone carry? A couple of 5.56 rounds? Is it a kamikaze vehicle? If you have a few thousand, you'll run out pretty quick. And then there's weather.

    How about chemical or biological weapons ?

  147. @Gary in Gramercy
    Did Mrs. Obama really say of her husband and their new house -- on national television, no less -- that "[he] doesn't have enough closet space?" Paging Dr. Freud...

    She has less respect for him than Hillary has for Bill.

    that “[he] doesn’t have enough closet space?” Paging Dr. Freud…

    Or Dr Kinsley.

    She calls to mind Mrs Eric Gill, who tolerated, and enabled, her husband’s distributist sex farm for ages. She got her revenge after his death by giving his very explicit diaries to UCLA. Even then, they weren’t made public until almost fifty years and two or three biographies later.

    Other Moral ‘Pearls’ of Eric Gill

  148. @Nathan
    What are these bird-sized drones supposed to kill you with? How much can a bird-sized drone carry? A couple of 5.56 rounds? Is it a kamikaze vehicle? If you have a few thousand, you'll run out pretty quick. And then there's weather.

    Of course, BATF could ban it by claiming a stream of electrical pulses to the trigger could convert a handgun to a machine gun.

  149. @Charles Pewitt
    Frauke Petry has 5 children and a degree in chemistry from University of Reading in the UK and she got a doctorate from the University of Gottingen. Got it?

    Frauke Petry was a leader of the Alternative for Deutschland(AfD) political party in Germany.

    She is a somewhat short German lady who looks like she could be a shapely wood nymph from some East German forest. You could add that in addition to looking like a German wood nymph, she is built like a brick something or other. The idea to keep attractive women as the front face of right wing populist movements in Europe is a good one.

    https://twitter.com/OuchikhKarim/status/618002879568347136

    Shorter women have higher TFR.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Really? Why?
    , @res

    Shorter women have higher TFR.
     
    Do you have data supporting that? I would expect a U shaped curve, although the peak might be below average height.

    Here is a Finnish twin study which seems contrary to your assertion. See Figure 1.
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/234088445_Height_Age_at_First_Birth_and_Lifetime_Reproductive_Success_A_Prospective_Cohort_Study_of_Finnish_Male_and_Female_Twins
  150. @Autochthon
    Hence in 1985 you could pretty much go into any buisness and use the restroom, often even the telephone, as a matter of common courtesy.

    Now the polyglot Hellholes require a code and purchase if you are lucky. Often as not, it's just "No Public Restroom."

    Or here, in a white area, the gas stations will let you use their restroom (which will be clean), and in other areas you know to not even ask.

  151. Tiny drones could deliver lethal micro doses of fentanyl.

    Etc.

  152. @Autochthon
    Jet skis and speedboats? Seriously? You're a hoot. Tell another joke.

    https://youtu.be/Zsf38NYzo5Q

    (If you're following along with the home game, that's seventy-five rounds per second with a range of two miles; the Phalanx is being, basically, dicked around with manually, by the way. And, yes, they've already been tested and proben to effectively pulverise incoming drones.)

    I'd also note once again (why ia this silly fetish such a recurrent one here?!), like the economist's proverbial can-opener, you seem to conveniently presume carriers operate alone, in littoral waters, with no BARCAP and without escort – Friend, if a carrier is within your wildest dreams of striking distance by your speedboats and jet-skis, rest assured your that carrier is not your priority: the marines and their accompanying aircraft pouring off of that amphibious assult ship over there are.

    Now, sneak attacks and sabatoge against incautioua crews like what happened to the Cole are another matter. But by definition you cannot defend against that kind of thing except to be more chary about pulling into ports full of Mohammedans....

    The Phalanx has enough ammunition for about 30 seconds of continuous fire. It can easily be overwhelmed by multiple inbound threats on multiple approach vectors. This isn’t even controversial. Close-in weapons systems are considered measures of last resort against anti-ship missiles or artillery rounds. They are not designed to handle, and cannot handle, swarming surface attacks.

    you seem to conveniently presume carriers operate alone, in littoral waters,

    I am not presuming anything, and you’re being way too literal in the littoral. Substitute any ship in the fleet for “aircraft carrier,” and the same dynamic applies. The point is that there are relatively cheap, asymmetrical ways to destroy expensive American military hardware.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    You either don't understand what you are writing, what I am writing, or both. The Phalanx absolutely is effective against inbound surface vessels (you jet-skis and speedboats) as well as drones. It's been effectively field-tested against both. It's original, primary purpose was agianst missiles; ironically, faster and faster missiles have made it more adroit at handling incoming surface attacks, which it has indeed, contrary to your statement, long since been upgraded to address. Because it is fully automated it doesn't need to be fired continuosly for hours or even minutes to destroy a swath of jet-skis – one pass and its done, Phalanx 75, idiots on jet-skis 0, time for the gunners' mates to have a beer and laugh (never mind that most surface vessels have multiple Phalanxes – carriers have three – in addition to manually operated, conventional machine-guns).

    Do you know what littoral means? Speedboats and jet-skis are not blue-water vessels. Carriers don't operate within range of them at all; I was attempting by making my point about LHDs to emphasise that. (For some famous examples: Dixie Station was eighty miles to sea; Yankee Station was about one hundred and twenty miles from shore.)

    Again, carriers – or, to adapt to the relocated goal-posts of the discussion, any surface ships – do not operate alone. Have their BARCAP pilots all been gunned down by jet-skiers weilding Berettas in your cartoonish scenario?

    I anticipate this exhange is on its way to the realm of "but, what if the drones had lasers, and the speedboats refueled en route, or..." so I'll just say that, yes, the United States Navy are aware of "multiple inboud threats on multiple approach vectors" (that's just a verbose way of saying "naval combat," by the way, of which it is the essence), and yes, there are myriad effective countermeasures to such threats, including "swarming surface attacks."

    Have you ever been in naval combat? Are you one of these guys who reads discussions on Quora among people who've never been in the military exhanging their geeky theories? Kind of like Samantha Power's qualifications to manage national security? I'm not trying to be rude; I'm really not, and I'm not presuming – Hell, maybe you've been the officer of the watch and earned a Navy Cross – but you aren't writing like it.
  153. @Johnny Smoggins
    "The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male."


    No need to cuck out here man, no one's going to tattle on you. And I think we managed to scare Rosie off so you're not getting a piece of that either.

    Johnny Smoggins wrote to me:

    [Dave]“The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.”

    [JS]No need to cuck out here man, no one’s going to tattle on you.

    Nope. One of those female engineers was my office mate for a year or so — she actually got the whole manufacturing operation going. She was probably the single most valuable engineer in the company. Number two and three top engineers were two guys who were my successive supervisors, both males (better engineers than supervisors — a bit of the Peter Principle).

    All three were immigrants from East Asia, though we did also have some extremely bright (but younger and less experienced) Caucasian engineers.

    You can draw what conclusions you wish: this is just anecdotal information. But, I was very well-positioned to judge these three individuals’ abilities as engineers.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    All three were immigrants from East Asia, though we did also have some extremely bright (but younger and less experienced) Caucasian engineers.
     
    Taking spots that could have been filled capably by natives.
    , @Mr. Anon

    You can draw what conclusions you wish: this is just anecdotal information. But, I was very well-positioned to judge these three individuals’ abilities as engineers.
     
    The conclusion I would draw is that your information is anecdotal.
  154. @Jack Strocchi
    I repectfully disagree.

    Sergey Shoygu sounds like the kind of guy you want to share a foxhole with. And perhaps a future President of Russia.

    But militarism has not served the Russian people well over the past century or so. They would be better off if they followed the Nordic example of putting an attractive woman in charge of defence.

    Better to put Alpha males like Shoygu in charge of border protection and population policy. The future belongs to people who can heed the lessons of Malthus and Galton.

    “Sergey Shoygu sounds like the kind of guy you want to share a foxhole with”

    He’s not well liked in Russia. Apparently didn’t have much of a service track record.

  155. @Cagey Beast
    Women are good at politics.

    I'm going to jump in and say it differently. Women are good at social networking but are horrible at politics. Politics is the art of balancing rival factions and finding mutually agreeable terms of coexistence with sharply differing people. Women are horrible at this. Women are unrivalled within the domain of personal palace intrigues but they're a danger to themselves and others out past the walls of the palace.

    Watch Hillary Clinton in an interview and you see how skilled she is as the dowager empress of the DNC. Watch her out in the wider world and see her wheels come off. Trump is her opposite in this. I don't just mean electoral politics, I mean the whole art of alliance bulding. That's why he's losing against the indoor Swamp of Washington.

    Women are unrivalled within the domain of personal palace intrigues

    Doesn’t that make them a danger to the palace, as well?

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Women engaging in social networking on behalf of her family is an asset but the problem is who decides what her "family" is? If it's not her literal family then she can do a lot of harm advocating for her substitute children, substitute husband and substitute elderly.
  156. @JMcG
    Saint-Exupéry I can take or leave. He had a passage in one of his books; probably Wind, Sand, and Stars, however, which has stayed with me for decades.
    In the passage he points out that in the newsreel footage of whatever conflict was then current, the smoke seen rising from bombed out cities inevitably marked the burning bodies of dead children.
    I can still remember the sense of scales falling from my eyes when I first read that passage.

    In the passage he points out that in the newsreel footage of whatever conflict was then current, the smoke seen rising from bombed out cities inevitably marked the burning bodies of dead children.

    Inevitably? Hardly.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    Considering the time period under discussion, he was likely referencing Nanking or Guernica. I’d say inevitably is pretty accurate. I didn’t look up the passage though, so any incorrect interpretation is certainly mine. I’ll see if I can find it.
  157. @atlantis_dweller
    Women have taught me to trust them without fail: trust that they'll conduct themselves like women, without fail.

    Women have taught me to trust them without fail: trust that they’ll conduct themselves like women, without fail.

    And how do women conduct themselves?

  158. @J.Ross
    This is normal in China and probably in many places. You simply cannot leave a "public" item out in much of the world, especially the southern half. It will be stolen by the next person who finds it. The parodic forcememe "We live in a society" is unintentionally wise: we North-Western and Confucian queue-formers live in something that can reasonably be called a society, whereas most humans live in a chaos of bitter competition.

    we North-Western and Confucian queue-formers

    Didn’t you just write above that the Chinese are NOT like this?

  159. @Lot
    Shorter women have higher TFR.

    Really? Why?

    • Replies: @Lot
    No idea. Harder to have a business career? Less likely to get a college sport recruitment? Male preference?
  160. @PhysicistDave
    Johnny Smoggins wrote to me:


    [Dave]“The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.”
     
    [JS]No need to cuck out here man, no one’s going to tattle on you.
     
    Nope. One of those female engineers was my office mate for a year or so -- she actually got the whole manufacturing operation going. She was probably the single most valuable engineer in the company. Number two and three top engineers were two guys who were my successive supervisors, both males (better engineers than supervisors -- a bit of the Peter Principle).

    All three were immigrants from East Asia, though we did also have some extremely bright (but younger and less experienced) Caucasian engineers.

    You can draw what conclusions you wish: this is just anecdotal information. But, I was very well-positioned to judge these three individuals' abilities as engineers.

    All three were immigrants from East Asia, though we did also have some extremely bright (but younger and less experienced) Caucasian engineers.

    Taking spots that could have been filled capably by natives.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    Anonymous[267] wrote to me:

    Taking spots that could have been filled capably by natives.
     
    Well... I think you'd be amazed at how many incompetent idiots are given engineering degrees by American universities! When I worked in the defense industry, I was truly stunned at the level of engineering incompetence (almost no Asians).
  161. @Anonymous
    Really? Why?

    No idea. Harder to have a business career? Less likely to get a college sport recruitment? Male preference?

  162. @Intelligent Dasein
    The Phalanx has enough ammunition for about 30 seconds of continuous fire. It can easily be overwhelmed by multiple inbound threats on multiple approach vectors. This isn't even controversial. Close-in weapons systems are considered measures of last resort against anti-ship missiles or artillery rounds. They are not designed to handle, and cannot handle, swarming surface attacks.

    you seem to conveniently presume carriers operate alone, in littoral waters,
     
    I am not presuming anything, and you're being way too literal in the littoral. Substitute any ship in the fleet for "aircraft carrier," and the same dynamic applies. The point is that there are relatively cheap, asymmetrical ways to destroy expensive American military hardware.

    You either don’t understand what you are writing, what I am writing, or both. The Phalanx absolutely is effective against inbound surface vessels (you jet-skis and speedboats) as well as drones. It’s been effectively field-tested against both. It’s original, primary purpose was agianst missiles; ironically, faster and faster missiles have made it more adroit at handling incoming surface attacks, which it has indeed, contrary to your statement, long since been upgraded to address. Because it is fully automated it doesn’t need to be fired continuosly for hours or even minutes to destroy a swath of jet-skis – one pass and its done, Phalanx 75, idiots on jet-skis 0, time for the gunners’ mates to have a beer and laugh (never mind that most surface vessels have multiple Phalanxes – carriers have three – in addition to manually operated, conventional machine-guns).

    Do you know what littoral means? Speedboats and jet-skis are not blue-water vessels. Carriers don’t operate within range of them at all; I was attempting by making my point about LHDs to emphasise that. (For some famous examples: Dixie Station was eighty miles to sea; Yankee Station was about one hundred and twenty miles from shore.)

    Again, carriers – or, to adapt to the relocated goal-posts of the discussion, any surface ships – do not operate alone. Have their BARCAP pilots all been gunned down by jet-skiers weilding Berettas in your cartoonish scenario?

    I anticipate this exhange is on its way to the realm of “but, what if the drones had lasers, and the speedboats refueled en route, or…” so I’ll just say that, yes, the United States Navy are aware of “multiple inboud threats on multiple approach vectors” (that’s just a verbose way of saying “naval combat,” by the way, of which it is the essence), and yes, there are myriad effective countermeasures to such threats, including “swarming surface attacks.”

    Have you ever been in naval combat? Are you one of these guys who reads discussions on Quora among people who’ve never been in the military exhanging their geeky theories? Kind of like Samantha Power’s qualifications to manage national security? I’m not trying to be rude; I’m really not, and I’m not presuming – Hell, maybe you’ve been the officer of the watch and earned a Navy Cross – but you aren’t writing like it.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    By a remarkable coincidence, this just in:

    http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/02/c_137713249.htm

    I anticipate this exhange is on its way to the realm of “but, what if the drones had lasers, and the speedboats refueled en route, or…”
     
    Not at all. This exchange is heading towards me concluding that you seem a little drunk tonight and not like your usual self.

    The holidays can be hard on people. Get some rest.
  163. @PhysicistDave
    Johnny Smoggins wrote to me:


    [Dave]“The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.”
     
    [JS]No need to cuck out here man, no one’s going to tattle on you.
     
    Nope. One of those female engineers was my office mate for a year or so -- she actually got the whole manufacturing operation going. She was probably the single most valuable engineer in the company. Number two and three top engineers were two guys who were my successive supervisors, both males (better engineers than supervisors -- a bit of the Peter Principle).

    All three were immigrants from East Asia, though we did also have some extremely bright (but younger and less experienced) Caucasian engineers.

    You can draw what conclusions you wish: this is just anecdotal information. But, I was very well-positioned to judge these three individuals' abilities as engineers.

    You can draw what conclusions you wish: this is just anecdotal information. But, I was very well-positioned to judge these three individuals’ abilities as engineers.

    The conclusion I would draw is that your information is anecdotal.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    Mr. Anon wrote:

    The conclusion I would draw is that your information is anecdotal.
     
    True. But the singular of "data" really is "anecdote."

    Sailer has emphasized, quite rightly, that when supposed "data" goes against anecdotal experience, a great deal of skepticism is in order.
  164. @Autochthon
    You either don't understand what you are writing, what I am writing, or both. The Phalanx absolutely is effective against inbound surface vessels (you jet-skis and speedboats) as well as drones. It's been effectively field-tested against both. It's original, primary purpose was agianst missiles; ironically, faster and faster missiles have made it more adroit at handling incoming surface attacks, which it has indeed, contrary to your statement, long since been upgraded to address. Because it is fully automated it doesn't need to be fired continuosly for hours or even minutes to destroy a swath of jet-skis – one pass and its done, Phalanx 75, idiots on jet-skis 0, time for the gunners' mates to have a beer and laugh (never mind that most surface vessels have multiple Phalanxes – carriers have three – in addition to manually operated, conventional machine-guns).

    Do you know what littoral means? Speedboats and jet-skis are not blue-water vessels. Carriers don't operate within range of them at all; I was attempting by making my point about LHDs to emphasise that. (For some famous examples: Dixie Station was eighty miles to sea; Yankee Station was about one hundred and twenty miles from shore.)

    Again, carriers – or, to adapt to the relocated goal-posts of the discussion, any surface ships – do not operate alone. Have their BARCAP pilots all been gunned down by jet-skiers weilding Berettas in your cartoonish scenario?

    I anticipate this exhange is on its way to the realm of "but, what if the drones had lasers, and the speedboats refueled en route, or..." so I'll just say that, yes, the United States Navy are aware of "multiple inboud threats on multiple approach vectors" (that's just a verbose way of saying "naval combat," by the way, of which it is the essence), and yes, there are myriad effective countermeasures to such threats, including "swarming surface attacks."

    Have you ever been in naval combat? Are you one of these guys who reads discussions on Quora among people who've never been in the military exhanging their geeky theories? Kind of like Samantha Power's qualifications to manage national security? I'm not trying to be rude; I'm really not, and I'm not presuming – Hell, maybe you've been the officer of the watch and earned a Navy Cross – but you aren't writing like it.

    By a remarkable coincidence, this just in:

    http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/02/c_137713249.htm

    I anticipate this exhange is on its way to the realm of “but, what if the drones had lasers, and the speedboats refueled en route, or…”

    Not at all. This exchange is heading towards me concluding that you seem a little drunk tonight and not like your usual self.

    The holidays can be hard on people. Get some rest.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    You have me confused with The Doughnut; I don't drink alcohol.

    Those Iranian speedboats will sink the Stennis about the same time Donald Trump honours a campaign promise related to the invasion.
  165. @Intelligent Dasein
    By a remarkable coincidence, this just in:

    http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/02/c_137713249.htm

    I anticipate this exhange is on its way to the realm of “but, what if the drones had lasers, and the speedboats refueled en route, or…”
     
    Not at all. This exchange is heading towards me concluding that you seem a little drunk tonight and not like your usual self.

    The holidays can be hard on people. Get some rest.

    You have me confused with The Doughnut; I don’t drink alcohol.

    Those Iranian speedboats will sink the Stennis about the same time Donald Trump honours a campaign promise related to the invasion.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Those Iranian speedboats will sink the Stennis about the same time Donald Trump honours a campaign promise related to the invasion.
     
    What invasion?
    , @Intelligent Dasein

    You have me confused with The Doughnut; I don’t drink alcohol.
     
    I take you at your word. I just meant to say that you don't seem like your normal self in these comments. It feels like something is bothering you, apart from just me.
  166. @Autochthon
    You have me confused with The Doughnut; I don't drink alcohol.

    Those Iranian speedboats will sink the Stennis about the same time Donald Trump honours a campaign promise related to the invasion.

    Those Iranian speedboats will sink the Stennis about the same time Donald Trump honours a campaign promise related to the invasion.

    What invasion?

    • LOL: Autochthon
  167. There is an aphorism in the defense industry: “After a while, you start to look like your customer.”

    This means that your company’s organizational structure will eventually parallel the organizational structure in the Department of Defense … and your corporate values will parody those in the Department of Defense.

    Women are being pushed to the top in the defense industries for the same reason that women are being pushed to the top within the military services and the Department of Defense. It’s politically correct and shows that your company is “with the program”. This is not new. It goes back at least to the 1980s.

    A defense contractor could be effectively blacklisted if accused of sex discrimination based on nothing but raw numbers of men and women at various organizational levels … especially if this draws the ire of the little known but very powerful Defense Department Advisory Committee on Women in the Services or the often female-dominated military contracting agencies.

    It is better for your company to be listed among the “100 Best Employers for Women” in spite of the high carrying costs of doing so, i.e. special career tracks (often called the Lifestyle Track) for working mothers that give them opportunities to work from home, work special hours, or take afternoons off for school functions without being penalized when it’s time for promotions and raises.

    At the end of the day, it is impossible for a defense company to be criticized if it appears on the list of the “100 Best Employers for Women” … and it gets bonus points for having a female CEO. Can you imagine a female CEO (especially one with children) being pulled before a congressional committee and berated for gouging the taxpayers for yet another “gold plated” system that doesn’t work?

    The time has come for female CEOs. In the “#MeToo” era, it’s the politically savvy thing to have, especially when positioning the company for government contracts.

  168. @Nathan
    Counterpoint:

    https://cdn.thewirecutter.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/leafblowers-lowres-0166.jpg

    Oh, unless you want the drones to be easily hackable/jamable, they'll need to freq hop. That adds weight that will further reduce payload. Also, they'll really need to be sure that it's Soldiers that they're blowing up, or else you'll have a lot of dead deer and other wildlife. And civilians. Dead civilians always go over well...

    I think the sight of dead civilians will get a yawn here . The outcry if any would be over the dead forest creatures .

  169. @Anonymous

    In the passage he points out that in the newsreel footage of whatever conflict was then current, the smoke seen rising from bombed out cities inevitably marked the burning bodies of dead children.
     
    Inevitably? Hardly.

    Considering the time period under discussion, he was likely referencing Nanking or Guernica. I’d say inevitably is pretty accurate. I didn’t look up the passage though, so any incorrect interpretation is certainly mine. I’ll see if I can find it.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Thank you.
  170. @Achmed E. Newman
    Something there bugged me to think harder on the composite tube (besides what I'm going to write to I.D.). No, there will always be a displacement, no matter how small, of all the components together, unless there is slippage, meaning failure of the material. The compliance (inverse of stiffness) of a composite will be mostly a function of the of the least compliant parts (the carbon, in this case) in the same way that resistance is mostly a function of the lowest resistance.

    Yes, the deformation will be weird, but a negative spring constant of a structure can't really exist in my determination either, the more I go back to my roots (roots engineering here). I'll write more in a short reply to I.D.

    At least I'm not out there screaming about it, right? ;-} Actually, in response to the rest of your post, I agree with the prof who has been teaching his ass off with no reward (or threat of firing). Is this not what the students are paying for, good teaching vs. research and teaching by un-understandable profs. that are teaching one class a year because they have to by law? I don't agree with the screaming, and I don't agree with a guy blowing you off with a mean remark. I would try to give you an explanation such as ID's or my reply coming in a few minutes.

    a) Carbon fiber tube and negative spring constant.
    I really need a video here, but I can’t find one.

    A spiral wound carbon fiber tube, with circular cross-section, is anisotropic with respect to the axis of the carbon fiber. Push the end of a cantilevered tube down and the tube end does go down, as you would expect. However, the tube also twists along its length, so that the end rotates around the tubes axis. If the end drops x mm from an initial position of x0 mm, then the cylinder we will consider twists by c*(x0-x) radians. Note that pushing own decreases x.
    Rigidly attach a rod horizontally to the tube such that the resulting structure forms a “T” shape, (the axis of the rod is perpendicular to that of the tube, the two axes meet at one point, that point being the center of mass of the tube). Push the end of the cylinder down and hold it. The rod will rotate by some fixed amount, theta

    So far, all is as expected: push down on cylinder, rod twists.

    OK, so now you move your finger along the rod, away from the tube end so that the finger is move up along the rod. Keep the finger’s force constant, and thus keeping the cylinder end stationary. _If_ the carbon tube is properly spiral wound with highly rigid carbon fiber, _then_ the tube will not rotate _and_ your finger will rise as you get further from the cylinder end. Eventually, your finger will rise above the cylinder end’s initial position.

    Now take your finger off the rod. Note that the rod will drop out from under your finger. If you press the rod down again, displacing the tube end same as before, your finger will rise.

    What’s happening: When you press the rod down, your finger exerts a torque on the cylinder. That torque will establish a stress field within the cylinder. The stress field will have principle tension direction something like the stripes on a barber pole, and the cylinder’s material will stretch along the stripes.
    For an isometric (same in all 3 spatial directions) substance, the stretch from the torque produced by your finger will usually (I won’t say always) tend to counter any rotation of the cylinder end. (For some cross-sectional cylinder shapes, pushing down above the cylinder axis will cause cylinder end to rotate about the cylinder’s axis.)
    If the cylinder cross-section is like a circle, and you reinforced the cylinder so that the carbon fiber was wound along the principle tension direction at every point. forming a continuous spiral pattern like a barber’s pole with thousands of stripes, then the principle tension would be on the long axis of the carbon fiber. The fiber is very rigid, and won’t lengthen detectably for the force you can exert with your finger. The composite tube will rotate as before (a little but less, but not detectably), the rod will rise. If your finger is far enough from the cylinder center, then your finger will rise.
    And it didn’t rise just a little, it rose a lot, while the tube bent a lot more yet.
    Material behavior often doesn’t conform to common sense.

    Now, the problem is to fit this into existing mathematics. I never tried, haven’t yet, and haven’t seen what other people have done. My work was in a quite different field. I will point out, however, that the existence of the phenomenon doesn’t depend on the mathematics that describe it; it’s more the other way around.

    It turns out that you can make a composite structure with zero Poisson ratio, and this is common for solid fuel rockets. If the rocket casing were to change dimensions due to pressure from the burning propellant, so would the solid fuel, and that would induce cracks in the solid fuel. The cracks would become combustion surfaces and the rocket would malfunction energetically.

    There is a commonly accessible book on this, J. E. Gordon _Structures: or why things don’t fall down_. Gordon an English mechanical engineer, most active during WW II, but still active when carbon composites were developed. He spends a book describing the semi-intuitive methods used by British MEs during his professional lifetime. He wrote a second book, _The New Science of Strong Materials_, which rehashes _Structures_ and has bit more about composites.

    • Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat
    This thread is getting long, but...

    It turns out that you can make a composite structure with zero Poisson ratio, and this is common for solid fuel rockets. If the rocket casing were to change dimensions due to pressure from the burning propellant, so would the solid fuel, and that would induce cracks in the solid fuel. The cracks would become combustion surfaces and the rocket would malfunction energetically.
     
    I think you're talking about the radial-to-axial deformation ratio of the case, which is a different concept from the Poisson ratio. Rocket motor cases can and do change shape under internal pressure; the propellant is stretchy enough to follow the deformation without cracking, if the motor is designed well.

    On the topic of a negative spring constant: a trivial example is snap-through of a curved elastic beam. If you push on the convex side of the beam, it pushes back on you, but if you push harder and cause it to snap through, it takes off and starts pulling on you. So the sign of the spring constant changes.
  171. @Achmed E. Newman
    Something there bugged me to think harder on the composite tube (besides what I'm going to write to I.D.). No, there will always be a displacement, no matter how small, of all the components together, unless there is slippage, meaning failure of the material. The compliance (inverse of stiffness) of a composite will be mostly a function of the of the least compliant parts (the carbon, in this case) in the same way that resistance is mostly a function of the lowest resistance.

    Yes, the deformation will be weird, but a negative spring constant of a structure can't really exist in my determination either, the more I go back to my roots (roots engineering here). I'll write more in a short reply to I.D.

    At least I'm not out there screaming about it, right? ;-} Actually, in response to the rest of your post, I agree with the prof who has been teaching his ass off with no reward (or threat of firing). Is this not what the students are paying for, good teaching vs. research and teaching by un-understandable profs. that are teaching one class a year because they have to by law? I don't agree with the screaming, and I don't agree with a guy blowing you off with a mean remark. I would try to give you an explanation such as ID's or my reply coming in a few minutes.

    Second subject: the screaming.

    The professor involved didn’t choose to start screaming, any more than he would have chosen to fall if pushed off a cliff. He’d just been pushed too far. Happened to me once, you don’t have any choices when that happens. This is even recognized under US law: people can lose control of themselves.
    The faculty eventually won that fight, though. They’d destroyed the career of something like the previous three University presidents. The one responsible for the teaching award, though, they killed. Essentially, they ignored him and let him work himself to death, which he did. He might have lived, but tripped while out jogging when completely exhausted, was hospitalized, developed cancer (from stress?) and died within a few months. The whole thing was catalyzed by an exceptionally brutal and stupid (no joke, they looked and acted like members of organized crime) administrative layer at that particular school, which made for a bad working environment and a general bloody mindedness.

    The point is that it is easy to make universities unproductive, and difficult to get research done. Research universities are under political pressure to stop research and start doing almost anything else. That’s bad.

    I’ve heard the “teaching is what students want” argument, even worked at a school that believed it (which was very like a high school). The problem is that people who don’t work with a subject can’t teach it. They end up either teaching the textbook (very unpopular with students, as it means actually learning the textbook material) or, more often, spouting nonsense that sounds good and giving tests that contain questions the students could answer in previous years. What else, after all, _could_ they do? One gets courses full of problem solving, but without meaningful content. That’s why people ordinarily say that they forget what they learned within six months, or that the course has “no practical application”. To get through those courses, you need a memory like a sponge: soak up course content, squeeze it out into the test, and you have an empty sponge waiting for the next round of nonsense. That’s hyperbole, of course, intended to illustrate a concept.

    So: ending research won’t just shut down research, it will also, eventually, shut down teaching, reducing classes to teaching rituals with little relation to reality, and professions consisting of learning standard practice in the field (rather like medicine prior to, say, the invention of antibiotics). School becomes a test of IQ and ability to tolerate ritual, eventually a test only of ability to tolerate ritual. Which several authors at this site have already commented on.

    What is apparently happening
    Science was started as part of religions, a way to know more about the Christian God, who ruled by faithfulness to His own word. From this, rules for the physical universe that God created. The bible is in the form of a history, the Acts of God. Physics is much the same, except that it has the acts in front of it.
    And the motivation for science is unchanged since then.
    Christianity is the _only_ religion that believes in a physical universe governed by unchanging laws. Nobody else does. Some say that the universe creator can change his mind at any time, some say society is the ultimate reality, some say everything is caused by local spirits, some say they don’t know and don’t care because they are too busy social climbing. And not one of them, Christians included, could prove their position objectively.
    Remove religion from science and you get the soft sciences, which are simply careers, much like fiction writing in day to day work. People in those fields find themselves writing morality stories, with nothing to study, and end up as propagandists simply to keep their self respect.
    Physics and mathematics could go the same way. If defended, they must be defended on religious grounds. Failure to realize or admit that means that physics and mathematics are largely undefended now, which is why the attacks against them (and against engineering as well) are now succeeding.

    Counterinsurgency

  172. @Reg Cæsar

    I still would ask: if the pair were as committed to having children as this implies, could not they have used a surrogate? IVF (practical in the UK in the 1980s)?
     
    How amoral do you want your "Conservative" leaders?

    And do you know which of them has the physiological problem?

    I don’t know that surrogacy is immoral. But your point is well taken as to IVF: it necessarily involves creating human beings and then discarding them, as only one of the numerous embryos is implanted.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I don’t know that surrogacy is immoral. But your point is well taken as to IVF: it necessarily involves creating human beings and then discarding them, as only one of the numerous embryos is implanted.
     
    Likewise, only one of the natural parents is present for the long haul.
  173. @anony-mouse
    White women mostly with kids. No wonder everyone here is against them. This man was much better: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madison_Grant

    White, great. Kids, excellent. Profiting massively from utterly unnecessary non defensive wars that get OUR children killed, not so good. This isn’t complicated.

  174. @Nathan
    It certainly isn't impossible, and just a cursory thought about the physics involved will give you a good grasp on the problem of drone swarms. Force equals mass times acceleration, so either bird sized drones produce a lot of acceleration, or they don't do too much to a hard target. Not having a lot of mass, the drones will be highly susceptable to the force produced by accelerating wind. Since the drones will be autonomous, a significant portion of their mass will be dedicated to communication/information processing. This limits payload and the mass you have to produce power and move the drone.

    Couldn’t the drone release poison gas?
    Could it explode near and over the enemy, like a navigable flying bunch of grenades?

    People with actual knowledge in these areas — I.e. not me — can tell us whether drones could be a useful combat instrument even if they have to be light for the reasons mentioned.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDqlT68lhf4
    , @Nathan
    Yeah, that's been suggested, but what do you need the drone for if you're going to release poison gas? You can just slime an area with persistent agent to the same effect.

    Also, everyone is working backwards. We shouldn't be asking how to make little drones deadly, we should start with deadly and go from there.
  175. @TomSchmidt
    Learn something new every day. Given Buchanan's Catholicism, there must be some personal tragedy there, like with May.

    Always wondered about that, and felt bad for Pat B. His sister Bay (Angela) has three children.

  176. @Autochthon
    You have me confused with The Doughnut; I don't drink alcohol.

    Those Iranian speedboats will sink the Stennis about the same time Donald Trump honours a campaign promise related to the invasion.

    You have me confused with The Doughnut; I don’t drink alcohol.

    I take you at your word. I just meant to say that you don’t seem like your normal self in these comments. It feels like something is bothering you, apart from just me.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I'm not bothered by you. I think it's weird how many people are obsessed with the idea that naval vessels are vulnerable to tonker toys and imagined, unstoppable missiles.

    I usually enjoy your commentary.

    I am dealing with a lot of burdens just now, but one realisation I made awhile ago and noted here is this blog (any blog) is no place for significant discussion of one's personal affairs). I only note it in passing because replying to that aspect of your remark seems a decent opportunity to mention that I may go away for awhile. Maybe indefinitely, maybe forever, because I have to focus on other things.

    https://youtu.be/I52eefwAKDE
  177. @Lot
    Shorter women have higher TFR.

    Shorter women have higher TFR.

    Do you have data supporting that? I would expect a U shaped curve, although the peak might be below average height.

    Here is a Finnish twin study which seems contrary to your assertion. See Figure 1.
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/234088445_Height_Age_at_First_Birth_and_Lifetime_Reproductive_Success_A_Prospective_Cohort_Study_of_Finnish_Male_and_Female_Twins

  178. @PhysicistDave
    I've worked as an engineer in both civilian high-tech and in the defense industry.

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

    The female engineers I knew in the defense industry were, to put it diplomatically, inadequate. I assumed that this was due to the heavy pressure for affirmative action in government contractors.

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.

    I will be interested to see how these female CEOs in the defense industry work out.

    Two words: Carly Fiorina.

  179. @Anonymous

    Women are unrivalled within the domain of personal palace intrigues
     
    Doesn't that make them a danger to the palace, as well?

    Women engaging in social networking on behalf of her family is an asset but the problem is who decides what her “family” is? If it’s not her literal family then she can do a lot of harm advocating for her substitute children, substitute husband and substitute elderly.

    • Agree: GermanReader2
  180. @Nathan
    Counterpoint:

    https://cdn.thewirecutter.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/leafblowers-lowres-0166.jpg

    Oh, unless you want the drones to be easily hackable/jamable, they'll need to freq hop. That adds weight that will further reduce payload. Also, they'll really need to be sure that it's Soldiers that they're blowing up, or else you'll have a lot of dead deer and other wildlife. And civilians. Dead civilians always go over well...

    Of course, that assumes the general range of frequencies is known; lots of engineers work for your OPFOR.

  181. Every previously terrible organization or policy becomes an incontrovertible good once in the hands of the post-modern left.

  182. @RadicalCenter
    Couldn’t the drone release poison gas?
    Could it explode near and over the enemy, like a navigable flying bunch of grenades?

    People with actual knowledge in these areas — I.e. not me — can tell us whether drones could be a useful combat instrument even if they have to be light for the reasons mentioned.

  183. @JMcG
    Considering the time period under discussion, he was likely referencing Nanking or Guernica. I’d say inevitably is pretty accurate. I didn’t look up the passage though, so any incorrect interpretation is certainly mine. I’ll see if I can find it.

    Thank you.

  184. @RadicalCenter
    Couldn’t the drone release poison gas?
    Could it explode near and over the enemy, like a navigable flying bunch of grenades?

    People with actual knowledge in these areas — I.e. not me — can tell us whether drones could be a useful combat instrument even if they have to be light for the reasons mentioned.

    Yeah, that’s been suggested, but what do you need the drone for if you’re going to release poison gas? You can just slime an area with persistent agent to the same effect.

    Also, everyone is working backwards. We shouldn’t be asking how to make little drones deadly, we should start with deadly and go from there.

  185. @Anonymous

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.
     
    Why would this be the case?

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

    Why would this be the case?

    I worked at an engineering firm for several years and it was my impression that about a third of the men fit the male engineering stereotype in that they believed people skills had absolutely nothing to with job performance. Another third were actually pretty good at interacting with others and the remainder were somewhere on a gradient between those two approaches.

    The few women engineers we had actually weren’t that effective at their jobs, but this was 25 years ago and it seemed to me that they were terrified of making mistakes around so many men. They did have people skills, though (relatively speaking), so I’m guessing things have changed a bit since then.

    • Replies: @L Woods
    Corporate management parasite spotted.
  186. @RadicalCenter
    I don’t know that surrogacy is immoral. But your point is well taken as to IVF: it necessarily involves creating human beings and then discarding them, as only one of the numerous embryos is implanted.

    I don’t know that surrogacy is immoral. But your point is well taken as to IVF: it necessarily involves creating human beings and then discarding them, as only one of the numerous embryos is implanted.

    Likewise, only one of the natural parents is present for the long haul.

  187. @Counterinsurgency
    Achmed

    Maybe my description wasn't that good. I meant to say that only a tube that has been spiral wrapped with carbon fibers (same pattern as the red stripe a barber pole, except there are many carbon fibers, not just one or two) will twist in the way indicated when it is deflected downwards. You're right, cylinders with an asymmetric cross-section can also twist. I'm not sure whether they could be made to mimic the behavior of the spiral wound carbon fiber tube, or at least not enough to actually push the lever end up enough to notice. The crucial thing about the carbon tube is that the spiral fibers, for all practical purposes, have a constant length under the full range of working stress.

    The professor could have said "show me" or "wrong model" or "that's interesting". In short, if he didn't know, he could have asked (0r ignored the comment). I was only trying to say something interesting and complementary about his school's research / engineering efforts. He did nothing like that. I later found that this wasn't particularly unusual at this particular institution.

    There was the time when, after a faculty general meeting, a senior professor who had been given a public award for teaching completely lost it after the meeting, and started screaming uncontrollably in the middle of most of the faculty as they walked back to the main engineering building. The general sense of his screaming was that the Administration (which notoriously heavy handed) had been threatening to fire him for decades for teaching and not bringing in research money, and now had the blind gall to give him an award for teaching. He was calmed down, and there were no repercussions _that I saw_. I could tell a couple of other stories of the same sort.

    That particular institution wasn't all that favorable an environment for research, if only because the administration continually threatened, as a means of controlling faculty, to revoke permission to conduct research. This sort of thing wasn't all that uncommon, back in c.a. AD 1980, and I suspect it isn't all that uncommon now.

    Ron Unz wasn't kidding that there is a good deal of pravda in the USA.

    Counterinsurgency

    Ron Unz wasn’t kidding that there is a good deal of pravda in the USA.

    I think you mean Pravda. The newspaper.

    Russians used to joke that in the news (Isvestia), there is no truth (pravda), and in the truth, there is no news.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
    No, I meant it in the sense of the Russian word that is usually translated as "truth" but, I've been told, would be more accurately translated as "official truth", or "what the government says". The overlap between the English language "government statements" and "truth" was particularly large back in the AD 1950s, and, as Ron Unz has pointed out, remains fairly large today.

    I'll take Bismark: "Never believe a rumor until it has been officially denied."

    Counterinsurgency
  188. @Anon
    The point of putting these women is charge is not that they're going to make or develop weapons. All the men working below them know that. They're there to sell them. Period. That's why they almost all have MBAs.

    2nd and 3rd world leaders find it harder to say no to a woman. 2nd and 3rd world leaders have always been intimidated and resentful of aggressive Western males, especially salesmen. They feel pushed around by them. But women? No. They're much more open to be sold things by a woman who is oozing up to them, flattering them and promising them they will become big and powerful leaders and can destroy their enemies if they buy this particular weapons system. The technique works. It's the Lady MacBeth technique.

    The point of putting these women is charge is not that they’re going to make or develop weapons. All the men working below them know that. They’re there to sell them.

    The left has made similar charges against even moderately patriotic leaders such as Marine Le Pen and Pia Kjærsgaard. They soften the message.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/02/world/europe/political-strategy-for-europes-far-right-female-leaders-wooing-female-voters.html

    Noteworthy excerpt:

    Men are neither more “nativist” nor “authoritarian,” compared with women, the study found, nor do women evince less “discontent” with their governments. Women by and large were deterred from voting for the radical right by other things, including the populist right’s “political style, occasional association with historic violence, stigmatization by parts of the elite and the general public” — in other words, their outlier-ness.

  189. “Do you think these weapons make me look fat?”

  190. @Mr. Anon
    Goodhart is one of seven children himself. His grandfather was Arthur Lehman Goodhart, grandson of Meyer Lehman, of those brothers.

    Was he the guy they named the citrus fruit after?

    Was he the guy they named the citrus fruit after?

    David’s Goodharts were New York City Jews, not known for dabbling in fruit farms in California or Michigan.

    David’s uncle, though, has a law of economics named for him:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodhart%27s_law

    “When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.”

    Sounds a lot like Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle.

  191. @Anonymous

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.
     
    Why would this be the case?

    Anonymous[205]:

    [Dave]The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

    [Anon.205]Why would this be the case?

    I don’t know. Could’ve just been a statistical fluctuation. As I mentioned, the engineer who got our whole manufacturing operation going was female, so she raised the female average a lot. Also, since our firm did not engage in affirmative action but aggressively tried to hire bright engineers of whatever sex or ethnicity, maybe we got the cream of female engineers.

  192. @Mr. Anon

    You can draw what conclusions you wish: this is just anecdotal information. But, I was very well-positioned to judge these three individuals’ abilities as engineers.
     
    The conclusion I would draw is that your information is anecdotal.

    Mr. Anon wrote:

    The conclusion I would draw is that your information is anecdotal.

    True. But the singular of “data” really is “anecdote.”

    Sailer has emphasized, quite rightly, that when supposed “data” goes against anecdotal experience, a great deal of skepticism is in order.

  193. @Anonymous

    All three were immigrants from East Asia, though we did also have some extremely bright (but younger and less experienced) Caucasian engineers.
     
    Taking spots that could have been filled capably by natives.

    Anonymous[267] wrote to me:

    Taking spots that could have been filled capably by natives.

    Well… I think you’d be amazed at how many incompetent idiots are given engineering degrees by American universities! When I worked in the defense industry, I was truly stunned at the level of engineering incompetence (almost no Asians).

    • Replies: @Peripatetic Commenter
    Sure, but that is an argument for improving American universities, not importing lots of people from elsewhere.
  194. @Counterinsurgency
    a) Carbon fiber tube and negative spring constant.
    I really need a video here, but I can't find one.

    A spiral wound carbon fiber tube, with circular cross-section, is anisotropic with respect to the axis of the carbon fiber. Push the end of a cantilevered tube down and the tube end does go down, as you would expect. However, the tube also twists along its length, so that the end rotates around the tubes axis. If the end drops x mm from an initial position of x0 mm, then the cylinder we will consider twists by c*(x0-x) radians. Note that pushing own decreases x.
    Rigidly attach a rod horizontally to the tube such that the resulting structure forms a "T" shape, (the axis of the rod is perpendicular to that of the tube, the two axes meet at one point, that point being the center of mass of the tube). Push the end of the cylinder down and hold it. The rod will rotate by some fixed amount, theta

    So far, all is as expected: push down on cylinder, rod twists.

    OK, so now you move your finger along the rod, away from the tube end so that the finger is move up along the rod. Keep the finger's force constant, and thus keeping the cylinder end stationary. _If_ the carbon tube is properly spiral wound with highly rigid carbon fiber, _then_ the tube will not rotate _and_ your finger will rise as you get further from the cylinder end. Eventually, your finger will rise above the cylinder end's initial position.

    Now take your finger off the rod. Note that the rod will drop out from under your finger. If you press the rod down again, displacing the tube end same as before, your finger will rise.

    What's happening: When you press the rod down, your finger exerts a torque on the cylinder. That torque will establish a stress field within the cylinder. The stress field will have principle tension direction something like the stripes on a barber pole, and the cylinder's material will stretch along the stripes.
    For an isometric (same in all 3 spatial directions) substance, the stretch from the torque produced by your finger will usually (I won't say always) tend to counter any rotation of the cylinder end. (For some cross-sectional cylinder shapes, pushing down above the cylinder axis will cause cylinder end to rotate about the cylinder's axis.)
    If the cylinder cross-section is like a circle, and you reinforced the cylinder so that the carbon fiber was wound along the principle tension direction at every point. forming a continuous spiral pattern like a barber's pole with thousands of stripes, then the principle tension would be on the long axis of the carbon fiber. The fiber is very rigid, and won't lengthen detectably for the force you can exert with your finger. The composite tube will rotate as before (a little but less, but not detectably), the rod will rise. If your finger is far enough from the cylinder center, then your finger will rise.
    And it didn't rise just a little, it rose a lot, while the tube bent a lot more yet.
    Material behavior often doesn't conform to common sense.

    Now, the problem is to fit this into existing mathematics. I never tried, haven't yet, and haven't seen what other people have done. My work was in a quite different field. I will point out, however, that the existence of the phenomenon doesn't depend on the mathematics that describe it; it's more the other way around.

    It turns out that you can make a composite structure with zero Poisson ratio, and this is common for solid fuel rockets. If the rocket casing were to change dimensions due to pressure from the burning propellant, so would the solid fuel, and that would induce cracks in the solid fuel. The cracks would become combustion surfaces and the rocket would malfunction energetically.

    There is a commonly accessible book on this, J. E. Gordon _Structures: or why things don't fall down_. Gordon an English mechanical engineer, most active during WW II, but still active when carbon composites were developed. He spends a book describing the semi-intuitive methods used by British MEs during his professional lifetime. He wrote a second book, _The New Science of Strong Materials_, which rehashes _Structures_ and has bit more about composites.

    This thread is getting long, but…

    It turns out that you can make a composite structure with zero Poisson ratio, and this is common for solid fuel rockets. If the rocket casing were to change dimensions due to pressure from the burning propellant, so would the solid fuel, and that would induce cracks in the solid fuel. The cracks would become combustion surfaces and the rocket would malfunction energetically.

    I think you’re talking about the radial-to-axial deformation ratio of the case, which is a different concept from the Poisson ratio. Rocket motor cases can and do change shape under internal pressure; the propellant is stretchy enough to follow the deformation without cracking, if the motor is designed well.

    On the topic of a negative spring constant: a trivial example is snap-through of a curved elastic beam. If you push on the convex side of the beam, it pushes back on you, but if you push harder and cause it to snap through, it takes off and starts pulling on you. So the sign of the spring constant changes.

    • Replies: @Nathan
    "This thread is getting long, but…"

    But none of you spergs are engaging the real question: are these female CEOs hot?
    , @Counterinsurgency
    Right, radial to axial deformation ratio.

    I know of the snap-through of a curved elastic beam as a belvoir spring. That one is a bit easier to understand. The structure I described has a negative K throughout its range of motion. In fact, if you pick just the right spot on the lever, then you can push down until the assembly breaks without moving your finger. The tube moves downward, but your finger does not.

    My real point, however, was the rejection of data by the ME professor. "I am a Master of the College; what I don't know isn't knowledge." This tube-lever structure was a device within a few hundred feet of him, and he attacked me rather than saying "That's interesting, let's take a look". Kudos to the Unz denizens who actually did say it's an interesting report. The ME professor was actually a lot closer to the mean for professors than the Unz denizens.

    The real point was in support of the thesis that research is always a rare event, and it is easy to prohibit research without anybody really noticing. In fact, most cultures/societies prefer to prohibit the new in favor of social stability. The West could end up doing the same.

    Counterinsurgency
  195. @PhysicistDave
    Anonymous[267] wrote to me:

    Taking spots that could have been filled capably by natives.
     
    Well... I think you'd be amazed at how many incompetent idiots are given engineering degrees by American universities! When I worked in the defense industry, I was truly stunned at the level of engineering incompetence (almost no Asians).

    Sure, but that is an argument for improving American universities, not importing lots of people from elsewhere.

  196. @Hail
    Teresa May
    1956: born in Sussex
    1977-1983: works at Bank of England
    1980: marriage
    1985-1997: works "as a financial consultant and senior advisor in International Affairs at the Association for Payment Clearing Services"
    1986-1994: "councillor for Durnsford ward, London Borough of Merton"
    1997: is elected to Parliament for the first time; turns 41 five months later

    Theresa May has revealed her heartbreaking struggle to have children which left both her and her husband "affected"

    [3 JUL 2016]
     

    Mrs May, hot favourite to take to the helm of the Tory party in the leadership battle, was speaking candidly for the first time about the issue in an interview with the Mail on Sunday.
     

    Mrs May said they wanted to have children but found they could not, adding: "It just didn't happen, so you know, it's one of those things." (Link)
     
    There are several possible interpretations of this claim.

    One is inevitably suspicious, of course, of the timing: This was what she told the press (note "for the firs time") while poised to take the helm of the Conservative Party in 2016 . Still, without better information, we can only take her at her word; even the claim alone is better than nothing or the opposite (something like "I hate children") for mothers' and would-be-mothers' morale.

    I still would ask: if the pair were as committed to having children as this implies, could not they have used a surrogate? IVF (practical in the UK in the 1980s)?

    When David Cameron resigned after the referendum (having previously said he’d stay on to implement the result however the vote went) there was an election for a new Conservative Party leader. AFAIK only MPs voted.

    One candidate MP, Andrea Leadsom, queried whether a candidate who had no children and therefore no deep visceral interest in Britain’s future – one with no skin in the game when it came to what a 2050 Britain might be like – could best lead the country.

    This is IMHO a reasonable argument, though I can think of at least one counter-argument – Elizabeth I. But it provoked a torrent of outrage from the massed ranks of female opinion journalists – among whom the childless are over-represented.

    I detest Mrs May and have done ever since she insulted her own party (“the nasty party”) to get a few Guardian headlines. Yet if she leads us out of the EU and out of the Single Market (aka “cliff-edge Brexit”) I will think of her as Karlsefni thought of Freydis when she put the Skraelings to flight.

    “This is a woman. She has done evil things, but I for one will honour her from this day forward.”

  197. @Faraday's Bobcat
    This thread is getting long, but...

    It turns out that you can make a composite structure with zero Poisson ratio, and this is common for solid fuel rockets. If the rocket casing were to change dimensions due to pressure from the burning propellant, so would the solid fuel, and that would induce cracks in the solid fuel. The cracks would become combustion surfaces and the rocket would malfunction energetically.
     
    I think you're talking about the radial-to-axial deformation ratio of the case, which is a different concept from the Poisson ratio. Rocket motor cases can and do change shape under internal pressure; the propellant is stretchy enough to follow the deformation without cracking, if the motor is designed well.

    On the topic of a negative spring constant: a trivial example is snap-through of a curved elastic beam. If you push on the convex side of the beam, it pushes back on you, but if you push harder and cause it to snap through, it takes off and starts pulling on you. So the sign of the spring constant changes.

    “This thread is getting long, but…”

    But none of you spergs are engaging the real question: are these female CEOs hot?

  198. @J1234

    The female engineers I worked with in civilian high-tech were very, very good, probably better than the average male.

     


    Why would this be the case?
     
    I worked at an engineering firm for several years and it was my impression that about a third of the men fit the male engineering stereotype in that they believed people skills had absolutely nothing to with job performance. Another third were actually pretty good at interacting with others and the remainder were somewhere on a gradient between those two approaches.

    The few women engineers we had actually weren't that effective at their jobs, but this was 25 years ago and it seemed to me that they were terrified of making mistakes around so many men. They did have people skills, though (relatively speaking), so I'm guessing things have changed a bit since then.

    Corporate management parasite spotted.

  199. @Faraday's Bobcat
    This thread is getting long, but...

    It turns out that you can make a composite structure with zero Poisson ratio, and this is common for solid fuel rockets. If the rocket casing were to change dimensions due to pressure from the burning propellant, so would the solid fuel, and that would induce cracks in the solid fuel. The cracks would become combustion surfaces and the rocket would malfunction energetically.
     
    I think you're talking about the radial-to-axial deformation ratio of the case, which is a different concept from the Poisson ratio. Rocket motor cases can and do change shape under internal pressure; the propellant is stretchy enough to follow the deformation without cracking, if the motor is designed well.

    On the topic of a negative spring constant: a trivial example is snap-through of a curved elastic beam. If you push on the convex side of the beam, it pushes back on you, but if you push harder and cause it to snap through, it takes off and starts pulling on you. So the sign of the spring constant changes.

    Right, radial to axial deformation ratio.

    I know of the snap-through of a curved elastic beam as a belvoir spring. That one is a bit easier to understand. The structure I described has a negative K throughout its range of motion. In fact, if you pick just the right spot on the lever, then you can push down until the assembly breaks without moving your finger. The tube moves downward, but your finger does not.

    My real point, however, was the rejection of data by the ME professor. “I am a Master of the College; what I don’t know isn’t knowledge.” This tube-lever structure was a device within a few hundred feet of him, and he attacked me rather than saying “That’s interesting, let’s take a look”. Kudos to the Unz denizens who actually did say it’s an interesting report. The ME professor was actually a lot closer to the mean for professors than the Unz denizens.

    The real point was in support of the thesis that research is always a rare event, and it is easy to prohibit research without anybody really noticing. In fact, most cultures/societies prefer to prohibit the new in favor of social stability. The West could end up doing the same.

    Counterinsurgency

  200. @Reg Cæsar

    Ron Unz wasn’t kidding that there is a good deal of pravda in the USA.
     
    I think you mean Pravda. The newspaper.

    Russians used to joke that in the news (Isvestia), there is no truth (pravda), and in the truth, there is no news.

    No, I meant it in the sense of the Russian word that is usually translated as “truth” but, I’ve been told, would be more accurately translated as “official truth”, or “what the government says”. The overlap between the English language “government statements” and “truth” was particularly large back in the AD 1950s, and, as Ron Unz has pointed out, remains fairly large today.

    I’ll take Bismark: “Never believe a rumor until it has been officially denied.”

    Counterinsurgency

  201. @Intelligent Dasein

    (According the the author of _Systemantics_, the ancient Egyptians had two people assigned to every job: a member of the aristocracy, and the person who actually did the job.
     
    This isn't really a bad thing, though. In fact, it's actually an essential and integral component of any sort of higher social organization.

    In order to fully run and integrate a large department of society---say, defense, agriculture, sanitation, or something like that---you will need an "ops manager" who oversees the day-to-day operations of the enterprise. But you will also need a "Minister of Thus-and-So" to liaison with the government and who, as a member of the ruling class, represents that particular organ of society therein and integrates it with the political power center. Failing this, the department would become a rebel faction, a separate political power of its own, and would lose its sanction to operate lawfully.

    There is a sort of libertarian fantasy, quite current nowadays, which holds that the political side of life is unnecessary, and that if the political power disappeared the "ops" side of life would go on functioning just as well without it; but this is not true. Although most people do not like to admit it and may not even be aware of it, we all need and seek a sanction for our activities. In the full scope of life, "can" is not enough to motivate action, to contextualize it, or to place it into the higher social, psychological, and spiritual gestalt in which deeds acquire meaning. We also need the "must" of moral imperative, the absence of which is decadence, shame, and disgrace. One the vital functions of government is to provide the sanctioning authority that blesses and condemns activities as the case my be, and that doles out honors and punishments accordingly.

    The problem with these female CEOs and minority contractors is not that these are political posts as opposed to ops posts, but that the political power is being distributed amongst the unworthies.

    Excellent points! If you try to eliminate politics, you get thugs. Polished thugs, sometimes, but thugs.

    Counterinsurgency

  202. How to tell the difference!

  203. @Ibound1
    Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Germany - all wealthy countries - barely have defense forces. Besides for the 1% of GNP spending:

    Germany has 4 Eurofighter jets ready for deployment. Four.

    https://www.thelocal.de/20180502/german-luftwaffe-only-has-four-operation-ready-eurofighter-jets-report

    Sweden can't even get enough troops to maintain the very small army they do fund
    https://taskandpurpose.com/sweden-military-retention

    You can learn all you need to learn about Norway from the accident report on the sinking of one of its very few Naval vessels which crashed into a tanker due to its own pathetic negligence and couldn't even be retrieved due to even more pathetic negligence. https://news.usni.org/2018/11/30/norwegian-frigate-helge-ingstad-accident-report

    Netherlands: They cannot even meet the most minimal commitments to NATO
    https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/75484

    Uncle Sucker defends these countries. Trump at least sees it and is getting tired of it but when he raised the issue of leaving NATO, you might have thought from the outrage he just said he was dissolving Congress. The DC Party is insane.

    We need to get out of NATO and only spend what we need for our own defense.

    Leaving NATO? Thats preposterous. Didn’t you look at the maps in your geography text books from first grade. The Warsaw Pact countries border many of our NATO allies. NATO is necessary in repelling those damn dirty reds.

  204. @IHTG
    Another good one from Tucker:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSuQ-AyiicA

    https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/tucker-carlson-mitt-romney-supports-the-status-quo-but-for-everyone-else-its-infuriating

    Striving for happiness. He sounds a lot like Jordan Peterson.

  205. @Hail

    Boeing’s Caret is famous for pushing for Neocon space wars
     

    Neocon
     
    What's this about?

    Is it that Our Greatest Ally has run the numbers and determined a vital strategic interest in preventing a Palestinian foothold on the Moon? Or is it a Baathist space station that must be pre-empted?

    ("Why Boeing's CEO of Defense Takes Trump's Idea of a Space Force Seriously," Fortune [featuring video interview], Oct 2018)

    Is that what this tv advert is all about?
    It’s always disturbing to me to see tv adverts for large corporations which don’t actually sell anything to the average person. the audience for this can’t be more than 100 people. Very disturbing that spending money on this could possibly be worth it.
    https://www.ispot.tv/ad/dJ2v/boeing-the-future-is-built-here

    • Replies: @Hail

    It’s always disturbing to me to see tv adverts for large corporations which don’t actually sell anything to the average person
     
    I agree.

    Is it building the brand? They have 140,000 employees, = several hundred thousand families. This kind of TV 'advertisement' (selling nothing) is presumably good for morale, recruitment, retainment.

    Another potential 'target' of the ads: present & future government policymakers.

    , @Joe Stalin
    Hah! I was working downtown Chicago years ago when Boeing moved their headquarters there. A Black guy mentioned a small company in a building a short distance away just moved in - Boeing.

    He had no idea what they made. I asked: ever hear of the B-17? 707? 727? 737? 747? 777?

    Not a clue. Total failure of corporate advertising.
  206. @Ibound1
    Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Germany - all wealthy countries - barely have defense forces. Besides for the 1% of GNP spending:

    Germany has 4 Eurofighter jets ready for deployment. Four.

    https://www.thelocal.de/20180502/german-luftwaffe-only-has-four-operation-ready-eurofighter-jets-report

    Sweden can't even get enough troops to maintain the very small army they do fund
    https://taskandpurpose.com/sweden-military-retention

    You can learn all you need to learn about Norway from the accident report on the sinking of one of its very few Naval vessels which crashed into a tanker due to its own pathetic negligence and couldn't even be retrieved due to even more pathetic negligence. https://news.usni.org/2018/11/30/norwegian-frigate-helge-ingstad-accident-report

    Netherlands: They cannot even meet the most minimal commitments to NATO
    https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/75484

    Uncle Sucker defends these countries. Trump at least sees it and is getting tired of it but when he raised the issue of leaving NATO, you might have thought from the outrage he just said he was dissolving Congress. The DC Party is insane.

    We need to get out of NATO and only spend what we need for our own defense.

    America play the fool because it wants to. NATO allows Washington to exercise political control over Europe and safeguard Israel.

  207. @Kyle
    Is that what this tv advert is all about?
    It's always disturbing to me to see tv adverts for large corporations which don't actually sell anything to the average person. the audience for this can't be more than 100 people. Very disturbing that spending money on this could possibly be worth it.
    https://www.ispot.tv/ad/dJ2v/boeing-the-future-is-built-here

    It’s always disturbing to me to see tv adverts for large corporations which don’t actually sell anything to the average person

    I agree.

    Is it building the brand? They have 140,000 employees, = several hundred thousand families. This kind of TV ‘advertisement’ (selling nothing) is presumably good for morale, recruitment, retainment.

    Another potential ‘target’ of the ads: present & future government policymakers.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Another potential ‘target’ of the ads: present & future government policymakers.
     
    And jurors.
  208. @Reg Cæsar

    I still would ask: if the pair were as committed to having children as this implies, could not they have used a surrogate? IVF (practical in the UK in the 1980s)?
     
    How amoral do you want your "Conservative" leaders?

    And do you know which of them has the physiological problem?

    do you know which of them has the physiological problem?

    From available information, are we even sure there was such a problem? Maybe someone reading this knows; I don’t. Her interview with the press quoted above was ambiguous.

    What we do know is that she had a solid career for most her most fertile years, then the coup de grace, so to speak, was a national-level political career falling on her lap towards the end of her 30s (first ran for parliament seat in the 1992 general election; she was 35). She was already a local elected official by age 29 or 30, previously at the Bank of England.

    Perhaps there is a physiological problem, but she does fit the profile of high-powered career woman who waited too long, unfortunately.

  209. @Redneck farmer
    Uh, do we REALLY want a German Defense Minister who understands the importance of Lesbenraum?

    German Defense Ministers, 1933-1945:

    Werner von Blomberg (1933-1938) [Baltic German]: Five children.
    General Wilhelm Keitel (1938-1945) [North German] (his assignment to this post meant the Defense Ministry was compromised, as it meant a military official was taking over the civilian ministry): Six children; five survived to adulthood; of which, one son died in the war and another son held as a POW in a Soviet gulag until 1956.

    So anti-Nazi activist Ursula (seven kids) beat both Nazis. That’ll show ’em.

  210. @Kyle
    Is that what this tv advert is all about?
    It's always disturbing to me to see tv adverts for large corporations which don't actually sell anything to the average person. the audience for this can't be more than 100 people. Very disturbing that spending money on this could possibly be worth it.
    https://www.ispot.tv/ad/dJ2v/boeing-the-future-is-built-here

    Hah! I was working downtown Chicago years ago when Boeing moved their headquarters there. A Black guy mentioned a small company in a building a short distance away just moved in – Boeing.

    He had no idea what they made. I asked: ever hear of the B-17? 707? 727? 737? 747? 777?

    Not a clue. Total failure of corporate advertising.

  211. @Intelligent Dasein

    You have me confused with The Doughnut; I don’t drink alcohol.
     
    I take you at your word. I just meant to say that you don't seem like your normal self in these comments. It feels like something is bothering you, apart from just me.

    I’m not bothered by you. I think it’s weird how many people are obsessed with the idea that naval vessels are vulnerable to tonker toys and imagined, unstoppable missiles.

    I usually enjoy your commentary.

    I am dealing with a lot of burdens just now, but one realisation I made awhile ago and noted here is this blog (any blog) is no place for significant discussion of one’s personal affairs). I only note it in passing because replying to that aspect of your remark seems a decent opportunity to mention that I may go away for awhile. Maybe indefinitely, maybe forever, because I have to focus on other things.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    I wish you the best, my friend, and I will pray for you.
  212. @Autochthon
    I'm not bothered by you. I think it's weird how many people are obsessed with the idea that naval vessels are vulnerable to tonker toys and imagined, unstoppable missiles.

    I usually enjoy your commentary.

    I am dealing with a lot of burdens just now, but one realisation I made awhile ago and noted here is this blog (any blog) is no place for significant discussion of one's personal affairs). I only note it in passing because replying to that aspect of your remark seems a decent opportunity to mention that I may go away for awhile. Maybe indefinitely, maybe forever, because I have to focus on other things.

    https://youtu.be/I52eefwAKDE

    I wish you the best, my friend, and I will pray for you.

  213. @Hail

    It’s always disturbing to me to see tv adverts for large corporations which don’t actually sell anything to the average person
     
    I agree.

    Is it building the brand? They have 140,000 employees, = several hundred thousand families. This kind of TV 'advertisement' (selling nothing) is presumably good for morale, recruitment, retainment.

    Another potential 'target' of the ads: present & future government policymakers.

    Another potential ‘target’ of the ads: present & future government policymakers.

    And jurors.

  214. @Achmed E. Newman
    Something there bugged me to think harder on the composite tube (besides what I'm going to write to I.D.). No, there will always be a displacement, no matter how small, of all the components together, unless there is slippage, meaning failure of the material. The compliance (inverse of stiffness) of a composite will be mostly a function of the of the least compliant parts (the carbon, in this case) in the same way that resistance is mostly a function of the lowest resistance.

    Yes, the deformation will be weird, but a negative spring constant of a structure can't really exist in my determination either, the more I go back to my roots (roots engineering here). I'll write more in a short reply to I.D.

    At least I'm not out there screaming about it, right? ;-} Actually, in response to the rest of your post, I agree with the prof who has been teaching his ass off with no reward (or threat of firing). Is this not what the students are paying for, good teaching vs. research and teaching by un-understandable profs. that are teaching one class a year because they have to by law? I don't agree with the screaming, and I don't agree with a guy blowing you off with a mean remark. I would try to give you an explanation such as ID's or my reply coming in a few minutes.

    After some thought, you might try the following approach:

    The anomalous behavior is due to the highly anisotropic behavior of carbon fibers. Their spring constant k is much higher for axial stresses than they are from transverse stresses (perpendicular to their axis) and, of course, to torques.

    * First approach, using energy stored within the system:
    Use minimum energy for the system, and use the equipartition of energy idea from physics. For a static mechanical system, the energy associated with carbon fiber longitudinal stress (neglecting epoxy matrix) should equal the energy associated with stresses within epoxy matrix transverse to the carbon fiber. The added condition might make the analysis feasible.

    * Second approach, using force rather than energy:
    During operation, the carbon fiber tube drops considerably more than the lever end rises. I believe that tube deflection was in the 30 to 40 degree range (from anchor to tip). I was a bit concerned over accidentally breaking the tube. It’s evident to me that considerably more energy was being stored in the tube than returned to my finger, more as I pushed harder.
    This suggests an analysis of a mechanism drawn as a free body, with torques and forces at the anchor and forces at the finger application point. If you assume the thumb is stationary and energy comes from varying anchor torque and forces, the structure makes a deal more sense. Since mechanism deflection is independent of coordinate system, the “stationary thumb” view must be valid for the “moving thumb” view.

    Good luck. I’m not really a mechanical engineer anymore, so I can’t do it myself.

    Counterinsurgency

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