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Trump Turnberry Banned by Royal & Ancient Golf Club from Hosting 2020 British Open
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A striking thing about Donald Trump’s campaign is that The Establishment’s hostility to him proposing immigration restrictions is costing him serious money, but unlike so many others, he has yet to flinch.

The term “The Establishment” was a 1960s hippie phrase, but it now seems to be mostly used today on the dissident right. Who exactly is “The Establishment” is debatable, but it seems fair to include The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, the ruling body of golf outside the U.S., within any definition of The Establishment.

From The Independent:

Donald Trump’s Turnberry golf club to no longer host The Open tournament amid anger over controversial remarks

The more offensive he is, the more popular he is – but not in Scotland, and not with golf’s ruling class
James Cusick Political Correspondent @indyvoices Sunday 13 December 201575 comments

The Turnberry golf course, which has hosted the Open Championship on numerous occasions, is one of two famous golf courses Donald Trump owns in Scotland

When Donald Trump bought the famous Turnberry golf club in Ayrshire last year, he believed his name would soon be cemented alongside the legends of the game.

But his dream of handing over the trophy at The Open is in tatters, The Independent on Sunday can reveal, after golf’s governing body, headquartered in Scotland, privately decided that his reputation is now so toxic that the newly renamed Trump Turnberry can no longer host the game’s most prestigious tournament.

Controversial remarks made by Mr Trump in his campaign for the Republican nomination – about Muslims, Mexicans, Chinese and women, among others – have given him a near-pariah status in the global game, raising the risk of a boycott by sponsors and international players.

Previously, the new chief executive of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews, Martin Slumbers, had been expected to endorse Turnberry as a venue for the 2020 Open. …

But his call for a “total and complete shutdown” of US borders to all Muslims, until, as he claimed, “our country’s representatives figure out what’s going on”, appears to have been the final straw for the R&A.

One member, close to the championship committee, told the IoS about recent discussions: “One word was thrown around: Enough.”

The property tycoon bought the Turnberry resort in April last year from the subsidiary owned by the Dubai investment group chaired by Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum. It was renamed Trump Turnberry and a £200m upgrade was promised.

And that gives me a chance to talk about golf courses …

Turnberry has the most spectacular site of any of the British Open courses, the Scottish equivalent of Pebble Beach. But its current golf architecture doesn’t take much advantage of its ocean clifftop location.

Fortunately, Trump has announced a host of revisions that would fully exploit the potential of the location, such as this new par 5 10th hole, which would one-up the 18th at Pebble Beach by constructing tees on the rocks by the lighthouse, offering a chance at eagle for those long enough and daring enough to risk the cliffs on both their tee shots and long iron approach shots.

Trump’s taste in golf architecture tended toward artificial waterfalls in the past, but it has improved over the decades, and his plans for Turnberry appear to be outstanding.

The purchase appeared to give the billionaire the near-guarantee that when the Open came to his place, he would be centre-stage at the winner’s presentation party on the 18th green, along with Mr Slumbers and other dignitaries, a ceremony shown to millions around the world.

Trump took time out from campaigning last summer to host the Women’s British Open at Turnberry.

Although the R&A is stuffed full of establishment figures, Turnberry with Trump is now seen as a risk they will not take. Another insider said: “2020 will not happen here. Turnberry will be back. But perhaps not Trump Turnberry.”

Even after his remarks about Muslims, Mr Trump still leads current polls of Republican voters with about 35 per cent, double his nearest rival, Ted Cruz.

However, while he may dream of handing over the Claret Jug having jetted into Scotland from the White House, the R&A doesn’t see it that way. Middle East sovereign wealth is a key element of European Tour golf sponsorship. Leading sponsors include DP World, the Dubai-based marine terminal company chaired by Sultan Ahmed bin Sulayem.

Jumeirah Golf Estates and the Emirates airline are also leading sponsors of the big-money finale to the European tour. The Damac real estate company in Dubai, currently building a multi-million-dollar golf complex marketed with the Trump signature, this week stripped his name from the project.

I’m always struck by how Trump haters assume that listing other Trump haters, such as Persian Gulf oil princes, will rally the average voter to hate Trump too.

Saudi Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal called Mr Trump “a disgrace to all America”, saying he should withdraw from the US presidential race.

Mr Trump’s reply indicated his disregard for any consequences. He called the prince “dopey”, saying that he wouldn’t be allowed to control US politicians when he became president.

We can’t have that: it’s unthinkable that US politicians wouldn’t be controlled by Arab oil princes.

Organisations that represent tour players in the United States and Europe, have so far said nothing official in response to Mr Trump’s racist comments. But that is not expected to last much longer….

Perhaps. But touring pros are not all that Democratic. Tom Watson was the only tour pro to vote Democratic in 1972 and he soon became a fervent Republican. Scott Simpson was the only pro to publicly express Democratic leanings in, I think, 2000.

Mr Trump himself has filed estimates which say his golf-related business is worth $1.5bn (£1bn) of his estimated $10bn fortune, though experts claim his golf assets are over-valued.

Trump has bought a bunch of top golf courses in the teeth of what may be a permanent golf recession. Does he know something everybody else doesn’t know? Or does the entrepreneur, whose mother was born in the Hebrides, just really like golf?

 
• Tags: Donald Trump, Golf 
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  1. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    hilarious comment here:

    If you ran golf, what would you change?

    I’ve felt strongly that golf should be an aspirational game. It shouldn’t be a game for all strata of society. It should be something that you aspire to. And I think golf got away from that. And by getting away from it, it actually hurt golf.

  2. Instead of letting Trump’s message play-out in the spirit of “Let the best platform win” the establishment signals that they’re eager to coerce Trump to abandon his message and while this may yield a short-term benefit for them of silencing the messenger, the positions Trump advances are held by a significant portion of society and when people are silenced and not permitted to have their grievances addressed in the political system, that’s when guillotines in the public square make a come-back and elites’ heads are used as basketballs. Does this dynamic escape the attention of the elites?

    • Replies: @27 year old
    @TangoMan

    > guillotines in the public square make a come-back and elites’ heads are used as basketballs.


    lol

    not gonna happen. put your dick away

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @AndrewR
    @TangoMan

    Mon ami, our globalist elites are... (wait for it)... globalists. This means that when SHTF they'll be on the next flight out to Israel, Switzerland, Qatar or wherever. And as long as they can bribe men with guns into protecting them they'll be relatively safe even in the US.

    , @rod1963
    @TangoMan

    Yes.

    Except many will pooh pooh the notion because it hasn't happened in their lifetimes.

    Too many think the party will never end because it's been going on for so long.

    The U.S. is in a very precarious position economically and socially. It wouldn't take much of a upset in either domain to really make the country go pear shaped.

    , @Anonymous
    @TangoMan

    No, it doesn't escape the attention of the elites, which is why the country is more or less evenly divided, as political affiliation will tend to be in a duopoly. Trump has fervent support with the Republican base, but his support will be more divided across the country as a whole. Which is why his success will depend on manipulating turnout. This can escape one's attention at the Unz Review and similar like-minded venues.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  3. “A striking thing about Donald Trump’s campaign is that The Establishment’s hostility to him proposing immigration restrictions is costing him serious money, but unlike so many others, he has yet to flinch.”

    These costs have galvanized Trump into a much more serious candidate than he would otherwise be.

    My guess is he may have been half-hearted “vanity” candidate when this all began, but there is no turning back now, not with all that he has lost.

    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Clyde
    @penntothal


    My guess is Trump may have been half-hearted “vanity” candidate when this all began, but there is no turning back now, not with all that he has lost.
     
    Seeing his "brand name" being tarnished gives him more incentive to win. Trump being President will restore the Trump brand. Fickle people gravitating to the "strong horse".
    Trump got hooked right from the start when he came out with strong words against illegal immigration. Strong enough to be construed as anti-Mexican and anti-Hispanic. He saw the battle and he liked it!
    , @iSteveFan
    @penntothal


    My guess is he may have been half-hearted “vanity” candidate when this all began, but there is no turning back now, not with all that he has lost.
     
    I don't think Trump has lost a lot. In fact Trump has gained more than most people ever dream. Sure he has been blacklisted and lost some of his business deals. But he is still a multi-billionaire who is in the top 0.00001 percent of the wealthiest people in the world.

    On the other hand Trump has something that most if not all people, especially rich ones, want. He has the genuine support and admiration of a tremendous amount of his nation's population. That is something you cannot buy. That is something you cannot put a price tag on. Rich guys throughout history have donated to universities, built libraries, endowed foundations, all in the hope of making the ordinary people like them. And in most cases the ordinary people who use the facilities created by their donations could care less.

    But in Trump's case he has genuinely struck a cord with the common people of this nation. And that has to hurt others in the elite. Though we think the elite look down upon us, and they probably do, most American elites detest the class system and like to think that despite their wealth, they are just like regular people. So when they see a guy like Trump make such a connection and draw huge crowds of ordinary, hardworking people, it must make them jealous with envy.

    For all the shenanigans Trump has pulled in his life, he has the chance now to become a genuinely beloved figure to a large segment of his nation if he plays out this campaign correctly and doesn't melt down. Trump has the opportunity to transform himself from a flamboyant rich guy into a person who could go down in the history books as having transformed the American political system. How many billionaires would gladly give up a few billion to accomplish that?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Harry Baldwin

  4. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I think it would be an interesting turn of events if the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission would keep douchebaggy Middle Eastern princes like the Al Maktoums out of the Kentucky Derby, Bluegrass Stakes, etc. I know New York and Maryland wouldn’t do anything but Kentucky might. And the beauty of the way horse racing is organized in the U.S. is Kentucky could unilaterally shut out selected owners from Derby participation without a federal immigration kerfuffle.

    • Agree: BB753
  5. “Trump’s racist comments”

    When did Muslims become a race?

    How can you be racist against a religion?

    • Replies: @Eric Rasmusen
    @Andrew

    Brilliant!

    , @AndrewR
    @Andrew

    "Racism" is the new witchcraft. (((Anti-racists))) have made it so that any attempt to deny that you are guilty of racism is only evidence of your guilt. The only socially acceptable response is full capitulation and a prayer for mercy. Hence why people need to own the term like blacks, gays and women have come to reclaim the slurs that have historically been used against them.

    "Yes, I am a racist. So what?" This short-circuits the lefty brain and allows fellow closet "racists" to feel more cinfident in admitting that they too are racist and that there's nothing wrong with that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dave Pinsen

  6. Here’s a video of Trump getting ready for his next round at St. Andrews…

    • Replies: @Another Canadian
    @Another Canadian

    I like it when Rodney Dangerfield yells, "Hey Whitey! Where's your hat?"

  7. Before the hippies, the expression “The Establishment” was a British expression referring to the elite of that Kingdom, and it’s still in use there. The Wikipedia entry says it was coined by someone in The Spectator in 1955.

    It also says: “Much more generally, this use of the word, Establishment, may have been influenced by the British term, established church, for the official church of Great Britain.” As in “antidisestablishmentarianism.” Which in turn chimes with the clunky alt-right expression “The Cathedral.”

  8. OT: Now that we have the “Truth” about the Bush memos that sank Dan Rather’s career, we’re going to get to the truth about Chappaquiddick, with the help of the director from 50 Shades of Grey: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/fifty-shades-grey-director-tackling-848494

    • Replies: @Bill
    @Jim Don Bob

    I missed something. What truth do we now know about the Bush memos which slightly accelerated Dan Rather's long-overdue retirement?

    From the link:


    You’ll see what [Senator Ted Kennedy] had to go through.
     
    Yeah, being a murdering degenerate can't be much fun.
  9. Mr Trump’s reply indicated his disregard for any consequences. He called the prince “dopey”, saying that he wouldn’t be allowed to control US politicians when he became president.

    Saudi Prince Dopey bin Talal…it has a nice ring to it!

  10. I think trump and his followers are pathetic. When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Anonymous

    Trump is feared and hated by all the right people. I have been worried Trump would back down at some point, not so far though.

    So basically the terrorist loving Gulfies have thrown a hissy fit, who cares! Maybe the golf community can strike back.

    Replies: @Big Bill

    , @Erik Sieven
    @Anonymous

    leftists are driven by irrational fears concerning an imagined threat from right-wing politics. But in general there is nothing wrong about fear. Fear is an integral part of thinking and civilization.

    , @slumber_j
    @Anonymous

    Is fear a trait, really? Isn't it something one experiences?

    Anyway: while cowardice isn't an admirable trait, prudence certainly is. It sounds to me as if you've swallowed the anti-Trump nonsense about Islamophobia without considering the merits of what he's proposing.

    That it's taken as buffoonish a character as Donald Trump to propose an actual solution to a lot of problems... Well, I'd say it reflects horribly on his opposition and well on him.

    , @bomag
    @Anonymous

    I think trump and his followers are pathetic.

    Now teacher can give you a gold star for reciting the answer your handlers have told you to say.

    How about the policies Trump and his followers are discussing? Do you want even more immigration? Do you want ever more care and feeding of dysfunctional gov't agencies?

    , @Stick
    @Anonymous

    When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    When you are offering security you sell fear. This is exactly what the establishment is trying to do with Trump, sell fear.

    , @AnAnon
    @Anonymous

    I think everyone afraid of Trump needs to answer that question.

    , @Crank
    @Anonymous

    "When did fear become an admirable trait ?"

    The only fear I see is from the hysterical anti-Trump folks screaming "OH MY GOD! TRUMP SCARES THE SHIT OUT OF ME!!! HE'S WORSE THAN HITLER!!"

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Anonymous

    Who is it that is afraid? No one in politics is as fearless as Trump. It's pc-weenies like yourself who live in constant terror that they might let slip an unapproved opinion.

  11. @TangoMan
    Instead of letting Trump's message play-out in the spirit of "Let the best platform win" the establishment signals that they're eager to coerce Trump to abandon his message and while this may yield a short-term benefit for them of silencing the messenger, the positions Trump advances are held by a significant portion of society and when people are silenced and not permitted to have their grievances addressed in the political system, that's when guillotines in the public square make a come-back and elites' heads are used as basketballs. Does this dynamic escape the attention of the elites?

    Replies: @27 year old, @AndrewR, @rod1963, @Anonymous

    > guillotines in the public square make a come-back and elites’ heads are used as basketballs.

    lol

    not gonna happen. put your dick away

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @27 year old

    Probably not, but when people say things like, "It can't happen here," anything can happen anywhere with the right circumstances.

    We are in uncharted and unbalanced economic waters. Combine a severe recession with diversity, lots of guns, and overwhelmingly white general staff and combat arms and air force (i.e., "doesn't look like America") and things can get nasty real quick and in unexpected ways.

    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence. Never saw it coming, and they had to leave houses, businesses, places their family had been for generations, and get on the next flight out.

    So, pray indulge us old crackpots in our apocalyptic fantasies.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill, @Reg Cæsar

  12. if golf is in a permanent recession, then the only place to make money on golf will be the top of the top of golf.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @27 year old

    Probably true, but the other way to go about it is how billionaire Mike Keiser is building superb quality new courses on remote seacoasts for guys with private jets. Trump tried that in Aberdeen, Scotland, but lately he's pursuing already famous courses like Turnberry and Doral.

  13. @Anonymous
    I think trump and his followers are pathetic. When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Erik Sieven, @slumber_j, @bomag, @Stick, @AnAnon, @Crank, @Harry Baldwin

    Trump is feared and hated by all the right people. I have been worried Trump would back down at some point, not so far though.

    So basically the terrorist loving Gulfies have thrown a hissy fit, who cares! Maybe the golf community can strike back.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    @LondonBob

    I was praying the Arab princes would be so angry with Trump that they would stop building, funding and staffing their terrorist-generating Wahhabi/Salafi Mosques all across America.

    It was too much to hope for, I guess.

    If anything, I bet the perfumed princes are going to double-down on Jihad, boost their spending and plant more Islamist Mosques across America. Maybe even give the Muslim colonists money for armed Mosque guards.

  14. @27 year old
    if golf is in a permanent recession, then the only place to make money on golf will be the top of the top of golf.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Probably true, but the other way to go about it is how billionaire Mike Keiser is building superb quality new courses on remote seacoasts for guys with private jets. Trump tried that in Aberdeen, Scotland, but lately he’s pursuing already famous courses like Turnberry and Doral.

  15. @Anonymous
    I think trump and his followers are pathetic. When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Erik Sieven, @slumber_j, @bomag, @Stick, @AnAnon, @Crank, @Harry Baldwin

    leftists are driven by irrational fears concerning an imagined threat from right-wing politics. But in general there is nothing wrong about fear. Fear is an integral part of thinking and civilization.

  16. Whether the Trump campaign folds early, wins or loses, the two great things are:

    1. Destroying Jeb Bush. Even if Bush becomes the nominee in some fluke, he is mortally wounded by Trump.
    2. Proving in the midst of the migrant debate that the Western elite are open borders uber alles. They will turn the 1st world into a techno-cream top for them with Brazil bottom just to maintain their current economic dominance and luxurious living.

    Forget the politicians, this is about the true power of the economic elite in our FIRE based economy. FIRE sectors need transactions. Need new marks for their scams. Tech gets in on it with the H1B visa crew and the ability to suck new customers into the Western consumer machine to buy their gadgets and maintain sales growth.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @SOBL

    "1. Destroying Jeb Bush. Even if Bush becomes the nominee in some fluke, he is mortally wounded by Trump."

    Jeb Bush in December of 2015 is not in the same position that Mitt Romney was in December of 2011. Mitt Romney was not polling in the single digits less than 2 months before the primaries began.

    The chances of Jeb Bush winning the Republican nomination are about the same as the washed up past his prime Kobe Bryant taking The Los Angeles Lakers all the way to The 2016 NBA Finals. At this point in his career even just making the Playoffs does not look very good, let alone the Finals.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @SOBL


    They will turn the 1st world into a techno-cream top for them with Brazil bottom…
     
    Much worse than that.

    The bottom of Brazil is still thoroughly Brazilian. The bottom of post-America won't be recognizable at all.

    The Brazilian élite hasn't betrayed its own people.
  17. @Anonymous
    I think trump and his followers are pathetic. When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Erik Sieven, @slumber_j, @bomag, @Stick, @AnAnon, @Crank, @Harry Baldwin

    Is fear a trait, really? Isn’t it something one experiences?

    Anyway: while cowardice isn’t an admirable trait, prudence certainly is. It sounds to me as if you’ve swallowed the anti-Trump nonsense about Islamophobia without considering the merits of what he’s proposing.

    That it’s taken as buffoonish a character as Donald Trump to propose an actual solution to a lot of problems… Well, I’d say it reflects horribly on his opposition and well on him.

  18. @27 year old
    @TangoMan

    > guillotines in the public square make a come-back and elites’ heads are used as basketballs.


    lol

    not gonna happen. put your dick away

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Probably not, but when people say things like, “It can’t happen here,” anything can happen anywhere with the right circumstances.

    We are in uncharted and unbalanced economic waters. Combine a severe recession with diversity, lots of guns, and overwhelmingly white general staff and combat arms and air force (i.e., “doesn’t look like America”) and things can get nasty real quick and in unexpected ways.

    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence. Never saw it coming, and they had to leave houses, businesses, places their family had been for generations, and get on the next flight out.

    So, pray indulge us old crackpots in our apocalyptic fantasies.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Ok thats bullshit if I've ever heard it. Bashar's dad killed tens of thousands in Hama in the '80s. Clearly Syria has never been a harmonious country. These Syrians you know who are "in shock" are either lying or inexcusably ignorant. Maybe (just maybe) the Syrian regime has managed to keep most Syrians in the dark about what happened in Hama. But there's no excuse for a Syrian outside of Syria with free access to information to not know about that.

    I'm not saying the US isn't close to civil war. But do not bring up Syria as an example of "it could happen anywhere." Syria's civil war was anything but unexpected. The only shocking thing is that it took so long to break out.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1982_Hama_massacre

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Bill
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence. Never saw it coming, and they had to leave houses, businesses, places their family had been for generations, and get on the next flight out.
     
    I'm curious who they blame.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence
     
    And they could read the Koran in the original? That sets a world record for naïveté!
  19. @Anonymous
    I think trump and his followers are pathetic. When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Erik Sieven, @slumber_j, @bomag, @Stick, @AnAnon, @Crank, @Harry Baldwin

    I think trump and his followers are pathetic.

    Now teacher can give you a gold star for reciting the answer your handlers have told you to say.

    How about the policies Trump and his followers are discussing? Do you want even more immigration? Do you want ever more care and feeding of dysfunctional gov’t agencies?

  20. @Andrew
    "Trump’s racist comments"

    When did Muslims become a race?

    How can you be racist against a religion?

    Replies: @Eric Rasmusen, @AndrewR

    Brilliant!

  21. First GamerGate, now GolfGate.

    What do you want to bet that entryists at R&A got them to promulgate a “Code of Conduct” [non-binding, of course] that established sensitivity, caring, respect and love-for-everybody as “guiding principles” of the organization?

    Which Trump, as the world’s biggest Blue Meany, clearly violates.

    Is there anyway to find out if R&A has established one of those lefty Codes?

  22. Of course if he were on a pro Muslim pro jihad kick they’d not only hold 2020 there they’d hold 2019 and probably 2021.

  23. @LondonBob
    @Anonymous

    Trump is feared and hated by all the right people. I have been worried Trump would back down at some point, not so far though.

    So basically the terrorist loving Gulfies have thrown a hissy fit, who cares! Maybe the golf community can strike back.

    Replies: @Big Bill

    I was praying the Arab princes would be so angry with Trump that they would stop building, funding and staffing their terrorist-generating Wahhabi/Salafi Mosques all across America.

    It was too much to hope for, I guess.

    If anything, I bet the perfumed princes are going to double-down on Jihad, boost their spending and plant more Islamist Mosques across America. Maybe even give the Muslim colonists money for armed Mosque guards.

  24. I wonder if the excitement of the campaign has made golf pale in comparison as an interest for Trump. He’s mentioned that in some comments, about his business in general. I know that I care about golf more than anything else, until something important crops up.

    Trump is reaching the age when you inevitably lose your game. He’s quite a good player for over 65, could maybe crack the top ten of the Virginia super-senior amateur tourney. A 65 year old player can still drive 90 percent of the distance he could at 50, or maybe equal it. But at age 70, you can’t do it anymore. Last summer I had a match versus a 70 year old who had competed in three US Ams, match play, and the US senior open. I almost won, but of course wouldn’t have had a chance if he had been five years younger.

    • Agree: jack ryan
  25. This is a warning shot to Trump supporters: “if you support Trump, we in the media will actively promote people to destroy your livelihood. We will justify it because these people will not be the government, and therefore the First Amendment won’t apply. And we won’t investigate charges that a government-agency or a a big time lefty donor like Soros is out to destroy you.”

    If there ever was a time to start your own business and thus protect most of your free speech rights by not being a company man, now is that time.

    A man with income independence and no debt is dangerous to the powers that be. Remember that.

  26. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @27 year old

    Probably not, but when people say things like, "It can't happen here," anything can happen anywhere with the right circumstances.

    We are in uncharted and unbalanced economic waters. Combine a severe recession with diversity, lots of guns, and overwhelmingly white general staff and combat arms and air force (i.e., "doesn't look like America") and things can get nasty real quick and in unexpected ways.

    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence. Never saw it coming, and they had to leave houses, businesses, places their family had been for generations, and get on the next flight out.

    So, pray indulge us old crackpots in our apocalyptic fantasies.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill, @Reg Cæsar

    Ok thats bullshit if I’ve ever heard it. Bashar’s dad killed tens of thousands in Hama in the ’80s. Clearly Syria has never been a harmonious country. These Syrians you know who are “in shock” are either lying or inexcusably ignorant. Maybe (just maybe) the Syrian regime has managed to keep most Syrians in the dark about what happened in Hama. But there’s no excuse for a Syrian outside of Syria with free access to information to not know about that.

    I’m not saying the US isn’t close to civil war. But do not bring up Syria as an example of “it could happen anywhere.” Syria’s civil war was anything but unexpected. The only shocking thing is that it took so long to break out.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1982_Hama_massacre

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @AndrewR

    It was life like anywhere under a ruthless secular dictator. Keep your head down, stay out of politics, pay the right bribes, and you can go about your café-dinner party/Mediterranean lifestyle. Nobody paid taxes either.

    The Byzantines were working in their bureaucracies and carrying out their petty feuds even as the Saracens were setting up camp in view of their walls. People are strange.

  27. @TangoMan
    Instead of letting Trump's message play-out in the spirit of "Let the best platform win" the establishment signals that they're eager to coerce Trump to abandon his message and while this may yield a short-term benefit for them of silencing the messenger, the positions Trump advances are held by a significant portion of society and when people are silenced and not permitted to have their grievances addressed in the political system, that's when guillotines in the public square make a come-back and elites' heads are used as basketballs. Does this dynamic escape the attention of the elites?

    Replies: @27 year old, @AndrewR, @rod1963, @Anonymous

    Mon ami, our globalist elites are… (wait for it)… globalists. This means that when SHTF they’ll be on the next flight out to Israel, Switzerland, Qatar or wherever. And as long as they can bribe men with guns into protecting them they’ll be relatively safe even in the US.

  28. @Andrew
    "Trump’s racist comments"

    When did Muslims become a race?

    How can you be racist against a religion?

    Replies: @Eric Rasmusen, @AndrewR

    “Racism” is the new witchcraft. (((Anti-racists))) have made it so that any attempt to deny that you are guilty of racism is only evidence of your guilt. The only socially acceptable response is full capitulation and a prayer for mercy. Hence why people need to own the term like blacks, gays and women have come to reclaim the slurs that have historically been used against them.

    “Yes, I am a racist. So what?” This short-circuits the lefty brain and allows fellow closet “racists” to feel more cinfident in admitting that they too are racist and that there’s nothing wrong with that.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    “Yes, I am a racist. So what?”
     
    Better yet, "Yeah? So was Abe Lincoln. So was [fill in progressive hero appropriate to the individual]. "
    , @Dave Pinsen
    @AndrewR

    https://youtu.be/RovF1zsDoeM

    Replies: @AndrewR

  29. “We can’t have that: it’s unthinkable that US politicians wouldn’t be controlled by Arab oil princes.”

    That is why the Left is against the Keystone pipeline. They want to continue to be slaves to Arab oil princes. The less money Saudi Arabia and Dubai get from the U.S, the better.

  30. Perhaps. But touring pros are not all that Democratic. Tom Watson was the only tour pro to vote Democratic in 1972 and he soon became a fervent Republican. Scott Simpson was the only pro to publicly express Democratic leanings in, I think, 2000.

    I remember hearing David Duval say he was a Democrat in the late 90s. PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem sure sounds like a Democrat in this interview. I think he would probably like to make things difficult for Trump. My impression is a lot of the players are more of the Bush/Rubio breed of Republican. I don’t think they would cross their sponsors or the PGA Tour to defend him.

    http://www.top-law-schools.com/tim-finchem-interview.html

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Barnard

    Yeah, I get the sense that PGA corporate types are among those most likely to say "Washington is worth an apology for white privilege" and go over to the SJW Dem team.

    These guys aren't getting these university presidencies because they're world-class educators, after all:

    https://twitter.com/OWHnews/status/676791485455462400

  31. @Anonymous
    I think trump and his followers are pathetic. When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Erik Sieven, @slumber_j, @bomag, @Stick, @AnAnon, @Crank, @Harry Baldwin

    When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    When you are offering security you sell fear. This is exactly what the establishment is trying to do with Trump, sell fear.

  32. An obvious (but heretofore unspoken) take on the Trump brouhaha, invade the world invite the world department.
    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/trump-and-the-riot-of-the-elites/

  33. @SOBL
    Whether the Trump campaign folds early, wins or loses, the two great things are:

    1. Destroying Jeb Bush. Even if Bush becomes the nominee in some fluke, he is mortally wounded by Trump.
    2. Proving in the midst of the migrant debate that the Western elite are open borders uber alles. They will turn the 1st world into a techno-cream top for them with Brazil bottom just to maintain their current economic dominance and luxurious living.

    Forget the politicians, this is about the true power of the economic elite in our FIRE based economy. FIRE sectors need transactions. Need new marks for their scams. Tech gets in on it with the H1B visa crew and the ability to suck new customers into the Western consumer machine to buy their gadgets and maintain sales growth.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Reg Cæsar

    “1. Destroying Jeb Bush. Even if Bush becomes the nominee in some fluke, he is mortally wounded by Trump.”

    Jeb Bush in December of 2015 is not in the same position that Mitt Romney was in December of 2011. Mitt Romney was not polling in the single digits less than 2 months before the primaries began.

    The chances of Jeb Bush winning the Republican nomination are about the same as the washed up past his prime Kobe Bryant taking The Los Angeles Lakers all the way to The 2016 NBA Finals. At this point in his career even just making the Playoffs does not look very good, let alone the Finals.

  34. You see this is why Europeans are getting used and abused by the Islamic invaders, European peoples are too busy biting their nose to spite their face (i.e. attacking Trump for trying to find a fix to the Islamist problem). Trump’s mother is Scottish , and yet the Royal & Ancient rather kow-tow to Muslims.

  35. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Strange.

    In the UK, the term ‘golf-club bore’ or its couplet ‘saloon bar bigot’ is taken as a generic description of a certain type of person – now mostly faded away – who was likely a Tory voter, solidly middle class, probably lived in a suburban semi, probably had a trimmed moustache, a clipped accent, likely to have had ‘colonial’ or armed forces connections, and whose politics, especially regarding ‘race’ were far far to the right of Donald Trump, if not Genghis Khan.

    Good God!, how times have changed!

    Even golf has gone PC.

  36. One fascinating thing about the events of this year, not just the reaction to the Trump campaign but also the reaction to the “Syrian” refugees in Europe, has been the revelation that not only is there very much an “Establishment”, but that it is determined to bring as many peasants from the third world into more developed countries as it can.

    I can think of historical parallels in the importation by the Roman and Chinese elites of barbarian tribesmen, and even entire barbarian tribes, to man their armies. But this is on an entirely bigger scale, and doesn’t seem to be for any positive reason such as providing manpower for the military.

  37. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I wonder if Prime Minister Cameron should be punished similarly to Trump. After all, he campaigned both in 2010 and 2015 on reducing non-EU immigration to Britain. I recall seeing a photo of one poster this year where the Conservatives proudly announced their reduction of non-EU immigration over Cameron’s first term. Not sure how true that is, but imagine in the US if reducing immigration was something politicians were proud of.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    @Anonymous

    I wonder if that pin head David Cameron gave any thought to the damage he was doing to the "special relationship" with the U.S.? After all, Trump has a very good chance of winning the Republican nomination and becoming the next President of the U.S. Trump impresses me as a man who takes attacks personally and holds grudges. If Trump is elected, Cameron can forget about the tradition of being the first foreign leader to visit the White House. I doubt if he will get any invitations to the White House under Trump. I also doubt that Trump will pay any visits to Britain as long as Cameron is P.M. What a stupid man!

    Replies: @IBC

  38. @Anonymous
    I think trump and his followers are pathetic. When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Erik Sieven, @slumber_j, @bomag, @Stick, @AnAnon, @Crank, @Harry Baldwin

    I think everyone afraid of Trump needs to answer that question.

  39. @Anonymous
    I think trump and his followers are pathetic. When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Erik Sieven, @slumber_j, @bomag, @Stick, @AnAnon, @Crank, @Harry Baldwin

    “When did fear become an admirable trait ?”

    The only fear I see is from the hysterical anti-Trump folks screaming “OH MY GOD! TRUMP SCARES THE SHIT OUT OF ME!!! HE’S WORSE THAN HITLER!!”

  40. The UK government is poised to bar Trump from entering the UK altogether since his statements denigrating Mexicans, Muslims, and Rosie O’Donnell constitute speech crimes in the UK and most of Western Europe and Scandinavia.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    @Mark Caplan

    It will be interesting to see what they do when Trump is elected President. Perhaps they will put a blanket ban on all Republicans (and Independents and Democrats who voted for him.

    IIRC, Jerry Rubin (Yuppie in Chief) twitted Congress back in 67-68 by publicly demanding a subpoena from the House Un-American Activities Committee. All his buddies were getting subpoenaed to testify before Congress and he felt left out.

    Further in that vein, does anyone know the British Minister that handles the "no visa" list?

    I would like to send him a letter, tell him I agree with everything Trump said about immigration, Rosie O'Donnell, Mexicans and Moslems and demand that they add my name to their list right alongside Trump's name.

    Like Jerry Rubin, I am feeling horribly left out. How dare they put Trump on their no-fly list as a threat to all humanity and not me?!?! I am at LEAST as rabid a neo-Nazi, fascist, racist, holocaustifying, homophobic savage as Trump, if not more so. For them to ignore ME and pick Trump first is mortifying. I will never again be able to hold my head up among my friends.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  41. @Anonymous
    I think trump and his followers are pathetic. When did fear become an admirable trait ?

    Replies: @LondonBob, @Erik Sieven, @slumber_j, @bomag, @Stick, @AnAnon, @Crank, @Harry Baldwin

    Who is it that is afraid? No one in politics is as fearless as Trump. It’s pc-weenies like yourself who live in constant terror that they might let slip an unapproved opinion.

  42. Trump’s courses should start offering steep discounts, provided that you wear some “Make America Great Again!!” golf wear. I’d go down to PV and play Trump National.

  43. I guess the government’s next move against Trump will be to freeze all his financial assets, like they did with Iran.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Harry Baldwin

    "I guess the government’s next move against Trump will be to freeze all his financial assets, like they did with Iran."

    , @Jefferson
    @Harry Baldwin

    "I guess the government’s next move against Trump will be to freeze all his financial assets, like they did with Iran."

    If the Hussein Obama administration pulls that shit on Donald Trump, they are bigger thugs than Cosa Nostra.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  44. Steve: “The term “The Establishment” was a 1960s hippie phrase, but it now seems to be mostly used today on the dissident right.”

    I refer to them as the Great Cult of Diversity. There may be many smaller cults, but they are the cult that rules over all the others. Sort of like how the under the old Persian Empire their ruler was referred to as the Great King. There are many smaller kingdoms within the Persian Empire, but the Great King rules over all of them.

    …One Cult to rule them all, One Cult to find them,
    One Cult to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them
    In the Land of Mordor where the SJWs lie

  45. @Jim Don Bob
    OT: Now that we have the "Truth" about the Bush memos that sank Dan Rather's career, we're going to get to the truth about Chappaquiddick, with the help of the director from 50 Shades of Grey: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/fifty-shades-grey-director-tackling-848494

    Replies: @Bill

    I missed something. What truth do we now know about the Bush memos which slightly accelerated Dan Rather’s long-overdue retirement?

    From the link:

    You’ll see what [Senator Ted Kennedy] had to go through.

    Yeah, being a murdering degenerate can’t be much fun.

  46. Prince Alaweed bin Talal was famous in the US for offering a check after 9/11, amounting to around $20million, but with strings that the US admit its role in fostering the attack by being anti-Islamic.

    Rudy Guiliani refused the money on national television, IIRC. To great cheers.

  47. @Harry Baldwin
    I guess the government's next move against Trump will be to freeze all his financial assets, like they did with Iran.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jefferson

    “I guess the government’s next move against Trump will be to freeze all his financial assets, like they did with Iran.”

  48. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @27 year old

    Probably not, but when people say things like, "It can't happen here," anything can happen anywhere with the right circumstances.

    We are in uncharted and unbalanced economic waters. Combine a severe recession with diversity, lots of guns, and overwhelmingly white general staff and combat arms and air force (i.e., "doesn't look like America") and things can get nasty real quick and in unexpected ways.

    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence. Never saw it coming, and they had to leave houses, businesses, places their family had been for generations, and get on the next flight out.

    So, pray indulge us old crackpots in our apocalyptic fantasies.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill, @Reg Cæsar

    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence. Never saw it coming, and they had to leave houses, businesses, places their family had been for generations, and get on the next flight out.

    I’m curious who they blame.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Bill

    Some blame America and Israel. Some blame Turkey and Gulf kingdoms/emirates. They also believe, I think with some evidence, that Chechens and foreign Arab militants elevated the conflict.

    I have talked to old Ba'athists who have been here long enough to know better, and they have a very rosy view of the old days with calls to prayer and church bells ringing at the same time. I also know an old guy who was in the security service, and he has no illusions about how order was maintained.

  49. @Harry Baldwin
    I guess the government's next move against Trump will be to freeze all his financial assets, like they did with Iran.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Jefferson

    “I guess the government’s next move against Trump will be to freeze all his financial assets, like they did with Iran.”

    If the Hussein Obama administration pulls that shit on Donald Trump, they are bigger thugs than Cosa Nostra.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jefferson


    If the Hussein Obama administration pulls that shit on Donald Trump, they are bigger thugs than Cosa Nostra.

     

    You're just learning this now?
  50. Trump should cultivate wealthy East Asians like the Japanese and Koreans, Hong Kong Chinese who like to play golf. Wealthy Arabs should be good golfers because the sport doesn’t require a lot of athletic ability, Tiger Woods being an exception.

    Exclusive golf country clubs used to exclude wealthy Jews, now the same can be done to wealthy Arabs/Muslims.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @jack ryan


    Trump should cultivate wealthy East Asians like the Japanese and Koreans, Hong Kong Chinese who like to play golf.
     
    Golf is slowly dying out in Japan, according to the Financial Times. Courses are closing all over. One firm specializes in converting them to solar energy farms.

    Wealthy Arabs should be good golfers because the sport doesn’t require a lot of athletic ability, Tiger Woods being an exception.
     
    Woods is an athlete? He doesn't look any more fit than his competition.
    , @EriK
    @jack ryan

    "Wealthy Arabs should be good golfers because the sport doesn’t require a lot of athletic ability"

    Have you ever played golf? I mean serious golf, walk the course, play by all the rules, etc?

    Plus, have you ever played golf in a robe?

  51. @Mark Caplan
    The UK government is poised to bar Trump from entering the UK altogether since his statements denigrating Mexicans, Muslims, and Rosie O'Donnell constitute speech crimes in the UK and most of Western Europe and Scandinavia.

    Replies: @Big Bill

    It will be interesting to see what they do when Trump is elected President. Perhaps they will put a blanket ban on all Republicans (and Independents and Democrats who voted for him.

    IIRC, Jerry Rubin (Yuppie in Chief) twitted Congress back in 67-68 by publicly demanding a subpoena from the House Un-American Activities Committee. All his buddies were getting subpoenaed to testify before Congress and he felt left out.

    Further in that vein, does anyone know the British Minister that handles the “no visa” list?

    I would like to send him a letter, tell him I agree with everything Trump said about immigration, Rosie O’Donnell, Mexicans and Moslems and demand that they add my name to their list right alongside Trump’s name.

    Like Jerry Rubin, I am feeling horribly left out. How dare they put Trump on their no-fly list as a threat to all humanity and not me?!?! I am at LEAST as rabid a neo-Nazi, fascist, racist, holocaustifying, homophobic savage as Trump, if not more so. For them to ignore ME and pick Trump first is mortifying. I will never again be able to hold my head up among my friends.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Big Bill


    IIRC, Jerry Rubin (Yuppie in Chief) twitted Congress back in 67-68…
     
    Rubin was using Twitter before Al Gore invented the Internet? Impressive of him!
  52. Nero fiddled while Rome burned..

    The West is playing golf while the West goes under to Islam.

  53. The Scots just handed Britain yet another one of its burgeoning sharia law-enforcing No-Go Zones.

  54. Someone refresh my memory. Have the Brits ever had problems with Muslim immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers?

    There are several YouTube videos and documentaries. See Dispatches Britain’s Hidden Child Abuse, The Hunt For Britain’s Sex Gangs (4 parts) and Sexual Grooming Gangs in the British Pakistani Community.

    This happened in several cities.
    Google and read these Wikipedia articles:
    1: Oxford Sex Gang – 7 Muslim men, five Pakistani and two Eritrean. Girls ranged from 11 to 15 years old.
    2: Rochdale Sex Trafficking Gang – 12 Muslim men charged. Eight were British Pakistani. One was an Afghan asylum seeker. 47 girls were involved. All girls are white.
    3: Derby Sex Gang – 13 Muslim men. 9 convicted. Up to 100 girls, ages 12-18
    4: Telford Sex Gang – 7 Muslim men convicted
    5: Rotherham Sex Grooming – In 2010, five men of Pakistani heritage were found guilty of a series of sexual offences against girls as young as twelve.

  55. @TangoMan
    Instead of letting Trump's message play-out in the spirit of "Let the best platform win" the establishment signals that they're eager to coerce Trump to abandon his message and while this may yield a short-term benefit for them of silencing the messenger, the positions Trump advances are held by a significant portion of society and when people are silenced and not permitted to have their grievances addressed in the political system, that's when guillotines in the public square make a come-back and elites' heads are used as basketballs. Does this dynamic escape the attention of the elites?

    Replies: @27 year old, @AndrewR, @rod1963, @Anonymous

    Yes.

    Except many will pooh pooh the notion because it hasn’t happened in their lifetimes.

    Too many think the party will never end because it’s been going on for so long.

    The U.S. is in a very precarious position economically and socially. It wouldn’t take much of a upset in either domain to really make the country go pear shaped.

  56. Well, at least Trump now has something in common with rich Jewish grandfathers who were also denied admission to golf clubs.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anon


    Well, at least Trump now has something in common with rich Jewish grandfathers who were also denied admission to golf clubs.

     

    Emma Lazarus's grandfather must have been shut out of the local course, because he started his own private club-- the New York Stock Exchange. Really. Look it up.
  57. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @TangoMan
    Instead of letting Trump's message play-out in the spirit of "Let the best platform win" the establishment signals that they're eager to coerce Trump to abandon his message and while this may yield a short-term benefit for them of silencing the messenger, the positions Trump advances are held by a significant portion of society and when people are silenced and not permitted to have their grievances addressed in the political system, that's when guillotines in the public square make a come-back and elites' heads are used as basketballs. Does this dynamic escape the attention of the elites?

    Replies: @27 year old, @AndrewR, @rod1963, @Anonymous

    No, it doesn’t escape the attention of the elites, which is why the country is more or less evenly divided, as political affiliation will tend to be in a duopoly. Trump has fervent support with the Republican base, but his support will be more divided across the country as a whole. Which is why his success will depend on manipulating turnout. This can escape one’s attention at the Unz Review and similar like-minded venues.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Trump has fervent support with the Republican base, but his support will be more divided across the country as a whole
     
    Are you sure? He seems to be pulling in people the other candidates can't touch.

    Was it the younger Kristol or the younger Podhoretz who complained that many of those showing up at Buchanan rallies in the '90s "didn't look like Republicans!"

    Sam Francis shot back, "They're not. They're Democrats."

    I can see Trump taking some New England states in November, even Massachusetts. (Reagan took all but R.I. twice.) The other Republicans? Only if they take his positions.

    Because "Americans vs aliens" is a more effective stance than "conservatives vs progressives".

    Replies: @Another Canadian, @Desiderius

  58. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @27 year old

    Probably not, but when people say things like, "It can't happen here," anything can happen anywhere with the right circumstances.

    We are in uncharted and unbalanced economic waters. Combine a severe recession with diversity, lots of guns, and overwhelmingly white general staff and combat arms and air force (i.e., "doesn't look like America") and things can get nasty real quick and in unexpected ways.

    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence. Never saw it coming, and they had to leave houses, businesses, places their family had been for generations, and get on the next flight out.

    So, pray indulge us old crackpots in our apocalyptic fantasies.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill, @Reg Cæsar

    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence

    And they could read the Koran in the original? That sets a world record for naïveté!

  59. @Another Canadian
    Here's a video of Trump getting ready for his next round at St. Andrews...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5u7yZiV3bI

    Replies: @Another Canadian

    I like it when Rodney Dangerfield yells, “Hey Whitey! Where’s your hat?”

  60. @Anon
    Well, at least Trump now has something in common with rich Jewish grandfathers who were also denied admission to golf clubs.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Well, at least Trump now has something in common with rich Jewish grandfathers who were also denied admission to golf clubs.

    Emma Lazarus’s grandfather must have been shut out of the local course, because he started his own private club– the New York Stock Exchange. Really. Look it up.

  61. @Anonymous
    @TangoMan

    No, it doesn't escape the attention of the elites, which is why the country is more or less evenly divided, as political affiliation will tend to be in a duopoly. Trump has fervent support with the Republican base, but his support will be more divided across the country as a whole. Which is why his success will depend on manipulating turnout. This can escape one's attention at the Unz Review and similar like-minded venues.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Trump has fervent support with the Republican base, but his support will be more divided across the country as a whole

    Are you sure? He seems to be pulling in people the other candidates can’t touch.

    Was it the younger Kristol or the younger Podhoretz who complained that many of those showing up at Buchanan rallies in the ’90s “didn’t look like Republicans!”

    Sam Francis shot back, “They’re not. They’re Democrats.”

    I can see Trump taking some New England states in November, even Massachusetts. (Reagan took all but R.I. twice.) The other Republicans? Only if they take his positions.

    Because “Americans vs aliens” is a more effective stance than “conservatives vs progressives”.

    • Replies: @Another Canadian
    @Reg Cæsar


    Are you sure? He seems to be pulling in people the other candidates can’t touch.
     
    He may even pull in some unexpectedly large fraction of black people in a general election. The combination of his showy brand, F-U attitude, and slapping around Mexicans and Muslims may just do it for a lot of blacks. Sticking it to the Republican Establishment doesn't hurt either.
    , @Desiderius
    @Reg Cæsar


    Because “Americans vs aliens” is a more effective stance than “conservatives vs progressives”.
     
    That's how a Dutchman (ironically) was able to unite England, Whig and Tory, against James II, ushering in a Revolution that became known as Glorious.
  62. @SOBL
    Whether the Trump campaign folds early, wins or loses, the two great things are:

    1. Destroying Jeb Bush. Even if Bush becomes the nominee in some fluke, he is mortally wounded by Trump.
    2. Proving in the midst of the migrant debate that the Western elite are open borders uber alles. They will turn the 1st world into a techno-cream top for them with Brazil bottom just to maintain their current economic dominance and luxurious living.

    Forget the politicians, this is about the true power of the economic elite in our FIRE based economy. FIRE sectors need transactions. Need new marks for their scams. Tech gets in on it with the H1B visa crew and the ability to suck new customers into the Western consumer machine to buy their gadgets and maintain sales growth.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Reg Cæsar

    They will turn the 1st world into a techno-cream top for them with Brazil bottom…

    Much worse than that.

    The bottom of Brazil is still thoroughly Brazilian. The bottom of post-America won’t be recognizable at all.

    The Brazilian élite hasn’t betrayed its own people.

  63. Another Canadian [AKA "Zinjanthropus"] says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Trump has fervent support with the Republican base, but his support will be more divided across the country as a whole
     
    Are you sure? He seems to be pulling in people the other candidates can't touch.

    Was it the younger Kristol or the younger Podhoretz who complained that many of those showing up at Buchanan rallies in the '90s "didn't look like Republicans!"

    Sam Francis shot back, "They're not. They're Democrats."

    I can see Trump taking some New England states in November, even Massachusetts. (Reagan took all but R.I. twice.) The other Republicans? Only if they take his positions.

    Because "Americans vs aliens" is a more effective stance than "conservatives vs progressives".

    Replies: @Another Canadian, @Desiderius

    Are you sure? He seems to be pulling in people the other candidates can’t touch.

    He may even pull in some unexpectedly large fraction of black people in a general election. The combination of his showy brand, F-U attitude, and slapping around Mexicans and Muslims may just do it for a lot of blacks. Sticking it to the Republican Establishment doesn’t hurt either.

  64. I like the “fat-fingered vulgarian” more every day.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Kylie


    I like the “fat-fingered vulgarian” more every day.
     
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OBt-nirXQDE

    NB: NSFW. NSFPC ["polite company"].

    Replies: @Kylie

  65. @jack ryan
    Trump should cultivate wealthy East Asians like the Japanese and Koreans, Hong Kong Chinese who like to play golf. Wealthy Arabs should be good golfers because the sport doesn't require a lot of athletic ability, Tiger Woods being an exception.

    Exclusive golf country clubs used to exclude wealthy Jews, now the same can be done to wealthy Arabs/Muslims.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @EriK

    Trump should cultivate wealthy East Asians like the Japanese and Koreans, Hong Kong Chinese who like to play golf.

    Golf is slowly dying out in Japan, according to the Financial Times. Courses are closing all over. One firm specializes in converting them to solar energy farms.

    Wealthy Arabs should be good golfers because the sport doesn’t require a lot of athletic ability, Tiger Woods being an exception.

    Woods is an athlete? He doesn’t look any more fit than his competition.

  66. @Kylie
    I like the "fat-fingered vulgarian" more every day.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I like the “fat-fingered vulgarian” more every day.

    NB: NSFW. NSFPC [“polite company”].

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Reg Cæsar

    Funny.

    But I was alluding to SPY magazine's invariable description of Trump.

    Replies: @Kylie

  67. @Jefferson
    @Harry Baldwin

    "I guess the government’s next move against Trump will be to freeze all his financial assets, like they did with Iran."

    If the Hussein Obama administration pulls that shit on Donald Trump, they are bigger thugs than Cosa Nostra.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    If the Hussein Obama administration pulls that shit on Donald Trump, they are bigger thugs than Cosa Nostra.

    You’re just learning this now?

  68. The property tycoon bought the Turnberry resort in April last year from the subsidiary owned by the Dubai investment group chaired by Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum.

    Great, so a guy from Dubai, land of diversity, tolerance, democracy, inclusion, women’s rights, gay rights, religious pluralism and openness to immigrants of all countries and religions, can own the course but NOT Donald Trump.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    @Rifleman

    You forget that that Dubai guy never made Islamophobic remarks.

  69. @Big Bill
    @Mark Caplan

    It will be interesting to see what they do when Trump is elected President. Perhaps they will put a blanket ban on all Republicans (and Independents and Democrats who voted for him.

    IIRC, Jerry Rubin (Yuppie in Chief) twitted Congress back in 67-68 by publicly demanding a subpoena from the House Un-American Activities Committee. All his buddies were getting subpoenaed to testify before Congress and he felt left out.

    Further in that vein, does anyone know the British Minister that handles the "no visa" list?

    I would like to send him a letter, tell him I agree with everything Trump said about immigration, Rosie O'Donnell, Mexicans and Moslems and demand that they add my name to their list right alongside Trump's name.

    Like Jerry Rubin, I am feeling horribly left out. How dare they put Trump on their no-fly list as a threat to all humanity and not me?!?! I am at LEAST as rabid a neo-Nazi, fascist, racist, holocaustifying, homophobic savage as Trump, if not more so. For them to ignore ME and pick Trump first is mortifying. I will never again be able to hold my head up among my friends.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    IIRC, Jerry Rubin (Yuppie in Chief) twitted Congress back in 67-68…

    Rubin was using Twitter before Al Gore invented the Internet? Impressive of him!

  70. @AndrewR
    @Andrew

    "Racism" is the new witchcraft. (((Anti-racists))) have made it so that any attempt to deny that you are guilty of racism is only evidence of your guilt. The only socially acceptable response is full capitulation and a prayer for mercy. Hence why people need to own the term like blacks, gays and women have come to reclaim the slurs that have historically been used against them.

    "Yes, I am a racist. So what?" This short-circuits the lefty brain and allows fellow closet "racists" to feel more cinfident in admitting that they too are racist and that there's nothing wrong with that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dave Pinsen

    “Yes, I am a racist. So what?”

    Better yet, “Yeah? So was Abe Lincoln. So was [fill in progressive hero appropriate to the individual]. ”

    • Agree: AndrewR
  71. @Reg Cæsar
    @Kylie


    I like the “fat-fingered vulgarian” more every day.
     
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OBt-nirXQDE

    NB: NSFW. NSFPC ["polite company"].

    Replies: @Kylie

    Funny.

    But I was alluding to SPY magazine’s invariable description of Trump.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Kylie

    Sorry, that should have been "short-fingered vulgarian".

  72. @AndrewR
    @Andrew

    "Racism" is the new witchcraft. (((Anti-racists))) have made it so that any attempt to deny that you are guilty of racism is only evidence of your guilt. The only socially acceptable response is full capitulation and a prayer for mercy. Hence why people need to own the term like blacks, gays and women have come to reclaim the slurs that have historically been used against them.

    "Yes, I am a racist. So what?" This short-circuits the lefty brain and allows fellow closet "racists" to feel more cinfident in admitting that they too are racist and that there's nothing wrong with that.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Dave Pinsen

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Dave Pinsen

    Triggered

  73. @Kylie
    @Reg Cæsar

    Funny.

    But I was alluding to SPY magazine's invariable description of Trump.

    Replies: @Kylie

    Sorry, that should have been “short-fingered vulgarian”.

  74. @Rifleman

    The property tycoon bought the Turnberry resort in April last year from the subsidiary owned by the Dubai investment group chaired by Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum.
     
    Great, so a guy from Dubai, land of diversity, tolerance, democracy, inclusion, women's rights, gay rights, religious pluralism and openness to immigrants of all countries and religions, can own the course but NOT Donald Trump.

    Replies: @reiner Tor

    You forget that that Dubai guy never made Islamophobic remarks.

  75. @jack ryan
    Trump should cultivate wealthy East Asians like the Japanese and Koreans, Hong Kong Chinese who like to play golf. Wealthy Arabs should be good golfers because the sport doesn't require a lot of athletic ability, Tiger Woods being an exception.

    Exclusive golf country clubs used to exclude wealthy Jews, now the same can be done to wealthy Arabs/Muslims.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @EriK

    “Wealthy Arabs should be good golfers because the sport doesn’t require a lot of athletic ability”

    Have you ever played golf? I mean serious golf, walk the course, play by all the rules, etc?

    Plus, have you ever played golf in a robe?

  76. @Dave Pinsen
    @AndrewR

    https://youtu.be/RovF1zsDoeM

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Triggered

  77. @AndrewR
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Ok thats bullshit if I've ever heard it. Bashar's dad killed tens of thousands in Hama in the '80s. Clearly Syria has never been a harmonious country. These Syrians you know who are "in shock" are either lying or inexcusably ignorant. Maybe (just maybe) the Syrian regime has managed to keep most Syrians in the dark about what happened in Hama. But there's no excuse for a Syrian outside of Syria with free access to information to not know about that.

    I'm not saying the US isn't close to civil war. But do not bring up Syria as an example of "it could happen anywhere." Syria's civil war was anything but unexpected. The only shocking thing is that it took so long to break out.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1982_Hama_massacre

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    It was life like anywhere under a ruthless secular dictator. Keep your head down, stay out of politics, pay the right bribes, and you can go about your café-dinner party/Mediterranean lifestyle. Nobody paid taxes either.

    The Byzantines were working in their bureaucracies and carrying out their petty feuds even as the Saracens were setting up camp in view of their walls. People are strange.

  78. @Bill
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    I happen to know a lot of Syrian Christians. Strange as it may seem, they are in shock that their country blew up 70 years after independence. Never saw it coming, and they had to leave houses, businesses, places their family had been for generations, and get on the next flight out.
     
    I'm curious who they blame.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Some blame America and Israel. Some blame Turkey and Gulf kingdoms/emirates. They also believe, I think with some evidence, that Chechens and foreign Arab militants elevated the conflict.

    I have talked to old Ba’athists who have been here long enough to know better, and they have a very rosy view of the old days with calls to prayer and church bells ringing at the same time. I also know an old guy who was in the security service, and he has no illusions about how order was maintained.

  79. Steve,

    This just adds irrefutable evidence to the idea that country clubs and their golf courses are the wormholes into political control of the universe.

  80. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Trump has fervent support with the Republican base, but his support will be more divided across the country as a whole
     
    Are you sure? He seems to be pulling in people the other candidates can't touch.

    Was it the younger Kristol or the younger Podhoretz who complained that many of those showing up at Buchanan rallies in the '90s "didn't look like Republicans!"

    Sam Francis shot back, "They're not. They're Democrats."

    I can see Trump taking some New England states in November, even Massachusetts. (Reagan took all but R.I. twice.) The other Republicans? Only if they take his positions.

    Because "Americans vs aliens" is a more effective stance than "conservatives vs progressives".

    Replies: @Another Canadian, @Desiderius

    Because “Americans vs aliens” is a more effective stance than “conservatives vs progressives”.

    That’s how a Dutchman (ironically) was able to unite England, Whig and Tory, against James II, ushering in a Revolution that became known as Glorious.

  81. @penntothal

    "A striking thing about Donald Trump’s campaign is that The Establishment’s hostility to him proposing immigration restrictions is costing him serious money, but unlike so many others, he has yet to flinch."
     
    These costs have galvanized Trump into a much more serious candidate than he would otherwise be.

    My guess is he may have been half-hearted "vanity" candidate when this all began, but there is no turning back now, not with all that he has lost.

    Replies: @Clyde, @iSteveFan

    My guess is Trump may have been half-hearted “vanity” candidate when this all began, but there is no turning back now, not with all that he has lost.

    Seeing his “brand name” being tarnished gives him more incentive to win. Trump being President will restore the Trump brand. Fickle people gravitating to the “strong horse”.
    Trump got hooked right from the start when he came out with strong words against illegal immigration. Strong enough to be construed as anti-Mexican and anti-Hispanic. He saw the battle and he liked it!

  82. @Anonymous
    I wonder if Prime Minister Cameron should be punished similarly to Trump. After all, he campaigned both in 2010 and 2015 on reducing non-EU immigration to Britain. I recall seeing a photo of one poster this year where the Conservatives proudly announced their reduction of non-EU immigration over Cameron's first term. Not sure how true that is, but imagine in the US if reducing immigration was something politicians were proud of.

    Replies: @tbraton

    I wonder if that pin head David Cameron gave any thought to the damage he was doing to the “special relationship” with the U.S.? After all, Trump has a very good chance of winning the Republican nomination and becoming the next President of the U.S. Trump impresses me as a man who takes attacks personally and holds grudges. If Trump is elected, Cameron can forget about the tradition of being the first foreign leader to visit the White House. I doubt if he will get any invitations to the White House under Trump. I also doubt that Trump will pay any visits to Britain as long as Cameron is P.M. What a stupid man!

    • Replies: @IBC
    @tbraton

    When President Obama chose to give Gordon Brown a DVD of E.T. (in the wrong regional format, no less) it was a pretty clear sign that the "special relationship" had become mostly an historical reference. No doubt Cameron's familiar with that little exchange and gets the picture. I like Britain, but it's just not as important as it used to be.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1159627/To-special-friend-Gordon-25-DVDs-Obama-gives-Brown-set-classic-movies-Lets-hope-likes-Wizard-Oz.html

    In contrast, look at how quickly President Obama tried to patch things up when PM Modi was elected. This was a man, who just before, had been legally barred from even setting foot in this country due to allegations of him inciting deadly mob violence against some of his own Muslim countrymen --not just talking about delaying some foreign people's travel plans as Trump has done.

    http://www.thenation.com/article/narenda-modis-transformation-international-outcast-indias-prime-minister/

  83. iSteveFan says:
    @penntothal

    "A striking thing about Donald Trump’s campaign is that The Establishment’s hostility to him proposing immigration restrictions is costing him serious money, but unlike so many others, he has yet to flinch."
     
    These costs have galvanized Trump into a much more serious candidate than he would otherwise be.

    My guess is he may have been half-hearted "vanity" candidate when this all began, but there is no turning back now, not with all that he has lost.

    Replies: @Clyde, @iSteveFan

    My guess is he may have been half-hearted “vanity” candidate when this all began, but there is no turning back now, not with all that he has lost.

    I don’t think Trump has lost a lot. In fact Trump has gained more than most people ever dream. Sure he has been blacklisted and lost some of his business deals. But he is still a multi-billionaire who is in the top 0.00001 percent of the wealthiest people in the world.

    On the other hand Trump has something that most if not all people, especially rich ones, want. He has the genuine support and admiration of a tremendous amount of his nation’s population. That is something you cannot buy. That is something you cannot put a price tag on. Rich guys throughout history have donated to universities, built libraries, endowed foundations, all in the hope of making the ordinary people like them. And in most cases the ordinary people who use the facilities created by their donations could care less.

    But in Trump’s case he has genuinely struck a cord with the common people of this nation. And that has to hurt others in the elite. Though we think the elite look down upon us, and they probably do, most American elites detest the class system and like to think that despite their wealth, they are just like regular people. So when they see a guy like Trump make such a connection and draw huge crowds of ordinary, hardworking people, it must make them jealous with envy.

    For all the shenanigans Trump has pulled in his life, he has the chance now to become a genuinely beloved figure to a large segment of his nation if he plays out this campaign correctly and doesn’t melt down. Trump has the opportunity to transform himself from a flamboyant rich guy into a person who could go down in the history books as having transformed the American political system. How many billionaires would gladly give up a few billion to accomplish that?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @iSteveFan


    But in Trump’s case he has genuinely struck a cord with the common people of this nation.
     
    For sure. But as any guitar or ukelele instructor will tell you, you have to strike at least three cords to strike a chord.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    @iSteveFan

    Trump has the opportunity to transform himself from a flamboyant rich guy into a person who could go down in the history books as having transformed the American political system. How many billionaires would gladly give up a few billion to accomplish that?

    Billionaires like Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, George Soros, and Sheldon Adelson are certainly willing to spend a few billion to make America a worse country. Among billionaires, Trump is unique. He wants to make it better!

  84. He may not even lose much money. Sure, the Arabs in Abu Dubai (sp?) took his name off some building but I’ll give you 10-1 odds that they still owe him money for using his name. Trump did not get where he is by not including failure to perform clauses in his contracts. It’s as if Fedex demanded that Dan Snyder take its name off the Redskin’s stadium because of their “racially insensitive” name; Snyder would say fine, but our contract says you still owe me 20 years of stadium naming rights money.

    I do worry that Kurt Schlichter may be right (http://townhall.com/columnists/kurtschlichter/2015/12/14/trump-is-going-to-break-your-heart-n2092525/page/full) and that the Donald may pull a Perot and hand the election to Hillary.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jim Don Bob


    …that the Donald may pull a Perot and hand the election to Hillary.
     
    Then he'd be throwing away all the acclaim iSteveFan describes in the comment right above yours.

    Another possibility is that he throws the election into the House, a House he may have some influence in making.
  85. @iSteveFan
    @penntothal


    My guess is he may have been half-hearted “vanity” candidate when this all began, but there is no turning back now, not with all that he has lost.
     
    I don't think Trump has lost a lot. In fact Trump has gained more than most people ever dream. Sure he has been blacklisted and lost some of his business deals. But he is still a multi-billionaire who is in the top 0.00001 percent of the wealthiest people in the world.

    On the other hand Trump has something that most if not all people, especially rich ones, want. He has the genuine support and admiration of a tremendous amount of his nation's population. That is something you cannot buy. That is something you cannot put a price tag on. Rich guys throughout history have donated to universities, built libraries, endowed foundations, all in the hope of making the ordinary people like them. And in most cases the ordinary people who use the facilities created by their donations could care less.

    But in Trump's case he has genuinely struck a cord with the common people of this nation. And that has to hurt others in the elite. Though we think the elite look down upon us, and they probably do, most American elites detest the class system and like to think that despite their wealth, they are just like regular people. So when they see a guy like Trump make such a connection and draw huge crowds of ordinary, hardworking people, it must make them jealous with envy.

    For all the shenanigans Trump has pulled in his life, he has the chance now to become a genuinely beloved figure to a large segment of his nation if he plays out this campaign correctly and doesn't melt down. Trump has the opportunity to transform himself from a flamboyant rich guy into a person who could go down in the history books as having transformed the American political system. How many billionaires would gladly give up a few billion to accomplish that?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Harry Baldwin

    But in Trump’s case he has genuinely struck a cord with the common people of this nation.

    For sure. But as any guitar or ukelele instructor will tell you, you have to strike at least three cords to strike a chord.

  86. @Jim Don Bob
    He may not even lose much money. Sure, the Arabs in Abu Dubai (sp?) took his name off some building but I'll give you 10-1 odds that they still owe him money for using his name. Trump did not get where he is by not including failure to perform clauses in his contracts. It's as if Fedex demanded that Dan Snyder take its name off the Redskin's stadium because of their "racially insensitive" name; Snyder would say fine, but our contract says you still owe me 20 years of stadium naming rights money.

    I do worry that Kurt Schlichter may be right (http://townhall.com/columnists/kurtschlichter/2015/12/14/trump-is-going-to-break-your-heart-n2092525/page/full) and that the Donald may pull a Perot and hand the election to Hillary.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    …that the Donald may pull a Perot and hand the election to Hillary.

    Then he’d be throwing away all the acclaim iSteveFan describes in the comment right above yours.

    Another possibility is that he throws the election into the House, a House he may have some influence in making.

  87. @tbraton
    @Anonymous

    I wonder if that pin head David Cameron gave any thought to the damage he was doing to the "special relationship" with the U.S.? After all, Trump has a very good chance of winning the Republican nomination and becoming the next President of the U.S. Trump impresses me as a man who takes attacks personally and holds grudges. If Trump is elected, Cameron can forget about the tradition of being the first foreign leader to visit the White House. I doubt if he will get any invitations to the White House under Trump. I also doubt that Trump will pay any visits to Britain as long as Cameron is P.M. What a stupid man!

    Replies: @IBC

    When President Obama chose to give Gordon Brown a DVD of E.T. (in the wrong regional format, no less) it was a pretty clear sign that the “special relationship” had become mostly an historical reference. No doubt Cameron’s familiar with that little exchange and gets the picture. I like Britain, but it’s just not as important as it used to be.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1159627/To-special-friend-Gordon-25-DVDs-Obama-gives-Brown-set-classic-movies-Lets-hope-likes-Wizard-Oz.html

    In contrast, look at how quickly President Obama tried to patch things up when PM Modi was elected. This was a man, who just before, had been legally barred from even setting foot in this country due to allegations of him inciting deadly mob violence against some of his own Muslim countrymen –not just talking about delaying some foreign people’s travel plans as Trump has done.

    http://www.thenation.com/article/narenda-modis-transformation-international-outcast-indias-prime-minister/

  88. @Barnard

    Perhaps. But touring pros are not all that Democratic. Tom Watson was the only tour pro to vote Democratic in 1972 and he soon became a fervent Republican. Scott Simpson was the only pro to publicly express Democratic leanings in, I think, 2000.
     
    I remember hearing David Duval say he was a Democrat in the late 90s. PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem sure sounds like a Democrat in this interview. I think he would probably like to make things difficult for Trump. My impression is a lot of the players are more of the Bush/Rubio breed of Republican. I don't think they would cross their sponsors or the PGA Tour to defend him.

    http://www.top-law-schools.com/tim-finchem-interview.html

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Yeah, I get the sense that PGA corporate types are among those most likely to say “Washington is worth an apology for white privilege” and go over to the SJW Dem team.

    These guys aren’t getting these university presidencies because they’re world-class educators, after all:

  89. @iSteveFan
    @penntothal


    My guess is he may have been half-hearted “vanity” candidate when this all began, but there is no turning back now, not with all that he has lost.
     
    I don't think Trump has lost a lot. In fact Trump has gained more than most people ever dream. Sure he has been blacklisted and lost some of his business deals. But he is still a multi-billionaire who is in the top 0.00001 percent of the wealthiest people in the world.

    On the other hand Trump has something that most if not all people, especially rich ones, want. He has the genuine support and admiration of a tremendous amount of his nation's population. That is something you cannot buy. That is something you cannot put a price tag on. Rich guys throughout history have donated to universities, built libraries, endowed foundations, all in the hope of making the ordinary people like them. And in most cases the ordinary people who use the facilities created by their donations could care less.

    But in Trump's case he has genuinely struck a cord with the common people of this nation. And that has to hurt others in the elite. Though we think the elite look down upon us, and they probably do, most American elites detest the class system and like to think that despite their wealth, they are just like regular people. So when they see a guy like Trump make such a connection and draw huge crowds of ordinary, hardworking people, it must make them jealous with envy.

    For all the shenanigans Trump has pulled in his life, he has the chance now to become a genuinely beloved figure to a large segment of his nation if he plays out this campaign correctly and doesn't melt down. Trump has the opportunity to transform himself from a flamboyant rich guy into a person who could go down in the history books as having transformed the American political system. How many billionaires would gladly give up a few billion to accomplish that?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Harry Baldwin

    Trump has the opportunity to transform himself from a flamboyant rich guy into a person who could go down in the history books as having transformed the American political system. How many billionaires would gladly give up a few billion to accomplish that?

    Billionaires like Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, George Soros, and Sheldon Adelson are certainly willing to spend a few billion to make America a worse country. Among billionaires, Trump is unique. He wants to make it better!

  90. Donald’s gone after Mexicans, Chinese, Muslims…but there’s one group that controls much more media and business in this country than any of those. And of course I’m talking about the homosexuals and their lobby, who have worked over the past few years to attempt to harm the lives and careers of anyone who stands in the way of their agenda. They’re a bigger threat to our country than any foreign power, and Trump as far as I know has been silent about them.

  91. I can understand that someone can own a night club, but a golf club? Owning a golf course, of course, but a club is owned by its members.

    A club is a group of members, so Diners Club is not a club, it’s en enterprise

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Grand Vizier

    Right, it's a strategic problem for Trump's ambition to host the USGA in that the USGA doesn't like to play the US Open at private courses that aren't owned by their membership. The famous example is Riviera in Los Angeles, which was the last LA club to host the US Open way back in 1948. The USGA would love to go back to the LA market for his top event, but Riviera, while a private club with lots of celebrity members, is a profit making enterprise owned by, I think still, a Japanese corporation. (See some "Curb Your Enthusiasm" episodes.) The USGA does not like that model, which is the model of some of Trump's clubs.

  92. @Grand Vizier
    I can understand that someone can own a night club, but a golf club? Owning a golf course, of course, but a club is owned by its members.

    A club is a group of members, so Diners Club is not a club, it's en enterprise

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Right, it’s a strategic problem for Trump’s ambition to host the USGA in that the USGA doesn’t like to play the US Open at private courses that aren’t owned by their membership. The famous example is Riviera in Los Angeles, which was the last LA club to host the US Open way back in 1948. The USGA would love to go back to the LA market for his top event, but Riviera, while a private club with lots of celebrity members, is a profit making enterprise owned by, I think still, a Japanese corporation. (See some “Curb Your Enthusiasm” episodes.) The USGA does not like that model, which is the model of some of Trump’s clubs.

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