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Donald, Donald Jr., George Steinbrenner, Billy Martin

As a Los Angeleno, I’ve long felt that Donald Trump is the second New Yorkeriest New Yorker ever, behind only George Steinbrenner, who owned the New York Yankees baseball team from 1974 to his death in 2010.

The Yankees, America’s most famous sports franchise, like Manchester United if they were in London, had fallen on hard times in the mid-1960s. At the bottom of NYC’s fortunes, Steinbrenner bought the Yankees and invested heavily in these new-fangled free agents like Reggie Jackson.

But unlike most team owners of the times, he battled constantly with his players and managers, especially Billy Martin whom he fired five times. Virtually every week seemed like a crisis if you were reading the sports pages. From 1975-1989, Steinbrenner changed managers 18 times, winning two World Series. Eventually, Steinbrenner slowed down and let Joe Torre win four World Series for him.

From Business Insider:

If you want to understand Trump, look at his early relationship with the man he has called his best friend

by Allan Smith

Apr. 2, 2017, 8:28 AM 43,726

On February 8, 1984, a few of the most prominent businessmen in New York — members of the New York State Urban Development Corporation — were holding a news conference.

Among them was a press darling — a man whose brash reputation and penchant for public tirades had made him one of the city’s most recognizable figures.

His rise to prominence a decade earlier sprung from his purchase of a major New York institution. He was tall, an imposing figure with his hair just long enough to be swept flat behind his ears. He often bellowed, “You’re fired!,” a connotation embraced by households across the country.

Standing nearby at that news conference was Donald Trump.

The man he was watching was George Steinbrenner, the owner of the New York Yankees. Known simply as “The Boss,” Steinbrenner is the man Trump has called his best friend.

Trump doesn’t toss around such a label frequently, at least in the press. But in Steinbrenner, the famed, bombastic owner, Trump saw a role model. …

Ray Negron, a Yankees employee for more than 40 years who serves as a columnist for Newsmax, told Business Insider that Steinbrenner was a “very strong mentor” to Trump. …

“And he looked at Steinbrenner as a big brother, as a hero, and you know he don’t look at anybody that way,” Negron continued. “They were both the same.”

… “Throughout the years he always called Mr. Steinbrenner … in any type of scenario. He would always checked in on him, and ‘The Boss’ always gave him what he thought was the right advice.”…

He made note that Trump borrowed his trademark phrase for his NBC show, “The Apprentice,” from Steinbrenner, who first popularized “you’re fired” in his years-long, love-hate relationship with manager Billy Martin, whom Steinbrenner hired and fired a total of five times.

Trump “borrowed that from the great George Steinbrenner, and people forget that,” Negron said. “I even used to ask ‘The Boss’ if he got upset with that and he said, ‘Imitation is the greatest form of flattery.'”

A controversial figure in his own right, Steinbrenner found himself in trouble at various points of his career. There were the illegal campaign contributions to President Richard Nixon. Years later, he paid to have dirt dug up on a star Yankees player, Dave Winfield. At both points, he served suspensions from Major League Baseball. In the first, he pleaded guilty to criminal charges for which he was later pardoned by President Ronald Reagan.

And Steinbrenner, as evidenced by his tumultuous relationship with Martin, was known to be an extremely tough person to work for.

Especially if you are George Costanza.

Anyway, my point is that the Trump White House is very much like Steinbrenner’s Yankees: every day seems like a crisis. To a Los Angeles Dodgers fan like myself who was used to the Dodgers having two managers (Walter Alston and Tom Lasorda) over 45 years and an announcer, Vin Scully, for 67 years, the Yankee revolving door soap opera always seemed like it couldn’t possibly go on a day longer.

But … the Steinbrenner Saga did just keep going on and on for many years.

In the very long run, Steinbrenner was quite successful. Today, baseball is wildly popular in New York City, which is very good for the game nationally.

 
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  1. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    OT: I thought readers might be interested in a field report from my recent grad school explorations. Keeping this a bit vague for anonymity.

    I got my bachelor’s at a respectable non-Ivy (think Rice) in the late 2000s. Spent a few years in the workforce and will be going back for a master’s this fall. Accepted to several schools in the set of {Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford} and will choose one of them shortly. Lately I’ve been spending some time on campus in the classrooms, talking to current students and faculty, etc. Here are some initial impressions:

    1. Holy crap are there a lot of foreign students. In my undergrad school there was a noticable foreign minority, but it wasn’t large enough to seriously affect the dominant culture of the school, which was formed by preppy upper-middle-class white kids. These campuses feel like U.N. meetings. Factor in all of the American minorities and the historic American population is way underrepresented. It changes the vibe a lot.

    These schools have a certain political reputation, obviously, and I expected to find a lot of “globalist” sentiments, but I wouldn’t underestimate the extent to which anti-Americanism is driven by the fact that such a large percentage of the students and faculty simply aren’t American.

    2. The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable. There are way more than I remember from undergrad, and I think the increase is mostly driven by students who are straight off the plane from China, not Chinese-Americans. I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I’m considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn’t write or speak grammatically correct English. Before class a Chinese student popped in and had a short conversation with the professor in Chinese, while a couple of other Asian students stood there with us. It felt weirdly awkward.

    3. These evil comments aside, I’m pretty psyched about the opportunity. As I talk with students, faculty, and recent grads, I see more and more what doors these institutions open. I’m looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned. My family didn’t attend schools like these, and I used to be pretty clueless about how the American higher-ed status system worked. It was the HBD blogs that turned me on to this stuff, so my dissident reading may turn out to yield big dividends. I’ll have to send Steve a nice donation when I get my first post-graduation check.

    • Replies: @Lugash
    I've experienced the same with on #1 and #2. The impression I got from a lot of undergrad students is that they didn't mind the foreign students unless the were forced to team up with a limited(i.e. nonexistent) proficiency English speaker.

    Steve: Please put down the meth pipe. This is like a dozen stories in the past 8 hours. I kid, I kid.
    , @Old fogey
    Interesting. To give you a bit of a historical perspective, when I was a graduate student at Columbia in the early 1960s I can recall only one foreign student in any of my classes (I studied history). He was Swiss.

    I did meet a group of Afghans who were studying education. They had been brought over by the U.S. government under an arrangement with Columbia designed to strengthen the Afghan educational system. Their English was very poor and I don't think they got much out of their classes, though they did enjoy being students at Columbia and living in NYC.
    , @Anon
    Good Stuff. I enjoy hearing the experience of fellow covert noticers/deplorables.
    , @Anonymous
    You should probably read the 100 reasons not to go to grad school.

    http://100rsns.blogspot.com
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable.
     
    The Duke of Edinburgh has words of caution.
    , @bomag

    The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable.
     
    When Ron Unz gets his way, there will be even more.

    I’m looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned.
     
    Here's hoping that you don't "gain the world and lose your soul." Let us know how many kids you have, and if your added wealth depends in any part on importing cheaper labor/outsourcing.
    , @anonymous
    Had the opportunity to return to my old college last year....hadn't set foot on the campus in over thirty years. Totally blown away! At least every other student that I saw was either Middle/Near Eastern, South Asian or East Asian.

    Oh my, but the times they are a-changin'.
    , @bomag

    I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I’m considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn’t write or speak grammatically correct English.
     
    I doubt universities in China reciprocate here by filling a slot with a foreigner stumbling over the Mandarin language.

    In my experience, such hires received extra points for being a foreigner, thus punching the diversity and "minority" buttons.

    Thus the construction of the academic pipeline continues. There are energetic protests against the Keystone oil pipeline; we should have some protests over this academic pipeline.
  2. Too bad the Dodgers didn’t have Martin or someone like him managing the team instead of Walt Alston, the most boring manager of his day

    • Replies: @David In TN
    Walter Alston must have been what Walter O'Malley wanted. I recall a Sport Illustrated piece on Alston in the early 70's. The gist of an anonymous quote was Alston didn't really have to win the pennant every year, just come close.
    , @Njguy73
    I'm as big a Yankee fan as a person can be, but Billy Martin was not someone you wanted as your manager long-term. Like Dick Williams, he was good as getting underperformers to achieve, but he'd wear out his welcome quickly. Alston wasn't Mr. Excitement, but he knew how to put the right players in the right roles and let them play.

    Of course, Alston had Buzzie Bavasi as his GM, while Yankee managers and GMs had to deal with Stienbrenner's meddling.
  3. If Larry David has the stones to go where the logic of comedy takes him, the next season of Curb Your Enthusiasm could be awesome.

  4. Such an authentic New Yorker… actually a carpet-bagger from Cleveland Ohio.
    I believe Seinfeld helped popularize the notion he sounded and acted like a native. George wanted to buy the Indians but old man Stouffer wouldn’t sell. He bought the Yankees instead and the Indians turned into the Yankees triple-A feeder team.

    It sucked to be an Indians fan.

    • Replies: @Broski
    Sounds like he was good at business.
    , @guest
    NYC is carpet bag central.
    , @prosa123
    Steinbrenner spent most of his time in Tampa rather than New York.
    , @marty
    Indians as Yankee feeder? Steinbrenner's key pick-ups were Jackson, Hunter, Rivers, Lyle, and Nettles, only the last coming from Cleveland.
  5. The U.S. doesn’t have a long run like that. Maybe if it was the 70s.

  6. Hail says: • Website

    Note:

    [George Steinbrenner’s] mother was an Irish immigrant who had changed her name from O’Haley to Haley.[4] His father was of German descent[5][6] and had been a world-class track and field hurdler while at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which he graduated in engineering in 1927, first in his class

    This is very nearly exactly the ancestral spread that Donald himself has. (Scottish mother, father of recent German descent).

    • Replies: @academic gossip
    A further similarity is that Donald John Trump's uncle John, was a renowned engineering professor at MIT, of the same age as Steinbrenner's MIT valedictorian dad.

    Trump and Steinbrenner are both the aggressive extroverted athletic "alpha" children of successful nerd families. Both attended military academies, had a lot of kids and handed over the business to their children (mostly the boys), whom they sent to the same colleges that they had attended.
  7. @Anon
    OT: I thought readers might be interested in a field report from my recent grad school explorations. Keeping this a bit vague for anonymity.

    I got my bachelor's at a respectable non-Ivy (think Rice) in the late 2000s. Spent a few years in the workforce and will be going back for a master's this fall. Accepted to several schools in the set of {Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford} and will choose one of them shortly. Lately I've been spending some time on campus in the classrooms, talking to current students and faculty, etc. Here are some initial impressions:

    1. Holy crap are there a lot of foreign students. In my undergrad school there was a noticable foreign minority, but it wasn't large enough to seriously affect the dominant culture of the school, which was formed by preppy upper-middle-class white kids. These campuses feel like U.N. meetings. Factor in all of the American minorities and the historic American population is way underrepresented. It changes the vibe a lot.

    These schools have a certain political reputation, obviously, and I expected to find a lot of "globalist" sentiments, but I wouldn't underestimate the extent to which anti-Americanism is driven by the fact that such a large percentage of the students and faculty simply aren't American.

    2. The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable. There are way more than I remember from undergrad, and I think the increase is mostly driven by students who are straight off the plane from China, not Chinese-Americans. I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I'm considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn't write or speak grammatically correct English. Before class a Chinese student popped in and had a short conversation with the professor in Chinese, while a couple of other Asian students stood there with us. It felt weirdly awkward.

    3. These evil comments aside, I'm pretty psyched about the opportunity. As I talk with students, faculty, and recent grads, I see more and more what doors these institutions open. I'm looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned. My family didn't attend schools like these, and I used to be pretty clueless about how the American higher-ed status system worked. It was the HBD blogs that turned me on to this stuff, so my dissident reading may turn out to yield big dividends. I'll have to send Steve a nice donation when I get my first post-graduation check.

    I’ve experienced the same with on #1 and #2. The impression I got from a lot of undergrad students is that they didn’t mind the foreign students unless the were forced to team up with a limited(i.e. nonexistent) proficiency English speaker.

    Steve: Please put down the meth pipe. This is like a dozen stories in the past 8 hours. I kid, I kid.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    Steve Sailer, you are great to read but I worry that you do not rest enough. Not complaining about output but you are very productive. Not sure how you do it.

    All the best.

    AKAHorace

  8. I recently agreed to proofread the Ph.D thesis of a Malaysian student here in London. Holy shit that thing was pure gibberish.

    • Replies: @Jack ryan
    Don t give this student a failing grade

    Just tell him the next time to tweet

    @blacklivesmater @blacklivesmatter
  9. I hate Vin Scully. I have always hated Vin Scully, his rambling, boring ,pompous diatribe just awful.

    • Replies: @Gapeseed
    Why are you mentioning Vin Scully? The Pine Tar incident? That wasn't Vin Scully; it was Bobby Mercer and some other announcer.

    Also, Vin Scully was great.
  10. @Anon
    OT: I thought readers might be interested in a field report from my recent grad school explorations. Keeping this a bit vague for anonymity.

    I got my bachelor's at a respectable non-Ivy (think Rice) in the late 2000s. Spent a few years in the workforce and will be going back for a master's this fall. Accepted to several schools in the set of {Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford} and will choose one of them shortly. Lately I've been spending some time on campus in the classrooms, talking to current students and faculty, etc. Here are some initial impressions:

    1. Holy crap are there a lot of foreign students. In my undergrad school there was a noticable foreign minority, but it wasn't large enough to seriously affect the dominant culture of the school, which was formed by preppy upper-middle-class white kids. These campuses feel like U.N. meetings. Factor in all of the American minorities and the historic American population is way underrepresented. It changes the vibe a lot.

    These schools have a certain political reputation, obviously, and I expected to find a lot of "globalist" sentiments, but I wouldn't underestimate the extent to which anti-Americanism is driven by the fact that such a large percentage of the students and faculty simply aren't American.

    2. The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable. There are way more than I remember from undergrad, and I think the increase is mostly driven by students who are straight off the plane from China, not Chinese-Americans. I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I'm considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn't write or speak grammatically correct English. Before class a Chinese student popped in and had a short conversation with the professor in Chinese, while a couple of other Asian students stood there with us. It felt weirdly awkward.

    3. These evil comments aside, I'm pretty psyched about the opportunity. As I talk with students, faculty, and recent grads, I see more and more what doors these institutions open. I'm looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned. My family didn't attend schools like these, and I used to be pretty clueless about how the American higher-ed status system worked. It was the HBD blogs that turned me on to this stuff, so my dissident reading may turn out to yield big dividends. I'll have to send Steve a nice donation when I get my first post-graduation check.

    Interesting. To give you a bit of a historical perspective, when I was a graduate student at Columbia in the early 1960s I can recall only one foreign student in any of my classes (I studied history). He was Swiss.

    I did meet a group of Afghans who were studying education. They had been brought over by the U.S. government under an arrangement with Columbia designed to strengthen the Afghan educational system. Their English was very poor and I don’t think they got much out of their classes, though they did enjoy being students at Columbia and living in NYC.

  11. Between them two and Al Czervik, it would be a three-way tie for New Yorkiest New Yorker ever. Ed Koch could play understudy for any of the three.

  12. @Jack O'Fire
    Such an authentic New Yorker... actually a carpet-bagger from Cleveland Ohio.
    I believe Seinfeld helped popularize the notion he sounded and acted like a native. George wanted to buy the Indians but old man Stouffer wouldn't sell. He bought the Yankees instead and the Indians turned into the Yankees triple-A feeder team.

    It sucked to be an Indians fan.

    Sounds like he was good at business.

  13. @Anon
    OT: I thought readers might be interested in a field report from my recent grad school explorations. Keeping this a bit vague for anonymity.

    I got my bachelor's at a respectable non-Ivy (think Rice) in the late 2000s. Spent a few years in the workforce and will be going back for a master's this fall. Accepted to several schools in the set of {Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford} and will choose one of them shortly. Lately I've been spending some time on campus in the classrooms, talking to current students and faculty, etc. Here are some initial impressions:

    1. Holy crap are there a lot of foreign students. In my undergrad school there was a noticable foreign minority, but it wasn't large enough to seriously affect the dominant culture of the school, which was formed by preppy upper-middle-class white kids. These campuses feel like U.N. meetings. Factor in all of the American minorities and the historic American population is way underrepresented. It changes the vibe a lot.

    These schools have a certain political reputation, obviously, and I expected to find a lot of "globalist" sentiments, but I wouldn't underestimate the extent to which anti-Americanism is driven by the fact that such a large percentage of the students and faculty simply aren't American.

    2. The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable. There are way more than I remember from undergrad, and I think the increase is mostly driven by students who are straight off the plane from China, not Chinese-Americans. I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I'm considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn't write or speak grammatically correct English. Before class a Chinese student popped in and had a short conversation with the professor in Chinese, while a couple of other Asian students stood there with us. It felt weirdly awkward.

    3. These evil comments aside, I'm pretty psyched about the opportunity. As I talk with students, faculty, and recent grads, I see more and more what doors these institutions open. I'm looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned. My family didn't attend schools like these, and I used to be pretty clueless about how the American higher-ed status system worked. It was the HBD blogs that turned me on to this stuff, so my dissident reading may turn out to yield big dividends. I'll have to send Steve a nice donation when I get my first post-graduation check.

    Good Stuff. I enjoy hearing the experience of fellow covert noticers/deplorables.

  14. Note the UF hat. Steinbrenner was a University of Florida Bull Gator (large donor) for some reason, dating back to the 70’s. His son Hal got his MBA there in ’94.

    My dad was friends with some Bull Gators, and so I met George Steinbrenner on an elevator ride to the Bull Gator Skybox at a football game. He was quite cordial to me, the dopey college kid of a friend of a friend. I am, according to the Kevin Bacon metric, two degrees removed from our President.

    So I got that goin’ for me.

  15. So what you’re telling us, Steve, is not to be discouraged. Is that it? You’re saying maybe Trump will make us Great Again(TM) like the Yankees.

    We are becoming skeptical: Nothing is really getting done about immigration or trade. Steve Bannon has been demoted. The president is sounding like his daughter is telling him who to bomb, and his closest advisor appears to be her baby-faced husband who wasn’t sharp enough to get into Harvard without Daddy’s contribution.

    Sure, this Syria thing makes him look tough. That’s easy to do with cruise missiles, but it is not America First.

    Some of us don’t know what to think right now. I’m taking John Derbyshire’s stance, written large on this site right now.

    https://www.unz.com/jderbyshire/collapse-of-trumpism-on-war-and-immigration/

    • Agree: Jack ryan
    • Replies: @Jean Ralphio
    Derb sucks. The only thing of note he ever wrote was the thing that got him fired from NR. And how "Alt Right" can a guy be if he worked for NR up to 2012?
  16. @Lugash
    I've experienced the same with on #1 and #2. The impression I got from a lot of undergrad students is that they didn't mind the foreign students unless the were forced to team up with a limited(i.e. nonexistent) proficiency English speaker.

    Steve: Please put down the meth pipe. This is like a dozen stories in the past 8 hours. I kid, I kid.

    Steve Sailer, you are great to read but I worry that you do not rest enough. Not complaining about output but you are very productive. Not sure how you do it.

    All the best.

    AKAHorace

  17. @Buzz Mohawk
    So what you're telling us, Steve, is not to be discouraged. Is that it? You're saying maybe Trump will make us Great Again(TM) like the Yankees.

    We are becoming skeptical: Nothing is really getting done about immigration or trade. Steve Bannon has been demoted. The president is sounding like his daughter is telling him who to bomb, and his closest advisor appears to be her baby-faced husband who wasn't sharp enough to get into Harvard without Daddy's contribution.

    Sure, this Syria thing makes him look tough. That's easy to do with cruise missiles, but it is not America First.

    Some of us don't know what to think right now. I'm taking John Derbyshire's stance, written large on this site right now.

    https://www.unz.com/jderbyshire/collapse-of-trumpism-on-war-and-immigration/

    Derb sucks. The only thing of note he ever wrote was the thing that got him fired from NR. And how “Alt Right” can a guy be if he worked for NR up to 2012?

    • Troll: Coemgen
  18. @Jack O'Fire
    Such an authentic New Yorker... actually a carpet-bagger from Cleveland Ohio.
    I believe Seinfeld helped popularize the notion he sounded and acted like a native. George wanted to buy the Indians but old man Stouffer wouldn't sell. He bought the Yankees instead and the Indians turned into the Yankees triple-A feeder team.

    It sucked to be an Indians fan.

    NYC is carpet bag central.

    • Replies: @Flip
    The Rockefellers were from Cleveland too and decamped for New York after getting rich.
  19. @Anon
    OT: I thought readers might be interested in a field report from my recent grad school explorations. Keeping this a bit vague for anonymity.

    I got my bachelor's at a respectable non-Ivy (think Rice) in the late 2000s. Spent a few years in the workforce and will be going back for a master's this fall. Accepted to several schools in the set of {Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford} and will choose one of them shortly. Lately I've been spending some time on campus in the classrooms, talking to current students and faculty, etc. Here are some initial impressions:

    1. Holy crap are there a lot of foreign students. In my undergrad school there was a noticable foreign minority, but it wasn't large enough to seriously affect the dominant culture of the school, which was formed by preppy upper-middle-class white kids. These campuses feel like U.N. meetings. Factor in all of the American minorities and the historic American population is way underrepresented. It changes the vibe a lot.

    These schools have a certain political reputation, obviously, and I expected to find a lot of "globalist" sentiments, but I wouldn't underestimate the extent to which anti-Americanism is driven by the fact that such a large percentage of the students and faculty simply aren't American.

    2. The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable. There are way more than I remember from undergrad, and I think the increase is mostly driven by students who are straight off the plane from China, not Chinese-Americans. I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I'm considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn't write or speak grammatically correct English. Before class a Chinese student popped in and had a short conversation with the professor in Chinese, while a couple of other Asian students stood there with us. It felt weirdly awkward.

    3. These evil comments aside, I'm pretty psyched about the opportunity. As I talk with students, faculty, and recent grads, I see more and more what doors these institutions open. I'm looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned. My family didn't attend schools like these, and I used to be pretty clueless about how the American higher-ed status system worked. It was the HBD blogs that turned me on to this stuff, so my dissident reading may turn out to yield big dividends. I'll have to send Steve a nice donation when I get my first post-graduation check.

    You should probably read the 100 reasons not to go to grad school.

    http://100rsns.blogspot.com

    • Replies: @carol
    I read 100 Reasons to Not Go to Law School, laughed...and went anyway.

    It seems like once you get on that train - take the tests and fill out the apps and get the rec letters - you can't get off.
  20. @Anon
    OT: I thought readers might be interested in a field report from my recent grad school explorations. Keeping this a bit vague for anonymity.

    I got my bachelor's at a respectable non-Ivy (think Rice) in the late 2000s. Spent a few years in the workforce and will be going back for a master's this fall. Accepted to several schools in the set of {Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford} and will choose one of them shortly. Lately I've been spending some time on campus in the classrooms, talking to current students and faculty, etc. Here are some initial impressions:

    1. Holy crap are there a lot of foreign students. In my undergrad school there was a noticable foreign minority, but it wasn't large enough to seriously affect the dominant culture of the school, which was formed by preppy upper-middle-class white kids. These campuses feel like U.N. meetings. Factor in all of the American minorities and the historic American population is way underrepresented. It changes the vibe a lot.

    These schools have a certain political reputation, obviously, and I expected to find a lot of "globalist" sentiments, but I wouldn't underestimate the extent to which anti-Americanism is driven by the fact that such a large percentage of the students and faculty simply aren't American.

    2. The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable. There are way more than I remember from undergrad, and I think the increase is mostly driven by students who are straight off the plane from China, not Chinese-Americans. I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I'm considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn't write or speak grammatically correct English. Before class a Chinese student popped in and had a short conversation with the professor in Chinese, while a couple of other Asian students stood there with us. It felt weirdly awkward.

    3. These evil comments aside, I'm pretty psyched about the opportunity. As I talk with students, faculty, and recent grads, I see more and more what doors these institutions open. I'm looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned. My family didn't attend schools like these, and I used to be pretty clueless about how the American higher-ed status system worked. It was the HBD blogs that turned me on to this stuff, so my dissident reading may turn out to yield big dividends. I'll have to send Steve a nice donation when I get my first post-graduation check.

    The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable.

    The Duke of Edinburgh has words of caution.

  21. The Yankees, America’s most famous sports franchise

    As a Dallas Cowboys fan, this triggers me.

    • Replies: @whorefinder

    As a Dallas Cowboys fan, this triggers me.
     
    As a consolation prize, the Dallas Cowboys cheerleaders are the gold standard for cheerleaders, and are internationally famous---so much so that when the Cowboys played in Mexico, the cheerleaders' bus was almost ripped open by eager "fans".

    So you got that going for ya, which is nice.

    *hears USC fans grumbling, looks away*
    *hears Lakers fans grumbling, laughs*
  22. The problem with the article is Trump is regularly killing people, including children at Yakla. Not to mention losing expensive equipment like a V-22 and cruise missiles. And finally there really is no plan just violence for the sake of violence.

  23. Who is President Trump’s Billy Martin? It is too soon to say, but Bannon is probably the leading candidate, if that’s how the 45th presidency proceeds.

  24. @Jack O'Fire
    Such an authentic New Yorker... actually a carpet-bagger from Cleveland Ohio.
    I believe Seinfeld helped popularize the notion he sounded and acted like a native. George wanted to buy the Indians but old man Stouffer wouldn't sell. He bought the Yankees instead and the Indians turned into the Yankees triple-A feeder team.

    It sucked to be an Indians fan.

    Steinbrenner spent most of his time in Tampa rather than New York.

    • Replies: @CJ

    Steinbrenner spent most of his time in Tampa rather than New York.

     

    My estimation of him has just gone up.
  25. One of my most prized possessions is a baseball autographed by Billy Martin. That said,the man was out of control and not because he was in the employ of George Steinbrenner. He worked for Sandy Alderson too and it was the same. When he complained about his office the A’s gave him a new one which he promptly trashed during one of his tantrums. The baseball I got autographed was signed as Martin sat in the convertible Cadillac he had been presented with on ‘Billy Martin Day’ the year before at the Oakland Coliseum. The interior resembled a pigsty! Then there was Billy’s kicking dirt on homeplate to make the umpire clean it up . When MLB prohibited that he actually began scooping it up and throwing it on umpires. While it may have been amusing to fans, Martin’s career in Oakland was a disaster for the team.

    It was only when the A’s got rid of Martin and made Sandy Alderson the GM that they began to rebuild the team they had been under Charlie Finley.

    • Replies: @marty
    On that Billy Martin Day you mention (1980 I think), two friends convinced me to join them at a bar in Emeryville called The Townhouse, to see a country band called Hearts on Fire. Around
    5 p.m. we were pouring our first pitcher when in walked Mantle, Maris and Bauer.
  26. More support for the idea that this Syria strike was primarily a gesture and not the prelude to Nation Building, Bush-style: this interview with Dr. Sebastian Gorka, who’s supposedly one of Trump’s major advisers on Middle East/terrorism issues:

    http://www.breitbart.com/radio/2017/04/07/gorka-syria-not-full-throated-war-deployment-just-surgical-missile-strike/

    Important Quotes:

    “Nothing has changed in the president’s policy to the use of force in international affairs. He said during the campaign, and he’s been explicit since he came into office, that he is not interested – this is not the second Bush administration. We are not interested in invading countries and occupying them. He understands why that is not a good idea and why fundamentally it’s un-American. We were born in rejection of imperialism, not to reinforce it.”

    “This is not Gulf I, nor is this 2003. This is a cruise missile strike against an air facility involved in a chemical attack on civilians. People need to understand that. This is not a full-throated war deployment. It is a surgical strike using missiles. I’d like people to think about that for a second. I understand the isolationist imperative, but weapons of mass destruction are in a very special category.”

    “I know the president, and I know what he thinks” about the slippery slope into larger actions of the Iraq War variety.

    “All I’m saying is I know the president, and I know his attitude to what happened in the last sixteen years. You can take that to the bank, my friend.”

    I really don’t know where Gorka comes down on the political trustworthiness scale, but I do know he’s been repeatedly smeared as a Nazi by the media, so he must have some value in the Trump administration. His critical attitude towards the Bush years, and his claim that Trump feels the same way, is quite heartening. Obviously, I disagree that even the use of the dreaded WMDs justifies foreign involvement, but his emphasizing the chemical attack stuff strengthens, to me, my theory that Trump did this to put on a show of zero tolerance for disapproved weapons for the benefit of other states, and to stop anyone from saying “See, you said you would leave Assad alone,and he celebrated by breaking out the gas bombs immediately.”

    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
    Not believing a word of it, till I hear it from bigmouth hisself.

    He didn't used to be so shy.
  27. @Anon
    OT: I thought readers might be interested in a field report from my recent grad school explorations. Keeping this a bit vague for anonymity.

    I got my bachelor's at a respectable non-Ivy (think Rice) in the late 2000s. Spent a few years in the workforce and will be going back for a master's this fall. Accepted to several schools in the set of {Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford} and will choose one of them shortly. Lately I've been spending some time on campus in the classrooms, talking to current students and faculty, etc. Here are some initial impressions:

    1. Holy crap are there a lot of foreign students. In my undergrad school there was a noticable foreign minority, but it wasn't large enough to seriously affect the dominant culture of the school, which was formed by preppy upper-middle-class white kids. These campuses feel like U.N. meetings. Factor in all of the American minorities and the historic American population is way underrepresented. It changes the vibe a lot.

    These schools have a certain political reputation, obviously, and I expected to find a lot of "globalist" sentiments, but I wouldn't underestimate the extent to which anti-Americanism is driven by the fact that such a large percentage of the students and faculty simply aren't American.

    2. The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable. There are way more than I remember from undergrad, and I think the increase is mostly driven by students who are straight off the plane from China, not Chinese-Americans. I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I'm considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn't write or speak grammatically correct English. Before class a Chinese student popped in and had a short conversation with the professor in Chinese, while a couple of other Asian students stood there with us. It felt weirdly awkward.

    3. These evil comments aside, I'm pretty psyched about the opportunity. As I talk with students, faculty, and recent grads, I see more and more what doors these institutions open. I'm looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned. My family didn't attend schools like these, and I used to be pretty clueless about how the American higher-ed status system worked. It was the HBD blogs that turned me on to this stuff, so my dissident reading may turn out to yield big dividends. I'll have to send Steve a nice donation when I get my first post-graduation check.

    The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable.

    When Ron Unz gets his way, there will be even more.

    I’m looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned.

    Here’s hoping that you don’t “gain the world and lose your soul.” Let us know how many kids you have, and if your added wealth depends in any part on importing cheaper labor/outsourcing.

  28. Steve’s commentary about George Steinbrenner are where his normally rock solid intuitions break down woefully.

    George Steinbrenner was neither Jewish nor a New Yorker. He lived in Cleveland then Tampa, he did not live in New York. He attended Williams College. He drank a lot. His family made its money in shipbuilding – a more goyische industry I cannot imagine.

    I’m afraid that next we will hear that Marge Schott was Jewish.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    Where does the post say Steinbrenner was Jewish? It doesn't. And George Steinbrenner neither drank nor smoked.
  29. @Anon
    OT: I thought readers might be interested in a field report from my recent grad school explorations. Keeping this a bit vague for anonymity.

    I got my bachelor's at a respectable non-Ivy (think Rice) in the late 2000s. Spent a few years in the workforce and will be going back for a master's this fall. Accepted to several schools in the set of {Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford} and will choose one of them shortly. Lately I've been spending some time on campus in the classrooms, talking to current students and faculty, etc. Here are some initial impressions:

    1. Holy crap are there a lot of foreign students. In my undergrad school there was a noticable foreign minority, but it wasn't large enough to seriously affect the dominant culture of the school, which was formed by preppy upper-middle-class white kids. These campuses feel like U.N. meetings. Factor in all of the American minorities and the historic American population is way underrepresented. It changes the vibe a lot.

    These schools have a certain political reputation, obviously, and I expected to find a lot of "globalist" sentiments, but I wouldn't underestimate the extent to which anti-Americanism is driven by the fact that such a large percentage of the students and faculty simply aren't American.

    2. The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable. There are way more than I remember from undergrad, and I think the increase is mostly driven by students who are straight off the plane from China, not Chinese-Americans. I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I'm considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn't write or speak grammatically correct English. Before class a Chinese student popped in and had a short conversation with the professor in Chinese, while a couple of other Asian students stood there with us. It felt weirdly awkward.

    3. These evil comments aside, I'm pretty psyched about the opportunity. As I talk with students, faculty, and recent grads, I see more and more what doors these institutions open. I'm looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned. My family didn't attend schools like these, and I used to be pretty clueless about how the American higher-ed status system worked. It was the HBD blogs that turned me on to this stuff, so my dissident reading may turn out to yield big dividends. I'll have to send Steve a nice donation when I get my first post-graduation check.

    Had the opportunity to return to my old college last year….hadn’t set foot on the campus in over thirty years. Totally blown away! At least every other student that I saw was either Middle/Near Eastern, South Asian or East Asian.

    Oh my, but the times they are a-changin’.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    You have more courage than I do. I don't think I could bear to return to my alma mater today. I last saw Iowa City in 1989. I just want to remember it the way it was in the 1970s.
  30. @Anon
    OT: I thought readers might be interested in a field report from my recent grad school explorations. Keeping this a bit vague for anonymity.

    I got my bachelor's at a respectable non-Ivy (think Rice) in the late 2000s. Spent a few years in the workforce and will be going back for a master's this fall. Accepted to several schools in the set of {Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford} and will choose one of them shortly. Lately I've been spending some time on campus in the classrooms, talking to current students and faculty, etc. Here are some initial impressions:

    1. Holy crap are there a lot of foreign students. In my undergrad school there was a noticable foreign minority, but it wasn't large enough to seriously affect the dominant culture of the school, which was formed by preppy upper-middle-class white kids. These campuses feel like U.N. meetings. Factor in all of the American minorities and the historic American population is way underrepresented. It changes the vibe a lot.

    These schools have a certain political reputation, obviously, and I expected to find a lot of "globalist" sentiments, but I wouldn't underestimate the extent to which anti-Americanism is driven by the fact that such a large percentage of the students and faculty simply aren't American.

    2. The number of Asian, and specifically Chinese, students is remarkable. There are way more than I remember from undergrad, and I think the increase is mostly driven by students who are straight off the plane from China, not Chinese-Americans. I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I'm considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn't write or speak grammatically correct English. Before class a Chinese student popped in and had a short conversation with the professor in Chinese, while a couple of other Asian students stood there with us. It felt weirdly awkward.

    3. These evil comments aside, I'm pretty psyched about the opportunity. As I talk with students, faculty, and recent grads, I see more and more what doors these institutions open. I'm looking at a pretty substantial salary increase if things go as planned. My family didn't attend schools like these, and I used to be pretty clueless about how the American higher-ed status system worked. It was the HBD blogs that turned me on to this stuff, so my dissident reading may turn out to yield big dividends. I'll have to send Steve a nice donation when I get my first post-graduation check.

    I exchanged emails and spoke with a Chinese professor who has a leadership position in one of the programs I’m considering, and I was interested to find that this professor, who holds a prestigious title at an iconic American institution, doesn’t write or speak grammatically correct English.

    I doubt universities in China reciprocate here by filling a slot with a foreigner stumbling over the Mandarin language.

    In my experience, such hires received extra points for being a foreigner, thus punching the diversity and “minority” buttons.

    Thus the construction of the academic pipeline continues. There are energetic protests against the Keystone oil pipeline; we should have some protests over this academic pipeline.

  31. Both Steinbrenner and Fred Trump were of German ancestry and eventually got Alzheimers.

  32. Interesting similarities between Trump and Steinbrenner. Both were sons of highly successful busindssmen. Similar heritage. They achieved success in the most jewish city… I always assumed both were Jewish.

    • Replies: @Jack ryan
    The New York Yankees and New York Giants Football team ownership and players were distinctly not Jewish and not politically Lib Left or racial anti White

    The Brooklyn Dodgers were the Jewish ethnic anti Manhattan WASP team.

    When the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles this was considered a big White flight move diss the NY Jews.
  33. @Jack O'Fire
    Such an authentic New Yorker... actually a carpet-bagger from Cleveland Ohio.
    I believe Seinfeld helped popularize the notion he sounded and acted like a native. George wanted to buy the Indians but old man Stouffer wouldn't sell. He bought the Yankees instead and the Indians turned into the Yankees triple-A feeder team.

    It sucked to be an Indians fan.

    Indians as Yankee feeder? Steinbrenner’s key pick-ups were Jackson, Hunter, Rivers, Lyle, and Nettles, only the last coming from Cleveland.

    • Replies: @Njguy73
    Chris Chambliss was also acquired from Cleveland.

    And Lyle and Nettles were acquired in 1972, while CBS still owned the team.

    Thank God for this forum. Anywhere else I'd be told to shut up by now.

  34. @Anonymous
    You should probably read the 100 reasons not to go to grad school.

    http://100rsns.blogspot.com

    I read 100 Reasons to Not Go to Law School, laughed…and went anyway.

    It seems like once you get on that train – take the tests and fill out the apps and get the rec letters – you can’t get off.

  35. @Anonymous
    Too bad the Dodgers didn't have Martin or someone like him managing the team instead of Walt Alston, the most boring manager of his day

    Walter Alston must have been what Walter O’Malley wanted. I recall a Sport Illustrated piece on Alston in the early 70’s. The gist of an anonymous quote was Alston didn’t really have to win the pennant every year, just come close.

  36. @prosa123
    Steinbrenner spent most of his time in Tampa rather than New York.

    Steinbrenner spent most of his time in Tampa rather than New York.

    My estimation of him has just gone up.

  37. Trump never got back into sports ownership after the flop of the New Jersey Generals and the USFL, even though it seems like the kind of thing that would be right up his alley. (Ted Turner seems like a potential role model even more than Steinbrenner – he and Trump both love cross-promotion.) I guess he would never want to own a team outside New York, and the local teams mostly have had stable ownership in the last several decades.

    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
    Wrestling.

    All professional 'sport' is just entertainment these days.
    , @Jack ryan
    Wasn t Trump involved in boxing promotion ?
  38. @Horseball
    Steve's commentary about George Steinbrenner are where his normally rock solid intuitions break down woefully.

    George Steinbrenner was neither Jewish nor a New Yorker. He lived in Cleveland then Tampa, he did not live in New York. He attended Williams College. He drank a lot. His family made its money in shipbuilding - a more goyische industry I cannot imagine.

    I'm afraid that next we will hear that Marge Schott was Jewish.

    Where does the post say Steinbrenner was Jewish? It doesn’t. And George Steinbrenner neither drank nor smoked.

    • Replies: @Horseball
    Here is Steve admitting that he thought Steinbrenner was Jewish: http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/10/more-on-forbes-400-by-ethnicity.html?m=1

    Other commentators here seem to have believed the same. To do so is a complete JewDar failure. Have you ever met a Jew who had anything to do with boats?
    , @Horseball
    Here is Steve admitting that he thought Steinbrenner was Jewish: http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/10/more-on-forbes-400-by-ethnicity.html?m=1

    Other commentators here seem to have believed the same. To do so is a complete JewDar failure. Have you ever met a Jew who had anything to do with boats?
  39. Niccolò Machiavelli said it best “Fortune is a woman, and if you want to keep her under, you’ve got to grab her by the ….

  40. @Manfred Arcane
    More support for the idea that this Syria strike was primarily a gesture and not the prelude to Nation Building, Bush-style: this interview with Dr. Sebastian Gorka, who's supposedly one of Trump's major advisers on Middle East/terrorism issues:

    http://www.breitbart.com/radio/2017/04/07/gorka-syria-not-full-throated-war-deployment-just-surgical-missile-strike/

    Important Quotes:

    "Nothing has changed in the president’s policy to the use of force in international affairs. He said during the campaign, and he’s been explicit since he came into office, that he is not interested – this is not the second Bush administration. We are not interested in invading countries and occupying them. He understands why that is not a good idea and why fundamentally it’s un-American. We were born in rejection of imperialism, not to reinforce it.”

    “This is not Gulf I, nor is this 2003. This is a cruise missile strike against an air facility involved in a chemical attack on civilians. People need to understand that. This is not a full-throated war deployment. It is a surgical strike using missiles. I’d like people to think about that for a second. I understand the isolationist imperative, but weapons of mass destruction are in a very special category.”

    “I know the president, and I know what he thinks” about the slippery slope into larger actions of the Iraq War variety.

    “All I’m saying is I know the president, and I know his attitude to what happened in the last sixteen years. You can take that to the bank, my friend.”

    I really don't know where Gorka comes down on the political trustworthiness scale, but I do know he's been repeatedly smeared as a Nazi by the media, so he must have some value in the Trump administration. His critical attitude towards the Bush years, and his claim that Trump feels the same way, is quite heartening. Obviously, I disagree that even the use of the dreaded WMDs justifies foreign involvement, but his emphasizing the chemical attack stuff strengthens, to me, my theory that Trump did this to put on a show of zero tolerance for disapproved weapons for the benefit of other states, and to stop anyone from saying "See, you said you would leave Assad alone,and he celebrated by breaking out the gas bombs immediately."

    Not believing a word of it, till I hear it from bigmouth hisself.

    He didn’t used to be so shy.

  41. @James Kabala
    Trump never got back into sports ownership after the flop of the New Jersey Generals and the USFL, even though it seems like the kind of thing that would be right up his alley. (Ted Turner seems like a potential role model even more than Steinbrenner - he and Trump both love cross-promotion.) I guess he would never want to own a team outside New York, and the local teams mostly have had stable ownership in the last several decades.

    Wrestling.

    All professional ‘sport’ is just entertainment these days.

    • Replies: @James Kabala
    Fair point, but I meant as an owner with power over people. He never actually owned any of WWE, did he?
    , @Brutusale
    When Ted Turner bought the WCW from Jim Crockett, he called WWF owner Vince McMahon to tell him he had real competition now that Turner was in the wrestling business. McMahon told Turner that he was talking to the wrong guy, as McMahon was in the entertainment business.

    We all know which of them read the tea leaves correctly.
  42. @jim jones
    I recently agreed to proofread the Ph.D thesis of a Malaysian student here in London. Holy shit that thing was pure gibberish.

    Don t give this student a failing grade

    Just tell him the next time to tweet

    @blacklivesmater @blacklivesmatter

  43. @James Kabala
    Trump never got back into sports ownership after the flop of the New Jersey Generals and the USFL, even though it seems like the kind of thing that would be right up his alley. (Ted Turner seems like a potential role model even more than Steinbrenner - he and Trump both love cross-promotion.) I guess he would never want to own a team outside New York, and the local teams mostly have had stable ownership in the last several decades.

    Wasn t Trump involved in boxing promotion ?

  44. @David Allan coe
    Interesting similarities between Trump and Steinbrenner. Both were sons of highly successful busindssmen. Similar heritage. They achieved success in the most jewish city... I always assumed both were Jewish.

    The New York Yankees and New York Giants Football team ownership and players were distinctly not Jewish and not politically Lib Left or racial anti White

    The Brooklyn Dodgers were the Jewish ethnic anti Manhattan WASP team.

    When the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles this was considered a big White flight move diss the NY Jews.

  45. @slumber_j
    Where does the post say Steinbrenner was Jewish? It doesn't. And George Steinbrenner neither drank nor smoked.

    Here is Steve admitting that he thought Steinbrenner was Jewish: http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/10/more-on-forbes-400-by-ethnicity.html?m=1

    Other commentators here seem to have believed the same. To do so is a complete JewDar failure. Have you ever met a Jew who had anything to do with boats?

    • Replies: @CJ

    Have you ever met a Jew who had anything to do with boats?
     
    Mark Cuban's, Larry Ellison's New Yachts On New Ranking Of 100 Biggest Yachts
  46. @slumber_j
    Where does the post say Steinbrenner was Jewish? It doesn't. And George Steinbrenner neither drank nor smoked.

    Here is Steve admitting that he thought Steinbrenner was Jewish: http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/10/more-on-forbes-400-by-ethnicity.html?m=1

    Other commentators here seem to have believed the same. To do so is a complete JewDar failure. Have you ever met a Jew who had anything to do with boats?

  47. @unit472
    One of my most prized possessions is a baseball autographed by Billy Martin. That said,the man was out of control and not because he was in the employ of George Steinbrenner. He worked for Sandy Alderson too and it was the same. When he complained about his office the A's gave him a new one which he promptly trashed during one of his tantrums. The baseball I got autographed was signed as Martin sat in the convertible Cadillac he had been presented with on 'Billy Martin Day' the year before at the Oakland Coliseum. The interior resembled a pigsty! Then there was Billy's kicking dirt on homeplate to make the umpire clean it up . When MLB prohibited that he actually began scooping it up and throwing it on umpires. While it may have been amusing to fans, Martin's career in Oakland was a disaster for the team.

    It was only when the A's got rid of Martin and made Sandy Alderson the GM that they began to rebuild the team they had been under Charlie Finley.

    On that Billy Martin Day you mention (1980 I think), two friends convinced me to join them at a bar in Emeryville called The Townhouse, to see a country band called Hearts on Fire. Around
    5 p.m. we were pouring our first pitcher when in walked Mantle, Maris and Bauer.

  48. @Stebbing Heuer
    Wrestling.

    All professional 'sport' is just entertainment these days.

    Fair point, but I meant as an owner with power over people. He never actually owned any of WWE, did he?

  49. @Anonymous
    Too bad the Dodgers didn't have Martin or someone like him managing the team instead of Walt Alston, the most boring manager of his day

    I’m as big a Yankee fan as a person can be, but Billy Martin was not someone you wanted as your manager long-term. Like Dick Williams, he was good as getting underperformers to achieve, but he’d wear out his welcome quickly. Alston wasn’t Mr. Excitement, but he knew how to put the right players in the right roles and let them play.

    Of course, Alston had Buzzie Bavasi as his GM, while Yankee managers and GMs had to deal with Stienbrenner’s meddling.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Right. Steinbrenner actually used Billy Martin in an effective manner: bring him in for awhile to stir things up, but then fire him before he ruins things for the long run.
  50. @marty
    Indians as Yankee feeder? Steinbrenner's key pick-ups were Jackson, Hunter, Rivers, Lyle, and Nettles, only the last coming from Cleveland.

    Chris Chambliss was also acquired from Cleveland.

    And Lyle and Nettles were acquired in 1972, while CBS still owned the team.

    Thank God for this forum. Anywhere else I’d be told to shut up by now.

  51. @Njguy73
    I'm as big a Yankee fan as a person can be, but Billy Martin was not someone you wanted as your manager long-term. Like Dick Williams, he was good as getting underperformers to achieve, but he'd wear out his welcome quickly. Alston wasn't Mr. Excitement, but he knew how to put the right players in the right roles and let them play.

    Of course, Alston had Buzzie Bavasi as his GM, while Yankee managers and GMs had to deal with Stienbrenner's meddling.

    Right. Steinbrenner actually used Billy Martin in an effective manner: bring him in for awhile to stir things up, but then fire him before he ruins things for the long run.

    • Replies: @Njguy73
    Just like the Twins in '69, Tigers in '71, Rangers in '73, and A's in '80. Three division titles, but none of those stints lasted more than three full seasons.
  52. @Horseball
    Here is Steve admitting that he thought Steinbrenner was Jewish: http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/10/more-on-forbes-400-by-ethnicity.html?m=1

    Other commentators here seem to have believed the same. To do so is a complete JewDar failure. Have you ever met a Jew who had anything to do with boats?

    Have you ever met a Jew who had anything to do with boats?

    Mark Cuban’s, Larry Ellison’s New Yachts On New Ranking Of 100 Biggest Yachts

  53. @Steve Sailer
    Right. Steinbrenner actually used Billy Martin in an effective manner: bring him in for awhile to stir things up, but then fire him before he ruins things for the long run.

    Just like the Twins in ’69, Tigers in ’71, Rangers in ’73, and A’s in ’80. Three division titles, but none of those stints lasted more than three full seasons.

  54. @guest
    NYC is carpet bag central.

    The Rockefellers were from Cleveland too and decamped for New York after getting rich.

  55. @Angular momentum
    I hate Vin Scully. I have always hated Vin Scully, his rambling, boring ,pompous diatribe just awful.

    Why are you mentioning Vin Scully? The Pine Tar incident? That wasn’t Vin Scully; it was Bobby Mercer and some other announcer.

    Also, Vin Scully was great.

  56. I remember Billy Martin one time in a brouhaha as Yankee manager described Reggie Jackson as a pathological liar and Steinbrenner as a convicted one.

    • Replies: @Galactic Overlord
    Martin's exact quote was "They deserve each other. One's a born liar, and the other's convicted."

    He wasn't necessarily saying that Steinbrenner was a liar, though he may well have. Steinbrenner had been convicted for making illegal contributions to Nixon's 1972 campaign, and was suspended from baseball for 15 months because of it.
  57. @anonymous
    Had the opportunity to return to my old college last year....hadn't set foot on the campus in over thirty years. Totally blown away! At least every other student that I saw was either Middle/Near Eastern, South Asian or East Asian.

    Oh my, but the times they are a-changin'.

    You have more courage than I do. I don’t think I could bear to return to my alma mater today. I last saw Iowa City in 1989. I just want to remember it the way it was in the 1970s.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    Given concerns about Iowa City, would you ever say I Oughta Went-ta Ames? Both campuses likely suffer from similar afflictions.
  58. @exiled off mainstreet
    I remember Billy Martin one time in a brouhaha as Yankee manager described Reggie Jackson as a pathological liar and Steinbrenner as a convicted one.

    Martin’s exact quote was “They deserve each other. One’s a born liar, and the other’s convicted.”

    He wasn’t necessarily saying that Steinbrenner was a liar, though he may well have. Steinbrenner had been convicted for making illegal contributions to Nixon’s 1972 campaign, and was suspended from baseball for 15 months because of it.

  59. @Hail
    Note:

    [George Steinbrenner's] mother was an Irish immigrant who had changed her name from O'Haley to Haley.[4] His father was of German descent[5][6] and had been a world-class track and field hurdler while at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which he graduated in engineering in 1927, first in his class
     
    This is very nearly exactly the ancestral spread that Donald himself has. (Scottish mother, father of recent German descent).

    A further similarity is that Donald John Trump’s uncle John, was a renowned engineering professor at MIT, of the same age as Steinbrenner’s MIT valedictorian dad.

    Trump and Steinbrenner are both the aggressive extroverted athletic “alpha” children of successful nerd families. Both attended military academies, had a lot of kids and handed over the business to their children (mostly the boys), whom they sent to the same colleges that they had attended.

    • Agree: Hail
  60. @RomanCandle

    The Yankees, America’s most famous sports franchise
     
    As a Dallas Cowboys fan, this triggers me.

    As a Dallas Cowboys fan, this triggers me.

    As a consolation prize, the Dallas Cowboys cheerleaders are the gold standard for cheerleaders, and are internationally famous—so much so that when the Cowboys played in Mexico, the cheerleaders’ bus was almost ripped open by eager “fans”.

    So you got that going for ya, which is nice.

    *hears USC fans grumbling, looks away*
    *hears Lakers fans grumbling, laughs*

  61. Martin’s paranoia was key to his success in baseball—and also his failings. He was perpetually fixated on the smallest edges, but managed to put enough together to be a great manager. But when his paranoia wasn’t on-target, he ended up driving the people around him nuts with frustration.

    Many jokes are made about baseball players being superstitious. I think the sport attracts a lot of guys whose paranoia/neurosis is, on average, higher than most. The nature of the game, with it’s long grind and streaky behavior up and down seems to select for the kind of superstitious-obsessive types whose behavior is all out of whack outside the diamond. Ted Williams “hitting until his blisters bled” is held up as an example of his dedication to the sport, but perhaps it was more of a sign of a dangerously obsessive mind being self-destructive, like a teen girl cutting herself.

    Anyway, said it before, but Steinbrenner and Trump also shared an “image is fundamental” thing that instilled a lot of loyalty and pride. Famously, before Steinbrenner bought the Yankees, the team was re-using batting practice balls to save money. After he took over, that practice stopped, and he instituted rules like “no long hair” and renovated the stadium and shelled out cash to keep Yankee stadium looking as polished as he could.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Steinbrenner and Trump both invested in New York City at its lowest ebb in the 1970s and did well for themselves when it came back in the 1980s.
  62. @whorefinder
    Martin's paranoia was key to his success in baseball---and also his failings. He was perpetually fixated on the smallest edges, but managed to put enough together to be a great manager. But when his paranoia wasn't on-target, he ended up driving the people around him nuts with frustration.

    Many jokes are made about baseball players being superstitious. I think the sport attracts a lot of guys whose paranoia/neurosis is, on average, higher than most. The nature of the game, with it's long grind and streaky behavior up and down seems to select for the kind of superstitious-obsessive types whose behavior is all out of whack outside the diamond. Ted Williams "hitting until his blisters bled" is held up as an example of his dedication to the sport, but perhaps it was more of a sign of a dangerously obsessive mind being self-destructive, like a teen girl cutting herself.

    Anyway, said it before, but Steinbrenner and Trump also shared an "image is fundamental" thing that instilled a lot of loyalty and pride. Famously, before Steinbrenner bought the Yankees, the team was re-using batting practice balls to save money. After he took over, that practice stopped, and he instituted rules like "no long hair" and renovated the stadium and shelled out cash to keep Yankee stadium looking as polished as he could.

    Steinbrenner and Trump both invested in New York City at its lowest ebb in the 1970s and did well for themselves when it came back in the 1980s.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Trump talks a lot in The Art of the Deal about how he thoroughly believes in cycles, in real estate and in other industries. To him, buying property when New York was declaring bankruptcy was the most natural thing in the world. He shares a lot with Warren Buffet in that sense; being greedy when others are penny-pinching, and vice-versa. Hence why (as Steve noticed) he bought golf courses/resorts in the teeth of a golf recession. It's simply the time to get the best deal.

    Of course real estate actually works well for this, since the timelines are longer. By the time Trump has closed on the property the cycle had come on an upswing, making financing the construction easier since the banks had more confidence in real estate. Then by the time the building actually got finished---some 3-4 years down the line, sometimes more---the cycle was swinging even further up, and Trump looked like a golden boy genius, since now he had a brand-spanking new building in a great location and people were eager to buy his condos/rent out retail space in his buildings.

    P.S. he's also quite frank in the book in stating that he believes that the stock market is nothing but legalized gambling.

  63. @Diversity Heretic
    You have more courage than I do. I don't think I could bear to return to my alma mater today. I last saw Iowa City in 1989. I just want to remember it the way it was in the 1970s.

    Given concerns about Iowa City, would you ever say I Oughta Went-ta Ames? Both campuses likely suffer from similar afflictions.

  64. @Steve Sailer
    Steinbrenner and Trump both invested in New York City at its lowest ebb in the 1970s and did well for themselves when it came back in the 1980s.

    Trump talks a lot in The Art of the Deal about how he thoroughly believes in cycles, in real estate and in other industries. To him, buying property when New York was declaring bankruptcy was the most natural thing in the world. He shares a lot with Warren Buffet in that sense; being greedy when others are penny-pinching, and vice-versa. Hence why (as Steve noticed) he bought golf courses/resorts in the teeth of a golf recession. It’s simply the time to get the best deal.

    Of course real estate actually works well for this, since the timelines are longer. By the time Trump has closed on the property the cycle had come on an upswing, making financing the construction easier since the banks had more confidence in real estate. Then by the time the building actually got finished—some 3-4 years down the line, sometimes more—the cycle was swinging even further up, and Trump looked like a golden boy genius, since now he had a brand-spanking new building in a great location and people were eager to buy his condos/rent out retail space in his buildings.

    P.S. he’s also quite frank in the book in stating that he believes that the stock market is nothing but legalized gambling.

  65. Nah, the Trump administration likes crisis because in general government bureaucrats like crisis.

    The State
    “War is the Health of the State”
    by Randolph Bourne (1918)

    https://www.antiwar.com/bourne.php

  66. @Stebbing Heuer
    Wrestling.

    All professional 'sport' is just entertainment these days.

    When Ted Turner bought the WCW from Jim Crockett, he called WWF owner Vince McMahon to tell him he had real competition now that Turner was in the wrestling business. McMahon told Turner that he was talking to the wrong guy, as McMahon was in the entertainment business.

    We all know which of them read the tea leaves correctly.

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