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I’ve been dealing with car problems, but as always, lots of stuff is happening. What do you think?

 
• Category: History 
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  1. Does Trump’s denouncing “anti-Semitism” implicitly feed a false narrative of American anti-Semitism/Holocaust risk?

    If so, would that be a legitimate reason for a president to resist making such denunciations?

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    What is the benefit of arm twisting someone to get them to denounce something? It smacks of bullying. No-one should condone bullying.
    , @International Jew
    By making the statement he did, he accepted the premise that antisemitism is to be found predominantly among his supporters. When in fact the opposite is the case; for every active member of the KKK, we admit ten Syrians, Somalis and others into the country.

    He should have said: "If I can cut off the inflow of Muslims, I'll have done more for the Jewish people than any President since, and probably including, FDR."

    , @Anonymous
    Trumps defending Israel is one thing he should do if they are threatened from outside their borders, however as this is never the real case as has been proven time and again, defending an International Crime committed by Israel against Palestine, it puts Trump in the unsavory category accomplice to Genocide.

    Popular Videos - International Criminal Court & Crime
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1K4Y8iqLzxQ&list=PL3dgxi5dUKZgK5INUQu-CZdNXuh0owELp
  2. I’ve seen a lot of comments on Trumps costs as far as protection and traveling. But I have a hard time taking the press seriously. Would be interested in hearing what others have to say.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I’ve seen a lot of comments on Trumps costs as far as protection and traveling. But I have a hard time taking the press seriously. Would be interested in hearing what others have to say.
     
    Regardless of who is POTUS, the opposition party will always make a big issue out of the huge cost of providing security for the occupant of the White House and his family, however the question of the movements of the President and his family being restricted simply because the budget for security has been spent never seems to come up, so it doesn't seem to be a very serious issue.

    It is an ill wind that blows nobody any good, and I am sure that plenty of Americans and American corporations are benefiting from the money spent on a show of security for the President, stopping the traffic, etc. This is not really to do with the safety of the President, who is just one government official, but about the US making a conspicuous display of might that other countries cannot match. The propaganda value is probably good value for money.

    Trump seems to be spending a lot of time creating havoc in Florida, but I wouldn't be surprised if he claims to be a Florida resident for (no) income tax purposes.
    , @Flip
    I was always astounded to hear how much Obama spent on vacations.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    The conservative press would write about the colossal cost of the Obama's vacations, for example the nearly half-million dollar vacation to Spain Michelle Obama took in 2010, but the subject didn't interest the mainstream press much. Of course, it's different now.

    http://www.judicialwatch.org/press-room/press-releases/michelle-obamas-august-2010-vacation-in-spain-cost-american-taxpayers-467585-according-to-records-obtained-by-judicial-watch/

    I thought it was interesting that the press got so riled up about Chris Christie's minions doing the lane-closing dirty trick. One of the accusations was that someone in an ambulance could have lost his life while waiting in traffic. What about the incredible inconvenience to travelers in the New York area when Obama dropped by for some fund raising? Couldn't someone in an ambulance just as easily have lost his life while waiting in traffic as Obama raised campaign contributions?
  3. All I have to do is get up in the morning, hear the phrase “President Trump” on the news, and I just feel so very, very happy.

    It’s about what I expected to happen if he won, when the campaign was going on: a little blundering around, but sure of eventual success if he sticks to what he said he would do if elected.

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Dr. X

    All I have to do is get up in the morning, hear the phrase “President Trump” on the news, and I just feel so very, very happy.
     
    Precisely. For all the hoopla being ginned up by the press, fact is that Trump hasn't actually done all that much yet. The Muslim refugee ban got immediately shot down (hopefully only temporarily), Obamacare hasn't been repealed yet, he's still working off last year's budget, and the administration isn't even fully staffed yet.

    Yet I'm happy and grateful even if Trump does nothing -- because finally, after eight long years, there's a break in the action from being constantly, daily assaulted by the leftist agenda coming out of the White House. Finally, at long last, we don't have to listen to Obama hector, berate, bitch, whine, lecture, and scold us on race, gays, transgenders, Muslims, and what-have-you, and tell us that he's going to put us on the "right side of history."

    The fact that we got that sanctimonious mulatto prig to finally STFU is reward enough for me right now.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson

    All I have to do is get up in the morning, hear the phrase “President Trump” on the news, and I just feel so very, very happy.
     
    Me too!
    , @Detective Club
    If Hillary had moved into the White House on January 20, 2017, she would have put out all the furniture on the lawn for the Saudis to buy in a gigantic yard sale.

    By the end of this month, she would have sold Alaska back to the Russians and Louisiana back to the French and laundered the proceeds through THE CLINTON FOUNDATION.
  4. I think Stephen Miller is next, after Flynn and MILO. They’ll tie him to Spencer, how he “lied” about once knowing him, and Opinionator will break this website. Remember they were sitting on the MILO stuff for months.

  5. Flynn then dreamers. What caused the bronze haired one’s collapse?

  6. Heck with Trump, I think you need to weigh in on pineapple-pizza-gate: http://icelandmag.visir.is/article/pineapple-pizza-gate-president-backtracks-i-cant-dictate-pizza-toppings-then-encourages

    Are you going to take a victory lap about “the deep state” becoming a mainstream topic of discussion long after you started using in reference to US affairs?

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Steve may deserve credit for a lot of things but I'm a little doubtful that he has played a significant role in popularizing the "deep state" meme.
  7. What kind of car problems are you having? Not related to the past weeks heavy rains, is it?

    • Replies: @Dr. X

    What kind of car problems are you having?
     
    Yeah, Steve, tell us. We here on the 'Net can help you figure out how to fix anything.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    You bet!! He's getting "go go gadget" shocks for the Noticemobile.

    http://www.allenbattino.com/www.allenbattino.com/Portfolio/Pages/Inspector_Gadget_files/Media/Gadget_car_legs1/thumb.jpg
  8. 1. Trump needs to do better than to base his speeches on his previous night’s TV viewing (Fox News, Sweden). It’s not necessarily that he’s wrong, but the President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense. He should use them.

    2. Margaret Thatcher had an ally in William Whitelaw, who was a traditional (patrician and paternalistic) Conservative from the left of the party, yet who believed in what Thatcher was trying to achieve. She would run her policies past Whitelaw, and he would tell her when her instincts were taking her beyond what the public would accept. When Whitelaw retired for health reasons, Thatcher’s administration quickly spun out of control, implementing a regressive tax (the “Community Charge”, popularly called the Poll Tax) that eventually led to her downfall.

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.

    3. Winston Churchill had stand-up rows with his Chief of Staff, Field Marshall Sir Alan Brooke. No doubt the rows irritated Churchill, but he considered them a small price to pay in return for receiving military advice of the highest quality. Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.

    4. Government by Twitter is not an entirely bad idea, but the tweets need to be more carefully considered. Donald Trump can and should use Twitter to promote his program, but he should remember that he is no longer fighting such easy targets as Hillary or Jeb. Most tweets should be planned and discussed with his press office a week or more in advance.

    • Replies: @Karl
    8 James N Kennett > President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense


    I imagine that such is true. However, DJT decided to comment on news that was disseminated in a public forum, the better to teach lessons to the people for whose safety, he is responsible.

    I can explain to you why you need to change your car's oil filter.... do you want me to give the calculus-based explanation, or do you want me to just show you the dirt and goop that has accumulated in the filter paper?

    hey iSteve, does RonUnz give a full payment for an "xxxyyyzzz Open Thread" article? You could probably churn out 800 of those a week. Much less wear & tear on your typewriter than those "normal" threads, where you have to actually fully set up a discussion topic....

    , @Kyle McKenna

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw
     
    Patrick J. Buchanan.


    Agreed about the casual tweeting etc. DT's never been a professional politician and sometimes doesn't have the sense to shut up, or at least not to hand ammo to his enemies.

    Meanwhile, gotta love that he throws right in the MSM's face that they have an even lower public-approval rating than Congress. That's gotta smart, or at least it would if they were capable of reflection.

    Everyone in the country needs to get over the idea that Trump needs (or should even seek) the approval of the endlessly-corrupt MSM. That's one Trump tweet I agree with.

    , @Desiderius

    the President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense
     
    cite needed.
    , @Dave Pinsen

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.
     
    Interesting idea, but Trump's ideas aren't that wild, and the resistance he's getting isn't from the public so much (his base still loves him and Dems still don't) but from the permanent government and the courts. And he seems to be getting decent advice on that recently.

    I liked the idea of rewriting the executive order on immigration, rather than risking a SCOTUS loss on it due to Kennedy. The rewrite will probably exclude current green card holders.

    Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.
     
    I don't think men like James Mattis or Rex Tillerson would be afraid to stand up to Trump. This is really an impressive cabinet, for the most part.
    , @TangoMan
    It's endearing that people still engage in the game of "Trump should . . . " I myself came to terms with Trump and who he is early in his campaign. What you see is what you get. Trump is not going to be who you would like him to be.
  9. TRUMP=body bags from Syria…a bakers dozen every week….Art of the Deal bullshit with Christian Russia over Crimea…

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Up your medications, and let loose of that live 110 that you have grasped and is shocking you into incoherence.
  10. I’m disappointed that “Dreamers” will be allowed to continue defying the law.

    He should have pulled the plug, made them leave, and apply for readmission from outside the U.S.

    He gave up a valuable bargaining chip and got nothing in return.

    • Agree: Autochthon, Travis
    • Replies: @James Braxton
    The DACA work permits expire on their own. Most of them in 2017. This is a smart play by Trump.
    , @MarkinLA
    Trump is really stupid if he doesn't see what letting the Dreamers stay really is - a back door amnesty for the Dreamers AND their parents since the violins will come out if they ever try and deport the parents.

    Maybe somebody in the Trump camp will read this and wake him up.
  11. Trump a man of action.

    The Bezos group blog:

    Riots erupt in Sweden’s capital just days after Trump comments

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/02/21/riots-erupt-in-swedens-capital-just-days-after-trump-comments/?utm_term=.47dcfffd9256

    • Replies: @Yak-15
    Clearly Trump caused those riots. Didn't you read the wapo? You are also a bigot. HATE SPEWER!
  12. @Opinionator
    Does Trump's denouncing "anti-Semitism" implicitly feed a false narrative of American anti-Semitism/Holocaust risk?

    If so, would that be a legitimate reason for a president to resist making such denunciations?

    What is the benefit of arm twisting someone to get them to denounce something? It smacks of bullying. No-one should condone bullying.

  13. @Polynices
    Heck with Trump, I think you need to weigh in on pineapple-pizza-gate: http://icelandmag.visir.is/article/pineapple-pizza-gate-president-backtracks-i-cant-dictate-pizza-toppings-then-encourages

    Are you going to take a victory lap about "the deep state" becoming a mainstream topic of discussion long after you started using in reference to US affairs?

    Steve may deserve credit for a lot of things but I’m a little doubtful that he has played a significant role in popularizing the “deep state” meme.

    • Replies: @Glossy
    *I* saw it first on this blog. Years ago Steve used it to describe Turkish politics, I think, and then applied it to US politics.
    , @bored identity
    Check your deep - (re)search privilege!

    You welcome.
    , @Clyde

    Steve may deserve credit for a lot of things but I’m a little doubtful that he has played a significant role in popularizing the “deep state” meme.
     
    First time I ever heard of or read about the Deep State was right here, and had to do with the deep state in Turkey and how prevalent conspiracy theories are over there.
  14. In a way I think this is a referendum on the media.

    They’ve pulled out all the stops, just as they did in the election. But I have to wonder just how much influence they still have honestly.

    In the end I guess what matters is what Congress actually does when it comes to voting. But if you think about it, the weird echo chamber in Washington is one of the few places that cares what the media parrots nonstop or takes it seriously.

    Otherwise it is just more fuel on the anger fire, changing no one’s mind, only exacerbating whatever position was held before the full court press started.

    Personally I think Trump needs to metaphorically get on the podium, extend both arms, and flip a double bird to… they need a name. Obstructionists? Wreckers?

    You know, all the talk on this site about altruism, western/northern (whichever it is) Europeans being more cooperative and being able to work in groups…

    Why can’t we get a protest of our own going. Like half a million or something walking by the CIA headquarters chanting “Hell No, Trump Won’t Go!”

    • Replies: @Autochthon

    Personally I think Trump needs to metaphorically get on the podium, extend both arms, and flip a double bird to… they need a name. Obstructionists? Wreckers?
     
    He just did that in Melbourne last weekend.
  15. Category: Sh*t, my Taki column is not ready to go!

    The gates of SCH are wide open…

    Cars, trains, airplanes with a drizzle of Trump, and topped with a cherry of personal daily transportation problems are thrown to iSteve’s starving commentariat….?!

    C’mon Sailer, I know it’s another deadline- midnight oil-Taki-moment of tribulation for you on its way….but you pulled it before and you will pull it again!

    You know why?

    Because, most of your- even half ass posted- widsdom has more substance than an entire MSM conglomerate’s annual production..

    Your ” Dam-Dam; Welcome to the Third World ” coverage of California’s latest embarrassment was probably the most extensive combination of essayist+ investigative+informative coverage that was plated to the American audience.

    Boy, I got too mushy…

    P.S. Disregard my previous bored advice about accepting that commencement speech offer;
    Shuster & Shyster dropped Milo’s book deal….

    You’ ll have to fix your car with your fair and square earned, limited financial resources…

    So, traditionally pocket-shy bored identity will contribute to the case.

    Wroom-wroom to the nearest budget opera house is all we need!

    Chear up Steve!

  16. @Opinionator
    Steve may deserve credit for a lot of things but I'm a little doubtful that he has played a significant role in popularizing the "deep state" meme.

    *I* saw it first on this blog. Years ago Steve used it to describe Turkish politics, I think, and then applied it to US politics.

    • Agree: Anonym
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I got the term from a book called "Midnight in Sicily" by Peter Robb that I read about a decade ago. It was about the Mafia and Operation Gladio leave-behinds and the like.

    Here's a pretty good movie review of "Il Divo" that I did in 2014 that draws a lot from Robb's book:

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/06/il-divo.html

    Then I went to Turkey in 2009 and started paying more attention to Turkey.

  17. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    First month of POTUS Trump in the books and there is a lot to appreciate and a whole bunch of snafus just like the campaign.

    –There’s a good article from a week ago that claims Trump wanted Flynn out and he only installed him in the first place out of loyalty (Flynn was an early Trump supporter). Mattis is quoted calling Flynn “crazy.” But Allahpundit likes McMaster so that’s a bad sign.

    –Great poll from The Hill today says 80% are against sanctuary cities!

    –Interesting that Melania whipped out the Lord’s Prayer in the hangar. I wonder if she is privy to all of the threats against her husband. It’s so obvious that the deep state wants him dead.

  18. @Opinionator
    Steve may deserve credit for a lot of things but I'm a little doubtful that he has played a significant role in popularizing the "deep state" meme.

    Check your deep – (re)search privilege!

    You welcome.

  19. @Opinionator
    Does Trump's denouncing "anti-Semitism" implicitly feed a false narrative of American anti-Semitism/Holocaust risk?

    If so, would that be a legitimate reason for a president to resist making such denunciations?

    By making the statement he did, he accepted the premise that antisemitism is to be found predominantly among his supporters. When in fact the opposite is the case; for every active member of the KKK, we admit ten Syrians, Somalis and others into the country.

    He should have said: “If I can cut off the inflow of Muslims, I’ll have done more for the Jewish people than any President since, and probably including, FDR.”

    • Agree: AndrewR, Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @utu
    I am pretty sure it is a false flag.

    He should have said that DOJ and FBI are launching large scale investigation and those responsible for making bomb threats and desecrating cemeteries will be caught. But he did not say it because the false flaggers may not be caught.

    This is another example that scenarios are written by others and Trump is forced to read the text from the scenario that boxes him in where they want him to be.
  20. Lost all respect for Trump over the civil forfeiture thing

  21. After the first month it’s clear that Pence is a huge mistake. Anything happens to Trump and Pence is going to reverse everything Trump ever did. I thought Pence was a rebel in congress but I should’ve known better.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Pence just seems like an empty vessel for neocons/establishment/media.
    , @AndrewR
    Agree 100%. The question is whom should Trump have picked realistically?
    , @Detective Club
    Pence was gung-ho Big Time for the 2013 US Senate Amnesty bill. You can't change a leopard's spots without a major operation and there's no reason to hope that said leopard would survive such an operation at the end of the day.

    Pence was Trump's signal that he was willing to play ball with the RINO establishment. JFK picked LBJ for his running mate in order to carry certain Southern states in November of 1960. Come November 22, 1963, this clever plan of Kennedy's literally blew up in his face.
    , @Dissident
    It took you until now to realize that about Pence? A lot of us said that picking Pence was DJT's first betrayal.

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/by-picking-pence-trump-rewarded-conservatism-inc-s-failure-now-he-must-double-down-on-america-first
    , @BB753
    Pence is a Lyndon B. Johnson backstabbing weasel traitor waiting for his turn. If I were Trump I'd send him on a worldwide diplomatic tour never to set foot in America for a couple of years. Pence also needs to spend a couple of months in Iraq and Afghanistan, just for fun. As vice-consul, Roman-style.
  22. @Sandy Berger's Socks
    I'm disappointed that "Dreamers" will be allowed to continue defying the law.

    He should have pulled the plug, made them leave, and apply for readmission from outside the U.S.

    He gave up a valuable bargaining chip and got nothing in return.

    The DACA work permits expire on their own. Most of them in 2017. This is a smart play by Trump.

    • Replies: @res
    A more detailed article at https://www.cato.org/blog/how-daca-will-end-timeline-expiration indicates that most DACA work permits will expire in 2018. Do you have information to support your 2017 assertion?
    , @Travis
    good to know. If they do expire this year he gains little by ending the program. but still much left to get done. Needs to start building the Wall , reject the Paris Agreement, and revoke some Obama executive orders (since it seems like an easy task, just needs to sign a document) Obama revoked 75 Bush executive orders in his first year...so far Trump has not done much to revoke the Obama executive orders.
  23. Steve,

    Have you seen the study by Hamermesh, et al dealing with how much time ethnic groups in the U.S. spend not working while at work? It was referenced in the Economist a couple of weeks ago.

    It determined by a significant margin that Hispanics are the laziest group (Hispanic women especially). Seemed very iSteve-y.

  24. @newrouter
    Trump a man of action.

    The Bezos group blog:

    Riots erupt in Sweden’s capital just days after Trump comments

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/02/21/riots-erupt-in-swedens-capital-just-days-after-trump-comments/?utm_term=.47dcfffd9256

    Clearly Trump caused those riots. Didn’t you read the wapo? You are also a bigot. HATE SPEWER!

  25. Today in Coalition of the Fringes:

    Nice Wholesome Stanford Coed All-American Bullied into Depression By WNBA Lesbians

    Wiggins, a four-time All-American at Stanford, asserts she was targeted for harassment from the time she was drafted by Minnesota because she is heterosexual and a nationally popular figure, of whom many other players were jealous.

    “Me being heterosexual and straight, and being vocal in my identity as a straight woman was huge,” Wiggins said. “I would say 98 percent of the women in the WNBA are gay women. It was a conformist type of place. There was a whole different set of rules they (the other players) could apply.

    “There was a lot of jealousy and competition, and we’re all fighting for crumbs,” Wiggins said. “The way I looked, the way I played – those things contributed to the tension.

    “People were deliberately trying to hurt me all of the time. I had never been called the B-word so many times in my life than I was in my rookie season. I’d never been thrown to the ground so much. The message was: ‘We want you to know we don’t like you.’ “

    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    What is great (in this crazy-assed Pokémon world we live in) is she is black and beautiful.
    , @BB753
    Inquiring minds want to know who the other WNBA heterosexual player is? She must feel very lonely in the locker room.
  26. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I think Trump is being crafty on immigration. Hardliners are disappointed so far but they don’t get the 3d chess match Trump needs to play to make the whole project happen.

    There are profound changes happening check out this article where DHS is now taking all funds from illegal immigrant assistance programs and shifting them to illegal immigramt crime victim programs:

    http://www.cnsnews.com/blog/craig-bannister/dhs-shifts-funds-defending-illegals-new-office-help-their-victims

    This is real change.

  27. @Opinionator
    Steve may deserve credit for a lot of things but I'm a little doubtful that he has played a significant role in popularizing the "deep state" meme.

    Steve may deserve credit for a lot of things but I’m a little doubtful that he has played a significant role in popularizing the “deep state” meme.

    First time I ever heard of or read about the Deep State was right here, and had to do with the deep state in Turkey and how prevalent conspiracy theories are over there.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I certainly did not make up the term "deep state," but I've been using it pretty regularly since 2009.
  28. The future of America!

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/apr/25/argentina.rorycarroll

    via @tcjfs on Twitter, a highly recommended follow.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    The present of California.

    FIFY
  29. This morning a Mexican man deported from the US jumped off a bridge crossing in Tijuana. He survived the drop, but he later passed away in a local hospital.

    It’s gonna get ugly.

    Despite the talk in some liberal circles about the “improving Mexican economy” and “net-zero” migration from Mexico, Mexicans are completely terrified of going back to their home country.

    http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/articulo/estados/2017/02/21/migrante-deportado-de-eu-se-suicida-en-tijuana

    • Replies: @Wade
    Maybe he committed suicide because he was forced to leave a loved one behind and felt despondent?
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Pepe said, "Despite the talk in some liberal circles about the “improving Mexican economy” and “net-zero” migration from Mexico, Mexicans are completely terrified of going back to their home country."

    Ask me if I care.
  30. @Half Canadian
    I've seen a lot of comments on Trumps costs as far as protection and traveling. But I have a hard time taking the press seriously. Would be interested in hearing what others have to say.

    I’ve seen a lot of comments on Trumps costs as far as protection and traveling. But I have a hard time taking the press seriously. Would be interested in hearing what others have to say.

    Regardless of who is POTUS, the opposition party will always make a big issue out of the huge cost of providing security for the occupant of the White House and his family, however the question of the movements of the President and his family being restricted simply because the budget for security has been spent never seems to come up, so it doesn’t seem to be a very serious issue.

    It is an ill wind that blows nobody any good, and I am sure that plenty of Americans and American corporations are benefiting from the money spent on a show of security for the President, stopping the traffic, etc. This is not really to do with the safety of the President, who is just one government official, but about the US making a conspicuous display of might that other countries cannot match. The propaganda value is probably good value for money.

    Trump seems to be spending a lot of time creating havoc in Florida, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he claims to be a Florida resident for (no) income tax purposes.

  31. At first, I thought Gen. McMaster was a good pick to replace Flynn (mostly because McMaster is not John Bolton). But then, I saw Bill “I rather have the Deep State” Kristol praising McMaster, and I saw John “Why aren’t we starring another war, yet” McCain also praising McMaster. Then I saw Susan “Let’s destroy Libya” Rice adivising McMaster about how he needs to get rid of Banon and Miller. And then, most depressing of all, I saw that McMaster believes all neoconservative propaganda about Russia and the Ukraine.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    McMaster will do Trump's bidding. What more can you ask?
    , @Anonymous
    And a lot of hardcore anti-neocons have praised the appointment of McMaster (Justin Raimondo, Col. W. Patrick Lang, et al.). I know it's early in Trump's Presidency, but I think you should have seen some evidence that Trump has an extremely rare ability to size things up-- and quickly-- and make the right move. Like Bobby Fischer. And the Deep State, MSM, Congress, elites, et al., are like the teams of Soviet chess grandmasters plotting moves to thwart him. He just sizes up the situation and makes the absolute winning combination of moves. 1/10^20.
  32. Here it is in a nutshell: it is Trump contra mundum.

    Outside of President Trump’s inner circle, everyone is out flogging every horse, dead or alive, to get him, because President Trump aims to break a great many of the rice bowls of The State That Serves The State Itself (it serves itself because it’s joined at the hip with Transnational Globali$t$ who work from upstream in the Big $ellout of the American people) But Never Serves The People.

    Downstream from the State That Serves The State Itself are all the client “victim” groups and the Praetorian Guard mercenaries (teachers, social workers, academics, VOLAGs, &c.) whose rice bowls are filled by the State for their “service” to the “victim” groups but never to the core American people. Worse, “victim” groups include, of course, the hordes of Perpetual Mass Third World Imminvaders whose influx keeps the State That Serves The State Itself’s vested interests and its Praetorian Guard’s and clients’ interests’ chokehold on the levers of Globali$t $ellout power by supplying the powerful $ellouts with an endless and ever-swelling stream of clients for the Praetorian Guard mercenaries to “service.”

  33. I think a lot of the supposed costs of security for Trump are semifictional. For example, it supposedly costs almost $1 million for Trump and family to fly on Air Force One to Florida for the weekend, but surely the people who operate the plane are government employees and are not all on overtime and would otherwise be spending the weekend at home with their feet up, and the cost of the fuel would be the same for any aircraft. In any case if the Air Force One staff do have to work extra at the weekends for Trump, then give them days off in the week as compensation.

    Being in the hotel business, I am sure Trump could negotiate good discounts for rooms for his security detail, or make them economize by using hotel beds in shifts and taking packed lunches with them.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    The bird's crew are members of the Air Force. They work whatever hours they are told, in shifts, for a flat rate, like all members of the military. Thus, the costs of personnel for the bird itself are negligible. Likewise for Marine One.
  34. @Anonymous
    What kind of car problems are you having? Not related to the past weeks heavy rains, is it?

    What kind of car problems are you having?

    Yeah, Steve, tell us. We here on the ‘Net can help you figure out how to fix anything.

  35. @Half Canadian
    I've seen a lot of comments on Trumps costs as far as protection and traveling. But I have a hard time taking the press seriously. Would be interested in hearing what others have to say.

    I was always astounded to hear how much Obama spent on vacations.

  36. @Yankee
    All I have to do is get up in the morning, hear the phrase "President Trump" on the news, and I just feel so very, very happy.

    It's about what I expected to happen if he won, when the campaign was going on: a little blundering around, but sure of eventual success if he sticks to what he said he would do if elected.

    All I have to do is get up in the morning, hear the phrase “President Trump” on the news, and I just feel so very, very happy.

    Precisely. For all the hoopla being ginned up by the press, fact is that Trump hasn’t actually done all that much yet. The Muslim refugee ban got immediately shot down (hopefully only temporarily), Obamacare hasn’t been repealed yet, he’s still working off last year’s budget, and the administration isn’t even fully staffed yet.

    Yet I’m happy and grateful even if Trump does nothing — because finally, after eight long years, there’s a break in the action from being constantly, daily assaulted by the leftist agenda coming out of the White House. Finally, at long last, we don’t have to listen to Obama hector, berate, bitch, whine, lecture, and scold us on race, gays, transgenders, Muslims, and what-have-you, and tell us that he’s going to put us on the “right side of history.”

    The fact that we got that sanctimonious mulatto prig to finally STFU is reward enough for me right now.

    • Agree: sayless
  37. I think we are in big trouble. There are no national republican politicians other than Trump speaking for the alt right. No one pressing for an immigration halt. No one wants to cut welfare. No nationalism for the native born. All the energy is on the anti trump side. Even the people in the White House seem like hired guns instead of believers in a nationalism cause.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    I share your concern. Any ideas on what should be done?
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Get a grip! Trump is the president. And against all odds. But if it makes you feel better let Opinionator clutch your pearls and you can grab his.
    , @Jack Highlands
    It doesn't matter. The Sleeping Giant awoke. Right now we are quiet and the globalist-backed Left is making all the noise because Trump is doing everything we could reasonably expect him to. But if they start shutting him down, there will be no going back to sleep. It is especially important that Trump build rapport with people on the ground in the dozens of branches of government that feature armed men. I fully expect him to do that extremely well.
    , @Lagertha
    There are so many good Republicans, youngish ones, now that Trump has steam-rolled emerica. I love the idea of Nikki and Zinke! Cotton and Ayotte, Ernst and Sasse; Crapo & Flake...o.k. I 'm losing it right now, laughing :0) If there is a duo for the 49th presidency, ....well, we gotta work on the names! Take a deep breath everyone.
  38. @Sandy Berger's Socks
    I'm disappointed that "Dreamers" will be allowed to continue defying the law.

    He should have pulled the plug, made them leave, and apply for readmission from outside the U.S.

    He gave up a valuable bargaining chip and got nothing in return.

    Trump is really stupid if he doesn’t see what letting the Dreamers stay really is – a back door amnesty for the Dreamers AND their parents since the violins will come out if they ever try and deport the parents.

    Maybe somebody in the Trump camp will read this and wake him up.

  39. It’s too soon to give up. It never fails to amaze me, how people time after time throw their hands in the air and grouse “Well that’s it, it’s over!” Now, of course there’s some concern trolling going on, but a lot of the people on our side of things seem prone to Debbie Downerism. Every time an attack is launched, people scream and shout and charge off madly in all directions: then the attack peters out, then providence delivers some unexpected little gift (Sweden, anyone?) Whether we call them the deep state, the Acela axis or TPTB, the American elite are openly attempting to destroy Donald Trump.

    And they’re barely touching him.

    This wasn’t a whim, this wasn’t a lark, Donald Trump is not an idiot, and so far he is flummoxing the powers that be at nearly every turn.

    Don’t be so quick to despair.

  40. @James N. Kennett
    1. Trump needs to do better than to base his speeches on his previous night's TV viewing (Fox News, Sweden). It's not necessarily that he's wrong, but the President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense. He should use them.

    2. Margaret Thatcher had an ally in William Whitelaw, who was a traditional (patrician and paternalistic) Conservative from the left of the party, yet who believed in what Thatcher was trying to achieve. She would run her policies past Whitelaw, and he would tell her when her instincts were taking her beyond what the public would accept. When Whitelaw retired for health reasons, Thatcher's administration quickly spun out of control, implementing a regressive tax (the "Community Charge", popularly called the Poll Tax) that eventually led to her downfall.

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.

    3. Winston Churchill had stand-up rows with his Chief of Staff, Field Marshall Sir Alan Brooke. No doubt the rows irritated Churchill, but he considered them a small price to pay in return for receiving military advice of the highest quality. Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.

    4. Government by Twitter is not an entirely bad idea, but the tweets need to be more carefully considered. Donald Trump can and should use Twitter to promote his program, but he should remember that he is no longer fighting such easy targets as Hillary or Jeb. Most tweets should be planned and discussed with his press office a week or more in advance.

    8 James N Kennett > President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense

    I imagine that such is true. However, DJT decided to comment on news that was disseminated in a public forum, the better to teach lessons to the people for whose safety, he is responsible.

    I can explain to you why you need to change your car’s oil filter…. do you want me to give the calculus-based explanation, or do you want me to just show you the dirt and goop that has accumulated in the filter paper?

    hey iSteve, does RonUnz give a full payment for an “xxxyyyzzz Open Thread” article? You could probably churn out 800 of those a week. Much less wear & tear on your typewriter than those “normal” threads, where you have to actually fully set up a discussion topic….

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Typewriter? Typewriter?

    Take your pill...or...something.
  41. @Yankee
    All I have to do is get up in the morning, hear the phrase "President Trump" on the news, and I just feel so very, very happy.

    It's about what I expected to happen if he won, when the campaign was going on: a little blundering around, but sure of eventual success if he sticks to what he said he would do if elected.

    All I have to do is get up in the morning, hear the phrase “President Trump” on the news, and I just feel so very, very happy.

    Me too!

  42. I voted in CA during the recent national election. I left the ‘chad’ for POTUS blank for some reasons peculiar to CA.

    I do want to thank those of you who did vote for Trump though. You’re great!

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    When you are in a dead state like California (like me) the only way to help is by donating money - no matter how small. The next battle will be to get rid of open borders Flake in Arizona. Hopefully, Kelli Ward will primary him out. The Republican establishment and stupid Arizona voters were too much for her when she ran against McCain. Hopefully, even those morons in Arizona can see their stupidity given McCain's antics against Trump once he was reelected.
  43. Next iSteve phrase to go mainstream, ‘having nice things’.

  44. @James N. Kennett
    1. Trump needs to do better than to base his speeches on his previous night's TV viewing (Fox News, Sweden). It's not necessarily that he's wrong, but the President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense. He should use them.

    2. Margaret Thatcher had an ally in William Whitelaw, who was a traditional (patrician and paternalistic) Conservative from the left of the party, yet who believed in what Thatcher was trying to achieve. She would run her policies past Whitelaw, and he would tell her when her instincts were taking her beyond what the public would accept. When Whitelaw retired for health reasons, Thatcher's administration quickly spun out of control, implementing a regressive tax (the "Community Charge", popularly called the Poll Tax) that eventually led to her downfall.

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.

    3. Winston Churchill had stand-up rows with his Chief of Staff, Field Marshall Sir Alan Brooke. No doubt the rows irritated Churchill, but he considered them a small price to pay in return for receiving military advice of the highest quality. Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.

    4. Government by Twitter is not an entirely bad idea, but the tweets need to be more carefully considered. Donald Trump can and should use Twitter to promote his program, but he should remember that he is no longer fighting such easy targets as Hillary or Jeb. Most tweets should be planned and discussed with his press office a week or more in advance.

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw

    Patrick J. Buchanan.

    Agreed about the casual tweeting etc. DT’s never been a professional politician and sometimes doesn’t have the sense to shut up, or at least not to hand ammo to his enemies.

    Meanwhile, gotta love that he throws right in the MSM’s face that they have an even lower public-approval rating than Congress. That’s gotta smart, or at least it would if they were capable of reflection.

    Everyone in the country needs to get over the idea that Trump needs (or should even seek) the approval of the endlessly-corrupt MSM. That’s one Trump tweet I agree with.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Well his own approval ratings aren't great. They might not be at levels high enough to win a reelection. So what's the plan?
  45. @International Jew
    By making the statement he did, he accepted the premise that antisemitism is to be found predominantly among his supporters. When in fact the opposite is the case; for every active member of the KKK, we admit ten Syrians, Somalis and others into the country.

    He should have said: "If I can cut off the inflow of Muslims, I'll have done more for the Jewish people than any President since, and probably including, FDR."

    I am pretty sure it is a false flag.

    He should have said that DOJ and FBI are launching large scale investigation and those responsible for making bomb threats and desecrating cemeteries will be caught. But he did not say it because the false flaggers may not be caught.

    This is another example that scenarios are written by others and Trump is forced to read the text from the scenario that boxes him in where they want him to be.

    • Replies: @utu
    It seems that this is a part of the campaign to get Steve Bannon out.
  46. @War for Blair Mountain
    TRUMP=body bags from Syria...a bakers dozen every week....Art of the Deal bullshit with Christian Russia over Crimea...

    Up your medications, and let loose of that live 110 that you have grasped and is shocking you into incoherence.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    Might you not do better to extend some compassion and grace toward him?
  47. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    It’s very strange to me that Republicans control the presidency, congress and most of the state legislatures and governorships, but are acting like they’re the ones who lost in November. Are they afraid to wield the power voters gave them? Are they apologizing for winning, like Adele at the Grammy’s? Who cares about the media, who cares what they say. Trump proved you don’t need them in your corner to win. He ran on the most blatant immigration restriction platform since the 1920’s and won, but now the GOP have cold feet about following through on a winning strategy? Idiots.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    He barely won.
    , @utu
    "Are they apologizing for winning, like Adele at the Grammy’s?"

    GOP is very happy for having congress however they want Pence. Everything is on hold until they succeed in removing Trump.
    , @TangoMan
    It’s very strange to me that Republicans control the presidency, congress and most of the state legislatures and governorships, but are acting like they’re the ones who lost in November.

    They're in a weird place - everyone wants government cut, just not the programs that they like. How do you implement this?
    , @MarkinLA
    The donors control Congress and they want cheap labor. The trusted stooges for the donors are working behind the scenes trying to get that amnesty. Trump will have to fight them every step of the way.
  48. After today’s comments condemning the violence (or is it threatened violence) at Jewish Community Centers, It could be he has taken Steve’s advice and hired a Jewish sensitivity advisor.

    • Replies: @Karl
    45 SF > It could be he has taken Steve’s advice and hired a Jewish sensitivity advisor


    blood would flow in the streets about the competition for that job. Grandmothers would be run over with dump trucks. Ink factories would be firebombed to make sure that no one else can print out a resume.
  49. @Kyle McKenna

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw
     
    Patrick J. Buchanan.


    Agreed about the casual tweeting etc. DT's never been a professional politician and sometimes doesn't have the sense to shut up, or at least not to hand ammo to his enemies.

    Meanwhile, gotta love that he throws right in the MSM's face that they have an even lower public-approval rating than Congress. That's gotta smart, or at least it would if they were capable of reflection.

    Everyone in the country needs to get over the idea that Trump needs (or should even seek) the approval of the endlessly-corrupt MSM. That's one Trump tweet I agree with.

    Well his own approval ratings aren’t great. They might not be at levels high enough to win a reelection. So what’s the plan?

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    The plan is to ignore you, and that alone will ensure Trump's re-election.
    , @Kyle McKenna
    Needless to say, I'm not privy to any 'plan' but my hope is that the President and his staff will ignore polls and not cast even a stray thought toward re-election. My hope is that every day they will keep foremost in mind the jobs they were elected to perform, and the reasons they were elected.

    Trump's signature campaign issue was the out-of-control third-world immigration which has swamped the American nation and turned it halfway into just another third-world cesspool. I need hardly dilate upon this on this website.

    However, one important remark of his during the Republican primary debate bears repeating:

    “We have done a tremendous disservice not only to the Middle East — we've done a tremendous disservice to humanity. The people that have been killed, the people that have been wiped away — and for what? It's not like we had victory. It's a mess. The Middle East is totally destabilized, a total and complete mess. I wish we had the 4 trillion dollars or 5 trillion dollars. I wish it were spent right here in the United States on schools, hospitals, roads, bridges, and everything else that is all falling apart!"
     

    Our MSM tell us that "America First" is a Nazi slogan. Trump is right to call the MSM an enemy of the American People.
    , @MarkinLA
    They might not be at levels high enough to win a reelection.

    What were they before this election? Yes, running against Hillary was a gift from the gods but there is nobody in the Democrat Party left worth voting for. The magic negro fairy dust is used up. Bernie can generate that same level of excitement since he has hitched his wagon to all the Democrats negatives. The Democrats have doubled down on "hate whitey". The economy will likely improve no matter who is in the White House. Trump is actually doing things the silent majority likes.

  50. @Anon
    It's very strange to me that Republicans control the presidency, congress and most of the state legislatures and governorships, but are acting like they're the ones who lost in November. Are they afraid to wield the power voters gave them? Are they apologizing for winning, like Adele at the Grammy's? Who cares about the media, who cares what they say. Trump proved you don't need them in your corner to win. He ran on the most blatant immigration restriction platform since the 1920's and won, but now the GOP have cold feet about following through on a winning strategy? Idiots.

    He barely won.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Yeah, you're right. Conservatives really got their ass handed to them in 2016.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Either your arithmetic is defective or you are focused on the wrong statistic. Count the votes in the Electoral College. Trump won 'bigly'.
  51. @Clyde

    Steve may deserve credit for a lot of things but I’m a little doubtful that he has played a significant role in popularizing the “deep state” meme.
     
    First time I ever heard of or read about the Deep State was right here, and had to do with the deep state in Turkey and how prevalent conspiracy theories are over there.

    I certainly did not make up the term “deep state,” but I’ve been using it pretty regularly since 2009.

    • Replies: @O'Really
    Like others, I first heard the term here.

    What is most striking, however, is the fact that the term burst into public awareness so quickly with the emergence of the fake news "dossier" on Jan. 10, 2017. This rapid rise in awareness is itself a massive failure of the deep state.

    A search of Google news shows minimal references to the "deep state" prior to that date, with the exception of a few fringe conspiracy sites and someone going by the 'nym Virgil at Breitbart (http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/12/12/virgil-the-deep-state-vs-donald-trump/). However, Ross Douthat (an iSteve reader) did use the term in passing in a December column (https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/opinion/the-donald-trump-matrix.html).

    It seems that Glenn Greenwald probably is most responsible (or at least was first) in explicitly linking the dossier to the deep state, on the day after it was released (https://theintercept.com/2017/01/11/the-deep-state-goes-to-war-with-president-elect-using-unverified-claims-as-dems-cheer/). References explode immediately thereafter.

    I think this turn of events has taken TPTB by surprise. (It could be said that being surprised by events is a defining feature of the American deep state.) For example, it took TPTB a full six weeks to mount a counter-attack in their go-to journal, the Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/02/why-its-dangerous-to-talk-about-a-deep-state/517221/
    , @TangoMan
    The concept of Deep State is at the heart of almost every Robert Ludlum novel.
    , @Clyde

    I certainly did not make up the term “deep state,” but I’ve been using it pretty regularly since 2009.
     
    You definitely get credit for popularizing the term "Deep State". Others too, but you for sure, and for all I know perhaps the most. The first time I read you discussing it, it made perfect sense. BTW these days the conservative mainstream Rush Limbaugh brings up alt right themes I first read about here (at iSteve) five years ago, with similar credit going to VDare. These days he frequently uses the phrase "white voters" and discusses their interests. Unheard of five years ago and even three years ago.

    Seen at Vdare the other day. Brenda Walker saying due to robotics slashing jobs we don't need any immigration anymore.


    Automation Makes Immigration Obsolete - It's time to end an institution that no longer serves Americans
    By Brenda Walker
    Published in The Social Contract
    Volume 27, Number 1 (Fall 2016)
    Issue theme: "When robots replace humans"
    http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc_27_1/tsc-27-1-walker-2.shtml

     

  52. @Steve Richter
    I think we are in big trouble. There are no national republican politicians other than Trump speaking for the alt right. No one pressing for an immigration halt. No one wants to cut welfare. No nationalism for the native born. All the energy is on the anti trump side. Even the people in the White House seem like hired guns instead of believers in a nationalism cause.

    I share your concern. Any ideas on what should be done?

    • Replies: @Steve Richter

    Any ideas on what should be done?
     
    I think we have to forget about the USA as a country. Push for states rights. In Europe the West is done. Going the way of Brazil or something. But Eastern Europe and Russia will remain countries that care about their people. With states ( even counties ) being able to control their borders people in the US will have places where they can live and identify with the community.
  53. @Anonymous
    After the first month it's clear that Pence is a huge mistake. Anything happens to Trump and Pence is going to reverse everything Trump ever did. I thought Pence was a rebel in congress but I should've known better.

    Pence just seems like an empty vessel for neocons/establishment/media.

  54. @Glossy
    *I* saw it first on this blog. Years ago Steve used it to describe Turkish politics, I think, and then applied it to US politics.

    I got the term from a book called “Midnight in Sicily” by Peter Robb that I read about a decade ago. It was about the Mafia and Operation Gladio leave-behinds and the like.

    Here’s a pretty good movie review of “Il Divo” that I did in 2014 that draws a lot from Robb’s book:

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/06/il-divo.html

    Then I went to Turkey in 2009 and started paying more attention to Turkey.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    I've been using "deep church" as an alternative to high/low church since about 2002.
    , @utu
    I think first time I learned about the concept of the Deep Sate was from Peter Dale Scott work.
    , @Opinionator
    I may have been wrong to doubt. I have been under the impression that the term has been around for a long while and was more widespread.

    By the way, this guy, writing as recently as 2014, appears to treat the term as his own. (People seem to think lifting terms and ideas from you doesn't require attribution--although I'm not suggesting that's what happened here.)

    http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/21/anatomy-of-the-deep-state/
  55. @JohnnyD
    At first, I thought Gen. McMaster was a good pick to replace Flynn (mostly because McMaster is not John Bolton). But then, I saw Bill "I rather have the Deep State" Kristol praising McMaster, and I saw John "Why aren't we starring another war, yet" McCain also praising McMaster. Then I saw Susan "Let's destroy Libya" Rice adivising McMaster about how he needs to get rid of Banon and Miller. And then, most depressing of all, I saw that McMaster believes all neoconservative propaganda about Russia and the Ukraine.

    McMaster will do Trump’s bidding. What more can you ask?

  56. @Steve Richter
    I think we are in big trouble. There are no national republican politicians other than Trump speaking for the alt right. No one pressing for an immigration halt. No one wants to cut welfare. No nationalism for the native born. All the energy is on the anti trump side. Even the people in the White House seem like hired guns instead of believers in a nationalism cause.

    Get a grip! Trump is the president. And against all odds. But if it makes you feel better let Opinionator clutch your pearls and you can grab his.

  57. @Opinionator
    He barely won.

    Yeah, you’re right. Conservatives really got their ass handed to them in 2016.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Don't get complacent.
  58. @Opinionator
    Well his own approval ratings aren't great. They might not be at levels high enough to win a reelection. So what's the plan?

    The plan is to ignore you, and that alone will ensure Trump’s re-election.

  59. @Opinionator
    He barely won.

    Either your arithmetic is defective or you are focused on the wrong statistic. Count the votes in the Electoral College. Trump won ‘bigly’.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    The electoral college margin came only as a result of infinitesimally small statewide popular vote margins. But you knew that.
  60. Steve,

    Trump’s staff will have their hands full for a while implementing his economic agenda and immigration policies. But I’d love to hear your thoughts on what policy proposal optimally combines (a) longterm damage to the Establishment/Cathedral and (b) political viability.

    Here’s mine: make any student loan over (say) $20k dischargeable in bankruptcy on a going-forward basis, and combine that legislative change with a modest debt-relief package for existing loans.

    Making student loans dischargeable in bankruptcy would deal a body blow to the educational indoctrination complex: only economically productive majors would survive in any meaningful numbers. Family formation would also likely accelerate as a consequence. And the legions of debt-burdened baristas who vote left out of resentment would gradually attrit away.

    The inhumanity of allowing teenagers to consign themselves to indentured servitude to the banks for degrees they barely understand is self-evident–the moral/emotional case is easy to make and hard to refute. And throwing in the debt-forgiveness element would be a great play for the Bernie crowd–and most of them likely wouldn’t be sophisticated enough to appreciate (or care about) the ultimate political/cultural implications of debt-dischargeability.

    Anyway, I’m guessing at least a few people with close connections to Trump follow your blog, so crowd-sourcing suggestions could be a good way to get creative ideas into his circle.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Insty makes the point that a bank won't lend an 18 yo $25ok to buy a Bentley, but it will lend them that much to get a degree in Women's Studies, mostly because the Feds guarantee the loan. And for a long time, many schools were in bed with lenders who kicked back part of the higher than market interest rate they got the kid to sign up for; no body got busted for that. My daughter works in a local pie shop and one of her co-workers has a PhD in Jazz!

    The Derb makes the point in his latest podcast that there are 300k+ foreign college students in the USA, up five-fold from 10 years ago. Colleges love them because they pay full freight, but why are tax payers subsidizing this racket?

    But your overall point is good; there is much than can be done by Executive Order to bring some sanity to academia by squeezing their finances.
  61. @Anon
    Yeah, you're right. Conservatives really got their ass handed to them in 2016.

    Don’t get complacent.

  62. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Either your arithmetic is defective or you are focused on the wrong statistic. Count the votes in the Electoral College. Trump won 'bigly'.

    The electoral college margin came only as a result of infinitesimally small statewide popular vote margins. But you knew that.

    • Replies: @The Practical Conservative
    Obama had similarly small margins, but you were mysteriously silent then. #stopeeyoring
    , @MarkinLA
    If the economy recovers and jobs come back to the rust belt, Trump's margins in Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Ohio will be much bigger.
    , @candid_observer
    Look, the narrowness of Trump's win was almost entirely due to the perception that he presented a great risk as a potential President. A large part of that could be reduced to questions like: how safe is it to put the fingers of this Twittery, irascible man next to the nuclear codes?

    But those are exactly the sorts of concerns that will be whisked away simply by Trump's getting through 4 years without major military or diplomatic incident --which seems actually quite likely, not least because Trump is far less inclined toward war than any other recent President.

    If Trump is to lose in 2020, it will because something important and negative took place -- which was what doomed both Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush. It won't be because the idiot media has been pounding him for those 4 years -- their blows are impotent if Trump's policies are successes. Nor will be because his non-"Presidential" manners will continue to be a big issue -- people will acclimate to his manners over the 4 years.

    Trump needs to be a successful President in the way that Americans care about: an improved economy, no failed military adventures, no disgracefully broken promises. If he manages to do this, he will be re-elected, and by far larger margins than his first election.

    I'd say that Trump's chances of doing this are quite good indeed. He's learning on the job, he seems genuinely to be motivated by doing good for the American people, he's an excellent manager -- even, I think, something of a menschenkenner.
  63. @Opinionator
    I share your concern. Any ideas on what should be done?

    Any ideas on what should be done?

    I think we have to forget about the USA as a country. Push for states rights. In Europe the West is done. Going the way of Brazil or something. But Eastern Europe and Russia will remain countries that care about their people. With states ( even counties ) being able to control their borders people in the US will have places where they can live and identify with the community.

  64. I’m thoroughly impressed by what DJT has managed in a month. It’s difficult to find, though, because no one’s reporting it. You have to read a zillion random second and third tier news sites and blogs, and the Google what they are talking about, to find the story. Like the rollback of the disastrous Waters of the US EPA rule. Or the coal mining rule rollback. Or the 5 year ban in Obama people being lobbyists. Or the local stories of illegals in high schools caught with weapons being immediately deported. Or VA staff being fired. or SecState people being fired. Or cyber security people being fired. Or….A hundred things you didn’t know. all great.

    I believe I read here that someone (Ohio gov Kasich, maybe?) was told by trump he could do all the foreign policy stuff, all the military stuff. What, did that leave trump doing, he asked? Making America great again. Whoever that was thought it was asinine and so passed it up.

    But I get what he means now. McMaster, Mattis, Pence–they can have whatever they want overseas. Foreign policy doesn’t matter to Americans. Jobs matter. Their towns matter. Ending the opioids matters. So he’s going to negotiate with Intel and Ford and everyone else. He’s going to stop the DoJ suing your local grammar school to allow the big who thinks he’s a girl in the girls locker room when they change clothes. He’s going to fix the dams and the bridges and the airports. He’s going to MAGA. And then US prestige will be determined by its GDP pushing the world’s, and the other issues will be solved however those folks want them. Because that ain’t what matters most anyway.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Historically (say past 26 years especially), foreign policy conflicts have distracted us from awareness of and attention to problems at home. It isn't as easy as saying, oh let Pence et al do whatever they want. The media will be sure that these conflicts (Russia, Muslim "terrorism," Iraq, Afganistan, etc.) occupy significant mindshare. Not to mention the material resources the conflicts absorb, the artificial safety net to the job market they provide, and the foreign immigration that they facilitate.
    , @SFG
    I believe you. What strategies could I employ to learn these things?
    , @Old fogey
    Wonderful analysis, Alice! Please continue to keep tabs on things like this to remind us of all the good things happening that no one in the media will report in a coherent fashion.
    , @MarkinLA
    Most Americans couldn't even tell you what continent some foreign country is on let alone find it on a map. However, it is continually pounded into their heads that it should matter and the US should lead somehow. This brainwashing is what needs to be countered.

    I bet that more than a few Americans actually think we should care about Crimea. Most don't have the slightest idea what caring about Crimea really entails.
  65. @SF
    After today's comments condemning the violence (or is it threatened violence) at Jewish Community Centers, It could be he has taken Steve's advice and hired a Jewish sensitivity advisor.

    45 SF > It could be he has taken Steve’s advice and hired a Jewish sensitivity advisor

    blood would flow in the streets about the competition for that job. Grandmothers would be run over with dump trucks. Ink factories would be firebombed to make sure that no one else can print out a resume.

  66. @Opinionator
    Well his own approval ratings aren't great. They might not be at levels high enough to win a reelection. So what's the plan?

    Needless to say, I’m not privy to any ‘plan’ but my hope is that the President and his staff will ignore polls and not cast even a stray thought toward re-election. My hope is that every day they will keep foremost in mind the jobs they were elected to perform, and the reasons they were elected.

    Trump’s signature campaign issue was the out-of-control third-world immigration which has swamped the American nation and turned it halfway into just another third-world cesspool. I need hardly dilate upon this on this website.

    However, one important remark of his during the Republican primary debate bears repeating:

    “We have done a tremendous disservice not only to the Middle East — we’ve done a tremendous disservice to humanity. The people that have been killed, the people that have been wiped away — and for what? It’s not like we had victory. It’s a mess. The Middle East is totally destabilized, a total and complete mess. I wish we had the 4 trillion dollars or 5 trillion dollars. I wish it were spent right here in the United States on schools, hospitals, roads, bridges, and everything else that is all falling apart!”

    Our MSM tell us that “America First” is a Nazi slogan. Trump is right to call the MSM an enemy of the American People.

  67. @James N. Kennett
    1. Trump needs to do better than to base his speeches on his previous night's TV viewing (Fox News, Sweden). It's not necessarily that he's wrong, but the President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense. He should use them.

    2. Margaret Thatcher had an ally in William Whitelaw, who was a traditional (patrician and paternalistic) Conservative from the left of the party, yet who believed in what Thatcher was trying to achieve. She would run her policies past Whitelaw, and he would tell her when her instincts were taking her beyond what the public would accept. When Whitelaw retired for health reasons, Thatcher's administration quickly spun out of control, implementing a regressive tax (the "Community Charge", popularly called the Poll Tax) that eventually led to her downfall.

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.

    3. Winston Churchill had stand-up rows with his Chief of Staff, Field Marshall Sir Alan Brooke. No doubt the rows irritated Churchill, but he considered them a small price to pay in return for receiving military advice of the highest quality. Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.

    4. Government by Twitter is not an entirely bad idea, but the tweets need to be more carefully considered. Donald Trump can and should use Twitter to promote his program, but he should remember that he is no longer fighting such easy targets as Hillary or Jeb. Most tweets should be planned and discussed with his press office a week or more in advance.

    the President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense

    cite needed.

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett

    cite needed.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President's_Daily_Brief
  68. @Steve Sailer
    I got the term from a book called "Midnight in Sicily" by Peter Robb that I read about a decade ago. It was about the Mafia and Operation Gladio leave-behinds and the like.

    Here's a pretty good movie review of "Il Divo" that I did in 2014 that draws a lot from Robb's book:

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/06/il-divo.html

    Then I went to Turkey in 2009 and started paying more attention to Turkey.

    I’ve been using “deep church” as an alternative to high/low church since about 2002.

  69. @Half Canadian
    I've seen a lot of comments on Trumps costs as far as protection and traveling. But I have a hard time taking the press seriously. Would be interested in hearing what others have to say.

    The conservative press would write about the colossal cost of the Obama’s vacations, for example the nearly half-million dollar vacation to Spain Michelle Obama took in 2010, but the subject didn’t interest the mainstream press much. Of course, it’s different now.

    http://www.judicialwatch.org/press-room/press-releases/michelle-obamas-august-2010-vacation-in-spain-cost-american-taxpayers-467585-according-to-records-obtained-by-judicial-watch/

    I thought it was interesting that the press got so riled up about Chris Christie’s minions doing the lane-closing dirty trick. One of the accusations was that someone in an ambulance could have lost his life while waiting in traffic. What about the incredible inconvenience to travelers in the New York area when Obama dropped by for some fund raising? Couldn’t someone in an ambulance just as easily have lost his life while waiting in traffic as Obama raised campaign contributions?

  70. @Steve Sailer
    I got the term from a book called "Midnight in Sicily" by Peter Robb that I read about a decade ago. It was about the Mafia and Operation Gladio leave-behinds and the like.

    Here's a pretty good movie review of "Il Divo" that I did in 2014 that draws a lot from Robb's book:

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/06/il-divo.html

    Then I went to Turkey in 2009 and started paying more attention to Turkey.

    I think first time I learned about the concept of the Deep Sate was from Peter Dale Scott work.

  71. @utu
    I am pretty sure it is a false flag.

    He should have said that DOJ and FBI are launching large scale investigation and those responsible for making bomb threats and desecrating cemeteries will be caught. But he did not say it because the false flaggers may not be caught.

    This is another example that scenarios are written by others and Trump is forced to read the text from the scenario that boxes him in where they want him to be.

    It seems that this is a part of the campaign to get Steve Bannon out.

  72. @Anon
    It's very strange to me that Republicans control the presidency, congress and most of the state legislatures and governorships, but are acting like they're the ones who lost in November. Are they afraid to wield the power voters gave them? Are they apologizing for winning, like Adele at the Grammy's? Who cares about the media, who cares what they say. Trump proved you don't need them in your corner to win. He ran on the most blatant immigration restriction platform since the 1920's and won, but now the GOP have cold feet about following through on a winning strategy? Idiots.

    “Are they apologizing for winning, like Adele at the Grammy’s?”

    GOP is very happy for having congress however they want Pence. Everything is on hold until they succeed in removing Trump.

  73. The left paranoia is malignant and metastatic. Today’s call is to fight Trump “In The Name Of Humanity” because he is a combination of “more dangerous than even Hitler” and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.

    In the Name of Humanity,
    We REFUSE to Accept a Fascist America!
    Drive Out the Trump/Pence Regime!

    The Trump/Pence Regime is a Fascist Regime. For the future of humanity and the planet, we, the people, must drive this regime out.

    Donald Trump and Mike Pence have assembled a vicious cabal that has put forth positions and begun initiatives which demonstrate that they fully intend to shred political and social norms with catastrophic consequence. Because Trump has his finger on the nuclear trigger, the Trump/Pence regime is more dangerous to the world than even Hitler.

    Fascism has direction and momentum. History has shown that fascism must be stopped before it becomes too late.

    This resistance is righteous and necessary, but it is not sufficient. We must recognize that the character of fascism is that it can absorb separate acts of resistance while continually throwing the opposition off balance by rapidly moving its agenda forward. The Trump/Pence regime will repeatedly launch new highly repressive measures, eventually clamping down on all resistance and remaking the law … IF THEY ARE NOT DRIVEN FROM POWER.

    Announcing National Tour:
    NO! In the Name of Humanity – We Refuse to Accept a Fascist America

    RefuseFascism.org is organizing people across the country to rise to the challenge of driving from office the fascist Trump/Pence regime, before it is too late. A key part of RefuseFascism’s plan is the Drive Out the Trump/Pence Regime National Tour. Organizers will set out from NYC to go to the South heading to Texas – areas where the two futures for the country and world are starkly contested.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    Stuff like that makes satire obsolete.
  74. @Alice
    I'm thoroughly impressed by what DJT has managed in a month. It's difficult to find, though, because no one's reporting it. You have to read a zillion random second and third tier news sites and blogs, and the Google what they are talking about, to find the story. Like the rollback of the disastrous Waters of the US EPA rule. Or the coal mining rule rollback. Or the 5 year ban in Obama people being lobbyists. Or the local stories of illegals in high schools caught with weapons being immediately deported. Or VA staff being fired. or SecState people being fired. Or cyber security people being fired. Or....A hundred things you didn't know. all great.

    I believe I read here that someone (Ohio gov Kasich, maybe?) was told by trump he could do all the foreign policy stuff, all the military stuff. What, did that leave trump doing, he asked? Making America great again. Whoever that was thought it was asinine and so passed it up.

    But I get what he means now. McMaster, Mattis, Pence--they can have whatever they want overseas. Foreign policy doesn't matter to Americans. Jobs matter. Their towns matter. Ending the opioids matters. So he's going to negotiate with Intel and Ford and everyone else. He's going to stop the DoJ suing your local grammar school to allow the big who thinks he's a girl in the girls locker room when they change clothes. He's going to fix the dams and the bridges and the airports. He's going to MAGA. And then US prestige will be determined by its GDP pushing the world's, and the other issues will be solved however those folks want them. Because that ain't what matters most anyway.

    Historically (say past 26 years especially), foreign policy conflicts have distracted us from awareness of and attention to problems at home. It isn’t as easy as saying, oh let Pence et al do whatever they want. The media will be sure that these conflicts (Russia, Muslim “terrorism,” Iraq, Afganistan, etc.) occupy significant mindshare. Not to mention the material resources the conflicts absorb, the artificial safety net to the job market they provide, and the foreign immigration that they facilitate.

    • Replies: @Dissident
    What about the increased danger that unnecessary foreign invasions and interventions create for Americans at home and the needless loss of life and limb-- both to members of our military as well as to countless civilians in the lands invaded?
  75. @Opinionator
    The electoral college margin came only as a result of infinitesimally small statewide popular vote margins. But you knew that.

    Obama had similarly small margins, but you were mysteriously silent then. #stopeeyoring

  76. @Steve Richter
    I think we are in big trouble. There are no national republican politicians other than Trump speaking for the alt right. No one pressing for an immigration halt. No one wants to cut welfare. No nationalism for the native born. All the energy is on the anti trump side. Even the people in the White House seem like hired guns instead of believers in a nationalism cause.

    It doesn’t matter. The Sleeping Giant awoke. Right now we are quiet and the globalist-backed Left is making all the noise because Trump is doing everything we could reasonably expect him to. But if they start shutting him down, there will be no going back to sleep. It is especially important that Trump build rapport with people on the ground in the dozens of branches of government that feature armed men. I fully expect him to do that extremely well.

  77. @Anonymous
    After the first month it's clear that Pence is a huge mistake. Anything happens to Trump and Pence is going to reverse everything Trump ever did. I thought Pence was a rebel in congress but I should've known better.

    Agree 100%. The question is whom should Trump have picked realistically?

  78. Given that he’s up against essentially everyone else in this country with any power (the Democratic Party, the Establishment of the Republican Party, the media, the tech industry, Hollywood, etc., etc., etc.), is a political newcomer without a deep bench of ready-made staff to draw on, and squeaked out a victory that will always have an asterisk after it, I’d say he’s doing ok. The left and the media are screaming themselves hoarse every week with some new outrage, but this serves more to reveal to people how barking mad they’ve gone than it says anything about Trump or his administration other than predictable early hiccups from a new Administration without much experience anywhere. Practically the only public institution with less public trust today than either the Trump Administration or Congress is the media, so him picking the fight with them is hardly a loser.

    The biggest shortcomings so far have been in staffing up both his White House and the government in general, and possibly in taking major action before he had the people in place to carry it out. That’s been par for the course since the campaign, and could have been readily predicted. The big questions have always been “Will Trump staff up fast enough?” and “Will Trump learn fast enough?” This was basically what happened when the immigration executive orders only a week into his Presidency got thrown back in his face. The apparently unclear lines of power and authority in the White House are somewhat worrisome (although I’ll assume they’ll sort themselves out eventually). Likewise, there are still hundreds of important positions in the government that need to be filled, and the Administration appears to still be way behind on this. It’s getting harder and harder though, between a media that has gone completely off the rails, the torrent of leaks, and I’m sure efforts underway to combat both of these, to get a clear picture of what’s actually going on in Washington day by day. Maybe Trump has a smooth-running inside operation picking names of people to nominate. If he doesn’t I would suggest he get it, or maybe spend a few more weekends inside working on that. Until the administration gets staffed up, there are going to continue to be real, ongoing risks of how the government is prepared to respond to potential crises.

    The Democratic Party I think is basically adrift and probably not going to be politically competitive again for at least the next 4 years, if not 6, unless Trump really blows it. Much ink has already been spilled over how deep in the wilderness they are by the numbers, but they seem intent on doubling down now and pandering to the most extreme passions of their lunatic base than to trying to compete for the votes of people they wold need to win outside their coastal and urban bastions anymore. (The recent, increasing embrace of Islam and Islamic trappings, like the hijab, is the best example of how out to lunch the left is.)

    Trump’s problems though are more going to come from the rest of the Republican Party, which eventually is going to get goaded by the media back into cuckservatism and into acting like a party of John McCains. (Obviously, they would prefer to take the tax cuts, Obamacare “reform,” and then cut Trump loose for Pence, if they could.)

    What Trump ought to do over the next couple years, IMHO, is make appearances in the states and districts that have Republican senators and representatives who are looking the weakest in 2018 and 2020 and hold some rallies. Then, have some photo ops with the incumbents, and maybe a couple of ambitious local Republicans who might want to present a primary challenge. The message will be clear enough: Trump plus the crowds he draws might swing for the incumbents… or might not, depending.

    • Agree: European-American
    • Replies: @Pericles
    Blocking the travel ban was an embarrassing exhibit of the fake judicial system, by the way.

    First Trump beat the Republicans, then he beat the Democrats, next he will beat the Deep State. Along the way, I guess he will beat the Media too. There certainly is a lot of them to beat, the rot is deep, but on the bright side they are mostly soft incompetents on sinecures.
    , @Dissident
    Insightful commentary. Well-written.
  79. @Steve Sailer
    I certainly did not make up the term "deep state," but I've been using it pretty regularly since 2009.

    Like others, I first heard the term here.

    What is most striking, however, is the fact that the term burst into public awareness so quickly with the emergence of the fake news “dossier” on Jan. 10, 2017. This rapid rise in awareness is itself a massive failure of the deep state.

    A search of Google news shows minimal references to the “deep state” prior to that date, with the exception of a few fringe conspiracy sites and someone going by the ‘nym Virgil at Breitbart (http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/12/12/virgil-the-deep-state-vs-donald-trump/). However, Ross Douthat (an iSteve reader) did use the term in passing in a December column (https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/opinion/the-donald-trump-matrix.html).

    It seems that Glenn Greenwald probably is most responsible (or at least was first) in explicitly linking the dossier to the deep state, on the day after it was released (https://theintercept.com/2017/01/11/the-deep-state-goes-to-war-with-president-elect-using-unverified-claims-as-dems-cheer/). References explode immediately thereafter.

    I think this turn of events has taken TPTB by surprise. (It could be said that being surprised by events is a defining feature of the American deep state.) For example, it took TPTB a full six weeks to mount a counter-attack in their go-to journal, the Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/02/why-its-dangerous-to-talk-about-a-deep-state/517221/

    • Replies: @Wade
    Great comment. Thanks for posting. It's very encouraging to think that the "Deep State" may be on its way to becoming as prominent a meme as "alt-right" has become.
    , @Dissident
  80. @James N. Kennett
    1. Trump needs to do better than to base his speeches on his previous night's TV viewing (Fox News, Sweden). It's not necessarily that he's wrong, but the President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense. He should use them.

    2. Margaret Thatcher had an ally in William Whitelaw, who was a traditional (patrician and paternalistic) Conservative from the left of the party, yet who believed in what Thatcher was trying to achieve. She would run her policies past Whitelaw, and he would tell her when her instincts were taking her beyond what the public would accept. When Whitelaw retired for health reasons, Thatcher's administration quickly spun out of control, implementing a regressive tax (the "Community Charge", popularly called the Poll Tax) that eventually led to her downfall.

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.

    3. Winston Churchill had stand-up rows with his Chief of Staff, Field Marshall Sir Alan Brooke. No doubt the rows irritated Churchill, but he considered them a small price to pay in return for receiving military advice of the highest quality. Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.

    4. Government by Twitter is not an entirely bad idea, but the tweets need to be more carefully considered. Donald Trump can and should use Twitter to promote his program, but he should remember that he is no longer fighting such easy targets as Hillary or Jeb. Most tweets should be planned and discussed with his press office a week or more in advance.

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.

    Interesting idea, but Trump’s ideas aren’t that wild, and the resistance he’s getting isn’t from the public so much (his base still loves him and Dems still don’t) but from the permanent government and the courts. And he seems to be getting decent advice on that recently.

    I liked the idea of rewriting the executive order on immigration, rather than risking a SCOTUS loss on it due to Kennedy. The rewrite will probably exclude current green card holders.

    Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.

    I don’t think men like James Mattis or Rex Tillerson would be afraid to stand up to Trump. This is really an impressive cabinet, for the most part.

    • Agree: Ivan K.
    • Replies: @Dissident

    I liked the idea of rewriting the executive order on immigration, rather than risking a SCOTUS loss on it due to Kennedy. The rewrite will probably exclude current green card holders.
     
    Is a complete, temporary moratorium on nearly all immigration out of the question? Couldn't the President (truthfully) simply explain that we need some time to get our own house in order; to at least make some considerable progress in the enormous backlog of clean-up and repair work that we have before us? That we must take care of our own first; charity starts at home, etc. (Not that what we are talking about here is by any means limited to charity.)

    Such a comprehensive ban would presumably side-step the whole "Muslim ban" preening nonsense as well.

    , @James N. Kennett

    Interesting idea, but Trump’s ideas aren’t that wild, and the resistance he’s getting isn’t from the public so much (his base still loves him and Dems still don’t) but from the permanent government and the courts. And he seems to be getting decent advice on that recently.

     

    I think the idea of the 90-day ban was pretty wild, because it was unnecessary: if new immigration policies will be in place within 90 days, then the current 90 days are not very important. It seemed to me that Trump just wanted to "sock it" to his opponents. Why waste the effort, especially if the order is not legally watertight?

    I hope you are right that he is getting better legal advice now.
  81. @James N. Kennett
    1. Trump needs to do better than to base his speeches on his previous night's TV viewing (Fox News, Sweden). It's not necessarily that he's wrong, but the President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense. He should use them.

    2. Margaret Thatcher had an ally in William Whitelaw, who was a traditional (patrician and paternalistic) Conservative from the left of the party, yet who believed in what Thatcher was trying to achieve. She would run her policies past Whitelaw, and he would tell her when her instincts were taking her beyond what the public would accept. When Whitelaw retired for health reasons, Thatcher's administration quickly spun out of control, implementing a regressive tax (the "Community Charge", popularly called the Poll Tax) that eventually led to her downfall.

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.

    3. Winston Churchill had stand-up rows with his Chief of Staff, Field Marshall Sir Alan Brooke. No doubt the rows irritated Churchill, but he considered them a small price to pay in return for receiving military advice of the highest quality. Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.

    4. Government by Twitter is not an entirely bad idea, but the tweets need to be more carefully considered. Donald Trump can and should use Twitter to promote his program, but he should remember that he is no longer fighting such easy targets as Hillary or Jeb. Most tweets should be planned and discussed with his press office a week or more in advance.

    It’s endearing that people still engage in the game of “Trump should . . . ” I myself came to terms with Trump and who he is early in his campaign. What you see is what you get. Trump is not going to be who you would like him to be.

  82. @Anon
    It's very strange to me that Republicans control the presidency, congress and most of the state legislatures and governorships, but are acting like they're the ones who lost in November. Are they afraid to wield the power voters gave them? Are they apologizing for winning, like Adele at the Grammy's? Who cares about the media, who cares what they say. Trump proved you don't need them in your corner to win. He ran on the most blatant immigration restriction platform since the 1920's and won, but now the GOP have cold feet about following through on a winning strategy? Idiots.

    It’s very strange to me that Republicans control the presidency, congress and most of the state legislatures and governorships, but are acting like they’re the ones who lost in November.

    They’re in a weird place – everyone wants government cut, just not the programs that they like. How do you implement this?

  83. @Steve Sailer
    I certainly did not make up the term "deep state," but I've been using it pretty regularly since 2009.

    The concept of Deep State is at the heart of almost every Robert Ludlum novel.

  84. @Steve Sailer
    I certainly did not make up the term "deep state," but I've been using it pretty regularly since 2009.

    I certainly did not make up the term “deep state,” but I’ve been using it pretty regularly since 2009.

    You definitely get credit for popularizing the term “Deep State”. Others too, but you for sure, and for all I know perhaps the most. The first time I read you discussing it, it made perfect sense. BTW these days the conservative mainstream Rush Limbaugh brings up alt right themes I first read about here (at iSteve) five years ago, with similar credit going to VDare. These days he frequently uses the phrase “white voters” and discusses their interests. Unheard of five years ago and even three years ago.

    Seen at Vdare the other day. Brenda Walker saying due to robotics slashing jobs we don’t need any immigration anymore.

    Automation Makes Immigration Obsolete – It’s time to end an institution that no longer serves Americans
    By Brenda Walker
    Published in The Social Contract
    Volume 27, Number 1 (Fall 2016)
    Issue theme: “When robots replace humans”
    http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc_27_1/tsc-27-1-walker-2.shtml

    • Replies: @william munny
    I read that Steve Jobs was proposing a tax on robots that replace human jobs, at least temporarily. Haven't thought it through or how it ties to immigration policy.

    Related - Has anyone directly advocated increased taxes for companies hiring visa holders instead of citizens? Or something like that?
    , @Dissident

    BTW these days the conservative mainstream Rush Limbaugh brings up alt right themes I first read about here (at iSteve) five years ago, with similar credit going to VDare. These days he frequently uses the phrase “white voters” and discusses their interests. Unheard of five years ago and even three years ago.
     
    I recall the late radio legend Bob Grant, who was vilified for his irreverent disregard of respectable racial pieties, pointing-out how Limbaugh took the easy path by simply avoiding the whole topic of race.
  85. @Thomas
    Given that he's up against essentially everyone else in this country with any power (the Democratic Party, the Establishment of the Republican Party, the media, the tech industry, Hollywood, etc., etc., etc.), is a political newcomer without a deep bench of ready-made staff to draw on, and squeaked out a victory that will always have an asterisk after it, I'd say he's doing ok. The left and the media are screaming themselves hoarse every week with some new outrage, but this serves more to reveal to people how barking mad they've gone than it says anything about Trump or his administration other than predictable early hiccups from a new Administration without much experience anywhere. Practically the only public institution with less public trust today than either the Trump Administration or Congress is the media, so him picking the fight with them is hardly a loser.

    The biggest shortcomings so far have been in staffing up both his White House and the government in general, and possibly in taking major action before he had the people in place to carry it out. That's been par for the course since the campaign, and could have been readily predicted. The big questions have always been "Will Trump staff up fast enough?" and "Will Trump learn fast enough?" This was basically what happened when the immigration executive orders only a week into his Presidency got thrown back in his face. The apparently unclear lines of power and authority in the White House are somewhat worrisome (although I'll assume they'll sort themselves out eventually). Likewise, there are still hundreds of important positions in the government that need to be filled, and the Administration appears to still be way behind on this. It's getting harder and harder though, between a media that has gone completely off the rails, the torrent of leaks, and I'm sure efforts underway to combat both of these, to get a clear picture of what's actually going on in Washington day by day. Maybe Trump has a smooth-running inside operation picking names of people to nominate. If he doesn't I would suggest he get it, or maybe spend a few more weekends inside working on that. Until the administration gets staffed up, there are going to continue to be real, ongoing risks of how the government is prepared to respond to potential crises.

    The Democratic Party I think is basically adrift and probably not going to be politically competitive again for at least the next 4 years, if not 6, unless Trump really blows it. Much ink has already been spilled over how deep in the wilderness they are by the numbers, but they seem intent on doubling down now and pandering to the most extreme passions of their lunatic base than to trying to compete for the votes of people they wold need to win outside their coastal and urban bastions anymore. (The recent, increasing embrace of Islam and Islamic trappings, like the hijab, is the best example of how out to lunch the left is.)

    Trump's problems though are more going to come from the rest of the Republican Party, which eventually is going to get goaded by the media back into cuckservatism and into acting like a party of John McCains. (Obviously, they would prefer to take the tax cuts, Obamacare "reform," and then cut Trump loose for Pence, if they could.)

    What Trump ought to do over the next couple years, IMHO, is make appearances in the states and districts that have Republican senators and representatives who are looking the weakest in 2018 and 2020 and hold some rallies. Then, have some photo ops with the incumbents, and maybe a couple of ambitious local Republicans who might want to present a primary challenge. The message will be clear enough: Trump plus the crowds he draws might swing for the incumbents... or might not, depending.

    Blocking the travel ban was an embarrassing exhibit of the fake judicial system, by the way.

    First Trump beat the Republicans, then he beat the Democrats, next he will beat the Deep State. Along the way, I guess he will beat the Media too. There certainly is a lot of them to beat, the rot is deep, but on the bright side they are mostly soft incompetents on sinecures.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Reputations matter. Unfortunately (or thankfully), reputations still matter to the talking heads in DC. And, so many of them have kids...so yeah, gotta be careful what you say or do.
  86. @Steve Sailer
    I got the term from a book called "Midnight in Sicily" by Peter Robb that I read about a decade ago. It was about the Mafia and Operation Gladio leave-behinds and the like.

    Here's a pretty good movie review of "Il Divo" that I did in 2014 that draws a lot from Robb's book:

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/06/il-divo.html

    Then I went to Turkey in 2009 and started paying more attention to Turkey.

    I may have been wrong to doubt. I have been under the impression that the term has been around for a long while and was more widespread.

    By the way, this guy, writing as recently as 2014, appears to treat the term as his own. (People seem to think lifting terms and ideas from you doesn’t require attribution–although I’m not suggesting that’s what happened here.)

    http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/21/anatomy-of-the-deep-state/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I reviewed Mike Lofgren's book "Deep State" last year:

    http://takimag.com/article/deep_state_of_the_union_steve_sailer/print#axzz4ZAy0zws3

    "The 20th-century Turkish concept of a “deep state” first spread to other Mediterranean countries such as Italy, and is now slowly being picked up by American pundits. Ex–Republican congressional staffer Mike Lofgren’s 2016 book The Deep State: The Fall of the Constitution and the Rise of the Shadow Government offers a snarky and intelligent tour d’horizon of some of America’s more or less perpetual ruling organs."

    http://takimag.com/article/deep_state_of_the_union_steve_sailer/print#ixzz4ZPktLXB6

    Generally, my attempts to invent terms don't catch on.

    Whatever role I played in spreading this old term, probably a key period was the spring of 2011 when the public learned that Osama bin Laden had been holed up a mile from the military academy of our close friends, the Pakistanis.

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2011/05/peak-state.html

    I suggested a corollary to the theory of the deep state: that the decision to host Osama probably wasn't made by some mid-level manager in Pakistan's deep state. Instead, I suspect, the question got kicked all the way upstairs to the peak state: military dictator Pervez Musharraf.

    That's sort of how things worked in Chicago during the 42 years of Mayors Daley.

    , @res

    I may have been wrong to doubt.
     
    You might want to make this sentence a hotkey in your editor and revisit all of your Trump posts.
  87. Trump Administration Open Thread
    I’ve been dealing with car problems, but as always, lots of stuff is happening. What do you think?

    I think things are going fine, and I have already compared the presidency with a four-year long car journey, with the driver having some – eminently solvable – car problems.

    I dunno if this is old hat or not:

    CA Fitts on Greg Hunter, Feb. 11: “Number one, Trump came into Washington with an agenda that would really make America great again: tax reform, regulatory relief, infrastructure and ObamaCare. Immediately, he got bogged down in those for a variety of reasons. If you look at Congress’s constituents, they can’t make money solving those things, particularly if it helps regular people. So, immediately you bog down on those issues. … If you want to slow Donald Trump down … the first thing you do is take out their loyal lieutenants. …
    Number two, Trump is an alpha male. So, you look for his weakness and you figure out what are his weaknesses. The alpha males always protect the females in his life, so what you do is go after the females. …
    The U.S. bureaucracy is huge and very complex, and it’s a matrix structure. The third thing you want to do is bollocks him up in the structure. ….. The reason you want to bollocks with a bureaucracy or the courts …. is then you bring everything into the mud, you complicate their lives and make things harder to do. And suddenly, I call them “Piggies” – the Piggies show up, and, of course, the Congress is greased to pass the things that the Piggies want. So, who do we see this week? We see George Schultz, Jim Baker […] show up promoting, – a carbon tax! So, here is the problem, if you get stuck in the mud on “make America great again,” the Piggies show up and will help you “get something done, ” – the Piggies fly through. ”

    “What you are seeing is a war between the ‘Piggies’ and the ‘Titanic’-turners. The question is can Trump learn how to play the game. And what we are seeing in how they rolled out the immigration [issue] is a lack of experience and knowing how to play the game. …… If you look at Pence and the generals, they got the knowledge, you just have to access it.. Trump is not a CEO, he’s running a matrix-structure with very complex checks and balances, which requires a much more complex, subtle game.”

    Greg Hunter: How does Trump win?

    “Trump wins by staying focused on the real issues. The U.S. economy needs a variety of different things, including turning the federal budget around. ….. The reality is the federal budget has a negative return of investment to taxpayers. It’s got to be turned positive. There is a lot of detail in that, but you’ve got to turn the Titanic. That comes down to tax reform, infrastructure and it comes down to Obamacare.
    The biggest problem in turning the Titanic – it’s not Washington. It’s not the Congress. The reason the Congress is acting as bizarrely as they are, is that the American people and all the different constituencies involved, refuse to face the truth and refuse to stop being Piggies.
    Frankly, if I was in White House, I’d start putting up websites that have simulations and games that show all the information the American people need to start to really engage in.”

    http://usawatchdog.com/empire-strikes-back-on-trump-catherine-austin-fitts/

    Fitts mentioned getting bogged down on Obamacare, but Dick Morris tells us: It’s over! Problem solved, a major campaign promise practically realized! :

    Trump’s BIG Move On Obamacare on 16 Feb
    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CPaRMdU3xI)

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    Thank you so much for posting the Dick Morris youtube link. I had noted the move to end the penalties, but didn't hear about the eliminating of the rule that made all insurance policies cover everything. I have never seen the need for health insurance to cover ordinary medical care. Insurance is needed for catastrophic events such as a car accident or a heart attack or a brain tumor - and am delighted to hear that soon such medical plans will be offered to the public again.
  88. I’m seeing more and more people speaking out about All That Has Been Silenced.

    In the past 72 hours, I’ve had conversations with five strangers thrilled to talk at length, and extremely intelligently, about Pres. Trump, immigration, population genetics, intelligence/self-control/forward thinking and their distribution, socialism as a great idea that can only work for people of Certain Ethnies (though they don’t use that word), and much more.

    This is right out in the open–aisles of commercial establishments, salespeople, taverns.

    I’m hearing more people nervously but remarkably boldly confiding their frustration with being dinged for being white and really getting sick of the Victim du Jour bulletins from Big Mother.

    I’m getting lots of e-mail fwds from posse members at the area leftist/hippie four-year college that attest to faculty members (mostly in science) speaking up against the Diversitopia Uber Alles stance of the incoming administration, which is clearly gob-smacked by Hillary’s failure to break her ceiling’s, erm, glass. Their admin doubles down…but it’s clear the institution is failing and needs to shift tiller/rudder. Can they? Doubtful. We shall see.

    I see Trump as a rather conservative Democrat of the 1970s. Can’t believe people call him “far right.” The man hasn’t really changed politics in my lifetime that I can tell…it’s just that the Dems/left took a hard port tack and think that “in irons” means close-hauled full speed ahead.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    If you believe in "From each according to his abilities, to each according to his needs," you can't very well bring into your country tens of millions of people who have very little in the way of ability and a great deal in the way of needs. The math doesn't work.

    socialism as a great idea that can only work for people of Certain Ethnies
  89. @Alice
    I'm thoroughly impressed by what DJT has managed in a month. It's difficult to find, though, because no one's reporting it. You have to read a zillion random second and third tier news sites and blogs, and the Google what they are talking about, to find the story. Like the rollback of the disastrous Waters of the US EPA rule. Or the coal mining rule rollback. Or the 5 year ban in Obama people being lobbyists. Or the local stories of illegals in high schools caught with weapons being immediately deported. Or VA staff being fired. or SecState people being fired. Or cyber security people being fired. Or....A hundred things you didn't know. all great.

    I believe I read here that someone (Ohio gov Kasich, maybe?) was told by trump he could do all the foreign policy stuff, all the military stuff. What, did that leave trump doing, he asked? Making America great again. Whoever that was thought it was asinine and so passed it up.

    But I get what he means now. McMaster, Mattis, Pence--they can have whatever they want overseas. Foreign policy doesn't matter to Americans. Jobs matter. Their towns matter. Ending the opioids matters. So he's going to negotiate with Intel and Ford and everyone else. He's going to stop the DoJ suing your local grammar school to allow the big who thinks he's a girl in the girls locker room when they change clothes. He's going to fix the dams and the bridges and the airports. He's going to MAGA. And then US prestige will be determined by its GDP pushing the world's, and the other issues will be solved however those folks want them. Because that ain't what matters most anyway.

    I believe you. What strategies could I employ to learn these things?

  90. @Clyde

    I certainly did not make up the term “deep state,” but I’ve been using it pretty regularly since 2009.
     
    You definitely get credit for popularizing the term "Deep State". Others too, but you for sure, and for all I know perhaps the most. The first time I read you discussing it, it made perfect sense. BTW these days the conservative mainstream Rush Limbaugh brings up alt right themes I first read about here (at iSteve) five years ago, with similar credit going to VDare. These days he frequently uses the phrase "white voters" and discusses their interests. Unheard of five years ago and even three years ago.

    Seen at Vdare the other day. Brenda Walker saying due to robotics slashing jobs we don't need any immigration anymore.


    Automation Makes Immigration Obsolete - It's time to end an institution that no longer serves Americans
    By Brenda Walker
    Published in The Social Contract
    Volume 27, Number 1 (Fall 2016)
    Issue theme: "When robots replace humans"
    http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc_27_1/tsc-27-1-walker-2.shtml

     

    I read that Steve Jobs was proposing a tax on robots that replace human jobs, at least temporarily. Haven’t thought it through or how it ties to immigration policy.

    Related – Has anyone directly advocated increased taxes for companies hiring visa holders instead of citizens? Or something like that?

    • Replies: @Dissident

    I read that Steve Jobs was proposing a tax on robots that replace human jobs
     
    That was Bill Gates. Steve Jobs can no longer make policy proposals where he is, at least not for this realm...
  91. @Anonymous
    What kind of car problems are you having? Not related to the past weeks heavy rains, is it?

    You bet!! He’s getting “go go gadget” shocks for the Noticemobile.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    (...because of the flooding, you see...)
  92. @Chrisnonymous
    You bet!! He's getting "go go gadget" shocks for the Noticemobile.

    http://www.allenbattino.com/www.allenbattino.com/Portfolio/Pages/Inspector_Gadget_files/Media/Gadget_car_legs1/thumb.jpg

    (…because of the flooding, you see…)

  93. @Opinionator
    I may have been wrong to doubt. I have been under the impression that the term has been around for a long while and was more widespread.

    By the way, this guy, writing as recently as 2014, appears to treat the term as his own. (People seem to think lifting terms and ideas from you doesn't require attribution--although I'm not suggesting that's what happened here.)

    http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/21/anatomy-of-the-deep-state/

    I reviewed Mike Lofgren’s book “Deep State” last year:

    http://takimag.com/article/deep_state_of_the_union_steve_sailer/print#axzz4ZAy0zws3

    “The 20th-century Turkish concept of a “deep state” first spread to other Mediterranean countries such as Italy, and is now slowly being picked up by American pundits. Ex–Republican congressional staffer Mike Lofgren’s 2016 book The Deep State: The Fall of the Constitution and the Rise of the Shadow Government offers a snarky and intelligent tour d’horizon of some of America’s more or less perpetual ruling organs.”

    http://takimag.com/article/deep_state_of_the_union_steve_sailer/print#ixzz4ZPktLXB6

    Generally, my attempts to invent terms don’t catch on.

    Whatever role I played in spreading this old term, probably a key period was the spring of 2011 when the public learned that Osama bin Laden had been holed up a mile from the military academy of our close friends, the Pakistanis.

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2011/05/peak-state.html

    I suggested a corollary to the theory of the deep state: that the decision to host Osama probably wasn’t made by some mid-level manager in Pakistan’s deep state. Instead, I suspect, the question got kicked all the way upstairs to the peak state: military dictator Pervez Musharraf.

    That’s sort of how things worked in Chicago during the 42 years of Mayors Daley.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Thanks
  94. When does Trump turn off the obamaphones?

  95. Peter Dale Scott’s Deep Politics and the Death of JFK was published in 1993 University of California Press.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Peter_Dale_Scott#Books

    According to reviewers, it uses the term “Deep State”

    Peter Dale Scott: “The Turkish term “deep State” (deren devlet) was coined after the so-called Susurluk incident, a 1996 car crash whose victims included the deputy chief of the Istanbul Police Department, a Member of Parliament, and Abdullah Çatlı, an international heroin trafficker and killer recruited by the Turkish police for “special missions” and paid in heroin while he was officially being sought by the Turkish authorities for murder. …..”

    http://whowhatwhy.org/2017/02/06/donald-j-trump-deep-state-part-1/

    These claims are mutually contradictory. Peter Dale Scott always (always!) says he borrowed the term from foreign media. But if it was coined in 1996, how could he have used it (or a very similar term) in 1993?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I looked through Google's Ngram for books mentioning "deep state" in the Turkish sense rather than in the "deep state of" relaxation or depression or whatever sense. The first I found was a 1997 book reprinting a Turkish newspaper article, perhaps after that amusing 1996 car crash in Turkey.
    , @utu

    What Is the Deep State?
     

    https://www.thenation.com/article/what-is-the-deep-state/
     

    " Peter Dale Scott was the first, as far as I know, to use the phrase “parapolitics” and “deep politics” to discuss what is now described as the deep state, and he’s the author of numerous books on the dense connections between illegal drugs, covert action, and finance. "
     

    Until recently, the phrase “deep state” had been mostly consigned to the bowels of the conspiratorial deep web, but over the past few weeks, since Donald Trump decided to take his fight with the intelligence community public, it has witnessed a remarkable florescence. The “deep state” apparently has Trump in its sights, at least according to former NSA intelligence analyst John Schindler, who tweeted that a friend in the “intelligence community” told him that Trump “will die in jail.”
     
    Usage of the term deep state in Turkey in 1970s
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_state_in_Turkey

    "derin devlet" - Rumours of the deep state have been widespread in Turkey since Ecevit's term as prime minister in the 1970s, after his revelation of the existence of a Turkish counterpart to Italy's Operation Gladio, the "Counter-Guerrilla"
  96. @Ivan K.
    Peter Dale Scott's Deep Politics and the Death of JFK was published in 1993 University of California Press.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Peter_Dale_Scott#Books

    According to reviewers, it uses the term "Deep State"

    https://www.amazon.com/Deep-Politics-Death-Peter-Scott/product-reviews/0520205197/ref=cm_cr_dp_d_btm?ie=UTF8&reviewerType=all_reviews&sortBy=recent

    Peter Dale Scott: “The Turkish term “deep State” (deren devlet) was coined after the so-called Susurluk incident, a 1996 car crash whose victims included the deputy chief of the Istanbul Police Department, a Member of Parliament, and Abdullah Çatlı, an international heroin trafficker and killer recruited by the Turkish police for “special missions” and paid in heroin while he was officially being sought by the Turkish authorities for murder. …..”

    http://whowhatwhy.org/2017/02/06/donald-j-trump-deep-state-part-1/

    These claims are mutually contradictory. Peter Dale Scott always (always!) says he borrowed the term from foreign media. But if it was coined in 1996, how could he have used it (or a very similar term) in 1993?

    I looked through Google’s Ngram for books mentioning “deep state” in the Turkish sense rather than in the “deep state of” relaxation or depression or whatever sense. The first I found was a 1997 book reprinting a Turkish newspaper article, perhaps after that amusing 1996 car crash in Turkey.

  97. @Alice
    I'm thoroughly impressed by what DJT has managed in a month. It's difficult to find, though, because no one's reporting it. You have to read a zillion random second and third tier news sites and blogs, and the Google what they are talking about, to find the story. Like the rollback of the disastrous Waters of the US EPA rule. Or the coal mining rule rollback. Or the 5 year ban in Obama people being lobbyists. Or the local stories of illegals in high schools caught with weapons being immediately deported. Or VA staff being fired. or SecState people being fired. Or cyber security people being fired. Or....A hundred things you didn't know. all great.

    I believe I read here that someone (Ohio gov Kasich, maybe?) was told by trump he could do all the foreign policy stuff, all the military stuff. What, did that leave trump doing, he asked? Making America great again. Whoever that was thought it was asinine and so passed it up.

    But I get what he means now. McMaster, Mattis, Pence--they can have whatever they want overseas. Foreign policy doesn't matter to Americans. Jobs matter. Their towns matter. Ending the opioids matters. So he's going to negotiate with Intel and Ford and everyone else. He's going to stop the DoJ suing your local grammar school to allow the big who thinks he's a girl in the girls locker room when they change clothes. He's going to fix the dams and the bridges and the airports. He's going to MAGA. And then US prestige will be determined by its GDP pushing the world's, and the other issues will be solved however those folks want them. Because that ain't what matters most anyway.

    Wonderful analysis, Alice! Please continue to keep tabs on things like this to remind us of all the good things happening that no one in the media will report in a coherent fashion.

  98. @Ivan K.

    Trump Administration Open Thread
    I’ve been dealing with car problems, but as always, lots of stuff is happening. What do you think?
     
    I think things are going fine, and I have already compared the presidency with a four-year long car journey, with the driver having some - eminently solvable - car problems.

    I dunno if this is old hat or not:

    CA Fitts on Greg Hunter, Feb. 11: “Number one, Trump came into Washington with an agenda that would really make America great again: tax reform, regulatory relief, infrastructure and ObamaCare. Immediately, he got bogged down in those for a variety of reasons. If you look at Congress’s constituents, they can’t make money solving those things, particularly if it helps regular people. So, immediately you bog down on those issues. ... If you want to slow Donald Trump down ... the first thing you do is take out their loyal lieutenants. ...
    Number two, Trump is an alpha male. So, you look for his weakness and you figure out what are his weaknesses. The alpha males always protect the females in his life, so what you do is go after the females. ...
    The U.S. bureaucracy is huge and very complex, and it’s a matrix structure. The third thing you want to do is bollocks him up in the structure. ..... The reason you want to bollocks with a bureaucracy or the courts .... is then you bring everything into the mud, you complicate their lives and make things harder to do. And suddenly, I call them "Piggies" - the Piggies show up, and, of course, the Congress is greased to pass the things that the Piggies want. So, who do we see this week? We see George Schultz, Jim Baker [...] show up promoting, - a carbon tax! So, here is the problem, if you get stuck in the mud on "make America great again," the Piggies show up and will help you "get something done, " - the Piggies fly through. "

    "What you are seeing is a war between the ‘Piggies’ and the ‘Titanic’-turners. The question is can Trump learn how to play the game. And what we are seeing in how they rolled out the immigration [issue] is a lack of experience and knowing how to play the game. ...... If you look at Pence and the generals, they got the knowledge, you just have to access it.. Trump is not a CEO, he's running a matrix-structure with very complex checks and balances, which requires a much more complex, subtle game."

    Greg Hunter: How does Trump win?

    “Trump wins by staying focused on the real issues. The U.S. economy needs a variety of different things, including turning the federal budget around. ..... The reality is the federal budget has a negative return of investment to taxpayers. It’s got to be turned positive. There is a lot of detail in that, but you've got to turn the Titanic. That comes down to tax reform, infrastructure and it comes down to Obamacare.
    The biggest problem in turning the Titanic - it's not Washington. It's not the Congress. The reason the Congress is acting as bizarrely as they are, is that the American people and all the different constituencies involved, refuse to face the truth and refuse to stop being Piggies.
    Frankly, if I was in White House, I'd start putting up websites that have simulations and games that show all the information the American people need to start to really engage in."

    http://usawatchdog.com/empire-strikes-back-on-trump-catherine-austin-fitts/

    Fitts mentioned getting bogged down on Obamacare, but Dick Morris tells us: It's over! Problem solved, a major campaign promise practically realized! :

    Trump’s BIG Move On Obamacare on 16 Feb
    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CPaRMdU3xI)

    Thank you so much for posting the Dick Morris youtube link. I had noted the move to end the penalties, but didn’t hear about the eliminating of the rule that made all insurance policies cover everything. I have never seen the need for health insurance to cover ordinary medical care. Insurance is needed for catastrophic events such as a car accident or a heart attack or a brain tumor – and am delighted to hear that soon such medical plans will be offered to the public again.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    I doubt there is any solution that the Republicans can offer. Obamacare already is a high deductible plan. Just because you are "covering" something that is not possible like male pregnancy doesn't mean that the actuaries are adding something for it in your premium.

    The biggest problem with medical insurance is that there is no limit to how much they may have to pay for catastrophic occurrences (up to some lifetime maximum) that can never be covered by 20 peoples premiums. It is even worse if these is an extremely low yearly premium. If these events could be quantified then they already would be offering insurance for pre-existing conditions, which they routinely reject without so much as a look at the underlying condition. I know because I applied and got my rejection letters within hours of putting my application in.

    My Obamacare premium is 600 dollars (I keep my income low to get my 360 subsidy) and I still have a 4500 deductible in my very limited EPO (heavily restricted PPO). My bills are routinely cut by 75% by the time I pay them. This means I will likely need to see 18,000 in medical bills before the insurance company pays a cent. Of the next 5000, I pay 2000 of that. That is another 20,000. So before I am completely covered I will likely see medical bills of 38,000 of which I will pay 6500 and the insurance company 2000. This is after the 7200 dollars of premiums.

    If the insurance companies are saying they can't make money on a plan like that, how are they going to make money on a plan where they charge you 2000 dollars a year. The deductible would have to be in the order of 25,000 meaning nothing but cancer or a heart transplant would be covered. Nobody but people with a lot of assets to protect will sign up for this and it too will collapse under it's own weight.
  99. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyD
    At first, I thought Gen. McMaster was a good pick to replace Flynn (mostly because McMaster is not John Bolton). But then, I saw Bill "I rather have the Deep State" Kristol praising McMaster, and I saw John "Why aren't we starring another war, yet" McCain also praising McMaster. Then I saw Susan "Let's destroy Libya" Rice adivising McMaster about how he needs to get rid of Banon and Miller. And then, most depressing of all, I saw that McMaster believes all neoconservative propaganda about Russia and the Ukraine.

    And a lot of hardcore anti-neocons have praised the appointment of McMaster (Justin Raimondo, Col. W. Patrick Lang, et al.). I know it’s early in Trump’s Presidency, but I think you should have seen some evidence that Trump has an extremely rare ability to size things up– and quickly– and make the right move. Like Bobby Fischer. And the Deep State, MSM, Congress, elites, et al., are like the teams of Soviet chess grandmasters plotting moves to thwart him. He just sizes up the situation and makes the absolute winning combination of moves. 1/10^20.

  100. Anonymous [AKA "Adam Baum"] says: • Website
    @Opinionator
    Does Trump's denouncing "anti-Semitism" implicitly feed a false narrative of American anti-Semitism/Holocaust risk?

    If so, would that be a legitimate reason for a president to resist making such denunciations?

    Trumps defending Israel is one thing he should do if they are threatened from outside their borders, however as this is never the real case as has been proven time and again, defending an International Crime committed by Israel against Palestine, it puts Trump in the unsavory category accomplice to Genocide.

    Popular Videos – International Criminal Court & Crime

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Yeah. Hutus/Tutsis/Israel/Palestine. Same genus. Machete attacks=building houses. Accomplice to genocide blah blah blah.
  101. @Yankee
    All I have to do is get up in the morning, hear the phrase "President Trump" on the news, and I just feel so very, very happy.

    It's about what I expected to happen if he won, when the campaign was going on: a little blundering around, but sure of eventual success if he sticks to what he said he would do if elected.

    If Hillary had moved into the White House on January 20, 2017, she would have put out all the furniture on the lawn for the Saudis to buy in a gigantic yard sale.

    By the end of this month, she would have sold Alaska back to the Russians and Louisiana back to the French and laundered the proceeds through THE CLINTON FOUNDATION.

  102. President Donald Trump is a decent baby boomer who loves the United States. President Trump is just like the great Norman by the name of William the Conqueror who slaughtered the Saxons in 1066 at the the Battle of Hastings. We’ll call our president Donald the Conqueror.

    Donald the Conqueror is now the leader of the European Christian people. Donald the Conqueror knows that European Christian nation-states such as Sweden, Germany, Denmark, Britain, Australia, France, the United States and many others are under attack from evil forces who are using mass immigration as a demographic weapon. This is White Genocide and many traitors in the Deep State of the American Empire are pushing it.

    Donald the Conqueror also knows that the only thing holding the American Empire together is monetary extremism from the privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank. The conjuring up of currency in order to prop up asset bubbles is occurring all over the globe. If the federal funds rate were to go to 10 percent the United States economy would implode within one month. Greedy baby boomers are preventing that creative destruction from happening.

    I find it very interesting that a Huguenot, Nigel Farage, and a 1/2 German — 1/2 Scot, Donald Trump, would be the ones to lead English nations to change course on immigration policy and the restoration of national sovereignty. Where the hell are the people with English ancestry? I have some English ancestry, but I had to wait for a Huguenot and a Scottish Kraut to challenge the ruling classes of Britain and America.

    Donald the Conqueror should call for a complete and total halt to all immigration into the United States. Donald the Conqueror should immediately deport all illegal alien invaders.

    Donald the Conqueror has launched a few exploratory charges against the ruling classes shield wall to determine where the weaknesses are. Very soon he will completely rout the treasonous ruling class of the American Empire.

  103. @Sunbeam
    In a way I think this is a referendum on the media.

    They've pulled out all the stops, just as they did in the election. But I have to wonder just how much influence they still have honestly.

    In the end I guess what matters is what Congress actually does when it comes to voting. But if you think about it, the weird echo chamber in Washington is one of the few places that cares what the media parrots nonstop or takes it seriously.

    Otherwise it is just more fuel on the anger fire, changing no one's mind, only exacerbating whatever position was held before the full court press started.

    Personally I think Trump needs to metaphorically get on the podium, extend both arms, and flip a double bird to... they need a name. Obstructionists? Wreckers?

    You know, all the talk on this site about altruism, western/northern (whichever it is) Europeans being more cooperative and being able to work in groups...

    Why can't we get a protest of our own going. Like half a million or something walking by the CIA headquarters chanting "Hell No, Trump Won't Go!"

    Personally I think Trump needs to metaphorically get on the podium, extend both arms, and flip a double bird to… they need a name. Obstructionists? Wreckers?

    He just did that in Melbourne last weekend.

  104. @Olorin
    I'm seeing more and more people speaking out about All That Has Been Silenced.

    In the past 72 hours, I've had conversations with five strangers thrilled to talk at length, and extremely intelligently, about Pres. Trump, immigration, population genetics, intelligence/self-control/forward thinking and their distribution, socialism as a great idea that can only work for people of Certain Ethnies (though they don't use that word), and much more.

    This is right out in the open--aisles of commercial establishments, salespeople, taverns.

    I'm hearing more people nervously but remarkably boldly confiding their frustration with being dinged for being white and really getting sick of the Victim du Jour bulletins from Big Mother.

    I'm getting lots of e-mail fwds from posse members at the area leftist/hippie four-year college that attest to faculty members (mostly in science) speaking up against the Diversitopia Uber Alles stance of the incoming administration, which is clearly gob-smacked by Hillary's failure to break her ceiling's, erm, glass. Their admin doubles down...but it's clear the institution is failing and needs to shift tiller/rudder. Can they? Doubtful. We shall see.

    I see Trump as a rather conservative Democrat of the 1970s. Can't believe people call him "far right." The man hasn't really changed politics in my lifetime that I can tell...it's just that the Dems/left took a hard port tack and think that "in irons" means close-hauled full speed ahead.

    If you believe in “From each according to his abilities, to each according to his needs,” you can’t very well bring into your country tens of millions of people who have very little in the way of ability and a great deal in the way of needs. The math doesn’t work.

    socialism as a great idea that can only work for people of Certain Ethnies

  105. @benjaminl
    The future of America!

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/apr/25/argentina.rorycarroll

    via @tcjfs on Twitter, a highly recommended follow.

    The present of California.

    FIFY

  106. @Pepe
    This morning a Mexican man deported from the US jumped off a bridge crossing in Tijuana. He survived the drop, but he later passed away in a local hospital.

    It's gonna get ugly.

    Despite the talk in some liberal circles about the "improving Mexican economy" and "net-zero" migration from Mexico, Mexicans are completely terrified of going back to their home country.

    http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/articulo/estados/2017/02/21/migrante-deportado-de-eu-se-suicida-en-tijuana

    Maybe he committed suicide because he was forced to leave a loved one behind and felt despondent?

    • Replies: @Pepe
    Updates indicate that he was 40 years old and divorced from his ex-wife in the US. As of this a.m. no one reported to claim the body.

    He denied offers of assistance to be returned to his hometown in Sinaloa state.

    He reportedly was yelling that he didn't want to go back to Mexico adding, "they're going to kill me!"

    Terrifying stuff...

    http://www.debate.com.mx/mexico/De-Ahome-el-hombre-que-se-suicido-tras-deportacion-20170221-0247.html
    , @Pepe
    Update to update:

    He was 42 years old and his wife in Mexico had passed away. He had only been working in the US for three years, doing landscaping and selling pine trees.

    His three children live with his aunt in a small town in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    The aunt and other family members in Sinaloa stated he was very worried about returning to his hometown, because he had previously only found day jobs that paid so little the family was living in poverty.

    Headline reads: "Guadalupe chose to jump off a bridge than return to poverty in Mexico."

    https://www.elsoldesinaloa.com.mx/local/miedo-a-volver-a-la-pobreza-orillo-a-guadalupe-olivas-a-quitarse-la-vida-tras-ser-deportado
  107. @Jonathan Mason
    I think a lot of the supposed costs of security for Trump are semifictional. For example, it supposedly costs almost $1 million for Trump and family to fly on Air Force One to Florida for the weekend, but surely the people who operate the plane are government employees and are not all on overtime and would otherwise be spending the weekend at home with their feet up, and the cost of the fuel would be the same for any aircraft. In any case if the Air Force One staff do have to work extra at the weekends for Trump, then give them days off in the week as compensation.

    Being in the hotel business, I am sure Trump could negotiate good discounts for rooms for his security detail, or make them economize by using hotel beds in shifts and taking packed lunches with them.

    The bird’s crew are members of the Air Force. They work whatever hours they are told, in shifts, for a flat rate, like all members of the military. Thus, the costs of personnel for the bird itself are negligible. Likewise for Marine One.

  108. @O'Really
    Like others, I first heard the term here.

    What is most striking, however, is the fact that the term burst into public awareness so quickly with the emergence of the fake news "dossier" on Jan. 10, 2017. This rapid rise in awareness is itself a massive failure of the deep state.

    A search of Google news shows minimal references to the "deep state" prior to that date, with the exception of a few fringe conspiracy sites and someone going by the 'nym Virgil at Breitbart (http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/12/12/virgil-the-deep-state-vs-donald-trump/). However, Ross Douthat (an iSteve reader) did use the term in passing in a December column (https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/opinion/the-donald-trump-matrix.html).

    It seems that Glenn Greenwald probably is most responsible (or at least was first) in explicitly linking the dossier to the deep state, on the day after it was released (https://theintercept.com/2017/01/11/the-deep-state-goes-to-war-with-president-elect-using-unverified-claims-as-dems-cheer/). References explode immediately thereafter.

    I think this turn of events has taken TPTB by surprise. (It could be said that being surprised by events is a defining feature of the American deep state.) For example, it took TPTB a full six weeks to mount a counter-attack in their go-to journal, the Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/02/why-its-dangerous-to-talk-about-a-deep-state/517221/

    Great comment. Thanks for posting. It’s very encouraging to think that the “Deep State” may be on its way to becoming as prominent a meme as “alt-right” has become.

  109. @Karl
    8 James N Kennett > President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense


    I imagine that such is true. However, DJT decided to comment on news that was disseminated in a public forum, the better to teach lessons to the people for whose safety, he is responsible.

    I can explain to you why you need to change your car's oil filter.... do you want me to give the calculus-based explanation, or do you want me to just show you the dirt and goop that has accumulated in the filter paper?

    hey iSteve, does RonUnz give a full payment for an "xxxyyyzzz Open Thread" article? You could probably churn out 800 of those a week. Much less wear & tear on your typewriter than those "normal" threads, where you have to actually fully set up a discussion topic....

    Typewriter? Typewriter?

    Take your pill…or…something.

  110. Trump has one minor ace-in-the-hole.
    McConnell.
    Don’t listen to what he says, only watch what he does.
    Putting his wife in the Cabinet was a brilliant quid pro quo move on Trump’s part.

  111. @jJay
    I voted in CA during the recent national election. I left the 'chad' for POTUS blank for some reasons peculiar to CA.

    I do want to thank those of you who did vote for Trump though. You're great!

    When you are in a dead state like California (like me) the only way to help is by donating money – no matter how small. The next battle will be to get rid of open borders Flake in Arizona. Hopefully, Kelli Ward will primary him out. The Republican establishment and stupid Arizona voters were too much for her when she ran against McCain. Hopefully, even those morons in Arizona can see their stupidity given McCain’s antics against Trump once he was reelected.

  112. @Opinionator
    Well his own approval ratings aren't great. They might not be at levels high enough to win a reelection. So what's the plan?

    They might not be at levels high enough to win a reelection.

    What were they before this election? Yes, running against Hillary was a gift from the gods but there is nobody in the Democrat Party left worth voting for. The magic negro fairy dust is used up. Bernie can generate that same level of excitement since he has hitched his wagon to all the Democrats negatives. The Democrats have doubled down on “hate whitey”. The economy will likely improve no matter who is in the White House. Trump is actually doing things the silent majority likes.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Bad proof read - Bernie Can't
  113. @Anon
    It's very strange to me that Republicans control the presidency, congress and most of the state legislatures and governorships, but are acting like they're the ones who lost in November. Are they afraid to wield the power voters gave them? Are they apologizing for winning, like Adele at the Grammy's? Who cares about the media, who cares what they say. Trump proved you don't need them in your corner to win. He ran on the most blatant immigration restriction platform since the 1920's and won, but now the GOP have cold feet about following through on a winning strategy? Idiots.

    The donors control Congress and they want cheap labor. The trusted stooges for the donors are working behind the scenes trying to get that amnesty. Trump will have to fight them every step of the way.

    • Agree: Opinionator
  114. @Opinionator
    The electoral college margin came only as a result of infinitesimally small statewide popular vote margins. But you knew that.

    If the economy recovers and jobs come back to the rust belt, Trump’s margins in Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Ohio will be much bigger.

  115. @Anonymous
    After the first month it's clear that Pence is a huge mistake. Anything happens to Trump and Pence is going to reverse everything Trump ever did. I thought Pence was a rebel in congress but I should've known better.

    Pence was gung-ho Big Time for the 2013 US Senate Amnesty bill. You can’t change a leopard’s spots without a major operation and there’s no reason to hope that said leopard would survive such an operation at the end of the day.

    Pence was Trump’s signal that he was willing to play ball with the RINO establishment. JFK picked LBJ for his running mate in order to carry certain Southern states in November of 1960. Come November 22, 1963, this clever plan of Kennedy’s literally blew up in his face.

  116. @Alice
    I'm thoroughly impressed by what DJT has managed in a month. It's difficult to find, though, because no one's reporting it. You have to read a zillion random second and third tier news sites and blogs, and the Google what they are talking about, to find the story. Like the rollback of the disastrous Waters of the US EPA rule. Or the coal mining rule rollback. Or the 5 year ban in Obama people being lobbyists. Or the local stories of illegals in high schools caught with weapons being immediately deported. Or VA staff being fired. or SecState people being fired. Or cyber security people being fired. Or....A hundred things you didn't know. all great.

    I believe I read here that someone (Ohio gov Kasich, maybe?) was told by trump he could do all the foreign policy stuff, all the military stuff. What, did that leave trump doing, he asked? Making America great again. Whoever that was thought it was asinine and so passed it up.

    But I get what he means now. McMaster, Mattis, Pence--they can have whatever they want overseas. Foreign policy doesn't matter to Americans. Jobs matter. Their towns matter. Ending the opioids matters. So he's going to negotiate with Intel and Ford and everyone else. He's going to stop the DoJ suing your local grammar school to allow the big who thinks he's a girl in the girls locker room when they change clothes. He's going to fix the dams and the bridges and the airports. He's going to MAGA. And then US prestige will be determined by its GDP pushing the world's, and the other issues will be solved however those folks want them. Because that ain't what matters most anyway.

    Most Americans couldn’t even tell you what continent some foreign country is on let alone find it on a map. However, it is continually pounded into their heads that it should matter and the US should lead somehow. This brainwashing is what needs to be countered.

    I bet that more than a few Americans actually think we should care about Crimea. Most don’t have the slightest idea what caring about Crimea really entails.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Crimea belongs to Russia.

    Donbass is supported by Russians who support the Ukrainians that want to be a part of Russia; not Ukraine; Ukrainians ( or Deep State) who killed off their democratically elected Ukrainian president. Well, you know...it is super complicated. BUT: CRIMEA IS RUSSIA.

    USA should absolutely not support Ukraine...or any crazy-assed (Nazi) army to take back Crimea, and will kill everyone (families/civilians) who represent/live in the area known as: Donbass.

  117. @James Braxton
    The DACA work permits expire on their own. Most of them in 2017. This is a smart play by Trump.

    A more detailed article at https://www.cato.org/blog/how-daca-will-end-timeline-expiration indicates that most DACA work permits will expire in 2018. Do you have information to support your 2017 assertion?

    • Replies: @James Braxton
    I stand corrected on that detail. In any case, they expire within the next year or two at which time all of the dreamers will go into the basket of deportables.
  118. @benjaminl
    Today in Coalition of the Fringes:

    Nice Wholesome Stanford Coed All-American Bullied into Depression By WNBA Lesbians

    Wiggins, a four-time All-American at Stanford, asserts she was targeted for harassment from the time she was drafted by Minnesota because she is heterosexual and a nationally popular figure, of whom many other players were jealous.

    “Me being heterosexual and straight, and being vocal in my identity as a straight woman was huge,” Wiggins said. “I would say 98 percent of the women in the WNBA are gay women. It was a conformist type of place. There was a whole different set of rules they (the other players) could apply.

    “There was a lot of jealousy and competition, and we’re all fighting for crumbs,” Wiggins said. “The way I looked, the way I played – those things contributed to the tension.

    “People were deliberately trying to hurt me all of the time. I had never been called the B-word so many times in my life than I was in my rookie season. I’d never been thrown to the ground so much. The message was: ‘We want you to know we don’t like you.’ “
     

    What is great (in this crazy-assed Pokémon world we live in) is she is black and beautiful.

  119. @MarkinLA
    They might not be at levels high enough to win a reelection.

    What were they before this election? Yes, running against Hillary was a gift from the gods but there is nobody in the Democrat Party left worth voting for. The magic negro fairy dust is used up. Bernie can generate that same level of excitement since he has hitched his wagon to all the Democrats negatives. The Democrats have doubled down on "hate whitey". The economy will likely improve no matter who is in the White House. Trump is actually doing things the silent majority likes.

    Bad proof read – Bernie Can’t

  120. @Opinionator
    I may have been wrong to doubt. I have been under the impression that the term has been around for a long while and was more widespread.

    By the way, this guy, writing as recently as 2014, appears to treat the term as his own. (People seem to think lifting terms and ideas from you doesn't require attribution--although I'm not suggesting that's what happened here.)

    http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/21/anatomy-of-the-deep-state/

    I may have been wrong to doubt.

    You might want to make this sentence a hotkey in your editor and revisit all of your Trump posts.

  121. Does Trump’s denouncing “anti-Semitism” implicitly feed a false narrative of American anti-Semitism/Holocaust risk?

    If so, would that be a legitimate reason for a president to resist making such denunciations?

    I see two obvious plays here. 1, call the media out on their calling out. Every time they call out, point out that they’re calling out, and call it out as a form of aggression, in the form of, “you don’t beat your wife, do you? You condemn wife-beating, don’t you?” 2, equivalence. “Of course I condemn anti-Semitism. I also condemn Jewish bigotry, racism against whites, the oppression of the Palestinians, the bullying and aggression that heterosexuals in the WNBA experience at the hands of homosexuals, etc.” Might be best to leaven the un-PC concerns among more acceptable pieties, of course.

    In fact, it wouldn’t be a horrible play to simply charge right at the charge:

    “Do you condemn anti-Semitism?”

    “What is it with you guys and anti-Semitism? Jews are the richest people in the world. They have enough friends already. Israel is super-popular in this country, except on the left. Why don’t you find some actual victim groups to stand up for? Btw, yes, I love Jews. Bibi Netanyahu is my favorite guy, ever. The things they’ve done in Israel, with the wall, with encouraging majority birth rates, with ethnic nationalism in general, I really admire them. I want to make America more like Bibi’s Israel. So of course I think it’s loony that anyone would hate Bibi just for being a Jew.”

    It’s a good idea to challenge the idea that Jews are some downtrodden minority: “you know, to my mind, the concern for bigotry against Jews has long stood out among the other concerns. Jews are the wealthiest ethnic group in the country, if not the world. So, they’re not poor like blacks, they don’t live in the shadows like immigrants, they aren’t disrespected or forgotten like the Appalachians, they aren’t down and out like the American Indians. Sure, I condemn anti-Semitism, just like I condemn bigotry in general, but I think Jews can get along just fine without having their hands held, and their brows smoothed. They aren’t even visible minorities. This overweening concern with how the wealthiest ethnic group in America is doing smacks of narcissism, or maybe neurosis.”

    In short, always have a pivot ready.

  122. Reports of the demise of the Trump presidency are wishful thinking by an antagonistic press working to undermine his presidency. Once he roots out all the moles infesting his cabinet and neutralizes Deep State operatives, the press will be eating their words.

    How many times have they counted him out in the last 18 months??? I’ve lost track.

  123. BobX [AKA "Bob who wants H1B 130k minimum"] says:

    Who is the Trump point man on H1B? The current system suppresses American wages. Remove the number limits and replace the lottery by top wage offered with a minimum of $130K. If the reason for these workers is what is claimed by the businesses that employ them this should be no problem.

    We will find however there never was a need for any but a very small number of these workers.

    • Replies: @Travis
    Firms should also have to pay a higher fee for each H1b visa they hire. In 2015 Congress increased the fees for H-1B and L1 visas by $4000 to $8,000 - $10,000. We should double the fees again to $20,000...or change the allocation system. instead of the current lottery, grant them to firms willing to pay the highest fees (min fee would be $15,000, see how much firms are willing to pay for these visas...will they pay $50,000 ?)

    It is crazy that Indian firms get 50% of the h1B visas allocated. Looks very fishy. If these workers are so talented we should not be granting most of the H1b visas to foreign firms. The purpose should be to help American companies compete against the foreign companies.
  124. @Opinionator
    The electoral college margin came only as a result of infinitesimally small statewide popular vote margins. But you knew that.

    Look, the narrowness of Trump’s win was almost entirely due to the perception that he presented a great risk as a potential President. A large part of that could be reduced to questions like: how safe is it to put the fingers of this Twittery, irascible man next to the nuclear codes?

    But those are exactly the sorts of concerns that will be whisked away simply by Trump’s getting through 4 years without major military or diplomatic incident –which seems actually quite likely, not least because Trump is far less inclined toward war than any other recent President.

    If Trump is to lose in 2020, it will because something important and negative took place — which was what doomed both Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush. It won’t be because the idiot media has been pounding him for those 4 years — their blows are impotent if Trump’s policies are successes. Nor will be because his non-“Presidential” manners will continue to be a big issue — people will acclimate to his manners over the 4 years.

    Trump needs to be a successful President in the way that Americans care about: an improved economy, no failed military adventures, no disgracefully broken promises. If he manages to do this, he will be re-elected, and by far larger margins than his first election.

    I’d say that Trump’s chances of doing this are quite good indeed. He’s learning on the job, he seems genuinely to be motivated by doing good for the American people, he’s an excellent manager — even, I think, something of a menschenkenner.

  125. @Steve Sailer
    I reviewed Mike Lofgren's book "Deep State" last year:

    http://takimag.com/article/deep_state_of_the_union_steve_sailer/print#axzz4ZAy0zws3

    "The 20th-century Turkish concept of a “deep state” first spread to other Mediterranean countries such as Italy, and is now slowly being picked up by American pundits. Ex–Republican congressional staffer Mike Lofgren’s 2016 book The Deep State: The Fall of the Constitution and the Rise of the Shadow Government offers a snarky and intelligent tour d’horizon of some of America’s more or less perpetual ruling organs."

    http://takimag.com/article/deep_state_of_the_union_steve_sailer/print#ixzz4ZPktLXB6

    Generally, my attempts to invent terms don't catch on.

    Whatever role I played in spreading this old term, probably a key period was the spring of 2011 when the public learned that Osama bin Laden had been holed up a mile from the military academy of our close friends, the Pakistanis.

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2011/05/peak-state.html

    I suggested a corollary to the theory of the deep state: that the decision to host Osama probably wasn't made by some mid-level manager in Pakistan's deep state. Instead, I suspect, the question got kicked all the way upstairs to the peak state: military dictator Pervez Musharraf.

    That's sort of how things worked in Chicago during the 42 years of Mayors Daley.

    Thanks

  126. @Anonymous
    After the first month it's clear that Pence is a huge mistake. Anything happens to Trump and Pence is going to reverse everything Trump ever did. I thought Pence was a rebel in congress but I should've known better.

    It took you until now to realize that about Pence? A lot of us said that picking Pence was DJT’s first betrayal.

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/by-picking-pence-trump-rewarded-conservatism-inc-s-failure-now-he-must-double-down-on-america-first

  127. The electoral college margin came only as a result of infinitesimally small statewide popular vote margins. But you knew that.

    The popular vote is meaningless, for reasons I have explained here several times. I can do so again, if you want. The Electoral College is the popular vote.

    Look, the narrowness of Trump’s win was almost entirely due to the perception that he presented a great risk as a potential President. A large part of that could be reduced to questions like: how safe is it to put the fingers of this Twittery, irascible man next to the nuclear codes?

    But those are exactly the sorts of concerns that will be whisked away simply by Trump’s getting through 4 years without major military or diplomatic incident –which seems actually quite likely, not least because Trump is far less inclined toward war than any other recent President.

    Very well said. Trump not nuking anyone or starting any wars will give him a big incumbent boost.

  128. BobX [AKA "Bob who would see the Asians deported too"] says:

    Is it a bug or a feature that using crime as a primary filter for deportation enforcement results in more Hispanics and fewer Asians deported relative to their ratio of the total illegal immigrant population?

  129. @CCZ
    The left paranoia is malignant and metastatic. Today’s call is to fight Trump “In The Name Of Humanity” because he is a combination of “more dangerous than even Hitler” and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.

    In the Name of Humanity,
    We REFUSE to Accept a Fascist America!
    Drive Out the Trump/Pence Regime!

    The Trump/Pence Regime is a Fascist Regime. For the future of humanity and the planet, we, the people, must drive this regime out.

    Donald Trump and Mike Pence have assembled a vicious cabal that has put forth positions and begun initiatives which demonstrate that they fully intend to shred political and social norms with catastrophic consequence. Because Trump has his finger on the nuclear trigger, the Trump/Pence regime is more dangerous to the world than even Hitler.

    Fascism has direction and momentum. History has shown that fascism must be stopped before it becomes too late.

    This resistance is righteous and necessary, but it is not sufficient. We must recognize that the character of fascism is that it can absorb separate acts of resistance while continually throwing the opposition off balance by rapidly moving its agenda forward. The Trump/Pence regime will repeatedly launch new highly repressive measures, eventually clamping down on all resistance and remaking the law … IF THEY ARE NOT DRIVEN FROM POWER.

    Announcing National Tour:
    NO! In the Name of Humanity – We Refuse to Accept a Fascist America

    RefuseFascism.org is organizing people across the country to rise to the challenge of driving from office the fascist Trump/Pence regime, before it is too late. A key part of RefuseFascism’s plan is the Drive Out the Trump/Pence Regime National Tour. Organizers will set out from NYC to go to the South heading to Texas – areas where the two futures for the country and world are starkly contested.

     

    Stuff like that makes satire obsolete.

  130. @Opinionator
    Historically (say past 26 years especially), foreign policy conflicts have distracted us from awareness of and attention to problems at home. It isn't as easy as saying, oh let Pence et al do whatever they want. The media will be sure that these conflicts (Russia, Muslim "terrorism," Iraq, Afganistan, etc.) occupy significant mindshare. Not to mention the material resources the conflicts absorb, the artificial safety net to the job market they provide, and the foreign immigration that they facilitate.

    What about the increased danger that unnecessary foreign invasions and interventions create for Americans at home and the needless loss of life and limb– both to members of our military as well as to countless civilians in the lands invaded?

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Of course. Those consequences, too,
  131. @Thomas
    Given that he's up against essentially everyone else in this country with any power (the Democratic Party, the Establishment of the Republican Party, the media, the tech industry, Hollywood, etc., etc., etc.), is a political newcomer without a deep bench of ready-made staff to draw on, and squeaked out a victory that will always have an asterisk after it, I'd say he's doing ok. The left and the media are screaming themselves hoarse every week with some new outrage, but this serves more to reveal to people how barking mad they've gone than it says anything about Trump or his administration other than predictable early hiccups from a new Administration without much experience anywhere. Practically the only public institution with less public trust today than either the Trump Administration or Congress is the media, so him picking the fight with them is hardly a loser.

    The biggest shortcomings so far have been in staffing up both his White House and the government in general, and possibly in taking major action before he had the people in place to carry it out. That's been par for the course since the campaign, and could have been readily predicted. The big questions have always been "Will Trump staff up fast enough?" and "Will Trump learn fast enough?" This was basically what happened when the immigration executive orders only a week into his Presidency got thrown back in his face. The apparently unclear lines of power and authority in the White House are somewhat worrisome (although I'll assume they'll sort themselves out eventually). Likewise, there are still hundreds of important positions in the government that need to be filled, and the Administration appears to still be way behind on this. It's getting harder and harder though, between a media that has gone completely off the rails, the torrent of leaks, and I'm sure efforts underway to combat both of these, to get a clear picture of what's actually going on in Washington day by day. Maybe Trump has a smooth-running inside operation picking names of people to nominate. If he doesn't I would suggest he get it, or maybe spend a few more weekends inside working on that. Until the administration gets staffed up, there are going to continue to be real, ongoing risks of how the government is prepared to respond to potential crises.

    The Democratic Party I think is basically adrift and probably not going to be politically competitive again for at least the next 4 years, if not 6, unless Trump really blows it. Much ink has already been spilled over how deep in the wilderness they are by the numbers, but they seem intent on doubling down now and pandering to the most extreme passions of their lunatic base than to trying to compete for the votes of people they wold need to win outside their coastal and urban bastions anymore. (The recent, increasing embrace of Islam and Islamic trappings, like the hijab, is the best example of how out to lunch the left is.)

    Trump's problems though are more going to come from the rest of the Republican Party, which eventually is going to get goaded by the media back into cuckservatism and into acting like a party of John McCains. (Obviously, they would prefer to take the tax cuts, Obamacare "reform," and then cut Trump loose for Pence, if they could.)

    What Trump ought to do over the next couple years, IMHO, is make appearances in the states and districts that have Republican senators and representatives who are looking the weakest in 2018 and 2020 and hold some rallies. Then, have some photo ops with the incumbents, and maybe a couple of ambitious local Republicans who might want to present a primary challenge. The message will be clear enough: Trump plus the crowds he draws might swing for the incumbents... or might not, depending.

    Insightful commentary. Well-written.

  132. @O'Really
    Like others, I first heard the term here.

    What is most striking, however, is the fact that the term burst into public awareness so quickly with the emergence of the fake news "dossier" on Jan. 10, 2017. This rapid rise in awareness is itself a massive failure of the deep state.

    A search of Google news shows minimal references to the "deep state" prior to that date, with the exception of a few fringe conspiracy sites and someone going by the 'nym Virgil at Breitbart (http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/12/12/virgil-the-deep-state-vs-donald-trump/). However, Ross Douthat (an iSteve reader) did use the term in passing in a December column (https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/opinion/the-donald-trump-matrix.html).

    It seems that Glenn Greenwald probably is most responsible (or at least was first) in explicitly linking the dossier to the deep state, on the day after it was released (https://theintercept.com/2017/01/11/the-deep-state-goes-to-war-with-president-elect-using-unverified-claims-as-dems-cheer/). References explode immediately thereafter.

    I think this turn of events has taken TPTB by surprise. (It could be said that being surprised by events is a defining feature of the American deep state.) For example, it took TPTB a full six weeks to mount a counter-attack in their go-to journal, the Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/02/why-its-dangerous-to-talk-about-a-deep-state/517221/
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    I am so happy that Glen is fighting the good fight.
  133. @Dave Pinsen

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.
     
    Interesting idea, but Trump's ideas aren't that wild, and the resistance he's getting isn't from the public so much (his base still loves him and Dems still don't) but from the permanent government and the courts. And he seems to be getting decent advice on that recently.

    I liked the idea of rewriting the executive order on immigration, rather than risking a SCOTUS loss on it due to Kennedy. The rewrite will probably exclude current green card holders.

    Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.
     
    I don't think men like James Mattis or Rex Tillerson would be afraid to stand up to Trump. This is really an impressive cabinet, for the most part.

    I liked the idea of rewriting the executive order on immigration, rather than risking a SCOTUS loss on it due to Kennedy. The rewrite will probably exclude current green card holders.

    Is a complete, temporary moratorium on nearly all immigration out of the question? Couldn’t the President (truthfully) simply explain that we need some time to get our own house in order; to at least make some considerable progress in the enormous backlog of clean-up and repair work that we have before us? That we must take care of our own first; charity starts at home, etc. (Not that what we are talking about here is by any means limited to charity.)

    Such a comprehensive ban would presumably side-step the whole “Muslim ban” preening nonsense as well.

    • Agree: sayless, Desiderius
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Agree. Scott Brown has proposed this. Unfortunately, he may be headed off to an ambassadorship in New Zealand.
  134. @Clyde

    I certainly did not make up the term “deep state,” but I’ve been using it pretty regularly since 2009.
     
    You definitely get credit for popularizing the term "Deep State". Others too, but you for sure, and for all I know perhaps the most. The first time I read you discussing it, it made perfect sense. BTW these days the conservative mainstream Rush Limbaugh brings up alt right themes I first read about here (at iSteve) five years ago, with similar credit going to VDare. These days he frequently uses the phrase "white voters" and discusses their interests. Unheard of five years ago and even three years ago.

    Seen at Vdare the other day. Brenda Walker saying due to robotics slashing jobs we don't need any immigration anymore.


    Automation Makes Immigration Obsolete - It's time to end an institution that no longer serves Americans
    By Brenda Walker
    Published in The Social Contract
    Volume 27, Number 1 (Fall 2016)
    Issue theme: "When robots replace humans"
    http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc_27_1/tsc-27-1-walker-2.shtml

     

    BTW these days the conservative mainstream Rush Limbaugh brings up alt right themes I first read about here (at iSteve) five years ago, with similar credit going to VDare. These days he frequently uses the phrase “white voters” and discusses their interests. Unheard of five years ago and even three years ago.

    I recall the late radio legend Bob Grant, who was vilified for his irreverent disregard of respectable racial pieties, pointing-out how Limbaugh took the easy path by simply avoiding the whole topic of race.

  135. @Ivan K.
    Peter Dale Scott's Deep Politics and the Death of JFK was published in 1993 University of California Press.

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Peter_Dale_Scott#Books

    According to reviewers, it uses the term "Deep State"

    https://www.amazon.com/Deep-Politics-Death-Peter-Scott/product-reviews/0520205197/ref=cm_cr_dp_d_btm?ie=UTF8&reviewerType=all_reviews&sortBy=recent

    Peter Dale Scott: “The Turkish term “deep State” (deren devlet) was coined after the so-called Susurluk incident, a 1996 car crash whose victims included the deputy chief of the Istanbul Police Department, a Member of Parliament, and Abdullah Çatlı, an international heroin trafficker and killer recruited by the Turkish police for “special missions” and paid in heroin while he was officially being sought by the Turkish authorities for murder. …..”

    http://whowhatwhy.org/2017/02/06/donald-j-trump-deep-state-part-1/

    These claims are mutually contradictory. Peter Dale Scott always (always!) says he borrowed the term from foreign media. But if it was coined in 1996, how could he have used it (or a very similar term) in 1993?

    What Is the Deep State?

    https://www.thenation.com/article/what-is-the-deep-state/

    Peter Dale Scott was the first, as far as I know, to use the phrase “parapolitics” and “deep politics” to discuss what is now described as the deep state, and he’s the author of numerous books on the dense connections between illegal drugs, covert action, and finance. “

    Until recently, the phrase “deep state” had been mostly consigned to the bowels of the conspiratorial deep web, but over the past few weeks, since Donald Trump decided to take his fight with the intelligence community public, it has witnessed a remarkable florescence. The “deep state” apparently has Trump in its sights, at least according to former NSA intelligence analyst John Schindler, who tweeted that a friend in the “intelligence community” told him that Trump “will die in jail.”

    Usage of the term deep state in Turkey in 1970s
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_state_in_Turkey

    “derin devlet” – Rumours of the deep state have been widespread in Turkey since Ecevit’s term as prime minister in the 1970s, after his revelation of the existence of a Turkish counterpart to Italy’s Operation Gladio, the “Counter-Guerrilla”

    • Replies: @grapesoda
    https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?date=all&q=%22deep%20state%22
  136. @william munny
    I read that Steve Jobs was proposing a tax on robots that replace human jobs, at least temporarily. Haven't thought it through or how it ties to immigration policy.

    Related - Has anyone directly advocated increased taxes for companies hiring visa holders instead of citizens? Or something like that?

    I read that Steve Jobs was proposing a tax on robots that replace human jobs

    That was Bill Gates. Steve Jobs can no longer make policy proposals where he is, at least not for this realm…

    • Replies: @william munny
    Hahahaha. I cannot separate them in my mind. I have the same block for a number of other people. Jeff Bridges and Jeff Daniels. Brad Pitt and Matt Damon. Gene Hackman and Robert Loggia. Causes me a lot of grief with my family. I assume there is some diagnostic label for this, but never took the trouble to look it up.
  137. Trump has also had a great effect outside the US. It’s too early to tell whether it will be an effect like that of Reagan. But it’s already obviously had the effect of shaking up elites and liberating speech and thinking. If he could be elected, then anything is possible!

    European countries are still very much in the habit of following trends from the US. It’s easy to be a follower when you get in the habit. And the greater freedom and resources in the US produce more innovation.

    Europeans respect power. If Trump manages to hang on and resist all the powers arrayed against him, many Europeans will gladly follow in his footsteps, even if they pretend to despise him.

    Finally, that Overton window Trump opened wide was opened, not just for Americans, but for the world. May it long stay open, and ever wider so!

  138. @Anonymous
    After the first month it's clear that Pence is a huge mistake. Anything happens to Trump and Pence is going to reverse everything Trump ever did. I thought Pence was a rebel in congress but I should've known better.

    Pence is a Lyndon B. Johnson backstabbing weasel traitor waiting for his turn. If I were Trump I’d send him on a worldwide diplomatic tour never to set foot in America for a couple of years. Pence also needs to spend a couple of months in Iraq and Afghanistan, just for fun. As vice-consul, Roman-style.

  139. @Dissident
    What about the increased danger that unnecessary foreign invasions and interventions create for Americans at home and the needless loss of life and limb-- both to members of our military as well as to countless civilians in the lands invaded?

    Of course. Those consequences, too,

    • Replies: @Dissident
    I'm glad you made that clear. The omission of any mention of the carnage and increased danger created by unnecessary invasions and interventions from your comment was unnerving to me.
  140. @Dissident

    I liked the idea of rewriting the executive order on immigration, rather than risking a SCOTUS loss on it due to Kennedy. The rewrite will probably exclude current green card holders.
     
    Is a complete, temporary moratorium on nearly all immigration out of the question? Couldn't the President (truthfully) simply explain that we need some time to get our own house in order; to at least make some considerable progress in the enormous backlog of clean-up and repair work that we have before us? That we must take care of our own first; charity starts at home, etc. (Not that what we are talking about here is by any means limited to charity.)

    Such a comprehensive ban would presumably side-step the whole "Muslim ban" preening nonsense as well.

    Agree. Scott Brown has proposed this. Unfortunately, he may be headed off to an ambassadorship in New Zealand.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    No, Brown is too valuable here.
  141. @James Braxton
    The DACA work permits expire on their own. Most of them in 2017. This is a smart play by Trump.

    good to know. If they do expire this year he gains little by ending the program. but still much left to get done. Needs to start building the Wall , reject the Paris Agreement, and revoke some Obama executive orders (since it seems like an easy task, just needs to sign a document) Obama revoked 75 Bush executive orders in his first year…so far Trump has not done much to revoke the Obama executive orders.

  142. @res
    A more detailed article at https://www.cato.org/blog/how-daca-will-end-timeline-expiration indicates that most DACA work permits will expire in 2018. Do you have information to support your 2017 assertion?

    I stand corrected on that detail. In any case, they expire within the next year or two at which time all of the dreamers will go into the basket of deportables.

  143. @BobX
    Who is the Trump point man on H1B? The current system suppresses American wages. Remove the number limits and replace the lottery by top wage offered with a minimum of $130K. If the reason for these workers is what is claimed by the businesses that employ them this should be no problem.

    We will find however there never was a need for any but a very small number of these workers.

    Firms should also have to pay a higher fee for each H1b visa they hire. In 2015 Congress increased the fees for H-1B and L1 visas by $4000 to $8,000 – $10,000. We should double the fees again to $20,000…or change the allocation system. instead of the current lottery, grant them to firms willing to pay the highest fees (min fee would be $15,000, see how much firms are willing to pay for these visas…will they pay $50,000 ?)

    It is crazy that Indian firms get 50% of the h1B visas allocated. Looks very fishy. If these workers are so talented we should not be granting most of the H1b visas to foreign firms. The purpose should be to help American companies compete against the foreign companies.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    instead of the current lottery, grant them to firms willing to pay the highest fees (min fee would be $15,000, see how much firms are willing to pay for these visas…will they pay $50,000 ?)

    I would not support anything where the companies could collude to hold down the fees. Remember Steve Jobs and his buddies had to settle that talent poaching agreement lawsuit recently. Even with that settlement, the average employee in Silicon Valley probably lost a lot of money.

    http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/silicon-valleys-poaching-case-growing-debate-employee-mobility/
    , @Lagertha
    according to Millennials ( M's I interact with) H1B visa holders are just "cogs in the wheel" when it comes down to "stealth" CS or, original, individualistic creative thought. But, H1B holders still hurt American (graduating with tremendous debt) students of comparable IQ/brain power/education/yoga moves...ok..but you get it. H1B is just outsourcing by another name/graphics.
  144. https://www.wsj.com/articles/donald-trump-would-reconsider-bannons-role-on-national-security-council-if-asked-white-house-says-1487712036

    Donald Trump Would Reconsider Bannon’s Role on National Security Council If McMaster Asks

    The deep state regaining a foothold?

  145. @Old fogey
    Thank you so much for posting the Dick Morris youtube link. I had noted the move to end the penalties, but didn't hear about the eliminating of the rule that made all insurance policies cover everything. I have never seen the need for health insurance to cover ordinary medical care. Insurance is needed for catastrophic events such as a car accident or a heart attack or a brain tumor - and am delighted to hear that soon such medical plans will be offered to the public again.

    I doubt there is any solution that the Republicans can offer. Obamacare already is a high deductible plan. Just because you are “covering” something that is not possible like male pregnancy doesn’t mean that the actuaries are adding something for it in your premium.

    The biggest problem with medical insurance is that there is no limit to how much they may have to pay for catastrophic occurrences (up to some lifetime maximum) that can never be covered by 20 peoples premiums. It is even worse if these is an extremely low yearly premium. If these events could be quantified then they already would be offering insurance for pre-existing conditions, which they routinely reject without so much as a look at the underlying condition. I know because I applied and got my rejection letters within hours of putting my application in.

    My Obamacare premium is 600 dollars (I keep my income low to get my 360 subsidy) and I still have a 4500 deductible in my very limited EPO (heavily restricted PPO). My bills are routinely cut by 75% by the time I pay them. This means I will likely need to see 18,000 in medical bills before the insurance company pays a cent. Of the next 5000, I pay 2000 of that. That is another 20,000. So before I am completely covered I will likely see medical bills of 38,000 of which I will pay 6500 and the insurance company 2000. This is after the 7200 dollars of premiums.

    If the insurance companies are saying they can’t make money on a plan like that, how are they going to make money on a plan where they charge you 2000 dollars a year. The deductible would have to be in the order of 25,000 meaning nothing but cancer or a heart transplant would be covered. Nobody but people with a lot of assets to protect will sign up for this and it too will collapse under it’s own weight.

  146. I thought John Derbyshire’s list of “worrying signs” from the latest Radio Derb (segment #05) was rather cogent.

    Meanwhile, we national conservatives are fretting that already, one month into his term of office, our President may be showing signs he’s going to cuck us.

    Derb then goes on to enumerate several signs. To his list, I would add the three instances of pandering and capitulation to the “LGBTQ” mafia on the part of the President that are documented at this link— with the qualification that they are, more than signs, disappointments (or perhaps expected but nonetheless reprehensible all the same).

    1. He said in an interview as President-elect that SCOTUS’ homosexual “marriage” ruling, Obergefell, is “settled” law (it’s not, any more than Roe v. Wade is, or the pro-sodomy-law Bowers v. Hardwick decision was);
    2. He reinstated Obama’s 2014 pro-LGBT executive order for federal contractors, which forces homosexualism on private businesses and ministries; and
    3. He now continues Obama’s pro-LGBTQ foreign policy promoting unnatural behaviors and sexual sin as “human rights.”

    NOTE: Although the site linked above, AFTAH, has an obviously Christian perspective, one need not be religious at all to recognize and appreciate the truth and validity of at least a great deal of what is written and presented there. One need not consider homosexuality sinful in order to recognize the preposterousness of the claim that it is equivalent to normative heterosexuality or that it always is innate and immutable[1]. And, certainly, the manifest reality that buggery is an inordinately disease-promoting, vile, brutal (and arguably, at least, inherently sadomasochistic,)* practice should be plain for anyone to see.
    (*GRAPHIC CONTENT)

    [1] An additional example that contradicts the claim of immutability:
    http://observer.com/2012/12/the-lesbian-past-of-bill-de-blasios-wife/

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Why would anyone make an issue out of LGBTQ when our very survival is at stake.
  147. @utu

    What Is the Deep State?
     

    https://www.thenation.com/article/what-is-the-deep-state/
     

    " Peter Dale Scott was the first, as far as I know, to use the phrase “parapolitics” and “deep politics” to discuss what is now described as the deep state, and he’s the author of numerous books on the dense connections between illegal drugs, covert action, and finance. "
     

    Until recently, the phrase “deep state” had been mostly consigned to the bowels of the conspiratorial deep web, but over the past few weeks, since Donald Trump decided to take his fight with the intelligence community public, it has witnessed a remarkable florescence. The “deep state” apparently has Trump in its sights, at least according to former NSA intelligence analyst John Schindler, who tweeted that a friend in the “intelligence community” told him that Trump “will die in jail.”
     
    Usage of the term deep state in Turkey in 1970s
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_state_in_Turkey

    "derin devlet" - Rumours of the deep state have been widespread in Turkey since Ecevit's term as prime minister in the 1970s, after his revelation of the existence of a Turkish counterpart to Italy's Operation Gladio, the "Counter-Guerrilla"
  148. @Wade
    Maybe he committed suicide because he was forced to leave a loved one behind and felt despondent?

    Updates indicate that he was 40 years old and divorced from his ex-wife in the US. As of this a.m. no one reported to claim the body.

    He denied offers of assistance to be returned to his hometown in Sinaloa state.

    He reportedly was yelling that he didn’t want to go back to Mexico adding, “they’re going to kill me!”

    Terrifying stuff…

    http://www.debate.com.mx/mexico/De-Ahome-el-hombre-que-se-suicido-tras-deportacion-20170221-0247.html

  149. @Pepe
    This morning a Mexican man deported from the US jumped off a bridge crossing in Tijuana. He survived the drop, but he later passed away in a local hospital.

    It's gonna get ugly.

    Despite the talk in some liberal circles about the "improving Mexican economy" and "net-zero" migration from Mexico, Mexicans are completely terrified of going back to their home country.

    http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/articulo/estados/2017/02/21/migrante-deportado-de-eu-se-suicida-en-tijuana

    Pepe said, “Despite the talk in some liberal circles about the “improving Mexican economy” and “net-zero” migration from Mexico, Mexicans are completely terrified of going back to their home country.”

    Ask me if I care.

  150. @Travis
    Firms should also have to pay a higher fee for each H1b visa they hire. In 2015 Congress increased the fees for H-1B and L1 visas by $4000 to $8,000 - $10,000. We should double the fees again to $20,000...or change the allocation system. instead of the current lottery, grant them to firms willing to pay the highest fees (min fee would be $15,000, see how much firms are willing to pay for these visas...will they pay $50,000 ?)

    It is crazy that Indian firms get 50% of the h1B visas allocated. Looks very fishy. If these workers are so talented we should not be granting most of the H1b visas to foreign firms. The purpose should be to help American companies compete against the foreign companies.

    instead of the current lottery, grant them to firms willing to pay the highest fees (min fee would be $15,000, see how much firms are willing to pay for these visas…will they pay $50,000 ?)

    I would not support anything where the companies could collude to hold down the fees. Remember Steve Jobs and his buddies had to settle that talent poaching agreement lawsuit recently. Even with that settlement, the average employee in Silicon Valley probably lost a lot of money.

    http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/silicon-valleys-poaching-case-growing-debate-employee-mobility/

  151. @Wade
    Maybe he committed suicide because he was forced to leave a loved one behind and felt despondent?

    Update to update:

    He was 42 years old and his wife in Mexico had passed away. He had only been working in the US for three years, doing landscaping and selling pine trees.

    His three children live with his aunt in a small town in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    The aunt and other family members in Sinaloa stated he was very worried about returning to his hometown, because he had previously only found day jobs that paid so little the family was living in poverty.

    Headline reads: “Guadalupe chose to jump off a bridge than return to poverty in Mexico.”

    https://www.elsoldesinaloa.com.mx/local/miedo-a-volver-a-la-pobreza-orillo-a-guadalupe-olivas-a-quitarse-la-vida-tras-ser-deportado

  152. @Dave Pinsen

    Trump needs somebody in the role of William Whitelaw: not to dilute his policies, but to ensure that the essential core is not derailed by his own wilder ideas.
     
    Interesting idea, but Trump's ideas aren't that wild, and the resistance he's getting isn't from the public so much (his base still loves him and Dems still don't) but from the permanent government and the courts. And he seems to be getting decent advice on that recently.

    I liked the idea of rewriting the executive order on immigration, rather than risking a SCOTUS loss on it due to Kennedy. The rewrite will probably exclude current green card holders.

    Trump needs staff who, while unswervingly loyal, are willing to stand up to him and argue with him over policy.
     
    I don't think men like James Mattis or Rex Tillerson would be afraid to stand up to Trump. This is really an impressive cabinet, for the most part.

    Interesting idea, but Trump’s ideas aren’t that wild, and the resistance he’s getting isn’t from the public so much (his base still loves him and Dems still don’t) but from the permanent government and the courts. And he seems to be getting decent advice on that recently.

    I think the idea of the 90-day ban was pretty wild, because it was unnecessary: if new immigration policies will be in place within 90 days, then the current 90 days are not very important. It seemed to me that Trump just wanted to “sock it” to his opponents. Why waste the effort, especially if the order is not legally watertight?

    I hope you are right that he is getting better legal advice now.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    get real. He can stop immigration tomorrow..for years.
  153. @Desiderius

    the President of the United States has access to better information sources, provided at great public expense
     
    cite needed.
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Thanks for sharing.

    I was referring to your claim that the information was of high quality.

    I was also (mostly) joking, though I wouldn't be surprised if someday St. Peter let me in on the secret that Sailer was more accurate than anything a President's been told in decades.
  154. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Debbie Harry has termed Donald Trump “an idiot”
    Check out her reasoning.

    Donald wasn’t interested in going out with her, because she was too short.

    I assume this was after she and Chris had broken up as a couple..still, what a cuck Stein has to be for being upset another man didn’t want to f*** his woman!

    This proves, one, maybe letting women vote was dumb, and two, musicians of either sex should not be running things.

    Debbie Harry has branded U.S. President Donald Trump an idiot.
    Monday, February 20, 2017
    Celebrity News
    The ELLE Style Awards 2017 at 41 Conduit Street, London [WENN.com]

    The Blondie frontwoman lashed out at the American leader, who has continued to divide opinion since taking over at the White House in January (17), during a chat with London’s Evening Standard newspaper.
    One of Trump’s most controversial orders since coming to power was banning citizens of seven different Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States, which the federal courts have since struck down, and Debbie is unimpressed with his actions so far.
    “I don’t want to go backwards in time; I don’t think isolationism is a good thing at this time in history. I think he’s an idiot,” Debbie fumed to the publication.
    “I don’t like the idea of promoting fear to gain popularity. It’s so ugly.”
    Debbie believes that music plays a part in protest, though “no one has written an anthem yet” about Trump’s divisive leadership.

    Blondie’s guitarist Chris Stein had some stinging comments about President Donald Trump ahead of Pollinator’s release, the band’s 11th album, due out in May.

    Recalling when Trump nearly chatted up Debbie, he said: “He was not part of the New York scene back in the day. Everybody thought he was an a*******.

    “Debbie met him a few years ago and he thought she was too short for him. So he said ‘hello’ and moved on.

    “That was a lucky escape, I guess. It is pretty grim. We’ll be playing back here in London in December and we are not sure if we will be allowed back in the US.”

  155. @Steve Richter
    I think we are in big trouble. There are no national republican politicians other than Trump speaking for the alt right. No one pressing for an immigration halt. No one wants to cut welfare. No nationalism for the native born. All the energy is on the anti trump side. Even the people in the White House seem like hired guns instead of believers in a nationalism cause.

    There are so many good Republicans, youngish ones, now that Trump has steam-rolled emerica. I love the idea of Nikki and Zinke! Cotton and Ayotte, Ernst and Sasse; Crapo & Flake…o.k. I ‘m losing it right now, laughing :0) If there is a duo for the 49th presidency, ….well, we gotta work on the names! Take a deep breath everyone.

    • Replies: @BB753
    Donald Trump Jr for president/ heir to the throne and Stephen Miller as vice-president . Please, don't ever let Ivanka run! Politics is serious business. Women need not apply.
  156. @James N. Kennett

    Interesting idea, but Trump’s ideas aren’t that wild, and the resistance he’s getting isn’t from the public so much (his base still loves him and Dems still don’t) but from the permanent government and the courts. And he seems to be getting decent advice on that recently.

     

    I think the idea of the 90-day ban was pretty wild, because it was unnecessary: if new immigration policies will be in place within 90 days, then the current 90 days are not very important. It seemed to me that Trump just wanted to "sock it" to his opponents. Why waste the effort, especially if the order is not legally watertight?

    I hope you are right that he is getting better legal advice now.

    get real. He can stop immigration tomorrow..for years.

  157. @Travis
    Firms should also have to pay a higher fee for each H1b visa they hire. In 2015 Congress increased the fees for H-1B and L1 visas by $4000 to $8,000 - $10,000. We should double the fees again to $20,000...or change the allocation system. instead of the current lottery, grant them to firms willing to pay the highest fees (min fee would be $15,000, see how much firms are willing to pay for these visas...will they pay $50,000 ?)

    It is crazy that Indian firms get 50% of the h1B visas allocated. Looks very fishy. If these workers are so talented we should not be granting most of the H1b visas to foreign firms. The purpose should be to help American companies compete against the foreign companies.

    according to Millennials ( M’s I interact with) H1B visa holders are just “cogs in the wheel” when it comes down to “stealth” CS or, original, individualistic creative thought. But, H1B holders still hurt American (graduating with tremendous debt) students of comparable IQ/brain power/education/yoga moves…ok..but you get it. H1B is just outsourcing by another name/graphics.

  158. @Dissident
    I thought John Derbyshire's list of "worrying signs" from the latest Radio Derb (segment #05) was rather cogent.

    Meanwhile, we national conservatives are fretting that already, one month into his term of office, our President may be showing signs he’s going to cuck us.
     
    Derb then goes on to enumerate several signs. To his list, I would add the three instances of pandering and capitulation to the "LGBTQ" mafia on the part of the President that are documented at this link-- with the qualification that they are, more than signs, disappointments (or perhaps expected but nonetheless reprehensible all the same).

    1. He said in an interview as President-elect that SCOTUS’ homosexual “marriage” ruling, Obergefell, is “settled” law (it’s not, any more than Roe v. Wade is, or the pro-sodomy-law Bowers v. Hardwick decision was);
    2. He reinstated Obama’s 2014 pro-LGBT executive order for federal contractors, which forces homosexualism on private businesses and ministries; and
    3. He now continues Obama’s pro-LGBTQ foreign policy promoting unnatural behaviors and sexual sin as “human rights.”
     

    NOTE: Although the site linked above, AFTAH, has an obviously Christian perspective, one need not be religious at all to recognize and appreciate the truth and validity of at least a great deal of what is written and presented there. One need not consider homosexuality sinful in order to recognize the preposterousness of the claim that it is equivalent to normative heterosexuality or that it always is innate and immutable[1]. And, certainly, the manifest reality that buggery is an inordinately disease-promoting, vile, brutal (and arguably, at least, inherently sadomasochistic,)* practice should be plain for anyone to see.
    (*GRAPHIC CONTENT)

    [1] An additional example that contradicts the claim of immutability:
    http://observer.com/2012/12/the-lesbian-past-of-bill-de-blasios-wife/

    Why would anyone make an issue out of LGBTQ when our very survival is at stake.

  159. @Opinionator
    Agree. Scott Brown has proposed this. Unfortunately, he may be headed off to an ambassadorship in New Zealand.

    No, Brown is too valuable here.

  160. @Dissident

    I am so happy that Glen is fighting the good fight.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Greenwald, Reynolds, Campbell.

    The Glen(n)s have really been coming through.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrIW5RpvBnM

  161. @MarkinLA
    Most Americans couldn't even tell you what continent some foreign country is on let alone find it on a map. However, it is continually pounded into their heads that it should matter and the US should lead somehow. This brainwashing is what needs to be countered.

    I bet that more than a few Americans actually think we should care about Crimea. Most don't have the slightest idea what caring about Crimea really entails.

    Crimea belongs to Russia.

    Donbass is supported by Russians who support the Ukrainians that want to be a part of Russia; not Ukraine; Ukrainians ( or Deep State) who killed off their democratically elected Ukrainian president. Well, you know…it is super complicated. BUT: CRIMEA IS RUSSIA.

    USA should absolutely not support Ukraine…or any crazy-assed (Nazi) army to take back Crimea, and will kill everyone (families/civilians) who represent/live in the area known as: Donbass.

    • Replies: @Dissident

    USA should absolutely not support Ukraine…or any crazy-assed (Nazi) army to take back Crimea, and will kill everyone (families/civilians) who represent/live in the area known as: Donbass.
     
    This raises what seems a great irony/paradox/hypocrisy to me: All these hysterical SJWs throwing the terms "Nazi" and "Hitler" around to the point that they've nearly lost all meaning and dishonoring those who knew the horror of the real Nazis. Meanwhile, if what I've heard is correct, a number of respectables have been supporting actual neo-Nazis in Ukraine.
  162. @Pericles
    Blocking the travel ban was an embarrassing exhibit of the fake judicial system, by the way.

    First Trump beat the Republicans, then he beat the Democrats, next he will beat the Deep State. Along the way, I guess he will beat the Media too. There certainly is a lot of them to beat, the rot is deep, but on the bright side they are mostly soft incompetents on sinecures.

    Reputations matter. Unfortunately (or thankfully), reputations still matter to the talking heads in DC. And, so many of them have kids…so yeah, gotta be careful what you say or do.

  163. @James N. Kennett

    cite needed.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President's_Daily_Brief

    Thanks for sharing.

    I was referring to your claim that the information was of high quality.

    I was also (mostly) joking, though I wouldn’t be surprised if someday St. Peter let me in on the secret that Sailer was more accurate than anything a President’s been told in decades.

  164. @Lagertha
    I am so happy that Glen is fighting the good fight.

    Greenwald, Reynolds, Campbell.

    The Glen(n)s have really been coming through.

  165. @Opinionator
    Of course. Those consequences, too,

    I’m glad you made that clear. The omission of any mention of the carnage and increased danger created by unnecessary invasions and interventions from your comment was unnerving to me.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    The commenter was drawing a distinction between domestic and foreign, or martial and non-martial, so I think my focus was on domestic consequences that might not otherwise be apparent.

    Do you think we should try to arrive at a peace settlement with ISIS?

    It isn't a rhetorical question.

  166. @Lagertha
    Crimea belongs to Russia.

    Donbass is supported by Russians who support the Ukrainians that want to be a part of Russia; not Ukraine; Ukrainians ( or Deep State) who killed off their democratically elected Ukrainian president. Well, you know...it is super complicated. BUT: CRIMEA IS RUSSIA.

    USA should absolutely not support Ukraine...or any crazy-assed (Nazi) army to take back Crimea, and will kill everyone (families/civilians) who represent/live in the area known as: Donbass.

    USA should absolutely not support Ukraine…or any crazy-assed (Nazi) army to take back Crimea, and will kill everyone (families/civilians) who represent/live in the area known as: Donbass.

    This raises what seems a great irony/paradox/hypocrisy to me: All these hysterical SJWs throwing the terms “Nazi” and “Hitler” around to the point that they’ve nearly lost all meaning and dishonoring those who knew the horror of the real Nazis. Meanwhile, if what I’ve heard is correct, a number of respectables have been supporting actual neo-Nazis in Ukraine.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Your last line: duh. Look up Donbass' own news site.
    , @Lagertha
    There is not enough time to be cavalier. Crimea is, has; will always be Russia - it is not a big area, btw. And nuclear Russia has been at Donbass for 50 years; their subs are there. Why are we not just getting along with this and all.....'CAUSE China? Let's just all get along and buy stuff from each other.
  167. @Dissident
    I'm glad you made that clear. The omission of any mention of the carnage and increased danger created by unnecessary invasions and interventions from your comment was unnerving to me.

    The commenter was drawing a distinction between domestic and foreign, or martial and non-martial, so I think my focus was on domestic consequences that might not otherwise be apparent.

    Do you think we should try to arrive at a peace settlement with ISIS?

    It isn’t a rhetorical question.

  168. @Dissident

    I read that Steve Jobs was proposing a tax on robots that replace human jobs
     
    That was Bill Gates. Steve Jobs can no longer make policy proposals where he is, at least not for this realm...

    Hahahaha. I cannot separate them in my mind. I have the same block for a number of other people. Jeff Bridges and Jeff Daniels. Brad Pitt and Matt Damon. Gene Hackman and Robert Loggia. Causes me a lot of grief with my family. I assume there is some diagnostic label for this, but never took the trouble to look it up.

  169. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Up your medications, and let loose of that live 110 that you have grasped and is shocking you into incoherence.

    Might you not do better to extend some compassion and grace toward him?

  170. @benjaminl
    Today in Coalition of the Fringes:

    Nice Wholesome Stanford Coed All-American Bullied into Depression By WNBA Lesbians

    Wiggins, a four-time All-American at Stanford, asserts she was targeted for harassment from the time she was drafted by Minnesota because she is heterosexual and a nationally popular figure, of whom many other players were jealous.

    “Me being heterosexual and straight, and being vocal in my identity as a straight woman was huge,” Wiggins said. “I would say 98 percent of the women in the WNBA are gay women. It was a conformist type of place. There was a whole different set of rules they (the other players) could apply.

    “There was a lot of jealousy and competition, and we’re all fighting for crumbs,” Wiggins said. “The way I looked, the way I played – those things contributed to the tension.

    “People were deliberately trying to hurt me all of the time. I had never been called the B-word so many times in my life than I was in my rookie season. I’d never been thrown to the ground so much. The message was: ‘We want you to know we don’t like you.’ “
     

    Inquiring minds want to know who the other WNBA heterosexual player is? She must feel very lonely in the locker room.

  171. @Lagertha
    There are so many good Republicans, youngish ones, now that Trump has steam-rolled emerica. I love the idea of Nikki and Zinke! Cotton and Ayotte, Ernst and Sasse; Crapo & Flake...o.k. I 'm losing it right now, laughing :0) If there is a duo for the 49th presidency, ....well, we gotta work on the names! Take a deep breath everyone.

    Donald Trump Jr for president/ heir to the throne and Stephen Miller as vice-president . Please, don’t ever let Ivanka run! Politics is serious business. Women need not apply.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Have we seen anything to indicate Ivanka's views aren't the same as Hillary's, Chelseas, and the Democrat cucks?
  172. @BB753
    Donald Trump Jr for president/ heir to the throne and Stephen Miller as vice-president . Please, don't ever let Ivanka run! Politics is serious business. Women need not apply.

    Have we seen anything to indicate Ivanka’s views aren’t the same as Hillary’s, Chelseas, and the Democrat cucks?

    • Replies: @BB753
    Not that I know. I fear Ivanka's a Trojan horse inside the White House. She's daddy's girl and Trump is blinded to the fact that that she's on the neo-cuck Paul Ryan train, along with her ass-grabbing husband Jared Whatshisname.
  173. @Opinionator
    Have we seen anything to indicate Ivanka's views aren't the same as Hillary's, Chelseas, and the Democrat cucks?

    Not that I know. I fear Ivanka’s a Trojan horse inside the White House. She’s daddy’s girl and Trump is blinded to the fact that that she’s on the neo-cuck Paul Ryan train, along with her ass-grabbing husband Jared Whatshisname.

  174. @Anonymous
    Trumps defending Israel is one thing he should do if they are threatened from outside their borders, however as this is never the real case as has been proven time and again, defending an International Crime committed by Israel against Palestine, it puts Trump in the unsavory category accomplice to Genocide.

    Popular Videos - International Criminal Court & Crime
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1K4Y8iqLzxQ&list=PL3dgxi5dUKZgK5INUQu-CZdNXuh0owELp

    Yeah. Hutus/Tutsis/Israel/Palestine. Same genus. Machete attacks=building houses. Accomplice to genocide blah blah blah.

  175. @Burton
    Steve,

    Trump's staff will have their hands full for a while implementing his economic agenda and immigration policies. But I'd love to hear your thoughts on what policy proposal optimally combines (a) longterm damage to the Establishment/Cathedral and (b) political viability.

    Here's mine: make any student loan over (say) $20k dischargeable in bankruptcy on a going-forward basis, and combine that legislative change with a modest debt-relief package for existing loans.

    Making student loans dischargeable in bankruptcy would deal a body blow to the educational indoctrination complex: only economically productive majors would survive in any meaningful numbers. Family formation would also likely accelerate as a consequence. And the legions of debt-burdened baristas who vote left out of resentment would gradually attrit away.

    The inhumanity of allowing teenagers to consign themselves to indentured servitude to the banks for degrees they barely understand is self-evident--the moral/emotional case is easy to make and hard to refute. And throwing in the debt-forgiveness element would be a great play for the Bernie crowd--and most of them likely wouldn't be sophisticated enough to appreciate (or care about) the ultimate political/cultural implications of debt-dischargeability.

    Anyway, I'm guessing at least a few people with close connections to Trump follow your blog, so crowd-sourcing suggestions could be a good way to get creative ideas into his circle.

    Insty makes the point that a bank won’t lend an 18 yo $25ok to buy a Bentley, but it will lend them that much to get a degree in Women’s Studies, mostly because the Feds guarantee the loan. And for a long time, many schools were in bed with lenders who kicked back part of the higher than market interest rate they got the kid to sign up for; no body got busted for that. My daughter works in a local pie shop and one of her co-workers has a PhD in Jazz!

    The Derb makes the point in his latest podcast that there are 300k+ foreign college students in the USA, up five-fold from 10 years ago. Colleges love them because they pay full freight, but why are tax payers subsidizing this racket?

    But your overall point is good; there is much than can be done by Executive Order to bring some sanity to academia by squeezing their finances.

  176. @Dissident

    USA should absolutely not support Ukraine…or any crazy-assed (Nazi) army to take back Crimea, and will kill everyone (families/civilians) who represent/live in the area known as: Donbass.
     
    This raises what seems a great irony/paradox/hypocrisy to me: All these hysterical SJWs throwing the terms "Nazi" and "Hitler" around to the point that they've nearly lost all meaning and dishonoring those who knew the horror of the real Nazis. Meanwhile, if what I've heard is correct, a number of respectables have been supporting actual neo-Nazis in Ukraine.

    Your last line: duh. Look up Donbass’ own news site.

  177. @Dissident

    USA should absolutely not support Ukraine…or any crazy-assed (Nazi) army to take back Crimea, and will kill everyone (families/civilians) who represent/live in the area known as: Donbass.
     
    This raises what seems a great irony/paradox/hypocrisy to me: All these hysterical SJWs throwing the terms "Nazi" and "Hitler" around to the point that they've nearly lost all meaning and dishonoring those who knew the horror of the real Nazis. Meanwhile, if what I've heard is correct, a number of respectables have been supporting actual neo-Nazis in Ukraine.

    There is not enough time to be cavalier. Crimea is, has; will always be Russia – it is not a big area, btw. And nuclear Russia has been at Donbass for 50 years; their subs are there. Why are we not just getting along with this and all…..’CAUSE China? Let’s just all get along and buy stuff from each other.

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