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Traffic Stops Are Bad Because They Discourage Black Criminals from Carrying Guns, Driving Badly, and Dealing Drugs
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From the New York Times news section:

Cities Try to Turn the Tide on Police Traffic Stops

Chiefs, prosecutors and lawmakers are rethinking the value, and the harm, of minor traffic stops like the one that ended in a man’s death in Grand Rapids.

By David D. Kirkpatrick, Steve Eder and Kim Barker
April 15, 2022, 3:00 a.m. ET

Los Angeles is overhauling its traffic policing, aiming to stop pulling over cars — frequently with Black drivers — for trivial infractions like broken taillights or expired tags as a pretext to search for drugs or guns.

“We want to fish with a hook, not a net,” Police Chief Michel Moore said.

Los Angeles last month became the biggest city to restrict the policing of minor violations. In Philadelphia, a ban on such stops has just taken effect. Pittsburgh; Seattle; Berkeley, Calif.; Lansing, Mich.; Brooklyn Center, Minn.; and the State of Virginia have all taken similar steps. Elsewhere across the country, a half-dozen prosecutors have said they will not bring charges based on evidence collected at these stops.

As the Biden Administration has made clear, America needs more gun control laws. But what America also needs, evidently, is less enforcement of existing gun control laws on those most likely to commit murder. The point of gun control laws is to harass the people who will obey the gun control laws, law abiding white Republican hunters, while easing off on enforcing gun control laws on black criminals carrying illegal handguns.

Officials pushing the new rules cite data showing that minor stops not only disproportionately snare Black drivers but also do little to combat serious crime or improve public safety, and some escalate into avoidable violence, even killing officers or drivers.

On the other hand, ever since the Racial Reckoning against pro-active cops started on May 25, 2020, both murders and traffic fatalities per million miles driven have gone up more than in another period of the last three score years, with black death rates particularly elevated.

It’s almost as if the threat of traffic stops encourage drivers to drive more safely and not pack an illegal handgun.

The latest example is the death in Grand Rapids, Mich., of Patrick Lyoya, an unarmed 26-year-old Black man who was pulled over for a mismatched license plate and, after a brief struggle, was apparently shot in the head from behind, according to videos released on Wednesday. An hour away in Lansing, new rules seek to prevent such deadly encounters.

“There is a trust factor,” Mayor Andy Schor of Lansing said in an interview last month, “that if you get pulled over — whether it’s a moving violation, or pretextual, or whatever — you’re not going to end up dead.”

Police chiefs and criminologists say the rule changes amount to the first major reconsideration of traffic policing since the early 1980s, when rising crime rates, a shift toward more proactive policing and the advent of squad car computers for checking driver records helped make pretextual stops a cornerstone of enforcement.

“Never before have government officials, policymakers or prosecutors tried to limit how police officers use traffic stops in their investigatory role — in fact, historically, making these stops was encouraged,” said Sarah A. Seo, a law professor at Columbia University who studies traffic stops. “These new policies may be turning the tide.”

Toward more murders and more fatal car crashes.

A New York Times investigation last fall revealed that in the previous five years police officers pulling over cars had killed more than 400 motorists who were neither wielding a gun or knife nor under pursuit for a violent crime — a rate of more than one a week. Police culture and court precedents significantly overstated the danger to officers, encouraging aggression in the name of self-defense and impunity from prosecutors and juries, the investigation found.

Legislation limiting stops in Pittsburgh quoted The Times’s reporting, and advocates across the country have cited it to argue for the changes. …

Good job, NYT!

The important thing is that you’ve encouraged a vast national movement elevating the highest value human beings — blacks who start fights with cops — over less important human beings, such as black party guests who are just standing around in the background eating a plate of ribs while one of the Important People goes and gets his illegal handgun out of his car and starts banging away into the crowd in the general direction of somebody who hurt his feelings.

… In Los Angeles, the police union is running online advertisements warning that discouraging stops could allow guns and killers to remain on the roads.

Ya think?

… At a time when an uptick in crime has stalled many criminal justice reform efforts, including at the federal level, the rethinking of traffic policing is striking. It is coming “at the very moment that the pendulum feels like it’s moving back toward concern about increases in street crime,” said Chuck Wexler, the executive director of the nonprofit Police Executive Research Forum.

In other words, it’s a zombie movement of bad ideas promoted by people who refuse to admit they were wrong over the last 22 months.

Finally, in the 32nd paragraph, a mention of the traffic crash problem when the cops aren’t making a big show of pulling people over by the side of the road with their lights flashing.

… In Seattle, Chief Adrian Z. Diaz said the demands for more equitable policing after George Floyd’s murder in 2020 had coincided with staffing challenges from the pandemic. Dangerous driving surged on empty streets while the number of officers available for duty fell sharply. In response, the city this year began using cameras to police red-light violations and other infractions at some intersections, and Chief Diaz ordered officers to quit stopping cars for a list of low-level traffic infractions that he deemed a waste of their time.

… State agencies could bill by mail for an expired registration. Police could quit stopping bicyclists for helmet violations because that no longer made sense in the era of helmetless bike sharing,

Bicycle riding is Good (because of climate change) so therefore it is Safe.

and pulling over cars just for air fresheners, cracked windows or missing front license plates had never made sense, he said. A program to pass out repair coupons for equipment violations is also in the works.

“We would prefer to get back to the basics of, you know, fighting crime,” Chief Diaz added.

In Los Angeles, the catalyst for change was a 2020 report from the police department’s inspector general showing that — reflecting national patterns — officers disproportionately stopped Black and Hispanic drivers, often for minor or technical violations. That was especially true for officers in gang units or assigned to high-crime areas. Yet even in those cases the minor stops almost never yielded arrests for serious crimes like drug or gun possession.

It’s almost as if pulling over guys who look like criminals tends to discourage them from carrying guns and drugs, so not pulling them over tends to encourage them to carry guns and drugs. Which may have something to do with the skyrocketing rates of shootings, traffic fatalities, and drug overdoses since May 25, 2020.

Last month the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration finally released its final 2020 report “Overview of Motor Vehicle Crashes in 2020.”

Executive Summary
There were 38,824 people killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes on U.S. roadways during 2020. This is the largest number of fatalities since 2007. It also represents a 6.8-percent increase from 36,355 fatalities in 2019, or 2,469 more people killed in traffic crashes in 2020. … The fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (VMT) increased by 21 percent from 1.11 in 2019 to 1.34 in 2020, which is the largest percentage increase on record.

During lockdowns, traffic eased and cops stopped stopping people out of fear of infection, so people drove like bats out of hell. But then kept doing that once traffic returned when The Establishment declared the Racial Reckoning to be our new highest priority.

The cops were clearly doing a lot less work in 2020 than in 2019. Thus it appears that all sorts of non-fatal crashes didn’t make it into police records in 2020 vs. 2019:

The estimated number of people injured on our roadways decreased in 2020 to 2.28 million, falling from 2.74 million in 2019, a statistically significant decrease of 17 percent. The injury rate per 100 million VMT decreased by 6.0 percent from 84 in 2019 to 79 in 2020. The estimated number of police-reported crashes decreased from 6.76 million in 2019 to 5.25 million in 2020, a statistically significant 22-percent decrease.

… Total VMT for 2020 decreased by 11 percent from 2019, from 3,262 billion to 2,904 billion.

Key findings from 2019 to 2020:
• Fatalities increased and injured people decreased in most categories.
• Speeding-related, alcohol-impaired-driving, and seat belt non-use fatalities increased.
• Urban fatalities increased by 8.5 percent; rural fatalities increased by 2.3 percent.
• Older drivers 65 and older involved in fatal crashes decreased by 9.8 percent; drivers under 65 involved increased.
• There were fewer fatalities among people 9 and younger and people 65 and older from 2019 to 2020. Most fatality increases were people 10 to 64, with the 25-34 age group having the largest increase of 1,117 additional fatalities.
• Male fatalities increased by 8.6 percent, and female fatalities increased by 1.9 percent.
• Nighttime (6 p.m. to 5:59 a.m.) fatalities increased by 12 percent; daytime (6 a.m. to 5:59 p.m.) traffic fatalities increased by 1.4 percent.
• Forty-two States and the District of Columbia had increases in the number of fatalities.

Summary of changes from 2019 to 2020 in fatalities, estimated people injured, estimated police reported non-fatal crashes, and travel pattern are provided in the following graphics.

Fatalities compared to 2019:

↑6.8% overall
↑14% unrestrained passenger vehicle occupants
↑21% rate per 100 million VMT
↑21% ejected passenger vehicle occupants

You gotta try pretty hard to get killed in an ejection.

↑14% in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes
↑9.4% in single-vehicle crashes
↑17% in speeding-related crashes
↑8.5% in urban areas
↑11% motorcyclists
↑12% during nighttime
↑3.9% pedestrians ↑9.5% during weekend

This report doesn’t break out by race, but my Taki’s column a year ago used NHTSA data and found the biggest increase was in black traffic fatalities (up 23%), with a massive shift from May to June 2020:

And from February, the NHTSA report for 2021 up through 9/30/21:

Early Estimate of Motor Vehicle Traffic Fatalities for the First 9 Months (January–September) of 2021
Summary
A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first 9 months of 2021 shows that an estimated 31,720 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes nationwide. This represents an increase of about 12.0 percent as compared to 28,325 fatalities that were projected in the first 9 months of 2020, as shown in Table 1. This also represents the highest number of fatalities during the first 9 months of the year since 2006 and the highest percentage increase during the first 9 months in the recorded history of data in the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). Preliminary data reported by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) show that vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in the first 9 months of 2021 increased by about 244.0 billion miles, or about a 11.7-percent increase as compared to the first 9 months of 2020. Also shown in Table 1 are the fatality rates per 100 million VMT, by quarter. The fatality rate for the first 9 months of 2021 increased to 1.36 fatalities per 100 million VMT, marginally up from the projected rate of 1.35 fatalities per 100 million VMT in the first 9 months of 2020.

So, 2021 was the New Normal carrying on the pandemic/George Floyd 2020.

 
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  1. Why you got the innocent brothas standin in tha background eatin ribs, Steve? Huh? Shakin my damn head.

    Anyway, from Crime In Wrigleyville:

    Lakeview Ald. Tom Tunney (44th) shared his notes from a recent public safety meeting, hosted by the mayor’s office, with his constituents in an email Thursday.

    “During the meeting the Mayor, several City department commissioners, and Northside [sic] police district commanders shared the work they are doing to combat rising violence levels across Chicago,”
    Tunney wrote.

    The veteran alderman, whom Lori Lightfoot appointed vice mayor after her election, ran down a list of the city’s anti-violence initiatives and provided a link to a colorful graphic, titled “Recent Public Safety Investments,” that shows how the city will invest \$1.9 billion this year.

    Here are two words you won’t find in Tunney’s email or the graphic: arrest and prosecution.

    There are violence disrupters, police cameras, “equitable growth and job creation,” “climate mitigation,” and “environmental justice priorities.” The city will also fight violence through by expanding “place-based arts and events opportunities,” supporting small businesses, and expanding resources to fight homelessness.

    “Business Affairs is doing more random checks of businesses that have a certain number of safety complaints, and Streets & Sanitation is prioritizing requests to repair streetlights in high crime neighborhoods,” Tunney claimed.

    The city will also increase access to mental health services, surely one of the most urgently needed programs. Any CTA ride or short walk would likely convince doubters. Yet the budget is \$86 million, the second-smallest allotment of the plan’s 11 categories.

    But there’s no mention of arresting more violent criminals, prosecuting more murderers, or — this may sound crazy — not allowing 95% of the people who shoot other people get away with the crime. And yes, 95% Chicago’s non-fatal shootings really do go unpunished.

    Tunney’s email has not even a whisper about how the city will rein in carjackings, which are now on-pace to set another record this year. If they do, it will be the third consecutive record high.

    • Agree: Mike Tre
    • Thanks: Polistra, bomag
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan
    @JimDandy

    Tom Tunney is gay. I mean,he's gay,but also literally gay.

    Lori Light foot must be one toke over the line. She said the young thugs are acting up because they are not loved.
    'Course that could apply to some of the commenters here.🙄

    Replies: @JimDandy

  2. Ask any law enforcement agency. The easiest and most productive way to clear warrants and get criminals off the street is simply to stop cars for any and all violations. Criminals don’t obey either the major or minor laws of society. In many states it’s the state highway patrol that consistently clears the highest number of warrants every year. Because criminals disregard any and all laws.

    • Thanks: Hibernian
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Alden

    I think it was Miami that did an experiment where they stopped everybody suspicious who was out and about late at night, and they had an almost 100% success rate. Law-abiding people are either in bed or at night shift work, everybody "hanging out" at 3 in the morning is all but guaranteed to be up to no good.

    Replies: @JohnnyUinta

  3. Chechnyyyaaaaaar…shame about it.

  4. Good show, old man.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @San Fernando Curt

    "Good show, old man."

    Jolly good show.

  5. All good points, Steve, and nice comprehensive take on it all. I still wish they’d been doing some of this when I was 25 years younger. One summer, I got pulled 3 times in one week! 2 were for about 15 mph over in town, but on nice wide, intersectionless roads, and one for rolling through a 4-way. Since I pulled into my own driveway on the latter one, the guy gave me a break.

    You can lay off the bicyclists. Is it just because you don’t enjoy it? It’s not the shape of our climate, it’s the the shape of our butts. Every seen a woman bicyclist WITHOUT a very nice rear end? I thought not. Don’t knock it.

    • Agree: Lockean Proviso
    • Replies: @Stealth
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Cyclists are a major pain in the ass to motorists, especially in big cities.

  6. Video of the shooting of Patrick Lyoya in Grand Rapids that sparked the latest national conversation.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @clifford brown

    The cop obviously made a mistake by shooting him in the head (could he have made the mistake of thinking he was still holding his taser?). But up till then the perp/victim was 100% in the wrong. He appeared to be either high, retarded, or so fresh off the boat and unable to speak English that he had no clue about how a traffic stop works.

    Also, having the wrong license plates on your car is hardly a ticky tack violation. It means the car is likely stolen or will be/has been used in a crime.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Almost Missouri, @possumman, @Ben tillman

  7. At some point the murder rate will exceed the birth rate and the problem will become self limiting.

    • Disagree: Polistra
  8. OK, one cool story, bros, from your neck of the woods, Steve. Of course, this story only makes sense in a world of White people.

    I had finally gotten my new plates after living there for a year or more, but I hadn’t gotten around to putting them on. (It was SO NICE not to have to worry about parking tickets.) Well, the cop pulled me over in my old POS and told me about getting plates within 30 days.

    “Yeah, I got ’em.” They were on the floorboards in the back.
    “OK, why don’t we put ’em on now?”
    I opened up the trunk, and I didn’t have my toolbox. I looked in the glove box too. “I don’t even have a screwdriver in here. Sorry.”
    “Well, let’s see. There’s a hardware store over there on the left.” It wasn’t but 200 yards away!
    We walked over there together, but it was past their open hours.
    “OK, you put ’em on in the morning.”
    “I promise.”

    I put them on as soon as I got home. How could I let a guy like that down?

    First World interactions…

    • Thanks: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Cato
    @Achmed E. Newman


    First World interactions…
     
    Great story, will repeat. What a country this would be were every resident capable of that kind of interaction (both on the cop side and the citizen side). Unfortunately, too many just don't get the concept of civility.
    , @Charles
    @Achmed E. Newman

    High-trust society worked pretty well while we had it.

    , @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In my experience in rural red state America these interactions are very common. There are some cops everywhere who are sadists and bullies, but when they’re dealing with mostly non dysfunctional and productive citizens the serve and protect ideal tends to be at the forefront.

    Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @Stealth

    , @Hangnail Hans
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Dude. That cop was looking for, you know, a "favor" .. Why were you making him spell it out like that? Whatever happened to respect.

  9. Someone needs to inform Chief Diaz that even when his officers only arrest people doing “real” crimes, they’re still racist.

    • Thanks: Hibernian
  10. Speaking of the 14 percent increase in alcohol related deaths, when are we finally going to acknowledge that the increased permissiveness on alcohol has been a disaster too?

    Open container laws suspended due to the pandemic, Sunday blue laws all repealed. 20 years ago you couldn’t buy alcohol in college stadiums, now everyone’s drinking in the stands. Not good.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jack P

    Blue laws are bad theology; Sunday is a feast day.

    I wonder if the bigger problem looming out there is heavy marijuana usage turning people into zombies or schizos, depending on their genetics.

    No idea if marijuana is good, bad or neutral. It's zero calorie and a lot less strain on your liver than alcohol but I wonder about the long-term effect on your brain. I wonder about it, because everyone seems so determined not to ask. It's just reflexively assumed that marijuana should be legalized.

    My instinct is to junk all controlled substance laws, but that's not really a good idea when you have a welfare state. And de facto decriminalization does not seem to be working out well for Charles Murray's Fishtown side of the distribution.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad, @Justvisiting

  11. Normalized shoplifting does not injure the white bystanders in the store (except financially), but normalized speeding, running traffic lights, drunk driving, and the like DO endanger others besides the reckless driver.

  12. Cop gets called regarding some sort of domestic dispute.
    Brutha ignores orders from cop, resists arrest.
    Girlfriend becomes hysterical.

    This was a major scandal at Purdue. Cop grovels.

    https://legalinsurrection.com/2022/04/bodycam-footage-exonerates-arresting-officer-in-viral-video-of-arrest-at-purdue-university-that-set-off-a-firestorm/

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Calvin Hobbes

    Thousands of stories like that one.
    Some make the "news" some don't.

    , @Altai
    @Calvin Hobbes

    Dude's mother named him 'Adonis', I suspect both parents had levels of narcissism and other dark triad traits.

  13. I received my umpteenth notice today that my scheduled jury duty has been cancelled.

    I’ve been a registered voter since 1980.

    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?

    I just can’t help wondering if I’ve been pre-profiled as someone who will not be influenced by a manipulative lawyer—thus I’m immediately disqualified. for service as a juror.

    Or, is it just coincidence that my public service has never been needed in over forty years?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Coemgen

    In the 1980's and 1990's, the National Institute of Trial Advocacy (NITA) held twice-a-year seminars at Boalt Hall to train jury lawyers. Then, in the early aughts, the frequency went down to once a year, and now they no longer hold them at all. Around 2012, I conducted a six month experiment. Since I was spending a lot of time in the law library anyway, I decided to walk up to the courthouse a block away each morning to see if I could catch a trial, whether civil or criminal. Going up there every day for six months, I never once found an actual trial in progress. The fact is that judges don't like trials, and in CA they have a strong union.

    Replies: @Coemgen

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Coemgen

    You are thinking too highly of yourself. I have received one jury notice, just before COVID hit. I went on their website the night before and they said that my number wasn't needed, so I was excused. By registering as available and checking in, that counts as my service for three years.

    Replies: @Coemgen

    , @International Jew
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never served on a jury and I'm Steve's age. I've been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Known Fact, @The Real World, @Alden, @Anon, @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Anon, @Ben tillman

    , @SafeNow
    @Coemgen

    Regarding avoidance of jury duty, I know a fellow who will ghost-write, for friends, what he calls “the Kleenex letter.” It is so named because the recipient at the jury office, upon reading the tale of woe skillfully set forth in the letter, will need a whole box of Kleenex to wipe the river of flowing tears. The would-be juror is invariably excused, without even having to report.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never even been called. I vaguely remember getting a notice that I was on the list of those who were about to be called. Didn't happen, though.
    , @duncsbaby
    @Coemgen

    I, too, have never served on jury duty. I've been on a list a couple of times, but never actually had to go out to the court. One of the times I was sent a letter from another state. I had just moved out of Wisconsin and a couple of weeks later at my new address I got the letter. Tbh, jury duty is just something I never think about.

    Of course, now it will probably happen due to me opening my big mouth.

  14. @Achmed E. Newman
    OK, one cool story, bros, from your neck of the woods, Steve. Of course, this story only makes sense in a world of White people.

    I had finally gotten my new plates after living there for a year or more, but I hadn't gotten around to putting them on. (It was SO NICE not to have to worry about parking tickets.) Well, the cop pulled me over in my old POS and told me about getting plates within 30 days.

    "Yeah, I got 'em." They were on the floorboards in the back.
    "OK, why don't we put 'em on now?"
    I opened up the trunk, and I didn't have my toolbox. I looked in the glove box too. "I don't even have a screwdriver in here. Sorry."
    "Well, let's see. There's a hardware store over there on the left." It wasn't but 200 yards away!
    We walked over there together, but it was past their open hours.
    "OK, you put 'em on in the morning."
    "I promise."

    I put them on as soon as I got home. How could I let a guy like that down?

    First World interactions...

    Replies: @Cato, @Charles, @John Milton’s Ghost, @Hangnail Hans

    First World interactions…

    Great story, will repeat. What a country this would be were every resident capable of that kind of interaction (both on the cop side and the citizen side). Unfortunately, too many just don’t get the concept of civility.

  15. @Alden
    Ask any law enforcement agency. The easiest and most productive way to clear warrants and get criminals off the street is simply to stop cars for any and all violations. Criminals don’t obey either the major or minor laws of society. In many states it’s the state highway patrol that consistently clears the highest number of warrants every year. Because criminals disregard any and all laws.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    I think it was Miami that did an experiment where they stopped everybody suspicious who was out and about late at night, and they had an almost 100% success rate. Law-abiding people are either in bed or at night shift work, everybody “hanging out” at 3 in the morning is all but guaranteed to be up to no good.

    • Replies: @JohnnyUinta
    @J.Ross

    When I was a teen in the late 50s and wanting to stay out late at night, my Dad had a saying,
    "Nothing good happens after midnight." He had me on a short leash.....If I was late I was grounded for a few weeks.

    Thanks Dad.

  16. • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Maybe you could not drink in college football stadiums twenty years ago, but 37 years ago, you sure as hell could.
    At halftime of UM/OSU in 1985, I left my seat, walked to the party store directly across from the stadium, bought a twelve pack (they had sold every case to other fans!), walked right back in to the BigHouse openly holding my beer (Labatt’s Blue), nodded at security, took my seat, passed down beers to my buddies, and cracked one open. (And then several more.)

    Best part?

    Watching Buckeye’s cry after that Harbaugh/Kolesar game-winner:


    https://youtu.be/l8rSBzgqBtU

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe

    , @Paul Jolliffe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    JW,

    What do you think about the “Epstein was the hit man for Wexner and DiBartolo in 1985 in Ohio” theory?

    I find it likely.

    , @Alden
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That was a very brief fad. Or attempted fad about 15, 18 years ago. The Chinese manufactured what were called slutty little girl clothes and they were on the shelves in Walmart and the cheaper stores. Not places like Macy’s
    The media reacted with shock, horror and endless blathering about the new styles.

    No one bought those clothes. Which were mostly tiny little mini micro skirts. In fact, that style was what put little and teen girls in pants, T shirts and sweatshirts permanently. To this day. Expect for the long hair, it’s impossible to distinguish boys from girls these days.

    Which you would know if you had kids at the time. I remember the editorials at the time. And never seeing actual girls wearing them.
    One of the few examples of consumers, mothers not following the fads imposed by the clothing industry.

    Just had to insert your pervy interest in little girls into a discussion about blacks objecting to traffic stops didn’t you? . Keep it to yourself.

  17. Anon[221] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: “President Joe Biden’s Dog Reportedly Attacked Secret Service Member For 8 Days Straight Leaving Agent With ‘Severe’ Injuries.”

    In one incident, Jill Biden, like a typical dog owner, didn’t bother to secure the dog by its collar when she saw it was about to bite. She just stood there like a stupid useless bitch and let it happen. I’m amazed that anyone would work in the Secret Service for the Bidens. Being Hunter’s agents must make you want to vomit. Any dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    https://radaronline.com/p/president-joe-bidens-dog-attacked-secret-service-injuries/

    • Replies: @Richard of Melbourne
    @Anon

    Any dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    Correction: Anyone who owns a dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    , @Alden
    @Anon

    Or why I don’t like dog owners. There was a time when every dog owner in ultra liberal Marin county Ca was like idiot Jill. At least she didn’t do what men dog owners do when dogs menace charge and bite people. Shout that the bitee deserved to be bitten because he or she feared the dog and people who fear dogs deserve to be bitten.

    That dog was a rescue dog. He’d probably been in and out of dog rescue operations and returned several times. Before he found his “ forever” home. Dogsbite.org has many articles about idiot dog lovers “ adopting” a rescue dog and being killed by poor little poopy pee pee .

    Replies: @Art Deco, @vinteuil

    , @Fidelios Automata
    @Anon

    This applies mainly to Elites like the Bidens. If you're one of the Little People, your dog gets put down even if the "victim" was antagonizing the poor beast.

  18. The extremely retarded concept of disparate impact is behind all of this. The idea that blacks commit a lot of crime because people think they commit a lot of crime.

    The communists never could connect with actual working people, so they have given up class in favor of race. Blegs will never tire of being over-praised and told nothing they do is ever their fault, and they will never catch up to everyone else. Blacks will always be in need of ‘help’ from the progressives. it’s like a perpetual motion machine for the plot to destroy America.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    The extremely retarded concept of disparate impact is behind all of this. The idea that blacks commit a lot of crime because people think they commit a lot of crime.
     
    I think their contention is that everyone commits crime at the levels that blacks do, it's just that blacks receive greater scrutiny from police and therefore get caught much more frequently than whites (and everybody else) leading to this negative perception and a disproportionate burden of criminal punishment on them.

    One thing they point to in support of this is that in polls (of questionable value) whites and blacks report similar levels of marijuana use, but blacks are charged with possession at much higher rates. Of course this elides the fact that there is a difference between smoking marijuana in one's home, and walking down Market Street with a lit joint on a weekday afternoon. Add to this the fact that if you possess drugs while committing other crimes, you're more likely to be caught with drugs by law enforcement authorities and then charged for drug possession (together with the other charges).

    The one thing they can't fake or obscure is dead bodies with holes in them, so their contention is patent nonsense but nevertheless they persist.

    Replies: @Justvisiting

  19. @JimDandy
    Why you got the innocent brothas standin in tha background eatin ribs, Steve? Huh? Shakin my damn head.

    Anyway, from Crime In Wrigleyville:

    Lakeview Ald. Tom Tunney (44th) shared his notes from a recent public safety meeting, hosted by the mayor’s office, with his constituents in an email Thursday.

    “During the meeting the Mayor, several City department commissioners, and Northside [sic] police district commanders shared the work they are doing to combat rising violence levels across Chicago,”
    Tunney wrote.

    The veteran alderman, whom Lori Lightfoot appointed vice mayor after her election, ran down a list of the city’s anti-violence initiatives and provided a link to a colorful graphic, titled “Recent Public Safety Investments,” that shows how the city will invest $1.9 billion this year.

    Here are two words you won’t find in Tunney’s email or the graphic: arrest and prosecution.


    There are violence disrupters, police cameras, “equitable growth and job creation,” “climate mitigation,” and “environmental justice priorities.” The city will also fight violence through by expanding “place-based arts and events opportunities,” supporting small businesses, and expanding resources to fight homelessness.

    “Business Affairs is doing more random checks of businesses that have a certain number of safety complaints, and Streets & Sanitation is prioritizing requests to repair streetlights in high crime neighborhoods,” Tunney claimed.

    The city will also increase access to mental health services, surely one of the most urgently needed programs. Any CTA ride or short walk would likely convince doubters. Yet the budget is $86 million, the second-smallest allotment of the plan’s 11 categories.

    But there’s no mention of arresting more violent criminals, prosecuting more murderers, or — this may sound crazy — not allowing 95% of the people who shoot other people get away with the crime. And yes, 95% Chicago’s non-fatal shootings really do go unpunished.

    Tunney’s email has not even a whisper about how the city will rein in carjackings, which are now on-pace to set another record this year. If they do, it will be the third consecutive record high.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldlan

    Tom Tunney is gay. I mean,he’s gay,but also literally gay.

    Lori Light foot must be one toke over the line. She said the young thugs are acting up because they are not loved.
    ‘Course that could apply to some of the commenters here.🙄

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    Yes, he is the Alderman of Boystown. Only a gay could recognize how fabulous this plan really is:

    'The city will also fight violence through by expanding “place-based arts and events opportunities,” '

  20. The important thing is that you’ve encouraged a vast national movement the highest value human beings — blacks who start fights with cops — over less important human beings, such as black party guests who are just standing around in the background eating a plate of ribs . . .

    Exactly. Approximately 90% of criminal violence by blacks is perpetrated against other blacks. So refusing to catch or prosecute black criminals is a systemic denial of police protection to the black community.

    For example, suppose the average criminal previously got away with an average of 40 crimes before getting arrested, convicted and incarcerated. If the NYT’s “de-incarceration” movement makes it half as likely to get caught by police, then the crime rate will approximately double as the same thugs will on average get away with 80 crimes before being put away. On top of that, crime is now twice as profitable (as against the cost of going to jail), so that will attract more criminals who decide that “crime does pay,” and incentivize them to commit more crimes.

    The NYT doesn’t care about white victims of course. But someone needs to crunch the numbers to estimate how many of the People Whose Lives Matter are being killed, raped and robbed due to the NYT’s success in de-policing. For bonus points they could figure out how much real estate value in in black neighborhoods is lost from the resulting black crime wave.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Hypnotoad666

    Great point about the numerous crimes committed by blacks they’re never arrested for. And get away with.

  21. Traffic Stops Are Bad Because They Discourage Black Criminals from Carrying Guns, Driving Badly, and Dealing Drugs

    Steve, you sound like some old PPP (pale penis person) fuddy duddy from circa 1960 who thinks a society ought to be organized around the needs of a nation’s normal people going about their business, being productive and raising their families.

    Not saying you’re wrong. But that’s not “who we are” anymore.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @AnotherDad

    It's easy to analyze this garbage and show how incredibly deluded and crime-inducing it is. Or simply make fun of it.

    But does anyone think we are rolling this all back? That we are going to restore the rules of civilized "old American" life? We are never going to drag this minoritarian shit show back to anything like the old America based in Western Civilization.

    Actual Americans who value what America once was--our people, culture, traditions, norms, values (including pesky little things like "the rule of law")--need to demand the right to have our traditional communities, culture, nation.

    We need to make the case now for our rights and for separate nations. Let the minoritarians depolice ... themselves. But not us. Separate nations.

  22. @clifford brown
    Video of the shooting of Patrick Lyoya in Grand Rapids that sparked the latest national conversation.

    https://youtu.be/inuQELf75lo?t=16

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    The cop obviously made a mistake by shooting him in the head (could he have made the mistake of thinking he was still holding his taser?). But up till then the perp/victim was 100% in the wrong. He appeared to be either high, retarded, or so fresh off the boat and unable to speak English that he had no clue about how a traffic stop works.

    Also, having the wrong license plates on your car is hardly a ticky tack violation. It means the car is likely stolen or will be/has been used in a crime.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Thanks: Polistra
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Hypnotoad666

    The cop is clearly about to collapse from exhaustion while he is fighting a crazed Congo refugee who keeps grabbing for his weapon. He was under no obligation to let the guy get into a situation where he could kill him. The cop keeps screaming at him to let go of his taser. He was justified in shooting him.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @Hangnail Hans, @Rooster14

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Hypnotoad666

    It looked to me like since the cop couldn't get the perp's hand off the taser, the cop got his gun to be ready for that escalation, but then the perp switched back to trying to escape, so the cop switched back to trying to hold him down. Unfortunately, he was still holding the gun, and in the pressure of that contest, he squeezed the trigger, and now the perp's dead.

    It used to be not rare for sullen black suspects to be surly and resist arrest without quite overtly attacking the officer. Since 5/25/2020, however, this seems to be the universal black response to arrest. A global memo went over the blackophone that there is no punishment for blacks resisting arrest, so you may as well try your luck.


    He appeared to be either high, retarded, or so fresh off the boat and unable to speak English that he had no clue about how a traffic stop works.
     
    At the beginning of the stop, the cop asked him if he spoke English, and he said, "yes". So he spoke English well enough to answer that. OTOH, the guy is from Congo, which IIRC has an average IQ that verges into retarded territory. For some reason, his whole family, including his parents are in Grand Rapids too, even though they don't speak any English. I guess the US needed them to cure cancer with witch doctor voodooing or something.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @possumman
    @Hypnotoad666

    He shot him in the head because he didn't want to hit a vital area!

    , @Ben tillman
    @Hypnotoad666

    Yes, your last paragraph is absolutely correct.

  23. @San Fernando Curt
    Good show, old man.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “Good show, old man.”

    Jolly good show.

  24. Read her t-shirt.

    You can’t make this stuff up.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Dat white bitch know her place now! Mmm-hmm!

    , @Mike Tre
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The article (and the victim) completely glosses over the elephant in the mug shot, I mean, the elephant in the room, by making this about "how hard it is to be an empire" blah blah blah. This is pure negro sense of entitlement manifesting itself into vengeful, cowardly violence (the sucker punch: a negro specialty,) similar to that NBA baby mama who shouted to her daughter to hit the girl on the opposing team for having the audacity to play defense against muh baby gurl.

    , @Ian Smith
    @JohnnyWalker123

    That blank stare…that prognathous pout… they all have that look in mugshots.

  25. I remember being in Copenhagen around 2006 and seeing a van full of police dressed in that weird paramilitary style that became so popular in large parts of continental Europe since the late 90s. It was going in the same direction as me and eventually I caught up with them.

    They’d set up a checkpoint… for cyclists. I don’t know what they were enforcing, rules on helmets, (I’m actually not sure if it is the law in Denmark as you see almost all adults not wearing them) people disobeying traffic rules. (I think it may have been a trend of people ‘bike jaywalking’ past red lights when they felt there was no traffic around, potentially dangerous at night) But it was surreal to see a bunch of young men dressed like fascist paramilitaries stopping a young women with long blonde hair on a bike at a bike checkpoint.

    The things you can do when law and order aren’t seen as ethnic or racial things. Of course, today Denmark does (And did then) have an ethnic crime problem but unlike Sweden which continued heavy amounts of immigration, Denmark was the lucky country in having Pia Kjærsgaard and the DPP coming into government in a long-term coalition and being given the immigration brief at the key moment in the early 2000s when asylum fraud just exploded. (I suspect the internet was a key factor) The only example of this happening in a Western country. So now Denmark has a much smaller and not as fast growing problem as Sweden whose second city, Malmo, is absolutely dominated by it politically and socially.

    In Denmark the immigrants don’t surround the Danes, the Danes surround the immigrants and their ubiquity isn’t the same given. They don’t have an ‘immigrant veto’ as I constantly see everywhere in the West where natives fear offending them by talking among themselves about things like immigration.

    • Agree: Escher
  26. • Replies: @Alden
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Whenever schools are closed; whether for covid hoax or summer vacation teen crime goes down. They meet in school and those save the negro youth programs at the rec centers.

    , @another fred
    @JohnnyWalker123

    This is because so much of teen behavior is driven by peer pressure, trying to be like the cool kids and, for males, impress the girls. Adults are only slightly less so.

    Most of the dumb crap I did as a teen was because of that.

    , @Fidelios Automata
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Could also be because the pendulum is swinging back after all the deaths from legal narcotics addiction. Unfortunately, the pendulum always swings both ways!

  27. @Hypnotoad666

    The important thing is that you’ve encouraged a vast national movement the highest value human beings — blacks who start fights with cops — over less important human beings, such as black party guests who are just standing around in the background eating a plate of ribs . . .
     
    Exactly. Approximately 90% of criminal violence by blacks is perpetrated against other blacks. So refusing to catch or prosecute black criminals is a systemic denial of police protection to the black community.

    For example, suppose the average criminal previously got away with an average of 40 crimes before getting arrested, convicted and incarcerated. If the NYT's "de-incarceration" movement makes it half as likely to get caught by police, then the crime rate will approximately double as the same thugs will on average get away with 80 crimes before being put away. On top of that, crime is now twice as profitable (as against the cost of going to jail), so that will attract more criminals who decide that "crime does pay," and incentivize them to commit more crimes.

    The NYT doesn't care about white victims of course. But someone needs to crunch the numbers to estimate how many of the People Whose Lives Matter are being killed, raped and robbed due to the NYT's success in de-policing. For bonus points they could figure out how much real estate value in in black neighborhoods is lost from the resulting black crime wave.

    Replies: @Alden

    Great point about the numerous crimes committed by blacks they’re never arrested for. And get away with.

  28. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/lymanstoneky/status/1515112647796084746

    Replies: @Alden, @another fred, @Fidelios Automata

    Whenever schools are closed; whether for covid hoax or summer vacation teen crime goes down. They meet in school and those save the negro youth programs at the rec centers.

  29. @Bardon Kaldlan
    @JimDandy

    Tom Tunney is gay. I mean,he's gay,but also literally gay.

    Lori Light foot must be one toke over the line. She said the young thugs are acting up because they are not loved.
    'Course that could apply to some of the commenters here.🙄

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Yes, he is the Alderman of Boystown. Only a gay could recognize how fabulous this plan really is:

    ‘The city will also fight violence through by expanding “place-based arts and events opportunities,” ‘

  30. anonymous[215] • Disclaimer says:
    @Coemgen
    I received my umpteenth notice today that my scheduled jury duty has been cancelled.

    I've been a registered voter since 1980.

    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?

    I just can't help wondering if I've been pre-profiled as someone who will not be influenced by a manipulative lawyer—thus I'm immediately disqualified. for service as a juror.

    Or, is it just coincidence that my public service has never been needed in over forty years?

    Replies: @anonymous, @ScarletNumber, @International Jew, @SafeNow, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby

    In the 1980’s and 1990’s, the National Institute of Trial Advocacy (NITA) held twice-a-year seminars at Boalt Hall to train jury lawyers. Then, in the early aughts, the frequency went down to once a year, and now they no longer hold them at all. Around 2012, I conducted a six month experiment. Since I was spending a lot of time in the law library anyway, I decided to walk up to the courthouse a block away each morning to see if I could catch a trial, whether civil or criminal. Going up there every day for six months, I never once found an actual trial in progress. The fact is that judges don’t like trials, and in CA they have a strong union.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @anonymous


    Going up there every day for six months, I never once found an actual trial in progress.
     
    Interesting. The one time I actually didn't have my jury duty cancelled before the trial date, I waited at the courthouse for several hours, as potential backup juror, until we were told to leave because all defendants for the day had "taken pleas."
  31. Seattle top cop Diaz also applied the new lax law enforcement philosophy to those being raped. In the past, Seattle cops advised women to scream, and yell “Don’t! Stop!” repeatedly.

    Diaz’s new instructions say to incrementally deescalate the rape scene by progressively lowering the voice and objections thusly–“Don’t! Stop!…Don’t, stop…Don’t stop.” Then, have a real or fake orgasm and a cigarette.

    • Thanks: Hangnail Hans
  32. ↑21% ejected passenger vehicle occupants

    You gotta try pretty hard to get killed in an ejection.

    May be a typo. It could have been “erected” occupants.

    the State of Virginia

    The Commonwealth of Virginia. Is the Times scraping the streets for reporters now?

    • Troll: ScarletNumber
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar



    the State of Virginia
     
    The Commonwealth of Virginia.
     
    I was once pulled over on I-95 in the Commonwealth by a trooper of the “Virginia State Police”. The trooper said I was speeding but I pointed out there is no State of Virginia and so he has no jurisdiction anywhere, and therefore he had no right to stop me. Sucka just stood there slack-jawed as I peeled out. No ticket, no chase, no nothin’. 25 Glocks got dropped off in Newark that afternoon. 💵💵💵

    Replies: @Richard of Melbourne, @Mike Tre

    , @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Reg Cæsar


    The Commonwealth of Virginia. Is the Times scraping the streets for reporters now?
     
    People who were raised and educated to be Americans knew this because they were taught about American history rather than a funhouse mirror version of it that foregrounds slavery and the purported past oppression of every high status identity group.

    Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and later Kentucky (formed from the westernmost parts of Virginia's territory) are Commonwealths. Puerto Rico is as well, for whatever that's worth.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  33. @Coemgen
    I received my umpteenth notice today that my scheduled jury duty has been cancelled.

    I've been a registered voter since 1980.

    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?

    I just can't help wondering if I've been pre-profiled as someone who will not be influenced by a manipulative lawyer—thus I'm immediately disqualified. for service as a juror.

    Or, is it just coincidence that my public service has never been needed in over forty years?

    Replies: @anonymous, @ScarletNumber, @International Jew, @SafeNow, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby

    You are thinking too highly of yourself. I have received one jury notice, just before COVID hit. I went on their website the night before and they said that my number wasn’t needed, so I was excused. By registering as available and checking in, that counts as my service for three years.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @ScarletNumber


    You are thinking too highly of yourself.
     
    Lol, I'm wondering what's the likelihood of never serving on a jury in over forty years.

    That means I can recall, in Massachusetts, when jurors were absolutely not picked at random—a retired family friend used jury service as a part-time job back in the 70s until Massachusetts "reformed" jury selection.

    It would be unsurprising to find there was still a thumb-on-the-scale for jury selection such as, excluding persons who are not political party members.
  34. @J.Ross
    @Alden

    I think it was Miami that did an experiment where they stopped everybody suspicious who was out and about late at night, and they had an almost 100% success rate. Law-abiding people are either in bed or at night shift work, everybody "hanging out" at 3 in the morning is all but guaranteed to be up to no good.

    Replies: @JohnnyUinta

    When I was a teen in the late 50s and wanting to stay out late at night, my Dad had a saying,
    “Nothing good happens after midnight.” He had me on a short leash…..If I was late I was grounded for a few weeks.

    Thanks Dad.

    • Agree: Rich
  35. @Hypnotoad666
    @clifford brown

    The cop obviously made a mistake by shooting him in the head (could he have made the mistake of thinking he was still holding his taser?). But up till then the perp/victim was 100% in the wrong. He appeared to be either high, retarded, or so fresh off the boat and unable to speak English that he had no clue about how a traffic stop works.

    Also, having the wrong license plates on your car is hardly a ticky tack violation. It means the car is likely stolen or will be/has been used in a crime.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Almost Missouri, @possumman, @Ben tillman

    The cop is clearly about to collapse from exhaustion while he is fighting a crazed Congo refugee who keeps grabbing for his weapon. He was under no obligation to let the guy get into a situation where he could kill him. The cop keeps screaming at him to let go of his taser. He was justified in shooting him.

    • Replies: @Blodgie
    @JimDandy

    You boot-licking boomer normies will defend the murdering cops regardless of the facts.

    Cop had no reason to shoot that idiot in the back of the head.

    Cops hate you and will take your freedom—why the reflexive support?

    Replies: @bomag, @JimDandy, @Vinnie O

    , @Hangnail Hans
    @JimDandy

    How could anyone want to be a cop in the cultural milieu our (elite) have fashioned for us now? This country is rapidly filling to the brim with absolute filth and our"elite" get off on weaponizing them against the few remaining civilized people.

    This particular lowlife? F him. And everyone like him. Yeah, no wonder YouTube makes it so difficult to watch vids showing just a glimpse of reality.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    , @Rooster14
    @JimDandy

    And the best part is nothing of value was lost!

    Replies: @JimDandy

  36. Helmets and Kevlar vests mandatory for pedestrians and occupants of passenger vehicles and public schools.

    Accidents involving school buses kill about 130 people each year. Public education is a public health hazard.

  37. @Reg Cæsar


    ↑21% ejected passenger vehicle occupants
     
    You gotta try pretty hard to get killed in an ejection.
     
    May be a typo. It could have been "erected" occupants.

    the State of Virginia
     
    The Commonwealth of Virginia. Is the Times scraping the streets for reporters now?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    the State of Virginia

    The Commonwealth of Virginia.

    I was once pulled over on I-95 in the Commonwealth by a trooper of the “Virginia State Police”. The trooper said I was speeding but I pointed out there is no State of Virginia and so he has no jurisdiction anywhere, and therefore he had no right to stop me. Sucka just stood there slack-jawed as I peeled out. No ticket, no chase, no nothin’. 25 Glocks got dropped off in Newark that afternoon. 💵💵💵

    • Thanks: Polistra
    • Replies: @Richard of Melbourne
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The Commonwealth of Massachusetts also has a law enforcement agency anomalously titled the "Massachusetts State Police".

    In Martin Scorsese's film The Departed, our young hero (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) is enticed into serving in an undercover unit of the State Police thus:

    You wanna serve the Commonwealth, this is your chance. We need you, pal.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Mike Tre
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    A Mississippi State Trooper pulled over an old lady for speeding down a rural highway one sunny afternoon. After requesting the lady's license and registration, the tropper asked the woman why she was driving so fast.

    The old lady replied "I'm sorry dear, but I was running late for the annual Mississippi State Police Ball"

    The trooper, who was in the middle of writing out the citation, replied automatically "Mississippi State Police don't have balls."

    With that, his pen stopped writing, he peeled the citation out of the booklet, crumpled it up, and said "Have a nice day, ma'am."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Ralph L

  38. @Anon
    OT: "President Joe Biden's Dog Reportedly Attacked Secret Service Member For 8 Days Straight Leaving Agent With 'Severe' Injuries."

    In one incident, Jill Biden, like a typical dog owner, didn't bother to secure the dog by its collar when she saw it was about to bite. She just stood there like a stupid useless bitch and let it happen. I'm amazed that anyone would work in the Secret Service for the Bidens. Being Hunter's agents must make you want to vomit. Any dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    https://radaronline.com/p/president-joe-bidens-dog-attacked-secret-service-injuries/

    Replies: @Richard of Melbourne, @Alden, @Fidelios Automata

    Any dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    Correction: Anyone who owns a dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans, fish
    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Richard of Melbourne

    Better correction: Anyone that equivocates the life of a human to the life of a dog should be put down.

  39. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar



    the State of Virginia
     
    The Commonwealth of Virginia.
     
    I was once pulled over on I-95 in the Commonwealth by a trooper of the “Virginia State Police”. The trooper said I was speeding but I pointed out there is no State of Virginia and so he has no jurisdiction anywhere, and therefore he had no right to stop me. Sucka just stood there slack-jawed as I peeled out. No ticket, no chase, no nothin’. 25 Glocks got dropped off in Newark that afternoon. 💵💵💵

    Replies: @Richard of Melbourne, @Mike Tre

    The Commonwealth of Massachusetts also has a law enforcement agency anomalously titled the “Massachusetts State Police”.

    In Martin Scorsese’s film The Departed, our young hero (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) is enticed into serving in an undercover unit of the State Police thus:

    You wanna serve the Commonwealth, this is your chance. We need you, pal.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Richard of Melbourne

    Great movie.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Richard of Melbourne


    Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and later Kentucky (formed from the westernmost parts of Virginia’s territory) are Commonwealths.
     
    As are the other 46; they just don't say so. Likewise, every state is a republic (cf. Article IV, Section 4), but only California splashes it on the flag.

    (When asked to recite the Pledge, I say "to the republics", and elide the "one nation" bit.)


    Puerto Rico is as well, for whatever that’s worth.
     
    As is Australia, making Oz a Commonwealth within a Commonwealth. Tasmania might follow suit, matryushka-style.
  40. Imagine if it was really racist and different demographics had different colour licence plates.

    • Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Gordo

    There’s an idea. BLM license plates. I put one on my car and I’ll never get pulled over

    Replies: @thenon

  41. It’s crack. Not guns.
    Get caught with cocaine and no one cares – it isn’t worth the effort to bust someone.
    Caught with crack, perhaps not the first time, and it could be a long enough stretch to justify pulling a handgun out of the glove compartment and taking your chances.

    That is why Black drivers freak out, that is why all Cops are terrified when they stop a black guy.

    Do the smart thing – make crack and cocaine equal in law. Pretty soon you’ll have just as many white guys killed by cops as black.!!

    • Replies: @E. Rekshun
    @michael droy

    Pretty soon you’ll have just as many white guys killed by cops as black.!!

    Actually, more Whites than blacks are killed by cops each year. I'm too lazy to google the sources, but they're easy to find.

  42. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1512368600753090563

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe, @Paul Jolliffe, @Alden

    Maybe you could not drink in college football stadiums twenty years ago, but 37 years ago, you sure as hell could.
    At halftime of UM/OSU in 1985, I left my seat, walked to the party store directly across from the stadium, bought a twelve pack (they had sold every case to other fans!), walked right back in to the BigHouse openly holding my beer (Labatt’s Blue), nodded at security, took my seat, passed down beers to my buddies, and cracked one open. (And then several more.)

    Best part?

    Watching Buckeye’s cry after that Harbaugh/Kolesar game-winner:

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    @Paul Jolliffe

    Sorry, I meant this reply to another commenter.

  43. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1512368600753090563

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe, @Paul Jolliffe, @Alden

    JW,

    What do you think about the “Epstein was the hit man for Wexner and DiBartolo in 1985 in Ohio” theory?

    I find it likely.

  44. @Paul Jolliffe
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Maybe you could not drink in college football stadiums twenty years ago, but 37 years ago, you sure as hell could.
    At halftime of UM/OSU in 1985, I left my seat, walked to the party store directly across from the stadium, bought a twelve pack (they had sold every case to other fans!), walked right back in to the BigHouse openly holding my beer (Labatt’s Blue), nodded at security, took my seat, passed down beers to my buddies, and cracked one open. (And then several more.)

    Best part?

    Watching Buckeye’s cry after that Harbaugh/Kolesar game-winner:


    https://youtu.be/l8rSBzgqBtU

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe

    Sorry, I meant this reply to another commenter.

  45. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/Not_the_Bee/status/1514668558982148096

    Read her t-shirt.

    You can't make this stuff up.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Mike Tre, @Ian Smith

    Dat white bitch know her place now! Mmm-hmm!

  46. Blacks can’t function in Western Civilization. What better reason to destroy Western Civilization.

  47. @Hypnotoad666
    @clifford brown

    The cop obviously made a mistake by shooting him in the head (could he have made the mistake of thinking he was still holding his taser?). But up till then the perp/victim was 100% in the wrong. He appeared to be either high, retarded, or so fresh off the boat and unable to speak English that he had no clue about how a traffic stop works.

    Also, having the wrong license plates on your car is hardly a ticky tack violation. It means the car is likely stolen or will be/has been used in a crime.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Almost Missouri, @possumman, @Ben tillman

    It looked to me like since the cop couldn’t get the perp’s hand off the taser, the cop got his gun to be ready for that escalation, but then the perp switched back to trying to escape, so the cop switched back to trying to hold him down. Unfortunately, he was still holding the gun, and in the pressure of that contest, he squeezed the trigger, and now the perp’s dead.

    It used to be not rare for sullen black suspects to be surly and resist arrest without quite overtly attacking the officer. Since 5/25/2020, however, this seems to be the universal black response to arrest. A global memo went over the blackophone that there is no punishment for blacks resisting arrest, so you may as well try your luck.

    He appeared to be either high, retarded, or so fresh off the boat and unable to speak English that he had no clue about how a traffic stop works.

    At the beginning of the stop, the cop asked him if he spoke English, and he said, “yes”. So he spoke English well enough to answer that. OTOH, the guy is from Congo, which IIRC has an average IQ that verges into retarded territory. For some reason, his whole family, including his parents are in Grand Rapids too, even though they don’t speak any English. I guess the US needed them to cure cancer with witch doctor voodooing or something.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Thanks: Charon
    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Almost Missouri

    He might not have been a retard at all but the lingua franca in Congo is French. If he had the means to get to the US, he could have been from what passes as the elite level in Congo, with a solid education — but in French. Between himself and the rest of his family, you could well be looking at an aggregate IQ in the triple digits.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Moses

  48. The latest example is the death in Grand Rapids, Mich., of Patrick Lyoya, an unarmed 26-year-old Black man who was pulled over for a mismatched license plate and, after a brief struggle, was apparently shot in the head from behind

    Oh, really? “Latest example”? Somehow the NYT — and the entire national media — failed to mention that the cops shot to death an unarmed white man from Pennsylvania who was on his way to the Canadian trucker protest two months ago:

    • Replies: @Elli
    @Dr. X

    Where and who was that? I can't find it anywhere.

    Replies: @anon, @Dr. X

    , @HammerJack
    @Dr. X

    Can't help but notice that YouTube doesn't bother putting up any barriers for viewing that one. Because they know there’s nothing to worry about when a white guy is shot.

    https://www.unz.com/article/integration-has-failed-black-supremacists-white-allies-ruining-american-journalism/#comment-5291009

    , @animalogic
    @Dr. X

    This is the problem with traffic stops for trivial matters (yes the definition of "trivial "is key here).
    Any contact with police, whatever your race is fraught with... possible "problems".
    US police do have a "shoot first etc etc" attitude. ( I recall the Australian (white) woman who tried to do her civic duty to report a potential rape, only to be shot dead by the police as she approached the police car dressed in a nighty, I believe)
    So, I at least think there's room to discuss what is a "trival" traffic offence & how the police should react to it.

    Replies: @International Jew, @J.Ross

  49. @Achmed E. Newman
    OK, one cool story, bros, from your neck of the woods, Steve. Of course, this story only makes sense in a world of White people.

    I had finally gotten my new plates after living there for a year or more, but I hadn't gotten around to putting them on. (It was SO NICE not to have to worry about parking tickets.) Well, the cop pulled me over in my old POS and told me about getting plates within 30 days.

    "Yeah, I got 'em." They were on the floorboards in the back.
    "OK, why don't we put 'em on now?"
    I opened up the trunk, and I didn't have my toolbox. I looked in the glove box too. "I don't even have a screwdriver in here. Sorry."
    "Well, let's see. There's a hardware store over there on the left." It wasn't but 200 yards away!
    We walked over there together, but it was past their open hours.
    "OK, you put 'em on in the morning."
    "I promise."

    I put them on as soon as I got home. How could I let a guy like that down?

    First World interactions...

    Replies: @Cato, @Charles, @John Milton’s Ghost, @Hangnail Hans

    High-trust society worked pretty well while we had it.

  50. This is of a piece with the consensus among the left where they’ve more or less given up on the idea of blacks committing fewer crimes if only we did enough “programs,” and have changed tack to go with a strategy of not enforcing criminal laws leading to blacks being criminally sanctioned less.

    The problem with this is that after the last time they did this, the Democrats still needed White Working Class voters in the PA/OH/MI/WI heartland to win national elections, so Democrats could be shamed into funding the police and bringing their enterprising local politicians to heel.

    Now, the Democrat coalition has sloughed off White Working Class voters and consists of a high-low coalition of college educated white gentrifiers (whose status depends upon not noticing crime or treating it like weather), and blacks (who are comfortable with crime at levels that other aren’t, and who are likely to have close relatives in the criminal justice system). I’m just not sanguine about a 199os style turnaround at this point.

    One thing that stuck out to me was the idea that cops aren’t going to be making stops for expired registrations. I think they’re slipping the rabbit into the hat here, since in most States registration of a vehicle usually coincides with its annual inspection to make sure that the vehicle is not dangerous to the driver/occupants and the general public. So you might expect that this will lead to more accidents caused by bald tires, worn out brake pads, etc. When I would work regularly in Center City Philadelphia, it was a given that I-95 would be stop and go for miles during rush hours, and eventually you would progress to a point where inevitably a black woman would be standing next to her smoking jalopy, broken down and blocking the left lane. (There is a market here for counterfeit inspection stickers). I’ve always wondered what the cost of lost value of man hours of labor lost in these traffic jams was, caused or greatly exacerbated by someone with an old, broken down car.

  51. @Coemgen
    I received my umpteenth notice today that my scheduled jury duty has been cancelled.

    I've been a registered voter since 1980.

    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?

    I just can't help wondering if I've been pre-profiled as someone who will not be influenced by a manipulative lawyer—thus I'm immediately disqualified. for service as a juror.

    Or, is it just coincidence that my public service has never been needed in over forty years?

    Replies: @anonymous, @ScarletNumber, @International Jew, @SafeNow, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby

    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?

    I’ve never served on a jury and I’m Steve’s age. I’ve been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @International Jew


    I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.
     
    You actually made a deliberately inflammatory and insulting statement that guaranteed that you would not be selected for the jury.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Known Fact
    @International Jew

    I've been called to two federal jury pools and immediately been placed right on a jury both times, with nary a peep from either side's attorneys, or any questions that would elicit my unsavory viewpoints or probe my newspaper experience. What does that say about me? Anyway, one case was a workplace discrimination/whistleblower lawsuit (an Indian guy vs NYC) and the other was a horrible child-porn criminal case.

    , @The Real World
    @International Jew

    I've been called a few times but, only served once, as an alternate juror.
    A story: It was circa 1988, in NYC, a purse snatching incident.

    The accused had a public defender and their big defense was that the perp could not have been the guy that stole her purse because he has a noticeable limp from a prior injury and the bystander witnesses saw no limp from the thief. His mother was brought in to testify about this injury/limp and some letter was provided by a Doc. Well, gee, so who knows what the deal is here, right?

    Oh no, during a court break, I happened to turn down an isolated hall where no one else was except, as it turned out, the defendant far ahead of me. He had ZERO limp then. Whereas, going into and out of court he had one (of course). After 20 seconds or so, he heard me, turned and saw me (surprised) and then produced the limp!

    The killer part was, I was not allowed to inform the jury of what I saw. Only info inside the courtroom can be used to determine a case. I do get the point of that but, given I was 100% sure of what I saw, it was rough not being able to relay it. I was released when they went into deliberations so never learned the outcome.

    Moral of the story, imo - Even some public defenders will conjure outright fraudulent defenses. That stupid case should have never gone to trial

    , @Alden
    @International Jew

    Might have been better had you been on the jury and convicted the thug. Alameda county Ca. Jury duty would be an ordeal surrounded by affirmative action black county employees all day. Chortling and blathering.

    , @Anon
    @International Jew

    All my life I've reported for jury duty but was never chosen. I think they prefer to have women as jurors. I haven't received a jury summons in almost ten years. I'd like to keep it that way.

    , @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2
    @International Jew

    Hah! If you haven't been threatened by a judge to be thrown in jail for tainting the jury pool then you haven't really lived.

    Defense: Do you think you could be objective deciding on this person's guilt or innocence? (paraphrased)

    RRLCWM2: No, he looks like a pedophile. (The nature of the jury questioning had clearly indicated that this was the nature of the charges)

    , @Anon
    @International Jew

    I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals.

    I'm definitely stealing this line for when I next get called for jury duty.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Ben tillman
    @International Jew

    When I lived in Georgia 30 years ago, the state did not require vehicle inspections.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  52. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    The extremely retarded concept of disparate impact is behind all of this. The idea that blacks commit a lot of crime because people think they commit a lot of crime.

    The communists never could connect with actual working people, so they have given up class in favor of race. Blegs will never tire of being over-praised and told nothing they do is ever their fault, and they will never catch up to everyone else. Blacks will always be in need of 'help' from the progressives. it's like a perpetual motion machine for the plot to destroy America.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    The extremely retarded concept of disparate impact is behind all of this. The idea that blacks commit a lot of crime because people think they commit a lot of crime.

    I think their contention is that everyone commits crime at the levels that blacks do, it’s just that blacks receive greater scrutiny from police and therefore get caught much more frequently than whites (and everybody else) leading to this negative perception and a disproportionate burden of criminal punishment on them.

    One thing they point to in support of this is that in polls (of questionable value) whites and blacks report similar levels of marijuana use, but blacks are charged with possession at much higher rates. Of course this elides the fact that there is a difference between smoking marijuana in one’s home, and walking down Market Street with a lit joint on a weekday afternoon. Add to this the fact that if you possess drugs while committing other crimes, you’re more likely to be caught with drugs by law enforcement authorities and then charged for drug possession (together with the other charges).

    The one thing they can’t fake or obscure is dead bodies with holes in them, so their contention is patent nonsense but nevertheless they persist.

    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    "One thing they point to in support of this is that in polls (of questionable value) whites and blacks report similar levels of marijuana use, but blacks are charged with possession at much higher rates."

    One of my vices is watching reruns of "Cops"--which shows lots of traffic stops of all kinds.

    If you watch enough episodes the mystery is solved.

    Blacks are more likely to have other drugs (especially crack) in their possession as well as marijuana. In addition, blacks stopped with marijuana only are more likely to have no or expired drivers licenses and expired or non-existent license plates. Cops are more likely to "throw in" the marijuana charge in those cases--if everything else is good they are more likely to let someone with a little marijuana off with a warning or ticket.

    My guess is that these dual drug arrests that include marijuana are included as "marijuana arrests" while tickets for minor possession are not included.

    Replies: @CCZ

  53. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/Not_the_Bee/status/1514668558982148096

    Read her t-shirt.

    You can't make this stuff up.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Mike Tre, @Ian Smith

    The article (and the victim) completely glosses over the elephant in the mug shot, I mean, the elephant in the room, by making this about “how hard it is to be an empire” blah blah blah. This is pure negro sense of entitlement manifesting itself into vengeful, cowardly violence (the sucker punch: a negro specialty,) similar to that NBA baby mama who shouted to her daughter to hit the girl on the opposing team for having the audacity to play defense against muh baby gurl.

  54. The rest of the country should be grateful that the dip-shits who live in California are doing this.

  55. There is a big difference between a random stop on somebody who turns out to be carrying a gun in their car which is not legal, which they perhaps carry all the time, and and actually stopping somebody on the way to commit a planned murder.

    What is the evidence that random traffic stops are actually successful in reducing the number of illegal guns and affecting the number of gun crimes that involved discharging the weapon or affecting the amount of illegal drugs circulating within a community?

    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.

    Of course there is nothing wrong with checking up on known people who are known to be on probation or out on parole for violations, which is one effective way to reduce crime.

    I don’t have the answer to all these questions, but I would probably take the opinion of professional criminologists and law enforcement officials over the opinion of an amateur criminologist like Steve.

    One thing that doesn’t help is that police forces are so fragmented within the United States, with many small police forces officiously policing interstate highways that pass through their counties. If they had the means they would probably policing aircraft overflying their airspace and shooting them down.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Jonathan Mason


    There is a big difference between a random stop on somebody who turns out to be carrying a gun in their car which is not legal, which they perhaps carry all the time, and and actually stopping somebody on the way to commit a planned murder.

    What is the evidence that random traffic stops are actually successful in reducing the number of illegal guns and affecting the number of gun crimes that involved discharging the weapon or affecting the amount of illegal drugs circulating within a community?

    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.

     

    Mason, seriously, just stop.

    Remember where you are: Steve's HBD blog.

    99.9% murderers aren't auditioning for roles in an Agatha Christie romp. And there is not some specific "murder" gene, where the murderer lives a life law-abiding propriety and then suddenly drives over and blasts the guy who dissed him. (Or would have if he hadn't popped up on your Mason's Murderer on the Move Machine and you had a cop intercept him.)

    People who commit crime in America (and elsewhere)--including violent assault, rape and murder--have a spectrum of traits which tend toward sociopathy, low-IQ, low-conscientiousness, uncooperativeness, high time-preference, hotheadedness. Those same traits make criminals considerable more likely to
    -- drive recklessly
    -- speed
    -- run red lights
    -- have broken tail lights (because they are careless and backed into something and have low conscientiousness about getting it fixed)
    -- have expired tags (again low conscientiousness)
    -- have outstanding warrants
    -- be carrying illegal guns
    -- be carrying drugs
    etc. etc. etc.

    This is a) obvious and b) cops have known this ... forever. The term "criminal element" should spring to mind.

    A civilized society stays a civilized society by civilized men enforcing their rules upon the uncivilized men--and punishing, killing or expelling them when they break those rules.

    You don't want to live in a civilized society--great. But just save us the wheedling b.s.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @vinteuil

    , @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    See Alden's answer #2 above.

    Under the Constitution, the police can't stop you and your car unless they have probable cause (there are some permitted exceptions such as drunk driving checkpoints where they stop everyone). This is generally good from a civil rights POV - you wouldn't want the police to come and search your house just to check that you aren't breaking any laws.

    OTOH, it is perfectly Constitutional for the police to stop you if you are in violation of the traffic laws, large or small. That's why they are called laws and they are called law enforcement officers. And once they have stopped you, they are allowed to sniff around to see if they smell dope or if you have drugs or weapons in plain sight or if you have any open warrants, etc. This is considered a legitimate police tactic and very effective "broken windows" type policing. Not only does this help to clear the streets of people who belong in jail, but it also makes criminals less likely to drive around with weapons, drugs, etc. because they know that they might get pulled over.

    Now if you are a criminal, you would prefer that the police not stop you. But if you are a law abiding citizen you have more to gain that to lose by this tactic. I've been pulled over a few times over the years by the local cops on these types of minor violations (generally they don't even give you a traffic ticket, just a warning) and I'm fine with them doing so because I know that this keeps crime down in my neighborhood. (Probably they are instructed to pull over a certain # of white people so that they don't appear racist - what they are really looking for are black people from the hood who have come out to the suburbs to commit crimes.)

    The only downside to these interactions is that some blacks are allergic to being arrested and so instead of complying with the police they try to fight with them or shoot them or run away from them, etc. and they end up getting shot by the cops. In 99% of such cases, all they needed to do was to comply with the lawful orders of the cops and they wouldn't be dead. But some blacks think that they have a right not to be arrested. In their mind they dindu nuffin and should be free to go regardless of whether a cop thinks otherwise.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Boy the way Glenn Miller played
    @Jonathan Mason


    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.
     
    Dogs, ghosts, registered mail...
  56. @Reg Cæsar


    ↑21% ejected passenger vehicle occupants
     
    You gotta try pretty hard to get killed in an ejection.
     
    May be a typo. It could have been "erected" occupants.

    the State of Virginia
     
    The Commonwealth of Virginia. Is the Times scraping the streets for reporters now?

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    The Commonwealth of Virginia. Is the Times scraping the streets for reporters now?

    People who were raised and educated to be Americans knew this because they were taught about American history rather than a funhouse mirror version of it that foregrounds slavery and the purported past oppression of every high status identity group.

    Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and later Kentucky (formed from the westernmost parts of Virginia’s territory) are Commonwealths. Puerto Rico is as well, for whatever that’s worth.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    Oops-- I sent my intended reply to Melbourne:


    https://www.unz.com/isteve/traffic-stops-are-bad-because-they-discourage-black-criminals-from-carrying-guns-driving-badly-and-dealing-drugs/#comment-5295173


    It mentions Australia, which is appropriate.

  57. @International Jew
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never served on a jury and I'm Steve's age. I've been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Known Fact, @The Real World, @Alden, @Anon, @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Anon, @Ben tillman

    I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    You actually made a deliberately inflammatory and insulting statement that guaranteed that you would not be selected for the jury.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Jonathan Mason

    No, I made a true statement.

    This was ten years ago, when I had no reason to fear getting fired if somehow my employer learned about the incident. It was a much freer country then. Or to put it another way, we've lost our freedom quite fast.

    The judge, it only slowly dawned on me, was a (very) light-skinned black woman. She at first thought she'd misunderstood me, and gave me a chance to then state my view even more clearly. Then there was a brief exchange. It was ten years ago but I already intuited that it would be a good idea to let the judge get in the last word, rather than me go Ben Shapiro on her.

    So anyway, getting back to the point, if you want to keep getting excused from jury duty, be like me :)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    You actually made a deliberately inflammatory and insulting statement that guaranteed that you would not be selected for the jury.
     
    Because the judge asked him to. What else could he do? Lie?

    What would you have said?

    Replies: @additionalMike

  58. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar



    the State of Virginia
     
    The Commonwealth of Virginia.
     
    I was once pulled over on I-95 in the Commonwealth by a trooper of the “Virginia State Police”. The trooper said I was speeding but I pointed out there is no State of Virginia and so he has no jurisdiction anywhere, and therefore he had no right to stop me. Sucka just stood there slack-jawed as I peeled out. No ticket, no chase, no nothin’. 25 Glocks got dropped off in Newark that afternoon. 💵💵💵

    Replies: @Richard of Melbourne, @Mike Tre

    A Mississippi State Trooper pulled over an old lady for speeding down a rural highway one sunny afternoon. After requesting the lady’s license and registration, the tropper asked the woman why she was driving so fast.

    The old lady replied “I’m sorry dear, but I was running late for the annual Mississippi State Police Ball”

    The trooper, who was in the middle of writing out the citation, replied automatically “Mississippi State Police don’t have balls.”

    With that, his pen stopped writing, he peeled the citation out of the booklet, crumpled it up, and said “Have a nice day, ma’am.”

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Mike Tre

    NUTS

    https://dygtyjqp7pi0m.cloudfront.net/i/13881/14049590_1.jpg

    , @Ralph L
    @Mike Tre

    A Mississippi State Trooper pulled over an old lady for driving 87 mph down a rural highway one sunny afternoon. After requesting the lady’s license and registration, the trooper asked the woman why she was driving 87 mph.

    "Because it shimmies so badly at 80."

  59. “The cops were clearly doing a lot less work in 2020 than in 2019.”

    Actually this isn’t true. Cope merely shifted their focus from actually confronting negroes in the commission of violent crime, to sending platoons of overweight police women to arrest white male veterans who weren’t wearing masks inside fast food restaurants.

    In all seriousness I’d be interested to see comparative numbers on number of arrests for “disorderly conduct” or whatever gutless euphemism was applied to the act of police arresting normies who didn’t put masks on in public.

  60. Racial profiling works. That’s how NYC got its annual murder rate down to 3000.

    • Troll: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @KenH

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/nyc-annual-murder-tally-at-record-low-2012-12-28

  61. I gotta add something about Seattle’s plans, going automated as much as possible. First of all, we all know that’s not going to be any less “racist” (in outcome, anyway). It’s just that, per one of Steve’s points here, that will obviously result in fewer “interactions gone wrong” by the side of the road.

    It can all happen at the courthouse once the perp has too much on his record for anyone to ignore. There are armed bailiffs at the courthouse, but then at some point before that, some of these black guys will have to be arrested at their houses … any better for the blacks or the cops, I dunno?

    As for me, I want to be able to face my accuser per US Constitution. I want nothing to do with ANY automated enforcement, and I hope most will join with me in ignoring citations executed, printed, and mailed to me, all by computer, with no humans involved.* I’d like to see red light cameras shot up all to hell.

    Then, I’ve been pulled over 85-90 times over the years by the best count I’ve got. I wasn’t always in a good mood afterwards, but there are some good stories…

    Actually, it’s been so long now that it’s UNCANNY – not just the Covid slackness either, as this goes farther back. I have a pick-up in which the speedometer hasn’t worked in 5 years – it doesn’t have a tach either, unfortunately. I’m kinda even looking forward to a stop and “do you know how fast you were going?” “No sir, there’s no way to know in this thing. Right now, it’s says I’m doing 85, but that CAN’T be right!”

    .

    * BTW, that’s one of the quick stories I forgot to put in my blog posts about the Covid-Zero Shanghai Shitshow – people have been taken to camps based on false positive tests. The guys in the bio-suits say “it’s just my job”, as they drag them off. China has got a newer, shinier version of 1984 like everything else they’ve got over there.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You have been stopped 85 to 90 times by the police in your car?
    Is this number typical for an American driver?
    In the UK I was stopped twice by the police as a teenager whilst driving an old beat up car in the early hours of the morning.
    In over 40 years of driving since then I have never been stopped by the police whilst driving any vehicle.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Bill Jones
    @Achmed E. Newman


    “No sir, there’s no way to know in this thing. Right now, it’s says I’m doing 85, but that CAN’T be right!”

     

    Ah, the Tesla excuse.


    https://www.zerohedge.com/technology/watch-driver-tesla-says-computer-froze-83-mph
  62. I gotta wonder if any NYT reporters follow Steve on this particular issue and, if so, what they secretly think?

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Luke Lea

    I'm probably not the only person here who's known NYT reporters—and editors. They're even worse than you think. Plus an extra helping of smug sanctimony.

    Back in the 1980s I knew some who were fundamentally decent people, but times have changed.

  63. @Jonathan Mason
    @International Jew


    I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.
     
    You actually made a deliberately inflammatory and insulting statement that guaranteed that you would not be selected for the jury.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Reg Cæsar

    No, I made a true statement.

    This was ten years ago, when I had no reason to fear getting fired if somehow my employer learned about the incident. It was a much freer country then. Or to put it another way, we’ve lost our freedom quite fast.

    The judge, it only slowly dawned on me, was a (very) light-skinned black woman. She at first thought she’d misunderstood me, and gave me a chance to then state my view even more clearly. Then there was a brief exchange. It was ten years ago but I already intuited that it would be a good idea to let the judge get in the last word, rather than me go Ben Shapiro on her.

    So anyway, getting back to the point, if you want to keep getting excused from jury duty, be like me 🙂

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @International Jew


    No, I made a true statement.
     
    Were you under oath, or otherwise at risk of sanction for making false statements?

    Did the jury empaneled in your absence acquit some monster?

    Replies: @International Jew

  64. Interesting to read the (now closed) comment stream to the article in the NYT. Seems to be a clear but not overwhelming majority of Times readers who support prosecuting small crimes so they don’t escalate to large ones and the idea of cooperating with law enforcement when pulled over.

  65. The point of gun control laws is to harass the people who will obey the gun control laws, law abiding white Republican hunters, while easing off on enforcing gun control laws on black criminals carrying illegal handguns.

    I’m glad you’ve finally seen the light. In the past, you speculated that liberals want gun control because they think it will reduce non-white violent crime, but since it would be politically correct to just come out and say that, they instead focus on mass shootings, etc.

    • Replies: @Stealth
    @Stealth

    I mean, politically incorrect.

  66. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/lymanstoneky/status/1515112647796084746

    Replies: @Alden, @another fred, @Fidelios Automata

    This is because so much of teen behavior is driven by peer pressure, trying to be like the cool kids and, for males, impress the girls. Adults are only slightly less so.

    Most of the dumb crap I did as a teen was because of that.

  67. The promise of the civil rights era was that as legal discrimination was permanently done away with and through a bit of extra help via the social welfare system and affirmative action, in short order blacks would take their natural place in America as co-equals with whites across a broad front of cultural and economic measures.

    Obviously that didn’t occur and although clearly there is a large faction on the left that sincerely believes a miasma of white supremacy is thwarting all the good work and policies put in place over the last 60 years, I do think there is a quiet but not insubstantial segment of the political left that has concluded nothing is going to work. The cognitive dissonance between a sincere belief in the ability of public policy to effect broad and desirable social outcomes and the daily in-your-face evidence this is not so is resulting in the rush to obliterate all metrics or standards that show inconvenient facts about our society and indirectly public policy.

    Unfortunately for us all, this has hugely negative consequences and the problems it creates will eventually become too large to ignore. On the plus side, it’s setting up a massive political opportunity for the other side as groups like Latinos and Asians that lean Democratic become fed up with the collateral damage and guilty whites and black activists continue to insist society at large shouldn’t believe their own lying eyes about what is going on.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Arclight


    Unfortunately for us all, this has hugely negative consequences and the problems it creates will eventually become too large to ignore. On the plus side, it’s setting up a massive political opportunity for the other side as groups like Latinos and Asians that lean Democratic become fed up with the collateral damage and guilty whites and black activists continue to insist society at large shouldn’t believe their own lying eyes about what is going on.
     
    The OBLM movement has set up a situation where limo liberals who were previously unaffected by their own nonsensical beliefs are getting it right between the eyes. That will change a good many votes. Pocketbook issues are a big deal when your own pocketbook is affected. Many will turn to the right, for purely tactical reasons at the beginning, and eventually adopt the entire GOP shebang so as to avoid the everyday cognitive dissonance of having one set of core beliefs and voting for the party with diametrically opposed views.

    Replies: @Arclight

  68. @Jonathan Mason
    There is a big difference between a random stop on somebody who turns out to be carrying a gun in their car which is not legal, which they perhaps carry all the time, and and actually stopping somebody on the way to commit a planned murder.

    What is the evidence that random traffic stops are actually successful in reducing the number of illegal guns and affecting the number of gun crimes that involved discharging the weapon or affecting the amount of illegal drugs circulating within a community?

    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.

    Of course there is nothing wrong with checking up on known people who are known to be on probation or out on parole for violations, which is one effective way to reduce crime.

    I don't have the answer to all these questions, but I would probably take the opinion of professional criminologists and law enforcement officials over the opinion of an amateur criminologist like Steve.

    One thing that doesn't help is that police forces are so fragmented within the United States, with many small police forces officiously policing interstate highways that pass through their counties. If they had the means they would probably policing aircraft overflying their airspace and shooting them down.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Jack D, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    There is a big difference between a random stop on somebody who turns out to be carrying a gun in their car which is not legal, which they perhaps carry all the time, and and actually stopping somebody on the way to commit a planned murder.

    What is the evidence that random traffic stops are actually successful in reducing the number of illegal guns and affecting the number of gun crimes that involved discharging the weapon or affecting the amount of illegal drugs circulating within a community?

    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.

    Mason, seriously, just stop.

    Remember where you are: Steve’s HBD blog.

    99.9% murderers aren’t auditioning for roles in an Agatha Christie romp. And there is not some specific “murder” gene, where the murderer lives a life law-abiding propriety and then suddenly drives over and blasts the guy who dissed him. (Or would have if he hadn’t popped up on your Mason’s Murderer on the Move Machine and you had a cop intercept him.)

    People who commit crime in America (and elsewhere)–including violent assault, rape and murder–have a spectrum of traits which tend toward sociopathy, low-IQ, low-conscientiousness, uncooperativeness, high time-preference, hotheadedness. Those same traits make criminals considerable more likely to
    — drive recklessly
    — speed
    — run red lights
    — have broken tail lights (because they are careless and backed into something and have low conscientiousness about getting it fixed)
    — have expired tags (again low conscientiousness)
    — have outstanding warrants
    — be carrying illegal guns
    — be carrying drugs
    etc. etc. etc.

    This is a) obvious and b) cops have known this … forever. The term “criminal element” should spring to mind.

    A civilized society stays a civilized society by civilized men enforcing their rules upon the uncivilized men–and punishing, killing or expelling them when they break those rules.

    You don’t want to live in a civilized society–great. But just save us the wheedling b.s.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @AnotherDad

    Yes, but read the post by Anonymous below, where he says that in the UK he was stopped two times by the police when driving a beat-up car as a teenager in the small hours of the morning and then never stopped again by the police while driving for the next 40 years.

    I get the impression from what some people say that police in the US just use stopping cars for alleged motoring offenses as a pretext for checking out and harassing people who may or may not be criminals rather than in a sincere effort to make sure that all vehicles have working brake lights because brake lights that are out cause a lot of accidents in their communities.

    Yes, people who drive badly may be drunks, druggies, or criminals, but there should be many ways in which police can identify delinquents in their own communities.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    According to an Orlando Sentinel article in 2019 nearly 2 million out 16.6 million Florida drivers on a certain date had their driver's license suspended not for unsafe driving, but due to unpaid fines and fees, that are often totally unrelated to driving.

    https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/crime/os-ne-drivers-license-suspensions-report-20191219-xazyr2cdkff7xfljjvgkcz6tum-story.html

    This is absolutely incredible, and shows what a police state Florida is. (It is not like Florida has much public transportation that poor people can use as an alternative to driving.)

    I myself had my Florida driver's license suspended after I sold a car to a neighbor who said he was going to take it to Tennessee and register it there. Fortunately I was out of the country (he dropped me at the airport) and did not even find out about this until several months later, by which time he had actually registered the transaction in Florida, and I was able to pay a "fine" (for nothing) and have my license reinstated over the phone.

    I don't know if any other states are like this, but which political party is fighting to reform this overbearing state?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Art Deco, @AnotherDad, @additionalMike

    , @vinteuil
    @AnotherDad


    A civilized society stays a civilized society by civilized men enforcing their rules upon the uncivilized men–and punishing, killing or expelling them when they break those rules.
     
    Well, yeah, sure - but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that's exactly what the left thinks they're doing. They're punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

    Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @AnotherDad

  69. @Jack P
    Speaking of the 14 percent increase in alcohol related deaths, when are we finally going to acknowledge that the increased permissiveness on alcohol has been a disaster too?

    Open container laws suspended due to the pandemic, Sunday blue laws all repealed. 20 years ago you couldn't buy alcohol in college stadiums, now everyone's drinking in the stands. Not good.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Blue laws are bad theology; Sunday is a feast day.

    I wonder if the bigger problem looming out there is heavy marijuana usage turning people into zombies or schizos, depending on their genetics.

    No idea if marijuana is good, bad or neutral. It’s zero calorie and a lot less strain on your liver than alcohol but I wonder about the long-term effect on your brain. I wonder about it, because everyone seems so determined not to ask. It’s just reflexively assumed that marijuana should be legalized.

    My instinct is to junk all controlled substance laws, but that’s not really a good idea when you have a welfare state. And de facto decriminalization does not seem to be working out well for Charles Murray’s Fishtown side of the distribution.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    ...but I wonder about the long-term effect on your brain.
     
    And lungs?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @AnotherDad
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    My instinct is to junk all controlled substance laws, but that’s not really a good idea when you have a welfare state. And de facto decriminalization does not seem to be working out well for Charles Murray’s Fishtown side of the distribution.
     
    A libertarian "paradise" does not mesh well with communitarian social policy.

    The old school way this was handled was you could be a drunken bum--but over on skid row. If you tried to hassle normal people in the commercial district or their neighborhoods, the cops would beat you down. And there was no--or insufficient--public welfare, so booze addicts relied on private charity and/or withered away and died off.

    My personal instincts tend toward "get out of my face" libertarian. I don't like being ordered about and don't wish to order about other people. But personally i like civilized society. I have zero desire to put up with any assholery. (Same instinct: Get out of my face.)

    To me the solution is straightforward: People have the right to live in communities with the norms they desire. You want to get high--fine. But you don't have that right in a community that does not want to have that behavior. People should be in separate communities with separate norms.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Justvisiting
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    "No idea if marijuana is good, bad or neutral."

    The correct answer, imho, is all of the above.

    Studies so far suggest that it is good for mitigating some physical and mental ailments while it harms the brain cells of fetuses, infants and young people.

    It should not be used when driving.

    Further muddying the waters is that some of the ingredients have different effects which are just beginning to be studied.

    Good luck getting a reasonable public policy out of that mess.

  70. @Jonathan Mason
    @International Jew


    I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.
     
    You actually made a deliberately inflammatory and insulting statement that guaranteed that you would not be selected for the jury.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Reg Cæsar

    You actually made a deliberately inflammatory and insulting statement that guaranteed that you would not be selected for the jury.

    Because the judge asked him to. What else could he do? Lie?

    What would you have said?

    • Replies: @additionalMike
    @Reg Cæsar

    Great Caesar, I think part of Mr. Mason's point was that the judge had asked the I.J. only whether the system was biased against blacks. Gratuitously throwing in his two cents (that it was biased in favor) although it is often true, would piss off almost any black person.

  71. @AnotherDad

    Traffic Stops Are Bad Because They Discourage Black Criminals from Carrying Guns, Driving Badly, and Dealing Drugs
     
    Steve, you sound like some old PPP (pale penis person) fuddy duddy from circa 1960 who thinks a society ought to be organized around the needs of a nation's normal people going about their business, being productive and raising their families.

    Not saying you're wrong. But that's not "who we are" anymore.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    It’s easy to analyze this garbage and show how incredibly deluded and crime-inducing it is. Or simply make fun of it.

    But does anyone think we are rolling this all back? That we are going to restore the rules of civilized “old American” life? We are never going to drag this minoritarian shit show back to anything like the old America based in Western Civilization.

    Actual Americans who value what America once was–our people, culture, traditions, norms, values (including pesky little things like “the rule of law”)–need to demand the right to have our traditional communities, culture, nation.

    We need to make the case now for our rights and for separate nations. Let the minoritarians depolice … themselves. But not us. Separate nations.

  72. @Richard of Melbourne
    @Anon

    Any dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    Correction: Anyone who owns a dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    Better correction: Anyone that equivocates the life of a human to the life of a dog should be put down.

  73. @International Jew
    @Jonathan Mason

    No, I made a true statement.

    This was ten years ago, when I had no reason to fear getting fired if somehow my employer learned about the incident. It was a much freer country then. Or to put it another way, we've lost our freedom quite fast.

    The judge, it only slowly dawned on me, was a (very) light-skinned black woman. She at first thought she'd misunderstood me, and gave me a chance to then state my view even more clearly. Then there was a brief exchange. It was ten years ago but I already intuited that it would be a good idea to let the judge get in the last word, rather than me go Ben Shapiro on her.

    So anyway, getting back to the point, if you want to keep getting excused from jury duty, be like me :)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    No, I made a true statement.

    Were you under oath, or otherwise at risk of sanction for making false statements?

    Did the jury empaneled in your absence acquit some monster?

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    You're not under any oath or obligation of any kind at that point. At least in California you're not.

    Now the best jury-selection scene I ever saw was some years earlier in Federal District Court (across the bay in San Francisco). It was for the trial of a Chinese gang accused of shaking down some brothels. To the judge's question of "Would you be able to give the accused a fair hearing?" (or whatever they ask you) the prospective juror said, "I'm familiar with the Wah-Ching [or whatever it was called] gang and have personally been victimized by it."

    (I was excused a little later myself, but for nothing worth relating here.)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  74. @JimDandy
    @Hypnotoad666

    The cop is clearly about to collapse from exhaustion while he is fighting a crazed Congo refugee who keeps grabbing for his weapon. He was under no obligation to let the guy get into a situation where he could kill him. The cop keeps screaming at him to let go of his taser. He was justified in shooting him.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @Hangnail Hans, @Rooster14

    You boot-licking boomer normies will defend the murdering cops regardless of the facts.

    Cop had no reason to shoot that idiot in the back of the head.

    Cops hate you and will take your freedom—why the reflexive support?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Blodgie

    We're in an age of picking sides.

    Do you want to be on the side represented by the cops?

    Or the one on the other side of the cops?

    , @JimDandy
    @Blodgie

    I already mentioned the excellent reasons the cop had for shooting that savage idiot. A cop--like all of us--only has one life to lose. If it makes you feel any better, I was really mad at the cop who arrested Sandra Bland. But he didn't kill her, and he was fired.

    , @Vinnie O
    @Blodgie

    The last time I was stopped by the Virginia State Police (during the morning rush hour), I kept both hands on the wheel except when I had warned the officer that my wallet was in my jacket pocket. Everything went fine, and the officer THANKED ME instead of issuing a ticket. But come on, I'm Irish from Chicago. If we ain't cops ourselves, we know 10 guys who are. So ya want an occasional ticket or ya want to be part of a shootout at the next bar ya leave?

  75. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jack P

    Blue laws are bad theology; Sunday is a feast day.

    I wonder if the bigger problem looming out there is heavy marijuana usage turning people into zombies or schizos, depending on their genetics.

    No idea if marijuana is good, bad or neutral. It's zero calorie and a lot less strain on your liver than alcohol but I wonder about the long-term effect on your brain. I wonder about it, because everyone seems so determined not to ask. It's just reflexively assumed that marijuana should be legalized.

    My instinct is to junk all controlled substance laws, but that's not really a good idea when you have a welfare state. And de facto decriminalization does not seem to be working out well for Charles Murray's Fishtown side of the distribution.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad, @Justvisiting

    …but I wonder about the long-term effect on your brain.

    And lungs?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Reg Cæsar

    This as well, but I think the tar load on your lungs is a lot lower than cigarettes because you just can't smoke the same quantity.

    BTW, what's the verdict on CBD oil? Asking for a friend.

    Replies: @thenon, @Reg Cæsar

  76. Anonymous[846] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I gotta add something about Seattle's plans, going automated as much as possible. First of all, we all know that's not going to be any less "racist" (in outcome, anyway). It's just that, per one of Steve's points here, that will obviously result in fewer "interactions gone wrong" by the side of the road.

    It can all happen at the courthouse once the perp has too much on his record for anyone to ignore. There are armed bailiffs at the courthouse, but then at some point before that, some of these black guys will have to be arrested at their houses ... any better for the blacks or the cops, I dunno?

    As for me, I want to be able to face my accuser per US Constitution. I want nothing to do with ANY automated enforcement, and I hope most will join with me in ignoring citations executed, printed, and mailed to me, all by computer, with no humans involved.* I'd like to see red light cameras shot up all to hell.

    Then, I've been pulled over 85-90 times over the years by the best count I've got. I wasn't always in a good mood afterwards, but there are some good stories...

    Actually, it's been so long now that it's UNCANNY - not just the Covid slackness either, as this goes farther back. I have a pick-up in which the speedometer hasn't worked in 5 years - it doesn't have a tach either, unfortunately. I'm kinda even looking forward to a stop and "do you know how fast you were going?" "No sir, there's no way to know in this thing. Right now, it's says I'm doing 85, but that CAN'T be right!"


    .

    * BTW, that's one of the quick stories I forgot to put in my blog posts about the Covid-Zero Shanghai Shitshow - people have been taken to camps based on false positive tests. The guys in the bio-suits say "it's just my job", as they drag them off. China has got a newer, shinier version of 1984 like everything else they've got over there.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Bill Jones

    You have been stopped 85 to 90 times by the police in your car?
    Is this number typical for an American driver?
    In the UK I was stopped twice by the police as a teenager whilst driving an old beat up car in the early hours of the morning.
    In over 40 years of driving since then I have never been stopped by the police whilst driving any vehicle.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anonymous

    No, not all in a car/truck. 5 times were on my motorcycle (in town), with nary a ticket, BTW, and 7 or 8 times were on a bicycle-bike.

    I am pretty sure this is well above average, especially for an (above-) average White guy. One time, the traffic court judge - a very fair guy from all my observation - asked "Hey, don't I know you from somewhere?" Luckily, he didn't remember exactly from where.

    (However, I did drive a certain sports car for many years, a model that they just plain pick on.)

    Replies: @HammerJack

  77. @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    ...but I wonder about the long-term effect on your brain.
     
    And lungs?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    This as well, but I think the tar load on your lungs is a lot lower than cigarettes because you just can’t smoke the same quantity.

    BTW, what’s the verdict on CBD oil? Asking for a friend.

    • Replies: @thenon
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Chewing weed with a little peanut butter works wonders on the PTSD and anxiety produced by excessive reading of right wing foaming-at-the-mouth paranoid blogs, but CBD oil either doesn't work, or gets me depressed. For best results, a small amount of Mexican black tar heroin laced with fentanyl injected into vein of your choice on the genitals.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    BTW, what’s the verdict on CBD oil? Asking for a friend.
     
    We give it to our dog and our cat at night. Really. Keeps 'em quiet.
  78. @Richard of Melbourne
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The Commonwealth of Massachusetts also has a law enforcement agency anomalously titled the "Massachusetts State Police".

    In Martin Scorsese's film The Departed, our young hero (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) is enticed into serving in an undercover unit of the State Police thus:

    You wanna serve the Commonwealth, this is your chance. We need you, pal.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Reg Cæsar

    Great movie.

  79. @Mike Tre
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    A Mississippi State Trooper pulled over an old lady for speeding down a rural highway one sunny afternoon. After requesting the lady's license and registration, the tropper asked the woman why she was driving so fast.

    The old lady replied "I'm sorry dear, but I was running late for the annual Mississippi State Police Ball"

    The trooper, who was in the middle of writing out the citation, replied automatically "Mississippi State Police don't have balls."

    With that, his pen stopped writing, he peeled the citation out of the booklet, crumpled it up, and said "Have a nice day, ma'am."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Ralph L

    NUTS

    [MORE]

  80. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jack P

    Blue laws are bad theology; Sunday is a feast day.

    I wonder if the bigger problem looming out there is heavy marijuana usage turning people into zombies or schizos, depending on their genetics.

    No idea if marijuana is good, bad or neutral. It's zero calorie and a lot less strain on your liver than alcohol but I wonder about the long-term effect on your brain. I wonder about it, because everyone seems so determined not to ask. It's just reflexively assumed that marijuana should be legalized.

    My instinct is to junk all controlled substance laws, but that's not really a good idea when you have a welfare state. And de facto decriminalization does not seem to be working out well for Charles Murray's Fishtown side of the distribution.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad, @Justvisiting

    My instinct is to junk all controlled substance laws, but that’s not really a good idea when you have a welfare state. And de facto decriminalization does not seem to be working out well for Charles Murray’s Fishtown side of the distribution.

    A libertarian “paradise” does not mesh well with communitarian social policy.

    The old school way this was handled was you could be a drunken bum–but over on skid row. If you tried to hassle normal people in the commercial district or their neighborhoods, the cops would beat you down. And there was no–or insufficient–public welfare, so booze addicts relied on private charity and/or withered away and died off.

    My personal instincts tend toward “get out of my face” libertarian. I don’t like being ordered about and don’t wish to order about other people. But personally i like civilized society. I have zero desire to put up with any assholery. (Same instinct: Get out of my face.)

    To me the solution is straightforward: People have the right to live in communities with the norms they desire. You want to get high–fine. But you don’t have that right in a community that does not want to have that behavior. People should be in separate communities with separate norms.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @AnotherDad

    “To me the solution is straightforward: People have the right to live in communities with the norms they desire. You want to get high–fine. But you don’t have that right in a community that does not want to have that behavior. People should be in separate communities with separate norms.“

    First, we do live on those types of communities. Second, your “solution” is libertarian in nature.

  81. Always got that money for that weed and Hennessy, never have that money to fix that tail light!

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
  82. OT:

    Welcome, refugees! [holds up sign with hearts and rainbows]

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10722403/Border-agents-grapple-Russian-woman-trying-political-asylum-US.html

    Seriously, enough of these show up and I bet Kamala Harris shuts that border right down.

    • Agree: Charon
  83. @Arclight
    The promise of the civil rights era was that as legal discrimination was permanently done away with and through a bit of extra help via the social welfare system and affirmative action, in short order blacks would take their natural place in America as co-equals with whites across a broad front of cultural and economic measures.

    Obviously that didn't occur and although clearly there is a large faction on the left that sincerely believes a miasma of white supremacy is thwarting all the good work and policies put in place over the last 60 years, I do think there is a quiet but not insubstantial segment of the political left that has concluded nothing is going to work. The cognitive dissonance between a sincere belief in the ability of public policy to effect broad and desirable social outcomes and the daily in-your-face evidence this is not so is resulting in the rush to obliterate all metrics or standards that show inconvenient facts about our society and indirectly public policy.

    Unfortunately for us all, this has hugely negative consequences and the problems it creates will eventually become too large to ignore. On the plus side, it's setting up a massive political opportunity for the other side as groups like Latinos and Asians that lean Democratic become fed up with the collateral damage and guilty whites and black activists continue to insist society at large shouldn't believe their own lying eyes about what is going on.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Unfortunately for us all, this has hugely negative consequences and the problems it creates will eventually become too large to ignore. On the plus side, it’s setting up a massive political opportunity for the other side as groups like Latinos and Asians that lean Democratic become fed up with the collateral damage and guilty whites and black activists continue to insist society at large shouldn’t believe their own lying eyes about what is going on.

    The OBLM movement has set up a situation where limo liberals who were previously unaffected by their own nonsensical beliefs are getting it right between the eyes. That will change a good many votes. Pocketbook issues are a big deal when your own pocketbook is affected. Many will turn to the right, for purely tactical reasons at the beginning, and eventually adopt the entire GOP shebang so as to avoid the everyday cognitive dissonance of having one set of core beliefs and voting for the party with diametrically opposed views.

    • Replies: @Arclight
    @Johann Ricke

    I don't know if white liberals are really getting the brunt of what they have unleashed yet. Many of them are able to opt out of the consequences through the neighborhoods they can afford to live in or the schools they can pay to send their kids to. Their anger won't be stoked until they see their kids rejected from the college slots they assumed were theirs after spending hundreds of thousands on private school and club sports, and/or spouses lose out on job or promotions for some diversity quota.

    Who it will get to first are other minorities who have to live near blacks or share schools with them. All the right has to say is that they promise to no longer prioritize black feelings over the commons good.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

  84. @Dr. X

    The latest example is the death in Grand Rapids, Mich., of Patrick Lyoya, an unarmed 26-year-old Black man who was pulled over for a mismatched license plate and, after a brief struggle, was apparently shot in the head from behind
     
    Oh, really? "Latest example"? Somehow the NYT -- and the entire national media -- failed to mention that the cops shot to death an unarmed white man from Pennsylvania who was on his way to the Canadian trucker protest two months ago:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BZA2NMn6Yo

    Replies: @Elli, @HammerJack, @animalogic

    Where and who was that? I can’t find it anywhere.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Elli

    15 February 2022


    BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — New York state police have identified the man who was fatally shot by a trooper in Buffalo as 38-year-old James Huber of North East in Erie County, Pennsylvania.

    The shooting of Huber by Trooper Anthony Nigro on Saturday is under investigation by the state’s attorney general, Letitia James.

    State police released the names of Huber and Nigro, a 14-year veteran of the department, on Monday.

    State Police Maj. Carla DiRienzo said during a news conference Saturday that the vehicle driven by Huber was first spotted driving “erratically” on a highway and was later pulled over on city streets in Buffalo.

    DiRienzo said Huber put the vehicle in reverse and tried to flee, briefly dragging Nigro, who was reaching into the vehicle. “The trooper discharged their division-issued firearm at the suspect,” she said.

    Huber died at the scene.

    James announced Monday that her office has begun its investigation into the shooting pursuant to a state law that requires the attorney general to review deaths caused by law enforcement officers.

    , @Dr. X
    @Elli


    Where and who was that? I can’t find it anywhere.

     

    Yep. You can, but you have to know what you are looking for. It was completely memory-holed. National press did not cover it. Local press barely mentioned it.

    Buffalo, NY, Feb. 12 2022. Deceased white man is James Huber, of North East, PA. 100% unarmed. Shot dead by New York State Police after attempting to flee a traffic stop. Guy was going to the Canadian trucker rally at the border, so he was probably an anti-vaxx Trump deplorable.

    White guy, so "conservatives" will blame the victim and say "he deserved it" for failing to grovel before the "hero" cop.

    Replies: @mikeInThe716

  85. Guess who are the worst drivers in South Africa? Township drivers are used to dirt roads or potholed streets, so black drivers are notoriously slow in traffic. They have a habit of suddenly coming to a full stop in the middle of the road to chat to pedestrians or to drop off passengers. Another habit is the use of brights (high beams) in traffic at night, or hazard lights used instead of indicators when turning or pulling over.

    South Africa has a dedicated traffic police force with different uniforms and cars from regular police. They are notoriously corrupt and are often seen sitting in their cars doing nothing during working hours, and they don’t operate after dark in most places except in special operations. Speed trap cameras haven’t functioned in the city live in for more than a decade now, there are no traffic cops qualified to operate them here, so it’s not admissible in court. Provincial traffic police still use them on highways, but they are under different management from city traffic police. Some cities do have legal functioning speed traps, especially were there are wealthy motorists who can afford to pay the fines.

    The punch line is that the black name for traffic police is “Sephethephethe”( pronounced sehpehtehpehteh). Seriously, that word is written on the graphics of their cars.

  86. @Achmed E. Newman
    OK, one cool story, bros, from your neck of the woods, Steve. Of course, this story only makes sense in a world of White people.

    I had finally gotten my new plates after living there for a year or more, but I hadn't gotten around to putting them on. (It was SO NICE not to have to worry about parking tickets.) Well, the cop pulled me over in my old POS and told me about getting plates within 30 days.

    "Yeah, I got 'em." They were on the floorboards in the back.
    "OK, why don't we put 'em on now?"
    I opened up the trunk, and I didn't have my toolbox. I looked in the glove box too. "I don't even have a screwdriver in here. Sorry."
    "Well, let's see. There's a hardware store over there on the left." It wasn't but 200 yards away!
    We walked over there together, but it was past their open hours.
    "OK, you put 'em on in the morning."
    "I promise."

    I put them on as soon as I got home. How could I let a guy like that down?

    First World interactions...

    Replies: @Cato, @Charles, @John Milton’s Ghost, @Hangnail Hans

    In my experience in rural red state America these interactions are very common. There are some cops everywhere who are sadists and bullies, but when they’re dealing with mostly non dysfunctional and productive citizens the serve and protect ideal tends to be at the forefront.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Except for a few rural sheriff's departments in Bumfuck, Montana or wherever, pigs are pigs are pigs.

    This happened in what is often ranked as America's most conservative city.

    If you haven't had your come-to-Jesus moment, you will.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBUUx0jUKxc

    , @Stealth
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    I got pulled over by a couple of sadistic cops about thirteen or fourteen years ago. They were sheriff's deputies, who in my experience tend to be vastly less professional, more stupid, and crueler than local and state police. One of them clearly wanted me to give him a pretext to physically harm me. It took a long time to get over.

  87. @Gordo
    Imagine if it was really racist and different demographics had different colour licence plates.

    Replies: @John Milton’s Ghost

    There’s an idea. BLM license plates. I put one on my car and I’ll never get pulled over

    • Replies: @thenon
    @John Milton’s Ghost

    Get one of these too.
    https://www.etsy.com/listing/619707423/realistic-black-man-male-latex-mask

  88. @International Jew
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never served on a jury and I'm Steve's age. I've been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Known Fact, @The Real World, @Alden, @Anon, @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Anon, @Ben tillman

    I’ve been called to two federal jury pools and immediately been placed right on a jury both times, with nary a peep from either side’s attorneys, or any questions that would elicit my unsavory viewpoints or probe my newspaper experience. What does that say about me? Anyway, one case was a workplace discrimination/whistleblower lawsuit (an Indian guy vs NYC) and the other was a horrible child-porn criminal case.

  89. The point of gun control laws is to harass the people who will obey the gun control laws, law abiding white Republican hunters, while easing off on enforcing gun control laws on black criminals carrying illegal handguns.

    And the cops, who play an essential role in implementing this anarcho-tyranny, show no sign of even dragging their feet.

    I pity any fool anywhere on the right who is stupid enough to back the blue. Some people are hopeless.

  90. @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In my experience in rural red state America these interactions are very common. There are some cops everywhere who are sadists and bullies, but when they’re dealing with mostly non dysfunctional and productive citizens the serve and protect ideal tends to be at the forefront.

    Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @Stealth

    Except for a few rural sheriff’s departments in Bumfuck, Montana or wherever, pigs are pigs are pigs.

    This happened in what is often ranked as America’s most conservative city.

    If you haven’t had your come-to-Jesus moment, you will.

  91. The government using those ridiculous, nuisance, motor vehicle regulations as a pretext to violate #4; and farm tax dollars (in some states, all of it goes to the schools). The number of people wrongfully convicted far, FAR exceeds the guilties let-off.

  92. There are designated bike lanes, I now propose designated “black lanes’ reserved just for black drivers, even if their car has no operating lights, no registration, no plates, coal black tinted windows, running on a flat, belching fucking climate changing thick exhaust. Just give blacks large areas, cities even, just to themselves. Call it reparations. biden can find the cash some place. Are there no blacks in this country that are embarrassed or ashamed that woke people think that they can’t follow the simplest rules? Prime example, not so long ago in Cleveland, a woman used to drive up over the curb, along the sidewalk and then back into the street…to avoid stopping behind a school bus with flashing red lights. She was finally caught, but today why bother. Oh, and she was black and in a hurry.

  93. The Democrats just want to take guns away from white gentiles, not from blacks and Hispanics.

  94. @Achmed E. Newman
    OK, one cool story, bros, from your neck of the woods, Steve. Of course, this story only makes sense in a world of White people.

    I had finally gotten my new plates after living there for a year or more, but I hadn't gotten around to putting them on. (It was SO NICE not to have to worry about parking tickets.) Well, the cop pulled me over in my old POS and told me about getting plates within 30 days.

    "Yeah, I got 'em." They were on the floorboards in the back.
    "OK, why don't we put 'em on now?"
    I opened up the trunk, and I didn't have my toolbox. I looked in the glove box too. "I don't even have a screwdriver in here. Sorry."
    "Well, let's see. There's a hardware store over there on the left." It wasn't but 200 yards away!
    We walked over there together, but it was past their open hours.
    "OK, you put 'em on in the morning."
    "I promise."

    I put them on as soon as I got home. How could I let a guy like that down?

    First World interactions...

    Replies: @Cato, @Charles, @John Milton’s Ghost, @Hangnail Hans

    Dude. That cop was looking for, you know, a “favor” .. Why were you making him spell it out like that? Whatever happened to respect.

  95. @Calvin Hobbes
    Cop gets called regarding some sort of domestic dispute.
    Brutha ignores orders from cop, resists arrest.
    Girlfriend becomes hysterical.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqJAr5IRc8g

    This was a major scandal at Purdue. Cop grovels.

    https://legalinsurrection.com/2022/04/bodycam-footage-exonerates-arresting-officer-in-viral-video-of-arrest-at-purdue-university-that-set-off-a-firestorm/

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans, @Altai

    Thousands of stories like that one.
    Some make the “news” some don’t.

  96. FYI, Some numbers from the WaPo police shootings database (Do they have a black-person doing the shootings database?)

    Between 2015 and 2019, U.S. police killed an average of nearly 1,000 people per year. African Americans made up 13% of the U.S. population but accounted for 24% of the victims. Conversely, whites made up roughly 60% of the population but only 46% of the deaths.

    While the number of police shootings in the U.S. is in the top 10 among nations, once that number is evaluated in relation to the total population, the U.S. drops all the way down to 33rd.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Known Fact

    FYI, Some numbers from the WaPo police shootings database (Do they have a black-person doing the shootings database?)

    I trust the Bureau of Justice Statistics before I'd trust the WaPo.

  97. From the NYT news section:

    … In Seattle, Chief Adrian Z. Diaz said…. pulling over cars just for air fresheners, cracked windows, or missing front license plates….

    Can anybody here describe an air freshener on a car?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Justpassingby

    The little styrofoam tree hanging from the rear view mirror. Presumably argued to be blocking visibility.

    Replies: @Justpassingby

    , @scrivener3
    @Justpassingby

    A little green tree shaped felt soaked in new car smell hanging from your rear view mirror.

    Most places illegal to hang anything from the rear view mirror, Blocks the view forward somewhat. Easily seen from outside the car to justify a stop.

    Replies: @Justpassingby, @mmack

  98. @Stealth

    The point of gun control laws is to harass the people who will obey the gun control laws, law abiding white Republican hunters, while easing off on enforcing gun control laws on black criminals carrying illegal handguns.
     
    I'm glad you've finally seen the light. In the past, you speculated that liberals want gun control because they think it will reduce non-white violent crime, but since it would be politically correct to just come out and say that, they instead focus on mass shootings, etc.

    Replies: @Stealth

    I mean, politically incorrect.

  99. @Richard of Melbourne
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The Commonwealth of Massachusetts also has a law enforcement agency anomalously titled the "Massachusetts State Police".

    In Martin Scorsese's film The Departed, our young hero (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) is enticed into serving in an undercover unit of the State Police thus:

    You wanna serve the Commonwealth, this is your chance. We need you, pal.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Reg Cæsar

    Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and later Kentucky (formed from the westernmost parts of Virginia’s territory) are Commonwealths.

    As are the other 46; they just don’t say so. Likewise, every state is a republic (cf. Article IV, Section 4), but only California splashes it on the flag.

    (When asked to recite the Pledge, I say “to the republics”, and elide the “one nation” bit.)

    Puerto Rico is as well, for whatever that’s worth.

    As is Australia, making Oz a Commonwealth within a Commonwealth. Tasmania might follow suit, matryushka-style.

  100. @JimDandy
    @Hypnotoad666

    The cop is clearly about to collapse from exhaustion while he is fighting a crazed Congo refugee who keeps grabbing for his weapon. He was under no obligation to let the guy get into a situation where he could kill him. The cop keeps screaming at him to let go of his taser. He was justified in shooting him.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @Hangnail Hans, @Rooster14

    How could anyone want to be a cop in the cultural milieu our (elite) have fashioned for us now? This country is rapidly filling to the brim with absolute filth and our”elite” get off on weaponizing them against the few remaining civilized people.

    This particular lowlife? F him. And everyone like him. Yeah, no wonder YouTube makes it so difficult to watch vids showing just a glimpse of reality.

    • Agree: bomag, HammerJack
    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Hangnail Hans

    If you fight with a cop and try hard to get his weapon, you are giving the cop permission to kill you. This shouldn't be controversial.

  101. @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In my experience in rural red state America these interactions are very common. There are some cops everywhere who are sadists and bullies, but when they’re dealing with mostly non dysfunctional and productive citizens the serve and protect ideal tends to be at the forefront.

    Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @Stealth

    I got pulled over by a couple of sadistic cops about thirteen or fourteen years ago. They were sheriff’s deputies, who in my experience tend to be vastly less professional, more stupid, and crueler than local and state police. One of them clearly wanted me to give him a pretext to physically harm me. It took a long time to get over.

  102. @Dr. X

    The latest example is the death in Grand Rapids, Mich., of Patrick Lyoya, an unarmed 26-year-old Black man who was pulled over for a mismatched license plate and, after a brief struggle, was apparently shot in the head from behind
     
    Oh, really? "Latest example"? Somehow the NYT -- and the entire national media -- failed to mention that the cops shot to death an unarmed white man from Pennsylvania who was on his way to the Canadian trucker protest two months ago:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BZA2NMn6Yo

    Replies: @Elli, @HammerJack, @animalogic

    Can’t help but notice that YouTube doesn’t bother putting up any barriers for viewing that one. Because they know there’s nothing to worry about when a white guy is shot.

    https://www.unz.com/article/integration-has-failed-black-supremacists-white-allies-ruining-american-journalism/#comment-5291009

  103. @KenH
    Racial profiling works. That's how NYC got its annual murder rate down to 3000.

    Replies: @HammerJack

  104. @Jonathan Mason
    There is a big difference between a random stop on somebody who turns out to be carrying a gun in their car which is not legal, which they perhaps carry all the time, and and actually stopping somebody on the way to commit a planned murder.

    What is the evidence that random traffic stops are actually successful in reducing the number of illegal guns and affecting the number of gun crimes that involved discharging the weapon or affecting the amount of illegal drugs circulating within a community?

    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.

    Of course there is nothing wrong with checking up on known people who are known to be on probation or out on parole for violations, which is one effective way to reduce crime.

    I don't have the answer to all these questions, but I would probably take the opinion of professional criminologists and law enforcement officials over the opinion of an amateur criminologist like Steve.

    One thing that doesn't help is that police forces are so fragmented within the United States, with many small police forces officiously policing interstate highways that pass through their counties. If they had the means they would probably policing aircraft overflying their airspace and shooting them down.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Jack D, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    See Alden’s answer #2 above.

    Under the Constitution, the police can’t stop you and your car unless they have probable cause (there are some permitted exceptions such as drunk driving checkpoints where they stop everyone). This is generally good from a civil rights POV – you wouldn’t want the police to come and search your house just to check that you aren’t breaking any laws.

    OTOH, it is perfectly Constitutional for the police to stop you if you are in violation of the traffic laws, large or small. That’s why they are called laws and they are called law enforcement officers. And once they have stopped you, they are allowed to sniff around to see if they smell dope or if you have drugs or weapons in plain sight or if you have any open warrants, etc. This is considered a legitimate police tactic and very effective “broken windows” type policing. Not only does this help to clear the streets of people who belong in jail, but it also makes criminals less likely to drive around with weapons, drugs, etc. because they know that they might get pulled over.

    Now if you are a criminal, you would prefer that the police not stop you. But if you are a law abiding citizen you have more to gain that to lose by this tactic. I’ve been pulled over a few times over the years by the local cops on these types of minor violations (generally they don’t even give you a traffic ticket, just a warning) and I’m fine with them doing so because I know that this keeps crime down in my neighborhood. (Probably they are instructed to pull over a certain # of white people so that they don’t appear racist – what they are really looking for are black people from the hood who have come out to the suburbs to commit crimes.)

    The only downside to these interactions is that some blacks are allergic to being arrested and so instead of complying with the police they try to fight with them or shoot them or run away from them, etc. and they end up getting shot by the cops. In 99% of such cases, all they needed to do was to comply with the lawful orders of the cops and they wouldn’t be dead. But some blacks think that they have a right not to be arrested. In their mind they dindu nuffin and should be free to go regardless of whether a cop thinks otherwise.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Disagree: Abolish_public_education
    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    You explained the idea of our civil rights pretty well (especially considering that you are dealing with a dufus who has lived in this country 20 or 30 years and still doesn't get Jack Squat!) However, this right here:


    ... there are some permitted exceptions such as drunk driving checkpoints where they stop everyone).
     
    You didn't state an opinion, but I will just get opinionated on this one. There are no such thing as PERMITTED EXCEPTIONS to Constitutional rights. It's not a thing.

    The reason I get livid about this DUI Checkpoint/"Show me your papers" shit is that the mid-1990s were the time I noticed States starting this stuff up with not enough resistance. That happened to be the time I realized this country was on a steady slide to hell.

    You think I'm a melodramatic Libertarian, but it's exactly this kind of thing that the "muh Constitution" deriding "practical" Conservatives ignore at their peril. It won't be in a court of law, but all of these things CAN and WILL be used against you by ctrl-left tyrants. Don't say I didn't warn you people. I did long ago - in the mid-1990s - no, not on this blog.

    Replies: @Jack D

  105. @Luke Lea
    I gotta wonder if any NYT reporters follow Steve on this particular issue and, if so, what they secretly think?

    Replies: @HammerJack

    I’m probably not the only person here who’s known NYT reporters—and editors. They’re even worse than you think. Plus an extra helping of smug sanctimony.

    Back in the 1980s I knew some who were fundamentally decent people, but times have changed.

  106. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/Not_the_Bee/status/1514668558982148096

    Read her t-shirt.

    You can't make this stuff up.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Mike Tre, @Ian Smith

    That blank stare…that prognathous pout… they all have that look in mugshots.

    • Agree: fish
  107. @International Jew
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never served on a jury and I'm Steve's age. I've been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Known Fact, @The Real World, @Alden, @Anon, @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Anon, @Ben tillman

    I’ve been called a few times but, only served once, as an alternate juror.
    A story: It was circa 1988, in NYC, a purse snatching incident.

    The accused had a public defender and their big defense was that the perp could not have been the guy that stole her purse because he has a noticeable limp from a prior injury and the bystander witnesses saw no limp from the thief. His mother was brought in to testify about this injury/limp and some letter was provided by a Doc. Well, gee, so who knows what the deal is here, right?

    Oh no, during a court break, I happened to turn down an isolated hall where no one else was except, as it turned out, the defendant far ahead of me. He had ZERO limp then. Whereas, going into and out of court he had one (of course). After 20 seconds or so, he heard me, turned and saw me (surprised) and then produced the limp!

    The killer part was, I was not allowed to inform the jury of what I saw. Only info inside the courtroom can be used to determine a case. I do get the point of that but, given I was 100% sure of what I saw, it was rough not being able to relay it. I was released when they went into deliberations so never learned the outcome.

    Moral of the story, imo – Even some public defenders will conjure outright fraudulent defenses. That stupid case should have never gone to trial

  108. OT: Harvard professor Roland Fryer has been mentioned here occasionally, e.g. here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/metoo-finally-coming-for-a-good-guy/

    He does evidence-based research that often turns out to disagree with the Narrative. Here is a recent story about how he was #MeToo’ed by an employee who had been fired:

    https://quillette.com/2022/04/15/why-did-harvard-university-go-after-one-of-its-best-black-professors/

    The outcome of a Title IX proceeding was a recommendation for training in setting boundaries. Harvard administrators instead decided to close down Fryer’s research, suspend him without pay for two years, and ban him from having graduate students.

    The writer of the article, Rob Montz, has produced a short documentary on the case:

    • Replies: @Alden
    @James N. Kennett

    OT There’s demonstrations in several French universities about the election. They’re glad LePen, Hitler’s great granddaughter lost of course. But absolutely furious Macron win. Despite his pro immigration stance, he’s now an evil capitalist pawn of bankers and capitalists and police and law and order and French racism fascism chauvinism etc. same old same old.

    Sorbonne had the biggest demo. In Paris. Where the students can’t even get around the city without being continually harassed at best, robbed beaten mauled or raped by the Africans and Muslims.

    Close the universities.

  109. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/KirbySommers/status/1512368600753090563

    Replies: @Paul Jolliffe, @Paul Jolliffe, @Alden

    That was a very brief fad. Or attempted fad about 15, 18 years ago. The Chinese manufactured what were called slutty little girl clothes and they were on the shelves in Walmart and the cheaper stores. Not places like Macy’s
    The media reacted with shock, horror and endless blathering about the new styles.

    No one bought those clothes. Which were mostly tiny little mini micro skirts. In fact, that style was what put little and teen girls in pants, T shirts and sweatshirts permanently. To this day. Expect for the long hair, it’s impossible to distinguish boys from girls these days.

    Which you would know if you had kids at the time. I remember the editorials at the time. And never seeing actual girls wearing them.
    One of the few examples of consumers, mothers not following the fads imposed by the clothing industry.

    Just had to insert your pervy interest in little girls into a discussion about blacks objecting to traffic stops didn’t you? . Keep it to yourself.

  110. @JimDandy
    @Hypnotoad666

    The cop is clearly about to collapse from exhaustion while he is fighting a crazed Congo refugee who keeps grabbing for his weapon. He was under no obligation to let the guy get into a situation where he could kill him. The cop keeps screaming at him to let go of his taser. He was justified in shooting him.

    Replies: @Blodgie, @Hangnail Hans, @Rooster14

    And the best part is nothing of value was lost!

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Rooster14

    I get it. But, I'll admit, when the shot rang out and the guy instantly stopped moving, I instinctively felt deep dismay at the guy's silly and totally unnecessary squandering of his precious young life. Much better him than the cop--or me or some other victim sometime in the future--but damn.

  111. @Hypnotoad666
    @clifford brown

    The cop obviously made a mistake by shooting him in the head (could he have made the mistake of thinking he was still holding his taser?). But up till then the perp/victim was 100% in the wrong. He appeared to be either high, retarded, or so fresh off the boat and unable to speak English that he had no clue about how a traffic stop works.

    Also, having the wrong license plates on your car is hardly a ticky tack violation. It means the car is likely stolen or will be/has been used in a crime.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Almost Missouri, @possumman, @Ben tillman

    He shot him in the head because he didn’t want to hit a vital area!

  112. @Anon
    OT: "President Joe Biden's Dog Reportedly Attacked Secret Service Member For 8 Days Straight Leaving Agent With 'Severe' Injuries."

    In one incident, Jill Biden, like a typical dog owner, didn't bother to secure the dog by its collar when she saw it was about to bite. She just stood there like a stupid useless bitch and let it happen. I'm amazed that anyone would work in the Secret Service for the Bidens. Being Hunter's agents must make you want to vomit. Any dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    https://radaronline.com/p/president-joe-bidens-dog-attacked-secret-service-injuries/

    Replies: @Richard of Melbourne, @Alden, @Fidelios Automata

    Or why I don’t like dog owners. There was a time when every dog owner in ultra liberal Marin county Ca was like idiot Jill. At least she didn’t do what men dog owners do when dogs menace charge and bite people. Shout that the bitee deserved to be bitten because he or she feared the dog and people who fear dogs deserve to be bitten.

    That dog was a rescue dog. He’d probably been in and out of dog rescue operations and returned several times. Before he found his “ forever” home. Dogsbite.org has many articles about idiot dog lovers “ adopting” a rescue dog and being killed by poor little poopy pee pee .

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Alden

    Dogs bite you Alden because you deserve it.

    Replies: @Alden

    , @vinteuil
    @Alden


    At least she didn’t do what...dog owners do when dogs menace...and bite people. Shout that the bitee deserved to be bitten because he or she feared the dog and people who fear dogs deserve to be bitten.
     
    No kidding. Owners of aggressive dogs always, always, always blame *you* for your injuries - 'cause you showed fear. They don't think they should control their pets, They think everybody else should learn to accommodate their pets.

    The parallel with wealthy leftists & their pet blacks is obvious.

  113. @Coemgen
    I received my umpteenth notice today that my scheduled jury duty has been cancelled.

    I've been a registered voter since 1980.

    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?

    I just can't help wondering if I've been pre-profiled as someone who will not be influenced by a manipulative lawyer—thus I'm immediately disqualified. for service as a juror.

    Or, is it just coincidence that my public service has never been needed in over forty years?

    Replies: @anonymous, @ScarletNumber, @International Jew, @SafeNow, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby

    Regarding avoidance of jury duty, I know a fellow who will ghost-write, for friends, what he calls “the Kleenex letter.” It is so named because the recipient at the jury office, upon reading the tale of woe skillfully set forth in the letter, will need a whole box of Kleenex to wipe the river of flowing tears. The would-be juror is invariably excused, without even having to report.

  114. @International Jew
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never served on a jury and I'm Steve's age. I've been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Known Fact, @The Real World, @Alden, @Anon, @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Anon, @Ben tillman

    Might have been better had you been on the jury and convicted the thug. Alameda county Ca. Jury duty would be an ordeal surrounded by affirmative action black county employees all day. Chortling and blathering.

  115. @Achmed E. Newman
    I gotta add something about Seattle's plans, going automated as much as possible. First of all, we all know that's not going to be any less "racist" (in outcome, anyway). It's just that, per one of Steve's points here, that will obviously result in fewer "interactions gone wrong" by the side of the road.

    It can all happen at the courthouse once the perp has too much on his record for anyone to ignore. There are armed bailiffs at the courthouse, but then at some point before that, some of these black guys will have to be arrested at their houses ... any better for the blacks or the cops, I dunno?

    As for me, I want to be able to face my accuser per US Constitution. I want nothing to do with ANY automated enforcement, and I hope most will join with me in ignoring citations executed, printed, and mailed to me, all by computer, with no humans involved.* I'd like to see red light cameras shot up all to hell.

    Then, I've been pulled over 85-90 times over the years by the best count I've got. I wasn't always in a good mood afterwards, but there are some good stories...

    Actually, it's been so long now that it's UNCANNY - not just the Covid slackness either, as this goes farther back. I have a pick-up in which the speedometer hasn't worked in 5 years - it doesn't have a tach either, unfortunately. I'm kinda even looking forward to a stop and "do you know how fast you were going?" "No sir, there's no way to know in this thing. Right now, it's says I'm doing 85, but that CAN'T be right!"


    .

    * BTW, that's one of the quick stories I forgot to put in my blog posts about the Covid-Zero Shanghai Shitshow - people have been taken to camps based on false positive tests. The guys in the bio-suits say "it's just my job", as they drag them off. China has got a newer, shinier version of 1984 like everything else they've got over there.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Bill Jones

    “No sir, there’s no way to know in this thing. Right now, it’s says I’m doing 85, but that CAN’T be right!”

    Ah, the Tesla excuse.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/technology/watch-driver-tesla-says-computer-froze-83-mph

  116. The silver lining is that it’s almost all Dindu-on-Dindu.

  117. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Reg Cæsar


    The Commonwealth of Virginia. Is the Times scraping the streets for reporters now?
     
    People who were raised and educated to be Americans knew this because they were taught about American history rather than a funhouse mirror version of it that foregrounds slavery and the purported past oppression of every high status identity group.

    Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and later Kentucky (formed from the westernmost parts of Virginia's territory) are Commonwealths. Puerto Rico is as well, for whatever that's worth.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  118. anon[357] • Disclaimer says:
    @Elli
    @Dr. X

    Where and who was that? I can't find it anywhere.

    Replies: @anon, @Dr. X

    15 February 2022

    BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — New York state police have identified the man who was fatally shot by a trooper in Buffalo as 38-year-old James Huber of North East in Erie County, Pennsylvania.

    The shooting of Huber by Trooper Anthony Nigro on Saturday is under investigation by the state’s attorney general, Letitia James.

    State police released the names of Huber and Nigro, a 14-year veteran of the department, on Monday.

    State Police Maj. Carla DiRienzo said during a news conference Saturday that the vehicle driven by Huber was first spotted driving “erratically” on a highway and was later pulled over on city streets in Buffalo.

    DiRienzo said Huber put the vehicle in reverse and tried to flee, briefly dragging Nigro, who was reaching into the vehicle. “The trooper discharged their division-issued firearm at the suspect,” she said.

    Huber died at the scene.

    James announced Monday that her office has begun its investigation into the shooting pursuant to a state law that requires the attorney general to review deaths caused by law enforcement officers.

  119. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    You actually made a deliberately inflammatory and insulting statement that guaranteed that you would not be selected for the jury.
     
    Because the judge asked him to. What else could he do? Lie?

    What would you have said?

    Replies: @additionalMike

    Great Caesar, I think part of Mr. Mason’s point was that the judge had asked the I.J. only whether the system was biased against blacks. Gratuitously throwing in his two cents (that it was biased in favor) although it is often true, would piss off almost any black person.

  120. @Justpassingby
    From the NYT news section:

    … In Seattle, Chief Adrian Z. Diaz said.... pulling over cars just for air fresheners, cracked windows, or missing front license plates....
     
    Can anybody here describe an air freshener on a car?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @scrivener3

    The little styrofoam tree hanging from the rear view mirror. Presumably argued to be blocking visibility.

    • Replies: @Justpassingby
    @J.Ross

    Thanks for the info.

  121. Yawn. The real mystery is why roaming bands of armed men are allowed and encouraged to harass people who are just trying to live their lives. If I need help subduing a mostly peaceful aspiring rapper who tryna turn he life around, I know the 9-1-1. You notice firemen don’t patrol the streets looking for fires to put out.

    • Agree: Dr. X, Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen


    You notice firemen don’t patrol the streets looking for fires to put out.
     
    Try calling the cops after you've been mugged. Complete waste of time. And you want to declare open season. Police presence as a deterrent is the only thing that even slows this type of crime down.
  122. @Known Fact
    FYI, Some numbers from the WaPo police shootings database (Do they have a black-person doing the shootings database?)

    Between 2015 and 2019, U.S. police killed an average of nearly 1,000 people per year. African Americans made up 13% of the U.S. population but accounted for 24% of the victims. Conversely, whites made up roughly 60% of the population but only 46% of the deaths.

    While the number of police shootings in the U.S. is in the top 10 among nations, once that number is evaluated in relation to the total population, the U.S. drops all the way down to 33rd.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    FYI, Some numbers from the WaPo police shootings database (Do they have a black-person doing the shootings database?)

    I trust the Bureau of Justice Statistics before I’d trust the WaPo.

  123. To the extent that these “reforms” help roll back the nanny state a bit, I’m for them. Especially those ludicrous helmet laws. Unintended consequences in a good way! Unfortunately, they’ll probably also encourage drunk driving, the crackdown on which is one of the biggest reasons for lowered fatalities.

  124. @Alden
    @Anon

    Or why I don’t like dog owners. There was a time when every dog owner in ultra liberal Marin county Ca was like idiot Jill. At least she didn’t do what men dog owners do when dogs menace charge and bite people. Shout that the bitee deserved to be bitten because he or she feared the dog and people who fear dogs deserve to be bitten.

    That dog was a rescue dog. He’d probably been in and out of dog rescue operations and returned several times. Before he found his “ forever” home. Dogsbite.org has many articles about idiot dog lovers “ adopting” a rescue dog and being killed by poor little poopy pee pee .

    Replies: @Art Deco, @vinteuil

    Dogs bite you Alden because you deserve it.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Alden
    @Art Deco

    No dog has ever bitten me. Or come within a few feet of me unless I permitted it. What I learned in ultra liberal Marin county. When the feral dogs who only come home once a day to eat charge grown and snarl at you; Charge right back at them. And shout the 4 magic words.

    Back off shut up. And the dogs back off. In Marin there wasn’t an owner in sight. Ever. But occasionally in SF there’d be a nerd wimp dog owner all shocked and upset I didn’t grovel to their uncontrolled untrained mutt.

    You are so lonely you need a dog to substitute for family and friends? At least train it not to attack every one walking jogging or biking on the public sidewalk. Dogs must run free. There’s a saying among the anti pit bull activists. Pit bulls are the new blacks.

    The same liberal idiots who defend uncontrolled untrained dogs attacking people are the very same liberal idiots who defend uncontrolled untrained blacks attacking Whites

    The most dog bites most untrained dogs live in democrat areas. Either black and Hispanic or rich entitled Whites.

    Replies: @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2

  125. @Anon
    OT: "President Joe Biden's Dog Reportedly Attacked Secret Service Member For 8 Days Straight Leaving Agent With 'Severe' Injuries."

    In one incident, Jill Biden, like a typical dog owner, didn't bother to secure the dog by its collar when she saw it was about to bite. She just stood there like a stupid useless bitch and let it happen. I'm amazed that anyone would work in the Secret Service for the Bidens. Being Hunter's agents must make you want to vomit. Any dog that attacks people that much needs to be put down.

    https://radaronline.com/p/president-joe-bidens-dog-attacked-secret-service-injuries/

    Replies: @Richard of Melbourne, @Alden, @Fidelios Automata

    This applies mainly to Elites like the Bidens. If you’re one of the Little People, your dog gets put down even if the “victim” was antagonizing the poor beast.

  126. @Blodgie
    @JimDandy

    You boot-licking boomer normies will defend the murdering cops regardless of the facts.

    Cop had no reason to shoot that idiot in the back of the head.

    Cops hate you and will take your freedom—why the reflexive support?

    Replies: @bomag, @JimDandy, @Vinnie O

    We’re in an age of picking sides.

    Do you want to be on the side represented by the cops?

    Or the one on the other side of the cops?

  127. @Hangnail Hans
    @JimDandy

    How could anyone want to be a cop in the cultural milieu our (elite) have fashioned for us now? This country is rapidly filling to the brim with absolute filth and our"elite" get off on weaponizing them against the few remaining civilized people.

    This particular lowlife? F him. And everyone like him. Yeah, no wonder YouTube makes it so difficult to watch vids showing just a glimpse of reality.

    Replies: @JimDandy

    If you fight with a cop and try hard to get his weapon, you are giving the cop permission to kill you. This shouldn’t be controversial.

  128. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/lymanstoneky/status/1515112647796084746

    Replies: @Alden, @another fred, @Fidelios Automata

    Could also be because the pendulum is swinging back after all the deaths from legal narcotics addiction. Unfortunately, the pendulum always swings both ways!

  129. Anon[446] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: “Teen Opioid Deaths Have Surge 350% Thanks To Rise Of Fentanyl.”

    It looks like an important factor here is that teens have lower weights than adults, and when taking doses of a very dangerous drug concocted for adult weights, they’re overdosing more often. In time, I expect the fentanyl plague will simmer down much the same way the crack cocaine plague did in the black community after the great crack epidemic of the 1980s. In that case, most of the people inclined to use crack eventually died from overdosing.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/teen-opioid-deaths-have-surge-350-thanks-rise-fentanyl

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Anon

    Fentanyl isn’t in prescription drugs scaled to adult or anyone’s weights. It’s only legally used by injection right before surgeries. When the nurse gives you a shot and tells you to count to 10 and you’re out by the time you get to 7.

    It’s only used in illegal drugs. Legally, it’s only in liquid form and only in pre operation medical cabinets. All the powder form fentanyl killing Americans comes from China in those big container ships.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  130. @Rooster14
    @JimDandy

    And the best part is nothing of value was lost!

    Replies: @JimDandy

    I get it. But, I’ll admit, when the shot rang out and the guy instantly stopped moving, I instinctively felt deep dismay at the guy’s silly and totally unnecessary squandering of his precious young life. Much better him than the cop–or me or some other victim sometime in the future–but damn.

  131. Separate nations.

    Right, but since that’s never going to happen, what’s the Plan B?

    • Replies: @Flip
    @HammerJack

    Whites will keep moving away from inner cities leaving the underclass behind. It is a big country and people will do more self-segregating. Hopefully a bankrupt Federal government won't be as meddlesome in the future.

  132. @Anonymous
    @Achmed E. Newman

    You have been stopped 85 to 90 times by the police in your car?
    Is this number typical for an American driver?
    In the UK I was stopped twice by the police as a teenager whilst driving an old beat up car in the early hours of the morning.
    In over 40 years of driving since then I have never been stopped by the police whilst driving any vehicle.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    No, not all in a car/truck. 5 times were on my motorcycle (in town), with nary a ticket, BTW, and 7 or 8 times were on a bicycle-bike.

    I am pretty sure this is well above average, especially for an (above-) average White guy. One time, the traffic court judge – a very fair guy from all my observation – asked “Hey, don’t I know you from somewhere?” Luckily, he didn’t remember exactly from where.

    (However, I did drive a certain sports car for many years, a model that they just plain pick on.)

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I did drive a certain sports car for many years, a model that they just plain pick on.
     
    You drove a Vette?? For real? That's the only sports car I know that cops pick on. Or was it a Jaguar E--Type? A Ferrari?

    Of course, it's also possible that you consider a Mustang or a Camaro or a Trans-Am a sports car. I may need to see your photo. None of the cars I mentioned in the previous paragraph seem to suit you. But that was then, right?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  133. @Alden
    @Anon

    Or why I don’t like dog owners. There was a time when every dog owner in ultra liberal Marin county Ca was like idiot Jill. At least she didn’t do what men dog owners do when dogs menace charge and bite people. Shout that the bitee deserved to be bitten because he or she feared the dog and people who fear dogs deserve to be bitten.

    That dog was a rescue dog. He’d probably been in and out of dog rescue operations and returned several times. Before he found his “ forever” home. Dogsbite.org has many articles about idiot dog lovers “ adopting” a rescue dog and being killed by poor little poopy pee pee .

    Replies: @Art Deco, @vinteuil

    At least she didn’t do what…dog owners do when dogs menace…and bite people. Shout that the bitee deserved to be bitten because he or she feared the dog and people who fear dogs deserve to be bitten.

    No kidding. Owners of aggressive dogs always, always, always blame *you* for your injuries – ’cause you showed fear. They don’t think they should control their pets, They think everybody else should learn to accommodate their pets.

    The parallel with wealthy leftists & their pet blacks is obvious.

    • Agree: Alden, AnotherDad, Mike Tre
  134. @Justpassingby
    From the NYT news section:

    … In Seattle, Chief Adrian Z. Diaz said.... pulling over cars just for air fresheners, cracked windows, or missing front license plates....
     
    Can anybody here describe an air freshener on a car?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @scrivener3

    A little green tree shaped felt soaked in new car smell hanging from your rear view mirror.

    Most places illegal to hang anything from the rear view mirror, Blocks the view forward somewhat. Easily seen from outside the car to justify a stop.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Justpassingby
    @scrivener3

    Thanks for the info.

    , @mmack
    @scrivener3

    "Most places illegal to hang anything from the rear view mirror, Blocks the view forward somewhat. Easily seen from outside the car to justify a stop."

    Not ranting at you, but that's just the sort of BS excuse coppers use to pull a traffic shakedown.

    Hey Officer Dunkin' Donuts, you know what REALLY obscures my view? The FEDERALLY MANDATED air bag jammed into the A-Pillar (the sheet metal that supports the edges of the windshield and the roof on passenger vehicles) of both cars I drive that makes that pillar about as thick as my arm, and that HAS caused me to miss seeing pedestrians standing in its visual shadow.

    But no, goodness forbid you have a little evergreen tree or rosary beads hanging from your rear view mirror. 🙄

  135. @Art Deco
    @Alden

    Dogs bite you Alden because you deserve it.

    Replies: @Alden

    No dog has ever bitten me. Or come within a few feet of me unless I permitted it. What I learned in ultra liberal Marin county. When the feral dogs who only come home once a day to eat charge grown and snarl at you; Charge right back at them. And shout the 4 magic words.

    Back off shut up. And the dogs back off. In Marin there wasn’t an owner in sight. Ever. But occasionally in SF there’d be a nerd wimp dog owner all shocked and upset I didn’t grovel to their uncontrolled untrained mutt.

    You are so lonely you need a dog to substitute for family and friends? At least train it not to attack every one walking jogging or biking on the public sidewalk. Dogs must run free. There’s a saying among the anti pit bull activists. Pit bulls are the new blacks.

    The same liberal idiots who defend uncontrolled untrained dogs attacking people are the very same liberal idiots who defend uncontrolled untrained blacks attacking Whites

    The most dog bites most untrained dogs live in democrat areas. Either black and Hispanic or rich entitled Whites.

    • Replies: @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2
    @Alden

    I cross the street when i see a chic with a dog over 50-ish pounds. I don't want to have to break that poor thing's neck when it pulls the leash right out of her hands.

  136. @AnotherDad
    @Jonathan Mason


    There is a big difference between a random stop on somebody who turns out to be carrying a gun in their car which is not legal, which they perhaps carry all the time, and and actually stopping somebody on the way to commit a planned murder.

    What is the evidence that random traffic stops are actually successful in reducing the number of illegal guns and affecting the number of gun crimes that involved discharging the weapon or affecting the amount of illegal drugs circulating within a community?

    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.

     

    Mason, seriously, just stop.

    Remember where you are: Steve's HBD blog.

    99.9% murderers aren't auditioning for roles in an Agatha Christie romp. And there is not some specific "murder" gene, where the murderer lives a life law-abiding propriety and then suddenly drives over and blasts the guy who dissed him. (Or would have if he hadn't popped up on your Mason's Murderer on the Move Machine and you had a cop intercept him.)

    People who commit crime in America (and elsewhere)--including violent assault, rape and murder--have a spectrum of traits which tend toward sociopathy, low-IQ, low-conscientiousness, uncooperativeness, high time-preference, hotheadedness. Those same traits make criminals considerable more likely to
    -- drive recklessly
    -- speed
    -- run red lights
    -- have broken tail lights (because they are careless and backed into something and have low conscientiousness about getting it fixed)
    -- have expired tags (again low conscientiousness)
    -- have outstanding warrants
    -- be carrying illegal guns
    -- be carrying drugs
    etc. etc. etc.

    This is a) obvious and b) cops have known this ... forever. The term "criminal element" should spring to mind.

    A civilized society stays a civilized society by civilized men enforcing their rules upon the uncivilized men--and punishing, killing or expelling them when they break those rules.

    You don't want to live in a civilized society--great. But just save us the wheedling b.s.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @vinteuil

    Yes, but read the post by Anonymous below, where he says that in the UK he was stopped two times by the police when driving a beat-up car as a teenager in the small hours of the morning and then never stopped again by the police while driving for the next 40 years.

    I get the impression from what some people say that police in the US just use stopping cars for alleged motoring offenses as a pretext for checking out and harassing people who may or may not be criminals rather than in a sincere effort to make sure that all vehicles have working brake lights because brake lights that are out cause a lot of accidents in their communities.

    Yes, people who drive badly may be drunks, druggies, or criminals, but there should be many ways in which police can identify delinquents in their own communities.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    According to an Orlando Sentinel article in 2019 nearly 2 million out 16.6 million Florida drivers on a certain date had their driver’s license suspended not for unsafe driving, but due to unpaid fines and fees, that are often totally unrelated to driving.

    https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/crime/os-ne-drivers-license-suspensions-report-20191219-xazyr2cdkff7xfljjvgkcz6tum-story.html

    This is absolutely incredible, and shows what a police state Florida is. (It is not like Florida has much public transportation that poor people can use as an alternative to driving.)

    I myself had my Florida driver’s license suspended after I sold a car to a neighbor who said he was going to take it to Tennessee and register it there. Fortunately I was out of the country (he dropped me at the airport) and did not even find out about this until several months later, by which time he had actually registered the transaction in Florida, and I was able to pay a “fine” (for nothing) and have my license reinstated over the phone.

    I don’t know if any other states are like this, but which political party is fighting to reform this overbearing state?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jonathan Mason

    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax. And vehicle registration is important so we can recover stolen vehicles and provide a favorable risk environment for insurance coverage. People with a trail of unpaid tickets and fines are irresponsible and credit risks, and we don't need them out there operating a 4,000 pound vehicle.

    The object of that article you linked is pretty pathetic.


    Every month, Celeste Sawyer takes an Uber ride to the grocery store and packs a stranger’s car with enough food to feed her family for weeks.

    The 33-year-old Apopka mother of five says it’s one of the embarrassing struggles she faces because of having a revoked driver’s license. Years of traffic tickets and arrests for driving with a suspended license left her owing thousands of dollars in court costs she can’t afford and labeled a habitual offender, Sawyer said.
     

    In other words, she missed court dates where she could have showed up and paid her fine and been on her way, but she didn't and kept racking up violations and ignoring bench warrants. She should have two kids or better yet no kids, and needs to be firmly attached to a man who makes her life decisions for her. I'm guessing she's one of our heroic single moms attached to Uncle Sugar, or some tattooed trash or pavement ape as irresponsible as she is.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    Police officers are in schools because the US is a diverse, low-trust society with lots of friction in and between groups. The mostly female teachers are not strong enough to handle problem cases of large, stupid teenagers, like the 14-year old, 350 pound behemoth that fell out of an amusement park ride down here last month. When schools were segregated we didn't have police in them.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Alden, @Jonathan Mason, @Charon

    , @Art Deco
    @Jonathan Mason

    According to an Orlando Sentinel article

    Did it ever occur to you that reporters tend to be people who are articulate but not intelligent, who misread data tables even when they're not being self-consciously dishonest?

    , @AnotherDad
    @Jonathan Mason

    Mason, you manage to froth up over nothings.

    The whole driving/roadway system--with/where
    -- big public infrastructure (ergo spending)
    -- a bunch of rules of the road
    -- some level of visual/mechanical skill required
    -- people smash their cars into each other

    obviously requires a bunch of rules and enforcement and penalties. Believe it or not, I do not want people who are incapable, or have an improperly functioning vehicle or keep breaking the traffic laws or--especially--keep having accidents, or are not insured or even do not pay their share out on the highways with me.

    And yes that means they'll be people who are afoul of the system. And, of course, it will be people who are generally less capable of navigating life--for the obvious genetic/cultural reasons. And ergo will tend to be poor. And yes, some "deserving poor" who are competent drivers are caught up in that. There should probably be reforms to simplify the process, make them less likely to become ensnared and help them--give 'em a path--drive even if behind on fines and tolls. But there are always "reforms" that would be desirable. That's the nature of bureaucracy. Heck it's the nature of life.

    I've bought two now, but have not sold a car in Florida yet, so i don't know the precise rules. But based on other states it sounds like you screwed up--did not do your part of the transaction of sending in your title to the state with the paperwork saying "hey this car isn't mine anymore i sold it to dickhead". And you ended up paying a fine for screwing up--BFD.

    That's not a "police state". Geez act like a grown up.

    ~~

    BTW, Florida this past couple of years has been the least "police statey" state in the nation.

    There was a bit of b.s. at the beginning. But then DeSantis quickly got the hang of it and restored sanity. AnotherMom and I have lived and breathed free.

    I was remarking to some of the neighbor's friends at a get together back in 2020--and to other friends and neighbors over the past couple years--that i've never gotten as big a direct "bang for the buck" as our votes for DeSantis in 2018. Holy cow!

    , @additionalMike
    @Jonathan Mason

    Mr. Mason, police are present in schools in NY state also. It is to prevent the students (many of whom do not belong in school), from killing the teachers, and each other.
    This true even of suburban schools, due in part to our wonderful diversity, and the rise of murderous ethnic gangs (see e.g. the "MS-13") in Long Island's Suffolk County.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

  137. @Elli
    @Dr. X

    Where and who was that? I can't find it anywhere.

    Replies: @anon, @Dr. X

    Where and who was that? I can’t find it anywhere.

    Yep. You can, but you have to know what you are looking for. It was completely memory-holed. National press did not cover it. Local press barely mentioned it.

    Buffalo, NY, Feb. 12 2022. Deceased white man is James Huber, of North East, PA. 100% unarmed. Shot dead by New York State Police after attempting to flee a traffic stop. Guy was going to the Canadian trucker rally at the border, so he was probably an anti-vaxx Trump deplorable.

    White guy, so “conservatives” will blame the victim and say “he deserved it” for failing to grovel before the “hero” cop.

    • Replies: @mikeInThe716
    @Dr. X

    IIRC, the deceased white man was driving 100+ MPH on I-90 before the cops broke off the chase. Troopers tracked him to downtown Buffalo (the I-90 and 190 around Buffalo have good cameras) and attempted a stop.

    He tried dragging the trooper with his car. So he got shot. In the totality of the circumstances, the deceased was a public hazard. I have little sympathy for lunatic-level driving on public roads. I'm close to someone maimed by such a driver.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Dr. X

  138. @Mike Tre
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    A Mississippi State Trooper pulled over an old lady for speeding down a rural highway one sunny afternoon. After requesting the lady's license and registration, the tropper asked the woman why she was driving so fast.

    The old lady replied "I'm sorry dear, but I was running late for the annual Mississippi State Police Ball"

    The trooper, who was in the middle of writing out the citation, replied automatically "Mississippi State Police don't have balls."

    With that, his pen stopped writing, he peeled the citation out of the booklet, crumpled it up, and said "Have a nice day, ma'am."

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @Ralph L

    A Mississippi State Trooper pulled over an old lady for driving 87 mph down a rural highway one sunny afternoon. After requesting the lady’s license and registration, the trooper asked the woman why she was driving 87 mph.

    “Because it shimmies so badly at 80.”

  139. @Calvin Hobbes
    Cop gets called regarding some sort of domestic dispute.
    Brutha ignores orders from cop, resists arrest.
    Girlfriend becomes hysterical.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqJAr5IRc8g

    This was a major scandal at Purdue. Cop grovels.

    https://legalinsurrection.com/2022/04/bodycam-footage-exonerates-arresting-officer-in-viral-video-of-arrest-at-purdue-university-that-set-off-a-firestorm/

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans, @Altai

    Dude’s mother named him ‘Adonis’, I suspect both parents had levels of narcissism and other dark triad traits.

  140. @AnotherDad
    @Jonathan Mason


    There is a big difference between a random stop on somebody who turns out to be carrying a gun in their car which is not legal, which they perhaps carry all the time, and and actually stopping somebody on the way to commit a planned murder.

    What is the evidence that random traffic stops are actually successful in reducing the number of illegal guns and affecting the number of gun crimes that involved discharging the weapon or affecting the amount of illegal drugs circulating within a community?

    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.

     

    Mason, seriously, just stop.

    Remember where you are: Steve's HBD blog.

    99.9% murderers aren't auditioning for roles in an Agatha Christie romp. And there is not some specific "murder" gene, where the murderer lives a life law-abiding propriety and then suddenly drives over and blasts the guy who dissed him. (Or would have if he hadn't popped up on your Mason's Murderer on the Move Machine and you had a cop intercept him.)

    People who commit crime in America (and elsewhere)--including violent assault, rape and murder--have a spectrum of traits which tend toward sociopathy, low-IQ, low-conscientiousness, uncooperativeness, high time-preference, hotheadedness. Those same traits make criminals considerable more likely to
    -- drive recklessly
    -- speed
    -- run red lights
    -- have broken tail lights (because they are careless and backed into something and have low conscientiousness about getting it fixed)
    -- have expired tags (again low conscientiousness)
    -- have outstanding warrants
    -- be carrying illegal guns
    -- be carrying drugs
    etc. etc. etc.

    This is a) obvious and b) cops have known this ... forever. The term "criminal element" should spring to mind.

    A civilized society stays a civilized society by civilized men enforcing their rules upon the uncivilized men--and punishing, killing or expelling them when they break those rules.

    You don't want to live in a civilized society--great. But just save us the wheedling b.s.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @vinteuil

    A civilized society stays a civilized society by civilized men enforcing their rules upon the uncivilized men–and punishing, killing or expelling them when they break those rules.

    Well, yeah, sure – but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that’s exactly what the left thinks they’re doing. They’re punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

    • Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr.
    @vinteuil

    Well, yeah, sure – but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that’s exactly what the left thinks they’re doing. They’re punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

    Yes they do.

    https://i.imgur.com/WnB8dp6.jpg

    , @AnotherDad
    @vinteuil


    Well, yeah, sure – but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that’s exactly what the left thinks they’re doing. They’re punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

     

    Exactly. You have just made my case for separate nations.

    This is the point i keep hammering on: There can only be one set of public norms.

    Fundamentally the people in a community must agree on what the public norms are. When they fundamentally do not agree, then they should not be sharing the same community, same nation.

    Yes, you can have regional variation on tractable issues. Here we close the bars on Sunday, here we do not. Here the schools are segregated, here they are not. Here you can smoke dope, here you can not. Even, here we speak English, here we speak French. This is what federalism/local control/autonomy can give you. As long as people agree on the scope of variation.

    But
    A) Americans and the minoritarians fundamentally disagree on what the public norms should be.

    And

    B) minoritarians are totalitarian.
    "Diversity is our greatest strength", does not mean leaving people alone to sort out the sort of community laws/norms they want. Minoritarianism demands that the nation's majority (really the motivation/target has always been white gentiles) must be insulted and badgered and the busy-body state must extend its reach into every nook and cranny of private life to ferret out and harass traditionalist dissenters, not with the program.

    Minoritarianism is not a "different strokes for different folks" ideology. It's basically a Jewish middle-man ideology of destroying the right of gentiles to have their own organic nations and govern themselves in their own communities, which dovetails beautifully with the natural tendency of the state apparatus to accrete power and grow, and the ideology of modern finance/business to level the world and hence has become dreadfully, terrifyingly powerful.

    Separation--saying "No, we are not your serfs. You can busybody yourselves, but we demand the right to governing ourselves in our nations" and fighting till we get it--is the only answer.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Travis

  141. @Blodgie
    @JimDandy

    You boot-licking boomer normies will defend the murdering cops regardless of the facts.

    Cop had no reason to shoot that idiot in the back of the head.

    Cops hate you and will take your freedom—why the reflexive support?

    Replies: @bomag, @JimDandy, @Vinnie O

    I already mentioned the excellent reasons the cop had for shooting that savage idiot. A cop–like all of us–only has one life to lose. If it makes you feel any better, I was really mad at the cop who arrested Sandra Bland. But he didn’t kill her, and he was fired.

  142. Give the public their full gun rights and get out of the way and the next time a drug thug clears leather at a citizen and gets a bullet for his trouble then that profession will rapidly start to lose its allure. CA has a crime problem because CA has a senile incompetent reality-isolated liberal bleeding heart politician problem. Same as NY state, stop tying the hands of the public with political B.S. that coddles criminals instead of honestly protecting the general public from the criminal element. Given the recent news about the lt. governor of NY they should consider reforming that state govt. and re-empowering the public to see to their own safety if it came to that. (NOTE: warning shots are legal, or should be)

  143. @International Jew
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never served on a jury and I'm Steve's age. I've been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Known Fact, @The Real World, @Alden, @Anon, @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Anon, @Ben tillman

    All my life I’ve reported for jury duty but was never chosen. I think they prefer to have women as jurors. I haven’t received a jury summons in almost ten years. I’d like to keep it that way.

  144. @Jonathan Mason
    @AnotherDad

    Yes, but read the post by Anonymous below, where he says that in the UK he was stopped two times by the police when driving a beat-up car as a teenager in the small hours of the morning and then never stopped again by the police while driving for the next 40 years.

    I get the impression from what some people say that police in the US just use stopping cars for alleged motoring offenses as a pretext for checking out and harassing people who may or may not be criminals rather than in a sincere effort to make sure that all vehicles have working brake lights because brake lights that are out cause a lot of accidents in their communities.

    Yes, people who drive badly may be drunks, druggies, or criminals, but there should be many ways in which police can identify delinquents in their own communities.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    According to an Orlando Sentinel article in 2019 nearly 2 million out 16.6 million Florida drivers on a certain date had their driver's license suspended not for unsafe driving, but due to unpaid fines and fees, that are often totally unrelated to driving.

    https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/crime/os-ne-drivers-license-suspensions-report-20191219-xazyr2cdkff7xfljjvgkcz6tum-story.html

    This is absolutely incredible, and shows what a police state Florida is. (It is not like Florida has much public transportation that poor people can use as an alternative to driving.)

    I myself had my Florida driver's license suspended after I sold a car to a neighbor who said he was going to take it to Tennessee and register it there. Fortunately I was out of the country (he dropped me at the airport) and did not even find out about this until several months later, by which time he had actually registered the transaction in Florida, and I was able to pay a "fine" (for nothing) and have my license reinstated over the phone.

    I don't know if any other states are like this, but which political party is fighting to reform this overbearing state?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Art Deco, @AnotherDad, @additionalMike

    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax. And vehicle registration is important so we can recover stolen vehicles and provide a favorable risk environment for insurance coverage. People with a trail of unpaid tickets and fines are irresponsible and credit risks, and we don’t need them out there operating a 4,000 pound vehicle.

    The object of that article you linked is pretty pathetic.

    Every month, Celeste Sawyer takes an Uber ride to the grocery store and packs a stranger’s car with enough food to feed her family for weeks.

    The 33-year-old Apopka mother of five says it’s one of the embarrassing struggles she faces because of having a revoked driver’s license. Years of traffic tickets and arrests for driving with a suspended license left her owing thousands of dollars in court costs she can’t afford and labeled a habitual offender, Sawyer said.

    In other words, she missed court dates where she could have showed up and paid her fine and been on her way, but she didn’t and kept racking up violations and ignoring bench warrants. She should have two kids or better yet no kids, and needs to be firmly attached to a man who makes her life decisions for her. I’m guessing she’s one of our heroic single moms attached to Uncle Sugar, or some tattooed trash or pavement ape as irresponsible as she is.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    Police officers are in schools because the US is a diverse, low-trust society with lots of friction in and between groups. The mostly female teachers are not strong enough to handle problem cases of large, stupid teenagers, like the 14-year old, 350 pound behemoth that fell out of an amusement park ride down here last month. When schools were segregated we didn’t have police in them.

    • Agree: Alden, Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax.

    I understand that state funding policies vary, but chances are that in the state, of which you refer, the roads are crappy -- e.g. filled with potholes and often clogged, and dangerous -- and the highway tolls are being used to fund PERS.

    CA has had a long, cultural aversion to high ("free") -way tolls, with car registration fees being the method chosen to pay for road maintenance. Over time, those fees have risen (i.e. based on car value), but only a minor fraction of the money is used for roads (with those projects made more costly by prevailing wage laws). Meanwhile, the state imposes high gasoline taxes, excise taxes on tires, etc., likewise with a highway pretext but actually diverted to pet projects. Then, of course, bridge tolls keep going up (they need to keep up with Port Authority of NY/NJ!) and the state has imposed auto-pay tolls (i.e. FastCrap) on diamond lanes.

    Of course in CA, a high income tax state, the roads are clogged and crappy; as are its schools.

    , @Alden
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    In California the fines are so costly it’s absolutely ridiculous. And about half the population is on welfare. So the custom is just show up in court tell the judge you’re poor and he or she orders you to pay what you can afford. Go down the hall to room whatever and pay what you can.

    The cities and counties would get a lot more revenue if the traffic and parking fines were reasonable. Like $25. But for a lot of people if it’s a choice between $145 for a parking or traffic fine or the gas and electric bill it’s the gas and electric bill they pay. Or the money goes towards the rent. More people can afford the $25 fine than can afford the $75 parking fine.

    More and more city dwellers are going the UBER route. All the convenience of a car without the expense and searching for a place to park. And paying to park at work. And when you have a Dr accountant whatever appointment. And when going to a movie or out for an evening. Or having to park 8 or 9 blocks from home.

    Until about 1960 many city dwellers didn’t have cars. Buses and subways were safe. And at least the subways were faster.

    Stores, including grocery delivered. Even pharmacies delivered little bottles of medicine. And there were plenty of cabs all over. Either call, wave one down or walk down to the corner where they waited. There were always cabs at the subway stops too. Nice in winter or in the rain.

    Now everything can be delivered. Amazon has the most ordinary little drug and hardware store items. Grocery stores deliver. CVS really wants to deliver meds instead of hiring clerks.

    The big problem of raising kids in cities instead of suburbs was the blacks on public transit. Stay at home Moms maids and drivers are expensive. So parents get the kids the UBER and LYFT accounts. Safety of a car freedom of public transit for the kids.

    For city people, there’s a real return to the good old days when they didn’t need a car because of deliveries and cabs.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Colin Wright

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax.
     
    My main point was that many people are having their driver license taken away for reasons that have nothing at all to do with being a safe person to drive a motor vehicle in a state that has very little in the way of public transportation alternatives.

    But since you raise the point about tolls, it is completely disproportionate to suspend someone's driver license over a 25 cents toll. And if the roads are funded by tolls then what is the point of having one eighth of the state's drivers supposedly not driving? Is this really cost effective?

    People often make mistakes and end up on toll roads by mistake, and perhaps they have no change.

    Once, several years ago, when I was driving away from Miami on I-275 I ended up completely by mistake on a toll road that seemed to lead to nowhere in particular. I actually paid the tolls, and eventually was able to make a U-Turn and go back and find my way onto I-275 and US 27.

    A few weeks later I got a letter in the mail about alleged unpaid tolls, and I wrote back to them and said that I had paid the tolls until I ran out of change, even though I had absolutely no intention of being on the road to nowhere. But I might well have never received the letter and my driver license might have been suspended without me ever knowing it, and then having to pay a shitload of money to get it back.

    It is all completely out of proportion to the supposed offense.

    Tell me in what other countries do people lose their driver license for non driving offenses?

    https://calmatters.org/justice/2021/01/california-drivers-licenses-traffic-ticket/

    More than three million traffic infraction citations are issued in California every year, averaging between $600 and $700 each.

    California has among the highest traffic ticket penalties in the country due to a litany of state and county add-on fees. A ticket for running a red light — which has a base fine of $100 — actually costs nearly $500 because of added state and local fees, and more than $800 if the driver misses a deadline to pay or appear in court.

    OK, admittedly deliberately running a red light is a extremely dangerous thing to do, that probably merits suspension of a driver license or imprisonment on a second offense, but one of the problems of having legislators who are made up mostly of rich people and lawyers is that they are completely out of touch with how much ordinary workers or students earn. So you can see that most likely many of the people who don't pay up don't pay because they cannot. They simply don't have the money. Probably many would prefer the option of a week in traffic jail and have the matter finished.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @mikeInThe716, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jim Don Bob

    , @Charon
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    Years of traffic tickets and arrests for driving with a suspended license left her owing thousands of dollars in court costs she can’t afford and labeled a habitual offender
     
    Some people just don't like following rules. It's racist or sexist or whatever to insist that they should.

    Reminds me of the BLM millionaire lady just the other day. Laws oppress us just by existing!

    You may call these people scofflaws, but they are really just Libertarians like Ron Paul. (Scratch the surface though, and you'll find that they want the rest of us to be law-abiding. Just like they want no cops except when they happen to want cops.

    Not just children. Stupid children.

  145. OT — coming confected food crisis — first there was the purely ideological cutoff of American energy production, then farmers apparently ordered to dramatically lower production, then the loss of Ukrainian and Russian grain and fertilizer as a result of the war, and now a rail line is flat out rejecting business with a major fertilizer company, partly as a result of personnel issues.
    The fertilizer company itself:
    https://www.cfindustries.com/newsroom/2022/union-pacific-shipping-restrictions
    An alternative media site I’ve never heard of offering context:
    https://www.visiontimes.com/2022/04/16/us-rail-carriers-cut-fertilizer-shipments-union-wars.html

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @J.Ross


    then farmers apparently ordered to dramatically lower production
     
    The USDA no longer limits production of grains. The only program that takes land out of production is CRP, which pays farmers to set aside highly erodible land. We used to have about ten acres in that program but it paid less and incurred higher expenses than our pasture land so we withdrew from the program. I know there are some programs for a few specialty crops such as oranges that set production quotas but they have a minimal impact on American food production.

    There are no production limits on the wheat, milo, soybeans, and corn that are grown on our place nor for livestock on our pasture. What is impacting farmers are increased input costs for fuel and fertilizer. In some cases these increases might cause farmers to remove marginal land from production but from what I can tell the increase in commodity prices makes up for increased costs. For example, last year we sold wheat for $5.64 a bushel. Today the price is around $9.50. But we’ve also had very little rain so far this year so our yield might be extremely low, if any. Plus, the price might drop precipitously between now and harvest.

    If you know of government imposed limits on major food sources, please provide links or citations.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @J.Ross

  146. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jonathan Mason

    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax. And vehicle registration is important so we can recover stolen vehicles and provide a favorable risk environment for insurance coverage. People with a trail of unpaid tickets and fines are irresponsible and credit risks, and we don't need them out there operating a 4,000 pound vehicle.

    The object of that article you linked is pretty pathetic.


    Every month, Celeste Sawyer takes an Uber ride to the grocery store and packs a stranger’s car with enough food to feed her family for weeks.

    The 33-year-old Apopka mother of five says it’s one of the embarrassing struggles she faces because of having a revoked driver’s license. Years of traffic tickets and arrests for driving with a suspended license left her owing thousands of dollars in court costs she can’t afford and labeled a habitual offender, Sawyer said.
     

    In other words, she missed court dates where she could have showed up and paid her fine and been on her way, but she didn't and kept racking up violations and ignoring bench warrants. She should have two kids or better yet no kids, and needs to be firmly attached to a man who makes her life decisions for her. I'm guessing she's one of our heroic single moms attached to Uncle Sugar, or some tattooed trash or pavement ape as irresponsible as she is.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    Police officers are in schools because the US is a diverse, low-trust society with lots of friction in and between groups. The mostly female teachers are not strong enough to handle problem cases of large, stupid teenagers, like the 14-year old, 350 pound behemoth that fell out of an amusement park ride down here last month. When schools were segregated we didn't have police in them.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Alden, @Jonathan Mason, @Charon

    paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax.

    I understand that state funding policies vary, but chances are that in the state, of which you refer, the roads are crappy — e.g. filled with potholes and often clogged, and dangerous — and the highway tolls are being used to fund PERS.

    CA has had a long, cultural aversion to high (“free”) -way tolls, with car registration fees being the method chosen to pay for road maintenance. Over time, those fees have risen (i.e. based on car value), but only a minor fraction of the money is used for roads (with those projects made more costly by prevailing wage laws). Meanwhile, the state imposes high gasoline taxes, excise taxes on tires, etc., likewise with a highway pretext but actually diverted to pet projects. Then, of course, bridge tolls keep going up (they need to keep up with Port Authority of NY/NJ!) and the state has imposed auto-pay tolls (i.e. FastCrap) on diamond lanes.

    Of course in CA, a high income tax state, the roads are clogged and crappy; as are its schools.

  147. @James N. Kennett
    OT: Harvard professor Roland Fryer has been mentioned here occasionally, e.g. here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/metoo-finally-coming-for-a-good-guy/

    He does evidence-based research that often turns out to disagree with the Narrative. Here is a recent story about how he was #MeToo'ed by an employee who had been fired:

    https://quillette.com/2022/04/15/why-did-harvard-university-go-after-one-of-its-best-black-professors/

    The outcome of a Title IX proceeding was a recommendation for training in setting boundaries. Harvard administrators instead decided to close down Fryer's research, suspend him without pay for two years, and ban him from having graduate students.

    The writer of the article, Rob Montz, has produced a short documentary on the case:

    https://youtu.be/m8xWOlk3WIw

    Replies: @Alden

    OT There’s demonstrations in several French universities about the election. They’re glad LePen, Hitler’s great granddaughter lost of course. But absolutely furious Macron win. Despite his pro immigration stance, he’s now an evil capitalist pawn of bankers and capitalists and police and law and order and French racism fascism chauvinism etc. same old same old.

    Sorbonne had the biggest demo. In Paris. Where the students can’t even get around the city without being continually harassed at best, robbed beaten mauled or raped by the Africans and Muslims.

    Close the universities.

  148. @Jack D
    @Jonathan Mason

    See Alden's answer #2 above.

    Under the Constitution, the police can't stop you and your car unless they have probable cause (there are some permitted exceptions such as drunk driving checkpoints where they stop everyone). This is generally good from a civil rights POV - you wouldn't want the police to come and search your house just to check that you aren't breaking any laws.

    OTOH, it is perfectly Constitutional for the police to stop you if you are in violation of the traffic laws, large or small. That's why they are called laws and they are called law enforcement officers. And once they have stopped you, they are allowed to sniff around to see if they smell dope or if you have drugs or weapons in plain sight or if you have any open warrants, etc. This is considered a legitimate police tactic and very effective "broken windows" type policing. Not only does this help to clear the streets of people who belong in jail, but it also makes criminals less likely to drive around with weapons, drugs, etc. because they know that they might get pulled over.

    Now if you are a criminal, you would prefer that the police not stop you. But if you are a law abiding citizen you have more to gain that to lose by this tactic. I've been pulled over a few times over the years by the local cops on these types of minor violations (generally they don't even give you a traffic ticket, just a warning) and I'm fine with them doing so because I know that this keeps crime down in my neighborhood. (Probably they are instructed to pull over a certain # of white people so that they don't appear racist - what they are really looking for are black people from the hood who have come out to the suburbs to commit crimes.)

    The only downside to these interactions is that some blacks are allergic to being arrested and so instead of complying with the police they try to fight with them or shoot them or run away from them, etc. and they end up getting shot by the cops. In 99% of such cases, all they needed to do was to comply with the lawful orders of the cops and they wouldn't be dead. But some blacks think that they have a right not to be arrested. In their mind they dindu nuffin and should be free to go regardless of whether a cop thinks otherwise.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    You explained the idea of our civil rights pretty well (especially considering that you are dealing with a dufus who has lived in this country 20 or 30 years and still doesn’t get Jack Squat!) However, this right here:

    … there are some permitted exceptions such as drunk driving checkpoints where they stop everyone).

    You didn’t state an opinion, but I will just get opinionated on this one. There are no such thing as PERMITTED EXCEPTIONS to Constitutional rights. It’s not a thing.

    The reason I get livid about this DUI Checkpoint/”Show me your papers” shit is that the mid-1990s were the time I noticed States starting this stuff up with not enough resistance. That happened to be the time I realized this country was on a steady slide to hell.

    You think I’m a melodramatic Libertarian, but it’s exactly this kind of thing that the “muh Constitution” deriding “practical” Conservatives ignore at their peril. It won’t be in a court of law, but all of these things CAN and WILL be used against you by ctrl-left tyrants. Don’t say I didn’t warn you people. I did long ago – in the mid-1990s – no, not on this blog.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don't tell you what the law should be. I tell you what it IS. The Supreme Court has found that the state’s interest in reducing drunk driving outweighs the minor infringement on a driver’s constitutional rights. Maybe this was wrongly decided, but that's the law. The Constitution is not self- enforcing. It means whatever the Supreme Court says it means.

    It's important to understand that while you have to submit to going thru the checkpoint, you still have your constitutional rights. You’re not required to consent to a search or to answer any incriminating questions. The only thing you have to provide is your identification and basic information.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  149. @vinteuil
    @AnotherDad


    A civilized society stays a civilized society by civilized men enforcing their rules upon the uncivilized men–and punishing, killing or expelling them when they break those rules.
     
    Well, yeah, sure - but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that's exactly what the left thinks they're doing. They're punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

    Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @AnotherDad

    Well, yeah, sure – but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that’s exactly what the left thinks they’re doing. They’re punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

    Yes they do.

  150. Anon[396] • Disclaimer says:

    I think that whites and Asians need to get more aggressive in the courts fighting this stuff. The Harvard Asian lawsuit is a good example. Follow Saul Alinsky’s rules for radicals #4: Make the enemy live up to its own book of rules. If it’s illegal for something to disproportionately affect a racial group as a simple matter of correlation, then it should apply to disproportionate effects on whites too. Force courts to explain, in published opinions, why this does not seem to apply to whites and Asians.

  151. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    You explained the idea of our civil rights pretty well (especially considering that you are dealing with a dufus who has lived in this country 20 or 30 years and still doesn't get Jack Squat!) However, this right here:


    ... there are some permitted exceptions such as drunk driving checkpoints where they stop everyone).
     
    You didn't state an opinion, but I will just get opinionated on this one. There are no such thing as PERMITTED EXCEPTIONS to Constitutional rights. It's not a thing.

    The reason I get livid about this DUI Checkpoint/"Show me your papers" shit is that the mid-1990s were the time I noticed States starting this stuff up with not enough resistance. That happened to be the time I realized this country was on a steady slide to hell.

    You think I'm a melodramatic Libertarian, but it's exactly this kind of thing that the "muh Constitution" deriding "practical" Conservatives ignore at their peril. It won't be in a court of law, but all of these things CAN and WILL be used against you by ctrl-left tyrants. Don't say I didn't warn you people. I did long ago - in the mid-1990s - no, not on this blog.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I don’t tell you what the law should be. I tell you what it IS. The Supreme Court has found that the state’s interest in reducing drunk driving outweighs the minor infringement on a driver’s constitutional rights. Maybe this was wrongly decided, but that’s the law. The Constitution is not self- enforcing. It means whatever the Supreme Court says it means.

    It’s important to understand that while you have to submit to going thru the checkpoint, you still have your constitutional rights. You’re not required to consent to a search or to answer any incriminating questions. The only thing you have to provide is your identification and basic information.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    I noted that you didn't state an opinion before Jack, but just brought it up. Did you miss that part?

    Now that you did, no. It's an unreasonable search, as your car is being checked, and you are being detained to begin with with no cause. Starting from there, what was next? Oh, yeah, TSA checkpoints cause, TERRA!


    Maybe this was wrongly decided,...
     
    Right.

    ... but that’s the law. The Constitution is not self- enforcing. It means whatever the Supreme Court says it means.
     
    That's the problem, people believing that's the case. The Constitution is in fairly plain English, and we can all read it. The Founders were mistaken in thinking the SCROTUS wouldn't turn into a political body.
  152. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jonathan Mason

    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax. And vehicle registration is important so we can recover stolen vehicles and provide a favorable risk environment for insurance coverage. People with a trail of unpaid tickets and fines are irresponsible and credit risks, and we don't need them out there operating a 4,000 pound vehicle.

    The object of that article you linked is pretty pathetic.


    Every month, Celeste Sawyer takes an Uber ride to the grocery store and packs a stranger’s car with enough food to feed her family for weeks.

    The 33-year-old Apopka mother of five says it’s one of the embarrassing struggles she faces because of having a revoked driver’s license. Years of traffic tickets and arrests for driving with a suspended license left her owing thousands of dollars in court costs she can’t afford and labeled a habitual offender, Sawyer said.
     

    In other words, she missed court dates where she could have showed up and paid her fine and been on her way, but she didn't and kept racking up violations and ignoring bench warrants. She should have two kids or better yet no kids, and needs to be firmly attached to a man who makes her life decisions for her. I'm guessing she's one of our heroic single moms attached to Uncle Sugar, or some tattooed trash or pavement ape as irresponsible as she is.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    Police officers are in schools because the US is a diverse, low-trust society with lots of friction in and between groups. The mostly female teachers are not strong enough to handle problem cases of large, stupid teenagers, like the 14-year old, 350 pound behemoth that fell out of an amusement park ride down here last month. When schools were segregated we didn't have police in them.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Alden, @Jonathan Mason, @Charon

    In California the fines are so costly it’s absolutely ridiculous. And about half the population is on welfare. So the custom is just show up in court tell the judge you’re poor and he or she orders you to pay what you can afford. Go down the hall to room whatever and pay what you can.

    The cities and counties would get a lot more revenue if the traffic and parking fines were reasonable. Like \$25. But for a lot of people if it’s a choice between \$145 for a parking or traffic fine or the gas and electric bill it’s the gas and electric bill they pay. Or the money goes towards the rent. More people can afford the \$25 fine than can afford the \$75 parking fine.

    More and more city dwellers are going the UBER route. All the convenience of a car without the expense and searching for a place to park. And paying to park at work. And when you have a Dr accountant whatever appointment. And when going to a movie or out for an evening. Or having to park 8 or 9 blocks from home.

    Until about 1960 many city dwellers didn’t have cars. Buses and subways were safe. And at least the subways were faster.

    Stores, including grocery delivered. Even pharmacies delivered little bottles of medicine. And there were plenty of cabs all over. Either call, wave one down or walk down to the corner where they waited. There were always cabs at the subway stops too. Nice in winter or in the rain.

    Now everything can be delivered. Amazon has the most ordinary little drug and hardware store items. Grocery stores deliver. CVS really wants to deliver meds instead of hiring clerks.

    The big problem of raising kids in cities instead of suburbs was the blacks on public transit. Stay at home Moms maids and drivers are expensive. So parents get the kids the UBER and LYFT accounts. Safety of a car freedom of public transit for the kids.

    For city people, there’s a real return to the good old days when they didn’t need a car because of deliveries and cabs.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Alden

    It's pretty hilarious when you think about it. Amazon, Uber, Lyft, Zoom: hundreds of billions of dollars of capital--software, buildings, vehicles, IP, finance--to facilitate white withdrawal from increasingly Vibrant and Diverse public spaces. Actually it's not funny at all.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Alden

    'In California the fines are so costly it’s absolutely ridiculous. And about half the population is on welfare. So the custom is just show up in court tell the judge you’re poor and he or she orders you to pay what you can afford. Go down the hall to room whatever and pay what you can.

    The cities and counties would get a lot more revenue if the traffic and parking fines were reasonable. Like $25. But for a lot of people if it’s a choice between $145 for a parking or traffic fine...'


    If only. Back in 2014 or thereabouts, they put in an (utterly superfluous) traffic light at the freeway exit we were accustomed to take getting back to our house.

    So my wife drops down the ramp, stops to make her accustomed right turn, fails to notice the new light-and-no-right-turn-on-red sign -- and gets nailed.

    $450 if she goes to traffic school. I suggested fighting it, but she didn't want to. My question was always, how did what was a $90 crime last year become five times as heinous this year?'

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  153. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don't tell you what the law should be. I tell you what it IS. The Supreme Court has found that the state’s interest in reducing drunk driving outweighs the minor infringement on a driver’s constitutional rights. Maybe this was wrongly decided, but that's the law. The Constitution is not self- enforcing. It means whatever the Supreme Court says it means.

    It's important to understand that while you have to submit to going thru the checkpoint, you still have your constitutional rights. You’re not required to consent to a search or to answer any incriminating questions. The only thing you have to provide is your identification and basic information.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I noted that you didn’t state an opinion before Jack, but just brought it up. Did you miss that part?

    Now that you did, no. It’s an unreasonable search, as your car is being checked, and you are being detained to begin with with no cause. Starting from there, what was next? Oh, yeah, TSA checkpoints cause, TERRA!

    Maybe this was wrongly decided,…

    Right.

    … but that’s the law. The Constitution is not self- enforcing. It means whatever the Supreme Court says it means.

    That’s the problem, people believing that’s the case. The Constitution is in fairly plain English, and we can all read it. The Founders were mistaken in thinking the SCROTUS wouldn’t turn into a political body.

  154. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jonathan Mason

    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax. And vehicle registration is important so we can recover stolen vehicles and provide a favorable risk environment for insurance coverage. People with a trail of unpaid tickets and fines are irresponsible and credit risks, and we don't need them out there operating a 4,000 pound vehicle.

    The object of that article you linked is pretty pathetic.


    Every month, Celeste Sawyer takes an Uber ride to the grocery store and packs a stranger’s car with enough food to feed her family for weeks.

    The 33-year-old Apopka mother of five says it’s one of the embarrassing struggles she faces because of having a revoked driver’s license. Years of traffic tickets and arrests for driving with a suspended license left her owing thousands of dollars in court costs she can’t afford and labeled a habitual offender, Sawyer said.
     

    In other words, she missed court dates where she could have showed up and paid her fine and been on her way, but she didn't and kept racking up violations and ignoring bench warrants. She should have two kids or better yet no kids, and needs to be firmly attached to a man who makes her life decisions for her. I'm guessing she's one of our heroic single moms attached to Uncle Sugar, or some tattooed trash or pavement ape as irresponsible as she is.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    Police officers are in schools because the US is a diverse, low-trust society with lots of friction in and between groups. The mostly female teachers are not strong enough to handle problem cases of large, stupid teenagers, like the 14-year old, 350 pound behemoth that fell out of an amusement park ride down here last month. When schools were segregated we didn't have police in them.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Alden, @Jonathan Mason, @Charon

    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax.

    My main point was that many people are having their driver license taken away for reasons that have nothing at all to do with being a safe person to drive a motor vehicle in a state that has very little in the way of public transportation alternatives.

    But since you raise the point about tolls, it is completely disproportionate to suspend someone’s driver license over a 25 cents toll. And if the roads are funded by tolls then what is the point of having one eighth of the state’s drivers supposedly not driving? Is this really cost effective?

    People often make mistakes and end up on toll roads by mistake, and perhaps they have no change.

    Once, several years ago, when I was driving away from Miami on I-275 I ended up completely by mistake on a toll road that seemed to lead to nowhere in particular. I actually paid the tolls, and eventually was able to make a U-Turn and go back and find my way onto I-275 and US 27.

    A few weeks later I got a letter in the mail about alleged unpaid tolls, and I wrote back to them and said that I had paid the tolls until I ran out of change, even though I had absolutely no intention of being on the road to nowhere. But I might well have never received the letter and my driver license might have been suspended without me ever knowing it, and then having to pay a shitload of money to get it back.

    It is all completely out of proportion to the supposed offense.

    Tell me in what other countries do people lose their driver license for non driving offenses?

    https://calmatters.org/justice/2021/01/california-drivers-licenses-traffic-ticket/

    More than three million traffic infraction citations are issued in California every year, averaging between \$600 and \$700 each.

    California has among the highest traffic ticket penalties in the country due to a litany of state and county add-on fees. A ticket for running a red light — which has a base fine of \$100 — actually costs nearly \$500 because of added state and local fees, and more than \$800 if the driver misses a deadline to pay or appear in court.

    OK, admittedly deliberately running a red light is a extremely dangerous thing to do, that probably merits suspension of a driver license or imprisonment on a second offense, but one of the problems of having legislators who are made up mostly of rich people and lawyers is that they are completely out of touch with how much ordinary workers or students earn. So you can see that most likely many of the people who don’t pay up don’t pay because they cannot. They simply don’t have the money. Probably many would prefer the option of a week in traffic jail and have the matter finished.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Jonathan Mason

    '...My main point was that many people are having their driver license taken away for reasons that have nothing at all to do with being a safe person...

    Leaving aside the equity or lack thereof of traffic fines and such, you really have to be pretty damned determined to actually lose your license.

    I've been there. Long -- and at points fairly comic -- story, but you get plenty of chances. You really do. When you've got a court date, show up. If you can't pay, explain why. STOP GETTING TICKETS.

    It's really not all that hard.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @mikeInThe716
    @Jonathan Mason

    You make some valid points.

    That said, in the USA, almost anyone can get a driver's license. In Europe and the UK, a valid license is much more expensive and challenging. And Americans need to be mobile - it's a continent size country. Heck, imposing Euro-style driving rules in the USA might reduce GDP by 1%. (Although it may also reduce auto fatalities by ~3000 lives annually, if you compare deaths/mile driven between Germany and the US).

    Yes, there are many ticky-tac driving fines and penalties that can hit the financially poor. That said, many such drivers have marginal ability at most tasks, much less piloting a 4000+ lbs vehicles.

    Here in western NY, there's a large office of a national auto-insurance firm. A manager confided that the worst 10% of their customers (in the "risk pool" that the MUST cover per state regs) account for >30% of their claims. Some of that "worst 10%" are young drivers who eventually improve. But half of them are repeatedly awful. It's probably similar in Florida - that's who you see in the in the suspended license stats.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jonathan Mason

    You're a white guy talking from white guy perspective. These people get underwater because they are trapped in a world of white American norms, where over half the people pay their fines or answer bench warrants by certain deadlines and timely renew their licenses. American blacks simply do not have that capacity in the same percentages as white Americans so they get trapped in norms which are unfair to their race. I imagine Spaniards in South America have a more realistic view of their Asiatic untermensch and these problems are avoided.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Jim Don Bob
    @Jonathan Mason

    Is this why you are on the lam in Ecuador?

  155. @Reg Cæsar
    @International Jew


    No, I made a true statement.
     
    Were you under oath, or otherwise at risk of sanction for making false statements?

    Did the jury empaneled in your absence acquit some monster?

    Replies: @International Jew

    You’re not under any oath or obligation of any kind at that point. At least in California you’re not.

    Now the best jury-selection scene I ever saw was some years earlier in Federal District Court (across the bay in San Francisco). It was for the trial of a Chinese gang accused of shaking down some brothels. To the judge’s question of “Would you be able to give the accused a fair hearing?” (or whatever they ask you) the prospective juror said, “I’m familiar with the Wah-Ching [or whatever it was called] gang and have personally been victimized by it.”

    (I was excused a little later myself, but for nothing worth relating here.)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @International Jew


    Now the best jury-selection scene I ever saw was some years earlier in Federal District Court (across the bay in San Francisco).
     
    A notable case at SCOTUS was Hoyt v Florida (1961). Gwendolyn Hoyt argued that her murder trial was unconstitutional because her jury was all-male. But why was it all male?


    Because Florida law then chose female jurors from a volunteer pool. The general pool in Hillsborough County was 1% female. There had been a vigorous drive to attract volunteers in next-door Pinellas County. It was quite a success. Their jury pool reached 4%.

    That was under an opt-in system. Other states used an opt-out method. Women were called, but got out with a simple "Nah." No trickery necessary! SCOTUS ended both in two separate cases in the 1970s. The notorious RBG was involved in the first and argued the second.
  156. @Jonathan Mason
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax.
     
    My main point was that many people are having their driver license taken away for reasons that have nothing at all to do with being a safe person to drive a motor vehicle in a state that has very little in the way of public transportation alternatives.

    But since you raise the point about tolls, it is completely disproportionate to suspend someone's driver license over a 25 cents toll. And if the roads are funded by tolls then what is the point of having one eighth of the state's drivers supposedly not driving? Is this really cost effective?

    People often make mistakes and end up on toll roads by mistake, and perhaps they have no change.

    Once, several years ago, when I was driving away from Miami on I-275 I ended up completely by mistake on a toll road that seemed to lead to nowhere in particular. I actually paid the tolls, and eventually was able to make a U-Turn and go back and find my way onto I-275 and US 27.

    A few weeks later I got a letter in the mail about alleged unpaid tolls, and I wrote back to them and said that I had paid the tolls until I ran out of change, even though I had absolutely no intention of being on the road to nowhere. But I might well have never received the letter and my driver license might have been suspended without me ever knowing it, and then having to pay a shitload of money to get it back.

    It is all completely out of proportion to the supposed offense.

    Tell me in what other countries do people lose their driver license for non driving offenses?

    https://calmatters.org/justice/2021/01/california-drivers-licenses-traffic-ticket/

    More than three million traffic infraction citations are issued in California every year, averaging between $600 and $700 each.

    California has among the highest traffic ticket penalties in the country due to a litany of state and county add-on fees. A ticket for running a red light — which has a base fine of $100 — actually costs nearly $500 because of added state and local fees, and more than $800 if the driver misses a deadline to pay or appear in court.

    OK, admittedly deliberately running a red light is a extremely dangerous thing to do, that probably merits suspension of a driver license or imprisonment on a second offense, but one of the problems of having legislators who are made up mostly of rich people and lawyers is that they are completely out of touch with how much ordinary workers or students earn. So you can see that most likely many of the people who don't pay up don't pay because they cannot. They simply don't have the money. Probably many would prefer the option of a week in traffic jail and have the matter finished.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @mikeInThe716, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jim Don Bob

    ‘…My main point was that many people are having their driver license taken away for reasons that have nothing at all to do with being a safe person…

    Leaving aside the equity or lack thereof of traffic fines and such, you really have to be pretty damned determined to actually lose your license.

    I’ve been there. Long — and at points fairly comic — story, but you get plenty of chances. You really do. When you’ve got a court date, show up. If you can’t pay, explain why. STOP GETTING TICKETS.

    It’s really not all that hard.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Colin Wright


    Leaving aside the equity or lack thereof of traffic fines and such, you really have to be pretty damned determined to actually lose your license.
     
    It seems improbable to me that 1 in 8 Florida drivers have gone out of their way to toss their driver license in a state that has fuck all public transportation other than school buses and which could legitimately be nicknamed the Parking Lot State.

    But if there is actually such a large segment of the population that is not fit to drive, then the state has done a hopeless job in providing alternatives for them. Yes, there is Uber, but I once checked out the price of a 45 minute drive by Uber and it was more than $50, and many people in Florida have a 30 minutes each way commute to work.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Colin Wright

  157. Dude,another mass shooting,this one at a mall in SC. Lots of wounded. Blacketty strikes again?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Bardon Kaldlan

    Is it that their primary objective is to look cool while mass shooting? Like, you know, shooting with the handgun sideways, sort of hanging limp-wristed, like "BLAHW! BLAHW! I'll shoot a mofo like it ain't no thang, like I'm hardly even thinkin' bout this shit, and SURE as hell ain't wastin no time AIMIN' at yo ayuss."

    , @AceDeuce
    @Bardon Kaldlan


    Dude,another mass shooting,this one at a mall in SC.
     
    Turns out it was the work of three Whites.

    Leroy White
    Trayvon White
    Sc'oobidoobius White

    /s
  158. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anonymous

    No, not all in a car/truck. 5 times were on my motorcycle (in town), with nary a ticket, BTW, and 7 or 8 times were on a bicycle-bike.

    I am pretty sure this is well above average, especially for an (above-) average White guy. One time, the traffic court judge - a very fair guy from all my observation - asked "Hey, don't I know you from somewhere?" Luckily, he didn't remember exactly from where.

    (However, I did drive a certain sports car for many years, a model that they just plain pick on.)

    Replies: @HammerJack

    I did drive a certain sports car for many years, a model that they just plain pick on.

    You drove a Vette?? For real? That’s the only sports car I know that cops pick on. Or was it a Jaguar E–Type? A Ferrari?

    Of course, it’s also possible that you consider a Mustang or a Camaro or a Trans-Am a sports car. I may need to see your photo. None of the cars I mentioned in the previous paragraph seem to suit you. But that was then, right?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @HammerJack

    Since you mentioned the Corvette, a guy who had one of those but previously the same model as me, told me that cops did NOT pick on him in the Vette nearly as much. His opinion was that they figure you have to have money to own the Vette, but the one I drove (and he previously) was one lots of irresponsible young men owned. (I never hit a thing with mine... well nothing moving.)

    I'm not gonna' say which model, but it is surely not Italian. That would not be me.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

  159. @Dr. X
    @Elli


    Where and who was that? I can’t find it anywhere.

     

    Yep. You can, but you have to know what you are looking for. It was completely memory-holed. National press did not cover it. Local press barely mentioned it.

    Buffalo, NY, Feb. 12 2022. Deceased white man is James Huber, of North East, PA. 100% unarmed. Shot dead by New York State Police after attempting to flee a traffic stop. Guy was going to the Canadian trucker rally at the border, so he was probably an anti-vaxx Trump deplorable.

    White guy, so "conservatives" will blame the victim and say "he deserved it" for failing to grovel before the "hero" cop.

    Replies: @mikeInThe716

    IIRC, the deceased white man was driving 100+ MPH on I-90 before the cops broke off the chase. Troopers tracked him to downtown Buffalo (the I-90 and 190 around Buffalo have good cameras) and attempted a stop.

    He tried dragging the trooper with his car. So he got shot. In the totality of the circumstances, the deceased was a public hazard. I have little sympathy for lunatic-level driving on public roads. I’m close to someone maimed by such a driver.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @mikeInThe716

    "He tried dragging the trooper with his car. So he got shot. In the totality of the circumstances, the deceased was a public hazard. I have little sympathy for lunatic-level driving on public roads. I’m close to someone maimed by such a driver. "

    The cop pulled his gun on the driver while the driver was sitting in the car. The cop then tried to pull the driver from the car with the same hand that was holding the gun. What in fuck was he thinking doing that?? Unforgivably stupid. The driver dragged the cop because the cop had leaned into the vehicle with his weapon pressed into the head of the driver. The driver's intent was not to drag the cop, it was to flee.

    I am not defending the driver's action prior to his interaction with the cop in the body cam. But that cop's actions were moronic.

    So you know someone hurt by a reckless driver and that justifies the cops shooting every reckless driver from here on out? Wow, that's good to know. Perhaps people who seek vicarious vengeance through excessive police force are more a threat to civilization than reckless drivers.

    , @Dr. X
    @mikeInThe716


    He tried dragging the trooper with his car.
     
    Bullshit. He threw it in reverse and the cop jumped backwards. There was no dragging in the video. The cop executed him for defying authority.
  160. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jonathan Mason

    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax. And vehicle registration is important so we can recover stolen vehicles and provide a favorable risk environment for insurance coverage. People with a trail of unpaid tickets and fines are irresponsible and credit risks, and we don't need them out there operating a 4,000 pound vehicle.

    The object of that article you linked is pretty pathetic.


    Every month, Celeste Sawyer takes an Uber ride to the grocery store and packs a stranger’s car with enough food to feed her family for weeks.

    The 33-year-old Apopka mother of five says it’s one of the embarrassing struggles she faces because of having a revoked driver’s license. Years of traffic tickets and arrests for driving with a suspended license left her owing thousands of dollars in court costs she can’t afford and labeled a habitual offender, Sawyer said.
     

    In other words, she missed court dates where she could have showed up and paid her fine and been on her way, but she didn't and kept racking up violations and ignoring bench warrants. She should have two kids or better yet no kids, and needs to be firmly attached to a man who makes her life decisions for her. I'm guessing she's one of our heroic single moms attached to Uncle Sugar, or some tattooed trash or pavement ape as irresponsible as she is.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    Police officers are in schools because the US is a diverse, low-trust society with lots of friction in and between groups. The mostly female teachers are not strong enough to handle problem cases of large, stupid teenagers, like the 14-year old, 350 pound behemoth that fell out of an amusement park ride down here last month. When schools were segregated we didn't have police in them.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @Alden, @Jonathan Mason, @Charon

    Years of traffic tickets and arrests for driving with a suspended license left her owing thousands of dollars in court costs she can’t afford and labeled a habitual offender

    Some people just don’t like following rules. It’s racist or sexist or whatever to insist that they should.

    Reminds me of the BLM millionaire lady just the other day. Laws oppress us just by existing!

    You may call these people scofflaws, but they are really just Libertarians like Ron Paul. (Scratch the surface though, and you’ll find that they want the rest of us to be law-abiding. Just like they want no cops except when they happen to want cops.

    Not just children. Stupid children.


  161. Why do the MSM always use photos of white cops when they’re trying to demonstrate Sailer’s Law?

    That is what they’re trying to do, isn’t it?

    Or is that what the gunmen were doing.

    • Replies: @Blodgie
    @HammerJack

    Why are those cops dressed and armed like they are ready to lay siege to Fallujah?

    That’s what the Thin Blue Line means.

    It’s the good guys, the cops, against everyone else and that is how they operate.

    They even had the balls to create their own battle flag to show everyone where they stand.

    Most conservatives support this shit 100%.

  162. @Jonathan Mason
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax.
     
    My main point was that many people are having their driver license taken away for reasons that have nothing at all to do with being a safe person to drive a motor vehicle in a state that has very little in the way of public transportation alternatives.

    But since you raise the point about tolls, it is completely disproportionate to suspend someone's driver license over a 25 cents toll. And if the roads are funded by tolls then what is the point of having one eighth of the state's drivers supposedly not driving? Is this really cost effective?

    People often make mistakes and end up on toll roads by mistake, and perhaps they have no change.

    Once, several years ago, when I was driving away from Miami on I-275 I ended up completely by mistake on a toll road that seemed to lead to nowhere in particular. I actually paid the tolls, and eventually was able to make a U-Turn and go back and find my way onto I-275 and US 27.

    A few weeks later I got a letter in the mail about alleged unpaid tolls, and I wrote back to them and said that I had paid the tolls until I ran out of change, even though I had absolutely no intention of being on the road to nowhere. But I might well have never received the letter and my driver license might have been suspended without me ever knowing it, and then having to pay a shitload of money to get it back.

    It is all completely out of proportion to the supposed offense.

    Tell me in what other countries do people lose their driver license for non driving offenses?

    https://calmatters.org/justice/2021/01/california-drivers-licenses-traffic-ticket/

    More than three million traffic infraction citations are issued in California every year, averaging between $600 and $700 each.

    California has among the highest traffic ticket penalties in the country due to a litany of state and county add-on fees. A ticket for running a red light — which has a base fine of $100 — actually costs nearly $500 because of added state and local fees, and more than $800 if the driver misses a deadline to pay or appear in court.

    OK, admittedly deliberately running a red light is a extremely dangerous thing to do, that probably merits suspension of a driver license or imprisonment on a second offense, but one of the problems of having legislators who are made up mostly of rich people and lawyers is that they are completely out of touch with how much ordinary workers or students earn. So you can see that most likely many of the people who don't pay up don't pay because they cannot. They simply don't have the money. Probably many would prefer the option of a week in traffic jail and have the matter finished.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @mikeInThe716, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jim Don Bob

    You make some valid points.

    That said, in the USA, almost anyone can get a driver’s license. In Europe and the UK, a valid license is much more expensive and challenging. And Americans need to be mobile – it’s a continent size country. Heck, imposing Euro-style driving rules in the USA might reduce GDP by 1%. (Although it may also reduce auto fatalities by ~3000 lives annually, if you compare deaths/mile driven between Germany and the US).

    Yes, there are many ticky-tac driving fines and penalties that can hit the financially poor. That said, many such drivers have marginal ability at most tasks, much less piloting a 4000+ lbs vehicles.

    Here in western NY, there’s a large office of a national auto-insurance firm. A manager confided that the worst 10% of their customers (in the “risk pool” that the MUST cover per state regs) account for >30% of their claims. Some of that “worst 10%” are young drivers who eventually improve. But half of them are repeatedly awful. It’s probably similar in Florida – that’s who you see in the in the suspended license stats.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @mikeInThe716


    A manager confided that the worst 10% of their customers (in the “risk pool” that the MUST cover per state regs) account for >30% of their claims.
     
    A 10%/30% skew is not at all impressive. But remember that these 10% are not the real bottom of the barrel; they still bothered to take out insurance. Many of these are law-abiding elderly with slow reflexes who are reaching the ends of their driving careers and meanwhile getting into expensive fender benders multiple times a year. And, yes, clumsy new drivers and irresponsible teenagers who can still get their parents to finance their irresponsibility.

    The real bottom of the barrel don't take out insurance (or register their cars, or get drivers licenses).

    The overall picture of accident-causers might be more like the one for violent crime, where 4% of the overall population (ie young black men) commit over 50% of all violent crimes.

    , @Anonymous
    @mikeInThe716


    Here in western NY, there’s a large office of a national auto-insurance firm. A manager confided that the worst 10% of their customers (in the “risk pool” that the MUST cover per state regs) account for >30% of their claims.
     
    I would have expected it to be higher.

    What is the breakdown by race?
  163. @Anon
    OT: "Teen Opioid Deaths Have Surge 350% Thanks To Rise Of Fentanyl."

    It looks like an important factor here is that teens have lower weights than adults, and when taking doses of a very dangerous drug concocted for adult weights, they're overdosing more often. In time, I expect the fentanyl plague will simmer down much the same way the crack cocaine plague did in the black community after the great crack epidemic of the 1980s. In that case, most of the people inclined to use crack eventually died from overdosing.

    "https://www.zerohedge.com/political/teen-opioid-deaths-have-surge-350-thanks-rise-fentanyl

    Replies: @Alden

    Fentanyl isn’t in prescription drugs scaled to adult or anyone’s weights. It’s only legally used by injection right before surgeries. When the nurse gives you a shot and tells you to count to 10 and you’re out by the time you get to 7.

    It’s only used in illegal drugs. Legally, it’s only in liquid form and only in pre operation medical cabinets. All the powder form fentanyl killing Americans comes from China in those big container ships.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Alden


    It (Fentanyl) is only used in illegal drugs. Legally, it’s only in liquid form and only in pre operation medical cabinets.
     
    You really should not believe everything you hear in the ladies barber shop!

    Fentanyl is used mainly for treatment of severe pain in terminal cancer patients and comes in the form of transdermal patches that are attached to the skin, or transmucosal lozenges that are sucked like popsicles. These should be kept well away from grandchildren.

    They may also be used on the battlefield by the military and has been since the 1990s. The UK military have opted for the 400 µg dose, but the US forces use an 800 µg dose. I guess they have greater tolerance for opiates.

    https://militaryhealth.bmj.com/content/jramc/164/6/458/F1.large.jpg

    Injected Fentanyl is sometimes combined with anesthesia for surgery because it helps to lower the amount of of anesthetic necessary and to suppress coughing when the patient has an artificial airway introduced. However it can also suppress breathing.

    It is also used postoperatively as the drug can also be given with a PCA (patient controlled analgesia) pump, where the patient presses a button to have a small dose of pain medication delivered through their IV line. Obviously the solution is very dilute.

    https://www.cdc.gov/stopoverdose/fentanyl/podcast/CDC-Podcast-The-Dangers-of-Fentanyl.mp3
  164. Anonymous[396] • Disclaimer says:

    Bring back the good ole days.

  165. If you were looking to get a pet as a companion, you should have gotten a Main Coon cat.

    A Maine Coon cat would be a good companion who wouldn’t take too much from your daily routine.

    Dogs are a pain in the a.

  166. @HammerJack
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I did drive a certain sports car for many years, a model that they just plain pick on.
     
    You drove a Vette?? For real? That's the only sports car I know that cops pick on. Or was it a Jaguar E--Type? A Ferrari?

    Of course, it's also possible that you consider a Mustang or a Camaro or a Trans-Am a sports car. I may need to see your photo. None of the cars I mentioned in the previous paragraph seem to suit you. But that was then, right?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Since you mentioned the Corvette, a guy who had one of those but previously the same model as me, told me that cops did NOT pick on him in the Vette nearly as much. His opinion was that they figure you have to have money to own the Vette, but the one I drove (and he previously) was one lots of irresponsible young men owned. (I never hit a thing with mine… well nothing moving.)

    I’m not gonna’ say which model, but it is surely not Italian. That would not be me.

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ah, you had either the Triumph TR-6 or the MGB-GT. Sporty, but notoriously unreliable; for those too impecunious to afford a Jaguar E-Type (which, for years, had its own well-documented electrical problems, requiring its owner to have a second car for those times the Jag was "in the shop").

    Alternative guess: the Austin Healey Sprite, similarly English, with similar difficulties. In Jay McInerney's Bright Lights, Big City, there's a reference to an Austin Healey the protagonist "bought with a junkyard under the hood."

    Replies: @Jack D

  167. @Bardon Kaldlan
    Dude,another mass shooting,this one at a mall in SC. Lots of wounded. Blacketty strikes again?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @AceDeuce

    Is it that their primary objective is to look cool while mass shooting? Like, you know, shooting with the handgun sideways, sort of hanging limp-wristed, like “BLAHW! BLAHW! I’ll shoot a mofo like it ain’t no thang, like I’m hardly even thinkin’ bout this shit, and SURE as hell ain’t wastin no time AIMIN’ at yo ayuss.”

  168. OT: Matt Boling 9.98 +1.6 in florida today

  169. @Jonathan Mason
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax.
     
    My main point was that many people are having their driver license taken away for reasons that have nothing at all to do with being a safe person to drive a motor vehicle in a state that has very little in the way of public transportation alternatives.

    But since you raise the point about tolls, it is completely disproportionate to suspend someone's driver license over a 25 cents toll. And if the roads are funded by tolls then what is the point of having one eighth of the state's drivers supposedly not driving? Is this really cost effective?

    People often make mistakes and end up on toll roads by mistake, and perhaps they have no change.

    Once, several years ago, when I was driving away from Miami on I-275 I ended up completely by mistake on a toll road that seemed to lead to nowhere in particular. I actually paid the tolls, and eventually was able to make a U-Turn and go back and find my way onto I-275 and US 27.

    A few weeks later I got a letter in the mail about alleged unpaid tolls, and I wrote back to them and said that I had paid the tolls until I ran out of change, even though I had absolutely no intention of being on the road to nowhere. But I might well have never received the letter and my driver license might have been suspended without me ever knowing it, and then having to pay a shitload of money to get it back.

    It is all completely out of proportion to the supposed offense.

    Tell me in what other countries do people lose their driver license for non driving offenses?

    https://calmatters.org/justice/2021/01/california-drivers-licenses-traffic-ticket/

    More than three million traffic infraction citations are issued in California every year, averaging between $600 and $700 each.

    California has among the highest traffic ticket penalties in the country due to a litany of state and county add-on fees. A ticket for running a red light — which has a base fine of $100 — actually costs nearly $500 because of added state and local fees, and more than $800 if the driver misses a deadline to pay or appear in court.

    OK, admittedly deliberately running a red light is a extremely dangerous thing to do, that probably merits suspension of a driver license or imprisonment on a second offense, but one of the problems of having legislators who are made up mostly of rich people and lawyers is that they are completely out of touch with how much ordinary workers or students earn. So you can see that most likely many of the people who don't pay up don't pay because they cannot. They simply don't have the money. Probably many would prefer the option of a week in traffic jail and have the matter finished.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @mikeInThe716, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jim Don Bob

    You’re a white guy talking from white guy perspective. These people get underwater because they are trapped in a world of white American norms, where over half the people pay their fines or answer bench warrants by certain deadlines and timely renew their licenses. American blacks simply do not have that capacity in the same percentages as white Americans so they get trapped in norms which are unfair to their race. I imagine Spaniards in South America have a more realistic view of their Asiatic untermensch and these problems are avoided.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    There’s no such thing as white American norms.

    And Jon is speaking from the perspective of a normal human being, something you obviously cannot relate to.

  170. @International Jew
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never served on a jury and I'm Steve's age. I've been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Known Fact, @The Real World, @Alden, @Anon, @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Anon, @Ben tillman

    Hah! If you haven’t been threatened by a judge to be thrown in jail for tainting the jury pool then you haven’t really lived.

    Defense: Do you think you could be objective deciding on this person’s guilt or innocence? (paraphrased)

    RRLCWM2: No, he looks like a pedophile. (The nature of the jury questioning had clearly indicated that this was the nature of the charges)

  171. @Alden
    @Art Deco

    No dog has ever bitten me. Or come within a few feet of me unless I permitted it. What I learned in ultra liberal Marin county. When the feral dogs who only come home once a day to eat charge grown and snarl at you; Charge right back at them. And shout the 4 magic words.

    Back off shut up. And the dogs back off. In Marin there wasn’t an owner in sight. Ever. But occasionally in SF there’d be a nerd wimp dog owner all shocked and upset I didn’t grovel to their uncontrolled untrained mutt.

    You are so lonely you need a dog to substitute for family and friends? At least train it not to attack every one walking jogging or biking on the public sidewalk. Dogs must run free. There’s a saying among the anti pit bull activists. Pit bulls are the new blacks.

    The same liberal idiots who defend uncontrolled untrained dogs attacking people are the very same liberal idiots who defend uncontrolled untrained blacks attacking Whites

    The most dog bites most untrained dogs live in democrat areas. Either black and Hispanic or rich entitled Whites.

    Replies: @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2

    I cross the street when i see a chic with a dog over 50-ish pounds. I don’t want to have to break that poor thing’s neck when it pulls the leash right out of her hands.

  172. @mikeInThe716
    @Jonathan Mason

    You make some valid points.

    That said, in the USA, almost anyone can get a driver's license. In Europe and the UK, a valid license is much more expensive and challenging. And Americans need to be mobile - it's a continent size country. Heck, imposing Euro-style driving rules in the USA might reduce GDP by 1%. (Although it may also reduce auto fatalities by ~3000 lives annually, if you compare deaths/mile driven between Germany and the US).

    Yes, there are many ticky-tac driving fines and penalties that can hit the financially poor. That said, many such drivers have marginal ability at most tasks, much less piloting a 4000+ lbs vehicles.

    Here in western NY, there's a large office of a national auto-insurance firm. A manager confided that the worst 10% of their customers (in the "risk pool" that the MUST cover per state regs) account for >30% of their claims. Some of that "worst 10%" are young drivers who eventually improve. But half of them are repeatedly awful. It's probably similar in Florida - that's who you see in the in the suspended license stats.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous

    A manager confided that the worst 10% of their customers (in the “risk pool” that the MUST cover per state regs) account for >30% of their claims.

    A 10%/30% skew is not at all impressive. But remember that these 10% are not the real bottom of the barrel; they still bothered to take out insurance. Many of these are law-abiding elderly with slow reflexes who are reaching the ends of their driving careers and meanwhile getting into expensive fender benders multiple times a year. And, yes, clumsy new drivers and irresponsible teenagers who can still get their parents to finance their irresponsibility.

    The real bottom of the barrel don’t take out insurance (or register their cars, or get drivers licenses).

    The overall picture of accident-causers might be more like the one for violent crime, where 4% of the overall population (ie young black men) commit over 50% of all violent crimes.

  173. @Almost Missouri
    @Hypnotoad666

    It looked to me like since the cop couldn't get the perp's hand off the taser, the cop got his gun to be ready for that escalation, but then the perp switched back to trying to escape, so the cop switched back to trying to hold him down. Unfortunately, he was still holding the gun, and in the pressure of that contest, he squeezed the trigger, and now the perp's dead.

    It used to be not rare for sullen black suspects to be surly and resist arrest without quite overtly attacking the officer. Since 5/25/2020, however, this seems to be the universal black response to arrest. A global memo went over the blackophone that there is no punishment for blacks resisting arrest, so you may as well try your luck.


    He appeared to be either high, retarded, or so fresh off the boat and unable to speak English that he had no clue about how a traffic stop works.
     
    At the beginning of the stop, the cop asked him if he spoke English, and he said, "yes". So he spoke English well enough to answer that. OTOH, the guy is from Congo, which IIRC has an average IQ that verges into retarded territory. For some reason, his whole family, including his parents are in Grand Rapids too, even though they don't speak any English. I guess the US needed them to cure cancer with witch doctor voodooing or something.

    Replies: @International Jew

    He might not have been a retard at all but the lingua franca in Congo is French. If he had the means to get to the US, he could have been from what passes as the elite level in Congo, with a solid education — but in French. Between himself and the rest of his family, you could well be looking at an aggregate IQ in the triple digits.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @International Jew


    Between himself and the rest of his family, you could well be looking at an aggregate IQ in the triple digits.
     
    Key word "could".

    I saw some stats a few years back that college students in South Africa have an IQ in the mid-90s. That's the "elite".
    , @Moses
    @International Jew


    Between himself and the rest of his family, you could well be looking at an aggregate IQ in the triple digits.
     
    Yes. And monkeys could fly out of my butt. Could.

    Replies: @International Jew

  174. @mikeInThe716
    @Dr. X

    IIRC, the deceased white man was driving 100+ MPH on I-90 before the cops broke off the chase. Troopers tracked him to downtown Buffalo (the I-90 and 190 around Buffalo have good cameras) and attempted a stop.

    He tried dragging the trooper with his car. So he got shot. In the totality of the circumstances, the deceased was a public hazard. I have little sympathy for lunatic-level driving on public roads. I'm close to someone maimed by such a driver.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Dr. X

    “He tried dragging the trooper with his car. So he got shot. In the totality of the circumstances, the deceased was a public hazard. I have little sympathy for lunatic-level driving on public roads. I’m close to someone maimed by such a driver. ”

    The cop pulled his gun on the driver while the driver was sitting in the car. The cop then tried to pull the driver from the car with the same hand that was holding the gun. What in fuck was he thinking doing that?? Unforgivably stupid. The driver dragged the cop because the cop had leaned into the vehicle with his weapon pressed into the head of the driver. The driver’s intent was not to drag the cop, it was to flee.

    I am not defending the driver’s action prior to his interaction with the cop in the body cam. But that cop’s actions were moronic.

    So you know someone hurt by a reckless driver and that justifies the cops shooting every reckless driver from here on out? Wow, that’s good to know. Perhaps people who seek vicarious vengeance through excessive police force are more a threat to civilization than reckless drivers.

  175. @Achmed E. Newman
    All good points, Steve, and nice comprehensive take on it all. I still wish they'd been doing some of this when I was 25 years younger. One summer, I got pulled 3 times in one week! 2 were for about 15 mph over in town, but on nice wide, intersectionless roads, and one for rolling through a 4-way. Since I pulled into my own driveway on the latter one, the guy gave me a break.

    You can lay off the bicyclists. Is it just because you don't enjoy it? It's not the shape of our climate, it's the the shape of our butts. Every seen a woman bicyclist WITHOUT a very nice rear end? I thought not. Don't knock it.

    Replies: @Stealth

    Cyclists are a major pain in the ass to motorists, especially in big cities.

  176. @Jonathan Mason
    @AnotherDad

    Yes, but read the post by Anonymous below, where he says that in the UK he was stopped two times by the police when driving a beat-up car as a teenager in the small hours of the morning and then never stopped again by the police while driving for the next 40 years.

    I get the impression from what some people say that police in the US just use stopping cars for alleged motoring offenses as a pretext for checking out and harassing people who may or may not be criminals rather than in a sincere effort to make sure that all vehicles have working brake lights because brake lights that are out cause a lot of accidents in their communities.

    Yes, people who drive badly may be drunks, druggies, or criminals, but there should be many ways in which police can identify delinquents in their own communities.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    According to an Orlando Sentinel article in 2019 nearly 2 million out 16.6 million Florida drivers on a certain date had their driver's license suspended not for unsafe driving, but due to unpaid fines and fees, that are often totally unrelated to driving.

    https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/crime/os-ne-drivers-license-suspensions-report-20191219-xazyr2cdkff7xfljjvgkcz6tum-story.html

    This is absolutely incredible, and shows what a police state Florida is. (It is not like Florida has much public transportation that poor people can use as an alternative to driving.)

    I myself had my Florida driver's license suspended after I sold a car to a neighbor who said he was going to take it to Tennessee and register it there. Fortunately I was out of the country (he dropped me at the airport) and did not even find out about this until several months later, by which time he had actually registered the transaction in Florida, and I was able to pay a "fine" (for nothing) and have my license reinstated over the phone.

    I don't know if any other states are like this, but which political party is fighting to reform this overbearing state?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Art Deco, @AnotherDad, @additionalMike

    According to an Orlando Sentinel article

    Did it ever occur to you that reporters tend to be people who are articulate but not intelligent, who misread data tables even when they’re not being self-consciously dishonest?

  177. @Jonathan Mason
    There is a big difference between a random stop on somebody who turns out to be carrying a gun in their car which is not legal, which they perhaps carry all the time, and and actually stopping somebody on the way to commit a planned murder.

    What is the evidence that random traffic stops are actually successful in reducing the number of illegal guns and affecting the number of gun crimes that involved discharging the weapon or affecting the amount of illegal drugs circulating within a community?

    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.

    Of course there is nothing wrong with checking up on known people who are known to be on probation or out on parole for violations, which is one effective way to reduce crime.

    I don't have the answer to all these questions, but I would probably take the opinion of professional criminologists and law enforcement officials over the opinion of an amateur criminologist like Steve.

    One thing that doesn't help is that police forces are so fragmented within the United States, with many small police forces officiously policing interstate highways that pass through their counties. If they had the means they would probably policing aircraft overflying their airspace and shooting them down.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Jack D, @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    If somebody has a tail light out they could be sent a citation in the mail, just as if they were photographed speeding.

    Dogs, ghosts, registered mail…

  178. @HammerJack
    @AnotherDad

    Separate nations.
     
    Right, but since that's never going to happen, what's the Plan B?

    Replies: @Flip

    Whites will keep moving away from inner cities leaving the underclass behind. It is a big country and people will do more self-segregating. Hopefully a bankrupt Federal government won’t be as meddlesome in the future.

  179. @Jonathan Mason
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    We suspend their licenses because paying tolls is how we fund roads in a state with no income tax.
     
    My main point was that many people are having their driver license taken away for reasons that have nothing at all to do with being a safe person to drive a motor vehicle in a state that has very little in the way of public transportation alternatives.

    But since you raise the point about tolls, it is completely disproportionate to suspend someone's driver license over a 25 cents toll. And if the roads are funded by tolls then what is the point of having one eighth of the state's drivers supposedly not driving? Is this really cost effective?

    People often make mistakes and end up on toll roads by mistake, and perhaps they have no change.

    Once, several years ago, when I was driving away from Miami on I-275 I ended up completely by mistake on a toll road that seemed to lead to nowhere in particular. I actually paid the tolls, and eventually was able to make a U-Turn and go back and find my way onto I-275 and US 27.

    A few weeks later I got a letter in the mail about alleged unpaid tolls, and I wrote back to them and said that I had paid the tolls until I ran out of change, even though I had absolutely no intention of being on the road to nowhere. But I might well have never received the letter and my driver license might have been suspended without me ever knowing it, and then having to pay a shitload of money to get it back.

    It is all completely out of proportion to the supposed offense.

    Tell me in what other countries do people lose their driver license for non driving offenses?

    https://calmatters.org/justice/2021/01/california-drivers-licenses-traffic-ticket/

    More than three million traffic infraction citations are issued in California every year, averaging between $600 and $700 each.

    California has among the highest traffic ticket penalties in the country due to a litany of state and county add-on fees. A ticket for running a red light — which has a base fine of $100 — actually costs nearly $500 because of added state and local fees, and more than $800 if the driver misses a deadline to pay or appear in court.

    OK, admittedly deliberately running a red light is a extremely dangerous thing to do, that probably merits suspension of a driver license or imprisonment on a second offense, but one of the problems of having legislators who are made up mostly of rich people and lawyers is that they are completely out of touch with how much ordinary workers or students earn. So you can see that most likely many of the people who don't pay up don't pay because they cannot. They simply don't have the money. Probably many would prefer the option of a week in traffic jail and have the matter finished.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @mikeInThe716, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Jim Don Bob

    Is this why you are on the lam in Ecuador?

  180. @J.Ross
    OT -- coming confected food crisis -- first there was the purely ideological cutoff of American energy production, then farmers apparently ordered to dramatically lower production, then the loss of Ukrainian and Russian grain and fertilizer as a result of the war, and now a rail line is flat out rejecting business with a major fertilizer company, partly as a result of personnel issues.
    The fertilizer company itself:
    https://www.cfindustries.com/newsroom/2022/union-pacific-shipping-restrictions
    An alternative media site I've never heard of offering context:
    https://www.visiontimes.com/2022/04/16/us-rail-carriers-cut-fertilizer-shipments-union-wars.html

    Replies: @FPD72

    then farmers apparently ordered to dramatically lower production

    The USDA no longer limits production of grains. The only program that takes land out of production is CRP, which pays farmers to set aside highly erodible land. We used to have about ten acres in that program but it paid less and incurred higher expenses than our pasture land so we withdrew from the program. I know there are some programs for a few specialty crops such as oranges that set production quotas but they have a minimal impact on American food production.

    There are no production limits on the wheat, milo, soybeans, and corn that are grown on our place nor for livestock on our pasture. What is impacting farmers are increased input costs for fuel and fertilizer. In some cases these increases might cause farmers to remove marginal land from production but from what I can tell the increase in commodity prices makes up for increased costs. For example, last year we sold wheat for \$5.64 a bushel. Today the price is around \$9.50. But we’ve also had very little rain so far this year so our yield might be extremely low, if any. Plus, the price might drop precipitously between now and harvest.

    If you know of government imposed limits on major food sources, please provide links or citations.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @FPD72

    If you know of government imposed limits on major food sources ..

    EBT is one, big handout to Big [junk] Food; from there, it trickles down to Big Ag. Higher prices at the checkout stand work the same as production limits.

    Farm price supports distort production. Favoritism for some commodities necessarily works to limit supplies of others.

    , @J.Ross
    @FPD72

    Before the recent Ukrainian madness hit its latest high there was a spate of twitter videos from people claiming to be farmers, complaining both of dramatic increases in input costs but also government orders to destroy materials and some sort of program incentivizing non-production. The government can effectively limit production everywhere it subsidizes by telling farmers it will not subsidize past a certain amount. The farmer would then be free to just produce anyway but would not be able to count on government help, which many would not be able to do.

  181. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Reg Cæsar

    This as well, but I think the tar load on your lungs is a lot lower than cigarettes because you just can't smoke the same quantity.

    BTW, what's the verdict on CBD oil? Asking for a friend.

    Replies: @thenon, @Reg Cæsar

    Chewing weed with a little peanut butter works wonders on the PTSD and anxiety produced by excessive reading of right wing foaming-at-the-mouth paranoid blogs, but CBD oil either doesn’t work, or gets me depressed. For best results, a small amount of Mexican black tar heroin laced with fentanyl injected into vein of your choice on the genitals.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @thenon

    Caffeine an' sugar an' THC's all the doctors are gonna find
    In me when they do the autopsy,
    The microorganism won't get me.

    https://youtu.be/D1nrfhpg0xo?t=59

  182. @vinteuil
    @AnotherDad


    A civilized society stays a civilized society by civilized men enforcing their rules upon the uncivilized men–and punishing, killing or expelling them when they break those rules.
     
    Well, yeah, sure - but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that's exactly what the left thinks they're doing. They're punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

    Replies: @Herbert R. Tarlek, Jr., @AnotherDad

    Well, yeah, sure – but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that’s exactly what the left thinks they’re doing. They’re punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

    Exactly. You have just made my case for separate nations.

    This is the point i keep hammering on: There can only be one set of public norms.

    Fundamentally the people in a community must agree on what the public norms are. When they fundamentally do not agree, then they should not be sharing the same community, same nation.

    Yes, you can have regional variation on tractable issues. Here we close the bars on Sunday, here we do not. Here the schools are segregated, here they are not. Here you can smoke dope, here you can not. Even, here we speak English, here we speak French. This is what federalism/local control/autonomy can give you. As long as people agree on the scope of variation.

    But
    A) Americans and the minoritarians fundamentally disagree on what the public norms should be.

    And

    B) minoritarians are totalitarian.
    “Diversity is our greatest strength”, does not mean leaving people alone to sort out the sort of community laws/norms they want. Minoritarianism demands that the nation’s majority (really the motivation/target has always been white gentiles) must be insulted and badgered and the busy-body state must extend its reach into every nook and cranny of private life to ferret out and harass traditionalist dissenters, not with the program.

    Minoritarianism is not a “different strokes for different folks” ideology. It’s basically a Jewish middle-man ideology of destroying the right of gentiles to have their own organic nations and govern themselves in their own communities, which dovetails beautifully with the natural tendency of the state apparatus to accrete power and grow, and the ideology of modern finance/business to level the world and hence has become dreadfully, terrifyingly powerful.

    Separation–saying “No, we are not your serfs. You can busybody yourselves, but we demand the right to governing ourselves in our nations” and fighting till we get it–is the only answer.

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @AnotherDad


    minoritarians are totalitarian.
     
    Yes.

    Minoritarianism is not a “different strokes for different folks” ideology. It’s basically a Jewish middle-man ideology of destroying the right of gentiles to have their own organic nation
     
    No, can't go there.
    , @Travis
    @AnotherDad

    it is not just Jews who are minoritarians. Of the ~180 million white gentile Americans, half are female. Most females are minoritarians and a significant number of white male gentiles are minoritarians (not just the queers, but many white progressives fully support minoritarian ideaology) A minority of whites oppose Minoritarianism. And even the 40% of whites who oppose Minoritarianism do not want separate nations. Maybe 10% of whites would support a separate white nation in the abstract while 70% would actively oppose a white nation-state.

    I agree that separate nations would be great. The greatest potential for a separate nation would be in the state of Maine. Since Maine is already 95% white and has plenty of space and a coast with a port. Maine is the best location of a future white state in America. While half the whites in Maine voted for Biden, the population is very small. Just 357,000 people voted for Hillary in 2016 and 435,000 voted for Biden in 2020 while trump received 360,000 votes in 2020. If 100,000 white nationalists relocated to Maine they would have the power to elect a white nationalist governor and white nationalists mayors , school boards etc...

    No other state offers the same potential. . How many White nationalists would relocate to Maine in order to build a white state with white rule and white culture ? How many White nationalists are there in America ? 200,000 ? The first step in creating a separate nation for whites would entail like-minded whites to relocate to a state like Maine where they could build a white state without the interference of non-whites. A separate nation would need to start in Maine. No other state offers the same potential.

  183. @Bardon Kaldlan
    Dude,another mass shooting,this one at a mall in SC. Lots of wounded. Blacketty strikes again?

    Replies: @JimDandy, @AceDeuce

    Dude,another mass shooting,this one at a mall in SC.

    Turns out it was the work of three Whites.

    Leroy White
    Trayvon White
    Sc’oobidoobius White

    /s

  184. @Alden
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    In California the fines are so costly it’s absolutely ridiculous. And about half the population is on welfare. So the custom is just show up in court tell the judge you’re poor and he or she orders you to pay what you can afford. Go down the hall to room whatever and pay what you can.

    The cities and counties would get a lot more revenue if the traffic and parking fines were reasonable. Like $25. But for a lot of people if it’s a choice between $145 for a parking or traffic fine or the gas and electric bill it’s the gas and electric bill they pay. Or the money goes towards the rent. More people can afford the $25 fine than can afford the $75 parking fine.

    More and more city dwellers are going the UBER route. All the convenience of a car without the expense and searching for a place to park. And paying to park at work. And when you have a Dr accountant whatever appointment. And when going to a movie or out for an evening. Or having to park 8 or 9 blocks from home.

    Until about 1960 many city dwellers didn’t have cars. Buses and subways were safe. And at least the subways were faster.

    Stores, including grocery delivered. Even pharmacies delivered little bottles of medicine. And there were plenty of cabs all over. Either call, wave one down or walk down to the corner where they waited. There were always cabs at the subway stops too. Nice in winter or in the rain.

    Now everything can be delivered. Amazon has the most ordinary little drug and hardware store items. Grocery stores deliver. CVS really wants to deliver meds instead of hiring clerks.

    The big problem of raising kids in cities instead of suburbs was the blacks on public transit. Stay at home Moms maids and drivers are expensive. So parents get the kids the UBER and LYFT accounts. Safety of a car freedom of public transit for the kids.

    For city people, there’s a real return to the good old days when they didn’t need a car because of deliveries and cabs.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Colin Wright

    It’s pretty hilarious when you think about it. Amazon, Uber, Lyft, Zoom: hundreds of billions of dollars of capital–software, buildings, vehicles, IP, finance–to facilitate white withdrawal from increasingly Vibrant and Diverse public spaces. Actually it’s not funny at all.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  185. @J.Ross
    @Justpassingby

    The little styrofoam tree hanging from the rear view mirror. Presumably argued to be blocking visibility.

    Replies: @Justpassingby

    Thanks for the info.

  186. @scrivener3
    @Justpassingby

    A little green tree shaped felt soaked in new car smell hanging from your rear view mirror.

    Most places illegal to hang anything from the rear view mirror, Blocks the view forward somewhat. Easily seen from outside the car to justify a stop.

    Replies: @Justpassingby, @mmack

    Thanks for the info.

  187. @Jonathan Mason
    @AnotherDad

    Yes, but read the post by Anonymous below, where he says that in the UK he was stopped two times by the police when driving a beat-up car as a teenager in the small hours of the morning and then never stopped again by the police while driving for the next 40 years.

    I get the impression from what some people say that police in the US just use stopping cars for alleged motoring offenses as a pretext for checking out and harassing people who may or may not be criminals rather than in a sincere effort to make sure that all vehicles have working brake lights because brake lights that are out cause a lot of accidents in their communities.

    Yes, people who drive badly may be drunks, druggies, or criminals, but there should be many ways in which police can identify delinquents in their own communities.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    According to an Orlando Sentinel article in 2019 nearly 2 million out 16.6 million Florida drivers on a certain date had their driver's license suspended not for unsafe driving, but due to unpaid fines and fees, that are often totally unrelated to driving.

    https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/crime/os-ne-drivers-license-suspensions-report-20191219-xazyr2cdkff7xfljjvgkcz6tum-story.html

    This is absolutely incredible, and shows what a police state Florida is. (It is not like Florida has much public transportation that poor people can use as an alternative to driving.)

    I myself had my Florida driver's license suspended after I sold a car to a neighbor who said he was going to take it to Tennessee and register it there. Fortunately I was out of the country (he dropped me at the airport) and did not even find out about this until several months later, by which time he had actually registered the transaction in Florida, and I was able to pay a "fine" (for nothing) and have my license reinstated over the phone.

    I don't know if any other states are like this, but which political party is fighting to reform this overbearing state?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Art Deco, @AnotherDad, @additionalMike

    Mason, you manage to froth up over nothings.

    The whole driving/roadway system–with/where
    — big public infrastructure (ergo spending)
    — a bunch of rules of the road
    — some level of visual/mechanical skill required
    — people smash their cars into each other

    obviously requires a bunch of rules and enforcement and penalties. Believe it or not, I do not want people who are incapable, or have an improperly functioning vehicle or keep breaking the traffic laws or–especially–keep having accidents, or are not insured or even do not pay their share out on the highways with me.

    And yes that means they’ll be people who are afoul of the system. And, of course, it will be people who are generally less capable of navigating life–for the obvious genetic/cultural reasons. And ergo will tend to be poor. And yes, some “deserving poor” who are competent drivers are caught up in that. There should probably be reforms to simplify the process, make them less likely to become ensnared and help them–give ’em a path–drive even if behind on fines and tolls. But there are always “reforms” that would be desirable. That’s the nature of bureaucracy. Heck it’s the nature of life.

    I’ve bought two now, but have not sold a car in Florida yet, so i don’t know the precise rules. But based on other states it sounds like you screwed up–did not do your part of the transaction of sending in your title to the state with the paperwork saying “hey this car isn’t mine anymore i sold it to dickhead”. And you ended up paying a fine for screwing up–BFD.

    That’s not a “police state”. Geez act like a grown up.

    ~~

    BTW, Florida this past couple of years has been the least “police statey” state in the nation.

    There was a bit of b.s. at the beginning. But then DeSantis quickly got the hang of it and restored sanity. AnotherMom and I have lived and breathed free.

    I was remarking to some of the neighbor’s friends at a get together back in 2020–and to other friends and neighbors over the past couple years–that i’ve never gotten as big a direct “bang for the buck” as our votes for DeSantis in 2018. Holy cow!

  188. @Hypnotoad666
    @clifford brown

    The cop obviously made a mistake by shooting him in the head (could he have made the mistake of thinking he was still holding his taser?). But up till then the perp/victim was 100% in the wrong. He appeared to be either high, retarded, or so fresh off the boat and unable to speak English that he had no clue about how a traffic stop works.

    Also, having the wrong license plates on your car is hardly a ticky tack violation. It means the car is likely stolen or will be/has been used in a crime.

    Replies: @JimDandy, @Almost Missouri, @possumman, @Ben tillman

    Yes, your last paragraph is absolutely correct.

  189. @John Milton’s Ghost
    @Gordo

    There’s an idea. BLM license plates. I put one on my car and I’ll never get pulled over

    Replies: @thenon

  190. @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Ghost of Bull Moose


    The extremely retarded concept of disparate impact is behind all of this. The idea that blacks commit a lot of crime because people think they commit a lot of crime.
     
    I think their contention is that everyone commits crime at the levels that blacks do, it's just that blacks receive greater scrutiny from police and therefore get caught much more frequently than whites (and everybody else) leading to this negative perception and a disproportionate burden of criminal punishment on them.

    One thing they point to in support of this is that in polls (of questionable value) whites and blacks report similar levels of marijuana use, but blacks are charged with possession at much higher rates. Of course this elides the fact that there is a difference between smoking marijuana in one's home, and walking down Market Street with a lit joint on a weekday afternoon. Add to this the fact that if you possess drugs while committing other crimes, you're more likely to be caught with drugs by law enforcement authorities and then charged for drug possession (together with the other charges).

    The one thing they can't fake or obscure is dead bodies with holes in them, so their contention is patent nonsense but nevertheless they persist.

    Replies: @Justvisiting

    “One thing they point to in support of this is that in polls (of questionable value) whites and blacks report similar levels of marijuana use, but blacks are charged with possession at much higher rates.”

    One of my vices is watching reruns of “Cops”–which shows lots of traffic stops of all kinds.

    If you watch enough episodes the mystery is solved.

    Blacks are more likely to have other drugs (especially crack) in their possession as well as marijuana. In addition, blacks stopped with marijuana only are more likely to have no or expired drivers licenses and expired or non-existent license plates. Cops are more likely to “throw in” the marijuana charge in those cases–if everything else is good they are more likely to let someone with a little marijuana off with a warning or ticket.

    My guess is that these dual drug arrests that include marijuana are included as “marijuana arrests” while tickets for minor possession are not included.

    • Replies: @CCZ
    @Justvisiting

    But what happens when the police are smoking the weed???? New "Community Relations" program????

    https://twitter.com/Raw_News1st/status/1516893562469765121

  191. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jack P

    Blue laws are bad theology; Sunday is a feast day.

    I wonder if the bigger problem looming out there is heavy marijuana usage turning people into zombies or schizos, depending on their genetics.

    No idea if marijuana is good, bad or neutral. It's zero calorie and a lot less strain on your liver than alcohol but I wonder about the long-term effect on your brain. I wonder about it, because everyone seems so determined not to ask. It's just reflexively assumed that marijuana should be legalized.

    My instinct is to junk all controlled substance laws, but that's not really a good idea when you have a welfare state. And de facto decriminalization does not seem to be working out well for Charles Murray's Fishtown side of the distribution.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad, @Justvisiting

    “No idea if marijuana is good, bad or neutral.”

    The correct answer, imho, is all of the above.

    Studies so far suggest that it is good for mitigating some physical and mental ailments while it harms the brain cells of fetuses, infants and young people.

    It should not be used when driving.

    Further muddying the waters is that some of the ingredients have different effects which are just beginning to be studied.

    Good luck getting a reasonable public policy out of that mess.

  192. @HammerJack
    https://i.ibb.co/sg22cQq/Screenshot-20220416-222646-Firefox.jpg

    Why do the MSM always use photos of white cops when they're trying to demonstrate Sailer's Law?

    That is what they're trying to do, isn't it?

    Or is that what the gunmen were doing.

    Replies: @Blodgie

    Why are those cops dressed and armed like they are ready to lay siege to Fallujah?

    That’s what the Thin Blue Line means.

    It’s the good guys, the cops, against everyone else and that is how they operate.

    They even had the balls to create their own battle flag to show everyone where they stand.

    Most conservatives support this shit 100%.

  193. @Jonathan Mason
    @AnotherDad

    Yes, but read the post by Anonymous below, where he says that in the UK he was stopped two times by the police when driving a beat-up car as a teenager in the small hours of the morning and then never stopped again by the police while driving for the next 40 years.

    I get the impression from what some people say that police in the US just use stopping cars for alleged motoring offenses as a pretext for checking out and harassing people who may or may not be criminals rather than in a sincere effort to make sure that all vehicles have working brake lights because brake lights that are out cause a lot of accidents in their communities.

    Yes, people who drive badly may be drunks, druggies, or criminals, but there should be many ways in which police can identify delinquents in their own communities.

    In the US they even have police officers in schools just to get the kids used to the idea that they live in a police state.

    According to an Orlando Sentinel article in 2019 nearly 2 million out 16.6 million Florida drivers on a certain date had their driver's license suspended not for unsafe driving, but due to unpaid fines and fees, that are often totally unrelated to driving.

    https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/crime/os-ne-drivers-license-suspensions-report-20191219-xazyr2cdkff7xfljjvgkcz6tum-story.html

    This is absolutely incredible, and shows what a police state Florida is. (It is not like Florida has much public transportation that poor people can use as an alternative to driving.)

    I myself had my Florida driver's license suspended after I sold a car to a neighbor who said he was going to take it to Tennessee and register it there. Fortunately I was out of the country (he dropped me at the airport) and did not even find out about this until several months later, by which time he had actually registered the transaction in Florida, and I was able to pay a "fine" (for nothing) and have my license reinstated over the phone.

    I don't know if any other states are like this, but which political party is fighting to reform this overbearing state?

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Art Deco, @AnotherDad, @additionalMike

    Mr. Mason, police are present in schools in NY state also. It is to prevent the students (many of whom do not belong in school), from killing the teachers, and each other.
    This true even of suburban schools, due in part to our wonderful diversity, and the rise of murderous ethnic gangs (see e.g. the “MS-13”) in Long Island’s Suffolk County.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @additionalMike

    police are present in schools in NY state also.

    I don't see why kids can't sign up to play on the JV police team.

    School cops are paid with the tax dollars. (Whatever their inflated bill rate, it's more than private security would charge.)

    If a school district contracts with the sheriff, that's an example of the sort of money spent on education that doesn't get counted in the oft-quoted, per-warm body statistics.

    If the financial burden of cops who are assigned to a school are borne by the public safety budget, that's an example of how money spent on schools gets buried in the budgets of other agencies.

  194. @International Jew
    @Almost Missouri

    He might not have been a retard at all but the lingua franca in Congo is French. If he had the means to get to the US, he could have been from what passes as the elite level in Congo, with a solid education — but in French. Between himself and the rest of his family, you could well be looking at an aggregate IQ in the triple digits.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Moses

    Between himself and the rest of his family, you could well be looking at an aggregate IQ in the triple digits.

    Key word “could”.

    I saw some stats a few years back that college students in South Africa have an IQ in the mid-90s. That’s the “elite”.

  195. @Dr. X

    The latest example is the death in Grand Rapids, Mich., of Patrick Lyoya, an unarmed 26-year-old Black man who was pulled over for a mismatched license plate and, after a brief struggle, was apparently shot in the head from behind
     
    Oh, really? "Latest example"? Somehow the NYT -- and the entire national media -- failed to mention that the cops shot to death an unarmed white man from Pennsylvania who was on his way to the Canadian trucker protest two months ago:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BZA2NMn6Yo

    Replies: @Elli, @HammerJack, @animalogic

    This is the problem with traffic stops for trivial matters (yes the definition of “trivial “is key here).
    Any contact with police, whatever your race is fraught with… possible “problems”.
    US police do have a “shoot first etc etc” attitude. ( I recall the Australian (white) woman who tried to do her civic duty to report a potential rape, only to be shot dead by the police as she approached the police car dressed in a nighty, I believe)
    So, I at least think there’s room to discuss what is a “trival” traffic offence & how the police should react to it.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @animalogic

    That guy was not (yet) a typical American cop.

    , @J.Ross
    @animalogic

    Terrible illustration, that guy was a worst-case affirmative action hire Somali. He shot her before anyone knew anything, as soon as he saw her, through a window, and across his partner's face.

  196. @International Jew
    @Almost Missouri

    He might not have been a retard at all but the lingua franca in Congo is French. If he had the means to get to the US, he could have been from what passes as the elite level in Congo, with a solid education — but in French. Between himself and the rest of his family, you could well be looking at an aggregate IQ in the triple digits.

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Moses

    Between himself and the rest of his family, you could well be looking at an aggregate IQ in the triple digits.

    Yes. And monkeys could fly out of my butt. Could.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Moses

    I said aggregate. Look it up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Moses

  197. @Achmed E. Newman
    @HammerJack

    Since you mentioned the Corvette, a guy who had one of those but previously the same model as me, told me that cops did NOT pick on him in the Vette nearly as much. His opinion was that they figure you have to have money to own the Vette, but the one I drove (and he previously) was one lots of irresponsible young men owned. (I never hit a thing with mine... well nothing moving.)

    I'm not gonna' say which model, but it is surely not Italian. That would not be me.

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    Ah, you had either the Triumph TR-6 or the MGB-GT. Sporty, but notoriously unreliable; for those too impecunious to afford a Jaguar E-Type (which, for years, had its own well-documented electrical problems, requiring its owner to have a second car for those times the Jag was “in the shop”).

    Alternative guess: the Austin Healey Sprite, similarly English, with similar difficulties. In Jay McInerney’s Bright Lights, Big City, there’s a reference to an Austin Healey the protagonist “bought with a junkyard under the hood.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Gary in Gramercy

    The little British sports cars were notoriously unreliable (especially the electricals) and not very powerful (little 4 cyl. tractor engines under the hood) but they were fun to drive - you weren't ACTUALLY going very fast but it FELT like you were going fast.

    The Mazda Miata was disappointing because its execution was too perfect. The fact that it would start every time took the adventure out of each trip. It was like that Swiss mountains where you can take an train thru a tunnel and an elevator to the summit - it turns the challenge of a lifetime into a boring subway ride.

    Replies: @mmack, @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

  198. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Ah, you had either the Triumph TR-6 or the MGB-GT. Sporty, but notoriously unreliable; for those too impecunious to afford a Jaguar E-Type (which, for years, had its own well-documented electrical problems, requiring its owner to have a second car for those times the Jag was "in the shop").

    Alternative guess: the Austin Healey Sprite, similarly English, with similar difficulties. In Jay McInerney's Bright Lights, Big City, there's a reference to an Austin Healey the protagonist "bought with a junkyard under the hood."

    Replies: @Jack D

    The little British sports cars were notoriously unreliable (especially the electricals) and not very powerful (little 4 cyl. tractor engines under the hood) but they were fun to drive – you weren’t ACTUALLY going very fast but it FELT like you were going fast.

    The Mazda Miata was disappointing because its execution was too perfect. The fact that it would start every time took the adventure out of each trip. It was like that Swiss mountains where you can take an train thru a tunnel and an elevator to the summit – it turns the challenge of a lifetime into a boring subway ride.

    • Replies: @mmack
    @Jack D

    Yesterday I went to a model show that had displays of all manor of airplanes, ships, tanks, and cars. One model was a beautiful MGB roadster detailed in accurate MG colors and placed over a mirror to show the work the builder had put into the model, topside and bottom. The builder was standing next to me and I opined the car was nearly perfect. He asked why it was nearly perfect and I told him it was missing a little pool of oil underneath the engine.

    Even he laughed. 😁

    I had two high school classmates who had MGBs when they were in school with me. They took the bus or rode in friend's cars a lot. A LOT.

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D


    but they were fun to drive – you weren’t ACTUALLY going very fast but it FELT like you were going fast.
     
    What is your favorite model of car (or models)?
    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    The little British sports cars were notoriously unreliable (especially the electricals) and not very powerful (little 4 cyl. tractor engines under the hood) but they were fun to drive...

    The Mazda Miata was disappointing because its execution was too perfect. The fact that it would start every time took the adventure out of each trip.
     
    https://youtu.be/78b67l_yxUc

    Replies: @Jack D

  199. Mr. D, I have never before heard anyone sound nostalgic about Lucas (“The Prince of Darkness”) electronics.

  200. @michael droy
    It's crack. Not guns.
    Get caught with cocaine and no one cares - it isn't worth the effort to bust someone.
    Caught with crack, perhaps not the first time, and it could be a long enough stretch to justify pulling a handgun out of the glove compartment and taking your chances.

    That is why Black drivers freak out, that is why all Cops are terrified when they stop a black guy.

    Do the smart thing - make crack and cocaine equal in law. Pretty soon you'll have just as many white guys killed by cops as black.!!

    Replies: @E. Rekshun

    Pretty soon you’ll have just as many white guys killed by cops as black.!!

    Actually, more Whites than blacks are killed by cops each year. I’m too lazy to google the sources, but they’re easy to find.

  201. @International Jew
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never served on a jury and I'm Steve's age. I've been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Known Fact, @The Real World, @Alden, @Anon, @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Anon, @Ben tillman

    I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals.

    I’m definitely stealing this line for when I next get called for jury duty.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anon



    I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals.
     
    I’m definitely stealing this line for when I next get called for jury duty.
     
    How is the law biased in favor of black criminals?
  202. @International Jew
    @Coemgen


    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?
     
    I've never served on a jury and I'm Steve's age. I've been called to a half dozen jury selections over the years but I always get preemptively challenged (or whatever the term is). The best one was when the judge asked me if I thought the criminal justice system was biased against blacks (it was a criminal trial for some huge thug) and (this was Alameda Cty, CA) I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals. I went home feeling pretty good about myself and grateful to that judge for having given me the opportunity to make that public service announcement in front of a pretty big crowd.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Known Fact, @The Real World, @Alden, @Anon, @RonaldReagansLoveChildWithMadonna2, @Anon, @Ben tillman

    When I lived in Georgia 30 years ago, the state did not require vehicle inspections.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Ben tillman


    When I lived in Georgia 30 years ago, the state did not require vehicle inspections.
     
    So that explains it.


    https://youtu.be/SnIH51niqCY
  203. @scrivener3
    @Justpassingby

    A little green tree shaped felt soaked in new car smell hanging from your rear view mirror.

    Most places illegal to hang anything from the rear view mirror, Blocks the view forward somewhat. Easily seen from outside the car to justify a stop.

    Replies: @Justpassingby, @mmack

    “Most places illegal to hang anything from the rear view mirror, Blocks the view forward somewhat. Easily seen from outside the car to justify a stop.”

    Not ranting at you, but that’s just the sort of BS excuse coppers use to pull a traffic shakedown.

    Hey Officer Dunkin’ Donuts, you know what REALLY obscures my view? The FEDERALLY MANDATED air bag jammed into the A-Pillar (the sheet metal that supports the edges of the windshield and the roof on passenger vehicles) of both cars I drive that makes that pillar about as thick as my arm, and that HAS caused me to miss seeing pedestrians standing in its visual shadow.

    But no, goodness forbid you have a little evergreen tree or rosary beads hanging from your rear view mirror. 🙄

  204. @Jack D
    @Gary in Gramercy

    The little British sports cars were notoriously unreliable (especially the electricals) and not very powerful (little 4 cyl. tractor engines under the hood) but they were fun to drive - you weren't ACTUALLY going very fast but it FELT like you were going fast.

    The Mazda Miata was disappointing because its execution was too perfect. The fact that it would start every time took the adventure out of each trip. It was like that Swiss mountains where you can take an train thru a tunnel and an elevator to the summit - it turns the challenge of a lifetime into a boring subway ride.

    Replies: @mmack, @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    Yesterday I went to a model show that had displays of all manor of airplanes, ships, tanks, and cars. One model was a beautiful MGB roadster detailed in accurate MG colors and placed over a mirror to show the work the builder had put into the model, topside and bottom. The builder was standing next to me and I opined the car was nearly perfect. He asked why it was nearly perfect and I told him it was missing a little pool of oil underneath the engine.

    Even he laughed. 😁

    I had two high school classmates who had MGBs when they were in school with me. They took the bus or rode in friend’s cars a lot. A LOT.

  205. @animalogic
    @Dr. X

    This is the problem with traffic stops for trivial matters (yes the definition of "trivial "is key here).
    Any contact with police, whatever your race is fraught with... possible "problems".
    US police do have a "shoot first etc etc" attitude. ( I recall the Australian (white) woman who tried to do her civic duty to report a potential rape, only to be shot dead by the police as she approached the police car dressed in a nighty, I believe)
    So, I at least think there's room to discuss what is a "trival" traffic offence & how the police should react to it.

    Replies: @International Jew, @J.Ross

    That guy was not (yet) a typical American cop.

  206. @mikeInThe716
    @Dr. X

    IIRC, the deceased white man was driving 100+ MPH on I-90 before the cops broke off the chase. Troopers tracked him to downtown Buffalo (the I-90 and 190 around Buffalo have good cameras) and attempted a stop.

    He tried dragging the trooper with his car. So he got shot. In the totality of the circumstances, the deceased was a public hazard. I have little sympathy for lunatic-level driving on public roads. I'm close to someone maimed by such a driver.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @Dr. X

    He tried dragging the trooper with his car.

    Bullshit. He threw it in reverse and the cop jumped backwards. There was no dragging in the video. The cop executed him for defying authority.

  207. @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    You're not under any oath or obligation of any kind at that point. At least in California you're not.

    Now the best jury-selection scene I ever saw was some years earlier in Federal District Court (across the bay in San Francisco). It was for the trial of a Chinese gang accused of shaking down some brothels. To the judge's question of "Would you be able to give the accused a fair hearing?" (or whatever they ask you) the prospective juror said, "I'm familiar with the Wah-Ching [or whatever it was called] gang and have personally been victimized by it."

    (I was excused a little later myself, but for nothing worth relating here.)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Now the best jury-selection scene I ever saw was some years earlier in Federal District Court (across the bay in San Francisco).

    A notable case at SCOTUS was Hoyt v Florida (1961). Gwendolyn Hoyt argued that her murder trial was unconstitutional because her jury was all-male. But why was it all male?

    Because Florida law then chose female jurors from a volunteer pool. The general pool in Hillsborough County was 1% female. There had been a vigorous drive to attract volunteers in next-door Pinellas County. It was quite a success. Their jury pool reached 4%.

    That was under an opt-in system. Other states used an opt-out method. Women were called, but got out with a simple “Nah.” No trickery necessary! SCOTUS ended both in two separate cases in the 1970s. The notorious RBG was involved in the first and argued the second.

  208. @Coemgen
    I received my umpteenth notice today that my scheduled jury duty has been cancelled.

    I've been a registered voter since 1980.

    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?

    I just can't help wondering if I've been pre-profiled as someone who will not be influenced by a manipulative lawyer—thus I'm immediately disqualified. for service as a juror.

    Or, is it just coincidence that my public service has never been needed in over forty years?

    Replies: @anonymous, @ScarletNumber, @International Jew, @SafeNow, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby

    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?

    I’ve never even been called. I vaguely remember getting a notice that I was on the list of those who were about to be called. Didn’t happen, though.

  209. @Ben tillman
    @International Jew

    When I lived in Georgia 30 years ago, the state did not require vehicle inspections.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    When I lived in Georgia 30 years ago, the state did not require vehicle inspections.

    So that explains it.

  210. @Colin Wright
    @Jonathan Mason

    '...My main point was that many people are having their driver license taken away for reasons that have nothing at all to do with being a safe person...

    Leaving aside the equity or lack thereof of traffic fines and such, you really have to be pretty damned determined to actually lose your license.

    I've been there. Long -- and at points fairly comic -- story, but you get plenty of chances. You really do. When you've got a court date, show up. If you can't pay, explain why. STOP GETTING TICKETS.

    It's really not all that hard.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Leaving aside the equity or lack thereof of traffic fines and such, you really have to be pretty damned determined to actually lose your license.

    It seems improbable to me that 1 in 8 Florida drivers have gone out of their way to toss their driver license in a state that has fuck all public transportation other than school buses and which could legitimately be nicknamed the Parking Lot State.

    But if there is actually such a large segment of the population that is not fit to drive, then the state has done a hopeless job in providing alternatives for them. Yes, there is Uber, but I once checked out the price of a 45 minute drive by Uber and it was more than \$50, and many people in Florida have a 30 minutes each way commute to work.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    a state that has 🏒-all public transportation
     
    I have a dim memory of a Miami Beach city bus going by about 50 years ago. The fumes were delicious. I think Detroit's were similar. The only buses I would have been familiar with were in Nassau County and Honolulu, neither of which evoke olfactory recall. Clearly bus engines and their exhaust varied widely at the time.


    Never mind "colorization". Bring back the aromas!


    https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8466/8137537474_a9d59b6606_z.jpg

    Replies: @fish

    , @Colin Wright
    @Jonathan Mason

    'It seems improbable to me that 1 in 8 Florida drivers have gone out of their way to toss their driver license in a state that has fuck all public transportation other than school buses and which could legitimately be nicknamed the Parking Lot State...'

    You would seem to have a somewhat optimistic view of the bottom 12.5% of the human race.

    Particularly, considering what proportion of that 12.5% in Florida would be black, nothing about it strikes me as improbable in the least.

    Have you ever had any contact with these folks? I won't speak of a 'thought process.' Do you have any conception of what their perceptions, reactions, and behavior are like?

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans, @Hangnail Hans

  211. @FPD72
    @J.Ross


    then farmers apparently ordered to dramatically lower production
     
    The USDA no longer limits production of grains. The only program that takes land out of production is CRP, which pays farmers to set aside highly erodible land. We used to have about ten acres in that program but it paid less and incurred higher expenses than our pasture land so we withdrew from the program. I know there are some programs for a few specialty crops such as oranges that set production quotas but they have a minimal impact on American food production.

    There are no production limits on the wheat, milo, soybeans, and corn that are grown on our place nor for livestock on our pasture. What is impacting farmers are increased input costs for fuel and fertilizer. In some cases these increases might cause farmers to remove marginal land from production but from what I can tell the increase in commodity prices makes up for increased costs. For example, last year we sold wheat for $5.64 a bushel. Today the price is around $9.50. But we’ve also had very little rain so far this year so our yield might be extremely low, if any. Plus, the price might drop precipitously between now and harvest.

    If you know of government imposed limits on major food sources, please provide links or citations.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @J.Ross

    If you know of government imposed limits on major food sources ..

    EBT is one, big handout to Big [junk] Food; from there, it trickles down to Big Ag. Higher prices at the checkout stand work the same as production limits.

    Farm price supports distort production. Favoritism for some commodities necessarily works to limit supplies of others.

  212. @Alden
    @Anon

    Fentanyl isn’t in prescription drugs scaled to adult or anyone’s weights. It’s only legally used by injection right before surgeries. When the nurse gives you a shot and tells you to count to 10 and you’re out by the time you get to 7.

    It’s only used in illegal drugs. Legally, it’s only in liquid form and only in pre operation medical cabinets. All the powder form fentanyl killing Americans comes from China in those big container ships.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    It (Fentanyl) is only used in illegal drugs. Legally, it’s only in liquid form and only in pre operation medical cabinets.

    You really should not believe everything you hear in the ladies barber shop!

    Fentanyl is used mainly for treatment of severe pain in terminal cancer patients and comes in the form of transdermal patches that are attached to the skin, or transmucosal lozenges that are sucked like popsicles. These should be kept well away from grandchildren.

    They may also be used on the battlefield by the military and has been since the 1990s. The UK military have opted for the 400 µg dose, but the US forces use an 800 µg dose. I guess they have greater tolerance for opiates.

    Injected Fentanyl is sometimes combined with anesthesia for surgery because it helps to lower the amount of of anesthetic necessary and to suppress coughing when the patient has an artificial airway introduced. However it can also suppress breathing.

    It is also used postoperatively as the drug can also be given with a PCA (patient controlled analgesia) pump, where the patient presses a button to have a small dose of pain medication delivered through their IV line. Obviously the solution is very dilute.

  213. @thenon
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Chewing weed with a little peanut butter works wonders on the PTSD and anxiety produced by excessive reading of right wing foaming-at-the-mouth paranoid blogs, but CBD oil either doesn't work, or gets me depressed. For best results, a small amount of Mexican black tar heroin laced with fentanyl injected into vein of your choice on the genitals.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Caffeine an’ sugar an’ THC’s all the doctors are gonna find
    In me when they do the autopsy,
    The microorganism won’t get me.

  214. @FPD72
    @J.Ross


    then farmers apparently ordered to dramatically lower production
     
    The USDA no longer limits production of grains. The only program that takes land out of production is CRP, which pays farmers to set aside highly erodible land. We used to have about ten acres in that program but it paid less and incurred higher expenses than our pasture land so we withdrew from the program. I know there are some programs for a few specialty crops such as oranges that set production quotas but they have a minimal impact on American food production.

    There are no production limits on the wheat, milo, soybeans, and corn that are grown on our place nor for livestock on our pasture. What is impacting farmers are increased input costs for fuel and fertilizer. In some cases these increases might cause farmers to remove marginal land from production but from what I can tell the increase in commodity prices makes up for increased costs. For example, last year we sold wheat for $5.64 a bushel. Today the price is around $9.50. But we’ve also had very little rain so far this year so our yield might be extremely low, if any. Plus, the price might drop precipitously between now and harvest.

    If you know of government imposed limits on major food sources, please provide links or citations.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education, @J.Ross

    Before the recent Ukrainian madness hit its latest high there was a spate of twitter videos from people claiming to be farmers, complaining both of dramatic increases in input costs but also government orders to destroy materials and some sort of program incentivizing non-production. The government can effectively limit production everywhere it subsidizes by telling farmers it will not subsidize past a certain amount. The farmer would then be free to just produce anyway but would not be able to count on government help, which many would not be able to do.

  215. @animalogic
    @Dr. X

    This is the problem with traffic stops for trivial matters (yes the definition of "trivial "is key here).
    Any contact with police, whatever your race is fraught with... possible "problems".
    US police do have a "shoot first etc etc" attitude. ( I recall the Australian (white) woman who tried to do her civic duty to report a potential rape, only to be shot dead by the police as she approached the police car dressed in a nighty, I believe)
    So, I at least think there's room to discuss what is a "trival" traffic offence & how the police should react to it.

    Replies: @International Jew, @J.Ross

    Terrible illustration, that guy was a worst-case affirmative action hire Somali. He shot her before anyone knew anything, as soon as he saw her, through a window, and across his partner’s face.

  216. @Jonathan Mason
    @Colin Wright


    Leaving aside the equity or lack thereof of traffic fines and such, you really have to be pretty damned determined to actually lose your license.
     
    It seems improbable to me that 1 in 8 Florida drivers have gone out of their way to toss their driver license in a state that has fuck all public transportation other than school buses and which could legitimately be nicknamed the Parking Lot State.

    But if there is actually such a large segment of the population that is not fit to drive, then the state has done a hopeless job in providing alternatives for them. Yes, there is Uber, but I once checked out the price of a 45 minute drive by Uber and it was more than $50, and many people in Florida have a 30 minutes each way commute to work.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Colin Wright

    a state that has 🏒-all public transportation

    I have a dim memory of a Miami Beach city bus going by about 50 years ago. The fumes were delicious. I think Detroit’s were similar. The only buses I would have been familiar with were in Nassau County and Honolulu, neither of which evoke olfactory recall. Clearly bus engines and their exhaust varied widely at the time.

    Never mind “colorization”. Bring back the aromas!

    • Replies: @fish
    @Reg Cæsar

    Bars on the windows even then.....

  217. Sailer’s Law isn’t taking Easter weekend off– 33 shot, two killed:

    US rocked by 3 mass shootings during Easter weekend; 2 dead

  218. @additionalMike
    @Jonathan Mason

    Mr. Mason, police are present in schools in NY state also. It is to prevent the students (many of whom do not belong in school), from killing the teachers, and each other.
    This true even of suburban schools, due in part to our wonderful diversity, and the rise of murderous ethnic gangs (see e.g. the "MS-13") in Long Island's Suffolk County.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    police are present in schools in NY state also.

    I don’t see why kids can’t sign up to play on the JV police team.

    School cops are paid with the tax dollars. (Whatever their inflated bill rate, it’s more than private security would charge.)

    If a school district contracts with the sheriff, that’s an example of the sort of money spent on education that doesn’t get counted in the oft-quoted, per-warm body statistics.

    If the financial burden of cops who are assigned to a school are borne by the public safety budget, that’s an example of how money spent on schools gets buried in the budgets of other agencies.

  219. Anonymous[114] • Disclaimer says:

    “On the other hand, ever since the Racial Reckoning against pro-active cops started on May 25, 2020, both murders and traffic fatalities per million miles driven have gone up more than in any other period of the last three score years, with black death rates particularly elevated.

    It’s almost as if the threat of traffic stops encourages drivers to drive more safely and not pack an illegal handgun.”

    Ignoring that white people were let off: https://www.aclu.org/blog/criminal-law-reform/reforming-police/data-reveals-driving-person-color-illinois-leads-more

  220. Anonymous[185] • Disclaimer says:
    @mikeInThe716
    @Jonathan Mason

    You make some valid points.

    That said, in the USA, almost anyone can get a driver's license. In Europe and the UK, a valid license is much more expensive and challenging. And Americans need to be mobile - it's a continent size country. Heck, imposing Euro-style driving rules in the USA might reduce GDP by 1%. (Although it may also reduce auto fatalities by ~3000 lives annually, if you compare deaths/mile driven between Germany and the US).

    Yes, there are many ticky-tac driving fines and penalties that can hit the financially poor. That said, many such drivers have marginal ability at most tasks, much less piloting a 4000+ lbs vehicles.

    Here in western NY, there's a large office of a national auto-insurance firm. A manager confided that the worst 10% of their customers (in the "risk pool" that the MUST cover per state regs) account for >30% of their claims. Some of that "worst 10%" are young drivers who eventually improve. But half of them are repeatedly awful. It's probably similar in Florida - that's who you see in the in the suspended license stats.

    Replies: @International Jew, @Anonymous

    Here in western NY, there’s a large office of a national auto-insurance firm. A manager confided that the worst 10% of their customers (in the “risk pool” that the MUST cover per state regs) account for >30% of their claims.

    I would have expected it to be higher.

    What is the breakdown by race?

  221. @Jack D
    @Gary in Gramercy

    The little British sports cars were notoriously unreliable (especially the electricals) and not very powerful (little 4 cyl. tractor engines under the hood) but they were fun to drive - you weren't ACTUALLY going very fast but it FELT like you were going fast.

    The Mazda Miata was disappointing because its execution was too perfect. The fact that it would start every time took the adventure out of each trip. It was like that Swiss mountains where you can take an train thru a tunnel and an elevator to the summit - it turns the challenge of a lifetime into a boring subway ride.

    Replies: @mmack, @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    but they were fun to drive – you weren’t ACTUALLY going very fast but it FELT like you were going fast.

    What is your favorite model of car (or models)?

  222. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Reg Cæsar

    This as well, but I think the tar load on your lungs is a lot lower than cigarettes because you just can't smoke the same quantity.

    BTW, what's the verdict on CBD oil? Asking for a friend.

    Replies: @thenon, @Reg Cæsar

    BTW, what’s the verdict on CBD oil? Asking for a friend.

    We give it to our dog and our cat at night. Really. Keeps ’em quiet.

  223. @Jack D
    @Gary in Gramercy

    The little British sports cars were notoriously unreliable (especially the electricals) and not very powerful (little 4 cyl. tractor engines under the hood) but they were fun to drive - you weren't ACTUALLY going very fast but it FELT like you were going fast.

    The Mazda Miata was disappointing because its execution was too perfect. The fact that it would start every time took the adventure out of each trip. It was like that Swiss mountains where you can take an train thru a tunnel and an elevator to the summit - it turns the challenge of a lifetime into a boring subway ride.

    Replies: @mmack, @Anonymous, @Reg Cæsar

    The little British sports cars were notoriously unreliable (especially the electricals) and not very powerful (little 4 cyl. tractor engines under the hood) but they were fun to drive…

    The Mazda Miata was disappointing because its execution was too perfect. The fact that it would start every time took the adventure out of each trip.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Given that the UK has a rather cool damp climate, you would think that they would have designed cars that were able to start when they were wet. But you would be wrong. The merest hint of moisture anywhere near the ignition system and these things would not fire, especially when they were no longer brand new.

    Electricity (the ignition spark) seeks the path of least resistance to ground and when wet the best path to ground was often thru cracks in the sparkplug wire insulation, carbon tracks inside the distributor cap, etc. Anywhere but across the gap of the spark plugs.

    If there are any of these things left (there aren't many), retrofitting them with electronic ignition works wonders. But most of the ones that are left are in sunny dry California where cars start anyway.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  224. @Jonathan Mason
    @Colin Wright


    Leaving aside the equity or lack thereof of traffic fines and such, you really have to be pretty damned determined to actually lose your license.
     
    It seems improbable to me that 1 in 8 Florida drivers have gone out of their way to toss their driver license in a state that has fuck all public transportation other than school buses and which could legitimately be nicknamed the Parking Lot State.

    But if there is actually such a large segment of the population that is not fit to drive, then the state has done a hopeless job in providing alternatives for them. Yes, there is Uber, but I once checked out the price of a 45 minute drive by Uber and it was more than $50, and many people in Florida have a 30 minutes each way commute to work.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Colin Wright

    ‘It seems improbable to me that 1 in 8 Florida drivers have gone out of their way to toss their driver license in a state that has fuck all public transportation other than school buses and which could legitimately be nicknamed the Parking Lot State…’

    You would seem to have a somewhat optimistic view of the bottom 12.5% of the human race.

    Particularly, considering what proportion of that 12.5% in Florida would be black, nothing about it strikes me as improbable in the least.

    Have you ever had any contact with these folks? I won’t speak of a ‘thought process.’ Do you have any conception of what their perceptions, reactions, and behavior are like?

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Colin Wright

    Over 1.5 million convicted

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Hangnail Hans
    @Colin Wright

    Over 1.5 million convicted felons in just that one state. And now they can all vote.

  225. @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    Yawn. The real mystery is why roaming bands of armed men are allowed and encouraged to harass people who are just trying to live their lives. If I need help subduing a mostly peaceful aspiring rapper who tryna turn he life around, I know the 9-1-1. You notice firemen don't patrol the streets looking for fires to put out.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    You notice firemen don’t patrol the streets looking for fires to put out.

    Try calling the cops after you’ve been mugged. Complete waste of time. And you want to declare open season. Police presence as a deterrent is the only thing that even slows this type of crime down.

  226. @AnotherDad
    @vinteuil


    Well, yeah, sure – but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that’s exactly what the left thinks they’re doing. They’re punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

     

    Exactly. You have just made my case for separate nations.

    This is the point i keep hammering on: There can only be one set of public norms.

    Fundamentally the people in a community must agree on what the public norms are. When they fundamentally do not agree, then they should not be sharing the same community, same nation.

    Yes, you can have regional variation on tractable issues. Here we close the bars on Sunday, here we do not. Here the schools are segregated, here they are not. Here you can smoke dope, here you can not. Even, here we speak English, here we speak French. This is what federalism/local control/autonomy can give you. As long as people agree on the scope of variation.

    But
    A) Americans and the minoritarians fundamentally disagree on what the public norms should be.

    And

    B) minoritarians are totalitarian.
    "Diversity is our greatest strength", does not mean leaving people alone to sort out the sort of community laws/norms they want. Minoritarianism demands that the nation's majority (really the motivation/target has always been white gentiles) must be insulted and badgered and the busy-body state must extend its reach into every nook and cranny of private life to ferret out and harass traditionalist dissenters, not with the program.

    Minoritarianism is not a "different strokes for different folks" ideology. It's basically a Jewish middle-man ideology of destroying the right of gentiles to have their own organic nations and govern themselves in their own communities, which dovetails beautifully with the natural tendency of the state apparatus to accrete power and grow, and the ideology of modern finance/business to level the world and hence has become dreadfully, terrifyingly powerful.

    Separation--saying "No, we are not your serfs. You can busybody yourselves, but we demand the right to governing ourselves in our nations" and fighting till we get it--is the only answer.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Travis

    minoritarians are totalitarian.

    Yes.

    Minoritarianism is not a “different strokes for different folks” ideology. It’s basically a Jewish middle-man ideology of destroying the right of gentiles to have their own organic nation

    No, can’t go there.

  227. @Coemgen
    I received my umpteenth notice today that my scheduled jury duty has been cancelled.

    I've been a registered voter since 1980.

    Is it unusual for me to have never served on a jury?

    I just can't help wondering if I've been pre-profiled as someone who will not be influenced by a manipulative lawyer—thus I'm immediately disqualified. for service as a juror.

    Or, is it just coincidence that my public service has never been needed in over forty years?

    Replies: @anonymous, @ScarletNumber, @International Jew, @SafeNow, @Reg Cæsar, @duncsbaby

    I, too, have never served on jury duty. I’ve been on a list a couple of times, but never actually had to go out to the court. One of the times I was sent a letter from another state. I had just moved out of Wisconsin and a couple of weeks later at my new address I got the letter. Tbh, jury duty is just something I never think about.

    Of course, now it will probably happen due to me opening my big mouth.

  228. @Moses
    @International Jew


    Between himself and the rest of his family, you could well be looking at an aggregate IQ in the triple digits.
     
    Yes. And monkeys could fly out of my butt. Could.

    Replies: @International Jew

    I said aggregate. Look it up.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @International Jew


    I said aggregate. Look it up.
     
    Your aggravation is understandable but there is no need to reply with aggression. To aggrandize thus is to aggrade the irritants in the other fellow's gut and to leave him feeling aggrieved.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @Moses
    @International Jew

    Indeed you did. The perils of posting in a rush. Lesson there.

  229. @anonymous
    @Coemgen

    In the 1980's and 1990's, the National Institute of Trial Advocacy (NITA) held twice-a-year seminars at Boalt Hall to train jury lawyers. Then, in the early aughts, the frequency went down to once a year, and now they no longer hold them at all. Around 2012, I conducted a six month experiment. Since I was spending a lot of time in the law library anyway, I decided to walk up to the courthouse a block away each morning to see if I could catch a trial, whether civil or criminal. Going up there every day for six months, I never once found an actual trial in progress. The fact is that judges don't like trials, and in CA they have a strong union.

    Replies: @Coemgen

    Going up there every day for six months, I never once found an actual trial in progress.

    Interesting. The one time I actually didn’t have my jury duty cancelled before the trial date, I waited at the courthouse for several hours, as potential backup juror, until we were told to leave because all defendants for the day had “taken pleas.”

  230. @ScarletNumber
    @Coemgen

    You are thinking too highly of yourself. I have received one jury notice, just before COVID hit. I went on their website the night before and they said that my number wasn't needed, so I was excused. By registering as available and checking in, that counts as my service for three years.

    Replies: @Coemgen

    You are thinking too highly of yourself.

    Lol, I’m wondering what’s the likelihood of never serving on a jury in over forty years.

    That means I can recall, in Massachusetts, when jurors were absolutely not picked at random—a retired family friend used jury service as a part-time job back in the 70s until Massachusetts “reformed” jury selection.

    It would be unsurprising to find there was still a thumb-on-the-scale for jury selection such as, excluding persons who are not political party members.

  231. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    The little British sports cars were notoriously unreliable (especially the electricals) and not very powerful (little 4 cyl. tractor engines under the hood) but they were fun to drive...

    The Mazda Miata was disappointing because its execution was too perfect. The fact that it would start every time took the adventure out of each trip.
     
    https://youtu.be/78b67l_yxUc

    Replies: @Jack D

    Given that the UK has a rather cool damp climate, you would think that they would have designed cars that were able to start when they were wet. But you would be wrong. The merest hint of moisture anywhere near the ignition system and these things would not fire, especially when they were no longer brand new.

    Electricity (the ignition spark) seeks the path of least resistance to ground and when wet the best path to ground was often thru cracks in the sparkplug wire insulation, carbon tracks inside the distributor cap, etc. Anywhere but across the gap of the spark plugs.

    If there are any of these things left (there aren’t many), retrofitting them with electronic ignition works wonders. But most of the ones that are left are in sunny dry California where cars start anyway.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Given that the UK has a rather cool damp climate, you would think that they would have designed cars that were able to start when they were wet.
     
    On the other hand drive wheel, my 18-year-old rice rocket sedan started every single time this winter, even at minus-double-digit temps. It was built in the Midwest, but south of the lakes. It rarely reaches that low there or home in Japan. Impressive.

    We mostly only drove it across the street every night due to winter parking regs, so the battery got drained anyway. The other day, I finally got around to resetting the time, and in a most medieval way. I was parked near a college and had just left a store that closes at 3pm, so I knew the hour but not the minut. I had left the cellphone at home. I was just about to take a guess at the minute when the school's carillon emitted a single peal.

    Voila! 3:15!

    We no longer have daily trains bound for Yuma, so that was handy.

    Replies: @Jack D

  232. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jonathan Mason


    a state that has 🏒-all public transportation
     
    I have a dim memory of a Miami Beach city bus going by about 50 years ago. The fumes were delicious. I think Detroit's were similar. The only buses I would have been familiar with were in Nassau County and Honolulu, neither of which evoke olfactory recall. Clearly bus engines and their exhaust varied widely at the time.


    Never mind "colorization". Bring back the aromas!


    https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8466/8137537474_a9d59b6606_z.jpg

    Replies: @fish

    Bars on the windows even then…..

  233. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    Given that the UK has a rather cool damp climate, you would think that they would have designed cars that were able to start when they were wet. But you would be wrong. The merest hint of moisture anywhere near the ignition system and these things would not fire, especially when they were no longer brand new.

    Electricity (the ignition spark) seeks the path of least resistance to ground and when wet the best path to ground was often thru cracks in the sparkplug wire insulation, carbon tracks inside the distributor cap, etc. Anywhere but across the gap of the spark plugs.

    If there are any of these things left (there aren't many), retrofitting them with electronic ignition works wonders. But most of the ones that are left are in sunny dry California where cars start anyway.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Given that the UK has a rather cool damp climate, you would think that they would have designed cars that were able to start when they were wet.

    On the other hand drive wheel, my 18-year-old rice rocket sedan started every single time this winter, even at minus-double-digit temps. It was built in the Midwest, but south of the lakes. It rarely reaches that low there or home in Japan. Impressive.

    We mostly only drove it across the street every night due to winter parking regs, so the battery got drained anyway. The other day, I finally got around to resetting the time, and in a most medieval way. I was parked near a college and had just left a store that closes at 3pm, so I knew the hour but not the minut. I had left the cellphone at home. I was just about to take a guess at the minute when the school’s carillon emitted a single peal.

    Voila! 3:15!

    We no longer have daily trains bound for Yuma, so that was handy.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    The young 'uns today don't know what they are missing. Electronic ignition combined with fuel injection (and the OBD money light that gives you advance warning of problems before they rise to the "no start" level) means than even ancient hoopties will start on cold damp days.

    I have a 2003 Subaru beater that will always start if it has a good battery but it helps that I have changed the spark plug wires and plugs according to schedule. Last year on a very cold night it misfired badly when half the coil pack gave up the ghost, but a $30 Chinese aftermarket coil and all was well again.

    On more modern cars there are generally no more spark plug wires - there are individual coils that sit directly on each plug, 1 coil/cylinder. This is really the system they should have had all along - switching 12V is much easier than switching 20,000V. But I suppose in the old days 6 or 8 coils would not have worked for reasons of cost and size. Kettering's battery ignition system was brilliant for its time but its time was 1910.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  234. @International Jew
    @Moses

    I said aggregate. Look it up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Moses

    I said aggregate. Look it up.

    Your aggravation is understandable but there is no need to reply with aggression. To aggrandize thus is to aggrade the irritants in the other fellow’s gut and to leave him feeling aggrieved.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Reg Cæsar

    It was an aggregious oversight ;-)

  235. @Reg Cæsar
    @International Jew


    I said aggregate. Look it up.
     
    Your aggravation is understandable but there is no need to reply with aggression. To aggrandize thus is to aggrade the irritants in the other fellow's gut and to leave him feeling aggrieved.

    Replies: @International Jew

    It was an aggregious oversight 😉

  236. @Blodgie
    @JimDandy

    You boot-licking boomer normies will defend the murdering cops regardless of the facts.

    Cop had no reason to shoot that idiot in the back of the head.

    Cops hate you and will take your freedom—why the reflexive support?

    Replies: @bomag, @JimDandy, @Vinnie O

    The last time I was stopped by the Virginia State Police (during the morning rush hour), I kept both hands on the wheel except when I had warned the officer that my wallet was in my jacket pocket. Everything went fine, and the officer THANKED ME instead of issuing a ticket. But come on, I’m Irish from Chicago. If we ain’t cops ourselves, we know 10 guys who are. So ya want an occasional ticket or ya want to be part of a shootout at the next bar ya leave?

    • Thanks: JimDandy
  237. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Given that the UK has a rather cool damp climate, you would think that they would have designed cars that were able to start when they were wet.
     
    On the other hand drive wheel, my 18-year-old rice rocket sedan started every single time this winter, even at minus-double-digit temps. It was built in the Midwest, but south of the lakes. It rarely reaches that low there or home in Japan. Impressive.

    We mostly only drove it across the street every night due to winter parking regs, so the battery got drained anyway. The other day, I finally got around to resetting the time, and in a most medieval way. I was parked near a college and had just left a store that closes at 3pm, so I knew the hour but not the minut. I had left the cellphone at home. I was just about to take a guess at the minute when the school's carillon emitted a single peal.

    Voila! 3:15!

    We no longer have daily trains bound for Yuma, so that was handy.

    Replies: @Jack D

    The young ‘uns today don’t know what they are missing. Electronic ignition combined with fuel injection (and the OBD money light that gives you advance warning of problems before they rise to the “no start” level) means than even ancient hoopties will start on cold damp days.

    I have a 2003 Subaru beater that will always start if it has a good battery but it helps that I have changed the spark plug wires and plugs according to schedule. Last year on a very cold night it misfired badly when half the coil pack gave up the ghost, but a \$30 Chinese aftermarket coil and all was well again.

    On more modern cars there are generally no more spark plug wires – there are individual coils that sit directly on each plug, 1 coil/cylinder. This is really the system they should have had all along – switching 12V is much easier than switching 20,000V. But I suppose in the old days 6 or 8 coils would not have worked for reasons of cost and size. Kettering’s battery ignition system was brilliant for its time but its time was 1910.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jack D


    Kettering’s battery ignition system was brilliant for its time but its time was 1910.
     
    Its time and place:


    https://www.unz.com/isteve/cdc-black-motor-vehicle-traffic-deaths-up-27-5-in-2020-while-whites-up-only-2-5/#comment-5297115
  238. @Jack D
    @Reg Cæsar

    The young 'uns today don't know what they are missing. Electronic ignition combined with fuel injection (and the OBD money light that gives you advance warning of problems before they rise to the "no start" level) means than even ancient hoopties will start on cold damp days.

    I have a 2003 Subaru beater that will always start if it has a good battery but it helps that I have changed the spark plug wires and plugs according to schedule. Last year on a very cold night it misfired badly when half the coil pack gave up the ghost, but a $30 Chinese aftermarket coil and all was well again.

    On more modern cars there are generally no more spark plug wires - there are individual coils that sit directly on each plug, 1 coil/cylinder. This is really the system they should have had all along - switching 12V is much easier than switching 20,000V. But I suppose in the old days 6 or 8 coils would not have worked for reasons of cost and size. Kettering's battery ignition system was brilliant for its time but its time was 1910.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Kettering’s battery ignition system was brilliant for its time but its time was 1910.

    Its time and place:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/cdc-black-motor-vehicle-traffic-deaths-up-27-5-in-2020-while-whites-up-only-2-5/#comment-5297115

  239. @International Jew
    @Moses

    I said aggregate. Look it up.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Moses

    Indeed you did. The perils of posting in a rush. Lesson there.

  240. @Alden
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    In California the fines are so costly it’s absolutely ridiculous. And about half the population is on welfare. So the custom is just show up in court tell the judge you’re poor and he or she orders you to pay what you can afford. Go down the hall to room whatever and pay what you can.

    The cities and counties would get a lot more revenue if the traffic and parking fines were reasonable. Like $25. But for a lot of people if it’s a choice between $145 for a parking or traffic fine or the gas and electric bill it’s the gas and electric bill they pay. Or the money goes towards the rent. More people can afford the $25 fine than can afford the $75 parking fine.

    More and more city dwellers are going the UBER route. All the convenience of a car without the expense and searching for a place to park. And paying to park at work. And when you have a Dr accountant whatever appointment. And when going to a movie or out for an evening. Or having to park 8 or 9 blocks from home.

    Until about 1960 many city dwellers didn’t have cars. Buses and subways were safe. And at least the subways were faster.

    Stores, including grocery delivered. Even pharmacies delivered little bottles of medicine. And there were plenty of cabs all over. Either call, wave one down or walk down to the corner where they waited. There were always cabs at the subway stops too. Nice in winter or in the rain.

    Now everything can be delivered. Amazon has the most ordinary little drug and hardware store items. Grocery stores deliver. CVS really wants to deliver meds instead of hiring clerks.

    The big problem of raising kids in cities instead of suburbs was the blacks on public transit. Stay at home Moms maids and drivers are expensive. So parents get the kids the UBER and LYFT accounts. Safety of a car freedom of public transit for the kids.

    For city people, there’s a real return to the good old days when they didn’t need a car because of deliveries and cabs.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic, @Colin Wright

    ‘In California the fines are so costly it’s absolutely ridiculous. And about half the population is on welfare. So the custom is just show up in court tell the judge you’re poor and he or she orders you to pay what you can afford. Go down the hall to room whatever and pay what you can.

    The cities and counties would get a lot more revenue if the traffic and parking fines were reasonable. Like \$25. But for a lot of people if it’s a choice between \$145 for a parking or traffic fine…’

    If only. Back in 2014 or thereabouts, they put in an (utterly superfluous) traffic light at the freeway exit we were accustomed to take getting back to our house.

    So my wife drops down the ramp, stops to make her accustomed right turn, fails to notice the new light-and-no-right-turn-on-red sign — and gets nailed.

    \$450 if she goes to traffic school. I suggested fighting it, but she didn’t want to. My question was always, how did what was a \$90 crime last year become five times as heinous this year?’

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Colin Wright


    My question was always, how did what was a $90 crime last year become five times as heinous this year?
     
    High speed rail to Bakersfield ain't gonna pay for itself, you know.

    (Check out how much of the ticket is CA tax ON TOP of whatever fine that jurisdiction wants. Or maybe you are not in California, but those ideas spread ...)
     
     

  241. @Johann Ricke
    @Arclight


    Unfortunately for us all, this has hugely negative consequences and the problems it creates will eventually become too large to ignore. On the plus side, it’s setting up a massive political opportunity for the other side as groups like Latinos and Asians that lean Democratic become fed up with the collateral damage and guilty whites and black activists continue to insist society at large shouldn’t believe their own lying eyes about what is going on.
     
    The OBLM movement has set up a situation where limo liberals who were previously unaffected by their own nonsensical beliefs are getting it right between the eyes. That will change a good many votes. Pocketbook issues are a big deal when your own pocketbook is affected. Many will turn to the right, for purely tactical reasons at the beginning, and eventually adopt the entire GOP shebang so as to avoid the everyday cognitive dissonance of having one set of core beliefs and voting for the party with diametrically opposed views.

    Replies: @Arclight

    I don’t know if white liberals are really getting the brunt of what they have unleashed yet. Many of them are able to opt out of the consequences through the neighborhoods they can afford to live in or the schools they can pay to send their kids to. Their anger won’t be stoked until they see their kids rejected from the college slots they assumed were theirs after spending hundreds of thousands on private school and club sports, and/or spouses lose out on job or promotions for some diversity quota.

    Who it will get to first are other minorities who have to live near blacks or share schools with them. All the right has to say is that they promise to no longer prioritize black feelings over the commons good.

    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
    @Arclight


    All the right has to say is that they promise to no longer prioritize black feelings over the common good.
     
    They'd lose 80 million GoodWhite votes right there, but I have to admit they'd never have those votes anyway.
  242. @Colin Wright
    @Alden

    'In California the fines are so costly it’s absolutely ridiculous. And about half the population is on welfare. So the custom is just show up in court tell the judge you’re poor and he or she orders you to pay what you can afford. Go down the hall to room whatever and pay what you can.

    The cities and counties would get a lot more revenue if the traffic and parking fines were reasonable. Like $25. But for a lot of people if it’s a choice between $145 for a parking or traffic fine...'


    If only. Back in 2014 or thereabouts, they put in an (utterly superfluous) traffic light at the freeway exit we were accustomed to take getting back to our house.

    So my wife drops down the ramp, stops to make her accustomed right turn, fails to notice the new light-and-no-right-turn-on-red sign -- and gets nailed.

    $450 if she goes to traffic school. I suggested fighting it, but she didn't want to. My question was always, how did what was a $90 crime last year become five times as heinous this year?'

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    My question was always, how did what was a \$90 crime last year become five times as heinous this year?

    High speed rail to Bakersfield ain’t gonna pay for itself, you know.

    (Check out how much of the ticket is CA tax ON TOP of whatever fine that jurisdiction wants. Or maybe you are not in California, but those ideas spread …)

  243. @Colin Wright
    @Jonathan Mason

    'It seems improbable to me that 1 in 8 Florida drivers have gone out of their way to toss their driver license in a state that has fuck all public transportation other than school buses and which could legitimately be nicknamed the Parking Lot State...'

    You would seem to have a somewhat optimistic view of the bottom 12.5% of the human race.

    Particularly, considering what proportion of that 12.5% in Florida would be black, nothing about it strikes me as improbable in the least.

    Have you ever had any contact with these folks? I won't speak of a 'thought process.' Do you have any conception of what their perceptions, reactions, and behavior are like?

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans, @Hangnail Hans

    Over 1.5 million convicted

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Hangnail Hans

    In this 1st iteration, I thought you were repeating a sign at the nearest McDonalds.

    "Over 30 million (of our employees) served (with warrants).

  244. @Colin Wright
    @Jonathan Mason

    'It seems improbable to me that 1 in 8 Florida drivers have gone out of their way to toss their driver license in a state that has fuck all public transportation other than school buses and which could legitimately be nicknamed the Parking Lot State...'

    You would seem to have a somewhat optimistic view of the bottom 12.5% of the human race.

    Particularly, considering what proportion of that 12.5% in Florida would be black, nothing about it strikes me as improbable in the least.

    Have you ever had any contact with these folks? I won't speak of a 'thought process.' Do you have any conception of what their perceptions, reactions, and behavior are like?

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans, @Hangnail Hans

    Over 1.5 million convicted felons in just that one state. And now they can all vote.

  245. @Arclight
    @Johann Ricke

    I don't know if white liberals are really getting the brunt of what they have unleashed yet. Many of them are able to opt out of the consequences through the neighborhoods they can afford to live in or the schools they can pay to send their kids to. Their anger won't be stoked until they see their kids rejected from the college slots they assumed were theirs after spending hundreds of thousands on private school and club sports, and/or spouses lose out on job or promotions for some diversity quota.

    Who it will get to first are other minorities who have to live near blacks or share schools with them. All the right has to say is that they promise to no longer prioritize black feelings over the commons good.

    Replies: @Hangnail Hans

    All the right has to say is that they promise to no longer prioritize black feelings over the common good.

    They’d lose 80 million GoodWhite votes right there, but I have to admit they’d never have those votes anyway.

  246. @Hangnail Hans
    @Colin Wright

    Over 1.5 million convicted

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    In this 1st iteration, I thought you were repeating a sign at the nearest McDonalds.

    “Over 30 million (of our employees) served (with warrants).

    • LOL: Hangnail Hans
  247. @AnotherDad
    @vinteuil


    Well, yeah, sure – but, unfortunately, changing the odd pronoun, here & there, that’s exactly what the left thinks they’re doing. They’re punishing, killing or expelling those who broke the rules.

    And they hold the whip hand.

     

    Exactly. You have just made my case for separate nations.

    This is the point i keep hammering on: There can only be one set of public norms.

    Fundamentally the people in a community must agree on what the public norms are. When they fundamentally do not agree, then they should not be sharing the same community, same nation.

    Yes, you can have regional variation on tractable issues. Here we close the bars on Sunday, here we do not. Here the schools are segregated, here they are not. Here you can smoke dope, here you can not. Even, here we speak English, here we speak French. This is what federalism/local control/autonomy can give you. As long as people agree on the scope of variation.

    But
    A) Americans and the minoritarians fundamentally disagree on what the public norms should be.

    And

    B) minoritarians are totalitarian.
    "Diversity is our greatest strength", does not mean leaving people alone to sort out the sort of community laws/norms they want. Minoritarianism demands that the nation's majority (really the motivation/target has always been white gentiles) must be insulted and badgered and the busy-body state must extend its reach into every nook and cranny of private life to ferret out and harass traditionalist dissenters, not with the program.

    Minoritarianism is not a "different strokes for different folks" ideology. It's basically a Jewish middle-man ideology of destroying the right of gentiles to have their own organic nations and govern themselves in their own communities, which dovetails beautifully with the natural tendency of the state apparatus to accrete power and grow, and the ideology of modern finance/business to level the world and hence has become dreadfully, terrifyingly powerful.

    Separation--saying "No, we are not your serfs. You can busybody yourselves, but we demand the right to governing ourselves in our nations" and fighting till we get it--is the only answer.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @Travis

    it is not just Jews who are minoritarians. Of the ~180 million white gentile Americans, half are female. Most females are minoritarians and a significant number of white male gentiles are minoritarians (not just the queers, but many white progressives fully support minoritarian ideaology) A minority of whites oppose Minoritarianism. And even the 40% of whites who oppose Minoritarianism do not want separate nations. Maybe 10% of whites would support a separate white nation in the abstract while 70% would actively oppose a white nation-state.

    I agree that separate nations would be great. The greatest potential for a separate nation would be in the state of Maine. Since Maine is already 95% white and has plenty of space and a coast with a port. Maine is the best location of a future white state in America. While half the whites in Maine voted for Biden, the population is very small. Just 357,000 people voted for Hillary in 2016 and 435,000 voted for Biden in 2020 while trump received 360,000 votes in 2020. If 100,000 white nationalists relocated to Maine they would have the power to elect a white nationalist governor and white nationalists mayors , school boards etc…

    No other state offers the same potential. . How many White nationalists would relocate to Maine in order to build a white state with white rule and white culture ? How many White nationalists are there in America ? 200,000 ? The first step in creating a separate nation for whites would entail like-minded whites to relocate to a state like Maine where they could build a white state without the interference of non-whites. A separate nation would need to start in Maine. No other state offers the same potential.

  248. @Anon
    @International Jew

    I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals.

    I'm definitely stealing this line for when I next get called for jury duty.

    Replies: @Anon

    I replied that I believe the law is biased in favor of black criminals.

    I’m definitely stealing this line for when I next get called for jury duty.

    How is the law biased in favor of black criminals?

  249. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jonathan Mason

    You're a white guy talking from white guy perspective. These people get underwater because they are trapped in a world of white American norms, where over half the people pay their fines or answer bench warrants by certain deadlines and timely renew their licenses. American blacks simply do not have that capacity in the same percentages as white Americans so they get trapped in norms which are unfair to their race. I imagine Spaniards in South America have a more realistic view of their Asiatic untermensch and these problems are avoided.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    There’s no such thing as white American norms.

    And Jon is speaking from the perspective of a normal human being, something you obviously cannot relate to.

  250. @AnotherDad
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    My instinct is to junk all controlled substance laws, but that’s not really a good idea when you have a welfare state. And de facto decriminalization does not seem to be working out well for Charles Murray’s Fishtown side of the distribution.
     
    A libertarian "paradise" does not mesh well with communitarian social policy.

    The old school way this was handled was you could be a drunken bum--but over on skid row. If you tried to hassle normal people in the commercial district or their neighborhoods, the cops would beat you down. And there was no--or insufficient--public welfare, so booze addicts relied on private charity and/or withered away and died off.

    My personal instincts tend toward "get out of my face" libertarian. I don't like being ordered about and don't wish to order about other people. But personally i like civilized society. I have zero desire to put up with any assholery. (Same instinct: Get out of my face.)

    To me the solution is straightforward: People have the right to live in communities with the norms they desire. You want to get high--fine. But you don't have that right in a community that does not want to have that behavior. People should be in separate communities with separate norms.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “To me the solution is straightforward: People have the right to live in communities with the norms they desire. You want to get high–fine. But you don’t have that right in a community that does not want to have that behavior. People should be in separate communities with separate norms.“

    First, we do live on those types of communities. Second, your “solution” is libertarian in nature.

  251. @Justvisiting
    @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    "One thing they point to in support of this is that in polls (of questionable value) whites and blacks report similar levels of marijuana use, but blacks are charged with possession at much higher rates."

    One of my vices is watching reruns of "Cops"--which shows lots of traffic stops of all kinds.

    If you watch enough episodes the mystery is solved.

    Blacks are more likely to have other drugs (especially crack) in their possession as well as marijuana. In addition, blacks stopped with marijuana only are more likely to have no or expired drivers licenses and expired or non-existent license plates. Cops are more likely to "throw in" the marijuana charge in those cases--if everything else is good they are more likely to let someone with a little marijuana off with a warning or ticket.

    My guess is that these dual drug arrests that include marijuana are included as "marijuana arrests" while tickets for minor possession are not included.

    Replies: @CCZ

    But what happens when the police are smoking the weed???? New “Community Relations” program????

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