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Traffic Deaths Per Mile Driven Soared 24% in 2020
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As part of my campaign to raise awareness about lethal trends in the number of violent deaths in my country, let’s move on from reporting on 2020’s murder boom to 2020’s car crash fatality boom:

From a National Safety Council press release:

Deaths up 8% even as mileage drops 13%

… The National Safety Council (NSC) estimate of total motor-vehicle deaths for 2020 is 42,060, up 8% from 39,107 in 2019. … The estimated mileage death rate is 1.49 deaths per 100 million vehicle miles traveled, up 24% from 1.20 in 2019. Estimated vehicle miles traveled for 2020 indicate over a 13% decrease compared to 2019, from 3,260 billion to 2,830 billion.

A medically consulted injury is an injury serious enough that a medical professional was consulted. Based on the current medically consulted injury-to-death ratio of 114:1, and rounded to the nearest thousand, the estimated number of nonfatal medically consulted injuries resulting from crashes during in 2020 was 4,795,000.

The estimated cost of motor-vehicle deaths, injuries, and property damage in 2020 was $474.4 billion.

Interestingly, when graphed on an annual basis with 2000 set to be 100, the rate of traffic fatalities per mile looks much the same shape as the murder rate:

I’m estimating that murders went up 28% in 2020 over 2019 (the Gun Violence Archive reports that gun murders were up 31%, but I’m guessing other types of murders didn’t increase so much).

Like homicides, deaths per 100 million miles driven should be going down as cars get safer and the population ages more out of its reckless (and wreckful) youth era.

A big question about the rise in 2020 in deaths per million miles driven was how much of it was a selection effect (mild-mannered online workers stopped commuting while more rambunctious essential workers continued to drive) versus how much was it a treatment effect driven by the various weirdnesses of 2020 (such as lockdowns and racial reckonings).

Looking at deaths per million miles driven in 2020, the big jump in deaths per 100 million miles was in April when miles driven plummeted.

This graph sets the 100 to be the monthly average for 2019.

This April leap in traffic fatalities per miles driven is in contrast to homicides in 2020 for which the big jump was in the weeks following George Floyd’s death on Memorial Day.

A commenter at Marginal Revolution cites a helpful anecdote:

Faze
My home-remodeler son and his construction team recall April, May and June of 2020 as a golden age, when they could zoom to jobs around our midwestern city at 100 mph, with no oldsters or commuters cluttering up the freeways, and zero traffic enforcement. His eyes get misty just thinking about it.

So, you can see the selection effect at work: cautious screen workers were staying home, leaving the roads to essential workers.

But note that total traffic fatalities actually fell in April due to the 25% plunge in miles driven. The rise in total fatalities primarily happened from May onward, rather like the rise in murders, although I don’t have data to look at traffic deaths day by day like I can now for gun murders.

But … miles driven had almost wholly recovered by June, but the death rate kept going up and got notably worse than in April. As miles driven mostly recovered following the April shelter-in-place craze, deaths per million miles driven continued to rise as did total deaths. In 2019, the worst month for traffic deaths was August with 3,645. But in 2020, traffic deaths were over 4,000 for five straight months, June thru October, a huge worsening compared to 2019 even though considerably fewer miles were being driven in those months in 2020 than in 2019. So, that looks like a treatment effect: not only did 2020 select for worse drivers on average, but drivers drove worse.Why drivers drove dramatically worse in the summer of 2020 than in the summer of 2019 even after adjusting for the fact that mostly worse drivers remained on the road remains an open question.

Perhaps the decline in traffic jams encouraged more reckless driving? That sounds plausible, yet this is the opposite of when miles driven fell by about 2.6% from 2007 to 2009 and the death rate per miles driven fell by about 17 percent. However, that was a subtle decline in traffic while 2020’s lessening of traffic was extraordinary.

There’s a lot of evidence that police reduced enforcement of many violations starting in late March due to the pandemic and then increasing after late May due to The Establishment declaring that every cop is a criminal and all the sinners saints.

But whether the cops retreating to the donut shop encouraged reckless driving is, while plausible, hard to prove for certain.

A related possibility is that lockdown boredom combined with public exuberance encouraged reckless driving. By way of analogy, according to new data from the Consumer Product Safety Commission, fireworks injuries almost tripled in 2020 over 2019.

I don’t see any data on the racial breakdowns of who was getting killed in car crashes.

My guess is the fireworks injuries were disproportionately among Latinos. The amazing Fourth of July backyard illegal fireworks display may have been related to the pro-Trump surge among Latino men, which, more speculatively might have been a sort of patriotic, anti-BLM, anti-SJW demonstration on their part.

But who knows about car crashes?

From the National Safety Council’s annual data:

Year Deaths % Chg Deaths vs. 2000 Mileage (Millions) % Chg Mileage vs. 2000 Death rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled % Chg Death Rate per Mile vs. 2000
1999 42,401 98 2,679,458 98 1.58 100
2000 43,354 2.2% 100 2,746,926 2.5% 100 1.58 -0.3% 100
2001 43,788 1.0% 101 2,795,610 1.8% 102 1.57 -0.8% 99
2002 45,380 3.6% 105 2,855,509 2.1% 104 1.59 1.5% 101
2003 44,757 -1.4% 103 2,890,221 1.2% 105 1.55 -2.6% 98
2004 44,933 0.4% 104 2,964,789 2.6% 108 1.52 -2.1% 96
2005 45,343 0.9% 105 2,989,428 0.8% 109 1.52 0.1% 96
2006 45,316 -0.1% 105 3,014,116 0.8% 110 1.50 -0.9% 95
2007 43,945 -3.0% 101 3,029,821 0.5% 110 1.45 -3.5% 92
2008 39,790 -9.5% 92 2,973,508 -1.9% 108 1.34 -7.7% 85
2009 36,216 -9.0% 84 2,956,763 -0.6% 108 1.22 -8.5% 78
2010 35,332 -2.4% 81 2,967,266 0.4% 108 1.19 -2.8% 75
2011 35,303 -0.1% 81 2,950,402 -0.6% 107 1.20 0.5% 76
2012 36,415 3.1% 84 2,968,567 0.6% 108 1.23 2.5% 78
2013 35,369 -2.9% 82 2,988,281 0.7% 109 1.18 -3.5% 75
2014 35,398 0.1% 82 3,025,656 1.3% 110 1.17 -1.2% 74
2015 37,757 6.7% 87 3,095,372 2.3% 113 1.22 4.3% 77
2016 40,327 6.8% 93 3,174,407 2.6% 116 1.27 4.1% 80
2017 40,231 -0.2% 93 3,212,346 1.2% 117 1.25 -1.4% 79
2018 39,404 -2.1% 91 3,234,240 0.7% 118 1.22 -2.7% 77
2019 39,107 -0.8% 90 3,259,691 0.8% 119 1.20 -1.5% 76
2020 42,060 7.6% 97 2,829,836 -13.2% 103 1.49 23.9% 94

And their recent monthly data:

Month Deaths % Chg. Deaths vs. 2019 avg Mileage (Millions) % Chg. Mileage vs. 2019 avg Death rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled % Chg. Death Rate vs. 2019 avg
Jan., 2019 2,948 90 246,500 91 1.20 100
Feb., 2019 2,535 -14% 78 229,300 -7% 84 1.11 -8% 92
Mar., 2019 2,956 17% 91 272,500 19% 100 1.08 -2% 90
Apr., 2019 3,079 4% 94 277,000 2% 102 1.11 2% 93
May., 2019 3,417 11% 105 285,500 3% 105 1.20 8% 100
Jun., 2019 3,449 1% 106 284,100 0% 105 1.21 1% 101
Jul., 2019 3,527 2% 108 292,700 3% 108 1.20 -1% 100
Aug., 2019 3,645 3% 112 286,400 -2% 105 1.27 6% 106
Sep., 2019 3,543 -3% 109 268,800 -6% 99 1.32 4% 110
Oct., 2019 3,506 -1% 108 283,000 5% 104 1.24 -6% 103
Nov., 2019 3,274 -7% 100 261,700 -8% 96 1.25 1% 104
Dec., 2019 3,228 -1% 99 272,191 4% 100 1.19 -5% 99
Jan., 2020 2,980 -8% 91 251,700 -8% 93 1.18 0% 99
Feb., 2020 2,830 -5% 87 233,900 -7% 86 1.21 2% 101
Mar., 2020 2,770 -2% 85 221,100 -5% 81 1.25 4% 104
Apr., 2020 2,520 -9% 77 165,900 -25% 61 1.52 21% 127
May., 2020 3,340 33% 102 212,700 28% 78 1.57 3% 131
Jun., 2020 4,040 21% 124 247,400 16% 91 1.63 4% 136
Jul., 2020 4,020 0% 123 260,100 5% 96 1.55 -5% 129
Aug., 2020 4,180 4% 128 252,700 -3% 93 1.65 7% 138
Sep., 2020 4,050 -3% 124 247,200 -2% 91 1.64 -1% 137
Oct., 2020 4,200 4% 129 259,200 5% 95 1.62 -1% 135
Nov., 2020 3,630 -14% 111 233,800 -10% 86 1.55 -4% 129
Dec., 2020 3,500 -4% 107 244,136 4% 90 1.43 -8% 119

 

 
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  1. It seems that every sort of progress attained by our society over the past years, decades, even centuries is now being driven into hard reverse.

    • Agree: JohnPlywood
    • Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Polistra


    Strange memories on this nervous night in Las Vegas. Five years later? Six? It seems like a lifetime, or at least a Main Era—the kind of peak that never comes again. San Francisco in the middle sixties was a very special time and place to be a part of. Maybe it meant something. Maybe not, in the long run . . . but no explanation, no mix of words or music or memories can touch that sense of knowing that you were there and alive in that corner of time and the world. Whatever it meant. . . .

    History is hard to know, because of all the hired bullshit, but even without being sure of “history” it seems entirely reasonable to think that every now and then the energy of a whole generation comes to a head in a long fine flash, for reasons that nobody really understands at the time—and which never explain, in retrospect, what actually happened.

    My central memory of that time seems to hang on one or five or maybe forty nights—or very early mornings—when I left the Fillmore half-crazy and, instead of going home, aimed the big 650 Lightning across the Bay Bridge at a hundred miles an hour wearing L. L. Bean shorts and a Butte sheepherder's jacket . . . booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change) . . . but being absolutely certain that no matter which way I went I would come to a place where people were just as high and wild as I was: No doubt at all about that. . . .

    There was madness in any direction, at any hour. If not across the Bay, then up the Golden Gate or down 101 to Los Altos or La Honda. . . . You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning. . . .

    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .

    So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark—that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back.
     

    Replies: @International Jew, @BenKenobi, @Ripple Earthdevil, @Anonymous, @Luzzatto

    , @theMann
    @Polistra

    America, 1969. We put a man on the moon.

    America, 2021. We quiver in fear of an an imaginary pandemic.

    When insane meets cowardly and they both slam into incompetent, the results can get a little bit....ugly. In any case, rejecting several hundred years worth of Enlightenment civilization is really, really, gonna suck.

    , @Mike_from_SGV
    @Polistra

    Hard reverse indeed. I just watched a movie on YouTube from 1949 set in San Francisco. Everyone was well dressed, all were Americans except the Chinese housekeeper, no freaks or vagrants sleeping in their excrement. SF really used to be like that, before the progressives vandalized it.

    Replies: @Polistra

  2. For some reason, there has been a surge of youth street racing in my area.

    A disproportionate share of the participants ate Black.

    • Agree: JohnPlywood
    • Replies: @pierog
    @JohnnyWalker123

    you could say they are not Fine Young Cannibals...

    , @Morton's toes
    @JohnnyWalker123

    In my zip code the cops are still writing tickets.

    Are most traffic fatalities still alcohol impaired? Does more social distancing reduce designated driving?

    The pertinent data is out there. This ain't like X files.

  3. I know during Ohio’s lockdown, the roads got more and more old people on them as it went on.
    As in, the kind of people the lockdown was supposed to protect.

  4. My bet as to the main causative factor would be higher speed due to less traffic. The traffic in my town seems almost half of that in 2019, and the speed on the road in front of my house seems much faster.

    Another reason for higher speed could be psychological. Some people need a release from the tension caused by the epidemic, and they find it in their cars.

    • Replies: @Aardvark
    @Bert

    I thought that for a while, the police weren't eager to make traffic stops for assorted reasons, so the idiots who thought that could drive as fast and recklessly as they could upped their idiocy.
    I witnessed all sorts of behavior from well above average speeding to blatantly running traffic lights.
    Left turns on red where it has never been permitted before seemed to increase.

    , @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Bert

    More speeding combined with less policing

    , @danand
    @Bert

    "My bet as to the main causative factor would be higher speed due to less traffic."

    Bert, seems to be part of it:

    https://flic.kr/p/2kHvuo6

    As corona cleared freeways up, throttles when down, peddles to mats. In the SF Bay Area it was common to see everthing from Corollas to Aventadors routinely fly by at 100+, middle of day. The wild west had returned to the 101, 280, 680, 880...

    Early "pandemic" you did see an unusually high number of muscle, show, and supercars out. Home Depot parking lots, crawling In N Out drive thru's...

    Cars shows cancelled, streets cleared, owners may have thought it the rare oppertunity to "play". Perhaps the thinking was "the world is ending", so what the hay.

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/04/23/100-mph-speeding-tickets-soar-statewide-roadshow/

    https://abc7news.com/chp-coronavirus-stay-home-orders-speeding-tickets/6124578/

    https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2020/03/04/chp-speeding-lead-footed-bay-area-drivers-ticketed-1704-for-going-over-100-mph-last-year/

    https://www.timesheraldonline.com/2020/12/10/chp-speeding-tickets-for-going-more-than-100-mph-on-the-rise-in-solano/

    https://sfist.com/2020/04/01/chp-tells-bay-area-drivers-to-slow-down-amid-uptick-in-100-mph-speeders-on-empty-highways/

    https://www.sfgate.com/local/article/100-mph-speeders-15162505.php

    Recently things have slowed, traffic's returned; the super & muscle cars parked back in their garages.

  5. My guess is that the summer 2020 flood of news items and videos hitting phones – must see! – would’ve contributed to the spike in deaths. Not for the first time, yesterday I saw a young woman walk straight into a traffic flow while texting – had the driver who screeched to a halt been less observant, she’d be waking up in the ICU or the mortuary.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Cortes

    It's sad he stopped

    Replies: @theMann

    , @jsm
    @Cortes

    Do people wake up in the mortuary, still? YIKES! I thought that kind of thing went out with the Middle Ages. (smile)

    Replies: @I, Libertine

  6. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:

    There just doesn’t seem to be the same police presence in Southern California. I never see any highway patrol, and quite often the average speed on the 5 freeway is 80 mph. Essentially, you can drive like an asshole with no worries.

    Pedestrians often seem distracted. They meander out into the middle of the street without looking for oncoming traffic like mental patients. I was just thinking that any serial killer could kill at least one pedestrian a week, legally. Just be ready for a pedestrian who wanders out into the middle of the street with his or her back to you, and wham! As long as they’re jaywalking, you’ve had your fun, and it’s all legal!

    They should do a “Better Call Saul” episode with that as the premise. Saul has to defend someone who’s taken out 10 jaywalkers in a month, and keeps taking them out all through the episode. Is he really a serial killer? Or just very unlucky? It could be a recurring character. How do you incarcerate someone who accidentally kills qualified jaywalkers?

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @Anonymous

    Indeed, COVID and the race drama seem to have gutted law enforcement. Police forces nationwide had been shrinking for years, though, just due to the aging of society generated by the infertility of white females, and the huge number of cops that existed from 1993-2014 was kind of an historical anomaly. The USA today must be shifting towards a 1970s level of police officers per capita.


    https://nypost.com/2020/02/08/americas-shrinking-police-forces-could-spell-trouble-for-our-safety/

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Redneck farmer
    @Anonymous

    Death Race 2021!

    , @Jim Christian
    @Anonymous

    Your hypothetical serial jaywalking basher would have to uparmor his front end. Crashing into humans really wads up a modern front end.

    , @Marty
    @Anonymous


    Pedestrians often seem distracted. They meander out into the middle of the street without looking for oncoming traffic like mental patients.
     
    In S.F., the pedestrian problem isn’t meandering, but an apparent yen to mess with drivers. Just last night, 9:00, I came upon a guy walking down the middle of the street in a residential neighborhood for no reason, the sidewalks being empty. He was about 80, wearing black, no reflectors. I asked him if he did that when he was 35 or 45, and he said FU. I probably should have gotten out and knocked him on his ass, after all there were no cameras anywhere. I can only speculate that it makes him feel young to adopt the woke attitudes of his grandkids, i.e. cars are evil so I’ll colonize the streets.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    , @Mike_from_SGV
    @Anonymous

    I'm seeing that too in my area of LA County, more speeding, whipping in and out of lanes, etc. Where the heck are the police or CHP. A lot of revenue could be raised for government coffers if they would enforce the law and fine violators.

  7. There were across the board waivers of driving license expirations in most states.

    This could imply tbat government regulation/the nanny state really is having an enormous effect on human behavior, and that easing regulation can result in an insant lapse of discipline among the general public, which results in a staggering increase in death and destruction — all through the mere signal of lax enforcement.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @JohnPlywood

    Lol getting an extra month to renew my license in no way made me drive more recklessly last year

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Clyde
    @JohnPlywood

    Is this your toot for the day? Please don't dismay. Send up another, my brother. Some one said you were tiny duck in disguise.

    , @John Up North
    @JohnPlywood

    I went to renew my driver's license in Chicago a short time ago and they waived the eye test which, in the past, I always had to do.

  8. Or, “is there any way in which the criminal lockdown was not massively damaging?”

  9. Higher impact speeds because the roads are less congested?

    Around here, drivers are still doing the same stupid things, crossing into the approaching lane, screwing up at intersections, etc., but we’re all moving along faster. Gotta watch out!

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Buzz Mohawk

    (I see Steve basically covers this in his article. I really should read the whole thing before commenting. That way, reading comprension, uh, compression, er, comprehension would be complete. Sorry.)

    Steve is so smart and thorough that it is hard to find anything to say that he hasn't already said. Yet we all try to contribute to his massive comment sections.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous

  10. @Buzz Mohawk
    Higher impact speeds because the roads are less congested?

    Around here, drivers are still doing the same stupid things, crossing into the approaching lane, screwing up at intersections, etc., but we're all moving along faster. Gotta watch out!

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    (I see Steve basically covers this in his article. I really should read the whole thing before commenting. That way, reading comprension, uh, compression, er, comprehension would be complete. Sorry.)

    Steve is so smart and thorough that it is hard to find anything to say that he hasn’t already said. Yet we all try to contribute to his massive comment sections.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Disagree: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, here's one: I was wondering how the NHTSB (or the National Safety Council for that matter, if they do any of this themselves) got an accurate "miles driven" number. My first thought was that maybe it's from gasoline sales and vehicle gas milages x number of various vehicles on the road with some estimation in there. In that case, I was wondering how much the electric vehicles would make actual miles driven greater than estimated.

    However, looking in this pretty readable paper by the Federal Highway Admin, for the NHTS from '17. , I see that they do large surveys of odometer readings gleaned from phone calls or mail surveys, I guess). Other estimates are from surveys milage estimated by drivers, and then surveys of estimated vehicle daily time in use. The paper says that even the odometer numbers (used for 80% or so of the 256,000 vehicles for this data quality assessment) aren't so reliable.

    Therefore, other factors (driver "characteristics", age of vehicle) are used in an attempt to correct mis-estimates that are made by those surveyed. There are simple correction equations used, with their fudge factors and the like, to make one set of data fit the other. It's somewhat interesting, but just this one paper should be good to make a user of this data realize that nothing is as easy as it sounds.

    So, the denominator for these fatality stats is not necessarily as accurate a number as the fatality number. Just sayin', so after all the guesses about the reasons for the numerator numbers, how 'bout let's think about the denominator too.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Steve Sailer

    , @Anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I think I’ve got an angle not addressed.

    Car driving behavior has become bolder and riskier because more people are at home and/or watching car racing. And the SIM iRacing (virtual) races have also attracted a lot of viewers.


    Rolex 24 Delivers IMSA Viewership Records
    Nearly 1.1 million viewers tune into Rolex 24 at Daytona…
    February 3, 2021

    The Rolex 24 at Daytona delivered viewership records across NBC and NBCSN last weekend – headlined by the most-watched IMSA telecast since 2008 – continuing IMSA’s viewership growth since NBC Sports acquired its broadcast rights prior to the 2019 season
     


    Return of live auto racing, golf draws huge TV ratings

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/05/18/sports/return-live-auto-racing-golf-draws-huge-tv-ratings/
     


    Audience for Sports Car Racing Increases as Other Sports Are in Decline

    https://www.hotrod.com/articles/imsa-ratings-increase-24-hours-of-daytona/
     

    Now, I will go a little further with my theory. NASCAR has seen a significant decrease in viewership in the past few years and alienated a lot more fans with what went on this summer (embracing BLM and Bubba Wallace’s hallucinations). The real gearhead car guys among this group gravitated to IMSA sports car racing. So, essentially these fans gravitated from watching racing on an oval with only wide left turns to watching track racing with a multitude of turns in which hitting the apex is crucial.

    Watching sports changes behavior. You watch an NFL game and you’re shadow throwing or kicking a football for a week or two. You watch a major fight and your shadowboxing in private for a week. You watch car racing and you pretend you’re racing other cars and you hit the apex at turns.

    Replies: @Luzzatto

  11. @Anonymous
    There just doesn’t seem to be the same police presence in Southern California. I never see any highway patrol, and quite often the average speed on the 5 freeway is 80 mph. Essentially, you can drive like an asshole with no worries.

    Pedestrians often seem distracted. They meander out into the middle of the street without looking for oncoming traffic like mental patients. I was just thinking that any serial killer could kill at least one pedestrian a week, legally. Just be ready for a pedestrian who wanders out into the middle of the street with his or her back to you, and wham! As long as they’re jaywalking, you’ve had your fun, and it’s all legal!

    They should do a "Better Call Saul" episode with that as the premise. Saul has to defend someone who's taken out 10 jaywalkers in a month, and keeps taking them out all through the episode. Is he really a serial killer? Or just very unlucky? It could be a recurring character. How do you incarcerate someone who accidentally kills qualified jaywalkers?

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Redneck farmer, @Jim Christian, @Marty, @Mike_from_SGV

    Indeed, COVID and the race drama seem to have gutted law enforcement. Police forces nationwide had been shrinking for years, though, just due to the aging of society generated by the infertility of white females, and the huge number of cops that existed from 1993-2014 was kind of an historical anomaly. The USA today must be shifting towards a 1970s level of police officers per capita.

    https://nypost.com/2020/02/08/americas-shrinking-police-forces-could-spell-trouble-for-our-safety/

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @JohnPlywood

    I'm ok with this. It's not like cops have any real duty to stop crime or catch criminals. It's nice when they do, but it's not in their job description.

  12. @Anonymous
    There just doesn’t seem to be the same police presence in Southern California. I never see any highway patrol, and quite often the average speed on the 5 freeway is 80 mph. Essentially, you can drive like an asshole with no worries.

    Pedestrians often seem distracted. They meander out into the middle of the street without looking for oncoming traffic like mental patients. I was just thinking that any serial killer could kill at least one pedestrian a week, legally. Just be ready for a pedestrian who wanders out into the middle of the street with his or her back to you, and wham! As long as they’re jaywalking, you’ve had your fun, and it’s all legal!

    They should do a "Better Call Saul" episode with that as the premise. Saul has to defend someone who's taken out 10 jaywalkers in a month, and keeps taking them out all through the episode. Is he really a serial killer? Or just very unlucky? It could be a recurring character. How do you incarcerate someone who accidentally kills qualified jaywalkers?

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Redneck farmer, @Jim Christian, @Marty, @Mike_from_SGV

    Death Race 2021!

  13. @Cortes
    My guess is that the summer 2020 flood of news items and videos hitting phones - must see! - would’ve contributed to the spike in deaths. Not for the first time, yesterday I saw a young woman walk straight into a traffic flow while texting - had the driver who screeched to a halt been less observant, she’d be waking up in the ICU or the mortuary.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jsm

    It’s sad he stopped

    • Agree: Macumazahn
    • LOL: Liza
    • Replies: @theMann
    @AndrewR

    I am coming around to that way of thinking. Hey, you want to be daily winner in the Galactic Fucktard Contest, that is the way to do it.

  14. Traffic deaths need to be filtered same as crime: by race. Then, “where”?

    As deaths by gunshots declined due to improved medical care; so, too, deaths in traffic accidents due to improved roads and greatly improved car safety structure since 1960. (Then, emergency medical care).

    Drunk driving is probably higher. “Desperation” probably fuels fatalism. Lack of funds means worse maintenance re tires (steering/braking/handling).

    I drive an average of thirty-one (31) states per year. Year-round, as a truck driver. Race correlates to driving habits much more than one might assume. Without seeing the driver — making bad choices at the wheel — I can usually predict both race & sex.

    [MORE]

    Skills have declined in general. “Caution”. To do with situational awareness and being responsive. “Knowing” (acting) what to do is worst among the poorest, best among the richest (zip code). Several generations of divorce cut off otherwise capable men from risk assessment such that they’re now blind to it. (Fathers lost authority vis-a-vis TV & Vietnam draft).

    Enstupidation means they are unwilling to be corrected.
    (Call an American every name in the book. Only at stupidity will he disagree).

    Selfishness drives car use style. Desperation makes it worse. Never had good habits = zero room for error.

    Traits seen on the highway as aberrations 25-years ago (versus practice the thirty-years previous) are indicative of immigrant incompetents (no exceptions). WWII was won by cooperation. Men drivers (nearly all) carried this over into highway practice up to around 1990.

    Metro areas grew worst fastest with suburban sprawl after our being ethnically-cleansed from our cities and wives forced to find full-time work to cover massive debt load. Then, “immigrants”.

    9-5 and “closed weekends” (or Sunday) meant life had a rhythm. A pace. What outlier women or foreigner bad habits (lack of awareness and compensatory behavior) wasn’t critical. But those two groups now outnumber the skilled (call it good habits) such that deductive reasoning per road rule principles has all but disappeared.

    Without race & region (metro vs rural, first) there’s no way to get a handle on WHY a rising death rate.

    From my personal perspective, I assume the bad habits borne of contempt for fellow drivers (never acquiring good habits) coupled to social indices (all-encompassing pressures) are adequate explanation.

    What lacks any explanation is the sheer number of cars on the road 150-miles from any major metro during workday hours. 20-million unemployed? Many more under-employed? This nationwide phenomenon DIDN’T EXIST 25+ (and more) years ago. From 1100 thru 2300 hours. This is several millions of cars, daily.

    Capture that in cross-section by race and one will have uncovered “economic” (or political) activity heretofore hidden. Networks. Cars ain’t cheap and running them is the same. (Explain the explosion of chain hotels built 2-3 at a time even in locations where demand would appear nearly non-existent). $150-$200 day overhead.

    What you know about your bubble (the 90% of the same places you go 90% of the time; per DHS) doesn’t track auto use (or, fatality) type & rates thereof. You can’t take yourself as normative. That went out with Uncle Ronnie.

    “Smart phones” explain Obama era and later changes, but the roots are deeper. (Inability to navigate without GPS). “Flocking” is what to look for. Pack-formation as anodyne to high speed travel anxiety.

    Genuinely bad weather (Texas absorbing a war blow) takes down the facade. Should’ve heard the CB that week. And knew how to dissect what you heard.

    “Stress” is adequate surface answer to ones own risk-assessment. “Stress” as among those without reasoning skills. Congenitally-incapable, or never taught (contempt) equals similar outcomes.

    Expect that the rate will rise. A crisis that won’t go to waste. WAZE is worthless except to predict what stupids will be doing. Worthless as your phone, when it matters.

    CITIZEN BAND (for those willing to hear & speak).


    http://www.k0bg.com.

    • Thanks: JMcG, BB753
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @SteeringWheelHolder

    Steering Wheel Holder, very nice comment.

    , @Danindc
    @SteeringWheelHolder

    Driving the DC and Baltimore beltways whenever I see a group of motorcycle riders popping wheelies WHILE going 90 mph I can also predict race and sex. I’ve never once been wrong.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

  15. @JohnnyWalker123
    For some reason, there has been a surge of youth street racing in my area.

    A disproportionate share of the participants ate Black.

    Replies: @pierog, @Morton's toes

    you could say they are not Fine Young Cannibals…

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  16. If beat cops aren’t out there enforcing traffic laws (and it seems they aren’t), there goes the last reason for their existence. Securing crime scenes while waiting for the detectives show up isn’t a viable long-term career.
    Does anyone keep track of traffic citations issued?

    • Replies: @anon
    @JMcG

    "On average, there are 6 million car accidents in the U.S. every year. That's roughly 16,438 per day. Of these crashes, 22,471 caused only property damage. Over 37,000 Americans die in automobile crashes per year.Oct 17, 2019"

    https://www.thewanderingrv.com/car-accident-statistics/

    Maybe the extra is the increase in joy-riding/car-jackings,

  17. Three theories:

    1. The character of the miles-driven changed from local to highway. Commuting fell sharply but for those who needed to make long trips (eg to check on an ailing family member), many avoided airlines and instead resorted to enduro road trips at high speeds.

    2. In many settled areas, the streets were empty which contributed to a general sense of “I Am Legend” style isolation, freedom, and lawlessness which encouraged reckless behavior.

    3. Many essential workers shunned mass transit during lockdowns and shifted to driving which put lots of rusty (and in some cases exhausted) drivers on the roads.

  18. @JohnPlywood
    @Anonymous

    Indeed, COVID and the race drama seem to have gutted law enforcement. Police forces nationwide had been shrinking for years, though, just due to the aging of society generated by the infertility of white females, and the huge number of cops that existed from 1993-2014 was kind of an historical anomaly. The USA today must be shifting towards a 1970s level of police officers per capita.


    https://nypost.com/2020/02/08/americas-shrinking-police-forces-could-spell-trouble-for-our-safety/

    Replies: @AndrewR

    I’m ok with this. It’s not like cops have any real duty to stop crime or catch criminals. It’s nice when they do, but it’s not in their job description.

    • Agree: JMcG
  19. @JohnPlywood
    There were across the board waivers of driving license expirations in most states.



    This could imply tbat government regulation/the nanny state really is having an enormous effect on human behavior, and that easing regulation can result in an insant lapse of discipline among the general public, which results in a staggering increase in death and destruction -- all through the mere signal of lax enforcement.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Clyde, @John Up North

    Lol getting an extra month to renew my license in no way made me drive more recklessly last year

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    @AndrewR

    The extensions lasted about a year in most states and haven't ended yet. They will likely have to be reinstated for another year after clumsy states like Texas (always the first to disappoint) generate and unleash the Fourth Wave of Death upon the country. Some states may have to do away with licensing altogether.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @AndrewR


    Lol getting an extra month to renew my license in no way made me drive more recklessly last year

     

    Lemme guess... you don't live in a "motor voter" state. Extending the deadline qualifies as "voter suppression".
  20. How granular do they get with the car crash data? For example, time of day, highway vs city driving, high speed vs low speed collision, high congestion vs low congestion, etc, etc.

    I think they try to look at these issues as part of traffic flow designs. The most lethal maneuver of all seems to be the old left hand turn across oncoming traffic. Plus the occasional person who just spaces out and doesn’t see a red light. Drunk, high, and distracted driving of course. And, finally, drivers who literally fall asleep at the wheel (usually on the highway at night).

    There might be some interesting patterns in the type of accidents occurring.

    I wonder, for example, if the Uber phenomenon might increase deaths per mile simply because there are more cars with two people now.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Hypnotoad666

    I've said this before and I'll say it again: Young drivers, though they may lack judgement, at least were always the ones with the quick reactions and good eyesight. The latter and maybe even the former, has changed due to their looking at screens 1 ft from their eyes for many hours daily.

    I see a car ready to pull out onto the road. He's got time. No, but he's not sure how far away I am and definitely can't tell how fast I'm going. So, he thinks about it for 2 seconds. OK, he's thought about it. Now he goes! I gotta put on the brakes for this fucking guy, no, not this old lady who is just trying to get groceries, with no bus service around, so, you know, but this 20-something y/o driver who's got no visual judgment, no quick thinking, and his eyes probably take 5 seconds to accommodate.

    Looking at the graphs, though, if the smart phones came out 10 years back, this doesn't match that well. However, how long has it been to where everyone's got unlimited data? Anyone remember "hang up and drive!"?

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Macumazahn

  21. The selection effect could be the roads driven on and trip length.
    I’m guessing higher accident rates because a higher percentage of shorter trips.
    Highway driving on interstates has a very low accident per mile rate compared to local driving.
    Another way to normalize the data is accident per trip, but that may not be in your data.

    This does not exclude other effects.

  22. I think most people talk shit and say things they can’t substantiate. They say things they think other people will appreciate and applaud, leave out anything about themselves:

  23. “COVID-19 travel restrictions cited in WA’s worst January road toll in a decade”, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 31st Jan 2021

    It is the worst start to the year since the Road Safety Commission started keeping online records in 2011.

    Based on year-to-date comparisons up until January 27, the 2021 tally is more than double the 11 deaths recorded during the same period in 2020 and five more than the 18 recorded over the same period in 2013, the second worst tally on record.

    […]

    WA Road Safety Commissioner Adrian Warner said an increase in the number of West Australians travelling around the state due to travel restrictions had contributed to the rise in crashes.

    In other words: fewer trips to Bali, more trips to Broome; fewer trips by plane, more loooong drives on country roads with dad tired and the kid screaming in the back; more traffic than isolated country roads normally see; methed-up truckies sharing the roads with Sunday drivers from the suburbs…

    (Sidebar: note that Western Australia has seen 9 COVID deaths, i.e., the state’s COVID response has, by the government’s own admission, caused more deaths than the virus.)

    Obviously testing this hypothesis would require a much deeper dive into the data. For instance:

    …miles driven had almost wholly recovered by June, but the death rate kept going up and got notably worse than in April.

    Total miles may have recovered by June – but were they the same miles, so to speak, as in 2019? I don’t think so. Not everyone is back at the office, even now; unemployment’s way up; etc. So who’s driving where, that wasn’t before? Best guesses: delivery drivers and intra-US tourists.

    Eyeballing the data, I think tourism is actually a pretty good guess: it looks like there’s a very mild seasonal pattern, with more road deaths in summer both years. But I’m not good with the numbers.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    (Sidebar: note that Western Australia has seen 9 COVID deaths, i.e., the state’s COVID response has, by the government’s own admission, caused more deaths than the virus.)

    Top spot, BO. This issue is a new weight to put in the balance pro- and anti-lockdown.

    (My own inclination is anti-lockdown, particularly after the first British lockdown had lost most of its purpose - or purported purpose - by May of last year.)

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    , @dearieme
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    note that Western Australia has seen 9 COVID deaths, i.e., the state’s COVID response has, by the government’s own admission, caused more deaths than the virus.

    Top spot, BO. This issue is a new weight to put in the balance pro- and anti-lockdown.

    For Britain I've found this:

    There were an estimated 1,580 road deaths in the year ending June 2020 which includes three months of the national lockdown. This is a decrease of 14% compared to the previous year. This change is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level.
    There were 131,220 casualties of all severities in the year ending June 2020, down by 16% from the previous year. This change is statistically significant.
    The overall casualty rate per vehicle mile decreased by 2% over the same period. The reduction in casualties is broadly in line with the reduction in traffic which decreased by 14% over this period.


    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/956524/road-casualties-year-ending-june-2020.pdf

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

  24. @Polistra
    It seems that every sort of progress attained by our society over the past years, decades, even centuries is now being driven into hard reverse.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @theMann, @Mike_from_SGV

    Strange memories on this nervous night in Las Vegas. Five years later? Six? It seems like a lifetime, or at least a Main Era—the kind of peak that never comes again. San Francisco in the middle sixties was a very special time and place to be a part of. Maybe it meant something. Maybe not, in the long run . . . but no explanation, no mix of words or music or memories can touch that sense of knowing that you were there and alive in that corner of time and the world. Whatever it meant. . . .

    History is hard to know, because of all the hired bullshit, but even without being sure of “history” it seems entirely reasonable to think that every now and then the energy of a whole generation comes to a head in a long fine flash, for reasons that nobody really understands at the time—and which never explain, in retrospect, what actually happened.

    My central memory of that time seems to hang on one or five or maybe forty nights—or very early mornings—when I left the Fillmore half-crazy and, instead of going home, aimed the big 650 Lightning across the Bay Bridge at a hundred miles an hour wearing L. L. Bean shorts and a Butte sheepherder’s jacket . . . booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change) . . . but being absolutely certain that no matter which way I went I would come to a place where people were just as high and wild as I was: No doubt at all about that. . . .

    There was madness in any direction, at any hour. If not across the Bay, then up the Golden Gate or down 101 to Los Altos or La Honda. . . . You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning. . . .

    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .

    So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark—that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account


    booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change
     
    Umm, on the Bay Bridge, the toll booths are on the west-bound lanes.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Morton's toes, @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @James B. Shearer

    , @BenKenobi
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    In my opinion, The Wave Speech is also very applicable to the 2016 Trump movement.

    All that enthusiasm and potential now gone, like tears in rain.

    https://i.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/000/996/777/8d7.png

    , @Ripple Earthdevil
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Hunter S. Thompson?

    , @Anonymous
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account


    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .
     
    When I was a teen in the mid-seventies, I lived in a So. Cal beach community, and if my friends and I didn’t have a plan for a Saturday night, we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends. We’d also travel down PCH to Huntington Beach with the same plan. More often than not there was a house right on the sand overlooking the Pacific Ocean having a surfer party, and we were welcome to partake. Hanging out in someone’s house we didn’t know, drinking off their keg.

    I was fortunate to experience the last gasp of California as Shangri-La. People who arrived in the 80's or later think I romanticize, because they can’t process that they contributed to ruining an entire state. They can’t imagine a place that was so much better than where they dame from. They'll never know what they missed. They don’t want to know. Parasites don’t want to know the history of their hosts.

    But I concur with that innate sense of victory. If you watch "American Graffitti," which was before my time, you can get the same existential flavor. Back then, anything good could probably happen. If not, you’d still have a good story. Even if you were a Toad.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Corn

    , @Luzzatto
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    Barack Hussein Obama claims the only time he ever experienced racism in Hawaii was from the White minority and never from the Asian majority.

    Is that believable that he never experienced any racism from the Asian majority in Hawaii or the Indigenous Hawaiian minority population and it all 100% came from Whitey only?

  25. You know I don’t wanna post a song undermining criminal Jews but come on

    Don’t that just make you want to tax yourself harder?

    Someone’s gotta pay these huge multinationals their heartfelt Jew

  26. These are likely to be counted as COVID deaths. Question is, did COVID infect the cars and cause them to kill the carbon comorbidities inside the machine, or did it impair the carbon units’ ability to control the machine?

    Hey, it’s not much more absurd to assert this as some of the shit the “scientists” have been throwing at the proverbial wall, hoping it will stick with many of us.

  27. Yep, but how many of those traffic deaths are actually “covid “deaths”? Lol!

    • Replies: @BB753
    @BB753

    Seriously, I believe wearing masks and driving, or having carried a face-hugger all day at work and then driving home exhausted from the lack of oxygen may account for a number of those deaths.

  28. @AndrewR
    @JohnPlywood

    Lol getting an extra month to renew my license in no way made me drive more recklessly last year

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Reg Cæsar

    The extensions lasted about a year in most states and haven’t ended yet. They will likely have to be reinstated for another year after clumsy states like Texas (always the first to disappoint) generate and unleash the Fourth Wave of Death upon the country. Some states may have to do away with licensing altogether.

  29. Is it possible that there was an increase in drunk driving? I haven’t used a cab or ride share service in a year. Of course, I haven’t gone out to dinner, parties, or other places away from home where there is drinking.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Steve-O

    Yes, Uber basically disappeared about a year ago. Still hasn't returned to my metro area.

  30. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Polistra


    Strange memories on this nervous night in Las Vegas. Five years later? Six? It seems like a lifetime, or at least a Main Era—the kind of peak that never comes again. San Francisco in the middle sixties was a very special time and place to be a part of. Maybe it meant something. Maybe not, in the long run . . . but no explanation, no mix of words or music or memories can touch that sense of knowing that you were there and alive in that corner of time and the world. Whatever it meant. . . .

    History is hard to know, because of all the hired bullshit, but even without being sure of “history” it seems entirely reasonable to think that every now and then the energy of a whole generation comes to a head in a long fine flash, for reasons that nobody really understands at the time—and which never explain, in retrospect, what actually happened.

    My central memory of that time seems to hang on one or five or maybe forty nights—or very early mornings—when I left the Fillmore half-crazy and, instead of going home, aimed the big 650 Lightning across the Bay Bridge at a hundred miles an hour wearing L. L. Bean shorts and a Butte sheepherder's jacket . . . booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change) . . . but being absolutely certain that no matter which way I went I would come to a place where people were just as high and wild as I was: No doubt at all about that. . . .

    There was madness in any direction, at any hour. If not across the Bay, then up the Golden Gate or down 101 to Los Altos or La Honda. . . . You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning. . . .

    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .

    So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark—that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back.
     

    Replies: @International Jew, @BenKenobi, @Ripple Earthdevil, @Anonymous, @Luzzatto

    booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change

    Umm, on the Bay Bridge, the toll booths are on the west-bound lanes.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @International Jew

    Wasn't The Graduate driving on the wrong deck for direction of travel, too, I.J.? I know that some of the scenes at Berkeley were at Berkeley but a bunch were really at UCLA(?) or somewhere in Southern Cal, closer to the movie makers.

    Replies: @Anon, @International Jew

    , @Morton's toes
    @International Jew

    When you are high and wild it's hard to remember when you get to the typewriter which way you were driving.

    , @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @International Jew

    Next you'll be telling me he didn't really do all that acid

    , @James B. Shearer
    @International Jew

    "Umm, on the Bay Bridge, the toll booths are on the west-bound lanes."

    According to wikipedia:

    "The toll plaza on the Oakland side (since 1969 for westbound traffic only) .."

    The quote refers to

    "... San Francisco in the middle sixties .."

    So it appears there would have been east-bound tolls at that time.

    Replies: @International Jew

  31. My guess is the fireworks injuries were disproportionately among Latinos.

    I think that’s an LA-skewed guess. And maybe my guess is similarly NY-skewed, but the Blax (it’s like Latinx: strive for consistency) around here got really into randomly shooting off roman candles etc. for many months starting last summer, with utter impunity.

    Everyone who wasn’t actually doing it was seriously freaking out about it, with good reason. I’m as pro-firework as the next red-blooded guy, but not so much in densely populated urban centers.

    • Replies: @DiogenesNYC
    @slumber_j

    Friends of our in parts of South Harlem (the “UUWS”) were under siege last Summer; constant displays of low-level, commercial-grade fireworks between high-rises. “The bombs bursting in air.”

    Entire neighborhoods were suffering from mild-PTSD and sleep deprivation.

    Part of it was 2020 lawlessness, but a big part was also down to nearby-NJ lifting its restrictions on retail sales of the big, mortar-style ordinance.

  32. If only generation faggot weren’t so full of vox days

  33. @Polistra
    It seems that every sort of progress attained by our society over the past years, decades, even centuries is now being driven into hard reverse.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @theMann, @Mike_from_SGV

    America, 1969. We put a man on the moon.

    America, 2021. We quiver in fear of an an imaginary pandemic.

    When insane meets cowardly and they both slam into incompetent, the results can get a little bit….ugly. In any case, rejecting several hundred years worth of Enlightenment civilization is really, really, gonna suck.

  34. @AndrewR
    @Cortes

    It's sad he stopped

    Replies: @theMann

    I am coming around to that way of thinking. Hey, you want to be daily winner in the Galactic Fucktard Contest, that is the way to do it.

  35. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    "COVID-19 travel restrictions cited in WA's worst January road toll in a decade", Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 31st Jan 2021

    It is the worst start to the year since the Road Safety Commission started keeping online records in 2011.

    Based on year-to-date comparisons up until January 27, the 2021 tally is more than double the 11 deaths recorded during the same period in 2020 and five more than the 18 recorded over the same period in 2013, the second worst tally on record.

    [...]

    WA Road Safety Commissioner Adrian Warner said an increase in the number of West Australians travelling around the state due to travel restrictions had contributed to the rise in crashes.
     
    In other words: fewer trips to Bali, more trips to Broome; fewer trips by plane, more loooong drives on country roads with dad tired and the kid screaming in the back; more traffic than isolated country roads normally see; methed-up truckies sharing the roads with Sunday drivers from the suburbs...

    (Sidebar: note that Western Australia has seen 9 COVID deaths, i.e., the state's COVID response has, by the government's own admission, caused more deaths than the virus.)

    Obviously testing this hypothesis would require a much deeper dive into the data. For instance:

    ...miles driven had almost wholly recovered by June, but the death rate kept going up and got notably worse than in April.
     
    Total miles may have recovered by June - but were they the same miles, so to speak, as in 2019? I don't think so. Not everyone is back at the office, even now; unemployment's way up; etc. So who's driving where, that wasn't before? Best guesses: delivery drivers and intra-US tourists.

    Eyeballing the data, I think tourism is actually a pretty good guess: it looks like there's a very mild seasonal pattern, with more road deaths in summer both years. But I'm not good with the numbers.

    Replies: @dearieme, @dearieme

    (Sidebar: note that Western Australia has seen 9 COVID deaths, i.e., the state’s COVID response has, by the government’s own admission, caused more deaths than the virus.)

    Top spot, BO. This issue is a new weight to put in the balance pro- and anti-lockdown.

    (My own inclination is anti-lockdown, particularly after the first British lockdown had lost most of its purpose – or purported purpose – by May of last year.)

    • Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @dearieme


    (My own inclination is anti-lockdown, particularly after the first British lockdown had lost most of its purpose – or purported purpose – by May of last year.)
     
    ?
  36. There was an uptick of racing around here, but no accidents. Also by May you had a lot of people driving to get out of the house. It would be interesting to see what states had the increase in traffic fatalities. The rioters did target highways. Did that impact traffic accidents by having people get onto unfamiliar roads to avoid the mayhem? Finally were the uptick of traffic fatalities in pot legal states? Apparently one the effects of the harmless weed is it last into the next day by making you sluggish. Reaction time matters when driving.

  37. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Buzz Mohawk

    (I see Steve basically covers this in his article. I really should read the whole thing before commenting. That way, reading comprension, uh, compression, er, comprehension would be complete. Sorry.)

    Steve is so smart and thorough that it is hard to find anything to say that he hasn't already said. Yet we all try to contribute to his massive comment sections.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous

    Well, here’s one: I was wondering how the NHTSB (or the National Safety Council for that matter, if they do any of this themselves) got an accurate “miles driven” number. My first thought was that maybe it’s from gasoline sales and vehicle gas milages x number of various vehicles on the road with some estimation in there. In that case, I was wondering how much the electric vehicles would make actual miles driven greater than estimated.

    However, looking in this pretty readable paper by the Federal Highway Admin, for the NHTS from ’17. , I see that they do large surveys of odometer readings gleaned from phone calls or mail surveys, I guess). Other estimates are from surveys milage estimated by drivers, and then surveys of estimated vehicle daily time in use. The paper says that even the odometer numbers (used for 80% or so of the 256,000 vehicles for this data quality assessment) aren’t so reliable.

    Therefore, other factors (driver “characteristics”, age of vehicle) are used in an attempt to correct mis-estimates that are made by those surveyed. There are simple correction equations used, with their fudge factors and the like, to make one set of data fit the other. It’s somewhat interesting, but just this one paper should be good to make a user of this data realize that nothing is as easy as it sounds.

    So, the denominator for these fatality stats is not necessarily as accurate a number as the fatality number. Just sayin’, so after all the guesses about the reasons for the numerator numbers, how ’bout let’s think about the denominator too.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Achmed E. Newman

    They can get lots of miles driven per year from annual state vehicle safety inspections. Not to worry though, once it's all perfected they'll be able to tell about every mile driven by a vehicle and every pack of chewing gum purchased by its occupants.

    , @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Oil company profits were way down in 2020 because, I assume, gasoline sales were down.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  38. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    "COVID-19 travel restrictions cited in WA's worst January road toll in a decade", Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 31st Jan 2021

    It is the worst start to the year since the Road Safety Commission started keeping online records in 2011.

    Based on year-to-date comparisons up until January 27, the 2021 tally is more than double the 11 deaths recorded during the same period in 2020 and five more than the 18 recorded over the same period in 2013, the second worst tally on record.

    [...]

    WA Road Safety Commissioner Adrian Warner said an increase in the number of West Australians travelling around the state due to travel restrictions had contributed to the rise in crashes.
     
    In other words: fewer trips to Bali, more trips to Broome; fewer trips by plane, more loooong drives on country roads with dad tired and the kid screaming in the back; more traffic than isolated country roads normally see; methed-up truckies sharing the roads with Sunday drivers from the suburbs...

    (Sidebar: note that Western Australia has seen 9 COVID deaths, i.e., the state's COVID response has, by the government's own admission, caused more deaths than the virus.)

    Obviously testing this hypothesis would require a much deeper dive into the data. For instance:

    ...miles driven had almost wholly recovered by June, but the death rate kept going up and got notably worse than in April.
     
    Total miles may have recovered by June - but were they the same miles, so to speak, as in 2019? I don't think so. Not everyone is back at the office, even now; unemployment's way up; etc. So who's driving where, that wasn't before? Best guesses: delivery drivers and intra-US tourists.

    Eyeballing the data, I think tourism is actually a pretty good guess: it looks like there's a very mild seasonal pattern, with more road deaths in summer both years. But I'm not good with the numbers.

    Replies: @dearieme, @dearieme

    note that Western Australia has seen 9 COVID deaths, i.e., the state’s COVID response has, by the government’s own admission, caused more deaths than the virus.

    Top spot, BO. This issue is a new weight to put in the balance pro- and anti-lockdown.

    For Britain I’ve found this:

    There were an estimated 1,580 road deaths in the year ending June 2020 which includes three months of the national lockdown. This is a decrease of 14% compared to the previous year. This change is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level.
    There were 131,220 casualties of all severities in the year ending June 2020, down by 16% from the previous year. This change is statistically significant.
    The overall casualty rate per vehicle mile decreased by 2% over the same period. The reduction in casualties is broadly in line with the reduction in traffic which decreased by 14% over this period.

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/956524/road-casualties-year-ending-june-2020.pdf

    • Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @dearieme

    There was the same decrease in Western Australia, with the general downtick in cars n the road. (I don't think anybody's disputing that you can eliminate car deaths entirely by eliminating the use of cars.) And yet, that boost in January, from holidaymakers (apparently); the general rise in America.

    If tourism's a factor, we should see the downward trend in Britain begin to be arrested by summer, which, per your link, it was. If that's when lockdowns ended, though, that will obviously be confounded somewhat. And then there's the rest of the year.

    Keep an eye out for the updated figures, I guess.

  39. @Hypnotoad666
    How granular do they get with the car crash data? For example, time of day, highway vs city driving, high speed vs low speed collision, high congestion vs low congestion, etc, etc.

    I think they try to look at these issues as part of traffic flow designs. The most lethal maneuver of all seems to be the old left hand turn across oncoming traffic. Plus the occasional person who just spaces out and doesn't see a red light. Drunk, high, and distracted driving of course. And, finally, drivers who literally fall asleep at the wheel (usually on the highway at night).

    There might be some interesting patterns in the type of accidents occurring.

    I wonder, for example, if the Uber phenomenon might increase deaths per mile simply because there are more cars with two people now.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again: Young drivers, though they may lack judgement, at least were always the ones with the quick reactions and good eyesight. The latter and maybe even the former, has changed due to their looking at screens 1 ft from their eyes for many hours daily.

    I see a car ready to pull out onto the road. He’s got time. No, but he’s not sure how far away I am and definitely can’t tell how fast I’m going. So, he thinks about it for 2 seconds. OK, he’s thought about it. Now he goes! I gotta put on the brakes for this fucking guy, no, not this old lady who is just trying to get groceries, with no bus service around, so, you know, but this 20-something y/o driver who’s got no visual judgment, no quick thinking, and his eyes probably take 5 seconds to accommodate.

    Looking at the graphs, though, if the smart phones came out 10 years back, this doesn’t match that well. However, how long has it been to where everyone’s got unlimited data? Anyone remember “hang up and drive!”?

    • Replies: @additionalMike
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Re young people and accidents:
    Smoking marijuana is pretty much legal now...my recollection (and this is on mild early-'70's weed) is that a stoned driver cannot accurately judge time, speed or distance...driving up to a red light, normally a simple task, became much more difficult. Your average Cheech & Chong aficionado might find himself coasting up to the light at walking speed, unable to gauge the distance, or having to slam on the brakes to avoid rolling right through the light. Driving through a long tunnel or a road construction site becomes terrifying, due to the narrow lane.
    Here's a thought for everyone: Young Black people in my Upstate NY city absolutely adore smoking locoweed... I wonder if the accident data is accurately broken down by race?

    , @Macumazahn
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I am simply incapable of driving and talking on the phone simultaneously. Twice I attempted it, both times while rolling down a flat, straight stretch of the interstate. By the time I hung up from telling my friends that I would arrive shortly, I was down to 45MPH and being passed on both the left and the right. I might just as well have been asleep for those 60-or-so seconds that the call lasted. I was a menace to myself and everyone around me. Never again.
    I once related this story to an acquaintance at a professional conference. He chuckled and told me that he had no difficulty driving while talking on the phone. The next day, as we were all leaving the parking garage to head to the airport, I heard a crash down below. I went over to the rail of the garage, and there was my acquaintance, in his rental car with the bumper torn off. He'd struck a bollard on the way out of the garage! I went down to make sure he was OK. He seemed a little stunned as he told me, "I only looked at my phone for a second..." I refrained from reminding him of our previous conversation, as he had trouble enough already without me rubbing salt in the wounds.

  40. @International Jew
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account


    booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change
     
    Umm, on the Bay Bridge, the toll booths are on the west-bound lanes.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Morton's toes, @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @James B. Shearer

    Wasn’t The Graduate driving on the wrong deck for direction of travel, too, I.J.? I know that some of the scenes at Berkeley were at Berkeley but a bunch were really at UCLA(?) or somewhere in Southern Cal, closer to the movie makers.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Achmed E. Newman

    And driving the wrong direction through the tunnel which leads AWAY from Santa Barbara on the northbound 101.

    , @International Jew
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's been a long time since the last time I saw The Graduate. All I remember is him driving into the rainbow-painted tunnels north of the GG Bridge, and then emerging two hundred miles to the south.

    Replies: @I, Libertine

  41. @Anonymous
    There just doesn’t seem to be the same police presence in Southern California. I never see any highway patrol, and quite often the average speed on the 5 freeway is 80 mph. Essentially, you can drive like an asshole with no worries.

    Pedestrians often seem distracted. They meander out into the middle of the street without looking for oncoming traffic like mental patients. I was just thinking that any serial killer could kill at least one pedestrian a week, legally. Just be ready for a pedestrian who wanders out into the middle of the street with his or her back to you, and wham! As long as they’re jaywalking, you’ve had your fun, and it’s all legal!

    They should do a "Better Call Saul" episode with that as the premise. Saul has to defend someone who's taken out 10 jaywalkers in a month, and keeps taking them out all through the episode. Is he really a serial killer? Or just very unlucky? It could be a recurring character. How do you incarcerate someone who accidentally kills qualified jaywalkers?

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Redneck farmer, @Jim Christian, @Marty, @Mike_from_SGV

    Your hypothetical serial jaywalking basher would have to uparmor his front end. Crashing into humans really wads up a modern front end.

  42. @BB753
    Yep, but how many of those traffic deaths are actually "covid "deaths"? Lol!

    Replies: @BB753

    Seriously, I believe wearing masks and driving, or having carried a face-hugger all day at work and then driving home exhausted from the lack of oxygen may account for a number of those deaths.

  43. @Cortes
    My guess is that the summer 2020 flood of news items and videos hitting phones - must see! - would’ve contributed to the spike in deaths. Not for the first time, yesterday I saw a young woman walk straight into a traffic flow while texting - had the driver who screeched to a halt been less observant, she’d be waking up in the ICU or the mortuary.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @jsm

    Do people wake up in the mortuary, still? YIKES! I thought that kind of thing went out with the Middle Ages. (smile)

    • Agree: I, Libertine
    • Replies: @I, Libertine
    @jsm

    That's why they're called "wakes," I've always suspected.

  44. @slumber_j

    My guess is the fireworks injuries were disproportionately among Latinos.
     
    I think that's an LA-skewed guess. And maybe my guess is similarly NY-skewed, but the Blax (it's like Latinx: strive for consistency) around here got really into randomly shooting off roman candles etc. for many months starting last summer, with utter impunity.

    Everyone who wasn't actually doing it was seriously freaking out about it, with good reason. I'm as pro-firework as the next red-blooded guy, but not so much in densely populated urban centers.

    Replies: @DiogenesNYC

    Friends of our in parts of South Harlem (the “UUWS”) were under siege last Summer; constant displays of low-level, commercial-grade fireworks between high-rises. “The bombs bursting in air.”

    Entire neighborhoods were suffering from mild-PTSD and sleep deprivation.

    Part of it was 2020 lawlessness, but a big part was also down to nearby-NJ lifting its restrictions on retail sales of the big, mortar-style ordinance.

  45. Anonymous[406] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    @Buzz Mohawk

    (I see Steve basically covers this in his article. I really should read the whole thing before commenting. That way, reading comprension, uh, compression, er, comprehension would be complete. Sorry.)

    Steve is so smart and thorough that it is hard to find anything to say that he hasn't already said. Yet we all try to contribute to his massive comment sections.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Anonymous

    I think I’ve got an angle not addressed.

    Car driving behavior has become bolder and riskier because more people are at home and/or watching car racing. And the SIM iRacing (virtual) races have also attracted a lot of viewers.

    Rolex 24 Delivers IMSA Viewership Records
    Nearly 1.1 million viewers tune into Rolex 24 at Daytona…
    February 3, 2021

    The Rolex 24 at Daytona delivered viewership records across NBC and NBCSN last weekend – headlined by the most-watched IMSA telecast since 2008 – continuing IMSA’s viewership growth since NBC Sports acquired its broadcast rights prior to the 2019 season

    Return of live auto racing, golf draws huge TV ratings

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/05/18/sports/return-live-auto-racing-golf-draws-huge-tv-ratings/

    Audience for Sports Car Racing Increases as Other Sports Are in Decline

    https://www.hotrod.com/articles/imsa-ratings-increase-24-hours-of-daytona/

    Now, I will go a little further with my theory. NASCAR has seen a significant decrease in viewership in the past few years and alienated a lot more fans with what went on this summer (embracing BLM and Bubba Wallace’s hallucinations). The real gearhead car guys among this group gravitated to IMSA sports car racing. So, essentially these fans gravitated from watching racing on an oval with only wide left turns to watching track racing with a multitude of turns in which hitting the apex is crucial.

    Watching sports changes behavior. You watch an NFL game and you’re shadow throwing or kicking a football for a week or two. You watch a major fight and your shadowboxing in private for a week. You watch car racing and you pretend you’re racing other cars and you hit the apex at turns.

    • Replies: @Luzzatto
    @Anonymous

    NASCAR does not have a single driver who is the offspring of 2 Black parents. They only have the Dwayne Johnson type Bubba Wallace. NASCAR needs to be Cancel Cultured and permanently shut down for this!

  46. I’m very surprised to learn traffic deaths went up during the early days of The Plague.

    My personal experience was that anyone still on the road in April slowed down and drove more carefully. I assumed it was a psychological issue. Drivers knew there was “something” out there that could kill them, and they became excessively cautious not just about what they touched but how they drove.

  47. Maybe it’s idiots wearing masks while driving. You can’t do anything as well as normal while wearing a mask, except rob a bank or go trick-or-treating.

    I laugh every time a car passes by when the one person who’s inside, driving alone, is wearing a mask.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk


    I laugh every time a car passes by when the one person who’s inside, driving alone, is wearing a mask.
     
    They're double-masking already, if you count the cabin-filter.

    I laugh when I see two or more people in a car wearing masks. If you're sitting in a car with someone, you're breating a soup of their aerosolized exhalation, mask or no.
    , @Adam Smith
    @Buzz Mohawk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3Z-_RmzxYM

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  48. Abolish motorcycle helmet laws!

    We understand the statistic showing that motorcyclist fatalities per mile driven are significantly higher compared to the figure for car drivers. But we also understand the harm caused by the incremental impact-energy related to the 2kg helmet the projectile motorcyclist is forced to wear. Some motorcycle fatalities are caused by body (non-head) injuries.

    The DEMs insist that a woman should have complete control over what she does to her own body, but that a man should have no control over what he does to his head.

    The DEMs are pro-choice on exactly one issue.

    [MORE]

    I am so sick and tired of seeing the government’s obsession with statistics. Collecting them. Analyzing them. Publishing them. Reacting to them. On and on.

    Which statistics get collected or published, or not, are all determined by politics.

    Most of all, I am disgusted by public education statistics (all of them bad, btw), and the army of six-figured, non-babysitting statistician-bureaucrats who process them.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @Abolish_public_education

    A_P_E, helmets allow you to have an open coffin, if they find your head. stay safe.

  49. @Bert
    My bet as to the main causative factor would be higher speed due to less traffic. The traffic in my town seems almost half of that in 2019, and the speed on the road in front of my house seems much faster.

    Another reason for higher speed could be psychological. Some people need a release from the tension caused by the epidemic, and they find it in their cars.

    Replies: @Aardvark, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @danand

    I thought that for a while, the police weren’t eager to make traffic stops for assorted reasons, so the idiots who thought that could drive as fast and recklessly as they could upped their idiocy.
    I witnessed all sorts of behavior from well above average speeding to blatantly running traffic lights.
    Left turns on red where it has never been permitted before seemed to increase.

  50. I wonder how many of that death rate figure died as a result of suicide? I do realise that a lot of people have been adversely affected by the new flu lockdowns, and thus found it too hard to cope. And of course there’s more than one way to end it. In the U.S. where guns are commonplace, I imagine that the gun suicide rate has increased over earlier years. So too you would think that vehicular suicide rates would also increase by a similar amount. But of course it would be hard to prove, unless a note was found somewhere.

  51. My impression is that alcohol use has been way up due to boredom, idleness, and stress associated with the pandemic and lockdowns. Not a good mix with driving, obviously.

  52. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Hypnotoad666

    I've said this before and I'll say it again: Young drivers, though they may lack judgement, at least were always the ones with the quick reactions and good eyesight. The latter and maybe even the former, has changed due to their looking at screens 1 ft from their eyes for many hours daily.

    I see a car ready to pull out onto the road. He's got time. No, but he's not sure how far away I am and definitely can't tell how fast I'm going. So, he thinks about it for 2 seconds. OK, he's thought about it. Now he goes! I gotta put on the brakes for this fucking guy, no, not this old lady who is just trying to get groceries, with no bus service around, so, you know, but this 20-something y/o driver who's got no visual judgment, no quick thinking, and his eyes probably take 5 seconds to accommodate.

    Looking at the graphs, though, if the smart phones came out 10 years back, this doesn't match that well. However, how long has it been to where everyone's got unlimited data? Anyone remember "hang up and drive!"?

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Macumazahn

    Re young people and accidents:
    Smoking marijuana is pretty much legal now…my recollection (and this is on mild early-’70’s weed) is that a stoned driver cannot accurately judge time, speed or distance…driving up to a red light, normally a simple task, became much more difficult. Your average Cheech & Chong aficionado might find himself coasting up to the light at walking speed, unable to gauge the distance, or having to slam on the brakes to avoid rolling right through the light. Driving through a long tunnel or a road construction site becomes terrifying, due to the narrow lane.
    Here’s a thought for everyone: Young Black people in my Upstate NY city absolutely adore smoking locoweed… I wonder if the accident data is accurately broken down by race?

  53. Lots of good theories here, but maybe there was an asteroid that exploded over North America and released a lot of lead? [sarcasm]

    More seriously though…how badly do recent trends hurt the lead-crime hypothesis?

  54. Interesting article. I’d noticed a decrease in driving ability in Spring 2020, mainly an inability to stay within a lane on the highway. At first I credited covid, wondering if folks were wearing their masks in the car and fogging their glasses, or if covid had some effect on cognition/vision. My wife brought up marijuana dispensaries opening up in our state as a more plausible explanation. But local marijuana laws don’t explain a national trend; although it would be interesting to see state-level data.

    After chatting about this article, she’s noticed an increase in substance abuse problems post covid (she works in the medical industry). Certainly there have been reports of folks starting on alcohol fairly early in the day. So I wonder how much of it is just an uptick in substance abuse from depression about covid, or from a lack of structure in folks’ lives.

  55. It’s a clusterf*ck: less traffic police, more stressed EW’s making deliveries, more addled old folks, and finally, my favorite: more ex-cons with no licenses.

    What could possibly go wrong?

  56. @JohnnyWalker123
    For some reason, there has been a surge of youth street racing in my area.

    A disproportionate share of the participants ate Black.

    Replies: @pierog, @Morton's toes

    In my zip code the cops are still writing tickets.

    Are most traffic fatalities still alcohol impaired? Does more social distancing reduce designated driving?

    The pertinent data is out there. This ain’t like X files.

  57. This problem could be easily solved by looking at a breakdown on the causes of the traffic deaths and comparing them to previous years.

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
    @Anon

    That's hard work.

  58. BTW, I don’t know why he was asleep at the wheel, but Tiger Woods definitely was asleep at the time of his crash. “Prove it”, you say? Absolutely no skid (i.e., braking) marks on either “his” side of the highway or on the other side, the side over which he crossed. Even if you’re texting or whatever, by the time you’ve crossed the median a part of your brain screams “Look OUT!”, you snap-to, hit the brakes…nothing like that happened in his crash.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    @Charles


    Absolutely no skid (i.e., braking) marks on either “his” side of the highway or on the other side, the side over which he crossed.
     
    My guess is that Tiger’s car had newer anti-lock brakes. Since the wheels are rolling throughout the application of brakes, there are no skid marks ( except for maybe those on the driver’s underwear). Older ABS left light dashes of marks but some newer systems avoid almost all skidding and leave little, if any, skid marks. But since you wrote that Tiger’s car left “absolutely no skid marks” then perhaps there was no brake application at all.

    Another interesting aspect of anti-lock brake systems (ABS): a 2004 Australian study by Monash University Accident Research Centre found that ABS increased the risk of run-off-the-road crashes by 35%.
  59. @International Jew
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account


    booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change
     
    Umm, on the Bay Bridge, the toll booths are on the west-bound lanes.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Morton's toes, @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @James B. Shearer

    When you are high and wild it’s hard to remember when you get to the typewriter which way you were driving.

  60. That’ll be all the Branch Covidian’s checking to see how their mask looks every 20 seconds.

  61. @Bert
    My bet as to the main causative factor would be higher speed due to less traffic. The traffic in my town seems almost half of that in 2019, and the speed on the road in front of my house seems much faster.

    Another reason for higher speed could be psychological. Some people need a release from the tension caused by the epidemic, and they find it in their cars.

    Replies: @Aardvark, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @danand

    More speeding combined with less policing

  62. CCZ says:

    Virginia’s racial justice traffic safety initiative:

    Virginia has enacted a law that will drastically reduce the circumstances in which law enforcement officers will be permitted to conduct traffic stops and enforce traffic laws. Proponents argue that police have been targeting black people and pulling them over for unwarranted stops and searches, the Daily Press reported.

    The legislation, which passed the General Assembly and has been signed into law by Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, bans law enforcement officer from stopping vehicles for driving without headlights, driving without working tail lights or brake lights, or driving with expired registration unless it has been expired for at least three months, WSLS reported.

    Police would also not be allowed to pull vehicles over for obstructed windshields, seatbelt violations, illegal tint, driving with defective or unsafe equipment, or smoking with minors inside the vehicle, according to the bill.

    Officers would be banned from stopping or searching anyone based upon the odor of marijuana, and would no longer be able to stop jaywalkers or pedestrians who are “carelessly or maliciously interfering with the orderly passage of vehicles,” the Daily Press reported.

    “This might be the most significant reform of the state’s criminal justice system in decades,” Justice Forward Virginia Executive Director Brad Haywood, an Arlington-based public defender, told the Daily Press. “This is a big step forward for racial justice in Virginia.”

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @CCZ

    CCZ, Berkeley followed suit with their non enforcement, but their law is citywide. This one is statewide. Hell, why register your car? Why pay for the inspection sticker. Why wear that restrictive seatbelt? Why buy a child's car seat? Oh, and when their stat based insurance rates go up, that will be caused by systemic racism. Loons, they are all loons.

    , @Mike_from_SGV
    @CCZ

    In New America, "Justice" = "Decriminalizing POC criminality".

    , @Bragadocious
    @CCZ


    Police would also not be allowed to pull vehicles over for obstructed windshields
     
    Well I can get behind this one thing. I love my $5 Wal-Mart smartphone holder that glues to the center of the windshield. It keeps the phone at eye level (unlike the ones that plug into the lighter or attach to the heater slats). And yet, it's absolutely illegal because it's glued to the windshield. Obviously, the rule change in Virginia is designed to decriminalize fuzzy dice and El Salvador mini-flags so the question is will they solely go after people like me?
    , @AnotherDad
    @CCZ

    Minoritarianism turns your decent Western nation into a slum. What else is new?

  63. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Polistra


    Strange memories on this nervous night in Las Vegas. Five years later? Six? It seems like a lifetime, or at least a Main Era—the kind of peak that never comes again. San Francisco in the middle sixties was a very special time and place to be a part of. Maybe it meant something. Maybe not, in the long run . . . but no explanation, no mix of words or music or memories can touch that sense of knowing that you were there and alive in that corner of time and the world. Whatever it meant. . . .

    History is hard to know, because of all the hired bullshit, but even without being sure of “history” it seems entirely reasonable to think that every now and then the energy of a whole generation comes to a head in a long fine flash, for reasons that nobody really understands at the time—and which never explain, in retrospect, what actually happened.

    My central memory of that time seems to hang on one or five or maybe forty nights—or very early mornings—when I left the Fillmore half-crazy and, instead of going home, aimed the big 650 Lightning across the Bay Bridge at a hundred miles an hour wearing L. L. Bean shorts and a Butte sheepherder's jacket . . . booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change) . . . but being absolutely certain that no matter which way I went I would come to a place where people were just as high and wild as I was: No doubt at all about that. . . .

    There was madness in any direction, at any hour. If not across the Bay, then up the Golden Gate or down 101 to Los Altos or La Honda. . . . You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning. . . .

    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .

    So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark—that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back.
     

    Replies: @International Jew, @BenKenobi, @Ripple Earthdevil, @Anonymous, @Luzzatto

    In my opinion, The Wave Speech is also very applicable to the 2016 Trump movement.

    All that enthusiasm and potential now gone, like tears in rain.

  64. It would be interesting to see a regional breakdown. I live in a state that never implemented a mask mandate. We were never locked down although there were six weeks ending around Memorial Day where things were slow.

    Our streets and highways have been clogged with out of state cars since then. Drivers from NY, NJ, PA, MI, and other lockdown states are still with us. How much of this wreckage has been caused by people driving every day where they are not familiar?

  65. While higher speeds on empty roads might account for some increase in traffic deaths, higher speed alone is not causative – you still need to get into an accident for the higher speed to have made things worse. I think folks have been drinking a lot more in quarantine (more accidents) plus the greatly and obviously reduced traffic enforcement resulted in less careful driving overall.

    My observation was there was no law enforcement on the highways here in the midwest most of last year. And having come from the East where cops look upon traffic enforcement with disdain (often as a punishment assignment when your sergeant is upset with you), I was surprised moving here how traffic enforcement is law enforcement’s primary activity. After last April it vanished. Two weeks ago they returned in force, couldn’t go two exits down the highway without seeing a stop. Everyone has slowed back down.

    I first assumed the cops were back out because Biden was installed. Learned from a police friend what really happened was a federal grant to fund greater traffic enforcement. Although, that likely was also politics related – cops are mostly unionized and unions support dems. Cops as individuals are conservatives and took face-shots all last year. Traffic enforcement overtime pay might be a small payback for the police unions. We shall see.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Drakejax

    A few years ago I worked with an ex-traffic cop. They have seen the results of human stupidity up close and in technicolour. They take no prisoners, even from those flashing Warrant Cards, and are cordially hated for it (another colleague’s dad - cop - was caught DUI and tried the funny handshake and Warrant Card and was treated like scum).

  66. I’d like to see age breakdowns for these extra traffic deaths. Teens/20s normally have the highest proportion killed, and 50+ the lowest.

    Did lockdown boredom induce teens/20s guys to seek a bit of excitement by speeding?

    • Replies: @DanHessinMD
    @Whyvert

    Age may certainly be a factor since young people have a higher accident rate. Bored teenagers and college kids with nothing to do may be driving much more while middle aged commuters are driving less.

  67. @JohnPlywood
    There were across the board waivers of driving license expirations in most states.



    This could imply tbat government regulation/the nanny state really is having an enormous effect on human behavior, and that easing regulation can result in an insant lapse of discipline among the general public, which results in a staggering increase in death and destruction -- all through the mere signal of lax enforcement.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Clyde, @John Up North

    Is this your toot for the day? Please don’t dismay. Send up another, my brother. Some one said you were tiny duck in disguise.

  68. “But … miles driven had almost wholly recovered by June, but the death rate kept going up and got notably worse than in April”

    It hadn’t “almost wholly recovered” by June, it was still significantly below the level of June 2019, as your graph shows. My guess is this is pretty much all selection effect. In March, even a lot of “essential” workers” were at home, whereas they started returning to work in April as things like retail started to open up again, thereby increasing total miles driven without drastically altering the profile of who was out driving.

    White collar workers, on the other hand, have mostly kept working from home. On my daily commute in San Jose, I still see most office parking lots deserted and drastically reduced traffic on roads around major office complexes. The people least likely to get in a wreck are still staying off the road.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @wewuzkangs

    Clearly, we had in 2020, to paraphrase Greta Garbo in Ninotchka, fewer but worse drivers.

    "My guess is this is pretty much all selection effect."

    But it can't be all selection effect: from June-Dec, total traffic deaths were 14% while miles driven were down 10% (for a 28% worsening of traffic deaths per miles driven).

    Replies: @Desiderius

  69. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Polistra


    Strange memories on this nervous night in Las Vegas. Five years later? Six? It seems like a lifetime, or at least a Main Era—the kind of peak that never comes again. San Francisco in the middle sixties was a very special time and place to be a part of. Maybe it meant something. Maybe not, in the long run . . . but no explanation, no mix of words or music or memories can touch that sense of knowing that you were there and alive in that corner of time and the world. Whatever it meant. . . .

    History is hard to know, because of all the hired bullshit, but even without being sure of “history” it seems entirely reasonable to think that every now and then the energy of a whole generation comes to a head in a long fine flash, for reasons that nobody really understands at the time—and which never explain, in retrospect, what actually happened.

    My central memory of that time seems to hang on one or five or maybe forty nights—or very early mornings—when I left the Fillmore half-crazy and, instead of going home, aimed the big 650 Lightning across the Bay Bridge at a hundred miles an hour wearing L. L. Bean shorts and a Butte sheepherder's jacket . . . booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change) . . . but being absolutely certain that no matter which way I went I would come to a place where people were just as high and wild as I was: No doubt at all about that. . . .

    There was madness in any direction, at any hour. If not across the Bay, then up the Golden Gate or down 101 to Los Altos or La Honda. . . . You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning. . . .

    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .

    So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark—that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back.
     

    Replies: @International Jew, @BenKenobi, @Ripple Earthdevil, @Anonymous, @Luzzatto

    Hunter S. Thompson?

  70. Another factor–driving while skunked… legalized weed and what else are you gonna do when home-trapped anyway. Among my accidental acquaintances, the boredom seems to have led to a massive increase in smoking it.

  71. It’s hard not to think of Tiger Woods’ recent car accident.

    He was driving alone on an empty road early in the morning on a sunny day in a nice neighborhood, and then he suddenly crossed the median and opposing lanes of traffic, going off the road, into trees, and landing at the bottom of a hill lucky to be alive.

    • Replies: @Charles
    @Grumpy

    See post #58 and comment if you have an opinion.

  72. I got from Medinah to my house in just under 30 minutes last May on a Friday evening. Normally an hour to two.

    I actually cut out post round beers last year because one should have your facilities when driving 85 plus.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Hodag


    I actually cut out post round beers last year because one should have your facilities when driving 85 plus.
     
    LOL.

    BTW, i didn't know we had a Medinah member in our ranks. The closest i've been to Medinah is taking off from O'Hare.

    Replies: @Hodag

  73. @JohnPlywood
    There were across the board waivers of driving license expirations in most states.



    This could imply tbat government regulation/the nanny state really is having an enormous effect on human behavior, and that easing regulation can result in an insant lapse of discipline among the general public, which results in a staggering increase in death and destruction -- all through the mere signal of lax enforcement.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Clyde, @John Up North

    I went to renew my driver’s license in Chicago a short time ago and they waived the eye test which, in the past, I always had to do.

    • Thanks: JohnPlywood
  74. I’m not going to speculate on reasons, but as someone who drives through the NY metro area three evenings a week on the way to night-shift work I can 100% attest to the huge increase in insanely reckless driving.
    Okay, if I had to guess, I’d attribute it to simple opportunity. Traffic levels dropped dramatically almost a year ago and that’s when the nutjob drivers came out in force. Those nice (relatively) open roads were a tempting chance to drive as fast as one wished. It was worst of all during the city’s riot-induced curfew in early June with hardly anyone on the roads, that being perhaps the only time I was actually quite fearful going to work. Traffic levels today are much closer to normal and the crazy drivers not quite as common,

  75. My sense has always been that it’s easier to drive in California where other drivers are used to being on dense roadways and where roads are built for heavy traffic (with protected left turns, etc.) than in less populated areas. Drivers are less predictable where there is less traffic.

  76. We often comment on the fact that trauma medicine has dramatically cut the fatality rate from gunshot wounds, but the advances in automobile design must have had much the same effect.
    I see the aftermath of a lot of car wrecks; I never cease to be amazed at the wadded balls of steel from which people walk away.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JMcG


    We often comment on the fact that trauma medicine has dramatically cut the fatality rate from gunshot wounds, but the advances in automobile design must have had much the same effect.
     
    Volvo employs a boron/steel fusing process to the passenger cage that makes a violation into the passenger space extremely difficult to achieve. If Tiger Woods had been driving an xc90, he likely would be playing golf today. If I were Tiger Woods, I wouldn’t drive anything that had anything much short of tank specs.

    He’s a professional athlete! He had ONE job: Don’t get fucked up in a stupid car crash. I don’t feel that sorry for him. He’s an arrogant idiot!

    If you’re a pro athlete, do your damned homework, and only get into a relatively safe vehicle!

    If I were making tens of millions a year based on my athletic ability, I’d be driving a Brinks truck!

    https://youtu.be/RCvzpPY1pwE
  77. At my GloboHomo Fortune 500 employer, everyone who can work from home has been at home since last March. Friends and former colleagues in other big corporations report a similar situation. So the idea that cautious drivers have left the mix seems plausible.

    A second effect, not discussed above, is that we’ve all been stuck at home with our significant others and children for the last year. When I do get to leave the house, I make the most of what little freedom I have, by taking unnecessary risks behind the wheel.

    Finally, take a look at figures from other countries. The UK has data up to June 2020; they saw a huge drop in road deaths compared to the previous 12 months. I can’t find national data for Canada, but some provinces seem to have significantly higher death rates.

  78. Some observations from my corner of coastal SoCal and my experiences continuing to commute for my essential-worker job:

    (1) The mix of drivers on the roads changed. Starting spring 2020, my take was that a much higher percentage of drivers at peak times were inexperienced; combine that with significantly higher average traffic speeds and higher dispersion around the mean (both recklessly fast and recklessly slow freeway driving), and you get more accidents on a per-car-on-the-road basis, and the severity of the accidents likely worse than before due to speed and speed differential.

    (2) On major arterial roads – not freeways, but the 4-6 lane divided roads with traffic lights at intersections that are the suburban transit backbones – traffic was reduced enough that traffic light timing was all screwed up; when approaching a green light, you have to be more prepared for it to change because you’re not in a pack of cars all going the same direction and keeping the traffic sensors engaged. So you end up making many more quick yellow light decisions about “hit the go pedal and clear the intersection, or brake abruptly and stop.” Combined with the higher than typical speeds due to lower traffic, then add in a higher percentage of worse drivers, and you have a potential recipe for a lot more high speed intersection collisions.

    I don’t have any evidence for the above besides my observations over the last year, but I think it’s plausible.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    Thanks.

    Traffic light timing is an interesting subject. I can recall a NYC cabbie in 1984 who got me from Midtown to La Guardia in 18 minutes by hitting every single light. He gave me a lecture on the precise speed he needed to drive on each street, such as, IIRC, 36.2 mph on Third Avenue.

    Traffic light timing appeared to be hard coded when it was first introduced in the US about 40 years ago. Does it now vary in real time based on traffic sensors?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Craken, @cthulhu

    , @Anonymous
    @cthulhu

    The traffic lights observation is a good one. I noticed the same thing last summer, while still going into work everyday. The lights made no sense whatsoever. Thirty seconds to sixty seconds lights with no one around.

  79. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Hypnotoad666

    I've said this before and I'll say it again: Young drivers, though they may lack judgement, at least were always the ones with the quick reactions and good eyesight. The latter and maybe even the former, has changed due to their looking at screens 1 ft from their eyes for many hours daily.

    I see a car ready to pull out onto the road. He's got time. No, but he's not sure how far away I am and definitely can't tell how fast I'm going. So, he thinks about it for 2 seconds. OK, he's thought about it. Now he goes! I gotta put on the brakes for this fucking guy, no, not this old lady who is just trying to get groceries, with no bus service around, so, you know, but this 20-something y/o driver who's got no visual judgment, no quick thinking, and his eyes probably take 5 seconds to accommodate.

    Looking at the graphs, though, if the smart phones came out 10 years back, this doesn't match that well. However, how long has it been to where everyone's got unlimited data? Anyone remember "hang up and drive!"?

    Replies: @additionalMike, @Macumazahn

    I am simply incapable of driving and talking on the phone simultaneously. Twice I attempted it, both times while rolling down a flat, straight stretch of the interstate. By the time I hung up from telling my friends that I would arrive shortly, I was down to 45MPH and being passed on both the left and the right. I might just as well have been asleep for those 60-or-so seconds that the call lasted. I was a menace to myself and everyone around me. Never again.
    I once related this story to an acquaintance at a professional conference. He chuckled and told me that he had no difficulty driving while talking on the phone. The next day, as we were all leaving the parking garage to head to the airport, I heard a crash down below. I went over to the rail of the garage, and there was my acquaintance, in his rental car with the bumper torn off. He’d struck a bollard on the way out of the garage! I went down to make sure he was OK. He seemed a little stunned as he told me, “I only looked at my phone for a second…” I refrained from reminding him of our previous conversation, as he had trouble enough already without me rubbing salt in the wounds.

    • Thanks: Dissident
  80. Agreed re: the crazy really came out when the roads were empty.
    As evidence, there is an informal race known as The Cannon Ball Run which is driving as fast as possible across America. In April, 2020, it was smashed several times. Madmen were flying across America at heretofore not seen rates. Scary and awesome at the same time. Winner drive across, from NYC to LA, in 26H38M

    http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/amp32092440/26-hour-38-minute-cannonball-record-coronavirus/

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    I already covered the new Cannonball records in a comment a few weeks ago:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/a-hypothesis-murders-and-bad-driving-trend-together/#comment-4469495

    We're well under 26 hours coast-to-coast, with the 25 hour barrier just within reach.

  81. @AndrewR
    @JohnPlywood

    Lol getting an extra month to renew my license in no way made me drive more recklessly last year

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Reg Cæsar

    Lol getting an extra month to renew my license in no way made me drive more recklessly last year

    Lemme guess… you don’t live in a “motor voter” state. Extending the deadline qualifies as “voter suppression”.

  82. What are the gun deaths per mile walked? Probably very high.

    Or per mile ridden? A few years ago a teenager in St Paul walked onto a bus and shot his target dead, then walked off.

  83. Berkeley has decided that traffic safety stops by police officers are too racist. And so were red light cameras. So, they are forming a new non-police workforce, Berkeley DOT, to enforce traffic laws. In the meantime “minor” traffic infractions such as expired registration, no license plates, not wearing seatbelts and things like no headlights or tail lights will not result in a traffic stop. But, you know, seat belts save lives especially children. So I guess black lives don’t really matter to the woke city council of berkeley.

    • Replies: @Luzzatto
    @Buffalo Joe

    Blacks are 11% of Berkeley's population but responsible for almost 100% of the gun violence there. What hurts Berkeley is that they are way too geographically close to the belly of the beast which is their next door neighbor Oakland. So Berkeley looks a lot Blacker than what the official demographic census say because so many Oakland Blacks pour into Berkeley either for work, schooling, or to commit crimes!

  84. Buzz Mohawk at #30 hits it.
    The Mask Effect.
    Especially for drivers wearing specs, fog over,
    and drivers with shallow lungs, reduced O2.

  85. @Hodag
    I got from Medinah to my house in just under 30 minutes last May on a Friday evening. Normally an hour to two.

    I actually cut out post round beers last year because one should have your facilities when driving 85 plus.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    I actually cut out post round beers last year because one should have your facilities when driving 85 plus.

    LOL.

    BTW, i didn’t know we had a Medinah member in our ranks. The closest i’ve been to Medinah is taking off from O’Hare.

    • Replies: @Hodag
    @AnotherDad

    I am not a Medinah member. I mooch off my friends. They had a really good setup last year at Medinah, they already owned a food truck!

  86. @JMcG
    If beat cops aren’t out there enforcing traffic laws (and it seems they aren’t), there goes the last reason for their existence. Securing crime scenes while waiting for the detectives show up isn’t a viable long-term career.
    Does anyone keep track of traffic citations issued?

    Replies: @anon

    “On average, there are 6 million car accidents in the U.S. every year. That’s roughly 16,438 per day. Of these crashes, 22,471 caused only property damage. Over 37,000 Americans die in automobile crashes per year.Oct 17, 2019”

    https://www.thewanderingrv.com/car-accident-statistics/

    Maybe the extra is the increase in joy-riding/car-jackings,

  87. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Polistra


    Strange memories on this nervous night in Las Vegas. Five years later? Six? It seems like a lifetime, or at least a Main Era—the kind of peak that never comes again. San Francisco in the middle sixties was a very special time and place to be a part of. Maybe it meant something. Maybe not, in the long run . . . but no explanation, no mix of words or music or memories can touch that sense of knowing that you were there and alive in that corner of time and the world. Whatever it meant. . . .

    History is hard to know, because of all the hired bullshit, but even without being sure of “history” it seems entirely reasonable to think that every now and then the energy of a whole generation comes to a head in a long fine flash, for reasons that nobody really understands at the time—and which never explain, in retrospect, what actually happened.

    My central memory of that time seems to hang on one or five or maybe forty nights—or very early mornings—when I left the Fillmore half-crazy and, instead of going home, aimed the big 650 Lightning across the Bay Bridge at a hundred miles an hour wearing L. L. Bean shorts and a Butte sheepherder's jacket . . . booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change) . . . but being absolutely certain that no matter which way I went I would come to a place where people were just as high and wild as I was: No doubt at all about that. . . .

    There was madness in any direction, at any hour. If not across the Bay, then up the Golden Gate or down 101 to Los Altos or La Honda. . . . You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning. . . .

    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .

    So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark—that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back.
     

    Replies: @International Jew, @BenKenobi, @Ripple Earthdevil, @Anonymous, @Luzzatto

    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .

    When I was a teen in the mid-seventies, I lived in a So. Cal beach community, and if my friends and I didn’t have a plan for a Saturday night, we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends. We’d also travel down PCH to Huntington Beach with the same plan. More often than not there was a house right on the sand overlooking the Pacific Ocean having a surfer party, and we were welcome to partake. Hanging out in someone’s house we didn’t know, drinking off their keg.

    I was fortunate to experience the last gasp of California as Shangri-La. People who arrived in the 80’s or later think I romanticize, because they can’t process that they contributed to ruining an entire state. They can’t imagine a place that was so much better than where they dame from. They’ll never know what they missed. They don’t want to know. Parasites don’t want to know the history of their hosts.

    But I concur with that innate sense of victory. If you watch “American Graffitti,” which was before my time, you can get the same existential flavor. Back then, anything good could probably happen. If not, you’d still have a good story. Even if you were a Toad.

    • Agree: Servant of Gla'aki
    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends."

    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn't been invited to the party. And the student replied, of course he hadn't, you just look around for a party and go to it. And Mr. Dukakis looked confused.

    So this Open Party culture probably didn't start all that long before the 1970s in So Cal and probably didn't last too long after it either.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Anon, @Danindc, @Not Raul, @Dissident, @Servant of Gla'aki

    , @Corn
    @Anonymous

    I love and hate listening to reminiscences of pre-90s California. I love what I hear but hate that I missed it.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  88. What percentage of those additional traffic deaths in 2020 were caused by Amazon delivery vehicles? Seems like the kind of thing Bezos would pay politicians and federal officials to cover up.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @JimB

    Gig economy deliveries were way up after March.

    Replies: @peterike

  89. @Anonymous
    There just doesn’t seem to be the same police presence in Southern California. I never see any highway patrol, and quite often the average speed on the 5 freeway is 80 mph. Essentially, you can drive like an asshole with no worries.

    Pedestrians often seem distracted. They meander out into the middle of the street without looking for oncoming traffic like mental patients. I was just thinking that any serial killer could kill at least one pedestrian a week, legally. Just be ready for a pedestrian who wanders out into the middle of the street with his or her back to you, and wham! As long as they’re jaywalking, you’ve had your fun, and it’s all legal!

    They should do a "Better Call Saul" episode with that as the premise. Saul has to defend someone who's taken out 10 jaywalkers in a month, and keeps taking them out all through the episode. Is he really a serial killer? Or just very unlucky? It could be a recurring character. How do you incarcerate someone who accidentally kills qualified jaywalkers?

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Redneck farmer, @Jim Christian, @Marty, @Mike_from_SGV

    Pedestrians often seem distracted. They meander out into the middle of the street without looking for oncoming traffic like mental patients.

    In S.F., the pedestrian problem isn’t meandering, but an apparent yen to mess with drivers. Just last night, 9:00, I came upon a guy walking down the middle of the street in a residential neighborhood for no reason, the sidewalks being empty. He was about 80, wearing black, no reflectors. I asked him if he did that when he was 35 or 45, and he said FU. I probably should have gotten out and knocked him on his ass, after all there were no cameras anywhere. I can only speculate that it makes him feel young to adopt the woke attitudes of his grandkids, i.e. cars are evil so I’ll colonize the streets.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @Marty

    He might well have had dementia and been wandering. My father has Parkinson's and wandered out of my parents's house and along a busy road while not dressed appropriately for the conditions. Fortunately a neighbor saw him and helped out. They live in the town with one of the lowest crime rates (and purely coincidentally, whitest demographics) in the state. My mother was asleep and he left leaving the door wide open. We have an appointment to see a neurologist tomorrow to see about medication, and I am getting door alarms.

    Parkinson's patients can get auditory hallucinations telling them to leave the house, and Alzheimer's sufferers get confused and wander in search of some delusional memory. Please don't hit the elderly like one of the polar or panda bear hunters in your fair city.

    Replies: @Jiminy

  90. anon[216] • Disclaimer says:

    Did any of the protesters killed by or hurt by car, did that add to the increase, while they were blocking traffic on roadways? I also noticed a big increase in bicycles all over the roads, highways where speeds are around 50mph and there is no shoulder. Maybe the busybodies have decided to try and use their bodies to slow down traffic, another form of protest, teaching us all a lesson?

  91. When I took a road trip over the holidays to South Florida, I noticed every 4th vehicle on I-10 and I-75 was an RV or a massive bulky SUV with luggage strapped to the back and to the roof. Many of these people were driving from much further away than me, too (Texas and Midwestern states in particular). Average speed was probably near 85 despite heavy congestion.

    Increase in people with poor driving skills going on family road trips probably contributed. I don’t understand how anyone who isn’t in an empty state like Utah or Kansas can travel 85+ on the interstate longer than an hour. I speed to get to work or appointments but it’s mentally/physically exhausting if you’re driving all day. I just cruise behind the semis at 70.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @S. Anonyia

    Speeding to get to a video shoot with Drew Brees didn't do Tiger Woods much good.

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @S. Anonyia


    I don’t understand how anyone who isn’t in an empty state like Utah or Kansas can travel 85+ on the interstate longer than an hour.
     
    A radar detector with great highway range helps.

    Vehicles designed for the autobahn help too.

    The real surprises are domestic full-size pickup trucks. The Big 3 have their best people spend a lot of money and time on them and it shines through, even at extra-legal highway speeds.
  92. The week the Rodney king riots went down, I was working on Treasure Island, between Oakland and Frisco. There was a huge march to the toll gates on the Oakland side of the Bay Bridge just as I was leaving work, and all traffic entering the bridge from the east was stopped.

    As soon as I realized this, I knew I had a once in lifetime opportunity. So I drove loop de loops and commuted in reverse on the top deck of the bridge heading for SF.

    So yes, when traffic is way down, the inner idiot will seize the opportunity.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  93. Too much ‘noticing’ for iSteve on this. Charts, graphs, stuff white people use (White!) to fool everyone else.

    Obviously the reason for higher fatalities is whites. Doing something ‘systemically racist.’

    Though I will agree with some commentators here. When freeways or multiple lane roadways have less traffic, it is far easier for crazies, speed demons and the like to do their thing.

    I’ve noticed on local heavily congested freeways that at morning and evening rush hours, there are fewer crashes and those that occur are usually minor. Why?

    Two reasons: you can’t speed, lane hop, weave and wander when traffic is packed. Impossible to accelerate or speed when you have no room.

    Secondly, commuter drivers nearly all are very familiar with traffic patterns, entrances and exits, and the usual congested hot spots. So they know where and when to move to exit safely and aside from a few emotionally disturbed drivers, don’t try to move faster than average.

    On the big Interstates, you can tell who the non local drivers are. They speed from outside the urban area and hit the traffic wall. They bob and weave and work very hard for very little. Locals know that there is no magic secret to getting ahead of the slow mass of drivers. I notice that drivers from small rural bergs often drive faster for shorter distances (nothing really) than urban drivers.

  94. @Bert
    My bet as to the main causative factor would be higher speed due to less traffic. The traffic in my town seems almost half of that in 2019, and the speed on the road in front of my house seems much faster.

    Another reason for higher speed could be psychological. Some people need a release from the tension caused by the epidemic, and they find it in their cars.

    Replies: @Aardvark, @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @danand

    “My bet as to the main causative factor would be higher speed due to less traffic.”

    Bert, seems to be part of it:

    100 mph

    As corona cleared freeways up, throttles when down, peddles to mats. In the SF Bay Area it was common to see everthing from Corollas to Aventadors routinely fly by at 100+, middle of day. The wild west had returned to the 101, 280, 680, 880…

    Early “pandemic” you did see an unusually high number of muscle, show, and supercars out. Home Depot parking lots, crawling In N Out drive thru’s…

    Cars shows cancelled, streets cleared, owners may have thought it the rare oppertunity to “play”. Perhaps the thinking was “the world is ending”, so what the hay.

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/04/23/100-mph-speeding-tickets-soar-statewide-roadshow/

    https://abc7news.com/chp-coronavirus-stay-home-orders-speeding-tickets/6124578/

    https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2020/03/04/chp-speeding-lead-footed-bay-area-drivers-ticketed-1704-for-going-over-100-mph-last-year/

    https://www.timesheraldonline.com/2020/12/10/chp-speeding-tickets-for-going-more-than-100-mph-on-the-rise-in-solano/

    https://sfist.com/2020/04/01/chp-tells-bay-area-drivers-to-slow-down-amid-uptick-in-100-mph-speeders-on-empty-highways/

    https://www.sfgate.com/local/article/100-mph-speeders-15162505.php

    Recently things have slowed, traffic’s returned; the super & muscle cars parked back in their garages.

  95. https://twitter.com/CortesSteve/status/1367949060343267329/photo/1

    North Dakota: 1,478 COVID deaths, 0.19% of population

    South Dakota: 1,896 COVID deaths, 0.21% of population

    North Dakota: mask-mandate

    South Dakota: NO mask-mandate

    The two states have very similar demographics, with the exception that South Dakota has a significantly larger native american population.

    But keep wearing your magic science-mask. In California, the mask mandate may soon come with two masks – for a double-dose of science.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman, JMcG
    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Mr. Anon

    The Science™ is clear, Double the mask, double the virtue.
    Triple the mask, triple the virtue.

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/6Y7nTCavIoA/hqdefault.jpg

    We must obey The Science™

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar

  96. @Buzz Mohawk
    Maybe it's idiots wearing masks while driving. You can't do anything as well as normal while wearing a mask, except rob a bank or go trick-or-treating.

    I laugh every time a car passes by when the one person who's inside, driving alone, is wearing a mask.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Adam Smith

    I laugh every time a car passes by when the one person who’s inside, driving alone, is wearing a mask.

    They’re double-masking already, if you count the cabin-filter.

    I laugh when I see two or more people in a car wearing masks. If you’re sitting in a car with someone, you’re breating a soup of their aerosolized exhalation, mask or no.

  97. @Barack Obama's secret Unz account
    @Polistra


    Strange memories on this nervous night in Las Vegas. Five years later? Six? It seems like a lifetime, or at least a Main Era—the kind of peak that never comes again. San Francisco in the middle sixties was a very special time and place to be a part of. Maybe it meant something. Maybe not, in the long run . . . but no explanation, no mix of words or music or memories can touch that sense of knowing that you were there and alive in that corner of time and the world. Whatever it meant. . . .

    History is hard to know, because of all the hired bullshit, but even without being sure of “history” it seems entirely reasonable to think that every now and then the energy of a whole generation comes to a head in a long fine flash, for reasons that nobody really understands at the time—and which never explain, in retrospect, what actually happened.

    My central memory of that time seems to hang on one or five or maybe forty nights—or very early mornings—when I left the Fillmore half-crazy and, instead of going home, aimed the big 650 Lightning across the Bay Bridge at a hundred miles an hour wearing L. L. Bean shorts and a Butte sheepherder's jacket . . . booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change) . . . but being absolutely certain that no matter which way I went I would come to a place where people were just as high and wild as I was: No doubt at all about that. . . .

    There was madness in any direction, at any hour. If not across the Bay, then up the Golden Gate or down 101 to Los Altos or La Honda. . . . You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning. . . .

    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .

    So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark—that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back.
     

    Replies: @International Jew, @BenKenobi, @Ripple Earthdevil, @Anonymous, @Luzzatto

    Barack Hussein Obama claims the only time he ever experienced racism in Hawaii was from the White minority and never from the Asian majority.

    Is that believable that he never experienced any racism from the Asian majority in Hawaii or the Indigenous Hawaiian minority population and it all 100% came from Whitey only?

  98. @Buffalo Joe
    Berkeley has decided that traffic safety stops by police officers are too racist. And so were red light cameras. So, they are forming a new non-police workforce, Berkeley DOT, to enforce traffic laws. In the meantime "minor" traffic infractions such as expired registration, no license plates, not wearing seatbelts and things like no headlights or tail lights will not result in a traffic stop. But, you know, seat belts save lives especially children. So I guess black lives don't really matter to the woke city council of berkeley.

    Replies: @Luzzatto

    Blacks are 11% of Berkeley’s population but responsible for almost 100% of the gun violence there. What hurts Berkeley is that they are way too geographically close to the belly of the beast which is their next door neighbor Oakland. So Berkeley looks a lot Blacker than what the official demographic census say because so many Oakland Blacks pour into Berkeley either for work, schooling, or to commit crimes!

    • Thanks: Buffalo Joe
  99. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Tulipmania is back again: “Jack Dorsey Is Auctioning His First Tweet Ever As An NFT… And It’s Now Worth Over $2MM.” Someone mentioned Grimes selling a dimwit digital art for 6 million.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/crypto/jack-dorsey-auctioning-his-first-tweet-ever-nft-and-its-now-worth-over-2mm

    It’s impressive seeing people who are even dumber at spending than black rappers.

    The next time any minority complains about the inherited wealth of certain white families, they need to be reminded that’s because there have always been other people who got rich, but some of them did stupid crap with their money, so they never had another generation to pass that wealth to.

    I blame liberal media. NFTs are what you buy if you’ve been raised on media that’s been selling you a line of bull since birth, and created a belief system utterly divorced from reality. You no longer have any sort of BS detector or common sense, and can’t tell what has value and what doesn’t. Therefore, you become the ultimate sucker for whatever garbage the media is peddling you.

    • Replies: @Luzzatto
    @Anon

    Jack Dorsey looks like a hipster White trash heroin junkie from Portland, Oregon who shoots up heroin into his arms inside a Starbucks restroom in Portland, Oregon!

    Replies: @Not Raul, @jsinton, @Reg Cæsar

  100. I’ve seen a lot of “rage” driving in my area. People who are driving like they are crazy-angry. People driving too close to my bumper even though I drive over the speed limit. People passing on curves and double lines. People driving like they are late to work all the time.

    • Replies: @SteeringWheelHolder
    @jsinton

    Correct.

    The ONLY period in which driving was significantly reduced was the first two weeks, and barely that.

    Yes, traffic has thinned, but that’s only due to office workers not commuting.

    The rest are driving in an even worse manner than before. Live in their cars. Travel without apparent purpose. Heater-skelter. One can’t import 100-million below average IQ “citizens” without consequences. Road safety, vehicle safety and improved emergency care have limits.

    Having made my first road trips to both coasts out of Texas in the Kennedy years I’ve a life-long set of memories to work from. Full-time travel most of the past quarter-century.

    City to City circa 1970 didn’t involve much suburban sprawl. The Interstates were working as designed. (Should have been required to BYPASS cities; another subject).

    By 1980 the stresses were apparent and have never really ceased. By 2000 it was obvious that population numbers were lies.

    I recall the day in 1967 we officially hit a population of 200-million.

    Those believing we are at 320-million or so are kidding themselves. I’d wager past 400-million already. 2021 and 1970 don’t correlate as well with traffic density as if we used other comparatives as the norm.

    The comments above are from bubble-dwellers. There is a larger picture not being seen. Car versus plane, etc, isn’t close to covering it. Nor are longer commutes, etc.

    See the map MEGA-REGIONS OF THE USA and comprehend that the limits shown DO NOT explain the high traffic density outside them. Even within them.

    Once upon a time there was a rush hour morning and evening. By the late 1970s wee were seeing men go into business for themselves as contractors, traveling farther than usual.

    Otherwise, rural Interstates were some trucks and some locals at mid-day. Long distance was regional salesmen and a few truckers. Except warm weather holidays or the densest coastal Interstates, traffic died down to a minimal level. Higher both morning and evening, but maybe not much more.

    75-miles from city centers is a general daily delivery limit. Today, it’s where you’ll see highest Interstate speed limits come down. D/FW is 100-miles wide E-W in these terms.

    What changed was those rural-most areas now featuring a constant traffic flow of cars. Same very bad drivers ill-equipped in every sense as in the major metro regions.

    Some one can break out fatalities by race & region the focus will get somewhere.

    .

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @jsinton


    I’ve seen a lot of “rage” driving in my area. People who are driving like they are crazy-angry. People driving too close to my bumper even though I drive over the speed limit. People passing on curves and double lines. People driving like they are late to work all the time.

     

    For almost five years now I've made twice-weekly trips to the county landfill, followed by a left turn onto a straight country road. One develops a good feel for how far away an oncoming vehicle is to be safe enough to make that turn in front of it.

    This afternoon a car was at what had always been a safe distance before, so I scooted across... and was nearly slammed. The fellow was revving up to a good 30 mph over the speed limit. Whether it was the result, or the cause, of just having passed another vehicle is anyone's guess.

    You're not even safe out in the boonies anymore. There were horses grazing nearby. It's tempting to take one of those next time.

    Replies: @Jiminy

  101. Buried somewhere in all of this may be an age breakdown of the traffic accidents, deaths, miles driven etc. but I didn’t read closely enough to see it. I might challenge the narrative that young drivers are the most dangerous. That might be true for drivers up to age 75, but I think there are more over-75 drivers out there. That’s my perception, and discussions about automobile driving trends are always going to bring out the anecdotal since most people spend so much time driving.

    I remember horrible accidents caused by teenagers when I was a kid. A friend of mine was in one, caused by his own recklessness. I would see foolish teenage driving all the time back then – I did it myself – and I know it still happens today. Most of the driving frustration I experience personally these days, however, is with very elderly drivers; they go half the speed limit, drive between lanes, don’t see other drivers, and so on. And then there are the angry drivers speeding up to get around slow elderly drivers.

    Of course, that wouldn’t explain the big increase over the last year. I don’t think I’ve seen more very old drivers on the road in the last year, but then, I don’t really look at other drivers until they do something weird.

  102. Nobody almost gets killed in a traffic accident when the entire road system is @ grid lock. And a lot of miles are historically compiled crawling in bumper to bumper at 6 miles per hour.

    So the statistic that needs to be examined is not “per mile driven”, but “per mile driven with room to maneuver.”

    https://www.traffictechnologytoday.com/news/safety/covid-19-crashes-more-likely-to-be-fatal-when-roads-are-clearer-finds-new-study.html

  103. “Perhaps the decline in traffic jams encouraged more reckless driving?”

    I observed amazingly clear roads. Traffic was substantially down.

    And there were also the folks in a rush doing an estimated twice the speed limit. They did not seem to feel any need to do so in the empty left lanes either. If I had to make a guess, they enjoyed the skii like sloloming (not a valid scrabble word).

    All that aside, I would assume people who have any potential murder on the mind likely arent concerned with pandemic restrictions.

  104. It wasn’t just confined to the US either, but it’s military bases abroad, confirming that it wasn’t just a case of the broken windows around you, but the broken windows in America’s psyche, or at least a part of America’s psyche.

    Guess the race of the US soldiers who ran around in Korea this year shooting fireworks including at residential buildings.

  105. Has anyone else noticed over the last couple years or so an increase in people driving at night without their headlights on? I started noticing about two years ago that, instead of coming across someone doing that every once in a long, long while, I was seeing it fairly frequently. Now, if I glance at the cars I pass and the cars around me when driving at night, there’s a pretty good chance I’ll see at least one without its headlights on, and sometimes a couple. That was not the case 5, 10, 15 years ago, at least not that I ever noticed.

    All I can think is that it’s smartphones, people being obsessed now with checking their facebook or looking at youtube or porn or something. Or maybe the increase of pot-smoking, though that’s not legal in my state (and I’m not really against it anyway).

    • Replies: @mmack
    @Sam Malone

    I think auto makers are to blame for driving without headlights. I’ve done it accidentally myself. 🤦🏻‍♂️

    Most cars today have automatic headlights using a dimmer sensor to come on. You just set it and forget it.

    Should someone, like say the apes at the quick change oil place I frequent, turn the headlights to manual on/off to check the car’s lights so as to sell you lightbulbs for your car and not reset it, then you have the disconcerting issue of the dashboard lights being on while your headlights are off. If you’re driving in a populated area with lots of lights, you don’t notice it. After all, if the dashboard is lit up the headlights are on, right? At least in older cars that was the case.

    Or if you think you’re changing the windshield wiper speed and instead change the headlamp settings (I’m looking at you KIA/Hyundai).

    Just a thought from experience.

    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Sam Malone


    Has anyone else noticed over the last couple years or so an increase in people driving at night without their headlights on?
     
    The ones that drive me batty are the white, silver, and grey cars that drive around in fog, rain, sleet, and snow with their lights off.

    That should be an instaticket for endangering the public in any jurisdiction.
  106. @Grumpy
    It's hard not to think of Tiger Woods' recent car accident.

    He was driving alone on an empty road early in the morning on a sunny day in a nice neighborhood, and then he suddenly crossed the median and opposing lanes of traffic, going off the road, into trees, and landing at the bottom of a hill lucky to be alive.

    Replies: @Charles

    See post #58 and comment if you have an opinion.

  107. @SteeringWheelHolder
    Traffic deaths need to be filtered same as crime: by race. Then, “where”?

    As deaths by gunshots declined due to improved medical care; so, too, deaths in traffic accidents due to improved roads and greatly improved car safety structure since 1960. (Then, emergency medical care).

    Drunk driving is probably higher. “Desperation” probably fuels fatalism. Lack of funds means worse maintenance re tires (steering/braking/handling).

    I drive an average of thirty-one (31) states per year. Year-round, as a truck driver. Race correlates to driving habits much more than one might assume. Without seeing the driver — making bad choices at the wheel — I can usually predict both race & sex.

    Skills have declined in general. “Caution”. To do with situational awareness and being responsive. “Knowing” (acting) what to do is worst among the poorest, best among the richest (zip code). Several generations of divorce cut off otherwise capable men from risk assessment such that they’re now blind to it. (Fathers lost authority vis-a-vis TV & Vietnam draft).

    Enstupidation means they are unwilling to be corrected.
    (Call an American every name in the book. Only at stupidity will he disagree).

    Selfishness drives car use style. Desperation makes it worse. Never had good habits = zero room for error.

    Traits seen on the highway as aberrations 25-years ago (versus practice the thirty-years previous) are indicative of immigrant incompetents (no exceptions). WWII was won by cooperation. Men drivers (nearly all) carried this over into highway practice up to around 1990.

    Metro areas grew worst fastest with suburban sprawl after our being ethnically-cleansed from our cities and wives forced to find full-time work to cover massive debt load. Then, “immigrants”.

    9-5 and “closed weekends” (or Sunday) meant life had a rhythm. A pace. What outlier women or foreigner bad habits (lack of awareness and compensatory behavior) wasn’t critical. But those two groups now outnumber the skilled (call it good habits) such that deductive reasoning per road rule principles has all but disappeared.

    Without race & region (metro vs rural, first) there’s no way to get a handle on WHY a rising death rate.

    From my personal perspective, I assume the bad habits borne of contempt for fellow drivers (never acquiring good habits) coupled to social indices (all-encompassing pressures) are adequate explanation.

    What lacks any explanation is the sheer number of cars on the road 150-miles from any major metro during workday hours. 20-million unemployed? Many more under-employed? This nationwide phenomenon DIDN'T EXIST 25+ (and more) years ago. From 1100 thru 2300 hours. This is several millions of cars, daily.

    Capture that in cross-section by race and one will have uncovered “economic” (or political) activity heretofore hidden. Networks. Cars ain’t cheap and running them is the same. (Explain the explosion of chain hotels built 2-3 at a time even in locations where demand would appear nearly non-existent). $150-$200 day overhead.

    What you know about your bubble (the 90% of the same places you go 90% of the time; per DHS) doesn’t track auto use (or, fatality) type & rates thereof. You can’t take yourself as normative. That went out with Uncle Ronnie.

    “Smart phones” explain Obama era and later changes, but the roots are deeper. (Inability to navigate without GPS). “Flocking” is what to look for. Pack-formation as anodyne to high speed travel anxiety.

    Genuinely bad weather (Texas absorbing a war blow) takes down the facade. Should’ve heard the CB that week. And knew how to dissect what you heard.

    “Stress” is adequate surface answer to ones own risk-assessment. “Stress” as among those without reasoning skills. Congenitally-incapable, or never taught (contempt) equals similar outcomes.

    Expect that the rate will rise. A crisis that won’t go to waste. WAZE is worthless except to predict what stupids will be doing. Worthless as your phone, when it matters.

    CITIZEN BAND (for those willing to hear & speak).


    www.k0bg.com
    .

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Danindc

    Steering Wheel Holder, very nice comment.

  108. now do the suicide rate.

    • Agree: BB753
  109. @Anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I think I’ve got an angle not addressed.

    Car driving behavior has become bolder and riskier because more people are at home and/or watching car racing. And the SIM iRacing (virtual) races have also attracted a lot of viewers.


    Rolex 24 Delivers IMSA Viewership Records
    Nearly 1.1 million viewers tune into Rolex 24 at Daytona…
    February 3, 2021

    The Rolex 24 at Daytona delivered viewership records across NBC and NBCSN last weekend – headlined by the most-watched IMSA telecast since 2008 – continuing IMSA’s viewership growth since NBC Sports acquired its broadcast rights prior to the 2019 season
     


    Return of live auto racing, golf draws huge TV ratings

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/05/18/sports/return-live-auto-racing-golf-draws-huge-tv-ratings/
     


    Audience for Sports Car Racing Increases as Other Sports Are in Decline

    https://www.hotrod.com/articles/imsa-ratings-increase-24-hours-of-daytona/
     

    Now, I will go a little further with my theory. NASCAR has seen a significant decrease in viewership in the past few years and alienated a lot more fans with what went on this summer (embracing BLM and Bubba Wallace’s hallucinations). The real gearhead car guys among this group gravitated to IMSA sports car racing. So, essentially these fans gravitated from watching racing on an oval with only wide left turns to watching track racing with a multitude of turns in which hitting the apex is crucial.

    Watching sports changes behavior. You watch an NFL game and you’re shadow throwing or kicking a football for a week or two. You watch a major fight and your shadowboxing in private for a week. You watch car racing and you pretend you’re racing other cars and you hit the apex at turns.

    Replies: @Luzzatto

    NASCAR does not have a single driver who is the offspring of 2 Black parents. They only have the Dwayne Johnson type Bubba Wallace. NASCAR needs to be Cancel Cultured and permanently shut down for this!

  110. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @JMcG
    We often comment on the fact that trauma medicine has dramatically cut the fatality rate from gunshot wounds, but the advances in automobile design must have had much the same effect.
    I see the aftermath of a lot of car wrecks; I never cease to be amazed at the wadded balls of steel from which people walk away.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    We often comment on the fact that trauma medicine has dramatically cut the fatality rate from gunshot wounds, but the advances in automobile design must have had much the same effect.

    Volvo employs a boron/steel fusing process to the passenger cage that makes a violation into the passenger space extremely difficult to achieve. If Tiger Woods had been driving an xc90, he likely would be playing golf today. If I were Tiger Woods, I wouldn’t drive anything that had anything much short of tank specs.

    He’s a professional athlete! He had ONE job: Don’t get fucked up in a stupid car crash. I don’t feel that sorry for him. He’s an arrogant idiot!

    If you’re a pro athlete, do your damned homework, and only get into a relatively safe vehicle!

    If I were making tens of millions a year based on my athletic ability, I’d be driving a Brinks truck!

  111. @Abolish_public_education
    Abolish motorcycle helmet laws!

    We understand the statistic showing that motorcyclist fatalities per mile driven are significantly higher compared to the figure for car drivers. But we also understand the harm caused by the incremental impact-energy related to the 2kg helmet the projectile motorcyclist is forced to wear. Some motorcycle fatalities are caused by body (non-head) injuries.

    The DEMs insist that a woman should have complete control over what she does to her own body, but that a man should have no control over what he does to his head.

    The DEMs are pro-choice on exactly one issue.

    I am so sick and tired of seeing the government’s obsession with statistics. Collecting them. Analyzing them. Publishing them. Reacting to them. On and on.

    Which statistics get collected or published, or not, are all determined by politics.

    Most of all, I am disgusted by public education statistics (all of them bad, btw), and the army of six-figured, non-babysitting statistician-bureaucrats who process them.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    A_P_E, helmets allow you to have an open coffin, if they find your head. stay safe.

  112. @CCZ
    Virginia's racial justice traffic safety initiative:

    Virginia has enacted a law that will drastically reduce the circumstances in which law enforcement officers will be permitted to conduct traffic stops and enforce traffic laws. Proponents argue that police have been targeting black people and pulling them over for unwarranted stops and searches, the Daily Press reported.

    The legislation, which passed the General Assembly and has been signed into law by Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, bans law enforcement officer from stopping vehicles for driving without headlights, driving without working tail lights or brake lights, or driving with expired registration unless it has been expired for at least three months, WSLS reported.

    Police would also not be allowed to pull vehicles over for obstructed windshields, seatbelt violations, illegal tint, driving with defective or unsafe equipment, or smoking with minors inside the vehicle, according to the bill.

    Officers would be banned from stopping or searching anyone based upon the odor of marijuana, and would no longer be able to stop jaywalkers or pedestrians who are “carelessly or maliciously interfering with the orderly passage of vehicles,” the Daily Press reported.

    “This might be the most significant reform of the state’s criminal justice system in decades,” Justice Forward Virginia Executive Director Brad Haywood, an Arlington-based public defender, told the Daily Press. “This is a big step forward for racial justice in Virginia.”

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Mike_from_SGV, @Bragadocious, @AnotherDad

    CCZ, Berkeley followed suit with their non enforcement, but their law is citywide. This one is statewide. Hell, why register your car? Why pay for the inspection sticker. Why wear that restrictive seatbelt? Why buy a child’s car seat? Oh, and when their stat based insurance rates go up, that will be caused by systemic racism. Loons, they are all loons.

  113. @Anon
    OT: Tulipmania is back again: "Jack Dorsey Is Auctioning His First Tweet Ever As An NFT... And It's Now Worth Over $2MM." Someone mentioned Grimes selling a dimwit digital art for 6 million.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/crypto/jack-dorsey-auctioning-his-first-tweet-ever-nft-and-its-now-worth-over-2mm

    It's impressive seeing people who are even dumber at spending than black rappers.

    The next time any minority complains about the inherited wealth of certain white families, they need to be reminded that's because there have always been other people who got rich, but some of them did stupid crap with their money, so they never had another generation to pass that wealth to.

    I blame liberal media. NFTs are what you buy if you've been raised on media that's been selling you a line of bull since birth, and created a belief system utterly divorced from reality. You no longer have any sort of BS detector or common sense, and can't tell what has value and what doesn't. Therefore, you become the ultimate sucker for whatever garbage the media is peddling you.

    Replies: @Luzzatto

    Jack Dorsey looks like a hipster White trash heroin junkie from Portland, Oregon who shoots up heroin into his arms inside a Starbucks restroom in Portland, Oregon!

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Luzzatto


    Jack Dorsey looks like a hipster White trash heroin junkie from Portland, Oregon who shoots up heroin into his arms inside a Starbucks restroom in Portland, Oregon!
     
    Hopefully he has better taste in coffee than that.
    , @jsinton
    @Luzzatto

    How dare you insult white trash heroin junkies from Portland like that.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Luzzatto


    Jack Dorsey looks like a hipster White trash heroin junkie from Portland, Oregon who shoots up heroin into his arms inside a Starbucks restroom in Portland, Oregon!
     
    Beats a Mickey D's in Liverpool.


    Horrified McDonald's customers watch naked man inject drugs into his testicles
  114. @Achmed E. Newman
    @International Jew

    Wasn't The Graduate driving on the wrong deck for direction of travel, too, I.J.? I know that some of the scenes at Berkeley were at Berkeley but a bunch were really at UCLA(?) or somewhere in Southern Cal, closer to the movie makers.

    Replies: @Anon, @International Jew

    And driving the wrong direction through the tunnel which leads AWAY from Santa Barbara on the northbound 101.

  115. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, here's one: I was wondering how the NHTSB (or the National Safety Council for that matter, if they do any of this themselves) got an accurate "miles driven" number. My first thought was that maybe it's from gasoline sales and vehicle gas milages x number of various vehicles on the road with some estimation in there. In that case, I was wondering how much the electric vehicles would make actual miles driven greater than estimated.

    However, looking in this pretty readable paper by the Federal Highway Admin, for the NHTS from '17. , I see that they do large surveys of odometer readings gleaned from phone calls or mail surveys, I guess). Other estimates are from surveys milage estimated by drivers, and then surveys of estimated vehicle daily time in use. The paper says that even the odometer numbers (used for 80% or so of the 256,000 vehicles for this data quality assessment) aren't so reliable.

    Therefore, other factors (driver "characteristics", age of vehicle) are used in an attempt to correct mis-estimates that are made by those surveyed. There are simple correction equations used, with their fudge factors and the like, to make one set of data fit the other. It's somewhat interesting, but just this one paper should be good to make a user of this data realize that nothing is as easy as it sounds.

    So, the denominator for these fatality stats is not necessarily as accurate a number as the fatality number. Just sayin', so after all the guesses about the reasons for the numerator numbers, how 'bout let's think about the denominator too.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Steve Sailer

    They can get lots of miles driven per year from annual state vehicle safety inspections. Not to worry though, once it’s all perfected they’ll be able to tell about every mile driven by a vehicle and every pack of chewing gum purchased by its occupants.

  116. Taxpayers react to crappy, physically dangerous public highways the same way that they react to crappy, physically dangerous public schools.

    They shrug their shoulders. What can anyone do?

    If roads were 100% privatized:

    • traffic fatalities would be a million-to-one shot.

    • traffic congestion would only exist in the Indy-500.

    • highways would be as tidy, and pot-hole free, as Disney’s Main Street USA.

    • there’d be no justification for (ridiculously high!) vehicle registration fees and gasoline taxes.

    In the mean time, helmets mandatory for occupants of passenger vehicles!

  117. @jsinton
    I've seen a lot of "rage" driving in my area. People who are driving like they are crazy-angry. People driving too close to my bumper even though I drive over the speed limit. People passing on curves and double lines. People driving like they are late to work all the time.

    Replies: @SteeringWheelHolder, @Reg Cæsar

    Correct.

    The ONLY period in which driving was significantly reduced was the first two weeks, and barely that.

    Yes, traffic has thinned, but that’s only due to office workers not commuting.

    The rest are driving in an even worse manner than before. Live in their cars. Travel without apparent purpose. Heater-skelter. One can’t import 100-million below average IQ “citizens” without consequences. Road safety, vehicle safety and improved emergency care have limits.

    Having made my first road trips to both coasts out of Texas in the Kennedy years I’ve a life-long set of memories to work from. Full-time travel most of the past quarter-century.

    City to City circa 1970 didn’t involve much suburban sprawl. The Interstates were working as designed. (Should have been required to BYPASS cities; another subject).

    By 1980 the stresses were apparent and have never really ceased. By 2000 it was obvious that population numbers were lies.

    I recall the day in 1967 we officially hit a population of 200-million.

    Those believing we are at 320-million or so are kidding themselves. I’d wager past 400-million already. 2021 and 1970 don’t correlate as well with traffic density as if we used other comparatives as the norm.

    The comments above are from bubble-dwellers. There is a larger picture not being seen. Car versus plane, etc, isn’t close to covering it. Nor are longer commutes, etc.

    See the map MEGA-REGIONS OF THE USA and comprehend that the limits shown DO NOT explain the high traffic density outside them. Even within them.

    Once upon a time there was a rush hour morning and evening. By the late 1970s wee were seeing men go into business for themselves as contractors, traveling farther than usual.

    Otherwise, rural Interstates were some trucks and some locals at mid-day. Long distance was regional salesmen and a few truckers. Except warm weather holidays or the densest coastal Interstates, traffic died down to a minimal level. Higher both morning and evening, but maybe not much more.

    75-miles from city centers is a general daily delivery limit. Today, it’s where you’ll see highest Interstate speed limits come down. D/FW is 100-miles wide E-W in these terms.

    What changed was those rural-most areas now featuring a constant traffic flow of cars. Same very bad drivers ill-equipped in every sense as in the major metro regions.

    Some one can break out fatalities by race & region the focus will get somewhere.

    .

  118. @International Jew
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account


    booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change
     
    Umm, on the Bay Bridge, the toll booths are on the west-bound lanes.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Morton's toes, @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @James B. Shearer

    Next you’ll be telling me he didn’t really do all that acid

  119. @dearieme
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    (Sidebar: note that Western Australia has seen 9 COVID deaths, i.e., the state’s COVID response has, by the government’s own admission, caused more deaths than the virus.)

    Top spot, BO. This issue is a new weight to put in the balance pro- and anti-lockdown.

    (My own inclination is anti-lockdown, particularly after the first British lockdown had lost most of its purpose - or purported purpose - by May of last year.)

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    (My own inclination is anti-lockdown, particularly after the first British lockdown had lost most of its purpose – or purported purpose – by May of last year.)

    ?

  120. An interracial Black female/White male couple looking for a ghetto lottery payday claim they experienced racial discrimination at an Italian restaurant in Orlando, Florida. Another boy cries wolf case from Democrats. If you read this entire article you will see they were being extremely paranoid!
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.orlandosentinel.com/news/florida/os-ne-couple-in-orlando-segregated-by-race-at-restaurant-20210306-6gnaq7wmt5a7zgfk6bsrtrx2le-story.html%3foutputType=amp

  121. @dearieme
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    note that Western Australia has seen 9 COVID deaths, i.e., the state’s COVID response has, by the government’s own admission, caused more deaths than the virus.

    Top spot, BO. This issue is a new weight to put in the balance pro- and anti-lockdown.

    For Britain I've found this:

    There were an estimated 1,580 road deaths in the year ending June 2020 which includes three months of the national lockdown. This is a decrease of 14% compared to the previous year. This change is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level.
    There were 131,220 casualties of all severities in the year ending June 2020, down by 16% from the previous year. This change is statistically significant.
    The overall casualty rate per vehicle mile decreased by 2% over the same period. The reduction in casualties is broadly in line with the reduction in traffic which decreased by 14% over this period.


    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/956524/road-casualties-year-ending-june-2020.pdf

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account

    There was the same decrease in Western Australia, with the general downtick in cars n the road. (I don’t think anybody’s disputing that you can eliminate car deaths entirely by eliminating the use of cars.) And yet, that boost in January, from holidaymakers (apparently); the general rise in America.

    If tourism’s a factor, we should see the downward trend in Britain begin to be arrested by summer, which, per your link, it was. If that’s when lockdowns ended, though, that will obviously be confounded somewhat. And then there’s the rest of the year.

    Keep an eye out for the updated figures, I guess.

  122. It could be that additional road traffic accidents are caused by people wearing face masks, because they certainly impair your field of vision and make glasses steam up.

    Although not driving I have twice fallen because of this, but fortunately no injuries.

  123. @International Jew
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account


    booming through the Treasure Island tunnel at the lights of Oakland and Berkeley and Richmond, not quite sure which turn-off to take when I got to the other end (always stalling at the toll-gate, too twisted to find neutral while I fumbled for change
     
    Umm, on the Bay Bridge, the toll booths are on the west-bound lanes.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Morton's toes, @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @James B. Shearer

    “Umm, on the Bay Bridge, the toll booths are on the west-bound lanes.”

    According to wikipedia:

    “The toll plaza on the Oakland side (since 1969 for westbound traffic only) ..”

    The quote refers to

    “… San Francisco in the middle sixties ..”

    So it appears there would have been east-bound tolls at that time.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @James B. Shearer

    Interesting. I stand corrected!
    I got there ten years later.

  124. The worst drivers I have ever shared a road with are Canadians, but the border is closed so no beavers on their way to our Southern shores. Maybe more people driving because airlines are petri dishes and not wanting to stay over night in an unsanitary motel leads to sleepy drivers.

  125. @Anonymous
    There just doesn’t seem to be the same police presence in Southern California. I never see any highway patrol, and quite often the average speed on the 5 freeway is 80 mph. Essentially, you can drive like an asshole with no worries.

    Pedestrians often seem distracted. They meander out into the middle of the street without looking for oncoming traffic like mental patients. I was just thinking that any serial killer could kill at least one pedestrian a week, legally. Just be ready for a pedestrian who wanders out into the middle of the street with his or her back to you, and wham! As long as they’re jaywalking, you’ve had your fun, and it’s all legal!

    They should do a "Better Call Saul" episode with that as the premise. Saul has to defend someone who's taken out 10 jaywalkers in a month, and keeps taking them out all through the episode. Is he really a serial killer? Or just very unlucky? It could be a recurring character. How do you incarcerate someone who accidentally kills qualified jaywalkers?

    Replies: @JohnPlywood, @Redneck farmer, @Jim Christian, @Marty, @Mike_from_SGV

    I’m seeing that too in my area of LA County, more speeding, whipping in and out of lanes, etc. Where the heck are the police or CHP. A lot of revenue could be raised for government coffers if they would enforce the law and fine violators.

  126. @CCZ
    Virginia's racial justice traffic safety initiative:

    Virginia has enacted a law that will drastically reduce the circumstances in which law enforcement officers will be permitted to conduct traffic stops and enforce traffic laws. Proponents argue that police have been targeting black people and pulling them over for unwarranted stops and searches, the Daily Press reported.

    The legislation, which passed the General Assembly and has been signed into law by Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, bans law enforcement officer from stopping vehicles for driving without headlights, driving without working tail lights or brake lights, or driving with expired registration unless it has been expired for at least three months, WSLS reported.

    Police would also not be allowed to pull vehicles over for obstructed windshields, seatbelt violations, illegal tint, driving with defective or unsafe equipment, or smoking with minors inside the vehicle, according to the bill.

    Officers would be banned from stopping or searching anyone based upon the odor of marijuana, and would no longer be able to stop jaywalkers or pedestrians who are “carelessly or maliciously interfering with the orderly passage of vehicles,” the Daily Press reported.

    “This might be the most significant reform of the state’s criminal justice system in decades,” Justice Forward Virginia Executive Director Brad Haywood, an Arlington-based public defender, told the Daily Press. “This is a big step forward for racial justice in Virginia.”

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Mike_from_SGV, @Bragadocious, @AnotherDad

    In New America, “Justice” = “Decriminalizing POC criminality”.

  127. @Sam Malone
    Has anyone else noticed over the last couple years or so an increase in people driving at night without their headlights on? I started noticing about two years ago that, instead of coming across someone doing that every once in a long, long while, I was seeing it fairly frequently. Now, if I glance at the cars I pass and the cars around me when driving at night, there's a pretty good chance I'll see at least one without its headlights on, and sometimes a couple. That was not the case 5, 10, 15 years ago, at least not that I ever noticed.

    All I can think is that it's smartphones, people being obsessed now with checking their facebook or looking at youtube or porn or something. Or maybe the increase of pot-smoking, though that's not legal in my state (and I'm not really against it anyway).

    Replies: @mmack, @The Wild Geese Howard

    I think auto makers are to blame for driving without headlights. I’ve done it accidentally myself. 🤦🏻‍♂️

    Most cars today have automatic headlights using a dimmer sensor to come on. You just set it and forget it.

    Should someone, like say the apes at the quick change oil place I frequent, turn the headlights to manual on/off to check the car’s lights so as to sell you lightbulbs for your car and not reset it, then you have the disconcerting issue of the dashboard lights being on while your headlights are off. If you’re driving in a populated area with lots of lights, you don’t notice it. After all, if the dashboard is lit up the headlights are on, right? At least in older cars that was the case.

    Or if you think you’re changing the windshield wiper speed and instead change the headlamp settings (I’m looking at you KIA/Hyundai).

    Just a thought from experience.

  128. OT

    • Replies: @JosephB
    @Anon

    I just tried it out. Interesting. At least the 7th image is an actual white guy.

    Just one more reason I'm glad I use bing.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Anon

    try
    Happy black women
    then
    Happy white women

    Replies: @Sam Malone

  129. This is anecdotal but as my Boomer friend in LA(not Steve) used to rail against…..latinos in general and Mexicans in specific have this Latin hot blooded temper thing…..they always annoyed him by being aggressive drivers…..this is also anecdotal but i almost didnt drive much in the last decade…..that changed in 2017 when i got married…..

    There are more latinos by a factor of say 20 to 50x on the road in most parts of the USA as they spread out away from the border….and probably 200 to 300x more than say in the late 2000s or early 2010s. When you import such numbers of foreigners in such a short time they drive as they did in whatever foreign country they’re from….

    Also anecdotal…..the number of folks i knew who got rides with relatives or friends for years in my millenial bracket threw in the towel in the last few yrs & got car notes for whatever reason….

    I think the jump in deaths will be short lived. I and most folks i know save Boomers & Puerto Ricans hate to drive…..

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
    @Neoconned

    NY State started giving licenses to illegals in 2019, along with some other states including Oregon and Colorado. It would be interesting to see traffic fatality rates in 2020 in the states that made this change the year before. NY called it the "green light" program which is hilariously apt since drivers from the developing world rarely see any other kind of light.

  130. steve is the last of the last!

  131. I’ve been thinking about this one all day, and here is my best analysis:

    Deaths per mile rose and this drove total deaths higher than before. Although it is possible the increased bad driving that led to increased deaths can be attributable to who stayed home versus who went to work, without more data (race/occupation/priors) it is chancey to find the critical factors.

    But, it should be noted that the perceived universe changed. Suddenly, it was thought dangerous to breathe by the cautious, and stupid to wear masks by the reckless. Many of the latter group caught Covid-19 and died, and suddenly the reckless were somewhat less reckless.

    I’ve noticed that when society goes through a sudden change where it appears the old rules no longer matter (even if they do), about half the population, who are governed by internal restraints continue to behave the same, and the other half start acting like assholes.

    If some people are prone to walking down the middle of a street, they might be bad drivers too, and in a world where the old rules no longer matter …

    • Replies: @peterike
    @James Speaks


    Suddenly, it was thought dangerous to breathe by the cautious, and stupid to wear masks by the reckless. Many of the latter group caught Covid-19 and died, and suddenly the reckless were somewhat less reckless.
     
    Lol!! Thanks, I needed that laugh.

    Yes, assuming 100% of Covid deaths were of the reckless, the population decrease of 0.1% of the reckless no doubt is making a tremendous difference.
  132. Please. keep fitghting for your community to adopt traumatized children ( you are actually providing a 2nd situation for these traumatized kids to get to the next level of healing. I just had to stop crying: Get kids into “school intro programs ‘ at the local children – NATIONAL MODEL!

  133. Anon[674] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Iranian Militia Group Claims to Have Active Cells in Washington DC: Report

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/iranian-militia-group-claims-have-active-cells-washington-dc-report

    Remember all the fuss about a potential right-wing invasion of our citizens of Washington that the leftwing media was bleating about? Well, you know what? The libturds have figured out how to have the best of both worlds. Secretly, they are well aware of terrorist threats from foreign countries like Iran, but when those terrorists get ready to launch an attack, the Biden administration is going to prep for it, but say they’re doing it to prevent an attack against native US citizens who are right-wingers. They’re going to lie their heads off.

    Biden is doing this because he knows his attacks in the Mideast have stirred up a hornet’s nest over there, and he’s trying to make it look like the baddies in the Mideast aren’t going to retaliate, which would leave him with egg on his face for being stupid. So he’s going to blame all foreign terrorist attacks on the US on the right here in the US.

    Don’t fall for this attempt at misdirection.

  134. @jsinton
    I've seen a lot of "rage" driving in my area. People who are driving like they are crazy-angry. People driving too close to my bumper even though I drive over the speed limit. People passing on curves and double lines. People driving like they are late to work all the time.

    Replies: @SteeringWheelHolder, @Reg Cæsar

    I’ve seen a lot of “rage” driving in my area. People who are driving like they are crazy-angry. People driving too close to my bumper even though I drive over the speed limit. People passing on curves and double lines. People driving like they are late to work all the time.

    For almost five years now I’ve made twice-weekly trips to the county landfill, followed by a left turn onto a straight country road. One develops a good feel for how far away an oncoming vehicle is to be safe enough to make that turn in front of it.

    This afternoon a car was at what had always been a safe distance before, so I scooted across… and was nearly slammed. The fellow was revving up to a good 30 mph over the speed limit. Whether it was the result, or the cause, of just having passed another vehicle is anyone’s guess.

    You’re not even safe out in the boonies anymore. There were horses grazing nearby. It’s tempting to take one of those next time.

    • Replies: @Jiminy
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reading this reminds me of driving across the wide open plains of central Australia. Boringly flat and devoid of trees, it becomes hard to judge distance when preparing to overtake the multi trailered semis. Mainly because there are just no points of interest or landmarks to help make the judgement call on where the oncoming car is. Just miles of nothing. Often you see a lot of travellers with radios and they just talk to the truckie and he’ll inform them when to pass. Which is alright as long as he hasn’t been watching the movie “Duel.”

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Muggles

  135. @Charles
    BTW, I don't know why he was asleep at the wheel, but Tiger Woods definitely was asleep at the time of his crash. "Prove it", you say? Absolutely no skid (i.e., braking) marks on either "his" side of the highway or on the other side, the side over which he crossed. Even if you're texting or whatever, by the time you've crossed the median a part of your brain screams "Look OUT!", you snap-to, hit the brakes...nothing like that happened in his crash.

    Replies: @FPD72

    Absolutely no skid (i.e., braking) marks on either “his” side of the highway or on the other side, the side over which he crossed.

    My guess is that Tiger’s car had newer anti-lock brakes. Since the wheels are rolling throughout the application of brakes, there are no skid marks ( except for maybe those on the driver’s underwear). Older ABS left light dashes of marks but some newer systems avoid almost all skidding and leave little, if any, skid marks. But since you wrote that Tiger’s car left “absolutely no skid marks” then perhaps there was no brake application at all.

    Another interesting aspect of anti-lock brake systems (ABS): a 2004 Australian study by Monash University Accident Research Centre found that ABS increased the risk of run-off-the-road crashes by 35%.

  136. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Well, here's one: I was wondering how the NHTSB (or the National Safety Council for that matter, if they do any of this themselves) got an accurate "miles driven" number. My first thought was that maybe it's from gasoline sales and vehicle gas milages x number of various vehicles on the road with some estimation in there. In that case, I was wondering how much the electric vehicles would make actual miles driven greater than estimated.

    However, looking in this pretty readable paper by the Federal Highway Admin, for the NHTS from '17. , I see that they do large surveys of odometer readings gleaned from phone calls or mail surveys, I guess). Other estimates are from surveys milage estimated by drivers, and then surveys of estimated vehicle daily time in use. The paper says that even the odometer numbers (used for 80% or so of the 256,000 vehicles for this data quality assessment) aren't so reliable.

    Therefore, other factors (driver "characteristics", age of vehicle) are used in an attempt to correct mis-estimates that are made by those surveyed. There are simple correction equations used, with their fudge factors and the like, to make one set of data fit the other. It's somewhat interesting, but just this one paper should be good to make a user of this data realize that nothing is as easy as it sounds.

    So, the denominator for these fatality stats is not necessarily as accurate a number as the fatality number. Just sayin', so after all the guesses about the reasons for the numerator numbers, how 'bout let's think about the denominator too.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter, @Steve Sailer

    Oil company profits were way down in 2020 because, I assume, gasoline sales were down.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Steve Sailer

    Gasoline sales
    https://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler.ashx?n=PET&s=A103600001&f=M

    If only we'd added them up, but markedly down.

    Here's more
    https://www.eia.gov/petroleum/weekly/gasoline.php

  137. @wewuzkangs
    "But … miles driven had almost wholly recovered by June, but the death rate kept going up and got notably worse than in April"

    It hadn't "almost wholly recovered" by June, it was still significantly below the level of June 2019, as your graph shows. My guess is this is pretty much all selection effect. In March, even a lot of "essential" workers" were at home, whereas they started returning to work in April as things like retail started to open up again, thereby increasing total miles driven without drastically altering the profile of who was out driving.

    White collar workers, on the other hand, have mostly kept working from home. On my daily commute in San Jose, I still see most office parking lots deserted and drastically reduced traffic on roads around major office complexes. The people least likely to get in a wreck are still staying off the road.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Clearly, we had in 2020, to paraphrase Greta Garbo in Ninotchka, fewer but worse drivers.

    “My guess is this is pretty much all selection effect.”

    But it can’t be all selection effect: from June-Dec, total traffic deaths were 14% while miles driven were down 10% (for a 28% worsening of traffic deaths per miles driven).

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Steve Sailer

    My guess is glued to Twitter effect.

  138. @cthulhu
    Some observations from my corner of coastal SoCal and my experiences continuing to commute for my essential-worker job:

    (1) The mix of drivers on the roads changed. Starting spring 2020, my take was that a much higher percentage of drivers at peak times were inexperienced; combine that with significantly higher average traffic speeds and higher dispersion around the mean (both recklessly fast and recklessly slow freeway driving), and you get more accidents on a per-car-on-the-road basis, and the severity of the accidents likely worse than before due to speed and speed differential.

    (2) On major arterial roads - not freeways, but the 4-6 lane divided roads with traffic lights at intersections that are the suburban transit backbones - traffic was reduced enough that traffic light timing was all screwed up; when approaching a green light, you have to be more prepared for it to change because you’re not in a pack of cars all going the same direction and keeping the traffic sensors engaged. So you end up making many more quick yellow light decisions about “hit the go pedal and clear the intersection, or brake abruptly and stop.” Combined with the higher than typical speeds due to lower traffic, then add in a higher percentage of worse drivers, and you have a potential recipe for a lot more high speed intersection collisions.

    I don’t have any evidence for the above besides my observations over the last year, but I think it’s plausible.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    Thanks.

    Traffic light timing is an interesting subject. I can recall a NYC cabbie in 1984 who got me from Midtown to La Guardia in 18 minutes by hitting every single light. He gave me a lecture on the precise speed he needed to drive on each street, such as, IIRC, 36.2 mph on Third Avenue.

    Traffic light timing appeared to be hard coded when it was first introduced in the US about 40 years ago. Does it now vary in real time based on traffic sensors?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    In some cases there are supposedly* scales under the road which register that a car is present and then speed up low-traffic long-wait lights. I once took a class with a guy who programmed them and claimed to have a "toy" streetlight in his backyard. It's simple to program them but the reasoning going into it can be complex, and most importantly:

    *when you're at this light you'll still feel like it's taking forever anyway.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Craken
    @Steve Sailer

    Some traffic lights have preset cycles for different times of day, but most (in big cities at least) are responsive to real-time traffic (conditioned also on time of day). Either pavement embedded wires or cameras can be used for the responsive systems. Optimization of city traffic networks is one of the ML/probability fields that has yielded some progress. Like the game of Go, city traffic has too many permutations to compute. But, ML is now much better at Go than any human or team of humans, despite Go being in either the NP or PSPACE class. In theory advances underlying AlphaGo-type systems apply as well to traffic simulations.

    , @cthulhu
    @Steve Sailer



    Traffic light timing appeared to be hard coded when it was first introduced in the US about 40 years ago. Does it now vary in real time based on traffic sensors?

     

    Yup. Most traffic-light-controlled intersections now have one or both of the following: inductive loop sensors buried in the lanes (you can see them by the sealer used to weatherproof the grooves in which they are installed) that sense the metal mass of a car, and/or cameras on the lights that feed simple image processing algorithms to detect cars in lanes.

    The sophistication of the traffic control algorithms depends on the municipality, and my impression is there are a handful of companies that specialize in selling these services to towns, cities or larger jurisdictions. But the rules typically rely on the local traffic density coming into an intersection (inductive loop sensors often are installed hundreds or even thousands of feet away from an intersection to gauge traffic on the road), and vary by time of day: for a major arterial used for commuting during mornings and afternoons, the traffic light logic will usually be synchronized along the major arterial in the predominant direction of flow. But at other times and on weekends, when traffic volume is lower and the likelihood of traffic from any direction is similar, the light may change after a short time, which drives up the probability that any random driver will hit a red light at a given intersection.

    The other sensor you may see at a traffic light nowadays is a fairly large rectangular sensor (often white); that’s a dedicated license plate reader tracking cars via their license plates. A story for another time...

    Replies: @Jiminy

  139. @Anonymous
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account


    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .
     
    When I was a teen in the mid-seventies, I lived in a So. Cal beach community, and if my friends and I didn’t have a plan for a Saturday night, we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends. We’d also travel down PCH to Huntington Beach with the same plan. More often than not there was a house right on the sand overlooking the Pacific Ocean having a surfer party, and we were welcome to partake. Hanging out in someone’s house we didn’t know, drinking off their keg.

    I was fortunate to experience the last gasp of California as Shangri-La. People who arrived in the 80's or later think I romanticize, because they can’t process that they contributed to ruining an entire state. They can’t imagine a place that was so much better than where they dame from. They'll never know what they missed. They don’t want to know. Parasites don’t want to know the history of their hosts.

    But I concur with that innate sense of victory. If you watch "American Graffitti," which was before my time, you can get the same existential flavor. Back then, anything good could probably happen. If not, you’d still have a good story. Even if you were a Toad.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Corn

    “we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends.”

    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn’t been invited to the party. And the student replied, of course he hadn’t, you just look around for a party and go to it. And Mr. Dukakis looked confused.

    So this Open Party culture probably didn’t start all that long before the 1970s in So Cal and probably didn’t last too long after it either.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Steve Sailer

    It lives on at Jimmy Buffet concerts.

    , @Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Many of Colin Flaherty’s tragedies came from a similar vein. The fellas crash a party, get rejected then come back guns a blazin’. Was on east coast of Florida last weekend, many small sedans with very dark tint, dodging and weaving. South Americans plus few cops seems to equal more dangerous roads.

    , @Danindc
    @Steve Sailer

    In high school in 1989 we had heard of these open party rumors but they never came to fruition. But we knew they existed. I’d say they had an 8-year run say 1974-1982.

    , @Not Raul
    @Steve Sailer

    There were open parties in college towns in California in the 1990s.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Dissident
    @Steve Sailer


    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn’t been invited to the party.
     
    1.) Reminds me of a Jean Shepherd story...

    2.) In Soviet Russia, the Party would look for (and usually find) you....

    https://vhscollector.com/sites/default/files/vhsimages/29387_d1_8.jpg

    , @Servant of Gla'aki
    @Steve Sailer

    I participated in this "open party" culture, as a teenager in the Los Gatos/Campbell/Cambrian region of Santa Clara County (as a teenager in the 1980s). I can pinpoint the year it all began to go to crap: 1986. That was the year that (very disproportionately Mexican) jerks started showing up at all the parties, and starting fights. So the tradition ended.

    When I was 14, my buddies and I would join parties thrown by other teenagers (usually featuring kegs), or sometimes schmooze our way right into parties where the median age was like 30. In the latter cases, we'd often get politely asked to leave within an hour, but still had ourselves a good time, drinking wine, and hitting off joints. You couldn't do that kinda stuff anymore by 1987 or '88.

    Replies: @Anon, @JohnnyWalker123

  140. @JimB
    What percentage of those additional traffic deaths in 2020 were caused by Amazon delivery vehicles? Seems like the kind of thing Bezos would pay politicians and federal officials to cover up.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Gig economy deliveries were way up after March.

    • Replies: @peterike
    @Steve Sailer


    Gig economy deliveries were way up after March.
     
    Yes, I was going to bring this up. The amount of take-out deliveries and grocery deliveries is up tremendously. And at least in New York City, they are 100% non-American drivers, with who-knows how much driving experience. To say nothing of all the delivery guys zipping around on motorized bicycles.

    New York City has also had a historical rise in moving vans leaving the city, but I doubt that's got anything to do with it. On the other hand, maybe city-dwellers who drove rarely or not at all suddenly moving to the suburbs does play some minor role.

  141. @S. Anonyia
    When I took a road trip over the holidays to South Florida, I noticed every 4th vehicle on I-10 and I-75 was an RV or a massive bulky SUV with luggage strapped to the back and to the roof. Many of these people were driving from much further away than me, too (Texas and Midwestern states in particular). Average speed was probably near 85 despite heavy congestion.

    Increase in people with poor driving skills going on family road trips probably contributed. I don’t understand how anyone who isn’t in an empty state like Utah or Kansas can travel 85+ on the interstate longer than an hour. I speed to get to work or appointments but it’s mentally/physically exhausting if you’re driving all day. I just cruise behind the semis at 70.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Speeding to get to a video shoot with Drew Brees didn’t do Tiger Woods much good.

  142. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends."

    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn't been invited to the party. And the student replied, of course he hadn't, you just look around for a party and go to it. And Mr. Dukakis looked confused.

    So this Open Party culture probably didn't start all that long before the 1970s in So Cal and probably didn't last too long after it either.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Anon, @Danindc, @Not Raul, @Dissident, @Servant of Gla'aki

    It lives on at Jimmy Buffet concerts.

  143. Cars(+trucks/SUV’s) in the US have gotten safer for occupants but a more dangerous for pedestrians.

    Pickups and SUV’s are a nightmare for pedestrians. They get hit higher and can’t just roll over the bonnet, windshield, and the roof like with collision’s with sedans.

    And of course the ratio of trucks+SUV’s vs sedans has become much higher.

  144. Anonymous[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve-O
    Is it possible that there was an increase in drunk driving? I haven’t used a cab or ride share service in a year. Of course, I haven’t gone out to dinner, parties, or other places away from home where there is drinking.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Yes, Uber basically disappeared about a year ago. Still hasn’t returned to my metro area.

  145. Anonymous[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @cthulhu
    Some observations from my corner of coastal SoCal and my experiences continuing to commute for my essential-worker job:

    (1) The mix of drivers on the roads changed. Starting spring 2020, my take was that a much higher percentage of drivers at peak times were inexperienced; combine that with significantly higher average traffic speeds and higher dispersion around the mean (both recklessly fast and recklessly slow freeway driving), and you get more accidents on a per-car-on-the-road basis, and the severity of the accidents likely worse than before due to speed and speed differential.

    (2) On major arterial roads - not freeways, but the 4-6 lane divided roads with traffic lights at intersections that are the suburban transit backbones - traffic was reduced enough that traffic light timing was all screwed up; when approaching a green light, you have to be more prepared for it to change because you’re not in a pack of cars all going the same direction and keeping the traffic sensors engaged. So you end up making many more quick yellow light decisions about “hit the go pedal and clear the intersection, or brake abruptly and stop.” Combined with the higher than typical speeds due to lower traffic, then add in a higher percentage of worse drivers, and you have a potential recipe for a lot more high speed intersection collisions.

    I don’t have any evidence for the above besides my observations over the last year, but I think it’s plausible.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    The traffic lights observation is a good one. I noticed the same thing last summer, while still going into work everyday. The lights made no sense whatsoever. Thirty seconds to sixty seconds lights with no one around.

  146. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends."

    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn't been invited to the party. And the student replied, of course he hadn't, you just look around for a party and go to it. And Mr. Dukakis looked confused.

    So this Open Party culture probably didn't start all that long before the 1970s in So Cal and probably didn't last too long after it either.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Anon, @Danindc, @Not Raul, @Dissident, @Servant of Gla'aki

    Many of Colin Flaherty’s tragedies came from a similar vein. The fellas crash a party, get rejected then come back guns a blazin’. Was on east coast of Florida last weekend, many small sedans with very dark tint, dodging and weaving. South Americans plus few cops seems to equal more dangerous roads.

  147. The Death Rate spike as evidence of COVID looking shakier by the day.

  148. @Steve Sailer
    @wewuzkangs

    Clearly, we had in 2020, to paraphrase Greta Garbo in Ninotchka, fewer but worse drivers.

    "My guess is this is pretty much all selection effect."

    But it can't be all selection effect: from June-Dec, total traffic deaths were 14% while miles driven were down 10% (for a 28% worsening of traffic deaths per miles driven).

    Replies: @Desiderius

    My guess is glued to Twitter effect.

  149. @Achmed E. Newman
    @International Jew

    Wasn't The Graduate driving on the wrong deck for direction of travel, too, I.J.? I know that some of the scenes at Berkeley were at Berkeley but a bunch were really at UCLA(?) or somewhere in Southern Cal, closer to the movie makers.

    Replies: @Anon, @International Jew

    It’s been a long time since the last time I saw The Graduate. All I remember is him driving into the rainbow-painted tunnels north of the GG Bridge, and then emerging two hundred miles to the south.

    • Replies: @I, Libertine
    @International Jew

    Movies and TV shows set in my home town, NYC, drive me nuts that way. Two pedestrians are conversing. They turn corner while one is in mid-sentence, and they've instantly been transported two miles.

  150. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    Thanks.

    Traffic light timing is an interesting subject. I can recall a NYC cabbie in 1984 who got me from Midtown to La Guardia in 18 minutes by hitting every single light. He gave me a lecture on the precise speed he needed to drive on each street, such as, IIRC, 36.2 mph on Third Avenue.

    Traffic light timing appeared to be hard coded when it was first introduced in the US about 40 years ago. Does it now vary in real time based on traffic sensors?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Craken, @cthulhu

    In some cases there are supposedly* scales under the road which register that a car is present and then speed up low-traffic long-wait lights. I once took a class with a guy who programmed them and claimed to have a “toy” streetlight in his backyard. It’s simple to program them but the reasoning going into it can be complex, and most importantly:

    *when you’re at this light you’ll still feel like it’s taking forever anyway.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @J.Ross

    These systems can be programmed in all kinds of ways nowadays, Mr. Ross. They are not run by scales though - there are eddy-current loops. Look for a big rectangular cut in the road.

    You need some bit of motion to produce that small current it takes for the system to sense your vehicle. (I think maybe even the engine running can do it.) That is often too much for a motorcycle though, and almost all the time too much for a bicycle, unless you take the bike and move it horizontally across the ground over the loop corner (not something I do on the road, mind you, but to get out of some gates that have no other way).

    Of course, a bicyclist should just run these ones. I'm sure as hell not going to wait for a car to come along. That is not exercise, and I feel the need for speed. Oh, hey, let's do another bicyclists are assholes thread. I'm up for that!

  151. @Anon
    OT

    https://twitter.com/sullydish/status/1368281351091261445

    Replies: @JosephB, @Bill Jones

    I just tried it out. Interesting. At least the 7th image is an actual white guy.

    Just one more reason I’m glad I use bing.

  152. @James B. Shearer
    @International Jew

    "Umm, on the Bay Bridge, the toll booths are on the west-bound lanes."

    According to wikipedia:

    "The toll plaza on the Oakland side (since 1969 for westbound traffic only) .."

    The quote refers to

    "... San Francisco in the middle sixties .."

    So it appears there would have been east-bound tolls at that time.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Interesting. I stand corrected!
    I got there ten years later.

  153. @SteeringWheelHolder
    Traffic deaths need to be filtered same as crime: by race. Then, “where”?

    As deaths by gunshots declined due to improved medical care; so, too, deaths in traffic accidents due to improved roads and greatly improved car safety structure since 1960. (Then, emergency medical care).

    Drunk driving is probably higher. “Desperation” probably fuels fatalism. Lack of funds means worse maintenance re tires (steering/braking/handling).

    I drive an average of thirty-one (31) states per year. Year-round, as a truck driver. Race correlates to driving habits much more than one might assume. Without seeing the driver — making bad choices at the wheel — I can usually predict both race & sex.

    Skills have declined in general. “Caution”. To do with situational awareness and being responsive. “Knowing” (acting) what to do is worst among the poorest, best among the richest (zip code). Several generations of divorce cut off otherwise capable men from risk assessment such that they’re now blind to it. (Fathers lost authority vis-a-vis TV & Vietnam draft).

    Enstupidation means they are unwilling to be corrected.
    (Call an American every name in the book. Only at stupidity will he disagree).

    Selfishness drives car use style. Desperation makes it worse. Never had good habits = zero room for error.

    Traits seen on the highway as aberrations 25-years ago (versus practice the thirty-years previous) are indicative of immigrant incompetents (no exceptions). WWII was won by cooperation. Men drivers (nearly all) carried this over into highway practice up to around 1990.

    Metro areas grew worst fastest with suburban sprawl after our being ethnically-cleansed from our cities and wives forced to find full-time work to cover massive debt load. Then, “immigrants”.

    9-5 and “closed weekends” (or Sunday) meant life had a rhythm. A pace. What outlier women or foreigner bad habits (lack of awareness and compensatory behavior) wasn’t critical. But those two groups now outnumber the skilled (call it good habits) such that deductive reasoning per road rule principles has all but disappeared.

    Without race & region (metro vs rural, first) there’s no way to get a handle on WHY a rising death rate.

    From my personal perspective, I assume the bad habits borne of contempt for fellow drivers (never acquiring good habits) coupled to social indices (all-encompassing pressures) are adequate explanation.

    What lacks any explanation is the sheer number of cars on the road 150-miles from any major metro during workday hours. 20-million unemployed? Many more under-employed? This nationwide phenomenon DIDN'T EXIST 25+ (and more) years ago. From 1100 thru 2300 hours. This is several millions of cars, daily.

    Capture that in cross-section by race and one will have uncovered “economic” (or political) activity heretofore hidden. Networks. Cars ain’t cheap and running them is the same. (Explain the explosion of chain hotels built 2-3 at a time even in locations where demand would appear nearly non-existent). $150-$200 day overhead.

    What you know about your bubble (the 90% of the same places you go 90% of the time; per DHS) doesn’t track auto use (or, fatality) type & rates thereof. You can’t take yourself as normative. That went out with Uncle Ronnie.

    “Smart phones” explain Obama era and later changes, but the roots are deeper. (Inability to navigate without GPS). “Flocking” is what to look for. Pack-formation as anodyne to high speed travel anxiety.

    Genuinely bad weather (Texas absorbing a war blow) takes down the facade. Should’ve heard the CB that week. And knew how to dissect what you heard.

    “Stress” is adequate surface answer to ones own risk-assessment. “Stress” as among those without reasoning skills. Congenitally-incapable, or never taught (contempt) equals similar outcomes.

    Expect that the rate will rise. A crisis that won’t go to waste. WAZE is worthless except to predict what stupids will be doing. Worthless as your phone, when it matters.

    CITIZEN BAND (for those willing to hear & speak).


    www.k0bg.com
    .

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Danindc

    Driving the DC and Baltimore beltways whenever I see a group of motorcycle riders popping wheelies WHILE going 90 mph I can also predict race and sex. I’ve never once been wrong.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @Danindc

    Yeah, those Chinese ladies get pretty wild stunting on their Gixxers and Ninjas heading home from mahjong club.

  154. @AnotherDad
    @Hodag


    I actually cut out post round beers last year because one should have your facilities when driving 85 plus.
     
    LOL.

    BTW, i didn't know we had a Medinah member in our ranks. The closest i've been to Medinah is taking off from O'Hare.

    Replies: @Hodag

    I am not a Medinah member. I mooch off my friends. They had a really good setup last year at Medinah, they already owned a food truck!

  155. A Chrysler 300 almost smashed into me the other day while weaving recklessly through highway traffic. Missed my car by inches while going at least 75 in a 50. Now who typically drives tree hunnerts?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Bragadocious

    I told Jack D. the other day that I'd put a lot of money on who. Where I live, it's 98% black people.

  156. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends."

    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn't been invited to the party. And the student replied, of course he hadn't, you just look around for a party and go to it. And Mr. Dukakis looked confused.

    So this Open Party culture probably didn't start all that long before the 1970s in So Cal and probably didn't last too long after it either.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Anon, @Danindc, @Not Raul, @Dissident, @Servant of Gla'aki

    In high school in 1989 we had heard of these open party rumors but they never came to fruition. But we knew they existed. I’d say they had an 8-year run say 1974-1982.

  157. @Anon
    OT

    https://twitter.com/sullydish/status/1368281351091261445

    Replies: @JosephB, @Bill Jones

    try
    Happy black women
    then
    Happy white women

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
    @Bill Jones

    wow...they really are f*cking with us...

    Replies: @Luzzatto

  158. @Steve Sailer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Oil company profits were way down in 2020 because, I assume, gasoline sales were down.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  159. @CCZ
    Virginia's racial justice traffic safety initiative:

    Virginia has enacted a law that will drastically reduce the circumstances in which law enforcement officers will be permitted to conduct traffic stops and enforce traffic laws. Proponents argue that police have been targeting black people and pulling them over for unwarranted stops and searches, the Daily Press reported.

    The legislation, which passed the General Assembly and has been signed into law by Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, bans law enforcement officer from stopping vehicles for driving without headlights, driving without working tail lights or brake lights, or driving with expired registration unless it has been expired for at least three months, WSLS reported.

    Police would also not be allowed to pull vehicles over for obstructed windshields, seatbelt violations, illegal tint, driving with defective or unsafe equipment, or smoking with minors inside the vehicle, according to the bill.

    Officers would be banned from stopping or searching anyone based upon the odor of marijuana, and would no longer be able to stop jaywalkers or pedestrians who are “carelessly or maliciously interfering with the orderly passage of vehicles,” the Daily Press reported.

    “This might be the most significant reform of the state’s criminal justice system in decades,” Justice Forward Virginia Executive Director Brad Haywood, an Arlington-based public defender, told the Daily Press. “This is a big step forward for racial justice in Virginia.”

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Mike_from_SGV, @Bragadocious, @AnotherDad

    Police would also not be allowed to pull vehicles over for obstructed windshields

    Well I can get behind this one thing. I love my $5 Wal-Mart smartphone holder that glues to the center of the windshield. It keeps the phone at eye level (unlike the ones that plug into the lighter or attach to the heater slats). And yet, it’s absolutely illegal because it’s glued to the windshield. Obviously, the rule change in Virginia is designed to decriminalize fuzzy dice and El Salvador mini-flags so the question is will they solely go after people like me?

  160. @Reg Cæsar
    @jsinton


    I’ve seen a lot of “rage” driving in my area. People who are driving like they are crazy-angry. People driving too close to my bumper even though I drive over the speed limit. People passing on curves and double lines. People driving like they are late to work all the time.

     

    For almost five years now I've made twice-weekly trips to the county landfill, followed by a left turn onto a straight country road. One develops a good feel for how far away an oncoming vehicle is to be safe enough to make that turn in front of it.

    This afternoon a car was at what had always been a safe distance before, so I scooted across... and was nearly slammed. The fellow was revving up to a good 30 mph over the speed limit. Whether it was the result, or the cause, of just having passed another vehicle is anyone's guess.

    You're not even safe out in the boonies anymore. There were horses grazing nearby. It's tempting to take one of those next time.

    Replies: @Jiminy

    Reading this reminds me of driving across the wide open plains of central Australia. Boringly flat and devoid of trees, it becomes hard to judge distance when preparing to overtake the multi trailered semis. Mainly because there are just no points of interest or landmarks to help make the judgement call on where the oncoming car is. Just miles of nothing. Often you see a lot of travellers with radios and they just talk to the truckie and he’ll inform them when to pass. Which is alright as long as he hasn’t been watching the movie “Duel.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jiminy


    Which is alright as long as he hasn’t been watching the movie “Duel.”
     
    Or Mad Max II: The Road Warrior. You don't want any of that.
    , @Muggles
    @Jiminy

    There is a fairly new tunnel underneath the Baltic from Denmark to Sweden and vice versa.

    While most of that is a perfect straight line, they intentionally made curves and wide/narrower spots to keep drivers awake. Evidently it takes about two hours to drive.

    Smart.

    In my experience in the west/plains, those long straight sections are oddly dangerous.

    Replies: @anon, @Cortes

  161. @jsm
    @Cortes

    Do people wake up in the mortuary, still? YIKES! I thought that kind of thing went out with the Middle Ages. (smile)

    Replies: @I, Libertine

    That’s why they’re called “wakes,” I’ve always suspected.

  162. @International Jew
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It's been a long time since the last time I saw The Graduate. All I remember is him driving into the rainbow-painted tunnels north of the GG Bridge, and then emerging two hundred miles to the south.

    Replies: @I, Libertine

    Movies and TV shows set in my home town, NYC, drive me nuts that way. Two pedestrians are conversing. They turn corner while one is in mid-sentence, and they’ve instantly been transported two miles.

  163. @Whyvert
    I'd like to see age breakdowns for these extra traffic deaths. Teens/20s normally have the highest proportion killed, and 50+ the lowest.

    Did lockdown boredom induce teens/20s guys to seek a bit of excitement by speeding?

    Replies: @DanHessinMD

    Age may certainly be a factor since young people have a higher accident rate. Bored teenagers and college kids with nothing to do may be driving much more while middle aged commuters are driving less.

  164. Wonder how many traffic deaths there were in Minnie, compared to 2019.

    Now they have the Free State of Floyd (h/t Rod Dreher):

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/minneapolis-prepares-potential-unrest-ahead-trial-killing-george-floyd-n1259721

    Floyd was killed in South Minneapolis, on Chicago Avenue. Concrete barriers and a steel bike rack on wheels blocked entrances to 37th and 39th streets leading to the Floyd memorial one afternoon this week.

    At the south end, a white sign with red lettering reads: “You are now entering the free state of George Floyd.”

    At the north entrance, volunteers guard the barriers, which have been spray-painted with “Black Lives Matter” and other pro-Black expressions.

    An assortment of fresh colorful flowers, a raised Pan-African flag and a portrait of Ahmaud Arbery, a Black man who was gunned down last year while jogging in Georgia after being chased by two white men, decorate Floyd’s memorial at 38th Street.

    Between these two blocks, the usual faces who live here sporadically park their cars in the middle of the road, standing guard and on the lookout for unfamiliar faces.

    Frey said the city has blocked vehicle traffic, allowing a space to which all are welcome to memorialize Floyd.

    Walking the blocks, however, tell a different, somewhat unwelcoming story.

    Marijuana smoke fills the cold, sunny air. Traffic signals are shut off. Sidewalks are eerily quiet. And the occupants of those parked cars roll down their windows to stare at and cross-examine strangers.

    Black residents and a few white volunteers enforce this gritty neighborhood, taking it upon themselves to preserve and protect the monument and Floyd’s legacy.

    “No outsiders allowed,” McDade-Davis said. “On one hand, residents stood up for themselves and banded together by blocking off access to a memorial dedicated to Floyd’s legacy. However, the neighborhood has become ripe for stickups.”

    But never fear!

    Frey said there will be zero tolerance for white supremacists or any other outside agitators who want to come into town and cause chaos or disrupt peaceful protests during the trial or after the verdict.

    “They are going to be arrested,” the mayor said.

  165. @James Speaks
    I've been thinking about this one all day, and here is my best analysis:

    Deaths per mile rose and this drove total deaths higher than before. Although it is possible the increased bad driving that led to increased deaths can be attributable to who stayed home versus who went to work, without more data (race/occupation/priors) it is chancey to find the critical factors.

    But, it should be noted that the perceived universe changed. Suddenly, it was thought dangerous to breathe by the cautious, and stupid to wear masks by the reckless. Many of the latter group caught Covid-19 and died, and suddenly the reckless were somewhat less reckless.

    I've noticed that when society goes through a sudden change where it appears the old rules no longer matter (even if they do), about half the population, who are governed by internal restraints continue to behave the same, and the other half start acting like assholes.

    If some people are prone to walking down the middle of a street, they might be bad drivers too, and in a world where the old rules no longer matter ...

    Replies: @peterike

    Suddenly, it was thought dangerous to breathe by the cautious, and stupid to wear masks by the reckless. Many of the latter group caught Covid-19 and died, and suddenly the reckless were somewhat less reckless.

    Lol!! Thanks, I needed that laugh.

    Yes, assuming 100% of Covid deaths were of the reckless, the population decrease of 0.1% of the reckless no doubt is making a tremendous difference.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  166. @Steve Sailer
    @JimB

    Gig economy deliveries were way up after March.

    Replies: @peterike

    Gig economy deliveries were way up after March.

    Yes, I was going to bring this up. The amount of take-out deliveries and grocery deliveries is up tremendously. And at least in New York City, they are 100% non-American drivers, with who-knows how much driving experience. To say nothing of all the delivery guys zipping around on motorized bicycles.

    New York City has also had a historical rise in moving vans leaving the city, but I doubt that’s got anything to do with it. On the other hand, maybe city-dwellers who drove rarely or not at all suddenly moving to the suburbs does play some minor role.

  167. TWS says:

    This thread is almost a perfect rorschach test. Each person (including our host) finds whatever pattern he wants from the picture.

    Some see excess covid deaths, some racial driving patterns, some police enforcement. It’s all seeing pictures in clouds. We know precisely enough to be able to say we know nothing. We’re bringing our own preconceptions to this party.

  168. People have discussed office workers staying put at home but also don’t forget the schools and other youth activities that have been closed or sharply reduced in many areas. This would mean:

    a) Greatly reduced school-bus traffic, a major factor at morning rush and mid-afternoon
    b) Greatly reduced number of moms ferrying kids back and forth at those times

    Maybe all the buses and mommy vans help slow things to a safer crawl twice a weekday.

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education
    @Known Fact

    It’s always something to see the number of imported SUVs — some with nanny chauffeurs — lined up (parked illegally!) outside of neighborhood public schools at 2:15.

    A total traffic jam. The drivers often make aggressive, illegal U-turns (e.g. cross a double yellow), blocking thru-traffic, as they jockey for position.

    The kids, dressed in new designer clothes, come tearing out of the building screaming like wild Indians.

    Replies: @Known Fact

  169. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    Thanks.

    Traffic light timing is an interesting subject. I can recall a NYC cabbie in 1984 who got me from Midtown to La Guardia in 18 minutes by hitting every single light. He gave me a lecture on the precise speed he needed to drive on each street, such as, IIRC, 36.2 mph on Third Avenue.

    Traffic light timing appeared to be hard coded when it was first introduced in the US about 40 years ago. Does it now vary in real time based on traffic sensors?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Craken, @cthulhu

    Some traffic lights have preset cycles for different times of day, but most (in big cities at least) are responsive to real-time traffic (conditioned also on time of day). Either pavement embedded wires or cameras can be used for the responsive systems. Optimization of city traffic networks is one of the ML/probability fields that has yielded some progress. Like the game of Go, city traffic has too many permutations to compute. But, ML is now much better at Go than any human or team of humans, despite Go being in either the NP or PSPACE class. In theory advances underlying AlphaGo-type systems apply as well to traffic simulations.

  170. Along with more weed, smartphones, empty roads and reduced policing, I’d add that people’s minds are simply wandering more behind the wheel.

    We mostly go through life on autopilot, but the past year has meant rethinking so many minor little logistics — as well as major issues like doing your job, paying your bills or protecting your family. If your spouse, kids or parents are troubled by all the changes, it’s going to divide your attention as you walk or drive down the street.

  171. @Neoconned
    This is anecdotal but as my Boomer friend in LA(not Steve) used to rail against.....latinos in general and Mexicans in specific have this Latin hot blooded temper thing.....they always annoyed him by being aggressive drivers.....this is also anecdotal but i almost didnt drive much in the last decade.....that changed in 2017 when i got married.....

    There are more latinos by a factor of say 20 to 50x on the road in most parts of the USA as they spread out away from the border....and probably 200 to 300x more than say in the late 2000s or early 2010s. When you import such numbers of foreigners in such a short time they drive as they did in whatever foreign country they're from....

    Also anecdotal.....the number of folks i knew who got rides with relatives or friends for years in my millenial bracket threw in the towel in the last few yrs & got car notes for whatever reason....

    I think the jump in deaths will be short lived. I and most folks i know save Boomers & Puerto Ricans hate to drive.....

    Replies: @Bragadocious

    NY State started giving licenses to illegals in 2019, along with some other states including Oregon and Colorado. It would be interesting to see traffic fatality rates in 2020 in the states that made this change the year before. NY called it the “green light” program which is hilariously apt since drivers from the developing world rarely see any other kind of light.

  172. Been going to traffic accidents for 30 years in the city of Los Angeles as a Firefighter. It is extremely rare to see a fatality these days. The vast majority involve impaired drivers slamming into vehicles or other objects at excessive speed. It’s hard to overstate how much safer vehicles have become. We pull up on scene with vehicles having ridiculous damage, often on their sides or overturned, and the occupants will be standing on the curb with minor injuries. Again the fatalities aren’t so much “accidents” where poor judgement by one or more drivers causes a collision, but rather the result of gross negligence where someone hits something at an excessive speed.

  173. @CCZ
    Virginia's racial justice traffic safety initiative:

    Virginia has enacted a law that will drastically reduce the circumstances in which law enforcement officers will be permitted to conduct traffic stops and enforce traffic laws. Proponents argue that police have been targeting black people and pulling them over for unwarranted stops and searches, the Daily Press reported.

    The legislation, which passed the General Assembly and has been signed into law by Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, bans law enforcement officer from stopping vehicles for driving without headlights, driving without working tail lights or brake lights, or driving with expired registration unless it has been expired for at least three months, WSLS reported.

    Police would also not be allowed to pull vehicles over for obstructed windshields, seatbelt violations, illegal tint, driving with defective or unsafe equipment, or smoking with minors inside the vehicle, according to the bill.

    Officers would be banned from stopping or searching anyone based upon the odor of marijuana, and would no longer be able to stop jaywalkers or pedestrians who are “carelessly or maliciously interfering with the orderly passage of vehicles,” the Daily Press reported.

    “This might be the most significant reform of the state’s criminal justice system in decades,” Justice Forward Virginia Executive Director Brad Haywood, an Arlington-based public defender, told the Daily Press. “This is a big step forward for racial justice in Virginia.”

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe, @Mike_from_SGV, @Bragadocious, @AnotherDad

    Minoritarianism turns your decent Western nation into a slum. What else is new?

  174. @Bill Jones
    @Anon

    try
    Happy black women
    then
    Happy white women

    Replies: @Sam Malone

    wow…they really are f*cking with us…

    • Replies: @Luzzatto
    @Sam Malone

    Thugs under Google Image has a picture of Donald Trump if you scroll down!

  175. @Steve Sailer
    @cthulhu

    Thanks.

    Traffic light timing is an interesting subject. I can recall a NYC cabbie in 1984 who got me from Midtown to La Guardia in 18 minutes by hitting every single light. He gave me a lecture on the precise speed he needed to drive on each street, such as, IIRC, 36.2 mph on Third Avenue.

    Traffic light timing appeared to be hard coded when it was first introduced in the US about 40 years ago. Does it now vary in real time based on traffic sensors?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Craken, @cthulhu

    Traffic light timing appeared to be hard coded when it was first introduced in the US about 40 years ago. Does it now vary in real time based on traffic sensors?

    Yup. Most traffic-light-controlled intersections now have one or both of the following: inductive loop sensors buried in the lanes (you can see them by the sealer used to weatherproof the grooves in which they are installed) that sense the metal mass of a car, and/or cameras on the lights that feed simple image processing algorithms to detect cars in lanes.

    The sophistication of the traffic control algorithms depends on the municipality, and my impression is there are a handful of companies that specialize in selling these services to towns, cities or larger jurisdictions. But the rules typically rely on the local traffic density coming into an intersection (inductive loop sensors often are installed hundreds or even thousands of feet away from an intersection to gauge traffic on the road), and vary by time of day: for a major arterial used for commuting during mornings and afternoons, the traffic light logic will usually be synchronized along the major arterial in the predominant direction of flow. But at other times and on weekends, when traffic volume is lower and the likelihood of traffic from any direction is similar, the light may change after a short time, which drives up the probability that any random driver will hit a red light at a given intersection.

    The other sensor you may see at a traffic light nowadays is a fairly large rectangular sensor (often white); that’s a dedicated license plate reader tracking cars via their license plates. A story for another time…

    • Replies: @Jiminy
    @cthulhu

    Another story for another time is how the amber light period is sometimes deliberately shortened on intersections that have red light cameras. By doing this the local government can raise revenues, and from what I read the contracting company gets their cut as well. I think a branch of Lockheed were involved.
    Being computer controlled makes it so much easier to do I presume. So the scenario becomes a driver gets used to maybe a three second break before red, only to hit the lights that have a shorter time period. He gets fined and maybe the chances of an accident increases.
    Yes, you should try to stop on an amber, I know. This was happening in the states several years ago now. I imagine the only reason it came to light is because there are concerned citizens who go around timing the intervals and taking note of the patterns.

    Replies: @Muggles

  176. Is “ladder in lane” a uniquely S. California phenomenon? Mattress in lane. Couch in lane. Recently a traffic reporter, in an unguarded moment, mentioned that this was the fifth ladder in lane to occur in the last hour. These totally preventable spilled-load events cause severe traffic jams, that delay thousands of people each time. I have lived here for decades, and this was not a problem back in the day.

  177. @Mr. Anon
    https://twitter.com/CortesSteve/status/1367949060343267329

    https://twitter.com/CortesSteve/status/1367949060343267329/photo/1

    North Dakota: 1,478 COVID deaths, 0.19% of population

    South Dakota: 1,896 COVID deaths, 0.21% of population

    North Dakota: mask-mandate

    South Dakota: NO mask-mandate

    The two states have very similar demographics, with the exception that South Dakota has a significantly larger native american population.

    But keep wearing your magic science-mask. In California, the mask mandate may soon come with two masks - for a double-dose of science.

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    The Science™ is clear, Double the mask, double the virtue.
    Triple the mask, triple the virtue.

    We must obey The Science™

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Adam Smith

    I wonder how they arrived at those "efficiency" figures. Or if they know what that word means.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Adam Smith

    Adding a second vane to a wind turbine increases efficiency by about 90%, a third by 9%, and a fourth by 0.9%.* That's why you never see four-vaned clovers wind turbines.


    *Or so Great Courses told me.

  178. @Buzz Mohawk
    Maybe it's idiots wearing masks while driving. You can't do anything as well as normal while wearing a mask, except rob a bank or go trick-or-treating.

    I laugh every time a car passes by when the one person who's inside, driving alone, is wearing a mask.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @Adam Smith

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Adam Smith

    Those the same guys who performed "I wear my mask when I'm in my car".

    They should do:

    "I mask alone........Yeah, all by myself. You know when I mask alone......I prefer to be by myself!"

    Replies: @Adam Smith

  179. It would be interesting to see state-by-state data.

    Are the states with the biggest increases in murder rate the same as the states with the biggest traffic fatality rate increases?

    Even better would be data by race, although I would imagine that bad drivers (see Asians) would be more evenly distributed than murderers.

  180. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends."

    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn't been invited to the party. And the student replied, of course he hadn't, you just look around for a party and go to it. And Mr. Dukakis looked confused.

    So this Open Party culture probably didn't start all that long before the 1970s in So Cal and probably didn't last too long after it either.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Anon, @Danindc, @Not Raul, @Dissident, @Servant of Gla'aki

    There were open parties in college towns in California in the 1990s.

    • Agree: Servant of Gla'aki
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Not Raul

    Chico State used to have open parties. Then the gang members and homeless ruined everything. Also, noise ordinances. So everything is tame these days.

  181. @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    In some cases there are supposedly* scales under the road which register that a car is present and then speed up low-traffic long-wait lights. I once took a class with a guy who programmed them and claimed to have a "toy" streetlight in his backyard. It's simple to program them but the reasoning going into it can be complex, and most importantly:

    *when you're at this light you'll still feel like it's taking forever anyway.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    These systems can be programmed in all kinds of ways nowadays, Mr. Ross. They are not run by scales though – there are eddy-current loops. Look for a big rectangular cut in the road.

    You need some bit of motion to produce that small current it takes for the system to sense your vehicle. (I think maybe even the engine running can do it.) That is often too much for a motorcycle though, and almost all the time too much for a bicycle, unless you take the bike and move it horizontally across the ground over the loop corner (not something I do on the road, mind you, but to get out of some gates that have no other way).

    Of course, a bicyclist should just run these ones. I’m sure as hell not going to wait for a car to come along. That is not exercise, and I feel the need for speed. Oh, hey, let’s do another bicyclists are assholes thread. I’m up for that!

  182. @Luzzatto
    @Anon

    Jack Dorsey looks like a hipster White trash heroin junkie from Portland, Oregon who shoots up heroin into his arms inside a Starbucks restroom in Portland, Oregon!

    Replies: @Not Raul, @jsinton, @Reg Cæsar

    Jack Dorsey looks like a hipster White trash heroin junkie from Portland, Oregon who shoots up heroin into his arms inside a Starbucks restroom in Portland, Oregon!

    Hopefully he has better taste in coffee than that.

  183. @Bragadocious
    A Chrysler 300 almost smashed into me the other day while weaving recklessly through highway traffic. Missed my car by inches while going at least 75 in a 50. Now who typically drives tree hunnerts?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I told Jack D. the other day that I’d put a lot of money on who. Where I live, it’s 98% black people.

  184. @Jiminy
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reading this reminds me of driving across the wide open plains of central Australia. Boringly flat and devoid of trees, it becomes hard to judge distance when preparing to overtake the multi trailered semis. Mainly because there are just no points of interest or landmarks to help make the judgement call on where the oncoming car is. Just miles of nothing. Often you see a lot of travellers with radios and they just talk to the truckie and he’ll inform them when to pass. Which is alright as long as he hasn’t been watching the movie “Duel.”

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Muggles

    Which is alright as long as he hasn’t been watching the movie “Duel.”

    Or Mad Max II: The Road Warrior. You don’t want any of that.

  185. @Jiminy
    @Reg Cæsar

    Reading this reminds me of driving across the wide open plains of central Australia. Boringly flat and devoid of trees, it becomes hard to judge distance when preparing to overtake the multi trailered semis. Mainly because there are just no points of interest or landmarks to help make the judgement call on where the oncoming car is. Just miles of nothing. Often you see a lot of travellers with radios and they just talk to the truckie and he’ll inform them when to pass. Which is alright as long as he hasn’t been watching the movie “Duel.”

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Muggles

    There is a fairly new tunnel underneath the Baltic from Denmark to Sweden and vice versa.

    While most of that is a perfect straight line, they intentionally made curves and wide/narrower spots to keep drivers awake. Evidently it takes about two hours to drive.

    Smart.

    In my experience in the west/plains, those long straight sections are oddly dangerous.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Muggles

    There is a fairly new tunnel underneath the Baltic from Denmark to Sweden and vice versa. While most of that is a perfect straight line, they intentionally made curves and wide/narrower spots to keep drivers awake. Evidently it takes about two hours to drive.

    Do you have a link? The only tunnel I've found is still under construction and it's not going to be a two-hour trip.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fehmarn_Belt_Fixed_Link

    Replies: @Muggles

    , @Cortes
    @Muggles

    I think the long-distance Australian roads used by trucks have been re-engineered for exactly the same reasons, introducing chicanes every so often to keep drivers awake.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

  186. @S. Anonyia
    When I took a road trip over the holidays to South Florida, I noticed every 4th vehicle on I-10 and I-75 was an RV or a massive bulky SUV with luggage strapped to the back and to the roof. Many of these people were driving from much further away than me, too (Texas and Midwestern states in particular). Average speed was probably near 85 despite heavy congestion.

    Increase in people with poor driving skills going on family road trips probably contributed. I don’t understand how anyone who isn’t in an empty state like Utah or Kansas can travel 85+ on the interstate longer than an hour. I speed to get to work or appointments but it’s mentally/physically exhausting if you’re driving all day. I just cruise behind the semis at 70.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @The Wild Geese Howard

    I don’t understand how anyone who isn’t in an empty state like Utah or Kansas can travel 85+ on the interstate longer than an hour.

    A radar detector with great highway range helps.

    Vehicles designed for the autobahn help too.

    The real surprises are domestic full-size pickup trucks. The Big 3 have their best people spend a lot of money and time on them and it shines through, even at extra-legal highway speeds.

  187. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    Agreed re: the crazy really came out when the roads were empty.
    As evidence, there is an informal race known as The Cannon Ball Run which is driving as fast as possible across America. In April, 2020, it was smashed several times. Madmen were flying across America at heretofore not seen rates. Scary and awesome at the same time. Winner drive across, from NYC to LA, in 26H38M

    www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/amp32092440/26-hour-38-minute-cannonball-record-coronavirus/

    Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard

    I already covered the new Cannonball records in a comment a few weeks ago:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/a-hypothesis-murders-and-bad-driving-trend-together/#comment-4469495

    We’re well under 26 hours coast-to-coast, with the 25 hour barrier just within reach.

  188. @Sam Malone
    Has anyone else noticed over the last couple years or so an increase in people driving at night without their headlights on? I started noticing about two years ago that, instead of coming across someone doing that every once in a long, long while, I was seeing it fairly frequently. Now, if I glance at the cars I pass and the cars around me when driving at night, there's a pretty good chance I'll see at least one without its headlights on, and sometimes a couple. That was not the case 5, 10, 15 years ago, at least not that I ever noticed.

    All I can think is that it's smartphones, people being obsessed now with checking their facebook or looking at youtube or porn or something. Or maybe the increase of pot-smoking, though that's not legal in my state (and I'm not really against it anyway).

    Replies: @mmack, @The Wild Geese Howard

    Has anyone else noticed over the last couple years or so an increase in people driving at night without their headlights on?

    The ones that drive me batty are the white, silver, and grey cars that drive around in fog, rain, sleet, and snow with their lights off.

    That should be an instaticket for endangering the public in any jurisdiction.

  189. @Adam Smith
    @Mr. Anon

    The Science™ is clear, Double the mask, double the virtue.
    Triple the mask, triple the virtue.

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/6Y7nTCavIoA/hqdefault.jpg

    We must obey The Science™

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar

    I wonder how they arrived at those “efficiency” figures. Or if they know what that word means.

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
    @J.Ross

    Fine print "Study by Monica Ghandi"

    Jewish Hindu crossover?

  190. @Luzzatto
    @Anon

    Jack Dorsey looks like a hipster White trash heroin junkie from Portland, Oregon who shoots up heroin into his arms inside a Starbucks restroom in Portland, Oregon!

    Replies: @Not Raul, @jsinton, @Reg Cæsar

    How dare you insult white trash heroin junkies from Portland like that.

  191. @Known Fact
    People have discussed office workers staying put at home but also don't forget the schools and other youth activities that have been closed or sharply reduced in many areas. This would mean:

    a) Greatly reduced school-bus traffic, a major factor at morning rush and mid-afternoon
    b) Greatly reduced number of moms ferrying kids back and forth at those times

    Maybe all the buses and mommy vans help slow things to a safer crawl twice a weekday.

    Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    It’s always something to see the number of imported SUVs — some with nanny chauffeurs — lined up (parked illegally!) outside of neighborhood public schools at 2:15.

    A total traffic jam. The drivers often make aggressive, illegal U-turns (e.g. cross a double yellow), blocking thru-traffic, as they jockey for position.

    The kids, dressed in new designer clothes, come tearing out of the building screaming like wild Indians.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Abolish_public_education


    The kids, dressed in new designer clothes, come tearing out of the building screaming like wild Indians.
     
    Puhleeze, they don't "scream like wild Indians," they "cry out for justice like oppressed Indigenous Americans."
  192. anon[226] • Disclaimer says:
    @Muggles
    @Jiminy

    There is a fairly new tunnel underneath the Baltic from Denmark to Sweden and vice versa.

    While most of that is a perfect straight line, they intentionally made curves and wide/narrower spots to keep drivers awake. Evidently it takes about two hours to drive.

    Smart.

    In my experience in the west/plains, those long straight sections are oddly dangerous.

    Replies: @anon, @Cortes

    There is a fairly new tunnel underneath the Baltic from Denmark to Sweden and vice versa. While most of that is a perfect straight line, they intentionally made curves and wide/narrower spots to keep drivers awake. Evidently it takes about two hours to drive.

    Do you have a link? The only tunnel I’ve found is still under construction and it’s not going to be a two-hour trip.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fehmarn_Belt_Fixed_Link

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @anon

    I saw a TV program on it, something like 'Engineering Marvels.'

    In the last year or two. I thought it was complete at the time, but perhaps only some sections, since I think it travels via some islands from Denmark.

    They did show the intentional curves, grades, etc. Large sections seemed to be ready.

    Perhaps it is not yet complete. I thought the travel time was two hours, but that may be only partial, or misremembered. What I recall about that is that I thought it was very fast.

    (Damn 'fact checkers' are everywhere now...)

    It will truly be a major accomplishment, on par with the Chunnel, if and when completed.

  193. @Anonymous
    @Barack Obama's secret Unz account


    And that, I think, was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn’t need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting—on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave. . . .
     
    When I was a teen in the mid-seventies, I lived in a So. Cal beach community, and if my friends and I didn’t have a plan for a Saturday night, we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends. We’d also travel down PCH to Huntington Beach with the same plan. More often than not there was a house right on the sand overlooking the Pacific Ocean having a surfer party, and we were welcome to partake. Hanging out in someone’s house we didn’t know, drinking off their keg.

    I was fortunate to experience the last gasp of California as Shangri-La. People who arrived in the 80's or later think I romanticize, because they can’t process that they contributed to ruining an entire state. They can’t imagine a place that was so much better than where they dame from. They'll never know what they missed. They don’t want to know. Parasites don’t want to know the history of their hosts.

    But I concur with that innate sense of victory. If you watch "American Graffitti," which was before my time, you can get the same existential flavor. Back then, anything good could probably happen. If not, you’d still have a good story. Even if you were a Toad.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Corn

    I love and hate listening to reminiscences of pre-90s California. I love what I hear but hate that I missed it.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Corn


    I love and hate listening to reminiscences of pre-90s California. I love what I hear but hate that I missed it.
     
    What Talleyrand said about Ancien Regime France could equally well be said about California up through the 1980s:

    "Whoever did not live in the eighteenth century before the Revolution does not know the sweetness of life and cannot imagine what happiness there can be in life."

    It lives in the memory of those who knew it like Vandal Carthage lived in the minds of those who's kingdom was swept away by the Byzantines and then the Arabs after them.
  194. @Drakejax
    While higher speeds on empty roads might account for some increase in traffic deaths, higher speed alone is not causative - you still need to get into an accident for the higher speed to have made things worse. I think folks have been drinking a lot more in quarantine (more accidents) plus the greatly and obviously reduced traffic enforcement resulted in less careful driving overall.

    My observation was there was no law enforcement on the highways here in the midwest most of last year. And having come from the East where cops look upon traffic enforcement with disdain (often as a punishment assignment when your sergeant is upset with you), I was surprised moving here how traffic enforcement is law enforcement's primary activity. After last April it vanished. Two weeks ago they returned in force, couldn't go two exits down the highway without seeing a stop. Everyone has slowed back down.

    I first assumed the cops were back out because Biden was installed. Learned from a police friend what really happened was a federal grant to fund greater traffic enforcement. Although, that likely was also politics related - cops are mostly unionized and unions support dems. Cops as individuals are conservatives and took face-shots all last year. Traffic enforcement overtime pay might be a small payback for the police unions. We shall see.

    Replies: @Cortes

    A few years ago I worked with an ex-traffic cop. They have seen the results of human stupidity up close and in technicolour. They take no prisoners, even from those flashing Warrant Cards, and are cordially hated for it (another colleague’s dad – cop – was caught DUI and tried the funny handshake and Warrant Card and was treated like scum).

  195. @Muggles
    @Jiminy

    There is a fairly new tunnel underneath the Baltic from Denmark to Sweden and vice versa.

    While most of that is a perfect straight line, they intentionally made curves and wide/narrower spots to keep drivers awake. Evidently it takes about two hours to drive.

    Smart.

    In my experience in the west/plains, those long straight sections are oddly dangerous.

    Replies: @anon, @Cortes

    I think the long-distance Australian roads used by trucks have been re-engineered for exactly the same reasons, introducing chicanes every so often to keep drivers awake.

    • Replies: @SaneClownPosse
    @Cortes

    "introducing chicanes every so often to keep drivers awake. "

    AKA "drunk traps", prior to legalized cannabis.

  196. Between COVID and BLM, there was an absolute standdown in police. People were driving really fast and doing really dumb things.

  197. @anon
    @Muggles

    There is a fairly new tunnel underneath the Baltic from Denmark to Sweden and vice versa. While most of that is a perfect straight line, they intentionally made curves and wide/narrower spots to keep drivers awake. Evidently it takes about two hours to drive.

    Do you have a link? The only tunnel I've found is still under construction and it's not going to be a two-hour trip.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fehmarn_Belt_Fixed_Link

    Replies: @Muggles

    I saw a TV program on it, something like ‘Engineering Marvels.’

    In the last year or two. I thought it was complete at the time, but perhaps only some sections, since I think it travels via some islands from Denmark.

    They did show the intentional curves, grades, etc. Large sections seemed to be ready.

    Perhaps it is not yet complete. I thought the travel time was two hours, but that may be only partial, or misremembered. What I recall about that is that I thought it was very fast.

    (Damn ‘fact checkers’ are everywhere now…)

    It will truly be a major accomplishment, on par with the Chunnel, if and when completed.

  198. @Luzzatto
    @Anon

    Jack Dorsey looks like a hipster White trash heroin junkie from Portland, Oregon who shoots up heroin into his arms inside a Starbucks restroom in Portland, Oregon!

    Replies: @Not Raul, @jsinton, @Reg Cæsar

    Jack Dorsey looks like a hipster White trash heroin junkie from Portland, Oregon who shoots up heroin into his arms inside a Starbucks restroom in Portland, Oregon!

    Beats a Mickey D’s in Liverpool.

    Horrified McDonald’s customers watch naked man inject drugs into his testicles

  199. @Adam Smith
    @Mr. Anon

    The Science™ is clear, Double the mask, double the virtue.
    Triple the mask, triple the virtue.

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/6Y7nTCavIoA/hqdefault.jpg

    We must obey The Science™

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Reg Cæsar

    Adding a second vane to a wind turbine increases efficiency by about 90%, a third by 9%, and a fourth by 0.9%.* That’s why you never see four-vaned clovers wind turbines.

    *Or so Great Courses told me.

  200. @Adam Smith
    @Buzz Mohawk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3Z-_RmzxYM

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Those the same guys who performed “I wear my mask when I’m in my car”.

    They should do:

    “I mask alone……..Yeah, all by myself. You know when I mask alone……I prefer to be by myself!”

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
    @Mr. Anon

    They are the same guys.
    Perhaps they take requests.(?)

    Yeah my whole family done give up on me
    And it makes me feel oh so bad
    The only one who will hang out with me
    Is my dear old granddad
    And we mask alone, yeah
    With nobody else

    Yeah, you know when I mask alone
    I prefer to be by myself

  201. @cthulhu
    @Steve Sailer



    Traffic light timing appeared to be hard coded when it was first introduced in the US about 40 years ago. Does it now vary in real time based on traffic sensors?

     

    Yup. Most traffic-light-controlled intersections now have one or both of the following: inductive loop sensors buried in the lanes (you can see them by the sealer used to weatherproof the grooves in which they are installed) that sense the metal mass of a car, and/or cameras on the lights that feed simple image processing algorithms to detect cars in lanes.

    The sophistication of the traffic control algorithms depends on the municipality, and my impression is there are a handful of companies that specialize in selling these services to towns, cities or larger jurisdictions. But the rules typically rely on the local traffic density coming into an intersection (inductive loop sensors often are installed hundreds or even thousands of feet away from an intersection to gauge traffic on the road), and vary by time of day: for a major arterial used for commuting during mornings and afternoons, the traffic light logic will usually be synchronized along the major arterial in the predominant direction of flow. But at other times and on weekends, when traffic volume is lower and the likelihood of traffic from any direction is similar, the light may change after a short time, which drives up the probability that any random driver will hit a red light at a given intersection.

    The other sensor you may see at a traffic light nowadays is a fairly large rectangular sensor (often white); that’s a dedicated license plate reader tracking cars via their license plates. A story for another time...

    Replies: @Jiminy

    Another story for another time is how the amber light period is sometimes deliberately shortened on intersections that have red light cameras. By doing this the local government can raise revenues, and from what I read the contracting company gets their cut as well. I think a branch of Lockheed were involved.
    Being computer controlled makes it so much easier to do I presume. So the scenario becomes a driver gets used to maybe a three second break before red, only to hit the lights that have a shorter time period. He gets fined and maybe the chances of an accident increases.
    Yes, you should try to stop on an amber, I know. This was happening in the states several years ago now. I imagine the only reason it came to light is because there are concerned citizens who go around timing the intervals and taking note of the patterns.

    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Jiminy

    Re: traffic cameras and ticket games

    Yes, those kinds of things are what killed those in Texas. "Great revenue idea" city officials touted.

    In about a year -- or as soon as possible -- the state legislature outlawed them.

    Same thing happened (though earlier I think) with "drunk driving" police checkpoints.

    "Don't mess with Texas drivers!"

  202. @Anon
    This problem could be easily solved by looking at a breakdown on the causes of the traffic deaths and comparing them to previous years.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    That’s hard work.

  203. @Cortes
    @Muggles

    I think the long-distance Australian roads used by trucks have been re-engineered for exactly the same reasons, introducing chicanes every so often to keep drivers awake.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    “introducing chicanes every so often to keep drivers awake. ”

    AKA “drunk traps”, prior to legalized cannabis.

  204. @J.Ross
    @Adam Smith

    I wonder how they arrived at those "efficiency" figures. Or if they know what that word means.

    Replies: @SaneClownPosse

    Fine print “Study by Monica Ghandi”

    Jewish Hindu crossover?

  205. @Polistra
    It seems that every sort of progress attained by our society over the past years, decades, even centuries is now being driven into hard reverse.

    Replies: @Barack Obama's secret Unz account, @theMann, @Mike_from_SGV

    Hard reverse indeed. I just watched a movie on YouTube from 1949 set in San Francisco. Everyone was well dressed, all were Americans except the Chinese housekeeper, no freaks or vagrants sleeping in their excrement. SF really used to be like that, before the progressives vandalized it.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Mike_from_SGV

    California as a whole was just this side of heaven before the mid-1960s. Heck, most of America was. Oh well.. That was then, this is now.

  206. @Mike_from_SGV
    @Polistra

    Hard reverse indeed. I just watched a movie on YouTube from 1949 set in San Francisco. Everyone was well dressed, all were Americans except the Chinese housekeeper, no freaks or vagrants sleeping in their excrement. SF really used to be like that, before the progressives vandalized it.

    Replies: @Polistra

    California as a whole was just this side of heaven before the mid-1960s. Heck, most of America was. Oh well.. That was then, this is now.

  207. @Sam Malone
    @Bill Jones

    wow...they really are f*cking with us...

    Replies: @Luzzatto

    Thugs under Google Image has a picture of Donald Trump if you scroll down!

  208. @Danindc
    @SteeringWheelHolder

    Driving the DC and Baltimore beltways whenever I see a group of motorcycle riders popping wheelies WHILE going 90 mph I can also predict race and sex. I’ve never once been wrong.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    Yeah, those Chinese ladies get pretty wild stunting on their Gixxers and Ninjas heading home from mahjong club.

  209. @Marty
    @Anonymous


    Pedestrians often seem distracted. They meander out into the middle of the street without looking for oncoming traffic like mental patients.
     
    In S.F., the pedestrian problem isn’t meandering, but an apparent yen to mess with drivers. Just last night, 9:00, I came upon a guy walking down the middle of the street in a residential neighborhood for no reason, the sidewalks being empty. He was about 80, wearing black, no reflectors. I asked him if he did that when he was 35 or 45, and he said FU. I probably should have gotten out and knocked him on his ass, after all there were no cameras anywhere. I can only speculate that it makes him feel young to adopt the woke attitudes of his grandkids, i.e. cars are evil so I’ll colonize the streets.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    He might well have had dementia and been wandering. My father has Parkinson’s and wandered out of my parents’s house and along a busy road while not dressed appropriately for the conditions. Fortunately a neighbor saw him and helped out. They live in the town with one of the lowest crime rates (and purely coincidentally, whitest demographics) in the state. My mother was asleep and he left leaving the door wide open. We have an appointment to see a neurologist tomorrow to see about medication, and I am getting door alarms.

    Parkinson’s patients can get auditory hallucinations telling them to leave the house, and Alzheimer’s sufferers get confused and wander in search of some delusional memory. Please don’t hit the elderly like one of the polar or panda bear hunters in your fair city.

    • Thanks: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Jiminy
    @Lockean Proviso

    This reminds me of when I visited an elderly friend living at an aged care village. As I parked my car I saw an old bloke standing on an island stuck between four lanes of busy traffic. After watching him for awhile, I crossed the road to get to him and spoke to him there. It turned out that he had Parkinsons and he got as far as the middle of the four lanes before he locked up and couldn’t move, backwards or forwards. He looked exhausted so who knows how long he had been there, as none of the staff had even known that he had done a runner. I suppose if I was a negro it would have been in my rights to clobber the old codger one, just because I could.

    Replies: @Polistra

  210. “Traffic Deaths” are a proxy for “deaths of desperation” which has been the single salient point of all my comments for YEARS.

    COVID? Fuck yeah! 30 years ago I would have bought a Ferrari or Lamborghini and rear-ended some NPC at 195mph for this idiot shit. Hysterical fuckwit cowards kowtowing to government propaganda have wrecked my young avaricious future? Fuck off.

    “Deaths of Despair” has always been the SOLE metric of salience for those longing perpetuation of the paradigm. Fuck off. We don’t care about being your tax-farm. If we aren’t free to hate you, then fuck off and watch us die.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Stan d Mute

    Now, now. Things are looking up! Just learn to relax and you may not even mind the lack of appropriate lubricant.

    https://cdni.rt.com/files/2021.03/l/6044ff26203027309a65865e.jpg

  211. @Lockean Proviso
    @Marty

    He might well have had dementia and been wandering. My father has Parkinson's and wandered out of my parents's house and along a busy road while not dressed appropriately for the conditions. Fortunately a neighbor saw him and helped out. They live in the town with one of the lowest crime rates (and purely coincidentally, whitest demographics) in the state. My mother was asleep and he left leaving the door wide open. We have an appointment to see a neurologist tomorrow to see about medication, and I am getting door alarms.

    Parkinson's patients can get auditory hallucinations telling them to leave the house, and Alzheimer's sufferers get confused and wander in search of some delusional memory. Please don't hit the elderly like one of the polar or panda bear hunters in your fair city.

    Replies: @Jiminy

    This reminds me of when I visited an elderly friend living at an aged care village. As I parked my car I saw an old bloke standing on an island stuck between four lanes of busy traffic. After watching him for awhile, I crossed the road to get to him and spoke to him there. It turned out that he had Parkinsons and he got as far as the middle of the four lanes before he locked up and couldn’t move, backwards or forwards. He looked exhausted so who knows how long he had been there, as none of the staff had even known that he had done a runner. I suppose if I was a negro it would have been in my rights to clobber the old codger one, just because I could.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Jiminy

    No, not because you could, but because systemic racism and white supremacy.

    Those will validate anything you want to do to white people, now and forever.

    BTW, I've also visited aged relatives in 'care homes' and the degree of neglect from the staff can be shocking. Better than outright abuse, I suppose, but you really need to have people (of your own) looking after you if you end up in one of those places. I believe that's a bit ironic.

  212. @Stan d Mute
    “Traffic Deaths” are a proxy for “deaths of desperation” which has been the single salient point of all my comments for YEARS.

    COVID? Fuck yeah! 30 years ago I would have bought a Ferrari or Lamborghini and rear-ended some NPC at 195mph for this idiot shit. Hysterical fuckwit cowards kowtowing to government propaganda have wrecked my young avaricious future? Fuck off.

    “Deaths of Despair” has always been the SOLE metric of salience for those longing perpetuation of the paradigm. Fuck off. We don’t care about being your tax-farm. If we aren’t free to hate you, then fuck off and watch us die.

    Replies: @HammerJack

    Now, now. Things are looking up! Just learn to relax and you may not even mind the lack of appropriate lubricant.

  213. @Abolish_public_education
    @Known Fact

    It’s always something to see the number of imported SUVs — some with nanny chauffeurs — lined up (parked illegally!) outside of neighborhood public schools at 2:15.

    A total traffic jam. The drivers often make aggressive, illegal U-turns (e.g. cross a double yellow), blocking thru-traffic, as they jockey for position.

    The kids, dressed in new designer clothes, come tearing out of the building screaming like wild Indians.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    The kids, dressed in new designer clothes, come tearing out of the building screaming like wild Indians.

    Puhleeze, they don’t “scream like wild Indians,” they “cry out for justice like oppressed Indigenous Americans.”

  214. @Mr. Anon
    @Adam Smith

    Those the same guys who performed "I wear my mask when I'm in my car".

    They should do:

    "I mask alone........Yeah, all by myself. You know when I mask alone......I prefer to be by myself!"

    Replies: @Adam Smith

    They are the same guys.
    Perhaps they take requests.(?)

    Yeah my whole family done give up on me
    And it makes me feel oh so bad
    The only one who will hang out with me
    Is my dear old granddad
    And we mask alone, yeah
    With nobody else

    Yeah, you know when I mask alone
    I prefer to be by myself

  215. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends."

    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn't been invited to the party. And the student replied, of course he hadn't, you just look around for a party and go to it. And Mr. Dukakis looked confused.

    So this Open Party culture probably didn't start all that long before the 1970s in So Cal and probably didn't last too long after it either.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Anon, @Danindc, @Not Raul, @Dissident, @Servant of Gla'aki

    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn’t been invited to the party.

    1.) Reminds me of a Jean Shepherd story…

    2.) In Soviet Russia, the Party would look for (and usually find) you….

    [MORE]

  216. @Jiminy
    @cthulhu

    Another story for another time is how the amber light period is sometimes deliberately shortened on intersections that have red light cameras. By doing this the local government can raise revenues, and from what I read the contracting company gets their cut as well. I think a branch of Lockheed were involved.
    Being computer controlled makes it so much easier to do I presume. So the scenario becomes a driver gets used to maybe a three second break before red, only to hit the lights that have a shorter time period. He gets fined and maybe the chances of an accident increases.
    Yes, you should try to stop on an amber, I know. This was happening in the states several years ago now. I imagine the only reason it came to light is because there are concerned citizens who go around timing the intervals and taking note of the patterns.

    Replies: @Muggles

    Re: traffic cameras and ticket games

    Yes, those kinds of things are what killed those in Texas. “Great revenue idea” city officials touted.

    In about a year — or as soon as possible — the state legislature outlawed them.

    Same thing happened (though earlier I think) with “drunk driving” police checkpoints.

    “Don’t mess with Texas drivers!”

  217. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "we’d just drive up and down the side streets looking for a party. When we found one, we’d just go in and have a few beers, meet new people or old friends."

    I can recall in Creative Writing class in high school around 1975 a student reading his story about driving around looking for a party and finding one and going in and getting a beer, and Mr. Dukakis stopping him to point out that it sounded like the author hadn't been invited to the party. And the student replied, of course he hadn't, you just look around for a party and go to it. And Mr. Dukakis looked confused.

    So this Open Party culture probably didn't start all that long before the 1970s in So Cal and probably didn't last too long after it either.

    Replies: @JMcG, @Anon, @Danindc, @Not Raul, @Dissident, @Servant of Gla'aki

    I participated in this “open party” culture, as a teenager in the Los Gatos/Campbell/Cambrian region of Santa Clara County (as a teenager in the 1980s). I can pinpoint the year it all began to go to crap: 1986. That was the year that (very disproportionately Mexican) jerks started showing up at all the parties, and starting fights. So the tradition ended.

    When I was 14, my buddies and I would join parties thrown by other teenagers (usually featuring kegs), or sometimes schmooze our way right into parties where the median age was like 30. In the latter cases, we’d often get politely asked to leave within an hour, but still had ourselves a good time, drinking wine, and hitting off joints. You couldn’t do that kinda stuff anymore by 1987 or ’88.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Servant of Gla'aki


    When I was 14, my buddies and I would join parties thrown by other teenagers (usually featuring kegs), or sometimes schmooze our way right into parties where the median age was like 30.
     
    Did you or any of your buddies ever attract the attention (if you know what I mean...) of any of the adult (or near-adult) females?
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Servant of Gla'aki

    During the 80s, you began to see lots of fistfights between White surfer dudes and Mexican cholo types. Nothing too extreme, but it killed some of the social vibes that existed along the SoCal beachfront communities.

  218. Anon[408] • Disclaimer says:
    @Servant of Gla'aki
    @Steve Sailer

    I participated in this "open party" culture, as a teenager in the Los Gatos/Campbell/Cambrian region of Santa Clara County (as a teenager in the 1980s). I can pinpoint the year it all began to go to crap: 1986. That was the year that (very disproportionately Mexican) jerks started showing up at all the parties, and starting fights. So the tradition ended.

    When I was 14, my buddies and I would join parties thrown by other teenagers (usually featuring kegs), or sometimes schmooze our way right into parties where the median age was like 30. In the latter cases, we'd often get politely asked to leave within an hour, but still had ourselves a good time, drinking wine, and hitting off joints. You couldn't do that kinda stuff anymore by 1987 or '88.

    Replies: @Anon, @JohnnyWalker123

    When I was 14, my buddies and I would join parties thrown by other teenagers (usually featuring kegs), or sometimes schmooze our way right into parties where the median age was like 30.

    Did you or any of your buddies ever attract the attention (if you know what I mean…) of any of the adult (or near-adult) females?

  219. @Corn
    @Anonymous

    I love and hate listening to reminiscences of pre-90s California. I love what I hear but hate that I missed it.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I love and hate listening to reminiscences of pre-90s California. I love what I hear but hate that I missed it.

    What Talleyrand said about Ancien Regime France could equally well be said about California up through the 1980s:

    “Whoever did not live in the eighteenth century before the Revolution does not know the sweetness of life and cannot imagine what happiness there can be in life.”

    It lives in the memory of those who knew it like Vandal Carthage lived in the minds of those who’s kingdom was swept away by the Byzantines and then the Arabs after them.

  220. @Jiminy
    @Lockean Proviso

    This reminds me of when I visited an elderly friend living at an aged care village. As I parked my car I saw an old bloke standing on an island stuck between four lanes of busy traffic. After watching him for awhile, I crossed the road to get to him and spoke to him there. It turned out that he had Parkinsons and he got as far as the middle of the four lanes before he locked up and couldn’t move, backwards or forwards. He looked exhausted so who knows how long he had been there, as none of the staff had even known that he had done a runner. I suppose if I was a negro it would have been in my rights to clobber the old codger one, just because I could.

    Replies: @Polistra

    No, not because you could, but because systemic racism and white supremacy.

    Those will validate anything you want to do to white people, now and forever.

    BTW, I’ve also visited aged relatives in ‘care homes’ and the degree of neglect from the staff can be shocking. Better than outright abuse, I suppose, but you really need to have people (of your own) looking after you if you end up in one of those places. I believe that’s a bit ironic.

  221. @Not Raul
    @Steve Sailer

    There were open parties in college towns in California in the 1990s.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Chico State used to have open parties. Then the gang members and homeless ruined everything. Also, noise ordinances. So everything is tame these days.

  222. @Servant of Gla'aki
    @Steve Sailer

    I participated in this "open party" culture, as a teenager in the Los Gatos/Campbell/Cambrian region of Santa Clara County (as a teenager in the 1980s). I can pinpoint the year it all began to go to crap: 1986. That was the year that (very disproportionately Mexican) jerks started showing up at all the parties, and starting fights. So the tradition ended.

    When I was 14, my buddies and I would join parties thrown by other teenagers (usually featuring kegs), or sometimes schmooze our way right into parties where the median age was like 30. In the latter cases, we'd often get politely asked to leave within an hour, but still had ourselves a good time, drinking wine, and hitting off joints. You couldn't do that kinda stuff anymore by 1987 or '88.

    Replies: @Anon, @JohnnyWalker123

    During the 80s, you began to see lots of fistfights between White surfer dudes and Mexican cholo types. Nothing too extreme, but it killed some of the social vibes that existed along the SoCal beachfront communities.

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