The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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For years, Audacious Epigone and myself have been pointing out that Texas public school kids do surprisingly well on the federal NAEP exam within each ethnic group. Now, the NYT finally figures that out, too: Surprise: Florida and Texas Excel in Math and Reading Scores OCT. 26, 2015 David Leonhardt @DLeonhardt When the Education Department... Read More
A general assumption of the moderate conventional wisdom over the last half century is that average black performance is dragged down by specific impediments, such as poverty, crime, culture of poverty, parental taciturnity, lead paint, or whatever. One would therefore expect blacks without those impediments to score equal with whites. But a close inspection of... Read More
One of the older, more nagging conundrums for anybody interested in education and demographics is the lack of readily available meaningful data on how high school students do by state and by race on high stakes tests such as the SAT and ACT college admissions tests. The federal government invests a lot of money in... Read More
Texas public school students usually score pretty well in the federal government's NAEP school achievement tests, at least when adjusted for ethnicity. I've always wondered how they do it. It would seem like the kind of thing worth checking into. One way, it turns out, is by excluding more students from having to take the... Read More
From the Telegraph of London, an account of a student in Australia: "who attended an elite private girls' school in Sydney, said she had a wrist problem, suffered discrimination and her mark should have been 100. Her result, a university entrance score, meant she beat 99.95 per cent of other students – but she believed... Read More
The NYT has an article on the gaokao, the national college admissions exam in China:Do even the Chinese find that other Chinese rather look alike? My old articles are archived at iSteve.com -- Steve Sailer
Chris Hayes argues in his new book Why Elites Fail the real reason that blacks and Hispanics are making so little progress over the generations at qualifying on their own merit for selective academic institutions is because rich whites are hogging all the test prep.Education Realist, who is in the test prep business, has a... Read More
From The NationBut the problem with my alma mater is that over time, the mechanisms of meritocracy have broken down. In 1995, when I was a student at Hunter, the student body was 12 percent black and 6 percent Hispanic. Not coincidentally, there was no test-prep industry for the Hunter entrance exam. That’s no longer... Read More
Greg Cochran brings up a topic that seems like it has disappeared over the last generation: reading speed. In the old days, the immense velocity at which Democratic Presidents like JFK and Jimmy Carter could read was part of political lore. Skeptics like Woody Allen joked that he had speed-read War and Peace: "It was... Read More
From the New York Times, an article on the annual Chinese college admissions test madness, the gao kao, and how Chinese test culture is spilling over to the U.S.:The story’s reporters, Tom Bartlett and Karin Fischer, wrote that Ms. Parker “has seen conditionally admitted students increase their Toefl scores by 30 or 40 points, out... Read More
Anatoly Karlin, who is making himself the go-to guy on analyzing the investment implications of international school test scores (a potentially lucrative niche), has a long, fascinating write-up of PISA scores adjusted by immigration status:This might not seem like much, but it is highly significant when bearing in mind the extremely close correlation between national... Read More
From the NYT:Which is exactly what the A.A.M.C. has in mind. In surveys, “the public had great confidence in doctors’ knowledge but much less in their bedside manner,” said Darrell G. Kirch, president of the association, in announcing the change. “The goal is to improve the medical admissions process to find the peo
If you are ever feeling in the need for a laugh, just look up the latest news from New York City on the Kindergarten Admissions Wars. Year after year, it's pure comedy gold. Amazingly, this NYT reporter, Anna M. Phillips, appears to be starting to get the joke:But experts pointed to several possible reasons for... Read More
The news that two states in India took the PISA test of 15-year-olds' school achievement in 2009 and bombed raises the question once again of China. As everybody remembers from a year ago, 2009 scores from Shanghai were released and they were higher than any country in the world. But what about the rest of... Read More
From the NYT:Because Asians do so badly on the SAT.My old articles are archived at iSteve.com -- Steve Sailer
It's interesting to compare college admissions in the U.S. to other countries. Here's an NYT article on Britain:Originally offered only in traditional academic subjects like English language and literature, mathematics, foreign languages and the sciences, in recent years the range has broadened to include media studies, health and social care, business studies, and travel and... Read More
The traditional concept of college admissions was that the goal was to predict applicants' future achievement (which could be measured in terms of first year in college grades or money donated 50 years later or whatever). The most obvious way to predict future achievement was past achievement: e.g., high school grades. Presumably, past achievement had... Read More
Respected commenter Mitch explains what is going on with rising Asian SAT scores:Certainly, the easier reading test makes it easier for Asians to get high scores. The writing test rewards attention to detail above all&nbs
The Unsilenced Silence blog has a good graph of Asian v. white SAT scores from 1996 to 2010 in terms of gaps in standard deviations:
The oldest SAT score report on the College Board website is from 1996, right after the "recentering" in 1995 that raised scores about 100 points on a 400 to 1600 scale. Over the last 15 years, the average overall score on the original two-part Verbal + Math SAT (i.e., ignoring the new-fangled Writing section of... Read More
From FairTest: 2011 College-Bound Seniors Avg SAT Scores W/score changes from 2006 READING MATH WRITING TOTAL ALL 497 (-6) 514 (-4) 489 (-8) 1500 (-18) Female 495 (-7) 500 (-2) 496 (-6) 1491 (-15) Male 500 (-5) 531 (-5) 482 (-9) 1513 (-19) Asian 517 (+7) 595 (+17)
For a long, long time, the foremost goal of the American educational system has been to close The Gap. This has turned out be kind of like if President Kennedy had announced in 1961 that America was committed to, by the end of the decade, building a perpetual motion machine. From the Atlanta Journal-Constitution:Yeah, this... Read More
Bryan Caplan writes:I made Duckworth's point in my 2007 FAQ on IQ:Q. So, you're saying that IQ testing can tell us more about group differences than about individual differences? 
Psychometrics is a relatively mature field of science, and a politically unpopular one. So you might think there isn't much money to be made in making up brand new standardized tests. Yet, there is. From the NYT: <nyt_byline> Standardized exams — the multiple-choice, bubble tests in math and reading that have played a growing role... Read More
Americans have devoted an enormous amount of effort over the centuries to devising useful baseball statistics. In recent years, Americans have talked a lot about devising useful educational statistics. For example, I've pointed out a million times over the last decade that it doesn't make much sense to judge teachers, schools, or colleges by their... Read More
Almost a decade ago, President Bush and Senator Kennedy got together and pushed through the No Child Left Behind act, which mandated that every single child in America would score "Proficient" or "Advanced" on reading and writing by 2013-2014, and told the states to concoct, administer, and grade their own tests to demonstrate this (nudge,... Read More
IQs by State, 1960 -- You probably remember the notorious "Democratic states have higher IQs" hoax from last May. Well, here, thanks to Prof. Henry Harpending of the U. of Utah anthropology dept., might be the closest thing to a national sample of IQ scores ever: the Project Talent database of 366,000 9th-12th grade students.... Read More
IQs by State, 1960 -- You probably remember the notorious "Democratic states have higher IQs" hoax from last May. Well, here, thanks to Prof. Henry Harpending of the U. of Utah anthropology dept., might be the closest thing to a national sample of IQ scores ever: the Project Talent database of 366,000 9th-12th grade students.... Read More
Steve Sailer
About Steve Sailer

Steve Sailer is a journalist, movie critic for Taki's Magazine, VDARE.com columnist, and founder of the Human Biodiversity discussion group for top scientists and public intellectuals.


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