The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection$
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Top 100 Counties by Homicide Rate vs. Black Share of the Population
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • B
Show CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Following up on my new Taki’s Magazine column on “The Floyd Effect,” here are the top 100 counties in the U.S. by population, with the total homicide rate (2018-2021) on the vertical axis and the black share of the population on the horizontal axis.

The correlation coefficient r is just over 0.7. Counties above the best-fit line tend to have major urban centers, such as Shelby County, Tennessee (Memphis) and Jackson MO (Kansas City). As I’ve been pointing out, the worst black homicide rates in recent years tend to be near the vast Mississippi watershed, both north and south.

The homicide rates in Philadelphia County and the District of Columbia are a disgrace compared to New York or Boston homicide rates. Washington DC has a huge number of armed men guarding federal offices and such highbrow whites that the white part of DC is so safe that the CDC won’t tell you for personal privacy reasons how many whites died by homicide over those four years, just that it was less than ten. Seth Rich wasn’t the last white murder victim in DC, but he’s close.

The worst homicide rate for a county with few blacks is Bernalillo, NM (Albuquerque) followed by Kern, CA (Bakersfield).

Most of the counties below the line are suburban, such as heavily black Prince George’s County, MD outside of Washington DC. Exceptions include Kings, NY (Brooklyn), Bronx, NY (both of which benefit from NYC’s very low shooting rate in this century), and Fulton, GA (Atlanta). Atlanta isn’t great, but it has traditionally had an intelligent black political class that wants to hang on to its white corporate tax cows. Hence, Atlanta has become the center of buppie culture in America.

Note that above-the-line St. Louis Co represents St. Louis’s suburbs, such as Ferguson, while slightly below-the-line Baltimore Co is Baltimore’s suburbs. St. Louis City and Baltimore City would be off the charts if they ranked in the top 100 counties by population.

 
Hide 71 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Thanks for doing counties. It’s about time someone did!

    I wonder about the intellectual propriety of adding independent cities to this mix.

    It sort of seems fair, as you note that counties which include Memphis and Atlanta are almost coterminous with cities anyway..

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Polistra

    I included St. Louis City and Baltimore City on my previous graph of Top 25 Counties with the Most Homicides, but they don't make the Top 100 Counties in Population, in part because the resident have shot each other so much.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    , @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @Polistra


    It sort of seems fair, as you note that counties which include Memphis and Atlanta are almost coterminous with cities anyway..
     
    It's typical in American government that the Chief prosecutor of State crimes such as murder is a local, county-level politician, often elected by the citizens of the county. Police policy is likewise under the civilian control of elected or appointed county politicians (i.e., mayor and police chief).

    That's what the "red states have higher crime lulz" misdirection was conceived to dodge - the jurisdictions with high rates of crime are overwhelmingly black and elect Democrats to their highest offices. Democrats now view black felons as part of their constituent coalition - black criminals are, however, a liability with most other persuadable voters, particularly when crime increases perceptively.

    I'd venture that the same people who say "red states have more crime lulz" would scream bloody murder if, say, the Governor of Mississippi took over governance of Jackson, dismissed the local prosecutors and police and ran law enforcement through the Attorney General's Office and the State Police.
  2. “Seth Rich wasn’t the last white murder victim in DC, but he’s close.”

    Last I checked, a couple of years ago, DC had a really good homicide clearance rate, something like 70%. Yet the Rich murder remains unsolved.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @stari_momak

    Ashley Babitt doesn't count as a "murder" because apparently it's legal in DC to kill an unarmed deplorable woman even when you have no conceivable claim of self-defense. But she's still a "homicide," which makes her, all by herself, over 10% of the whites killed in DC.


    Last I checked, a couple of years ago, DC had a really good homicide clearance rate, something like 70%. Yet the Rich murder remains unsolved.
     
    Does the CDC have a category for Arkancide?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Truth

    , @animalogic
    @stari_momak

    "Yet the Rich murder remains unsolved."
    Funny, that.... It's almost like a political thumb was on the scales.

  3. The worst homicide rate for a county with few blacks is Bernalillo, NM (Albuquerque) followed by Kern, CA (Bakersfield).

    Calling out “The Myth of Hispanic Crime” theory!

    • Agree: usNthem
  4. Thanks Steve, great graph!

    Boston is basically “Suffolk, MA” (Suffolk county is Boston + Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop) right around 20% black.

    (Chelsea is mostly Latino and Revere is majority White, but with many Latinos; Winthrop is very white).

    Born and raised in Boston (Dorchester) and lived in the Boston area for total of about 35 years, I have the impression that the Boston Police have traditionally been very responsive and aggressive in how they police all neighborhoods and criminality within the city.

    White, black, Asian, Latino: they are happy to bust your head if you are doing something you shouldn’t be doing.

    The “core” White areas of the city have always been pretty safe (Back Bay, Beacon Hill, North End, South Boston, Charlestown, parts of Dorchester, like Savin Hill, Neponset, Lower Mills, West Roxbury, parts of the South End. I have always thought Allston/Brighton to be questionable, but I will throw them in).

    Bad areas: Roxbury/Mattapan/(regrettably and painfully to me) most of Dorchester.

    These are almost all black areas. My mom used to say: the blacks took these areas and just wrecked them.

    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.

    Every European nationality under the sun,
    Including many Jews.

    Dorchester was same, but would say that Irish Americans predominated, especially in the eastern half. Pretty much all gone as the neighborhoods had more and more blacks.

    • Replies: @Larry, San Francisco
    @BosTex

    In the early 1970's Mattapan was chosen to be integrated by a cabal of rich Jews and Wasps who thought the working class Jewish residents would be less prejudiced (probably, true most working class were liberal Democrats or Socialists). Poor blacks from Roxbury were given subsidized mortgages and other inducements to move in. Although initially welcomed the influx destroyed the community and Mattapan became another poor black neighborhood.

    Replies: @BosTex

    , @BosTex
    @BosTex

    I hate replying to myself: i have not been a very good Bostonian in my note.

    I forgot entire significant neighborhoods!

    Jamaica Plain: mostly yuppie, SWPL types, but long border with Roxbury.

    Roslindale: whites are plurality with plenty of blacks and Latinos. I can’t imagine very desirable now, but was a nice area when I was a kid.

    Hyde Park: reverse of Roslindale. Mostly black. I seem to recall it was pretty nice when I was young. Both Hyde Park and Roslindale have a more suburban feel to them.

    , @Coemgen
    @BosTex


    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.
     
    One of my grandfathers grew up in Roxbury, MA in the early 1900s. I never knew this until I researched him on ancestry.com — the house where he grew up was in a “no go zone” by the 1960s.

    My grandfather’s spinster younger sister was wont to give my female cousins, much to their amusement, her version of The Talk which was considerably less genteel than Derbyshire’s version. We thought she was a nut but now I realize she was just giving good advice from her personal experience.

    My grandmother had a white old lady friend who lived in Mattapan, MA on a side street off of Blue Hill Ave in the 1960s who I also thought was a nut because all she talked about was of her old lady friends being assaulted and having their purses stolen by blacks. Now I realize that she was just telling it like it was.

    Replies: @BosTex

    , @BosTex
    @BosTex

    Reply to self number 2:

    Good lord: not living in Boston for almost 5 years, I am starting to forget stuff!

    East Boston: last apartment we had in the city before moving to Texas! How could I forget?

    Mostly Latino (Salvadoran I think; prior to the Salvadorans, had been mostly Italian America), but being gentrified rapidly (aka more and more young white folks getting off the train at Maverick, fewer and fewer Latinos…at least five years ago).

    Safety varies: Maverick Square and Jeffries Point always felt fine. The further into East Boston it seemed a little worse.

    East Boston is a 4 minute train ride under Boston Harbor to the financial district and had probably the last of the marginally affordable housing that is also close to Boston..again, 5 years ago.

    , @Masshole
    @BosTex

    Spot on break-down of Boston / Suffolk Co. Kudos!

    Replies: @BosTex

    , @VivaLaMigra
    @BosTex

    Having spent a fair amount of time around Revere and Winthrop, I'd say Winthrop is probably 95% white, but Revere has suffered a severe infestation of Central American gangbangers. They've been building high-priced condos like crazy on the beachfront, and those buyers positively loathe the takeover of Revere Beach Blvd by that element on summer weekends, reinforced by the Hispanics pouring in from nearby Chelsea. Tiny Winthrop has elevated property values and limited access. There's no public parking available at their small, rocky beaches so their residents have thus far been saved.

    As for Dorcester, my family moved out of a triple decker on Talbot Avenue near Codman Square in 1962. The writing was on the wall. The Jews down on Blue Hill Avenue were packing up and moving to Canton and Randolph around that time, too.

  5. Anon[375] • Disclaimer says:

    If you limit the counties to those with black populations between, say, 0% and 20% what is their correlation coefficient? That’s the important part, and the scattergraph looks pretty random there. It’d be nice to blow up that part so that the county names would be legible. At any rate I think it would require the introduction of factors in addition to race to get a good correlation if you remove the obviously pathological counties where they whites have all fled.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Anon


    If you limit the counties to those with black populations between, say, 0% and 20% what is their correlation coefficient? That’s the important part, and the scattergraph looks pretty random there. It’d be nice to blow up that part so that the county names would be legible.
     
    Interesting suggestion.

    At any rate I think it would require the introduction of factors in addition to race to get a good correlation if you remove the obviously pathological counties where the whites have all fled.
     
    Yes, after solving for the black problem, what is the next way to lower crime in neighborhoods where non-blacks actually live?

    Superficially, it looks like the next one is to solve the Hispanic crime problem. The above-the-line counties in the 0%-20% box look disproportionately Southwestern.

    And the below-the-line 0%-20% counties look disproportionately rich af.

    So there's your solution to gracious living and low crime:
    1) avoid blax,
    2) avoid Hispanx,
    3) be rich.

    Who could have foreseen this?
    , @ic1000
    @Anon

    > It’d be nice to blow up [the graph] so that the county names would be legible.

    In most browsers, if one moves the cursor over to a figure and then press [control] and the mouse button, an option like "Open image in new tab" will appear. Do that, and one is able to zoom in, limited only by the resolution of the image.

    For Steve's graph, county names are legible. Although the some are still obscured in the lower-left cluster (which may be your point).

  6. I live in Marion County, home of Indianapolis, which is number nine on the list of U.S. counties with high crime rates. It, of course, has a lot of blacks and a Democrat mayor. The crime, though, is concentrated in the areas with lots of poor blacks. I drove through the northern suburban part today on a pleasant autumn day and it looks mostly the same as it did in 1963 when I was a seven-year-old.

    The crime problem really is mostly a black problem. I can remember the last days of segregation. It was awful and needed to be ended but the lingering white guilt for how we treated blacks led to coddling them and not holding them to the same standards as we do whites. We need to stop this. Since blacks genetically have a lower IQ and higher propensity to violence than whites, this will lead to a higher percentage of blacks getting arrested and sent to prison than whites but we need to accept that in order to get crime under control. Law abiding blacks can make a contribution to this country. I’m currently reading a biography of Wes Montgomery, a black Indianapolis jazz guitarist who was an incredible musical talent.

    • Disagree: silviosilver
    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Mark G.

    When and if you feel like it, I'd enjoy reading your impressions of the Wes Montgomery bio. Simply reply to one of my posts, at your convenience. I'm a big fan of his, but I don't know his back story.

    I'm hoping he wasn't a junkie like so many jazz greats! (I presume not, given the context in which you mentioned him.)

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Mark G.

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Mark G.


    I’m currently reading a biography of Wes Montgomery, a black Indianapolis jazz guitarist who was an incredible musical talent.
     
    I love Wes Montgomery's music.
    (Your comment is simple & clear. There are societies in wich Blacks are way less incarcereated (and in conlict with the law) than in the US. Best practise is dear in this context.)

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Mark G.

    Wes Montgomery was terrific, but it is worth noting that he was only one of several extraordinarily creative and innovative black jazz musicians of the 1950s and 1960s.

    https://youtu.be/KH_y0L3H1AQ

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Mark G.

    Montgomery had a unique style, using his right thumb as a plectrum. A virtuoso.

    The counties with the highest murder rates coincide with high- density, low-income housing where too many young men belong to gangs, get along by trafficking and trading in drugs, and drinking too much alcohol.

    Such areas also have a high incidence of mentally ill residents.

    On the other hand low-density areas like Montecito, California, where Oprah Winfrey lives, have few murders, but a lot of tax evasion.

    If everywhere was like Montecito, murder would be almost unknown, and no-one would pay any taxes. Win-win. Let's make it happen.

  7. @Polistra
    Thanks for doing counties. It's about time someone did!

    I wonder about the intellectual propriety of adding independent cities to this mix.

    It sort of seems fair, as you note that counties which include Memphis and Atlanta are almost coterminous with cities anyway..

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    I included St. Louis City and Baltimore City on my previous graph of Top 25 Counties with the Most Homicides, but they don’t make the Top 100 Counties in Population, in part because the resident have shot each other so much.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Steve Sailer


    I included St. Louis City and Baltimore City on my previous graph of Top 25 Counties with the Most Homicides, but they don’t make the Top 100 Counties in Population, in part because the resident have shot each other so much.
     
    Would they have been included if you did the top 500 largest counties? Then you’d have more data, and the correlation might be a little bit higher.

    States near the Mississippi River, particularly in the South, don’t tend to have counties with huge populations. Mississippi has 82 counties.

    Your sample might not be geographically representative.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  8. @Steve Sailer
    @Polistra

    I included St. Louis City and Baltimore City on my previous graph of Top 25 Counties with the Most Homicides, but they don't make the Top 100 Counties in Population, in part because the resident have shot each other so much.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    I included St. Louis City and Baltimore City on my previous graph of Top 25 Counties with the Most Homicides, but they don’t make the Top 100 Counties in Population, in part because the resident have shot each other so much.

    Would they have been included if you did the top 500 largest counties? Then you’d have more data, and the correlation might be a little bit higher.

    States near the Mississippi River, particularly in the South, don’t tend to have counties with huge populations. Mississippi has 82 counties.

    Your sample might not be geographically representative.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Not Raul

    Texas has big cities and small counties.

    Replies: @Not Raul

  9. @BosTex
    Thanks Steve, great graph!

    Boston is basically “Suffolk, MA” (Suffolk county is Boston + Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop) right around 20% black.

    (Chelsea is mostly Latino and Revere is majority White, but with many Latinos; Winthrop is very white).

    Born and raised in Boston (Dorchester) and lived in the Boston area for total of about 35 years, I have the impression that the Boston Police have traditionally been very responsive and aggressive in how they police all neighborhoods and criminality within the city.

    White, black, Asian, Latino: they are happy to bust your head if you are doing something you shouldn’t be doing.

    The “core” White areas of the city have always been pretty safe (Back Bay, Beacon Hill, North End, South Boston, Charlestown, parts of Dorchester, like Savin Hill, Neponset, Lower Mills, West Roxbury, parts of the South End. I have always thought Allston/Brighton to be questionable, but I will throw them in).

    Bad areas: Roxbury/Mattapan/(regrettably and painfully to me) most of Dorchester.

    These are almost all black areas. My mom used to say: the blacks took these areas and just wrecked them.

    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.

    Every European nationality under the sun,
    Including many Jews.

    Dorchester was same, but would say that Irish Americans predominated, especially in the eastern half. Pretty much all gone as the neighborhoods had more and more blacks.

    Replies: @Larry, San Francisco, @BosTex, @Coemgen, @BosTex, @Masshole, @VivaLaMigra

    In the early 1970’s Mattapan was chosen to be integrated by a cabal of rich Jews and Wasps who thought the working class Jewish residents would be less prejudiced (probably, true most working class were liberal Democrats or Socialists). Poor blacks from Roxbury were given subsidized mortgages and other inducements to move in. Although initially welcomed the influx destroyed the community and Mattapan became another poor black neighborhood.

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Larry, San Francisco

    Thanks Larry. I have heard this Mattapan story repeatedly.

    I will have to read up, because I know very little about this episode and would be interesting to know who the players were.

    I doubt the Jews welcomed the blacks. They could look right next door at Roxbury and see the destruction wrought. Luckily for the Jewish folks, Sharon was right down the road.

    I think a lot of the small businesses on Blue Hill Ave had been Jewish owned. Burned to ashes by the blacks.

    Replies: @Inverness, @Brutusale, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  10. @Mark G.
    I live in Marion County, home of Indianapolis, which is number nine on the list of U.S. counties with high crime rates. It, of course, has a lot of blacks and a Democrat mayor. The crime, though, is concentrated in the areas with lots of poor blacks. I drove through the northern suburban part today on a pleasant autumn day and it looks mostly the same as it did in 1963 when I was a seven-year-old.

    The crime problem really is mostly a black problem. I can remember the last days of segregation. It was awful and needed to be ended but the lingering white guilt for how we treated blacks led to coddling them and not holding them to the same standards as we do whites. We need to stop this. Since blacks genetically have a lower IQ and higher propensity to violence than whites, this will lead to a higher percentage of blacks getting arrested and sent to prison than whites but we need to accept that in order to get crime under control. Law abiding blacks can make a contribution to this country. I'm currently reading a biography of Wes Montgomery, a black Indianapolis jazz guitarist who was an incredible musical talent.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Dieter Kief, @PiltdownMan, @Jonathan Mason

    When and if you feel like it, I’d enjoy reading your impressions of the Wes Montgomery bio. Simply reply to one of my posts, at your convenience. I’m a big fan of his, but I don’t know his back story.

    I’m hoping he wasn’t a junkie like so many jazz greats! (I presume not, given the context in which you mentioned him.)

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Polistra


    I’m hoping he wasn’t a junkie like so many jazz greats! (I presume not, given the context in which you mentioned him.)
     
    Wes Montgomery was a married man who had seven children.

    Because he was scared of flying, he drove very long distances to gigs. Unfortunately he was not scared of smoking, and he died of a heart attack at the age of 45.

    As far as I know he was not a junkie.

    Many of the jazz musicians of the time were junkies, e.g. Chet Baker, Joe Pass.

    , @Mark G.
    @Polistra


    I’m a big fan of his, but I don’t know his back story.

     

    Wes Montgomery lived in obscurity here in Indianapolis for many years. He had a wife and several children and in order to take care of them worked two jobs. He was a welder by day and at night he played in local jazz clubs in the forties and fifties. All the clubs mentioned in his biography are no longer here in Indianapolis. The author says they all closed later in the sixties when rock replaced jazz as the favorite form of pop music.

    Then one day in 1959 Cannonball Adderley played here at the Indiana theater. During the intermission Wes went up to him and invited him to come see him at the club he was playing in later that night. Later that evening Adderley showed up and sat down in the back of the club. After two songs he moved to the front row. He slumped back and his head tilted back and he looked like someone had just knocked him out. He stayed rooted there the rest of the evening. When Adderley got back to New York he charged into the offices of Riverside Records and announced, "there is this guitarist in Indianapolis you have to get for your label and here is his phone number". Wes got lucky in finally being discovered and fortunately got to enjoy being famous the last few years of his life.
  11. @Not Raul
    @Steve Sailer


    I included St. Louis City and Baltimore City on my previous graph of Top 25 Counties with the Most Homicides, but they don’t make the Top 100 Counties in Population, in part because the resident have shot each other so much.
     
    Would they have been included if you did the top 500 largest counties? Then you’d have more data, and the correlation might be a little bit higher.

    States near the Mississippi River, particularly in the South, don’t tend to have counties with huge populations. Mississippi has 82 counties.

    Your sample might not be geographically representative.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Texas has big cities and small counties.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Steve Sailer


    Texas has big cities and small counties.
     
    If you did an analysis just on Texas, and included every county with a population above 90,000 (Texas has 45), the correlation might be higher. It would probably be a good idea to get an average number of murders in a four year period, to deal with random fluctuations.

    Keeping the analysis within one state would help control for a lot of policy and historical variables. Also, some counties with large Chicano populations, like El Paso, have a relatively small homicide rate.
  12. Seth Rich was killed not by the Democrat party elite – but by the Democrat party base.

  13. @Mark G.
    I live in Marion County, home of Indianapolis, which is number nine on the list of U.S. counties with high crime rates. It, of course, has a lot of blacks and a Democrat mayor. The crime, though, is concentrated in the areas with lots of poor blacks. I drove through the northern suburban part today on a pleasant autumn day and it looks mostly the same as it did in 1963 when I was a seven-year-old.

    The crime problem really is mostly a black problem. I can remember the last days of segregation. It was awful and needed to be ended but the lingering white guilt for how we treated blacks led to coddling them and not holding them to the same standards as we do whites. We need to stop this. Since blacks genetically have a lower IQ and higher propensity to violence than whites, this will lead to a higher percentage of blacks getting arrested and sent to prison than whites but we need to accept that in order to get crime under control. Law abiding blacks can make a contribution to this country. I'm currently reading a biography of Wes Montgomery, a black Indianapolis jazz guitarist who was an incredible musical talent.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Dieter Kief, @PiltdownMan, @Jonathan Mason

    I’m currently reading a biography of Wes Montgomery, a black Indianapolis jazz guitarist who was an incredible musical talent.

    I love Wes Montgomery’s music.
    (Your comment is simple & clear. There are societies in wich Blacks are way less incarcereated (and in conlict with the law) than in the US. Best practise is dear in this context.)

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Dieter Kief


    There are societies in wich Blacks are way less incarcereated (and in conlict with the law) than in the US. Best practise is dear in this context.
     
    True, and it's too bad because there are probably lessons to be learned, or "takeaways" as corp-speak has it.

    We can compare notes, but my impression is that the secret sauce of "less black incarceration" is ...

    ... more policing.

    In other words, you can police them before they commit crimes, or arrest them afterwards. Europe takes the former approach, the US takes the latter approach (or did till a couple of years ago, since which time it has taken no approach at all).

    So the "dear best practices" might not be any hidden holy grail, but just to do what everyone should have been doing all along.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  14. @stari_momak
    "Seth Rich wasn’t the last white murder victim in DC, but he’s close."

    Last I checked, a couple of years ago, DC had a really good homicide clearance rate, something like 70%. Yet the Rich murder remains unsolved.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @animalogic

    Ashley Babitt doesn’t count as a “murder” because apparently it’s legal in DC to kill an unarmed deplorable woman even when you have no conceivable claim of self-defense. But she’s still a “homicide,” which makes her, all by herself, over 10% of the whites killed in DC.

    Last I checked, a couple of years ago, DC had a really good homicide clearance rate, something like 70%. Yet the Rich murder remains unsolved.

    Does the CDC have a category for Arkancide?

    • Agree: TWS
    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @dearieme
    @Hypnotoad666

    Maybe somebody dim misinterpreted Kill the Rich.

    , @Truth
    @Hypnotoad666

    ...An unarmed deplorable woman, laying siege to the Capital Building while it is in session...

  15. If the data on both population demographics (got that) and crime (don’t have that?*) were crunched for voting precinct level areas, I think there’s be an even higher correlation between “black” and “murder”.

    That “other side of the tracks” expression from back in the day really meant something. It still does, though it’s not always a division by railroad tracks.

    There’s one place near me where the very nice neighborhood – I mean, 1/2 acre lots with near-real-mansions on each one and lots of trees – is, at the west end of it, just across the street from a solid black trashed-out area. There was a cinder block wall up on the black side of that road. (I wrote “was”, just because I haven’t been over there in a few years.)

    To get to the truth, you’ve got to drill down.

    .

    * I doubt that CDC “Wonder” dBase would have it. (You wouldn’t want to do it by hand, of course!)

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Achmed E. Newman


    If the data on both population demographics ... and crime ... were crunched for voting precinct level areas, I think there’s be an even higher correlation ...

    I doubt that CDC “Wonder” dBase would have it.
     
    The Census drills down to sub-county "census tracts". I don't think that CDC goes below county-level though (there is no census-tract-level authority to collect medical data from), so you wouldn't have anything to compare that census tract data to.

    Counties (or parishes or boroughs) is kind of the sweet spot for US geo-demography.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  16. @BosTex
    Thanks Steve, great graph!

    Boston is basically “Suffolk, MA” (Suffolk county is Boston + Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop) right around 20% black.

    (Chelsea is mostly Latino and Revere is majority White, but with many Latinos; Winthrop is very white).

    Born and raised in Boston (Dorchester) and lived in the Boston area for total of about 35 years, I have the impression that the Boston Police have traditionally been very responsive and aggressive in how they police all neighborhoods and criminality within the city.

    White, black, Asian, Latino: they are happy to bust your head if you are doing something you shouldn’t be doing.

    The “core” White areas of the city have always been pretty safe (Back Bay, Beacon Hill, North End, South Boston, Charlestown, parts of Dorchester, like Savin Hill, Neponset, Lower Mills, West Roxbury, parts of the South End. I have always thought Allston/Brighton to be questionable, but I will throw them in).

    Bad areas: Roxbury/Mattapan/(regrettably and painfully to me) most of Dorchester.

    These are almost all black areas. My mom used to say: the blacks took these areas and just wrecked them.

    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.

    Every European nationality under the sun,
    Including many Jews.

    Dorchester was same, but would say that Irish Americans predominated, especially in the eastern half. Pretty much all gone as the neighborhoods had more and more blacks.

    Replies: @Larry, San Francisco, @BosTex, @Coemgen, @BosTex, @Masshole, @VivaLaMigra

    I hate replying to myself: i have not been a very good Bostonian in my note.

    I forgot entire significant neighborhoods!

    Jamaica Plain: mostly yuppie, SWPL types, but long border with Roxbury.

    Roslindale: whites are plurality with plenty of blacks and Latinos. I can’t imagine very desirable now, but was a nice area when I was a kid.

    Hyde Park: reverse of Roslindale. Mostly black. I seem to recall it was pretty nice when I was young. Both Hyde Park and Roslindale have a more suburban feel to them.

  17. @Larry, San Francisco
    @BosTex

    In the early 1970's Mattapan was chosen to be integrated by a cabal of rich Jews and Wasps who thought the working class Jewish residents would be less prejudiced (probably, true most working class were liberal Democrats or Socialists). Poor blacks from Roxbury were given subsidized mortgages and other inducements to move in. Although initially welcomed the influx destroyed the community and Mattapan became another poor black neighborhood.

    Replies: @BosTex

    Thanks Larry. I have heard this Mattapan story repeatedly.

    I will have to read up, because I know very little about this episode and would be interesting to know who the players were.

    I doubt the Jews welcomed the blacks. They could look right next door at Roxbury and see the destruction wrought. Luckily for the Jewish folks, Sharon was right down the road.

    I think a lot of the small businesses on Blue Hill Ave had been Jewish owned. Burned to ashes by the blacks.

    • Replies: @Inverness
    @BosTex


    I doubt the Jews welcomed the blacks.
     
    Well no, not to their own neighbourhoods.
    , @Brutusale
    @BosTex

    The Jewish residents of old Mattapan put the money in their pockets and decamped for Randolph. A lot of them were there in the late 60s because that's where we went for Chinese food.

    Sharon didn't come into play for them until the late 80s when Randolph was sufficiently darkened up.

    Replies: @BosTex, @Joseph Echols

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @BosTex


    I will have to read up, because I know very little about this episode and would be interesting to know who the players were.
     
    A Boston Globe article covers it, citing the book:

    The Death of an American Jewish Community
    A Tragedy of Good Intentions
     
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-redliningocaust-aoc-tells-tnc-new-deal-like-the-holocaust-requires-reparations/#comment-2781439 (#26)

    From the Globe article:


    Downtown major Jewish institutional leaders, who lived in the suburbs, suggested that the thousands of working-class Jews living in Mattapan and Dorchester move.
     
  18. @Hypnotoad666
    @stari_momak

    Ashley Babitt doesn't count as a "murder" because apparently it's legal in DC to kill an unarmed deplorable woman even when you have no conceivable claim of self-defense. But she's still a "homicide," which makes her, all by herself, over 10% of the whites killed in DC.


    Last I checked, a couple of years ago, DC had a really good homicide clearance rate, something like 70%. Yet the Rich murder remains unsolved.
     
    Does the CDC have a category for Arkancide?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Truth

    Maybe somebody dim misinterpreted Kill the Rich.

  19. “The worst homicide rate for a county with few blacks is…followed by Kern, CA (Bakersfield).”

    Somewhere, Buck Owens is weeping.

  20. @Mark G.
    I live in Marion County, home of Indianapolis, which is number nine on the list of U.S. counties with high crime rates. It, of course, has a lot of blacks and a Democrat mayor. The crime, though, is concentrated in the areas with lots of poor blacks. I drove through the northern suburban part today on a pleasant autumn day and it looks mostly the same as it did in 1963 when I was a seven-year-old.

    The crime problem really is mostly a black problem. I can remember the last days of segregation. It was awful and needed to be ended but the lingering white guilt for how we treated blacks led to coddling them and not holding them to the same standards as we do whites. We need to stop this. Since blacks genetically have a lower IQ and higher propensity to violence than whites, this will lead to a higher percentage of blacks getting arrested and sent to prison than whites but we need to accept that in order to get crime under control. Law abiding blacks can make a contribution to this country. I'm currently reading a biography of Wes Montgomery, a black Indianapolis jazz guitarist who was an incredible musical talent.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Dieter Kief, @PiltdownMan, @Jonathan Mason

    Wes Montgomery was terrific, but it is worth noting that he was only one of several extraordinarily creative and innovative black jazz musicians of the 1950s and 1960s.

  21. @BosTex
    Thanks Steve, great graph!

    Boston is basically “Suffolk, MA” (Suffolk county is Boston + Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop) right around 20% black.

    (Chelsea is mostly Latino and Revere is majority White, but with many Latinos; Winthrop is very white).

    Born and raised in Boston (Dorchester) and lived in the Boston area for total of about 35 years, I have the impression that the Boston Police have traditionally been very responsive and aggressive in how they police all neighborhoods and criminality within the city.

    White, black, Asian, Latino: they are happy to bust your head if you are doing something you shouldn’t be doing.

    The “core” White areas of the city have always been pretty safe (Back Bay, Beacon Hill, North End, South Boston, Charlestown, parts of Dorchester, like Savin Hill, Neponset, Lower Mills, West Roxbury, parts of the South End. I have always thought Allston/Brighton to be questionable, but I will throw them in).

    Bad areas: Roxbury/Mattapan/(regrettably and painfully to me) most of Dorchester.

    These are almost all black areas. My mom used to say: the blacks took these areas and just wrecked them.

    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.

    Every European nationality under the sun,
    Including many Jews.

    Dorchester was same, but would say that Irish Americans predominated, especially in the eastern half. Pretty much all gone as the neighborhoods had more and more blacks.

    Replies: @Larry, San Francisco, @BosTex, @Coemgen, @BosTex, @Masshole, @VivaLaMigra

    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.

    One of my grandfathers grew up in Roxbury, MA in the early 1900s. I never knew this until I researched him on ancestry.com — the house where he grew up was in a “no go zone” by the 1960s.

    My grandfather’s spinster younger sister was wont to give my female cousins, much to their amusement, her version of The Talk which was considerably less genteel than Derbyshire’s version. We thought she was a nut but now I realize she was just giving good advice from her personal experience.

    My grandmother had a white old lady friend who lived in Mattapan, MA on a side street off of Blue Hill Ave in the 1960s who I also thought was a nut because all she talked about was of her old lady friends being assaulted and having their purses stolen by blacks. Now I realize that she was just telling it like it was.

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Coemgen

    Coemgen-

    Thanks for the kind note.

    Son of a gun: I had a similar experience on ancestry.com.

    Discovered that some of my (father’s mother’s people) English/Scottish (immigrated as children from Halifax, Canada; late 1870s) forebears lived for a very, very long time in the Roxbury area (north Roxbury).

    My father’s father (immigrated to Boston from that exotic locale called Youngstown, OH; Anglo /Irish) also lived in Roxbury as a young man, but later moved over to the Northeastern area.

    (I think the area just west of Northeastern on Huntington is considered “Roxbury” but feels like Fenway/medical area, more than anything).

    Great-grandfather was there until the 1950s and Great grandmother was there until the early 1960s.

    I don’t think they ever got to the point of seeing the black problem in Roxbury.

    —————————————————————————

    It is amazing to think that Roxbury and Mattapan became “no go” areas (for non-blacks) within such a short amount of time.

    These had been really decent neighborhoods (close to Boston: some of the areas with quite beautiful housing stock; near Franklin Park; basically all good stuff) and rapidly became areas to be completely avoided. Horrible.

    ——————————————————-———————

    Gentrification has been taking place all over Boston (at least prior to COVID) so perhaps Roxbury and Mattapan will be slowly taken back with the blacks squeezed down to Brockton/back to wherever they came from. Both are too good to remain as they are, especially Roxbury.

  22. Looking at that chart, I would guess that the percentage of our white leadership class that hails from counties with a black share of 20% or higher is extremely small, with most from the cluster at the bottom left. That’s probably a pretty important dividing line amongst white Democrats and their enthusiasm for anti-racist measures or a preference for just maintaining current social subsidies but no real appetite for handing society over to the whims of black political demands. The lack of familiarity of our most powerful members of society with our thorniest cohort has a lot to do with the awful politics on this issue.

    • Replies: @LP5
    @Arclight

    Arclight writes:


    The lack of familiarity of our most powerful members of society with our thorniest cohort has a lot to do with the awful politics on this issue.
     
    WWII, and to some extent even Vietnam-era drafts provided the first real interaction for so many by race, religion and region. Your basic training neighbor might've been from Brooklyn while you hailed from Chicago, or maybe you met Bubba or Forrest Gump and learned about shrimp or whatever.

    Draft deferments diluted those effects, so future PMC masters of the universe didn't mingle as much with future NPCs.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

  23. Martha’s Vineyard has a good handle on the problem of crime. Why not enrich the area?

  24. @BosTex
    @Larry, San Francisco

    Thanks Larry. I have heard this Mattapan story repeatedly.

    I will have to read up, because I know very little about this episode and would be interesting to know who the players were.

    I doubt the Jews welcomed the blacks. They could look right next door at Roxbury and see the destruction wrought. Luckily for the Jewish folks, Sharon was right down the road.

    I think a lot of the small businesses on Blue Hill Ave had been Jewish owned. Burned to ashes by the blacks.

    Replies: @Inverness, @Brutusale, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I doubt the Jews welcomed the blacks.

    Well no, not to their own neighbourhoods.

    • Agree: anonymouseperson, Renard
  25. @BosTex
    @Larry, San Francisco

    Thanks Larry. I have heard this Mattapan story repeatedly.

    I will have to read up, because I know very little about this episode and would be interesting to know who the players were.

    I doubt the Jews welcomed the blacks. They could look right next door at Roxbury and see the destruction wrought. Luckily for the Jewish folks, Sharon was right down the road.

    I think a lot of the small businesses on Blue Hill Ave had been Jewish owned. Burned to ashes by the blacks.

    Replies: @Inverness, @Brutusale, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The Jewish residents of old Mattapan put the money in their pockets and decamped for Randolph. A lot of them were there in the late 60s because that’s where we went for Chinese food.

    Sharon didn’t come into play for them until the late 80s when Randolph was sufficiently darkened up.

    • Thanks: BosTex
    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Brutusale

    Thanks!Ah! Randolph!

    That’s right.

    A couple of my older female cousins are friends with two Jewish girls (girls! They are all in their 60s at this point), and remember going to visit with them in Randolph: they had this great back yard where they had set up a wiffleball field. Was always a lot of fun to go there.

    One of the Jewish girls: remarkably attractive. Blue eyes, very fine features. Heart shaped face, etc

    Her sister: quite homely (challenging schnozz, plain Jane). yet she carried herself with such confidence that she was always fun to see.

    Super good folks: they would call and check in on my mom every year, without fail, until she passed away a few years back.

    , @Joseph Echols
    @Brutusale

    The intellectual globalists that I am friends with in Mass live in either Newton, Brookline, or Sharon. They tell me there is a huge difference in house prices. A house that costs $1 million in sharon is $3 million in newton is $5 million in Brookline. So there is huge economic sorting. Is this true?

    Replies: @BosTex, @Brutusale

  26. @Coemgen
    @BosTex


    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.
     
    One of my grandfathers grew up in Roxbury, MA in the early 1900s. I never knew this until I researched him on ancestry.com — the house where he grew up was in a “no go zone” by the 1960s.

    My grandfather’s spinster younger sister was wont to give my female cousins, much to their amusement, her version of The Talk which was considerably less genteel than Derbyshire’s version. We thought she was a nut but now I realize she was just giving good advice from her personal experience.

    My grandmother had a white old lady friend who lived in Mattapan, MA on a side street off of Blue Hill Ave in the 1960s who I also thought was a nut because all she talked about was of her old lady friends being assaulted and having their purses stolen by blacks. Now I realize that she was just telling it like it was.

    Replies: @BosTex

    Coemgen-

    Thanks for the kind note.

    Son of a gun: I had a similar experience on ancestry.com.

    Discovered that some of my (father’s mother’s people) English/Scottish (immigrated as children from Halifax, Canada; late 1870s) forebears lived for a very, very long time in the Roxbury area (north Roxbury).

    My father’s father (immigrated to Boston from that exotic locale called Youngstown, OH; Anglo /Irish) also lived in Roxbury as a young man, but later moved over to the Northeastern area.

    (I think the area just west of Northeastern on Huntington is considered “Roxbury” but feels like Fenway/medical area, more than anything).

    Great-grandfather was there until the 1950s and Great grandmother was there until the early 1960s.

    I don’t think they ever got to the point of seeing the black problem in Roxbury.

    —————————————————————————

    It is amazing to think that Roxbury and Mattapan became “no go” areas (for non-blacks) within such a short amount of time.

    These had been really decent neighborhoods (close to Boston: some of the areas with quite beautiful housing stock; near Franklin Park; basically all good stuff) and rapidly became areas to be completely avoided. Horrible.

    ——————————————————-———————

    Gentrification has been taking place all over Boston (at least prior to COVID) so perhaps Roxbury and Mattapan will be slowly taken back with the blacks squeezed down to Brockton/back to wherever they came from. Both are too good to remain as they are, especially Roxbury.

  27. @BosTex
    Thanks Steve, great graph!

    Boston is basically “Suffolk, MA” (Suffolk county is Boston + Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop) right around 20% black.

    (Chelsea is mostly Latino and Revere is majority White, but with many Latinos; Winthrop is very white).

    Born and raised in Boston (Dorchester) and lived in the Boston area for total of about 35 years, I have the impression that the Boston Police have traditionally been very responsive and aggressive in how they police all neighborhoods and criminality within the city.

    White, black, Asian, Latino: they are happy to bust your head if you are doing something you shouldn’t be doing.

    The “core” White areas of the city have always been pretty safe (Back Bay, Beacon Hill, North End, South Boston, Charlestown, parts of Dorchester, like Savin Hill, Neponset, Lower Mills, West Roxbury, parts of the South End. I have always thought Allston/Brighton to be questionable, but I will throw them in).

    Bad areas: Roxbury/Mattapan/(regrettably and painfully to me) most of Dorchester.

    These are almost all black areas. My mom used to say: the blacks took these areas and just wrecked them.

    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.

    Every European nationality under the sun,
    Including many Jews.

    Dorchester was same, but would say that Irish Americans predominated, especially in the eastern half. Pretty much all gone as the neighborhoods had more and more blacks.

    Replies: @Larry, San Francisco, @BosTex, @Coemgen, @BosTex, @Masshole, @VivaLaMigra

    Reply to self number 2:

    Good lord: not living in Boston for almost 5 years, I am starting to forget stuff!

    East Boston: last apartment we had in the city before moving to Texas! How could I forget?

    Mostly Latino (Salvadoran I think; prior to the Salvadorans, had been mostly Italian America), but being gentrified rapidly (aka more and more young white folks getting off the train at Maverick, fewer and fewer Latinos…at least five years ago).

    Safety varies: Maverick Square and Jeffries Point always felt fine. The further into East Boston it seemed a little worse.

    East Boston is a 4 minute train ride under Boston Harbor to the financial district and had probably the last of the marginally affordable housing that is also close to Boston..again, 5 years ago.

  28. The worst homicide rate for a county with few blacks is Bernalillo, NM (Albuquerque) followed by Kern, CA (Bakersfield).

    Kern County, CA is the southern end of the agricultural “Central Valley” of California. I had to rent a U-Haul pickup truck in Bakersfield to haul a trailer north… since it only had an AM radio, it seemed every available station was broadcasting in Spanish or playing Mexican music. It’s 55% hispanic, 31% non-hispanic White.

  29. @Brutusale
    @BosTex

    The Jewish residents of old Mattapan put the money in their pockets and decamped for Randolph. A lot of them were there in the late 60s because that's where we went for Chinese food.

    Sharon didn't come into play for them until the late 80s when Randolph was sufficiently darkened up.

    Replies: @BosTex, @Joseph Echols

    Thanks!Ah! Randolph!

    That’s right.

    A couple of my older female cousins are friends with two Jewish girls (girls! They are all in their 60s at this point), and remember going to visit with them in Randolph: they had this great back yard where they had set up a wiffleball field. Was always a lot of fun to go there.

    One of the Jewish girls: remarkably attractive. Blue eyes, very fine features. Heart shaped face, etc

    Her sister: quite homely (challenging schnozz, plain Jane). yet she carried herself with such confidence that she was always fun to see.

    Super good folks: they would call and check in on my mom every year, without fail, until she passed away a few years back.

  30. On a semi-related topic, NPR aired a news segment this morning on crime rates that’s a textbook lesson in obfuscation, deflection, and narrative shoehorning. Just in time before the coming elections.

    https://www.npr.org/2022/11/03/1133790735/rising-crime-statistics-are-not-all-that-they-seem

    The standard educated lefty white consuming this schlocky reporting walks away being dumber on what’s really going on with violent crime rates than they already were before.

    And how does NPR even find these people to quote for this “story”? Good grief.

    Defund NPR…

    • Agree: A. Clifton
  31. @Arclight
    Looking at that chart, I would guess that the percentage of our white leadership class that hails from counties with a black share of 20% or higher is extremely small, with most from the cluster at the bottom left. That's probably a pretty important dividing line amongst white Democrats and their enthusiasm for anti-racist measures or a preference for just maintaining current social subsidies but no real appetite for handing society over to the whims of black political demands. The lack of familiarity of our most powerful members of society with our thorniest cohort has a lot to do with the awful politics on this issue.

    Replies: @LP5

    Arclight writes:

    The lack of familiarity of our most powerful members of society with our thorniest cohort has a lot to do with the awful politics on this issue.

    WWII, and to some extent even Vietnam-era drafts provided the first real interaction for so many by race, religion and region. Your basic training neighbor might’ve been from Brooklyn while you hailed from Chicago, or maybe you met Bubba or Forrest Gump and learned about shrimp or whatever.

    Draft deferments diluted those effects, so future PMC masters of the universe didn’t mingle as much with future NPCs.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @LP5

    Between the end of the Korean War and the full ramp-up of Vietnam it was somewhat unusual for male college graduates to not do a stint in the military. For a period after Korea there was even a peacetime draft. The choice for male college graduates often came down to: better to go in voluntarily as an officer than get drafted and be enlisted.

    If one spends a few years in the military, they interact with people from all over the US and with a wide range of cognitive abilities. They develop a view of them that is both more realistic and less contemptuous. Too many of our ruling "elites" have met and interacted with very few people outside of their circles. In short, they are often quite provincial.

    I referred to Charles Johnson in the "white male Republicans donate to Ivy's" thread earlier. From his Wiki we learn: "An ROTC cadet, he later served as a lieutenant in the United States Army stationed in Germany.[3]"

    About his brother Rupert (who donated $100mm to Washington & Lee before Charles one-upped him with Yale) we learn: "Johnson graduated from Washington and Lee University, then served as a Marine."

    I only cite these two because of the reference to Charles in a different thread. Not too many Yale graduates spend 3-4 years in the Army before focusing on getting rich these days.

  32. @Mark G.
    I live in Marion County, home of Indianapolis, which is number nine on the list of U.S. counties with high crime rates. It, of course, has a lot of blacks and a Democrat mayor. The crime, though, is concentrated in the areas with lots of poor blacks. I drove through the northern suburban part today on a pleasant autumn day and it looks mostly the same as it did in 1963 when I was a seven-year-old.

    The crime problem really is mostly a black problem. I can remember the last days of segregation. It was awful and needed to be ended but the lingering white guilt for how we treated blacks led to coddling them and not holding them to the same standards as we do whites. We need to stop this. Since blacks genetically have a lower IQ and higher propensity to violence than whites, this will lead to a higher percentage of blacks getting arrested and sent to prison than whites but we need to accept that in order to get crime under control. Law abiding blacks can make a contribution to this country. I'm currently reading a biography of Wes Montgomery, a black Indianapolis jazz guitarist who was an incredible musical talent.

    Replies: @Polistra, @Dieter Kief, @PiltdownMan, @Jonathan Mason

    Montgomery had a unique style, using his right thumb as a plectrum. A virtuoso.

    The counties with the highest murder rates coincide with high- density, low-income housing where too many young men belong to gangs, get along by trafficking and trading in drugs, and drinking too much alcohol.

    Such areas also have a high incidence of mentally ill residents.

    On the other hand low-density areas like Montecito, California, where Oprah Winfrey lives, have few murders, but a lot of tax evasion.

    If everywhere was like Montecito, murder would be almost unknown, and no-one would pay any taxes. Win-win. Let’s make it happen.

  33. @Anon
    If you limit the counties to those with black populations between, say, 0% and 20% what is their correlation coefficient? That’s the important part, and the scattergraph looks pretty random there. It’d be nice to blow up that part so that the county names would be legible. At any rate I think it would require the introduction of factors in addition to race to get a good correlation if you remove the obviously pathological counties where they whites have all fled.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @ic1000

    If you limit the counties to those with black populations between, say, 0% and 20% what is their correlation coefficient? That’s the important part, and the scattergraph looks pretty random there. It’d be nice to blow up that part so that the county names would be legible.

    Interesting suggestion.

    At any rate I think it would require the introduction of factors in addition to race to get a good correlation if you remove the obviously pathological counties where the whites have all fled.

    Yes, after solving for the black problem, what is the next way to lower crime in neighborhoods where non-blacks actually live?

    Superficially, it looks like the next one is to solve the Hispanic crime problem. The above-the-line counties in the 0%-20% box look disproportionately Southwestern.

    And the below-the-line 0%-20% counties look disproportionately rich af.

    So there’s your solution to gracious living and low crime:
    1) avoid blax,
    2) avoid Hispanx,
    3) be rich.

    Who could have foreseen this?

    • LOL: BosTex
  34. @Achmed E. Newman
    If the data on both population demographics (got that) and crime (don't have that?*) were crunched for voting precinct level areas, I think there's be an even higher correlation between "black" and "murder".

    That "other side of the tracks" expression from back in the day really meant something. It still does, though it's not always a division by railroad tracks.

    There's one place near me where the very nice neighborhood - I mean, 1/2 acre lots with near-real-mansions on each one and lots of trees - is, at the west end of it, just across the street from a solid black trashed-out area. There was a cinder block wall up on the black side of that road. (I wrote "was", just because I haven't been over there in a few years.)

    To get to the truth, you've got to drill down.

    .


    * I doubt that CDC "Wonder" dBase would have it. (You wouldn't want to do it by hand, of course!)

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    If the data on both population demographics … and crime … were crunched for voting precinct level areas, I think there’s be an even higher correlation …

    I doubt that CDC “Wonder” dBase would have it.

    The Census drills down to sub-county “census tracts“. I don’t think that CDC goes below county-level though (there is no census-tract-level authority to collect medical data from), so you wouldn’t have anything to compare that census tract data to.

    Counties (or parishes or boroughs) is kind of the sweet spot for US geo-demography.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Almost Missouri

    Right, census-tract is what I meant, thanks.


    Counties (or parishes or boroughs) is kind of the sweet spot for US geo-demography.
     
    If it's all you got (as with the CDC data), yeah. However, I could show you counties for which it'd be MUCH better and safer to live over here than over there.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  35. @Brutusale
    @BosTex

    The Jewish residents of old Mattapan put the money in their pockets and decamped for Randolph. A lot of them were there in the late 60s because that's where we went for Chinese food.

    Sharon didn't come into play for them until the late 80s when Randolph was sufficiently darkened up.

    Replies: @BosTex, @Joseph Echols

    The intellectual globalists that I am friends with in Mass live in either Newton, Brookline, or Sharon. They tell me there is a huge difference in house prices. A house that costs $1 million in sharon is $3 million in newton is $5 million in Brookline. So there is huge economic sorting. Is this true?

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Joseph Echols

    That sounds about right, but might reverse Newton and Brookline.

    I think Newton has better schools than Brookline.

    That said: we are friends with a couple, both physicians, they were moving up from New Haven and they really wanted to live in Brookline:

    They had total sticker shock, even from condos, etc. in Brookline.

    So could be right to place Brookline as most expensive.

    All of the Boston area is crazy for housing cost for anything that is desirable.

    , @Brutusale
    @Joseph Echols

    Maybe not to the numbers you quote, but that's the direction the prices move.

    Boston is the central attractor to the entire New England region, and what you pay for a home in Eastern Mass is mostly based on your distance from downtown. Those three locales get the added bump of being desirable and welcoming to Jews. None are very welcoming to their pets, with Brookline and Newton at about 3% and Sharon less than 1% black. My little SWPL hamlet is blacker than all three at 3.8%!

  36. @Dieter Kief
    @Mark G.


    I’m currently reading a biography of Wes Montgomery, a black Indianapolis jazz guitarist who was an incredible musical talent.
     
    I love Wes Montgomery's music.
    (Your comment is simple & clear. There are societies in wich Blacks are way less incarcereated (and in conlict with the law) than in the US. Best practise is dear in this context.)

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    There are societies in wich Blacks are way less incarcereated (and in conlict with the law) than in the US. Best practise is dear in this context.

    True, and it’s too bad because there are probably lessons to be learned, or “takeaways” as corp-speak has it.

    We can compare notes, but my impression is that the secret sauce of “less black incarceration” is …

    … more policing.

    In other words, you can police them before they commit crimes, or arrest them afterwards. Europe takes the former approach, the US takes the latter approach (or did till a couple of years ago, since which time it has taken no approach at all).

    So the “dear best practices” might not be any hidden holy grail, but just to do what everyone should have been doing all along.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Almost Missouri


    We can compare notes, but my impression is that the secret sauce of “less black incarceration” is… more policing.

     

    Steve Sailer (used?) to say: More guidance as well.
    This must not necessarily mean an authoritarian or patronizing approach. One could also reformulate this idea this way: To respect the need for structure that everybody has - just not in the same intensity maybe...

    What went definitely wrong in Sweden for example was, to treat the immigrants in exactly the same way as Swedes. - If those are from Somalia, let's say, and come in large quantities and stay together in large quantities - - - No go.
    It looks as if societies are - in this respect too - no engines, which work in the same way, wherever they operate - like the TOYOTA pickups, that seem to be doing fine everywhere...

    Why did Sweden turn Right-wing? - The Post (unherd.com)
  37. My theory about Mississippi Valley violence is that in the first half of the 19th century, the more unruly, “vibrant” slaves in east coast states were sold to the newly-settled cotton plantations near the Mississippi. The ones left behind had a higher percentage of trusted house slaves with more white blood, and big plantations were declining in the East due to soil exhaustion. The house slaves that were sold out of state had done something bad. Most owners didn’t want to break up families when they sold.

  38. @Almost Missouri
    @Achmed E. Newman


    If the data on both population demographics ... and crime ... were crunched for voting precinct level areas, I think there’s be an even higher correlation ...

    I doubt that CDC “Wonder” dBase would have it.
     
    The Census drills down to sub-county "census tracts". I don't think that CDC goes below county-level though (there is no census-tract-level authority to collect medical data from), so you wouldn't have anything to compare that census tract data to.

    Counties (or parishes or boroughs) is kind of the sweet spot for US geo-demography.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Right, census-tract is what I meant, thanks.

    Counties (or parishes or boroughs) is kind of the sweet spot for US geo-demography.

    If it’s all you got (as with the CDC data), yeah. However, I could show you counties for which it’d be MUCH better and safer to live over here than over there.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Achmed E. Newman


    I could show you counties for which it’d be MUCH better and safer to live over here than over there.
     
    No doubt. Every county may have such potentially life-or-death nuances.

    My point was only that from the Olympian heights of the statistical analyst, things get difficult below the county level, and things get blurry above the county level.
  39. @BosTex
    @Larry, San Francisco

    Thanks Larry. I have heard this Mattapan story repeatedly.

    I will have to read up, because I know very little about this episode and would be interesting to know who the players were.

    I doubt the Jews welcomed the blacks. They could look right next door at Roxbury and see the destruction wrought. Luckily for the Jewish folks, Sharon was right down the road.

    I think a lot of the small businesses on Blue Hill Ave had been Jewish owned. Burned to ashes by the blacks.

    Replies: @Inverness, @Brutusale, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I will have to read up, because I know very little about this episode and would be interesting to know who the players were.

    A Boston Globe article covers it, citing the book:

    The Death of an American Jewish Community
    A Tragedy of Good Intentions

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/the-redliningocaust-aoc-tells-tnc-new-deal-like-the-holocaust-requires-reparations/#comment-2781439 (#26)

    From the Globe article:

    Downtown major Jewish institutional leaders, who lived in the suburbs, suggested that the thousands of working-class Jews living in Mattapan and Dorchester move.

    • Thanks: Coemgen, BosTex
  40. @Polistra
    Thanks for doing counties. It's about time someone did!

    I wonder about the intellectual propriety of adding independent cities to this mix.

    It sort of seems fair, as you note that counties which include Memphis and Atlanta are almost coterminous with cities anyway..

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alec Leamas (working from home)

    It sort of seems fair, as you note that counties which include Memphis and Atlanta are almost coterminous with cities anyway..

    It’s typical in American government that the Chief prosecutor of State crimes such as murder is a local, county-level politician, often elected by the citizens of the county. Police policy is likewise under the civilian control of elected or appointed county politicians (i.e., mayor and police chief).

    That’s what the “red states have higher crime lulz” misdirection was conceived to dodge – the jurisdictions with high rates of crime are overwhelmingly black and elect Democrats to their highest offices. Democrats now view black felons as part of their constituent coalition – black criminals are, however, a liability with most other persuadable voters, particularly when crime increases perceptively.

    I’d venture that the same people who say “red states have more crime lulz” would scream bloody murder if, say, the Governor of Mississippi took over governance of Jackson, dismissed the local prosecutors and police and ran law enforcement through the Attorney General’s Office and the State Police.

  41. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Almost Missouri

    Right, census-tract is what I meant, thanks.


    Counties (or parishes or boroughs) is kind of the sweet spot for US geo-demography.
     
    If it's all you got (as with the CDC data), yeah. However, I could show you counties for which it'd be MUCH better and safer to live over here than over there.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    I could show you counties for which it’d be MUCH better and safer to live over here than over there.

    No doubt. Every county may have such potentially life-or-death nuances.

    My point was only that from the Olympian heights of the statistical analyst, things get difficult below the county level, and things get blurry above the county level.

  42. @Almost Missouri
    @Dieter Kief


    There are societies in wich Blacks are way less incarcereated (and in conlict with the law) than in the US. Best practise is dear in this context.
     
    True, and it's too bad because there are probably lessons to be learned, or "takeaways" as corp-speak has it.

    We can compare notes, but my impression is that the secret sauce of "less black incarceration" is ...

    ... more policing.

    In other words, you can police them before they commit crimes, or arrest them afterwards. Europe takes the former approach, the US takes the latter approach (or did till a couple of years ago, since which time it has taken no approach at all).

    So the "dear best practices" might not be any hidden holy grail, but just to do what everyone should have been doing all along.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    We can compare notes, but my impression is that the secret sauce of “less black incarceration” is… more policing.

    Steve Sailer (used?) to say: More guidance as well.
    This must not necessarily mean an authoritarian or patronizing approach. One could also reformulate this idea this way: To respect the need for structure that everybody has – just not in the same intensity maybe…

    What went definitely wrong in Sweden for example was, to treat the immigrants in exactly the same way as Swedes. – If those are from Somalia, let’s say, and come in large quantities and stay together in large quantities – – – No go.
    It looks as if societies are – in this respect too – no engines, which work in the same way, wherever they operate – like the TOYOTA pickups, that seem to be doing fine everywhere…

    Why did Sweden turn Right-wing? – The Post (unherd.com)

  43. @Polistra
    @Mark G.

    When and if you feel like it, I'd enjoy reading your impressions of the Wes Montgomery bio. Simply reply to one of my posts, at your convenience. I'm a big fan of his, but I don't know his back story.

    I'm hoping he wasn't a junkie like so many jazz greats! (I presume not, given the context in which you mentioned him.)

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Mark G.

    I’m hoping he wasn’t a junkie like so many jazz greats! (I presume not, given the context in which you mentioned him.)

    Wes Montgomery was a married man who had seven children.

    Because he was scared of flying, he drove very long distances to gigs. Unfortunately he was not scared of smoking, and he died of a heart attack at the age of 45.

    As far as I know he was not a junkie.

    Many of the jazz musicians of the time were junkies, e.g. Chet Baker, Joe Pass.

  44. I know Boston has a rich history of political corruption, but I never seem to hear anything bad about it in terms of crime and homelessness — which if true would make it an outlier these days among D-run cities. Is that correct?

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Known Fact

    I have lived in Boston, Minneapolis and Houston.

    Houston has the scruffiest dirtiest looking homeless people of the three, but not too many of them.

    I would say that our police force is second rate and we don’t have enough police officers for how massive the city is (don’t worry, we are all
    Heavily armed to compensate).

    Boston has a terrible homeless problem but seems to be confined to one particular district.
    Brutusale can add more color.

    I would say that Boston has been very aggressively policed over the years, so depending on the neighborhood: pretty safe.

    Unclear if the leftist they elected will change this.
    One caveat is that the city has housing projects spread about all over: those are always to be avoided regardless of neighborhood.

    Haven’t lived in Minneapolis in more than 10
    Years but looks like the Floyd crisis was just catastrophic.

    Prior to Floyd: low crime and a lot of really nice parks. I do not recall a ton of homeless. Think about how cold it is.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Brutusale
    @Known Fact

    What kept Boston safe was its Irish police department. That's going away.

    The third quarter of 2022 has seen a serious uptick in violence. The mayor is now a Chinese woman, the police chief is now black, and the DA is a black man of the highest yella. Things are headed south.

    What saves Boston, indeed the entire area, are its colleges and universities. In addition to it being one of the most educated areas in the country, the 250K+ students arriving every fall make it an expensive place to live. It keeps the underclass to what the Commonwealth will support.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @BosTex

  45. As even the worst MSNBC news gal could tell you, all your stinkin’ graph shows is that, because of white racism, too many Black people can’t escape murderous environments.

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Tono-Bungay


    …too many Black people can’t escape murderous environment…
     
    What black men need is to have the same opportunities as white men have such as being harangued, from childhood, to the point that they are afraid to touch a weapon as adults.

    Disclaimer: I take no responsibility for any explosively murderous reactions to such haranguing.
  46. @Anon
    If you limit the counties to those with black populations between, say, 0% and 20% what is their correlation coefficient? That’s the important part, and the scattergraph looks pretty random there. It’d be nice to blow up that part so that the county names would be legible. At any rate I think it would require the introduction of factors in addition to race to get a good correlation if you remove the obviously pathological counties where they whites have all fled.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @ic1000

    > It’d be nice to blow up [the graph] so that the county names would be legible.

    In most browsers, if one moves the cursor over to a figure and then press [control] and the mouse button, an option like “Open image in new tab” will appear. Do that, and one is able to zoom in, limited only by the resolution of the image.

    For Steve’s graph, county names are legible. Although the some are still obscured in the lower-left cluster (which may be your point).

  47. @Joseph Echols
    @Brutusale

    The intellectual globalists that I am friends with in Mass live in either Newton, Brookline, or Sharon. They tell me there is a huge difference in house prices. A house that costs $1 million in sharon is $3 million in newton is $5 million in Brookline. So there is huge economic sorting. Is this true?

    Replies: @BosTex, @Brutusale

    That sounds about right, but might reverse Newton and Brookline.

    I think Newton has better schools than Brookline.

    That said: we are friends with a couple, both physicians, they were moving up from New Haven and they really wanted to live in Brookline:

    They had total sticker shock, even from condos, etc. in Brookline.

    So could be right to place Brookline as most expensive.

    All of the Boston area is crazy for housing cost for anything that is desirable.

  48. @Known Fact
    I know Boston has a rich history of political corruption, but I never seem to hear anything bad about it in terms of crime and homelessness -- which if true would make it an outlier these days among D-run cities. Is that correct?

    Replies: @BosTex, @Brutusale

    I have lived in Boston, Minneapolis and Houston.

    Houston has the scruffiest dirtiest looking homeless people of the three, but not too many of them.

    I would say that our police force is second rate and we don’t have enough police officers for how massive the city is (don’t worry, we are all
    Heavily armed to compensate).

    Boston has a terrible homeless problem but seems to be confined to one particular district.
    Brutusale can add more color.

    I would say that Boston has been very aggressively policed over the years, so depending on the neighborhood: pretty safe.

    Unclear if the leftist they elected will change this.
    One caveat is that the city has housing projects spread about all over: those are always to be avoided regardless of neighborhood.

    Haven’t lived in Minneapolis in more than 10
    Years but looks like the Floyd crisis was just catastrophic.

    Prior to Floyd: low crime and a lot of really nice parks. I do not recall a ton of homeless. Think about how cold it is.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @BosTex


    Haven’t lived in Minneapolis in more than 10
    Years but looks like the Floyd crisis was just catastrophic.
     
    The small riot in the '60s in North Minneapolis may have been a race riot, but the Floyd riots were entirely political. That part of South Minneapolis is extremely diverse. The black animosity toward whites you see in other places never grew much in the Cities because there were so many "others" competing for attention. Hmong and other Asians, Somalis and other Africans, American Indians, fewer Hispanics than farther south, maybe, but a lot for the Rust Belt-- the economy is healthier.

    "Hating whitey" never paid. "Playing whitey's guilt" is much more effective, and productive. (Besides, it's hard to hate fools.)

    If it ever comes out just who engineered these disturbances, count on nearly every one of them being white. Minneapolis is on the way from Chicago to Seattle and Portland in more than just the geographic sense!

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @BosTex

    How's Southie these days?

    Replies: @BosTex

  49. I couldn’t agree more with your take on Washington DC, the social situation there is an absolute embarrassment to our nation: enormous inequality, Uber-yuppy white neighborhoods who’ve gotten rich entirely off the federal government, tons of homeless just blocks from the White House, and then incredibly dangerous black neighborhoods across the river in Anacostia that pretty much resembles a Third World country. I lived there for 4 very fun years cavorting around the fancy bars, plus it was also amusing to see the cognitive dissonance among the SJWs on the rare times they realized what their cherished beliefs and policies had led to.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  50. @LP5
    @Arclight

    Arclight writes:


    The lack of familiarity of our most powerful members of society with our thorniest cohort has a lot to do with the awful politics on this issue.
     
    WWII, and to some extent even Vietnam-era drafts provided the first real interaction for so many by race, religion and region. Your basic training neighbor might've been from Brooklyn while you hailed from Chicago, or maybe you met Bubba or Forrest Gump and learned about shrimp or whatever.

    Draft deferments diluted those effects, so future PMC masters of the universe didn't mingle as much with future NPCs.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    Between the end of the Korean War and the full ramp-up of Vietnam it was somewhat unusual for male college graduates to not do a stint in the military. For a period after Korea there was even a peacetime draft. The choice for male college graduates often came down to: better to go in voluntarily as an officer than get drafted and be enlisted.

    If one spends a few years in the military, they interact with people from all over the US and with a wide range of cognitive abilities. They develop a view of them that is both more realistic and less contemptuous. Too many of our ruling “elites” have met and interacted with very few people outside of their circles. In short, they are often quite provincial.

    I referred to Charles Johnson in the “white male Republicans donate to Ivy’s” thread earlier. From his Wiki we learn: “An ROTC cadet, he later served as a lieutenant in the United States Army stationed in Germany.[3]”

    About his brother Rupert (who donated $100mm to Washington & Lee before Charles one-upped him with Yale) we learn: “Johnson graduated from Washington and Lee University, then served as a Marine.”

    I only cite these two because of the reference to Charles in a different thread. Not too many Yale graduates spend 3-4 years in the Army before focusing on getting rich these days.

  51. @Tono-Bungay
    As even the worst MSNBC news gal could tell you, all your stinkin' graph shows is that, because of white racism, too many Black people can't escape murderous environments.

    Replies: @Coemgen

    …too many Black people can’t escape murderous environment…

    What black men need is to have the same opportunities as white men have such as being harangued, from childhood, to the point that they are afraid to touch a weapon as adults.

    Disclaimer: I take no responsibility for any explosively murderous reactions to such haranguing.

  52. @Steve Sailer
    @Not Raul

    Texas has big cities and small counties.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    Texas has big cities and small counties.

    If you did an analysis just on Texas, and included every county with a population above 90,000 (Texas has 45), the correlation might be higher. It would probably be a good idea to get an average number of murders in a four year period, to deal with random fluctuations.

    Keeping the analysis within one state would help control for a lot of policy and historical variables. Also, some counties with large Chicano populations, like El Paso, have a relatively small homicide rate.

  53. @Joseph Echols
    @Brutusale

    The intellectual globalists that I am friends with in Mass live in either Newton, Brookline, or Sharon. They tell me there is a huge difference in house prices. A house that costs $1 million in sharon is $3 million in newton is $5 million in Brookline. So there is huge economic sorting. Is this true?

    Replies: @BosTex, @Brutusale

    Maybe not to the numbers you quote, but that’s the direction the prices move.

    Boston is the central attractor to the entire New England region, and what you pay for a home in Eastern Mass is mostly based on your distance from downtown. Those three locales get the added bump of being desirable and welcoming to Jews. None are very welcoming to their pets, with Brookline and Newton at about 3% and Sharon less than 1% black. My little SWPL hamlet is blacker than all three at 3.8%!

  54. @Known Fact
    I know Boston has a rich history of political corruption, but I never seem to hear anything bad about it in terms of crime and homelessness -- which if true would make it an outlier these days among D-run cities. Is that correct?

    Replies: @BosTex, @Brutusale

    What kept Boston safe was its Irish police department. That’s going away.

    The third quarter of 2022 has seen a serious uptick in violence. The mayor is now a Chinese woman, the police chief is now black, and the DA is a black man of the highest yella. Things are headed south.

    What saves Boston, indeed the entire area, are its colleges and universities. In addition to it being one of the most educated areas in the country, the 250K+ students arriving every fall make it an expensive place to live. It keeps the underclass to what the Commonwealth will support.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Brutusale



    I know Boston has a rich history of political corruption, but I never seem to hear anything bad about it in terms of crime and homelessness
     
    What kept Boston safe was its Irish police department. That’s going away.
     
    One of the girly mags did an exposé back in the 1970s called "City of Hate".

    That city was Boston.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    , @BosTex
    @Brutusale

    Thanks Brutusale. I always say:

    Colleges and universities plus all the prime healthcare systems happens to be what keeps Boston afloat (the two are closely related).

    You shared a video of mass and case awhile back. Can you share again?

    Replies: @BosTex

  55. @BosTex
    @Known Fact

    I have lived in Boston, Minneapolis and Houston.

    Houston has the scruffiest dirtiest looking homeless people of the three, but not too many of them.

    I would say that our police force is second rate and we don’t have enough police officers for how massive the city is (don’t worry, we are all
    Heavily armed to compensate).

    Boston has a terrible homeless problem but seems to be confined to one particular district.
    Brutusale can add more color.

    I would say that Boston has been very aggressively policed over the years, so depending on the neighborhood: pretty safe.

    Unclear if the leftist they elected will change this.
    One caveat is that the city has housing projects spread about all over: those are always to be avoided regardless of neighborhood.

    Haven’t lived in Minneapolis in more than 10
    Years but looks like the Floyd crisis was just catastrophic.

    Prior to Floyd: low crime and a lot of really nice parks. I do not recall a ton of homeless. Think about how cold it is.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JohnnyWalker123

    Haven’t lived in Minneapolis in more than 10
    Years but looks like the Floyd crisis was just catastrophic.

    The small riot in the ’60s in North Minneapolis may have been a race riot, but the Floyd riots were entirely political. That part of South Minneapolis is extremely diverse. The black animosity toward whites you see in other places never grew much in the Cities because there were so many “others” competing for attention. Hmong and other Asians, Somalis and other Africans, American Indians, fewer Hispanics than farther south, maybe, but a lot for the Rust Belt– the economy is healthier.

    “Hating whitey” never paid. “Playing whitey’s guilt” is much more effective, and productive. (Besides, it’s hard to hate fools.)

    If it ever comes out just who engineered these disturbances, count on nearly every one of them being white. Minneapolis is on the way from Chicago to Seattle and Portland in more than just the geographic sense!

  56. @BosTex
    @Known Fact

    I have lived in Boston, Minneapolis and Houston.

    Houston has the scruffiest dirtiest looking homeless people of the three, but not too many of them.

    I would say that our police force is second rate and we don’t have enough police officers for how massive the city is (don’t worry, we are all
    Heavily armed to compensate).

    Boston has a terrible homeless problem but seems to be confined to one particular district.
    Brutusale can add more color.

    I would say that Boston has been very aggressively policed over the years, so depending on the neighborhood: pretty safe.

    Unclear if the leftist they elected will change this.
    One caveat is that the city has housing projects spread about all over: those are always to be avoided regardless of neighborhood.

    Haven’t lived in Minneapolis in more than 10
    Years but looks like the Floyd crisis was just catastrophic.

    Prior to Floyd: low crime and a lot of really nice parks. I do not recall a ton of homeless. Think about how cold it is.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @JohnnyWalker123

    How’s Southie these days?

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @JohnnyWalker123

    JW123-

    We used to live in Southie, in the Seaport’ section.

    Basically a really nice renovation of the all the wharves and old warehouses that used to be in that section of Southie.

    I am not sure if there has been any other radical changes, but rent has increased tremendously.

    I checked out our old apartment bldg.

    We used to pay just under $3000 per month, no utilities included. 1 and half bedrooms, 800 Sq. That right, 800 sq ft. Nice apartment. This was 2015-2017 timeframe.

    Same apartment is now over $5000 per month. Crazy.

    Yes. Nice neighborhood, paying for location, etc. still just a crazy rent.

    Parking not included.

    As part of moving to Houston, received a significant promotion, but the move was totally with it for other reasons.

    We bought a nice townhouse close to downtown, mortgage payments less than $3000 per month. 3 bedroom, 3.5 baths. 2800 sq feet. attached 2 car garage. Really nice improvement in lifestyle. Built in 2007, but renovated, soup to nuts in 2017.

    Love Boston, through and through, but could never go back given the weather and the cost of living.

  57. @Brutusale
    @Known Fact

    What kept Boston safe was its Irish police department. That's going away.

    The third quarter of 2022 has seen a serious uptick in violence. The mayor is now a Chinese woman, the police chief is now black, and the DA is a black man of the highest yella. Things are headed south.

    What saves Boston, indeed the entire area, are its colleges and universities. In addition to it being one of the most educated areas in the country, the 250K+ students arriving every fall make it an expensive place to live. It keeps the underclass to what the Commonwealth will support.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @BosTex

    I know Boston has a rich history of political corruption, but I never seem to hear anything bad about it in terms of crime and homelessness

    What kept Boston safe was its Irish police department. That’s going away.

    One of the girly mags did an exposé back in the 1970s called “City of Hate”.

    That city was Boston.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Reg Cæsar

    Boston was settled by Puritans. Its most voluble and numerous immigrants were the Irish. Neither group is known for their amiability.

  58. @Brutusale
    @Known Fact

    What kept Boston safe was its Irish police department. That's going away.

    The third quarter of 2022 has seen a serious uptick in violence. The mayor is now a Chinese woman, the police chief is now black, and the DA is a black man of the highest yella. Things are headed south.

    What saves Boston, indeed the entire area, are its colleges and universities. In addition to it being one of the most educated areas in the country, the 250K+ students arriving every fall make it an expensive place to live. It keeps the underclass to what the Commonwealth will support.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @BosTex

    Thanks Brutusale. I always say:

    Colleges and universities plus all the prime healthcare systems happens to be what keeps Boston afloat (the two are closely related).

    You shared a video of mass and case awhile back. Can you share again?

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @BosTex

    Was able to find the link.

    Jesus what a disaster. We actually drove though this mess back in July during a short family vacation to Boston. My wife was aghast.

    This area has always been run down and scruffy, but the quantity of homeless and their degraded behavior is new.

    https://youtu.be/UkxDQJZWREY

  59. @Polistra
    @Mark G.

    When and if you feel like it, I'd enjoy reading your impressions of the Wes Montgomery bio. Simply reply to one of my posts, at your convenience. I'm a big fan of his, but I don't know his back story.

    I'm hoping he wasn't a junkie like so many jazz greats! (I presume not, given the context in which you mentioned him.)

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @Mark G.

    I’m a big fan of his, but I don’t know his back story.

    Wes Montgomery lived in obscurity here in Indianapolis for many years. He had a wife and several children and in order to take care of them worked two jobs. He was a welder by day and at night he played in local jazz clubs in the forties and fifties. All the clubs mentioned in his biography are no longer here in Indianapolis. The author says they all closed later in the sixties when rock replaced jazz as the favorite form of pop music.

    Then one day in 1959 Cannonball Adderley played here at the Indiana theater. During the intermission Wes went up to him and invited him to come see him at the club he was playing in later that night. Later that evening Adderley showed up and sat down in the back of the club. After two songs he moved to the front row. He slumped back and his head tilted back and he looked like someone had just knocked him out. He stayed rooted there the rest of the evening. When Adderley got back to New York he charged into the offices of Riverside Records and announced, “there is this guitarist in Indianapolis you have to get for your label and here is his phone number”. Wes got lucky in finally being discovered and fortunately got to enjoy being famous the last few years of his life.

    • Thanks: Polistra
  60. Mr. Sailer sir.

    Would there be some way to do the crime rates of ALL counties in the USA and measure them by murder rates and % black? It would be interesting to see the comparisons.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anonymouseperson

    There's a problem that the CDC won't report less than 10 murders in any requested category (for privacy reasons -- they don't want nosy people using their database to figuring out their ex-wife's cousin died of something embarrassing). Instead, you just get the word SUPPRESSed. So that leaves out a large fraction of the small counties in the country.

    And there's no way to legibly graph more than about 60 counties at a time.

    Replies: @anonymouseperson

  61. @anonymouseperson
    Mr. Sailer sir.

    Would there be some way to do the crime rates of ALL counties in the USA and measure them by murder rates and % black? It would be interesting to see the comparisons.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    There’s a problem that the CDC won’t report less than 10 murders in any requested category (for privacy reasons — they don’t want nosy people using their database to figuring out their ex-wife’s cousin died of something embarrassing). Instead, you just get the word SUPPRESSed. So that leaves out a large fraction of the small counties in the country.

    And there’s no way to legibly graph more than about 60 counties at a time.

    • Replies: @anonymouseperson
    @Steve Sailer

    Okay. I didn't know any of this. Thank you for that, Mr. Sailer.

  62. @JohnnyWalker123
    @BosTex

    How's Southie these days?

    Replies: @BosTex

    JW123-

    We used to live in Southie, in the Seaport’ section.

    Basically a really nice renovation of the all the wharves and old warehouses that used to be in that section of Southie.

    I am not sure if there has been any other radical changes, but rent has increased tremendously.

    I checked out our old apartment bldg.

    We used to pay just under $3000 per month, no utilities included. 1 and half bedrooms, 800 Sq. That right, 800 sq ft. Nice apartment. This was 2015-2017 timeframe.

    Same apartment is now over $5000 per month. Crazy.

    Yes. Nice neighborhood, paying for location, etc. still just a crazy rent.

    Parking not included.

    As part of moving to Houston, received a significant promotion, but the move was totally with it for other reasons.

    We bought a nice townhouse close to downtown, mortgage payments less than $3000 per month. 3 bedroom, 3.5 baths. 2800 sq feet. attached 2 car garage. Really nice improvement in lifestyle. Built in 2007, but renovated, soup to nuts in 2017.

    Love Boston, through and through, but could never go back given the weather and the cost of living.

    • Thanks: JohnnyWalker123
  63. @BosTex
    @Brutusale

    Thanks Brutusale. I always say:

    Colleges and universities plus all the prime healthcare systems happens to be what keeps Boston afloat (the two are closely related).

    You shared a video of mass and case awhile back. Can you share again?

    Replies: @BosTex

    Was able to find the link.

    Jesus what a disaster. We actually drove though this mess back in July during a short family vacation to Boston. My wife was aghast.

    This area has always been run down and scruffy, but the quantity of homeless and their degraded behavior is new.

  64. @stari_momak
    "Seth Rich wasn’t the last white murder victim in DC, but he’s close."

    Last I checked, a couple of years ago, DC had a really good homicide clearance rate, something like 70%. Yet the Rich murder remains unsolved.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @animalogic

    “Yet the Rich murder remains unsolved.”
    Funny, that…. It’s almost like a political thumb was on the scales.

  65. @Hypnotoad666
    @stari_momak

    Ashley Babitt doesn't count as a "murder" because apparently it's legal in DC to kill an unarmed deplorable woman even when you have no conceivable claim of self-defense. But she's still a "homicide," which makes her, all by herself, over 10% of the whites killed in DC.


    Last I checked, a couple of years ago, DC had a really good homicide clearance rate, something like 70%. Yet the Rich murder remains unsolved.
     
    Does the CDC have a category for Arkancide?

    Replies: @dearieme, @Truth

    …An unarmed deplorable woman, laying siege to the Capital Building while it is in session…

  66. @Steve Sailer
    @anonymouseperson

    There's a problem that the CDC won't report less than 10 murders in any requested category (for privacy reasons -- they don't want nosy people using their database to figuring out their ex-wife's cousin died of something embarrassing). Instead, you just get the word SUPPRESSed. So that leaves out a large fraction of the small counties in the country.

    And there's no way to legibly graph more than about 60 counties at a time.

    Replies: @anonymouseperson

    Okay. I didn’t know any of this. Thank you for that, Mr. Sailer.

  67. @BosTex
    Thanks Steve, great graph!

    Boston is basically “Suffolk, MA” (Suffolk county is Boston + Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop) right around 20% black.

    (Chelsea is mostly Latino and Revere is majority White, but with many Latinos; Winthrop is very white).

    Born and raised in Boston (Dorchester) and lived in the Boston area for total of about 35 years, I have the impression that the Boston Police have traditionally been very responsive and aggressive in how they police all neighborhoods and criminality within the city.

    White, black, Asian, Latino: they are happy to bust your head if you are doing something you shouldn’t be doing.

    The “core” White areas of the city have always been pretty safe (Back Bay, Beacon Hill, North End, South Boston, Charlestown, parts of Dorchester, like Savin Hill, Neponset, Lower Mills, West Roxbury, parts of the South End. I have always thought Allston/Brighton to be questionable, but I will throw them in).

    Bad areas: Roxbury/Mattapan/(regrettably and painfully to me) most of Dorchester.

    These are almost all black areas. My mom used to say: the blacks took these areas and just wrecked them.

    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.

    Every European nationality under the sun,
    Including many Jews.

    Dorchester was same, but would say that Irish Americans predominated, especially in the eastern half. Pretty much all gone as the neighborhoods had more and more blacks.

    Replies: @Larry, San Francisco, @BosTex, @Coemgen, @BosTex, @Masshole, @VivaLaMigra

    Spot on break-down of Boston / Suffolk Co. Kudos!

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Masshole

    Thanks! Lol!

    I think I still forgot a few areas. I got all the major neighborhoods.

    If anyone here gets robbed by a ‘groid in Roxbury at midnight on Blue Hill Ave: t’aint’t my fault.

    (I had a buddy who lived in northern Vermont: would spend half a conversation virtue signaling about blacks—-while living in the whitest section of the whitest state. I would just say: “let me know when you, your wife and daughter take that walk down Blue Hill Ave at Midnight. Let’s see that virtue protect you.)

    He would agree with me that blacks suck…then go back to virtue signaling…

  68. @Masshole
    @BosTex

    Spot on break-down of Boston / Suffolk Co. Kudos!

    Replies: @BosTex

    Thanks! Lol!

    I think I still forgot a few areas. I got all the major neighborhoods.

    If anyone here gets robbed by a ‘groid in Roxbury at midnight on Blue Hill Ave: t’aint’t my fault.

    (I had a buddy who lived in northern Vermont: would spend half a conversation virtue signaling about blacks—-while living in the whitest section of the whitest state. I would just say: “let me know when you, your wife and daughter take that walk down Blue Hill Ave at Midnight. Let’s see that virtue protect you.)

    He would agree with me that blacks suck…then go back to virtue signaling…

  69. @BosTex
    Thanks Steve, great graph!

    Boston is basically “Suffolk, MA” (Suffolk county is Boston + Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop) right around 20% black.

    (Chelsea is mostly Latino and Revere is majority White, but with many Latinos; Winthrop is very white).

    Born and raised in Boston (Dorchester) and lived in the Boston area for total of about 35 years, I have the impression that the Boston Police have traditionally been very responsive and aggressive in how they police all neighborhoods and criminality within the city.

    White, black, Asian, Latino: they are happy to bust your head if you are doing something you shouldn’t be doing.

    The “core” White areas of the city have always been pretty safe (Back Bay, Beacon Hill, North End, South Boston, Charlestown, parts of Dorchester, like Savin Hill, Neponset, Lower Mills, West Roxbury, parts of the South End. I have always thought Allston/Brighton to be questionable, but I will throw them in).

    Bad areas: Roxbury/Mattapan/(regrettably and painfully to me) most of Dorchester.

    These are almost all black areas. My mom used to say: the blacks took these areas and just wrecked them.

    Mattapan and Roxbury had traditionally been very European American “diverse”.

    Every European nationality under the sun,
    Including many Jews.

    Dorchester was same, but would say that Irish Americans predominated, especially in the eastern half. Pretty much all gone as the neighborhoods had more and more blacks.

    Replies: @Larry, San Francisco, @BosTex, @Coemgen, @BosTex, @Masshole, @VivaLaMigra

    Having spent a fair amount of time around Revere and Winthrop, I’d say Winthrop is probably 95% white, but Revere has suffered a severe infestation of Central American gangbangers. They’ve been building high-priced condos like crazy on the beachfront, and those buyers positively loathe the takeover of Revere Beach Blvd by that element on summer weekends, reinforced by the Hispanics pouring in from nearby Chelsea. Tiny Winthrop has elevated property values and limited access. There’s no public parking available at their small, rocky beaches so their residents have thus far been saved.

    As for Dorcester, my family moved out of a triple decker on Talbot Avenue near Codman Square in 1962. The writing was on the wall. The Jews down on Blue Hill Avenue were packing up and moving to Canton and Randolph around that time, too.

  70. The girlfriend and I have been to Bianchi’s on the Beach a couple times recently. The knucklehead ratio on Revere Beach is way down these days. Revere itself has taken on quite a few Cambodians over the past few years.

    Bianchi’s still serves an old-school pie, like Regina’s and Santarpio’s used to!

  71. @Reg Cæsar
    @Brutusale



    I know Boston has a rich history of political corruption, but I never seem to hear anything bad about it in terms of crime and homelessness
     
    What kept Boston safe was its Irish police department. That’s going away.
     
    One of the girly mags did an exposé back in the 1970s called "City of Hate".

    That city was Boston.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Boston was settled by Puritans. Its most voluble and numerous immigrants were the Irish. Neither group is known for their amiability.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The Surprising Elements of Talmudic Judaism
Analyzing the History of a Controversial Movement
Shouldn't they recuse themselves when dealing with the Middle East?
The Shaping Event of Our Modern World
From the Leo Frank Case to the Present Day
The JFK Assassination and the 9/11 Attacks?