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Screenshot 2017-04-08 01.35.22

As I pointed out in VDARE in 2002, the greatest accomplishment by an American woman sculptor is Malvina Hoffman’s spectacular Races of Mankind collection created for Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History Museum.

Now you might think that in an age constantly on the look out for female talent of the past, this would be honored. But from the late 1960s onward, Hoffman’s immense set of over 100 bronzes was broken up and intentionally insulted and denigrated by the museum for ideological reasons, for failing to bow down to the anti-human biodiversity dogmas of the late 20th Century. For example, the life-size 6’8″ Nuer Warrior bronze was displayed down in the basement utility room next to the Penny Squeezer machine.

Lately, the Field Museum has decided to treat Hoffman’s artistry a little more respectfully, but just with lots of printed labels insulting it. From the New York Times:

‘Races of Mankind’ Sculptures, Long Exiled, Return to Display at Chicago’s Field Museum
By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER JAN. 20, 2016

CHICAGO — For decades, the bronzes created by the artist Malvina Hoffman for the Field Museum’s “Races of Mankind” exhibit have had a ghostly afterlife at the institution. Hailed at their unveiling in 1933 as “the finest racial portraiture the world has yet seen” and viewed by millions of visitors, the sculptures were banished to storage in 1969, embarrassing relics of discredited ideas about human difference.

Some were later scattered through the museum, like the Australian aboriginal man who stood guard for a time outside a McDonald’s on the ground floor, minus his original boomerang and spear. But to curators they remained strangely compelling, if troubling, objects.

“When I first came here, I sort of fell in love with them,” Alaka Wali, an anthropologist at the museum, recalled recently. “But there was always debate about what the museum should do with them. They were problematic objects.”

Now the Field Museum has put 50 of the 104 sculptures back on display as part of “Looking at Ourselves: Rethinking the Sculptures of Malvina Hoffman,” an exhibition exploring both Hoffman’s artistry and the vexed history of the dubious scientific ideas that her talent was enlisted to serve. At the time of the bronzes’ creation, many anthropologists believed that the world’s people could be divided into distinct racial types, whose visible differences in skin tone, hair texture and bone structure explained differences in behavior.

It’s an idea, the show makes clear through wall texts and video touch-screen displays, that scientists have abandoned, though hardly one that has entirely gone away.

“It’s not as if just because scientists say race is not a biological fact, that it doesn’t continue to have an impact,” Ms. Wali, who curated the exhibition, said during a tour of the gallery. She stopped near a section discussing the legacy of scientific racism, which includes photographs of Black Lives Matter protests.

“Scientists can now show that human genetic variation doesn’t correspond to racial types,” she said. “But people don’t always listen to scientists.”

People who say that “human genetic variation doesn’t correspond to racial types” aren’t actually scientists speaking scientifically. Look, in this century, there have been a gigantic number of genome studies, and, on net, the’ve overwhelmingly bolstered the general outlook of the old physical anthropologists.

A Nuer man from Sudan and a Tamil man from southeastern India. Commissioned in the 1930s to illustrate racial types, over 100 bronzes by Hoffman were packed away in embarrassment.

Pygmy family

… It was Field who, in 1929, voted with the museum’s board to commission a group of artists to depict the world’s varied “racial types in a dignified manner.” Instead, the whole job went to Hoffman, a New York sculptor who had studied with Rodin, in what The New York Times called “probably the largest commission ever granted any sculptor,” male or female.

Hoffman traveled the world looking for models with her husband, Samuel Grimson, who took thousands of photographs and made film clips of potential subjects. Hoffman, who once studied anatomy by dissecting cadavers alongside medical students, approached the project with a meticulous realism, using different patinas to subtly suggest skin tones.

The “Races” exhibit, which opened in 1933, included both simple busts and elaborate life-size pieces showing people shooting arrows, climbing trees or posing with spears. In the center stood “Unity of Man,” showing noble figures representing what were believed to be the world’s three main racial groups shouldering the globe equally. But its overall thrust — driven home by diagrams showing different nose types and the like — was unmistakable: The world’s peoples could be arranged in a hierarchy, from the primitive to the most civilized.

About 10 million visitors viewed the exhibit over the next three decades, according to the museum, and a show of miniature reproductions traveled the country. But by the 1960s, the scientific theories behind the show had fallen into disrepute. In 1969, the exhibit was dismantled. The Field also halted publication of a “Map of Mankind” based on the exhibit, after receiving a letter from the poet Amiri Baraka (born LeRoi Jones), who denounced it as “white racist pseudo anthropology.”

If you can’t trust Amiri Baraka’s scientific expertise, who can you trust?

Science has shown today that “we share a common ancestry and the differences among people are not as great as they seem,” according to the website for “Race: Are We So Different?” — a traveling exhibition created by the American Anthropological Association.

At the Field, the few permanent exhibits that address human variation focus on cultural differences, like a wall of shoes from around the world that Ms. Wali curated in 1997.

Oh boy …

Commenter Yak-15 adds:

Last year I went to Member’s Day where I was able to see the newly constructed exhibit displaying Hoffman’s statues. While the walls were adorned with anti-hate messages, stories about racism and the KKK, the statues stick out in sharp contrast to the attempted obfuscation of their meaning. It is amazing to see in person.

It is as though the Catholic Church took the bones of Sue (the T-Rex) and made an exhibit showcasing the divine brilliance of God in constructing an elaborate hoax to test mankind’s faith in the Bible’s creationism.

Likewise, in this case, the cultural construct on display is equally beautiful and revealing. The viewer sees the clear differences in the models in all their brilliant biological diversity.

Simultaneously, he confronts the dissonant, conflicting message of the exhibit – that race does not biologically exist. As such, the display is unintentionally meta. The bronze figures are not the center of focus. Rather, it is the spate of extreme measures that arbiters of “social justice” take to defend their worldview in the face of undeniable evidence to the contrary.

In this respect, it is perhaps the most brilliant work of millennial art. I hope people from 50 years will be able to see it in all its glory.

 
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  1. Here is Black Pigeon’s take on Trumps FU .

    • Agree: anonguy
    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @donut

    For argument's sake, let's assume that Black Pigeon's analysis is correct. I've seen a lot of other people around the internet saying essentially the same thing, viz. that this missile attack on Syria was meant to placate the neocons, strike fear into the hearts of Iran and North Korea, dispel any notions of Russian collusion, and distract the public from Trump's domestic policy inaction.

    If anything, that's worse than the other plausible narrative being circulated, that Trump is an emotionally unstable sellout. When did any of these things become an acceptable reason for bombing a third party who had nothing to do with any of it? It angers me that some Trump supporters would be willing to write this all off as a necessary game of N-dimensional chess. When you add on the fact that the original gas attack was pretty clearly a false flag, then this whole episode seems atrocious.

    I am reminded of Trump's first campaign video spot. The one showed a mushroom cloud and a clip of a laughing Vladimir Putin. The same one that Trump quickly took down once the Alt-Right made it clear that they were not interested in campaign messaging demonizing Putin, because we actually like the guy. But a missile attack cannot simply be taken back. Real people are dead now.

    If Trump wanted to send a message, he should have drawn the real "red line" of American nationalism by steadfastly refusing to do anything. He should have made it clear that America will no longer intervene militarily in foreign countries on the flimsiest of pretexts. The ultimate casualty here is Trump's credibility. Whether he is emotionally unstable or playing bloody chess games, he can no longer be trusted.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Rod1963, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Olorin, @donut

  2. Anonymous [AKA "From small sweatshops mighty NASDAQs grow"] says:

    a wall of shoes from around the world that Ms. Wali curated in 1997.

    What’s it called, “E pluribus Payless?”

    • Replies: @CCZ
    @Anonymous

    “E pluribus Payless?” BANKRUPT!!

    Payless seeks bankruptcy court protection, 400 stores to close.
    Kevin McCoy, USA TODAY, Updated April 5, 2017

    “Discount footwear chain Payless ShoeSource sought bankruptcy court protection Tuesday, announcing it will close about 400 stores, including 378 in the U.S., after facing bruising competition from online retailers and other setbacks.

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Anonymous

    "Wall of Shoes"? How derivative. That's been done before. In the 1940s.
    Is she going to do "Box of Dentures" next?

    Replies: @Venator

  3. How about we move the NFL and NBA teams to the locker-rooms and keep them there cuz they trigger notions of different racial types and abilities.

  4. Well the San bowman featured in the above photo was civilized enough to be wearing “tighty whiteties” So anyhow, this is in keeping with last week’s protest that whites should not be allowed to portray people of color in any art form. That is real progress.

  5. But by the 1960s, the scientific theories behind the show had fallen into disrepute.

    Besides, they were too busy with real science like Freudianism.

  6. Amiri Baraka – Who Will Survive America?

    Let us all survive who need to
    We wish each other good luck

    Amiri Baraka “Somebody Blew Up America”

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    @George

    I kind of enjoy Baraka's work. The "in your face" Black Power rhetoric is something that I can relate to, it feels masculine and confident, shockingly different from the contemporary rhetoric of the Left.

    Baraka worked with Sun-Ra, and I am quite the fan of Sun-Ra. Trippy stuff.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s8VZz-ERO0


    Amiri Baraka's son was elected to replace Corey Booker as mayor of Newark, New Jersey.

    Replies: @oddsbodkins, @NOMAN

  7. like a wall of shoes from around the world that Ms. Wali curated in 1997.

    The worst part is how long the 68er generation is going to live and how long they’ll have to work due before retiring. Their influence will be around longer than any human cohort yet seen.

  8. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    The Negro with the dong…

    isn’t that what today’s rap, sports, porn, and advertising all about?

    I don’t get it. It was the Libs who came up with ‘cuckold’ phemon. Alt Right just ran with it.
    Libs push this notion of how Negro stud is masterful and deserve white women.

    NYT even ran an article on it.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/30/magazine/black-male-sexuality-last-taboo.html?_r=0

    But then, we are told ‘race is not real’.

    How long can our culture increasingly get porny in expression and priggish in ideology?

  9. use the shoe exhibit to shod each 1, & add plastic cat eye glasses to make them all seem harmless. & give each one a briefcase. & a white or asian wife. then it’s more PC. b/c it’s the current year.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @egregious philbin

    Might work. Also, to combat stereotypes, show all of them engaged in the least likely activities for them. Have the bushwoman working a slide rule, computing John Glenn's trajectory. Show the white man hunting with a spear. Put the Aztec at the helm of a ship crossing the Atlantic west-to-east. Etc.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

  10. Speaking of shoes, there seems to be a strong correlation with places where flipflops are the dominate footwear and violent brutal death.

  11. Do you know what I find sort of strange?

    America used dead children to justify the recent airstrike on Syria.

    Here was the justification for the first Gulf War back in 1991.

    President HW Bush claimed Saddam Hussein was killing incubator babies in Kuwait. A Kuwaiti girl testifed that she saw this happening. Year later, it was revealed that claim was false and Saddam Hussein never killed any babies. Even more interesting – the Kuwaiti girl turned out to be the Kuwaiti ambassador’s daughter. She was coached by a US-based PR firm.

    Hmmm…………

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    America armed ISIS and Al Qaeda in Syria.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyQLHbHoilE

    I wonder why...........

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Mr. Anon
    @JohnnyWalker123


    Year laters, it was revealed that claim was false and Saddam Hussein never killed any babies.
     
    Saddam Hussein did indeed kill babies. Just not those. Anyway, point taken.
  12. When global thermonuclear WWIII is finished those Pygmies have a decent chance of pressing on alone as inheritors of the earth.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Anonymous


    When global thermonuclear WWIII is finished those Pygmies have a decent chance of pressing on alone as inheritors of the earth.
     
    The midgets shall inherit the earth.

    Replies: @TWS

    , @Senator Brundlefly
    @Anonymous

    That sounds like a really interesting sci-fi concept. An untouched tribe inherits the earth after a nuclear event. They progress to the point where they can discover that an entire civilization once existed and failed.

    Though, thinking about it more, that's kinda what the subplot of the first Planet of the Apes was about. I wished the sequels explored more the whole Dr. Zaius/Cornelius dynamic of covering up history rather than doing the whole bomb-worshiping cult/time travel to the past thing.

  13. @JohnnyWalker123
    Do you know what I find sort of strange?

    America used dead children to justify the recent airstrike on Syria.

    Here was the justification for the first Gulf War back in 1991.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v94WsjWKQ3U

    President HW Bush claimed Saddam Hussein was killing incubator babies in Kuwait. A Kuwaiti girl testifed that she saw this happening. Year later, it was revealed that claim was false and Saddam Hussein never killed any babies. Even more interesting - the Kuwaiti girl turned out to be the Kuwaiti ambassador's daughter. She was coached by a US-based PR firm.

    Hmmm............

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Mr. Anon

    America armed ISIS and Al Qaeda in Syria.

    I wonder why………..

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I hate videos like that, and I ignore them. If they want me to pay attention to what they say, they shouldn't pipe in distracting music over it. If they want me to believe that they are proferring the truth, devoid of sleezy marketing tactics, then they shouldn't use sleezy marketing tactics.

  14. Malvina Hoffman, surely Jewish? The face, the concert pianist father, the milieu in which she moved. I would have thought people would have had more respect for her.

    What has been done to her works is a disgrace.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @Anonym

    Hoffman could also be a (Lutheran) Swedish surname.

    , @Lot
    @Anonym

    Her father wrote church music and was born in Manchester UK, so probably not.

    Hoffman means "land manager" so has a lot of high achieving German and Jewish carriers.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    , @Expletive Deleted
    @Anonym

    Charley Hoffman was out the gate like a boss, and is right up the leaderboard right now. Neither he nor his ginger kid could look less Jewish. More Swede/German, I'd say, but he never takes that damn green cap off, so it's hard to be sure.

  15. That “wall of shoes” quote is a master stroke, bravo. You really can get a lot from quality NYT articles by just rearranging them.

    The article is worth clicking through for more photos of the sculptures. I don’t know if diversity is our strength, but it makes for compelling, moving viewing.

    A thing is beautiful by representing a world. These sculptures represent multiple lost worlds: each figure’s, and our own, from a time when such works and thoughts could be publicly produced and displayed.

    Perhaps diversity is best appreciated from sameness. Can diversity contemplate diversity?

    • Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    @European-American

    In 1969 the teleology of all mankind seems to have been to become a suburban American. As R. Lee Ermey says in Full Metal Jacket:


    Inside every gook is an American waiting to get out.
     
    So if you ignore the HBD issues, what Aristotle would call the Material Cause, then you can try and socially engineer this into reality... or, in a more non-western manner -you are using magic, joojoo, "medicine".

    But why cannot we just let Maasai be Maasai, or Tamil Tamil? Does every Indian have to become a shitty coder looking at porn on his mobile device while living is a sprawling urban slum instead of spending the day following lengthy Hindu rituals his ancestral village?

    Likewise for me: Why do I have to amass debt to live in a pile of Sheetrock filled with plastic from China -why is my "village" so expensive? Why can I not just live in a town with my people, with a pub and a church?

    Because Six Sigma: all human capital must be interchangeable and variability must be eliminated (while diversity is celebrated...)

    Replies: @European-American

  16. Good news. It appears Stephen Bannon is staying.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/white-house/steve-bannon-appears-be-digging-against-storm-bad-press-n744196

    Steve Bannon ‘Ain’t Going Anywhere’ Despite Negative Press: Sources

    Bannon on Saturday attended a meeting with Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and Kushner with the intent of presenting a united front, according to a source familiar with the situation.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/top-trump-aides-said-to-bury-the-hatchet-after-press-reports-of-feud_us_58e979b8e4b058f0a02faec0

    Top White House aides Steve Bannon and Jared Kushner met and agreed to “bury the hatchet” over their differences, a senior administration official said on Saturday, in a bid to stop infighting that has distracted from President Donald Trump’s message.

    Kushner is still in charge though.

    It appears that we’re going to have to wait this out. Donald Trump is very mercurial and could easily change his mind quickly. So Bannon will have to wait for Kushner to fall out of favor.

    Don’t give up on Trump yet.

    • Replies: @European-American
    @JohnnyWalker123

    When did OT posting become the norm? Are all threads going to be hijacked by opinions on the current situation because some people are alarmed that a putsch or WW3 may be just around the corner? Sorry to whine, but I think the topic of this article is worthy.

    Perhaps a current event open thread could be pinned to the top so concerned readers could easily find an outlet without drowning out other topics.

    Or maybe it's ok, comments don't matter much anyway!

    Replies: @Anonym, @Anon, @Harry Baldwin

  17. Here’s a relativistic, diversity-based argument for tolerating racism:

    I bet we’d feel uncomfortable to see a Japanese anthropological display on the subject of European races. It would no doubt in places seem wrong, reductionist, patronizing, alarming, and more… But it might also contain some unsuspected treasures of objectivity, insight, and beauty.

    So, tolerate racism, it’s just another point of view, and in some cases interesting.

    Think it’ll fly? 🙂

    • Replies: @TWS
    @European-American

    They already did that. It was called 'Star Blazers'.

    , @PiltdownMan
    @European-American


    I bet we’d feel uncomfortable to see a Japanese anthropological display on the subject of European races.
     
    What you mean "we", Kemosabe?
  18. @JohnnyWalker123
    Good news. It appears Stephen Bannon is staying.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/white-house/steve-bannon-appears-be-digging-against-storm-bad-press-n744196


    Steve Bannon ‘Ain’t Going Anywhere’ Despite Negative Press: Sources
     

    Bannon on Saturday attended a meeting with Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and Kushner with the intent of presenting a united front, according to a source familiar with the situation.
     
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/top-trump-aides-said-to-bury-the-hatchet-after-press-reports-of-feud_us_58e979b8e4b058f0a02faec0

    Top White House aides Steve Bannon and Jared Kushner met and agreed to “bury the hatchet” over their differences, a senior administration official said on Saturday, in a bid to stop infighting that has distracted from President Donald Trump’s message.
     
    Kushner is still in charge though.

    It appears that we're going to have to wait this out. Donald Trump is very mercurial and could easily change his mind quickly. So Bannon will have to wait for Kushner to fall out of favor.

    Don't give up on Trump yet.

    Replies: @European-American

    When did OT posting become the norm? Are all threads going to be hijacked by opinions on the current situation because some people are alarmed that a putsch or WW3 may be just around the corner? Sorry to whine, but I think the topic of this article is worthy.

    Perhaps a current event open thread could be pinned to the top so concerned readers could easily find an outlet without drowning out other topics.

    Or maybe it’s ok, comments don’t matter much anyway!

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @European-American

    The topic is worthy. But where else do we post TINF information of our own to the hive mind? The occasional open thread is ok but conservative treehouse style daily pinned open thread is the ultimate in gayness, IMO. No, just no. Don't mess with what works.

    , @Anon
    @European-American

    Perhaps that is a partial result of this blog/websites' rather odd way of measuring success by number of comments instead of number of unique visitors, which I've ever seen posted.

    On topic, it saddens me that future generations are going to be fixing the boomer mess for many years to come. It just takes one generation of brainwashing ... and suddenly racism is our original sin, science is all screwed up, and the next in lines' birthright is bestowed upon invaders. Sigh.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @European-American

    OT comments don't bother me as long as they're relevant to the topics generally discussed here. Steve moves along so quickly that if you comment on a thread that appeared two days previously, no one is going to see it as we're all just struggling to keep up.

  19. “there have been a gigantic number of genome studies, and, on net, the’ve overwhelmingly bolstered the general outlook of the old physical anthropologists.”

    Can you point to any that haven’t bolstered the general outlook of the old phys anthems?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Joe, averaged

    Carleton Coon theorized in 1965 that the indigenous Ainu of Japan were semi-Caucasian, like the Laplanders of Finland are semi-Oriental.

    That has not panned out. There are some other theories like that that didn't work out, but mostly Coon's 1965 "Living Races of Man" has stood up to 21st Century genome research.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Lot, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Joe, averaged

  20. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I’m a Tamil man, and as soon as I saw that sculpture of the man climbing a tree I knew that was a Tamil man. The facial structure, the hair, the sinewy body… I’ve seen the exact same sight a hundred times in my childhood, but I doubt I could have even described it in the same exquisite detail that Ms Hoffman has sculpted it. Very impressive that she could pick up little aspects of facial and bodily features of people so different from her.

    Also very interesting to note, from Wikipedia and other sources, that she associated with Vivekananda, the man who brought Yoga to the West.
    http://www.ramakrishna.org/Hoffman/hoffman.htm

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Anonymous

    Excellent comment.

    , @PiltdownMan
    @Anonymous

    A dying breed. Note that the basket the man uses today is identical in form to the one in the sculpture, from almost 80 years ago.

    http://www.livemint.com/Companies/tr7GyPwljjqVUQiVQyDDxL/Past-Present-Future--The-coconut-tree-climber.html

    This book might be of interest to you.

    http://tinyurl.com/lemxb92

  21. The analogy seems unfair to pygmies, to be honest.

  22. Steve, I share your disgust for the science denying oogily-boogily. But keep in mind that Aristarchus of Samos presented the first known model that placed the Sun at the center of the known universe with the Earth revolving around it. His model was rejected in favor of the Aristotle and Ptolemy model. 1700 years later Copernicus corrected the error.

    So, 1700 years to go…

  23. @Joe, averaged
    "there have been a gigantic number of genome studies, and, on net, the’ve overwhelmingly bolstered the general outlook of the old physical anthropologists."

    Can you point to any that haven't bolstered the general outlook of the old phys anthems?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Carleton Coon theorized in 1965 that the indigenous Ainu of Japan were semi-Caucasian, like the Laplanders of Finland are semi-Oriental.

    That has not panned out. There are some other theories like that that didn’t work out, but mostly Coon’s 1965 “Living Races of Man” has stood up to 21st Century genome research.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Steve Sailer

    The most plausible theory regarding the Ainu to me has been that they are Australoid (they share a haplogroup with the Andamanese, for instance). They would have come up through SE Asia, through Taiwan and then to Japan, made easier by land bridges created by the ice age glacial maximums. The Australoids that stayed in Japan became the Ainu, but some of them may have moved on and hugged the Pacific coastline all the way to the Americas.

    , @Lot
    @Steve Sailer

    It is a great book for browsing with lots of photos.

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Steve Sailer

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought Coon's underlying theory was that the major racial groups developed from separate lineages of Homo erectus. He argued that the striking similarities in the facial structures of modern humans in Africa, Asia and Europe with similar features in Homo erctus skulls was not a striking example of convergent evolution but rather proof that the Homo erectus lineages were the precursors of modern human races. This is very much at odds with our current understanding.

    , @Joe, averaged
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks, Steve. Ever since I became an ex-SJW I've been amazed at how little support my old positions had, an how robustly the "wrong" positions were grounded in science.

  24. Never mind the racism, I can’t believe the gross sexism of this exhibit. Note the ‘bushmother’ is caring for the child while the ‘bushfather’ is wielding the bow and arrow. That is a modern invention. Prior to colonialism of course San men and women (as well as other equally represented genders) took turns hunting and sharing equally in child-rearing. Everyone knows this.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    @ziel

    Tacitus was a big fan of "noble savagery", and took particular care to emphasise the carefree improvidence of the Fenni (somewhere up North, beyond the Germans and Sarmatians. Possibly some Saami/Finnic hunter/forager crew). He was shocked, shocked, to have to inform his fellow sophisticates of their outlandish habits.


    The Fenni are strangely beast-like and squalidly poor (also rendered as "horribly wild and disgustingly poor"); neither arms nor homes have they; their food is herbs, their clothing skins, their bed the earth. They trust wholly to their arrows, which, for want of iron, are pointed with bone. The men and the women are alike supplied by the chase; for the latter are always present, and demand a share of the prey. The little children have no shelter from wild beasts and storms but a covering of interlaced boughs. Such are the homes of the young, such the resting place of the old. Yet they count this greater happiness than groaning over field-labour, toiling at building, and poising the fortunes of themselves and others between hope and fear. Heedless of men, heedless of gods, they have attained that hardest of results, the not needing so much as a wish.
     
  25. I’ve long found it interesting that race is the ONLY “social construct” that can be determined by forensic examination of skeletal remains. The other day, I was watching an old “Forensic Files” rerun in which a wealthy businessman turned con artist tried to fake his own death by digging up a corpse from a remote Mexican graveyard and staging an automobile fire; he prized loose one tooth to give to his wife so the authorities could “identify” the body. Well, they just had a few fragments of skull and teeth left to go on, but they sent them to a “leading forensic anthropologist” (sorry, I forget his name), who quickly deduced that the skull fragments and teeth were from a Mongoloid (horrors!), the teeth showed cavities and wear that no American millionaire’s should have, and, of course, the skull sutures were fully closed, causing the anthropologist to determine conclusively that the charred remains were from (and I quote), “an old Mestizo peasant,” and not a 30-something Caucasoid entrepreneur.

    The narrator said that “sometimes” this approach was “useful.” You think?

    So, theoretically, then, you SHOULD be able to tell, from bone fragments and teeth, if a person was Catholic or Protestant (or Muslim), or Republican or Democrat, or any of a number of other “social constructs” like race, right?

    Right?

    • Agree: Federalist
  26. @Steve Sailer
    @Joe, averaged

    Carleton Coon theorized in 1965 that the indigenous Ainu of Japan were semi-Caucasian, like the Laplanders of Finland are semi-Oriental.

    That has not panned out. There are some other theories like that that didn't work out, but mostly Coon's 1965 "Living Races of Man" has stood up to 21st Century genome research.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Lot, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Joe, averaged

    The most plausible theory regarding the Ainu to me has been that they are Australoid (they share a haplogroup with the Andamanese, for instance). They would have come up through SE Asia, through Taiwan and then to Japan, made easier by land bridges created by the ice age glacial maximums. The Australoids that stayed in Japan became the Ainu, but some of them may have moved on and hugged the Pacific coastline all the way to the Americas.

  27. @European-American
    @JohnnyWalker123

    When did OT posting become the norm? Are all threads going to be hijacked by opinions on the current situation because some people are alarmed that a putsch or WW3 may be just around the corner? Sorry to whine, but I think the topic of this article is worthy.

    Perhaps a current event open thread could be pinned to the top so concerned readers could easily find an outlet without drowning out other topics.

    Or maybe it's ok, comments don't matter much anyway!

    Replies: @Anonym, @Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    The topic is worthy. But where else do we post TINF information of our own to the hive mind? The occasional open thread is ok but conservative treehouse style daily pinned open thread is the ultimate in gayness, IMO. No, just no. Don’t mess with what works.

  28. @George
    Amiri Baraka - Who Will Survive America?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJtlzcxBXBo

    Let us all survive who need to
    We wish each other good luck

    Amiri Baraka "Somebody Blew Up America"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUEu-pG1HWw

    Replies: @Clifford Brown

    I kind of enjoy Baraka’s work. The “in your face” Black Power rhetoric is something that I can relate to, it feels masculine and confident, shockingly different from the contemporary rhetoric of the Left.

    Baraka worked with Sun-Ra, and I am quite the fan of Sun-Ra. Trippy stuff.

    Amiri Baraka’s son was elected to replace Corey Booker as mayor of Newark, New Jersey.

    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
    @Clifford Brown

    Space is the Place by Sun-Ra is good if you are a bit drunk or stoned.

    , @NOMAN
    @Clifford Brown

    The film version of his play "Dutchman" is quite a piece of work, worth a look if you've never seen it. The anger expressed in it struck a chord with me that seemed to transcend black-vs.-white (although I realize Baraka hated whites!). Tour-de-force acting, especially by Shirley Knight in her least-characteristic role ever.

  29. I don’t understand why the statues were shunned. That’s what the people looked like, so what’s controversial?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Flip

    What people actually look like is controversial to the left. My wife used to illustrate children's textbooks, and she got instructions not to make African Americans "too" dark, not to make their lips thick, not to make their palms pink, etc.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn, @ben tillman

    , @AnotherDad
    @Flip


    I don’t understand why the statues were shunned. That’s what the people looked like, so what’s controversial?
     
    Exactly. There should be nothing controversial here--at all. Apparently the sculptress did detailed photographic work and the sculptures are in fact accurate representations of human variety, not cartoon stereotypes. But they shunted her beautiful, realistic--scientifically accurate--work off into the basement, in favor of PC platitudes and nonsense.

    You can tell a good deal about the quality of an ideology by how blatant the lying required to propagate it.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    , @Anonymous
    @Flip


    During their [sculpture] lessons, [Rodin] advised [Hoffman], "Do not be afraid of realism". wiki
     

    this collection of bronze figures and heads is a sculptor's interpretation of Humanity, studied from three angles—Art, Science, and Psychology. It represents not only the actual study and work of the past five years, but the result of my observations and study over a period of many years previous to 1930. museum
     
    Well. Into the smelter, then.

    Hoffman sounds like an immensely talented person. High energy. Studying for four years with Rodin, working with Nijinsky and Pavlova, receiving this huge commission directly from Stanley Field during the Depression...
  30. That bronze at the top is quite good. I bet that bowman would make a good pool player.

    • LOL: Kylie
  31. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @European-American
    @JohnnyWalker123

    When did OT posting become the norm? Are all threads going to be hijacked by opinions on the current situation because some people are alarmed that a putsch or WW3 may be just around the corner? Sorry to whine, but I think the topic of this article is worthy.

    Perhaps a current event open thread could be pinned to the top so concerned readers could easily find an outlet without drowning out other topics.

    Or maybe it's ok, comments don't matter much anyway!

    Replies: @Anonym, @Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    Perhaps that is a partial result of this blog/websites’ rather odd way of measuring success by number of comments instead of number of unique visitors, which I’ve ever seen posted.

    On topic, it saddens me that future generations are going to be fixing the boomer mess for many years to come. It just takes one generation of brainwashing … and suddenly racism is our original sin, science is all screwed up, and the next in lines’ birthright is bestowed upon invaders. Sigh.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Anon


    On topic, it saddens me that future generations are going to be fixing the boomer mess for many years to come.
     
    Except that this PC nonsense wasn't started by the Boomers. It was started by the previous generation. You know, the ones who elected LBJ. The ones who pushed the Civil Rights movement. The ones who took over academia for the Left. The ones who gave the Cultural Left a stranglehold on the media. All of these things were achieved by the generation born in the 1925-1945 period.

    If you want a generation to hate then the generation born 1925-1945 is well worthy of your hatred.

    To use this case as an example, the decision to remove the statues because they were racist was made in 1969. The people who made that decision would certainly not have been Boomers.

    What confuses people is that the cultural rot really got going in the 1960s so they blame the Boomers, conveniently overlooking the fact that just about everybody in a position of power and influence during the 60s came from the generation that preceded the Boomers.

    When the Boomers got old enough to have any real influence they elected Reagan.

    Replies: @BB753, @PV van der Byl

  32. CCZ says:
    @Anonymous

    a wall of shoes from around the world that Ms. Wali curated in 1997.
     
    What's it called, "E pluribus Payless?"

    Replies: @CCZ, @Expletive Deleted

    “E pluribus Payless?” BANKRUPT!!

    Payless seeks bankruptcy court protection, 400 stores to close.
    Kevin McCoy, USA TODAY, Updated April 5, 2017

    “Discount footwear chain Payless ShoeSource sought bankruptcy court protection Tuesday, announcing it will close about 400 stores, including 378 in the U.S., after facing bruising competition from online retailers and other setbacks.

  33. Hey speaking of tall, long armed Nuers….

    Minnesota’s class AAA state basketball championship was two weeks ago and featured defending champion DeLeSalle, led by 6’7″ forward Goanar Mar, facing off against an imposing cast of long armed, purple skinned Martians from the small industry town of Austin. Both Gach, Duoth Gach, and Oman Oman were able to make a number of impressive defensive plays, but were inconsistent offensively and went down in defeat 72-44.

    Here are the pictures which prove that this was not some bizarre dream I had:

    http://www.postbulletin.com/sports/high_school/basketball/photos-austin-delasalle-boys-basketball-class-aaa-state-championship/collection_6c7857a0-11ba-11e7-901d-7ba0451100a1.html#1

    • Replies: @Lot
    @Halvorson

    Lots of age fraud here. Goanar is listed as 6-7 as a sophmore and the same height two years later. How many Africans are at their adult height at age 15?

  34. @European-American
    Here's a relativistic, diversity-based argument for tolerating racism:

    I bet we'd feel uncomfortable to see a Japanese anthropological display on the subject of European races. It would no doubt in places seem wrong, reductionist, patronizing, alarming, and more... But it might also contain some unsuspected treasures of objectivity, insight, and beauty.

    So, tolerate racism, it's just another point of view, and in some cases interesting.

    Think it'll fly? :-)

    Replies: @TWS, @PiltdownMan

    They already did that. It was called ‘Star Blazers’.

  35. @Anonymous
    I'm a Tamil man, and as soon as I saw that sculpture of the man climbing a tree I knew that was a Tamil man. The facial structure, the hair, the sinewy body... I've seen the exact same sight a hundred times in my childhood, but I doubt I could have even described it in the same exquisite detail that Ms Hoffman has sculpted it. Very impressive that she could pick up little aspects of facial and bodily features of people so different from her.

    Also very interesting to note, from Wikipedia and other sources, that she associated with Vivekananda, the man who brought Yoga to the West.
    http://www.ramakrishna.org/Hoffman/hoffman.htm

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan

    Excellent comment.

  36. Masters commentary? Much good golf today, more Sunday.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Ivy

    The nerves are the first to go. Spieth and Fowler were hitting the 4, 6, 8 foot putts in a way that looked way better than the older guys. Sergio? Got grit but can't close.

    , @JohnnyGeo
    @Ivy

    I think you mean "Magisters"

    http://www.ricethresher.org/article/2017/04/master-title-changed-to-magister

  37. The quote needs to be rephrased to meet scientific rigor:

    Science has shown today that “we [don’t] share a common ancestry and the differences among people are … as great as they seem,” according to the website for “Race: We Are So Different!” — a traveling exhibition created by the American Anthropological Association.

    Let’s be honest about all this.

  38. @Anonym
    Malvina Hoffman, surely Jewish? The face, the concert pianist father, the milieu in which she moved. I would have thought people would have had more respect for her.

    What has been done to her works is a disgrace.

    Replies: @snorlax, @Lot, @Expletive Deleted

    Hoffman could also be a (Lutheran) Swedish surname.

  39. How do these people make sense of the ubiquitous TV ads for ancestry.com DNA tests?

    Or, conversely, what are these people going to do when a critical mass of the population has participated (or knows someone who participated) in an at-home DNA ancestry test? Wouldn’t they have been on stronger ground acknowledging that there are genetic differences, but these are irrelevant to the question of human dignity?

    • Replies: @anon
    @O'Really


    Wouldn’t they have been on stronger ground acknowledging that there are genetic differences, but these are irrelevant to the question of human dignity?
     
    Why take an intellectually honest position when you project your own anti-scientific bias on to the other side? That sounds, like, hard, man.
  40. @donut
    Here is Black Pigeon's take on Trumps FU .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NU2TapgWl-A

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    For argument’s sake, let’s assume that Black Pigeon’s analysis is correct. I’ve seen a lot of other people around the internet saying essentially the same thing, viz. that this missile attack on Syria was meant to placate the neocons, strike fear into the hearts of Iran and North Korea, dispel any notions of Russian collusion, and distract the public from Trump’s domestic policy inaction.

    If anything, that’s worse than the other plausible narrative being circulated, that Trump is an emotionally unstable sellout. When did any of these things become an acceptable reason for bombing a third party who had nothing to do with any of it? It angers me that some Trump supporters would be willing to write this all off as a necessary game of N-dimensional chess. When you add on the fact that the original gas attack was pretty clearly a false flag, then this whole episode seems atrocious.

    I am reminded of Trump’s first campaign video spot. The one showed a mushroom cloud and a clip of a laughing Vladimir Putin. The same one that Trump quickly took down once the Alt-Right made it clear that they were not interested in campaign messaging demonizing Putin, because we actually like the guy. But a missile attack cannot simply be taken back. Real people are dead now.

    If Trump wanted to send a message, he should have drawn the real “red line” of American nationalism by steadfastly refusing to do anything. He should have made it clear that America will no longer intervene militarily in foreign countries on the flimsiest of pretexts. The ultimate casualty here is Trump’s credibility. Whether he is emotionally unstable or playing bloody chess games, he can no longer be trusted.

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Yes when you add in facts that the Putin Amen Corner pulled out of their asses your argument does seem more compelling.

    There is any set of facts that supports the notion that the Syrian Air Force had nothing to do with the situation. At best that airbase was used to launch unguided bombing attacks on civilian centers which is a war crime. So at best they were war criminals.

    The alt right has yet to come up with a persuasive reason why their kneepad act in front of Putin is any different than the neocons support of Netanyahu.

    Replies: @Bensalem, @Thea, @Mr. Anon

    , @Rod1963
    @Intelligent Dasein

    The more I think of it, what Trump did was really wrong and Sundance's assertions are full of shit.

    Trump screwed up big time. The attack tells me he's not listening to Bannon but others like Kushner and Ivanka who are Democrats and globalists. Hence Bannon being kicked to the side.

    Worse, both Mattis and McMaster are generals who made rank under the Neo-Cons and both have the same views on Russia - our primary enemy. Pence is no better.

    He couldn't have picked a better staff to start WWIII.

    Bottom line, Trump was elected to fix America, not start fights all over the world. His base will only tolerate so much before they turn on him and the GOP. If he pushes for a fight with NK, he's dead meat politically.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Intelligent Dasein

    One of Trump's most persistent campaign promises was that he would extract us from the Syrian mess and certainly not get us deeper into it. Trump's eschewal of "invade the world" was one of the reasons I voted for him. Now he has deserted his base and is embracing the very establishment that so viciously sought to destroy his presidential campaign.

    The snake, Rancid Priebus, is the epitome of the stoopid party establishment and seems to be slithering his way ever deeper into Trump's inner circle. But ultimately I expect it's his loser son-in-law "Daddy bought my way into Harvard" Kushner who's behind Trump's betrayal of his base. He talks and acts like a neocon plant.

    Unless Trump does a one-eighty ASAP, I plan to utterly repudiate him. From what I have seen, heard, and read I suspect that my resolve is is nearly universal within his base. As soon as that base deserts him he is doomed. His current "friends" will instantly turn on him.

    BTW, I suspect that sometime during the presidential campaign or shortly thereafter Trump communicated to the Russians the same position vis-a-vis Syria as he did to his base. The message might well have been that the Russians were doing such a good job eradicating ISIS that there was no need for any US involvement. The Russian response to Trump's unconstitutional and illegal act of war against Syria certainly suggests surprise and shocked outrage. I suspect that even Putin is unaware of the ubiquity and power of neocons and Zionists in the national establishment and the upper reaches of the federal government.

    , @Olorin
    @Intelligent Dasein

    You're in the habit of putting trust in politicians? Even--especially--ones you may have voted for?

    Dude, that's not the US system of government as my ancestors set it up in Philly that time....

    , @donut
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I have tried to reply and agree with you 2 times but the edit button is no longer available . I guess Steve can't afford it . Trump has revealed himself . Unfortunately we have put all our eggs in the wrong basket . He folded so quickly that I have to wonder if that wasn't the plan all along . I would say our only faint hope is to take over the Republican Party , a third party is the wet dream of the "Democrats" . Unfortunately we are just scattered white Americans with no core or center to rally around . So despite the fact that we can win an election for a traitor to our cause we remain powerless in the face of our masters . We are a laughing stock to them as we deserve to be . Have you seen all the youtube videos ? The police were more than happy to ignore left wing violence . They are dogs , low bred mongrels . F**k Blue Lives . White lives matter .

  41. the scientific theories behind the show had fallen into disrepute

    Yes, “Oh boy …”

    OT

    In other news, the Syrian national rugby team is seeking asylum:

    https://twitter.com/nontolerantman/status/850869987896156160

  42. @Anonym
    Malvina Hoffman, surely Jewish? The face, the concert pianist father, the milieu in which she moved. I would have thought people would have had more respect for her.

    What has been done to her works is a disgrace.

    Replies: @snorlax, @Lot, @Expletive Deleted

    Her father wrote church music and was born in Manchester UK, so probably not.

    Hoffman means “land manager” so has a lot of high achieving German and Jewish carriers.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Lot

    Her father wrote church music and was born in Manchester UK, so probably not.

    Apparently there was a lot of German and Jewish immigration to Manchester. So could either be assimilated Jewish or German.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Manchester

    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Lot

    I'm guessing Charlie Hoffman isn't Jewish.

  43. @Steve Sailer
    @Joe, averaged

    Carleton Coon theorized in 1965 that the indigenous Ainu of Japan were semi-Caucasian, like the Laplanders of Finland are semi-Oriental.

    That has not panned out. There are some other theories like that that didn't work out, but mostly Coon's 1965 "Living Races of Man" has stood up to 21st Century genome research.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Lot, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Joe, averaged

    It is a great book for browsing with lots of photos.

  44. @European-American
    @JohnnyWalker123

    When did OT posting become the norm? Are all threads going to be hijacked by opinions on the current situation because some people are alarmed that a putsch or WW3 may be just around the corner? Sorry to whine, but I think the topic of this article is worthy.

    Perhaps a current event open thread could be pinned to the top so concerned readers could easily find an outlet without drowning out other topics.

    Or maybe it's ok, comments don't matter much anyway!

    Replies: @Anonym, @Anon, @Harry Baldwin

    OT comments don’t bother me as long as they’re relevant to the topics generally discussed here. Steve moves along so quickly that if you comment on a thread that appeared two days previously, no one is going to see it as we’re all just struggling to keep up.

  45. @Halvorson
    Hey speaking of tall, long armed Nuers....

    Minnesota's class AAA state basketball championship was two weeks ago and featured defending champion DeLeSalle, led by 6'7" forward Goanar Mar, facing off against an imposing cast of long armed, purple skinned Martians from the small industry town of Austin. Both Gach, Duoth Gach, and Oman Oman were able to make a number of impressive defensive plays, but were inconsistent offensively and went down in defeat 72-44.

    Here are the pictures which prove that this was not some bizarre dream I had:

    http://www.postbulletin.com/sports/high_school/basketball/photos-austin-delasalle-boys-basketball-class-aaa-state-championship/collection_6c7857a0-11ba-11e7-901d-7ba0451100a1.html#1

    Replies: @Lot

    Lots of age fraud here. Goanar is listed as 6-7 as a sophmore and the same height two years later. How many Africans are at their adult height at age 15?

  46. @Lot
    @Anonym

    Her father wrote church music and was born in Manchester UK, so probably not.

    Hoffman means "land manager" so has a lot of high achieving German and Jewish carriers.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Her father wrote church music and was born in Manchester UK, so probably not.

    Apparently there was a lot of German and Jewish immigration to Manchester. So could either be assimilated Jewish or German.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Manchester

  47. @Flip
    I don't understand why the statues were shunned. That's what the people looked like, so what's controversial?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    What people actually look like is controversial to the left. My wife used to illustrate children’s textbooks, and she got instructions not to make African Americans “too” dark, not to make their lips thick, not to make their palms pink, etc.

    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
    @Harry Baldwin

    I've noticed this racial squeamishness in illustration. Non-white phenotypes are depicted as if they have at least one white grandparent. Not just that, but the non-whites are scrupulously middle class, as if stepping from a Gap advert.

    Replies: @res

    , @ben tillman
    @Harry Baldwin


    What people actually look like is controversial to the left.
     
    At lunch today, I saw the most extreme example of steatopygia I have ever seen outside an encyclopedia. The woman's buttocks looked like this:

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/398850110729798442/
  48. @European-American
    Here's a relativistic, diversity-based argument for tolerating racism:

    I bet we'd feel uncomfortable to see a Japanese anthropological display on the subject of European races. It would no doubt in places seem wrong, reductionist, patronizing, alarming, and more... But it might also contain some unsuspected treasures of objectivity, insight, and beauty.

    So, tolerate racism, it's just another point of view, and in some cases interesting.

    Think it'll fly? :-)

    Replies: @TWS, @PiltdownMan

    I bet we’d feel uncomfortable to see a Japanese anthropological display on the subject of European races.

    What you mean “we”, Kemosabe?

  49. @Intelligent Dasein
    @donut

    For argument's sake, let's assume that Black Pigeon's analysis is correct. I've seen a lot of other people around the internet saying essentially the same thing, viz. that this missile attack on Syria was meant to placate the neocons, strike fear into the hearts of Iran and North Korea, dispel any notions of Russian collusion, and distract the public from Trump's domestic policy inaction.

    If anything, that's worse than the other plausible narrative being circulated, that Trump is an emotionally unstable sellout. When did any of these things become an acceptable reason for bombing a third party who had nothing to do with any of it? It angers me that some Trump supporters would be willing to write this all off as a necessary game of N-dimensional chess. When you add on the fact that the original gas attack was pretty clearly a false flag, then this whole episode seems atrocious.

    I am reminded of Trump's first campaign video spot. The one showed a mushroom cloud and a clip of a laughing Vladimir Putin. The same one that Trump quickly took down once the Alt-Right made it clear that they were not interested in campaign messaging demonizing Putin, because we actually like the guy. But a missile attack cannot simply be taken back. Real people are dead now.

    If Trump wanted to send a message, he should have drawn the real "red line" of American nationalism by steadfastly refusing to do anything. He should have made it clear that America will no longer intervene militarily in foreign countries on the flimsiest of pretexts. The ultimate casualty here is Trump's credibility. Whether he is emotionally unstable or playing bloody chess games, he can no longer be trusted.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Rod1963, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Olorin, @donut

    Yes when you add in facts that the Putin Amen Corner pulled out of their asses your argument does seem more compelling.

    There is any set of facts that supports the notion that the Syrian Air Force had nothing to do with the situation. At best that airbase was used to launch unguided bombing attacks on civilian centers which is a war crime. So at best they were war criminals.

    The alt right has yet to come up with a persuasive reason why their kneepad act in front of Putin is any different than the neocons support of Netanyahu.

    • Replies: @Bensalem
    @Sam Haysom

    Are you serious? When Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz, Powell, etc are hung, then we can start talking about other nations' "war criminals." Not one has even been hounded out from public life.

    , @Thea
    @Sam Haysom

    No one has been bombed or invaded by the US military on behalf of Putin.


    The us doesn't benefit from attacking Syria so our government should refrain. How hard is this to understand!

    Are you going to tell me Iraq is a better place since we invaded ?

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Sam Haysom

    "There is any set of facts that supports the notion that the Syrian Air Force had nothing to do with the situation. At best that airbase was used to launch unguided bombing attacks on civilian centers which is a war crime. So at best they were war criminals."

    Acts which the United States did in WWII on a vastly greater scale. And why did you add "unguided"? If they had used a precision munition to blow up a hospital, would that have been better?

    And it is ridiculous of you to talk about a "Putin Amen Corner". If you want to see a chorus shouting "Amen" all at once, just take a look at the response by the media and political establishment to Trump's attack. Clearly, they think that they're getting the band back together for another round of ill-defined and open-ended warring in the middle east on behalf of a whole raft of interests, none of them that of the american people.

    We've heard your kind of war-whoring for sixteen years now. It is - as it ever was - tendentious horseshit.

  50. @Intelligent Dasein
    @donut

    For argument's sake, let's assume that Black Pigeon's analysis is correct. I've seen a lot of other people around the internet saying essentially the same thing, viz. that this missile attack on Syria was meant to placate the neocons, strike fear into the hearts of Iran and North Korea, dispel any notions of Russian collusion, and distract the public from Trump's domestic policy inaction.

    If anything, that's worse than the other plausible narrative being circulated, that Trump is an emotionally unstable sellout. When did any of these things become an acceptable reason for bombing a third party who had nothing to do with any of it? It angers me that some Trump supporters would be willing to write this all off as a necessary game of N-dimensional chess. When you add on the fact that the original gas attack was pretty clearly a false flag, then this whole episode seems atrocious.

    I am reminded of Trump's first campaign video spot. The one showed a mushroom cloud and a clip of a laughing Vladimir Putin. The same one that Trump quickly took down once the Alt-Right made it clear that they were not interested in campaign messaging demonizing Putin, because we actually like the guy. But a missile attack cannot simply be taken back. Real people are dead now.

    If Trump wanted to send a message, he should have drawn the real "red line" of American nationalism by steadfastly refusing to do anything. He should have made it clear that America will no longer intervene militarily in foreign countries on the flimsiest of pretexts. The ultimate casualty here is Trump's credibility. Whether he is emotionally unstable or playing bloody chess games, he can no longer be trusted.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Rod1963, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Olorin, @donut

    The more I think of it, what Trump did was really wrong and Sundance’s assertions are full of shit.

    Trump screwed up big time. The attack tells me he’s not listening to Bannon but others like Kushner and Ivanka who are Democrats and globalists. Hence Bannon being kicked to the side.

    Worse, both Mattis and McMaster are generals who made rank under the Neo-Cons and both have the same views on Russia – our primary enemy. Pence is no better.

    He couldn’t have picked a better staff to start WWIII.

    Bottom line, Trump was elected to fix America, not start fights all over the world. His base will only tolerate so much before they turn on him and the GOP. If he pushes for a fight with NK, he’s dead meat politically.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Rod1963


    Worse, both Mattis and McMaster are generals who made rank under the Neo-Cons and both have the same views on Russia – our primary enemy. Pence is no better.
     
    Maybe some truth in that but if so all it means is personnel who want all three of
    - controlled labor supply
    - balanced trade and rebuilding the domestic economy
    - less intervention
    aren't available among the upper echelons in sufficient quantity to fill an administration.

    This may only apply to the "less intervention" part or it may (probably/possibly) relate to the other two as well - we shall see.

    He couldn’t have picked a better staff to start WWIII.
     
    Sure he could. That's the scary part - the current administration is the least likely to start WWIII and it's still 50/50.

    Clinton would have set it in motion already because her and a no-fly zone would have told the Russians there was no possibility of the US developing brakes.
  51. @egregious philbin
    use the shoe exhibit to shod each 1, & add plastic cat eye glasses to make them all seem harmless. & give each one a briefcase. & a white or asian wife. then it's more PC. b/c it's the current year.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Might work. Also, to combat stereotypes, show all of them engaged in the least likely activities for them. Have the bushwoman working a slide rule, computing John Glenn’s trajectory. Show the white man hunting with a spear. Put the Aztec at the helm of a ship crossing the Atlantic west-to-east. Etc.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @International Jew


    Also, to combat stereotypes, show all of them engaged in the least likely activities for them.
     
    Hollywood does this all the time.

    Have the bushwoman working a slide rule, computing John Glenn’s trajectory.
     
    https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-TOsjHX1XMKI/WHZvW3iypZI/AAAAAAAAqYU/1O-JCsCMlwU-IBttZmv-_OLHn67K21aiQCLcB/s1600/hidden%2Bfigures.png

    Show the white man hunting with a spear.
     
    http://d3domination.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/arnold_conan_barbarian_spear_sword.jpg

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

  52. In just one day of Trump Sell Out News:

    Nikki Haley endorses Syria Regime Change

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/08/politics/nikki-haley-syria-interview-sotu-cnntv/

    Trump appoints Bushie idiot Kevin “Dow 36,000” Hassett as his chief economic advisor. Hassett belives in free trade and called for doubling immigration over Obama levels

    https://ftalphaville.ft.com/2017/04/07/2187127/trump-appoints-pro-immigration-free-trader-as-cea-chair/

    And like every day of Trump’s presidency, a few hundred work permits issued to illegal aliens under DACA.

  53. @Sam Haysom
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Yes when you add in facts that the Putin Amen Corner pulled out of their asses your argument does seem more compelling.

    There is any set of facts that supports the notion that the Syrian Air Force had nothing to do with the situation. At best that airbase was used to launch unguided bombing attacks on civilian centers which is a war crime. So at best they were war criminals.

    The alt right has yet to come up with a persuasive reason why their kneepad act in front of Putin is any different than the neocons support of Netanyahu.

    Replies: @Bensalem, @Thea, @Mr. Anon

    Are you serious? When Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz, Powell, etc are hung, then we can start talking about other nations’ “war criminals.” Not one has even been hounded out from public life.

  54. @Clifford Brown
    @George

    I kind of enjoy Baraka's work. The "in your face" Black Power rhetoric is something that I can relate to, it feels masculine and confident, shockingly different from the contemporary rhetoric of the Left.

    Baraka worked with Sun-Ra, and I am quite the fan of Sun-Ra. Trippy stuff.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s8VZz-ERO0


    Amiri Baraka's son was elected to replace Corey Booker as mayor of Newark, New Jersey.

    Replies: @oddsbodkins, @NOMAN

    Space is the Place by Sun-Ra is good if you are a bit drunk or stoned.

  55. OT: Interesting hard-headed piece in National Affairs by Amy Wax, whom you’ve written about before.

  56. @Sam Haysom
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Yes when you add in facts that the Putin Amen Corner pulled out of their asses your argument does seem more compelling.

    There is any set of facts that supports the notion that the Syrian Air Force had nothing to do with the situation. At best that airbase was used to launch unguided bombing attacks on civilian centers which is a war crime. So at best they were war criminals.

    The alt right has yet to come up with a persuasive reason why their kneepad act in front of Putin is any different than the neocons support of Netanyahu.

    Replies: @Bensalem, @Thea, @Mr. Anon

    No one has been bombed or invaded by the US military on behalf of Putin.

    The us doesn’t benefit from attacking Syria so our government should refrain. How hard is this to understand!

    Are you going to tell me Iraq is a better place since we invaded ?

  57. Last year I went to Member’s Day where I was able to see the newly constructed exhibit displaying Hoffman’s statues. While the walls were adorned with anti-hate messages, stories about racism and the KKK, the statues stick out in sharp contrast to the attempted obfuscation of their meaning. It is amazing to see in person.

    It is as though the Catholic Church took the bones of Sue (the T-Rex) and made an exhibit showcasing the divine brilliance of God in constructing an elaborate hoax to test mankind’s faith in the Bible’s creationism.

    Likewise, in this case, the cultural construct on display is equally beautiful and revealing. The viewer sees the clear differences in the models in all their brilliant biological diversity.

    Simultaneously, he confronts the dissonant, conflicting message of the exhibit – that race does not biologically exist. As such, the display is unintentionally meta. The bronze figures are not the center of focus. Rather, it is the spate of extreme measures that arbiters of “social justice” take to defend their worldview in the face of undeniable evidence to the contrary.

    In this respect, it is perhaps the most brilliant work of millennial art. I hope people from 50 years will be able to see it in all its glory.

    • Replies: @res
    @Yak-15


    As such, the display is unintentionally meta. The bronze figures are not the center of focus. Rather, it is the spate of extreme measures that arbiters of “social justice” take to defend their worldview in the face of undeniable evidence to the contrary.

    In this respect, it is perhaps the most brilliant work of millennial art.
     
    I wonder how many of the people who created (or visited) the exhibit saw this?

    Replies: @Yak-15

    , @Anonymous
    @Yak-15

    The Catholic Church is not fundamentalist and it does not teach biblical-literalist creationism. See http://www.pewforum.org/2009/02/04/religious-groups-views-on-evolution/.

    A misfiring analogy always damages an otherwise great argument.

  58. @International Jew
    @egregious philbin

    Might work. Also, to combat stereotypes, show all of them engaged in the least likely activities for them. Have the bushwoman working a slide rule, computing John Glenn's trajectory. Show the white man hunting with a spear. Put the Aztec at the helm of a ship crossing the Atlantic west-to-east. Etc.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    Also, to combat stereotypes, show all of them engaged in the least likely activities for them.

    Hollywood does this all the time.

    Have the bushwoman working a slide rule, computing John Glenn’s trajectory.

    Show the white man hunting with a spear.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Stan Adams

    The movie is absurd but that still of the Negro woman at the blackboard is LOL funny. I've seen actual photos of these women at work. They are seated at small standard-issue government desks with the old electro-mechanical Frieden calculators front and center. During my undergraduate years in the late 1960s I worked in a variety of scientific and engineering facilities, e.g. modifying CERN programs in a high energy physics lab and writing code for FFTs in an engineering firm. My experience was that the people with those Frieden calculators on their desks were at best glorified data entry clerks. Their usual tasks were to enter numbers into formulas they were given and compute results. The staff who did this usually had little competence beyond high school mathematics. Usually two or more would be assigned the same tasks and supervisors would compare results to detect and correct errors. Remember, these women got their BAs from colleges which, to put it kindly, didn't have sterling academic credentials.

  59. @Anon
    @European-American

    Perhaps that is a partial result of this blog/websites' rather odd way of measuring success by number of comments instead of number of unique visitors, which I've ever seen posted.

    On topic, it saddens me that future generations are going to be fixing the boomer mess for many years to come. It just takes one generation of brainwashing ... and suddenly racism is our original sin, science is all screwed up, and the next in lines' birthright is bestowed upon invaders. Sigh.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    On topic, it saddens me that future generations are going to be fixing the boomer mess for many years to come.

    Except that this PC nonsense wasn’t started by the Boomers. It was started by the previous generation. You know, the ones who elected LBJ. The ones who pushed the Civil Rights movement. The ones who took over academia for the Left. The ones who gave the Cultural Left a stranglehold on the media. All of these things were achieved by the generation born in the 1925-1945 period.

    If you want a generation to hate then the generation born 1925-1945 is well worthy of your hatred.

    To use this case as an example, the decision to remove the statues because they were racist was made in 1969. The people who made that decision would certainly not have been Boomers.

    What confuses people is that the cultural rot really got going in the 1960s so they blame the Boomers, conveniently overlooking the fact that just about everybody in a position of power and influence during the 60s came from the generation that preceded the Boomers.

    When the Boomers got old enough to have any real influence they elected Reagan.

    • Agree: Kylie, PV van der Byl
    • Replies: @BB753
    @dfordoom

    You're overlooking the fact that the Boomers were the shock-troops of those changes brought about by the Greatest Generation. They didn't oppose the cultural revolution and were all too eager to fill the power vacuum left by the purged or fleeing WASP'S

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @PV van der Byl
    @dfordoom

    Excellent comment. And everything in your comment also applies to Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. The rot in the UK may have set in more with those born in the 1900-1920 period.

  60. @Anonymous
    I'm a Tamil man, and as soon as I saw that sculpture of the man climbing a tree I knew that was a Tamil man. The facial structure, the hair, the sinewy body... I've seen the exact same sight a hundred times in my childhood, but I doubt I could have even described it in the same exquisite detail that Ms Hoffman has sculpted it. Very impressive that she could pick up little aspects of facial and bodily features of people so different from her.

    Also very interesting to note, from Wikipedia and other sources, that she associated with Vivekananda, the man who brought Yoga to the West.
    http://www.ramakrishna.org/Hoffman/hoffman.htm

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @PiltdownMan

    A dying breed. Note that the basket the man uses today is identical in form to the one in the sculpture, from almost 80 years ago.

    http://www.livemint.com/Companies/tr7GyPwljjqVUQiVQyDDxL/Past-Present-Future–The-coconut-tree-climber.html

    This book might be of interest to you.

    http://tinyurl.com/lemxb92

  61. @Harry Baldwin
    @Flip

    What people actually look like is controversial to the left. My wife used to illustrate children's textbooks, and she got instructions not to make African Americans "too" dark, not to make their lips thick, not to make their palms pink, etc.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn, @ben tillman

    I’ve noticed this racial squeamishness in illustration. Non-white phenotypes are depicted as if they have at least one white grandparent. Not just that, but the non-whites are scrupulously middle class, as if stepping from a Gap advert.

    • Replies: @res
    @TelfoedJohn

    It is hard to argue we are all alike when presented with such graphic evidence to the contrary. Like this exhibit.

  62. @European-American
    That "wall of shoes" quote is a master stroke, bravo. You really can get a lot from quality NYT articles by just rearranging them.

    The article is worth clicking through for more photos of the sculptures. I don't know if diversity is our strength, but it makes for compelling, moving viewing.

    A thing is beautiful by representing a world. These sculptures represent multiple lost worlds: each figure's, and our own, from a time when such works and thoughts could be publicly produced and displayed.

    Perhaps diversity is best appreciated from sameness. Can diversity contemplate diversity?

    Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel

    In 1969 the teleology of all mankind seems to have been to become a suburban American. As R. Lee Ermey says in Full Metal Jacket:

    Inside every gook is an American waiting to get out.

    So if you ignore the HBD issues, what Aristotle would call the Material Cause, then you can try and socially engineer this into reality… or, in a more non-western manner -you are using magic, joojoo, “medicine”.

    But why cannot we just let Maasai be Maasai, or Tamil Tamil? Does every Indian have to become a shitty coder looking at porn on his mobile device while living is a sprawling urban slum instead of spending the day following lengthy Hindu rituals his ancestral village?

    Likewise for me: Why do I have to amass debt to live in a pile of Sheetrock filled with plastic from China -why is my “village” so expensive? Why can I not just live in a town with my people, with a pub and a church?

    Because Six Sigma: all human capital must be interchangeable and variability must be eliminated (while diversity is celebrated…)

    • Replies: @European-American
    @Je Suis Charlie Martel

    > all human capital must be interchangeable
    > and variability must be eliminated (while diversity is celebrated…)

    It seems like an effort doomed to fail. Like trying to optimize globally, instead of optimizing locally in various specific situations. Like saying, "I'm going to find the secret about what makes all good music good" instead of focusing on what makes specific musical genres good. Like trying to isolate what makes all good foods good, and then relentlessly applying that everywhere, instead of studying separately what makes good pizza, wine, ice cream, roast lamb, wontons, etc. Sure, maybe you'll find some good practices relating to quality, attention to detail, good ingredients... Won't you lose a lot if you try to make everything fit excessively abstracted principles? Like trying to make the best toaster-computer-camera-nailclipper rather than making excellent versions of each of the tools.

    And yes, it's that paradox: we value diversity, while at the same time ruthlessly rooting it out.

    It's just bonkers.

    And it's hardly different from the attitudes that gave us the dumbest forms of colonialism and proselytizing Christianity.

    And it's like colonizing the world on behalf of... no one. Ardently proselytizing in the name of... Nothing.

  63. @Ivy
    Masters commentary? Much good golf today, more Sunday.

    Replies: @anon, @JohnnyGeo

    The nerves are the first to go. Spieth and Fowler were hitting the 4, 6, 8 foot putts in a way that looked way better than the older guys. Sergio? Got grit but can’t close.

  64. OT, sorry E-A,

    As we all know by now, if one is targeting the Ivies, one must carefully choose his parents …

    and his siblings as well.

    • Replies: @a reader
    @a reader

    Please note (next to last paragraph) the brightest of the brothers Aaron, the musician, said he was among the top 25 students in his class.

    Out of 25 students?

    (I follow Mr. Sailer's advice to read till the end.)

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @res, @International Jew, @AnotherDad

  65. Why is this even controversial? Implying there is a diversity of human forms does not necessarily imply hierarchy. Despite whatever personal opinions one may have, from the unfeeling, agnostic view of nature (and I think this should be the general tenor of a natural history museum) there is no “paragon of animals”. There is no great chain of being. There are simply animals that exist because they are well suited to their environment at that particular time. Just present humans the same way you would the dinosaurs or the taxidermy animals. Here’s how they are. Though, I guess there’s always a bit of bias. By presenting the two FDR elephants and Sue (and, before her, a big ol’ brachiosaurus) in the main hall, you kinda imply some animals are more equal than others. Plus, much as I love them and view them as cultural treasures, keeping all the old Charles R. Knight tail dragging lizard artwork in the dinosaur hall kinda biases one towards the “evolutionary dead-end they had it coming” view of natural history.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Senator Brundlefly


    Why is this even controversial?
     
    Two reasons.

    One - Baas, cultural marxism etc - intended to change US immigration laws

    Two - people tend to prefer their own phenotype so hajnal nicewhites look at those statues, feel mildly racist (aka genetic self-love) and then feel guilty about it afterwards because of their centuries of universalist bio-engineering -> conflicted nature
    , @David Davenport
    @Senator Brundlefly

    Why is this even controversial? Implying there is a diversity of human forms does not necessarily imply hierarchy.

    Are you sure about that?

    Replies: @Senator Brundlefly

  66. @a reader
    OT, sorry E-A,

    As we all know by now, if one is targeting the Ivies, one must carefully choose his parents ...

    ...and his siblings as well.

    Replies: @a reader

    Please note (next to last paragraph) the brightest of the brothers Aaron, the musician, said he was among the top 25 students in his class.

    Out of 25 students?

    (I follow Mr. Sailer’s advice to read till the end.)

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @a reader

    Not quite sure what you meant here, but U.S. News and World Report has this to say about the Wade quadruplets' high school, Lakota East: https://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/ohio/districts/lakota-local/lakota-east-high-school-15440

    Note that for grades 9-12, "total enrollment" is listed at 2,538. That averages to about 635 per class. Even if that figure has declined to, say, 600 by senior year (grade 12), Aaron's statement that he is among the top 25 students in his [graduating] class puts him...among the top 5% of that class.

    , @res
    @a reader

    They also said (in the same paragraph): "their ACT scores range from the 94th to the 99th percentile." That's surprisingly specific in my experience of this type of article and probably indicates they are good students (though I suspect Asian quads with those scores etc. would not have the same admissions outcomes).

    One thing that strikes me as odd is the current ACT percentiles don't show a score corresponding to 94%: http://blog.prepscholar.com/act-percentiles-high-precision-2016

    Some other interesting bits from the article:


    In a clever stroke, the four brothers wrote essays that can be read separately, yet are meant to be read together, like four pieces of a puzzle. Each piece is charming and winning on its own, but together, they are even better, and college admissions officers everywhere seemed to agree and were unwilling to pull them apart.
     

    The Wade quads are “fertility babies,” conceived through a fertility procedure, a growing part of the college-age population.
     

    their father, Darrin Wade, a software architect for General Electric, would punish disciplinary infractions like lying by making them do situps and push-ups and run around the block. He and their mother, Kim, a school principal, also had them do word puzzles, memorize math tables and write book reports at home from a young age.
    ...
    The Wade parents met in math class at Jackson State University
     

    So far, Yale has given them the best financial aid deal, they said, and has assiduously courted them, offering to fly them to New Haven to visit the campus, something they could not afford to do before they were accepted. (Yale admitted another set of African-American quadruplets, two boys and two girls, in 2010.)
     
    So it appears the Ivies are actually adhering to their agreement not to conspire on financial aid offers...
    Does anyone have numbers or other examples of multiple siblings admitted to the same Ivy class? For schools that admit <10% of their students that is a lot of admission slots to devote to one family (what about diversity!).
    , @International Jew
    @a reader

    The brothers look remarkably different from one another! Even if they originated in four different ova, you'd expect more of a resemblance.

    Could the whole thing be a joke?

    , @AnotherDad
    @a reader


    Please note (next to last paragraph) the brightest of the brothers Aaron, the musician, said he was among the top 25 students in his class.

    Out of 25 students?
     
    No out of something like 600 students.

    Lakota East is a huge suburban high school north of Cincinnati (along I75 toward before you get to Middletown). It was just "Lakota HS" when I was in HS back in the 70s. (I lived about 10 miles SW as the crow flies in Greenhills). But that area was already booming back then and I guess at some point they split into East and West. (I looked it up on Great Schools--2600 kids; 80% white, 8% black.)

    Being 25th best in these huge suburban high schools is an excellent achievement. There are a ton of strivers at these places. They are where most of America's smart kids are from. My older two kids were "top of their class" with 4.0s in their big suburban HS (400-500 class size), but they shared that with 10-15 other kids. You can get a single B+ ... you're immediately borderline on being bumped from the top 5%.

    I was actually somewhat surprised, that the one kid had rejections from a couple of 2nd tier schools, Northwestern and Tulane. They claim the weakest of the boys was 94%tile. Sure that's not top tier and there are about--back of envelope with 2m kids college bound--120,000 kids a year with better scores. But *very* few of those are African-American, probably 1000-2000. And there are quotas to fill. This is a chronic problem: finding enough *quality* blacks to fill the desired--innumerate--AA quota. The Caribbean and African immigrants and half-castes must have really ramped up and be satisfying most of the desired "diversity" levels, for any of these boys to get any rejections outside HYPS. (Assuming the numbers given are accurate.) (Of course Northwestern and Tulane are both places where there's a lot of local blacks-made-good who they feel duty bound to take.)

    The reality is if these boys were even at all representative--even just representative of the top 5% of blacks, instead of the top 1%--we wouldn't have the race problems we have today. Unfortunately black young men like them are exceedingly rare.
  67. @Anonymous

    a wall of shoes from around the world that Ms. Wali curated in 1997.
     
    What's it called, "E pluribus Payless?"

    Replies: @CCZ, @Expletive Deleted

    “Wall of Shoes”? How derivative. That’s been done before. In the 1940s.
    Is she going to do “Box of Dentures” next?

    • Replies: @Venator
    @Expletive Deleted

    Ok, hate me, sue me, or jail me, but I loled.

  68. I knew Amiri Baraka when he was Leroy Jones, married to Hetty Cohen, and living in wonderful floor-through apt in Chelsea and giving great parties in the mid-50s. Knew him well enough to go to his parties. Years later living in Austin Texas I wrote him a letter with the jazz section of a Goodie’s record catalog torn out asking for jazz record recommendations. In time, he sent it back with check marks next to around 25 albums. No personal communication other than checkmarks. Which I bought and got up to speed on straight-ahead classic 50s-60s instrumental jazz. I didn’t that much like the Sam Cooke album in the check list. Leroy wrote interesting avant-garde plays like Toilet and Subway both of which I got to see a production of. And was a not bad poet. He was into little magazines of poetry, editing or co-editing Yurgen, F You, a Magazine of the Arts, and others. Not that bad of a poet. In the 60s he went crazy, moved to Harlem, no longer to be seen at the Cedar Bar, acquired bodyguards. Gil Sorrentino told a funny story then when as an editor at Grove Press, Leroy came by the office on biz and Gil suggested they host a few at the Cedar. Leroy dismissed the bodyguards and indeed Gil & Leroy went to the Cedar. Other anecdote: at the Cedar, Leroy recounting to Cubby Selby of Last Stop to Brooklyn fame how some publisher took him to lunch in a limousine and suddenly turned the a/c on. Leroy acted out cowering before the blast of air and said something about extermination camps. Cubby laughed and said yur not a jew. I think Cubby meant for me to overhear the remark.

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @Anonymouse

    Last Exit to Brooklyn.

    Suggested to Cubby by Fred Seagal, who taught high school biology in Bayside, NY. Fred, a habitue of Gil Sorrentino's poets coven in Gil's cheapo apt near Foster ave. Seagal, frequently driving home through the mid-town tunnel came out on the Brooklyn side onto the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway where indeed there was a sign with the title of Cubby's book, later a movie.

  69. @Anonym
    Malvina Hoffman, surely Jewish? The face, the concert pianist father, the milieu in which she moved. I would have thought people would have had more respect for her.

    What has been done to her works is a disgrace.

    Replies: @snorlax, @Lot, @Expletive Deleted

    Charley Hoffman was out the gate like a boss, and is right up the leaderboard right now. Neither he nor his ginger kid could look less Jewish. More Swede/German, I’d say, but he never takes that damn green cap off, so it’s hard to be sure.

  70. @ziel
    Never mind the racism, I can't believe the gross sexism of this exhibit. Note the 'bushmother' is caring for the child while the 'bushfather' is wielding the bow and arrow. That is a modern invention. Prior to colonialism of course San men and women (as well as other equally represented genders) took turns hunting and sharing equally in child-rearing. Everyone knows this.

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    Tacitus was a big fan of “noble savagery”, and took particular care to emphasise the carefree improvidence of the Fenni (somewhere up North, beyond the Germans and Sarmatians. Possibly some Saami/Finnic hunter/forager crew). He was shocked, shocked, to have to inform his fellow sophisticates of their outlandish habits.

    The Fenni are strangely beast-like and squalidly poor (also rendered as “horribly wild and disgustingly poor”); neither arms nor homes have they; their food is herbs, their clothing skins, their bed the earth. They trust wholly to their arrows, which, for want of iron, are pointed with bone. The men and the women are alike supplied by the chase; for the latter are always present, and demand a share of the prey. The little children have no shelter from wild beasts and storms but a covering of interlaced boughs. Such are the homes of the young, such the resting place of the old. Yet they count this greater happiness than groaning over field-labour, toiling at building, and poising the fortunes of themselves and others between hope and fear. Heedless of men, heedless of gods, they have attained that hardest of results, the not needing so much as a wish.

  71. @Anonymouse
    I knew Amiri Baraka when he was Leroy Jones, married to Hetty Cohen, and living in wonderful floor-through apt in Chelsea and giving great parties in the mid-50s. Knew him well enough to go to his parties. Years later living in Austin Texas I wrote him a letter with the jazz section of a Goodie's record catalog torn out asking for jazz record recommendations. In time, he sent it back with check marks next to around 25 albums. No personal communication other than checkmarks. Which I bought and got up to speed on straight-ahead classic 50s-60s instrumental jazz. I didn't that much like the Sam Cooke album in the check list. Leroy wrote interesting avant-garde plays like Toilet and Subway both of which I got to see a production of. And was a not bad poet. He was into little magazines of poetry, editing or co-editing Yurgen, F You, a Magazine of the Arts, and others. Not that bad of a poet. In the 60s he went crazy, moved to Harlem, no longer to be seen at the Cedar Bar, acquired bodyguards. Gil Sorrentino told a funny story then when as an editor at Grove Press, Leroy came by the office on biz and Gil suggested they host a few at the Cedar. Leroy dismissed the bodyguards and indeed Gil & Leroy went to the Cedar. Other anecdote: at the Cedar, Leroy recounting to Cubby Selby of Last Stop to Brooklyn fame how some publisher took him to lunch in a limousine and suddenly turned the a/c on. Leroy acted out cowering before the blast of air and said something about extermination camps. Cubby laughed and said yur not a jew. I think Cubby meant for me to overhear the remark.

    Replies: @Anonymouse

    Last Exit to Brooklyn.

    Suggested to Cubby by Fred Seagal, who taught high school biology in Bayside, NY. Fred, a habitue of Gil Sorrentino’s poets coven in Gil’s cheapo apt near Foster ave. Seagal, frequently driving home through the mid-town tunnel came out on the Brooklyn side onto the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway where indeed there was a sign with the title of Cubby’s book, later a movie.

  72. HBD aside the sculptures look fantastic.

  73. @Anonymous
    When global thermonuclear WWIII is finished those Pygmies have a decent chance of pressing on alone as inheritors of the earth.

    Replies: @anon, @Senator Brundlefly

    When global thermonuclear WWIII is finished those Pygmies have a decent chance of pressing on alone as inheritors of the earth.

    The midgets shall inherit the earth.

    • Replies: @TWS
    @anon

    There are no unmixed pygmies left. They will be bred out of existence soon.

  74. @dfordoom
    @Anon


    On topic, it saddens me that future generations are going to be fixing the boomer mess for many years to come.
     
    Except that this PC nonsense wasn't started by the Boomers. It was started by the previous generation. You know, the ones who elected LBJ. The ones who pushed the Civil Rights movement. The ones who took over academia for the Left. The ones who gave the Cultural Left a stranglehold on the media. All of these things were achieved by the generation born in the 1925-1945 period.

    If you want a generation to hate then the generation born 1925-1945 is well worthy of your hatred.

    To use this case as an example, the decision to remove the statues because they were racist was made in 1969. The people who made that decision would certainly not have been Boomers.

    What confuses people is that the cultural rot really got going in the 1960s so they blame the Boomers, conveniently overlooking the fact that just about everybody in a position of power and influence during the 60s came from the generation that preceded the Boomers.

    When the Boomers got old enough to have any real influence they elected Reagan.

    Replies: @BB753, @PV van der Byl

    You’re overlooking the fact that the Boomers were the shock-troops of those changes brought about by the Greatest Generation. They didn’t oppose the cultural revolution and were all too eager to fill the power vacuum left by the purged or fleeing WASP’S

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @BB753


    You’re overlooking the fact that the Boomers were the shock-troops of those changes brought about by the Greatest Generation. They didn’t oppose the cultural revolution and were all too eager to fill the power vacuum left by the purged or fleeing WASP’S
     
    Sure. Every generation has made its contribution. Including the Boomers and Gen-X and the Millennials. My point was that the biggest contribution was made by the generation born between 1925 and 1945 - they are the ones who made the initial breakthrough, smashing the defences of our civilisation. And during the 60s and 70s they served as the generals directing the Culture War.

    The Boomers and Gen-X have both had opportunities to do something to try to undo some of the damage and both have failed to do so.

    The big question is why did that 1925-1945 generation turn out to be so destructive? Why did the kids who grew up in the 40s want to destroy their own society? It couldn't have been the war - they were mostly too young for the war to have had an impact. And they were able to surf the wave of ever-growing prosperity in the postwar period. Never had a generation had so much to be thankful for, and never has a generation shown such treachery and ingratitude.

    I suspect it has a lot to do with the extremely foolish expansion of higher education after the war. Too many kids in the late 1940s and the 1950s going to college. If you want to destroy a civilisation build more universities.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

  75. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Rod1963
    @Intelligent Dasein

    The more I think of it, what Trump did was really wrong and Sundance's assertions are full of shit.

    Trump screwed up big time. The attack tells me he's not listening to Bannon but others like Kushner and Ivanka who are Democrats and globalists. Hence Bannon being kicked to the side.

    Worse, both Mattis and McMaster are generals who made rank under the Neo-Cons and both have the same views on Russia - our primary enemy. Pence is no better.

    He couldn't have picked a better staff to start WWIII.

    Bottom line, Trump was elected to fix America, not start fights all over the world. His base will only tolerate so much before they turn on him and the GOP. If he pushes for a fight with NK, he's dead meat politically.

    Replies: @anon

    Worse, both Mattis and McMaster are generals who made rank under the Neo-Cons and both have the same views on Russia – our primary enemy. Pence is no better.

    Maybe some truth in that but if so all it means is personnel who want all three of
    – controlled labor supply
    – balanced trade and rebuilding the domestic economy
    – less intervention
    aren’t available among the upper echelons in sufficient quantity to fill an administration.

    This may only apply to the “less intervention” part or it may (probably/possibly) relate to the other two as well – we shall see.

    He couldn’t have picked a better staff to start WWIII.

    Sure he could. That’s the scary part – the current administration is the least likely to start WWIII and it’s still 50/50.

    Clinton would have set it in motion already because her and a no-fly zone would have told the Russians there was no possibility of the US developing brakes.

  76. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Senator Brundlefly
    Why is this even controversial? Implying there is a diversity of human forms does not necessarily imply hierarchy. Despite whatever personal opinions one may have, from the unfeeling, agnostic view of nature (and I think this should be the general tenor of a natural history museum) there is no "paragon of animals". There is no great chain of being. There are simply animals that exist because they are well suited to their environment at that particular time. Just present humans the same way you would the dinosaurs or the taxidermy animals. Here's how they are. Though, I guess there's always a bit of bias. By presenting the two FDR elephants and Sue (and, before her, a big ol' brachiosaurus) in the main hall, you kinda imply some animals are more equal than others. Plus, much as I love them and view them as cultural treasures, keeping all the old Charles R. Knight tail dragging lizard artwork in the dinosaur hall kinda biases one towards the "evolutionary dead-end they had it coming" view of natural history.

    Replies: @anon, @David Davenport

    Why is this even controversial?

    Two reasons.

    One – Baas, cultural marxism etc – intended to change US immigration laws

    Two – people tend to prefer their own phenotype so hajnal nicewhites look at those statues, feel mildly racist (aka genetic self-love) and then feel guilty about it afterwards because of their centuries of universalist bio-engineering -> conflicted nature

  77. @Lot
    @Anonym

    Her father wrote church music and was born in Manchester UK, so probably not.

    Hoffman means "land manager" so has a lot of high achieving German and Jewish carriers.

    Replies: @Anonym, @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I’m guessing Charlie Hoffman isn’t Jewish.

  78. At the time of the bronzes’ creation, many anthropologists believed that the world’s people could be divided into distinct racial types, whose visible differences in skin tone, hair texture and bone structure explained differences in behavior.

    Even though this sentence is near the top of Jennifer Schuessler’s article, it brings one of Steve’s observations to mind:

    the NYT tends to employ first rate reporters, but it strikes a devil’s deal with them: rather than put the interesting news at the beginning of the article, the good stuff gets hidden away at the end. NYT reporters are significantly smarter than NYT subscribers, but they are only allowed to disturb the worldviews of the small fraction who read all the way to the end.

    The world’s people [can] be divided into distinct racial types, [with] visible differences in skin tone, hair texture and bone structure.

    Obviously true.

    Visible differences in skin tone, hair texture and bone structure [explain] differences in behavior.

    Could Jennifer name even one of the “many anthropologists” who believed or believe that hair texture etc. causes the varied behaviors of different cultures and ‘outbred extended families’? Of course not. The sentence is a bone [sic] thrown to the smart fraction of the NYT subscriber base. These readers have to perform the explains correlates with operation, themselves.

  79. At the time of the bronzes’ creation, many anthropologists believed that the world’s people could be divided into distinct racial types, whose visible differences in skin tone, hair texture and bone structure explained differences in behavior.

    Perhaps I’m wrong, but I strongly doubt that even a single anthropologist–let along “many” of them–ever believed this: it makes no sense.

    The author of this piece has no theory of mind when it comes to the past, and no understanding of what people got up to in the horribly benighted age before current year. And so we’re meant to be astonished by the sculptress’s otherwise unheard-of practice of studying human anatomy by dissecting cadavers, for example. What a dope.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    @slumber_j

    Two comments posted at 2:02 pm, heh.

    Replies: @slumber_j

  80. res says:
    @Yak-15
    Last year I went to Member's Day where I was able to see the newly constructed exhibit displaying Hoffman's statues. While the walls were adorned with anti-hate messages, stories about racism and the KKK, the statues stick out in sharp contrast to the attempted obfuscation of their meaning. It is amazing to see in person.

    It is as though the Catholic Church took the bones of Sue (the T-Rex) and made an exhibit showcasing the divine brilliance of God in constructing an elaborate hoax to test mankind's faith in the Bible's creationism.

    Likewise, in this case, the cultural construct on display is equally beautiful and revealing. The viewer sees the clear differences in the models in all their brilliant biological diversity.

    Simultaneously, he confronts the dissonant, conflicting message of the exhibit - that race does not biologically exist. As such, the display is unintentionally meta. The bronze figures are not the center of focus. Rather, it is the spate of extreme measures that arbiters of "social justice" take to defend their worldview in the face of undeniable evidence to the contrary.

    In this respect, it is perhaps the most brilliant work of millennial art. I hope people from 50 years will be able to see it in all its glory.

    Replies: @res, @Anonymous

    As such, the display is unintentionally meta. The bronze figures are not the center of focus. Rather, it is the spate of extreme measures that arbiters of “social justice” take to defend their worldview in the face of undeniable evidence to the contrary.

    In this respect, it is perhaps the most brilliant work of millennial art.

    I wonder how many of the people who created (or visited) the exhibit saw this?

    • Replies: @Yak-15
    @res

    I bet very few.

  81. @TelfoedJohn
    @Harry Baldwin

    I've noticed this racial squeamishness in illustration. Non-white phenotypes are depicted as if they have at least one white grandparent. Not just that, but the non-whites are scrupulously middle class, as if stepping from a Gap advert.

    Replies: @res

    It is hard to argue we are all alike when presented with such graphic evidence to the contrary. Like this exhibit.

  82. @O'Really
    How do these people make sense of the ubiquitous TV ads for ancestry.com DNA tests?

    Or, conversely, what are these people going to do when a critical mass of the population has participated (or knows someone who participated) in an at-home DNA ancestry test? Wouldn't they have been on stronger ground acknowledging that there are genetic differences, but these are irrelevant to the question of human dignity?

    Replies: @anon

    Wouldn’t they have been on stronger ground acknowledging that there are genetic differences, but these are irrelevant to the question of human dignity?

    Why take an intellectually honest position when you project your own anti-scientific bias on to the other side? That sounds, like, hard, man.

  83. @a reader
    @a reader

    Please note (next to last paragraph) the brightest of the brothers Aaron, the musician, said he was among the top 25 students in his class.

    Out of 25 students?

    (I follow Mr. Sailer's advice to read till the end.)

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @res, @International Jew, @AnotherDad

    Not quite sure what you meant here, but U.S. News and World Report has this to say about the Wade quadruplets’ high school, Lakota East: https://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/ohio/districts/lakota-local/lakota-east-high-school-15440

    Note that for grades 9-12, “total enrollment” is listed at 2,538. That averages to about 635 per class. Even if that figure has declined to, say, 600 by senior year (grade 12), Aaron’s statement that he is among the top 25 students in his [graduating] class puts him…among the top 5% of that class.

  84. res says:
    @a reader
    @a reader

    Please note (next to last paragraph) the brightest of the brothers Aaron, the musician, said he was among the top 25 students in his class.

    Out of 25 students?

    (I follow Mr. Sailer's advice to read till the end.)

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @res, @International Jew, @AnotherDad

    They also said (in the same paragraph): “their ACT scores range from the 94th to the 99th percentile.” That’s surprisingly specific in my experience of this type of article and probably indicates they are good students (though I suspect Asian quads with those scores etc. would not have the same admissions outcomes).

    One thing that strikes me as odd is the current ACT percentiles don’t show a score corresponding to 94%: http://blog.prepscholar.com/act-percentiles-high-precision-2016

    Some other interesting bits from the article:

    In a clever stroke, the four brothers wrote essays that can be read separately, yet are meant to be read together, like four pieces of a puzzle. Each piece is charming and winning on its own, but together, they are even better, and college admissions officers everywhere seemed to agree and were unwilling to pull them apart.

    The Wade quads are “fertility babies,” conceived through a fertility procedure, a growing part of the college-age population.

    their father, Darrin Wade, a software architect for General Electric, would punish disciplinary infractions like lying by making them do situps and push-ups and run around the block. He and their mother, Kim, a school principal, also had them do word puzzles, memorize math tables and write book reports at home from a young age.

    The Wade parents met in math class at Jackson State University

    So far, Yale has given them the best financial aid deal, they said, and has assiduously courted them, offering to fly them to New Haven to visit the campus, something they could not afford to do before they were accepted. (Yale admitted another set of African-American quadruplets, two boys and two girls, in 2010.)

    So it appears the Ivies are actually adhering to their agreement not to conspire on financial aid offers…
    Does anyone have numbers or other examples of multiple siblings admitted to the same Ivy class? For schools that admit <10% of their students that is a lot of admission slots to devote to one family (what about diversity!).

  85. @slumber_j

    At the time of the bronzes’ creation, many anthropologists believed that the world’s people could be divided into distinct racial types, whose visible differences in skin tone, hair texture and bone structure explained differences in behavior.
     
    Perhaps I'm wrong, but I strongly doubt that even a single anthropologist--let along "many" of them--ever believed this: it makes no sense.

    The author of this piece has no theory of mind when it comes to the past, and no understanding of what people got up to in the horribly benighted age before current year. And so we're meant to be astonished by the sculptress's otherwise unheard-of practice of studying human anatomy by dissecting cadavers, for example. What a dope.

    Replies: @ic1000

    Two comments posted at 2:02 pm, heh.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    @ic1000

    Yeah, super-weird. It must have been caused by our skin color, hair texture and bone structure.

  86. @a reader
    @a reader

    Please note (next to last paragraph) the brightest of the brothers Aaron, the musician, said he was among the top 25 students in his class.

    Out of 25 students?

    (I follow Mr. Sailer's advice to read till the end.)

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @res, @International Jew, @AnotherDad

    The brothers look remarkably different from one another! Even if they originated in four different ova, you’d expect more of a resemblance.

    Could the whole thing be a joke?

  87. @Flip
    I don't understand why the statues were shunned. That's what the people looked like, so what's controversial?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    I don’t understand why the statues were shunned. That’s what the people looked like, so what’s controversial?

    Exactly. There should be nothing controversial here–at all. Apparently the sculptress did detailed photographic work and the sculptures are in fact accurate representations of human variety, not cartoon stereotypes. But they shunted her beautiful, realistic–scientifically accurate–work off into the basement, in favor of PC platitudes and nonsense.

    You can tell a good deal about the quality of an ideology by how blatant the lying required to propagate it.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    @AnotherDad

    Another Dad, You are precisely right. Isn't this similar to what National Geographic published for years and what the old Travelogues of my youth showed. Different people and different cultures in a time before cheap air travel. It is actually how we learned about these things. Every museum's dioramas where these sculptures in miniature.

  88. @res
    @Yak-15


    As such, the display is unintentionally meta. The bronze figures are not the center of focus. Rather, it is the spate of extreme measures that arbiters of “social justice” take to defend their worldview in the face of undeniable evidence to the contrary.

    In this respect, it is perhaps the most brilliant work of millennial art.
     
    I wonder how many of the people who created (or visited) the exhibit saw this?

    Replies: @Yak-15

    I bet very few.

  89. @Steve Sailer
    @Joe, averaged

    Carleton Coon theorized in 1965 that the indigenous Ainu of Japan were semi-Caucasian, like the Laplanders of Finland are semi-Oriental.

    That has not panned out. There are some other theories like that that didn't work out, but mostly Coon's 1965 "Living Races of Man" has stood up to 21st Century genome research.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Lot, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Joe, averaged

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but I thought Coon’s underlying theory was that the major racial groups developed from separate lineages of Homo erectus. He argued that the striking similarities in the facial structures of modern humans in Africa, Asia and Europe with similar features in Homo erctus skulls was not a striking example of convergent evolution but rather proof that the Homo erectus lineages were the precursors of modern human races. This is very much at odds with our current understanding.

  90. @ic1000
    @slumber_j

    Two comments posted at 2:02 pm, heh.

    Replies: @slumber_j

    Yeah, super-weird. It must have been caused by our skin color, hair texture and bone structure.

    • Agree: ic1000
  91. @Intelligent Dasein
    @donut

    For argument's sake, let's assume that Black Pigeon's analysis is correct. I've seen a lot of other people around the internet saying essentially the same thing, viz. that this missile attack on Syria was meant to placate the neocons, strike fear into the hearts of Iran and North Korea, dispel any notions of Russian collusion, and distract the public from Trump's domestic policy inaction.

    If anything, that's worse than the other plausible narrative being circulated, that Trump is an emotionally unstable sellout. When did any of these things become an acceptable reason for bombing a third party who had nothing to do with any of it? It angers me that some Trump supporters would be willing to write this all off as a necessary game of N-dimensional chess. When you add on the fact that the original gas attack was pretty clearly a false flag, then this whole episode seems atrocious.

    I am reminded of Trump's first campaign video spot. The one showed a mushroom cloud and a clip of a laughing Vladimir Putin. The same one that Trump quickly took down once the Alt-Right made it clear that they were not interested in campaign messaging demonizing Putin, because we actually like the guy. But a missile attack cannot simply be taken back. Real people are dead now.

    If Trump wanted to send a message, he should have drawn the real "red line" of American nationalism by steadfastly refusing to do anything. He should have made it clear that America will no longer intervene militarily in foreign countries on the flimsiest of pretexts. The ultimate casualty here is Trump's credibility. Whether he is emotionally unstable or playing bloody chess games, he can no longer be trusted.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Rod1963, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Olorin, @donut

    One of Trump’s most persistent campaign promises was that he would extract us from the Syrian mess and certainly not get us deeper into it. Trump’s eschewal of “invade the world” was one of the reasons I voted for him. Now he has deserted his base and is embracing the very establishment that so viciously sought to destroy his presidential campaign.

    The snake, Rancid Priebus, is the epitome of the stoopid party establishment and seems to be slithering his way ever deeper into Trump’s inner circle. But ultimately I expect it’s his loser son-in-law “Daddy bought my way into Harvard” Kushner who’s behind Trump’s betrayal of his base. He talks and acts like a neocon plant.

    Unless Trump does a one-eighty ASAP, I plan to utterly repudiate him. From what I have seen, heard, and read I suspect that my resolve is is nearly universal within his base. As soon as that base deserts him he is doomed. His current “friends” will instantly turn on him.

    BTW, I suspect that sometime during the presidential campaign or shortly thereafter Trump communicated to the Russians the same position vis-a-vis Syria as he did to his base. The message might well have been that the Russians were doing such a good job eradicating ISIS that there was no need for any US involvement. The Russian response to Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal act of war against Syria certainly suggests surprise and shocked outrage. I suspect that even Putin is unaware of the ubiquity and power of neocons and Zionists in the national establishment and the upper reaches of the federal government.

  92. @Expletive Deleted
    @Anonymous

    "Wall of Shoes"? How derivative. That's been done before. In the 1940s.
    Is she going to do "Box of Dentures" next?

    Replies: @Venator

    Ok, hate me, sue me, or jail me, but I loled.

  93. @a reader
    @a reader

    Please note (next to last paragraph) the brightest of the brothers Aaron, the musician, said he was among the top 25 students in his class.

    Out of 25 students?

    (I follow Mr. Sailer's advice to read till the end.)

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy, @res, @International Jew, @AnotherDad

    Please note (next to last paragraph) the brightest of the brothers Aaron, the musician, said he was among the top 25 students in his class.

    Out of 25 students?

    No out of something like 600 students.

    Lakota East is a huge suburban high school north of Cincinnati (along I75 toward before you get to Middletown). It was just “Lakota HS” when I was in HS back in the 70s. (I lived about 10 miles SW as the crow flies in Greenhills). But that area was already booming back then and I guess at some point they split into East and West. (I looked it up on Great Schools–2600 kids; 80% white, 8% black.)

    Being 25th best in these huge suburban high schools is an excellent achievement. There are a ton of strivers at these places. They are where most of America’s smart kids are from. My older two kids were “top of their class” with 4.0s in their big suburban HS (400-500 class size), but they shared that with 10-15 other kids. You can get a single B+ … you’re immediately borderline on being bumped from the top 5%.

    I was actually somewhat surprised, that the one kid had rejections from a couple of 2nd tier schools, Northwestern and Tulane. They claim the weakest of the boys was 94%tile. Sure that’s not top tier and there are about–back of envelope with 2m kids college bound–120,000 kids a year with better scores. But *very* few of those are African-American, probably 1000-2000. And there are quotas to fill. This is a chronic problem: finding enough *quality* blacks to fill the desired–innumerate–AA quota. The Caribbean and African immigrants and half-castes must have really ramped up and be satisfying most of the desired “diversity” levels, for any of these boys to get any rejections outside HYPS. (Assuming the numbers given are accurate.) (Of course Northwestern and Tulane are both places where there’s a lot of local blacks-made-good who they feel duty bound to take.)

    The reality is if these boys were even at all representative–even just representative of the top 5% of blacks, instead of the top 1%–we wouldn’t have the race problems we have today. Unfortunately black young men like them are exceedingly rare.

  94. @Stan Adams
    @International Jew


    Also, to combat stereotypes, show all of them engaged in the least likely activities for them.
     
    Hollywood does this all the time.

    Have the bushwoman working a slide rule, computing John Glenn’s trajectory.
     
    https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-TOsjHX1XMKI/WHZvW3iypZI/AAAAAAAAqYU/1O-JCsCMlwU-IBttZmv-_OLHn67K21aiQCLcB/s1600/hidden%2Bfigures.png

    Show the white man hunting with a spear.
     
    http://d3domination.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/arnold_conan_barbarian_spear_sword.jpg

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    The movie is absurd but that still of the Negro woman at the blackboard is LOL funny. I’ve seen actual photos of these women at work. They are seated at small standard-issue government desks with the old electro-mechanical Frieden calculators front and center. During my undergraduate years in the late 1960s I worked in a variety of scientific and engineering facilities, e.g. modifying CERN programs in a high energy physics lab and writing code for FFTs in an engineering firm. My experience was that the people with those Frieden calculators on their desks were at best glorified data entry clerks. Their usual tasks were to enter numbers into formulas they were given and compute results. The staff who did this usually had little competence beyond high school mathematics. Usually two or more would be assigned the same tasks and supervisors would compare results to detect and correct errors. Remember, these women got their BAs from colleges which, to put it kindly, didn’t have sterling academic credentials.

  95. @Yak-15
    Last year I went to Member's Day where I was able to see the newly constructed exhibit displaying Hoffman's statues. While the walls were adorned with anti-hate messages, stories about racism and the KKK, the statues stick out in sharp contrast to the attempted obfuscation of their meaning. It is amazing to see in person.

    It is as though the Catholic Church took the bones of Sue (the T-Rex) and made an exhibit showcasing the divine brilliance of God in constructing an elaborate hoax to test mankind's faith in the Bible's creationism.

    Likewise, in this case, the cultural construct on display is equally beautiful and revealing. The viewer sees the clear differences in the models in all their brilliant biological diversity.

    Simultaneously, he confronts the dissonant, conflicting message of the exhibit - that race does not biologically exist. As such, the display is unintentionally meta. The bronze figures are not the center of focus. Rather, it is the spate of extreme measures that arbiters of "social justice" take to defend their worldview in the face of undeniable evidence to the contrary.

    In this respect, it is perhaps the most brilliant work of millennial art. I hope people from 50 years will be able to see it in all its glory.

    Replies: @res, @Anonymous

    The Catholic Church is not fundamentalist and it does not teach biblical-literalist creationism. See http://www.pewforum.org/2009/02/04/religious-groups-views-on-evolution/.

    A misfiring analogy always damages an otherwise great argument.

  96. At the time of the bronzes’ creation, many anthropologists believed that the world’s people could be divided into distinct racial types, whose visible differences in skin tone, hair texture and bone structure explained differences in behavior.

    Of course, that is an idea that was believed by no anthropologists. The anthropologists whom this display mischaracterizes and insults did not think that “visible differences in skin tone, hair texture and bone structure explained differences in behavior.” Rather, they thought that heredity explained both “visible differences in skin tone, hair texture and bone structure” and “differences in behavior”.

  97. @JohnnyWalker123
    Do you know what I find sort of strange?

    America used dead children to justify the recent airstrike on Syria.

    Here was the justification for the first Gulf War back in 1991.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v94WsjWKQ3U

    President HW Bush claimed Saddam Hussein was killing incubator babies in Kuwait. A Kuwaiti girl testifed that she saw this happening. Year later, it was revealed that claim was false and Saddam Hussein never killed any babies. Even more interesting - the Kuwaiti girl turned out to be the Kuwaiti ambassador's daughter. She was coached by a US-based PR firm.

    Hmmm............

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @Mr. Anon

    Year laters, it was revealed that claim was false and Saddam Hussein never killed any babies.

    Saddam Hussein did indeed kill babies. Just not those. Anyway, point taken.

  98. Here is Alaka Wali’s profile: https://www.fieldmuseum.org/about/staff/profile/416

    Born in India, now “a curator of North American Anthropology in the Science and Education Division”. Doing the jobs Americans won’t do.

  99. @JohnnyWalker123
    @JohnnyWalker123

    America armed ISIS and Al Qaeda in Syria.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyQLHbHoilE

    I wonder why...........

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I hate videos like that, and I ignore them. If they want me to pay attention to what they say, they shouldn’t pipe in distracting music over it. If they want me to believe that they are proferring the truth, devoid of sleezy marketing tactics, then they shouldn’t use sleezy marketing tactics.

  100. @Sam Haysom
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Yes when you add in facts that the Putin Amen Corner pulled out of their asses your argument does seem more compelling.

    There is any set of facts that supports the notion that the Syrian Air Force had nothing to do with the situation. At best that airbase was used to launch unguided bombing attacks on civilian centers which is a war crime. So at best they were war criminals.

    The alt right has yet to come up with a persuasive reason why their kneepad act in front of Putin is any different than the neocons support of Netanyahu.

    Replies: @Bensalem, @Thea, @Mr. Anon

    “There is any set of facts that supports the notion that the Syrian Air Force had nothing to do with the situation. At best that airbase was used to launch unguided bombing attacks on civilian centers which is a war crime. So at best they were war criminals.”

    Acts which the United States did in WWII on a vastly greater scale. And why did you add “unguided”? If they had used a precision munition to blow up a hospital, would that have been better?

    And it is ridiculous of you to talk about a “Putin Amen Corner”. If you want to see a chorus shouting “Amen” all at once, just take a look at the response by the media and political establishment to Trump’s attack. Clearly, they think that they’re getting the band back together for another round of ill-defined and open-ended warring in the middle east on behalf of a whole raft of interests, none of them that of the american people.

    We’ve heard your kind of war-whoring for sixteen years now. It is – as it ever was – tendentious horseshit.

  101. @dfordoom
    @Anon


    On topic, it saddens me that future generations are going to be fixing the boomer mess for many years to come.
     
    Except that this PC nonsense wasn't started by the Boomers. It was started by the previous generation. You know, the ones who elected LBJ. The ones who pushed the Civil Rights movement. The ones who took over academia for the Left. The ones who gave the Cultural Left a stranglehold on the media. All of these things were achieved by the generation born in the 1925-1945 period.

    If you want a generation to hate then the generation born 1925-1945 is well worthy of your hatred.

    To use this case as an example, the decision to remove the statues because they were racist was made in 1969. The people who made that decision would certainly not have been Boomers.

    What confuses people is that the cultural rot really got going in the 1960s so they blame the Boomers, conveniently overlooking the fact that just about everybody in a position of power and influence during the 60s came from the generation that preceded the Boomers.

    When the Boomers got old enough to have any real influence they elected Reagan.

    Replies: @BB753, @PV van der Byl

    Excellent comment. And everything in your comment also applies to Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. The rot in the UK may have set in more with those born in the 1900-1920 period.

  102. Anonymous [AKA "bronze age bronzer"] says:
    @Flip
    I don't understand why the statues were shunned. That's what the people looked like, so what's controversial?

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @AnotherDad, @Anonymous

    During their [sculpture] lessons, [Rodin] advised [Hoffman], “Do not be afraid of realism”. wiki

    this collection of bronze figures and heads is a sculptor’s interpretation of Humanity, studied from three angles—Art, Science, and Psychology. It represents not only the actual study and work of the past five years, but the result of my observations and study over a period of many years previous to 1930. museum

    Well. Into the smelter, then.

    Hoffman sounds like an immensely talented person. High energy. Studying for four years with Rodin, working with Nijinsky and Pavlova, receiving this huge commission directly from Stanley Field during the Depression…

  103. Those sculptures are GORGEOUS. How could anyone deem them insulting?

  104. @AnotherDad
    @Flip


    I don’t understand why the statues were shunned. That’s what the people looked like, so what’s controversial?
     
    Exactly. There should be nothing controversial here--at all. Apparently the sculptress did detailed photographic work and the sculptures are in fact accurate representations of human variety, not cartoon stereotypes. But they shunted her beautiful, realistic--scientifically accurate--work off into the basement, in favor of PC platitudes and nonsense.

    You can tell a good deal about the quality of an ideology by how blatant the lying required to propagate it.

    Replies: @Buffalo Joe

    Another Dad, You are precisely right. Isn’t this similar to what National Geographic published for years and what the old Travelogues of my youth showed. Different people and different cultures in a time before cheap air travel. It is actually how we learned about these things. Every museum’s dioramas where these sculptures in miniature.

  105. @BB753
    @dfordoom

    You're overlooking the fact that the Boomers were the shock-troops of those changes brought about by the Greatest Generation. They didn't oppose the cultural revolution and were all too eager to fill the power vacuum left by the purged or fleeing WASP'S

    Replies: @dfordoom

    You’re overlooking the fact that the Boomers were the shock-troops of those changes brought about by the Greatest Generation. They didn’t oppose the cultural revolution and were all too eager to fill the power vacuum left by the purged or fleeing WASP’S

    Sure. Every generation has made its contribution. Including the Boomers and Gen-X and the Millennials. My point was that the biggest contribution was made by the generation born between 1925 and 1945 – they are the ones who made the initial breakthrough, smashing the defences of our civilisation. And during the 60s and 70s they served as the generals directing the Culture War.

    The Boomers and Gen-X have both had opportunities to do something to try to undo some of the damage and both have failed to do so.

    The big question is why did that 1925-1945 generation turn out to be so destructive? Why did the kids who grew up in the 40s want to destroy their own society? It couldn’t have been the war – they were mostly too young for the war to have had an impact. And they were able to surf the wave of ever-growing prosperity in the postwar period. Never had a generation had so much to be thankful for, and never has a generation shown such treachery and ingratitude.

    I suspect it has a lot to do with the extremely foolish expansion of higher education after the war. Too many kids in the late 1940s and the 1950s going to college. If you want to destroy a civilisation build more universities.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @dfordoom


    My point was that the biggest contribution was made by the generation born between 1925 and 1945.
     
    They're called the Silent. That's the standard Strauss-and-Howian designation.

    In gross aggregate terms, their psychology and political outlook has always tended towards muddleheaded liberalism. Once they came into their own, they expressed a collective desire to expand the circle of compassion (mainly by Big Government, technocratic means) and to "lighten up a little bit" by loosening sexual mores, gender definitions, and racial boundaries. They were the original civil rights activists, the New Dealers, the Frankfort Socialists, readers of Freud and Kinsey, second-wave feminists, founders of Greenpeace, and the general architects of that shag-carpet-and-swinger-sex vibe that pervaded the 1970s. They were positioned at the right age and state of life to become the mid-level administrators and functionaries of the radical expansion of federal power pioneered by LBJ and Carter, and of its analogues in the private sector. Caught between the war-regimented G.I. Generation and the free-spirited Boomers, they took after the former in terms of their loyalty to big institutions and the latter in terms of their social interests. Basically a managerial generation who inherited a functioning social order, they were also the primary beneficiaries of the post-war Pax Americana. Perhaps no other generation in history has experienced such a continuous, lifelong uptrend in their general fortunes. After weathering the Great Depression and WWII in their childhood, when the vexations of those turbulent times fell upon older heads than theirs, they knew nothing except a world of intact families, safe neighborhoods, good schools, a growing economy, high-paying jobs, fat pensions, and international peace.

    Cultural disorder always sets in when one generation's adulthood ironies and nuances become the basis for the next generation's pedagogy. It's one thing for a safely employed bunch of professionals to discuss racial integration through clouds of Pall Mall smoke at the Elks Lodge, safely isolated from any consequences of their imagined schemes (where facts are absent, sentiment reigns); it's quite another thing for their children to absorb this as their moral imperative. Anything that parents do has an amplified effect in the children, for good or for ill. The Silent destroyed their society not so much by tasting forbidden fruits as by feeding them to their children instead of truth and tradition.

    You really should read The Fourth Turning if you haven't. I don't agree entirely with book's main thesis of inevitable cyclical generational archetypes, for every historiography is but a creature of it's own time and it marshals the facts of history primarily to explain the present mood, but it offers many valuable insights nonetheless and is a pretty decent encyclopedia of Americana in its own right.

    Replies: @BB753, @Curle

  106. @Anonymous
    When global thermonuclear WWIII is finished those Pygmies have a decent chance of pressing on alone as inheritors of the earth.

    Replies: @anon, @Senator Brundlefly

    That sounds like a really interesting sci-fi concept. An untouched tribe inherits the earth after a nuclear event. They progress to the point where they can discover that an entire civilization once existed and failed.

    Though, thinking about it more, that’s kinda what the subplot of the first Planet of the Apes was about. I wished the sequels explored more the whole Dr. Zaius/Cornelius dynamic of covering up history rather than doing the whole bomb-worshiping cult/time travel to the past thing.

  107. @Senator Brundlefly
    Why is this even controversial? Implying there is a diversity of human forms does not necessarily imply hierarchy. Despite whatever personal opinions one may have, from the unfeeling, agnostic view of nature (and I think this should be the general tenor of a natural history museum) there is no "paragon of animals". There is no great chain of being. There are simply animals that exist because they are well suited to their environment at that particular time. Just present humans the same way you would the dinosaurs or the taxidermy animals. Here's how they are. Though, I guess there's always a bit of bias. By presenting the two FDR elephants and Sue (and, before her, a big ol' brachiosaurus) in the main hall, you kinda imply some animals are more equal than others. Plus, much as I love them and view them as cultural treasures, keeping all the old Charles R. Knight tail dragging lizard artwork in the dinosaur hall kinda biases one towards the "evolutionary dead-end they had it coming" view of natural history.

    Replies: @anon, @David Davenport

    Why is this even controversial? Implying there is a diversity of human forms does not necessarily imply hierarchy.

    Are you sure about that?

    • Replies: @Senator Brundlefly
    @David Davenport

    Well, it depends what sort of view you want to take. As a Westerner, politically I'd say that Western societies are superior to non-Western ones. Democracy, science, Christian morality are all things I personally value. Politically, I'd also claim humans to be superior to coelacanths since coelacanths lack empathy, intelligence, and also science, democracy, Christian morality etc.

    But a natural history museum exists to present biology, not our social biases. From an evolutionary standpoint, coelacanths have a body plan that has remained practically unchanged for about 400 million years. Can humans really claim to be overall "superior" to them? It's a pointless question in this context. Both humans and coelacanths presently survive in their respective ecological niches. Biologically that's about all you can say. Nature doesn't care about democracy, science, or Christian morality. It is not sentient. It just is. I'd go further to say that the distinction is important because thinking about evolution in terms of hierarchy muddles things up. One of the most deceptively tricky images in popular science is the whole "monkey-chimp-apeman-caveman-modern man" lineup. Its not necessarily false in the fact that human ancestors might have looked that way. But it is deceptive in the fact that it seems to subtly endorse the idea of teleology. That a chimp like form is an inferior form destined to become human. Which inevitably leads to stupid questions like "if we evolved form monkeys, why are monkeys still here?"

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/cd/96/f4/cd96f435ebafc63421fc83c95d78861b.jpg

    Monkeys are still here because evolution isn't a straight line leading towards a pre-determined result. Its a series of braided branches, some still growing outward and some stopped short. The out-of date view of evolution as teleological biases popular perceptions of the concept and is probably to blame for why the left is uncomfortable presenting the Field Museum statues. They've internalized the idea that showing a black man with a bow and arrow implies that said black man is biologically inferior to a nearby Western man without the bow and arrow when really that dichotomy is biologically irrelevant. Its just the human/coelacanth dichotomy again. Black guys with a bow and arrow are presently well suited to their niche just like coelacanths are well suited to theirs. If, in a scientific context, we want to talk dispassionately about human differences, the first step would be to get rid of all the biologically irrelevant social baggage of hierarchy. Devoid of political context, IQ doesn't matter. Coelacanths don't need to write #Blacklivesmatter one hundred times to catch a squid. Once we have a scientific baseline, then we can get to talk about policy, politics, and values.

  108. @anon
    @Anonymous


    When global thermonuclear WWIII is finished those Pygmies have a decent chance of pressing on alone as inheritors of the earth.
     
    The midgets shall inherit the earth.

    Replies: @TWS

    There are no unmixed pygmies left. They will be bred out of existence soon.

  109. @Harry Baldwin
    @Flip

    What people actually look like is controversial to the left. My wife used to illustrate children's textbooks, and she got instructions not to make African Americans "too" dark, not to make their lips thick, not to make their palms pink, etc.

    Replies: @TelfoedJohn, @ben tillman

    What people actually look like is controversial to the left.

    At lunch today, I saw the most extreme example of steatopygia I have ever seen outside an encyclopedia. The woman’s buttocks looked like this:

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/398850110729798442/

  110. I love Sailer’s blog for content like this. I wouldn’t have heard or read anything about this status collection anywhere else. I can imagine this is covered in normal arts newspapers, but just as a generic art exhibit article to skim over.

    This blog is notorious for highlighting the comic absurdities of the ctrl-left…

  111. @dfordoom
    @BB753


    You’re overlooking the fact that the Boomers were the shock-troops of those changes brought about by the Greatest Generation. They didn’t oppose the cultural revolution and were all too eager to fill the power vacuum left by the purged or fleeing WASP’S
     
    Sure. Every generation has made its contribution. Including the Boomers and Gen-X and the Millennials. My point was that the biggest contribution was made by the generation born between 1925 and 1945 - they are the ones who made the initial breakthrough, smashing the defences of our civilisation. And during the 60s and 70s they served as the generals directing the Culture War.

    The Boomers and Gen-X have both had opportunities to do something to try to undo some of the damage and both have failed to do so.

    The big question is why did that 1925-1945 generation turn out to be so destructive? Why did the kids who grew up in the 40s want to destroy their own society? It couldn't have been the war - they were mostly too young for the war to have had an impact. And they were able to surf the wave of ever-growing prosperity in the postwar period. Never had a generation had so much to be thankful for, and never has a generation shown such treachery and ingratitude.

    I suspect it has a lot to do with the extremely foolish expansion of higher education after the war. Too many kids in the late 1940s and the 1950s going to college. If you want to destroy a civilisation build more universities.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    My point was that the biggest contribution was made by the generation born between 1925 and 1945.

    They’re called the Silent. That’s the standard Strauss-and-Howian designation.

    In gross aggregate terms, their psychology and political outlook has always tended towards muddleheaded liberalism. Once they came into their own, they expressed a collective desire to expand the circle of compassion (mainly by Big Government, technocratic means) and to “lighten up a little bit” by loosening sexual mores, gender definitions, and racial boundaries. They were the original civil rights activists, the New Dealers, the Frankfort Socialists, readers of Freud and Kinsey, second-wave feminists, founders of Greenpeace, and the general architects of that shag-carpet-and-swinger-sex vibe that pervaded the 1970s. They were positioned at the right age and state of life to become the mid-level administrators and functionaries of the radical expansion of federal power pioneered by LBJ and Carter, and of its analogues in the private sector. Caught between the war-regimented G.I. Generation and the free-spirited Boomers, they took after the former in terms of their loyalty to big institutions and the latter in terms of their social interests. Basically a managerial generation who inherited a functioning social order, they were also the primary beneficiaries of the post-war Pax Americana. Perhaps no other generation in history has experienced such a continuous, lifelong uptrend in their general fortunes. After weathering the Great Depression and WWII in their childhood, when the vexations of those turbulent times fell upon older heads than theirs, they knew nothing except a world of intact families, safe neighborhoods, good schools, a growing economy, high-paying jobs, fat pensions, and international peace.

    Cultural disorder always sets in when one generation’s adulthood ironies and nuances become the basis for the next generation’s pedagogy. It’s one thing for a safely employed bunch of professionals to discuss racial integration through clouds of Pall Mall smoke at the Elks Lodge, safely isolated from any consequences of their imagined schemes (where facts are absent, sentiment reigns); it’s quite another thing for their children to absorb this as their moral imperative. Anything that parents do has an amplified effect in the children, for good or for ill. The Silent destroyed their society not so much by tasting forbidden fruits as by feeding them to their children instead of truth and tradition.

    You really should read The Fourth Turning if you haven’t. I don’t agree entirely with book’s main thesis of inevitable cyclical generational archetypes, for every historiography is but a creature of it’s own time and it marshals the facts of history primarily to explain the present mood, but it offers many valuable insights nonetheless and is a pretty decent encyclopedia of Americana in its own right.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Pat Buchanan could write an insightful book about his generation. I assume he must loathe them all.

    , @Curle
    @Intelligent Dasein

    "Cultural disorder always sets in when one generation’s adulthood ironies and nuances become the basis for the next generation’s pedagogy."

    Read that and couldn't help but think of poor, dumb and idealistic (or was it opportunistic?) Jack Kemp and his absurd Enterprise Zones becoming the lodestar for young impressionable mutton-headed Paul Ryan.

  112. …a wall of shoes from around the world that Ms. Wali curated in 1997.

    I was going to say, wasn’t Imelda Marcos still alive then? But Imelda Marcos is still alive today!

    The two could get together to found Wali World, a great big castle made of shoes, with a shoehorn drawbridge and a moat of NP 27.

  113. Pygmies Standing on the Shoulders of Nuers

    Speaking of Canada…

    The late Leonard Cohen was represented at the recent Juno awards by his son Adam and grandson Cassius.

    Cassius Cohen– what a fantastic moniker! He’s sure to make a name for himself in prizefighting, or in painting poker-playing dogs

  114. @David Davenport
    @Senator Brundlefly

    Why is this even controversial? Implying there is a diversity of human forms does not necessarily imply hierarchy.

    Are you sure about that?

    Replies: @Senator Brundlefly

    Well, it depends what sort of view you want to take. As a Westerner, politically I’d say that Western societies are superior to non-Western ones. Democracy, science, Christian morality are all things I personally value. Politically, I’d also claim humans to be superior to coelacanths since coelacanths lack empathy, intelligence, and also science, democracy, Christian morality etc.

    But a natural history museum exists to present biology, not our social biases. From an evolutionary standpoint, coelacanths have a body plan that has remained practically unchanged for about 400 million years. Can humans really claim to be overall “superior” to them? It’s a pointless question in this context. Both humans and coelacanths presently survive in their respective ecological niches. Biologically that’s about all you can say. Nature doesn’t care about democracy, science, or Christian morality. It is not sentient. It just is. I’d go further to say that the distinction is important because thinking about evolution in terms of hierarchy muddles things up. One of the most deceptively tricky images in popular science is the whole “monkey-chimp-apeman-caveman-modern man” lineup. Its not necessarily false in the fact that human ancestors might have looked that way. But it is deceptive in the fact that it seems to subtly endorse the idea of teleology. That a chimp like form is an inferior form destined to become human. Which inevitably leads to stupid questions like “if we evolved form monkeys, why are monkeys still here?”

    Monkeys are still here because evolution isn’t a straight line leading towards a pre-determined result. Its a series of braided branches, some still growing outward and some stopped short. The out-of date view of evolution as teleological biases popular perceptions of the concept and is probably to blame for why the left is uncomfortable presenting the Field Museum statues. They’ve internalized the idea that showing a black man with a bow and arrow implies that said black man is biologically inferior to a nearby Western man without the bow and arrow when really that dichotomy is biologically irrelevant. Its just the human/coelacanth dichotomy again. Black guys with a bow and arrow are presently well suited to their niche just like coelacanths are well suited to theirs. If, in a scientific context, we want to talk dispassionately about human differences, the first step would be to get rid of all the biologically irrelevant social baggage of hierarchy. Devoid of political context, IQ doesn’t matter. Coelacanths don’t need to write #Blacklivesmatter one hundred times to catch a squid. Once we have a scientific baseline, then we can get to talk about policy, politics, and values.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  115. The Field Museum can get around the problem by just switching the name tags on all the sculptures. Put the San sculpture tag on the Tamil item, and the Viking title on the Chinese piece. That will break stereotypes. The enlightened patrons can nod sagely to themselves as they view the exhibits. “Biodiversity is a social construct, and you can tell because this Tamil looks just like a San!”

  116. Bronze, huh?
    That makes it important for a non-cuck authority to assemble photos of all the Hoffman sculptures. The enemies of reality may not be able to resist a “melting pot”.

  117. @Steve Sailer
    @Joe, averaged

    Carleton Coon theorized in 1965 that the indigenous Ainu of Japan were semi-Caucasian, like the Laplanders of Finland are semi-Oriental.

    That has not panned out. There are some other theories like that that didn't work out, but mostly Coon's 1965 "Living Races of Man" has stood up to 21st Century genome research.

    Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy, @Lot, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Joe, averaged

    Thanks, Steve. Ever since I became an ex-SJW I’ve been amazed at how little support my old positions had, an how robustly the “wrong” positions were grounded in science.

  118. @Intelligent Dasein
    @dfordoom


    My point was that the biggest contribution was made by the generation born between 1925 and 1945.
     
    They're called the Silent. That's the standard Strauss-and-Howian designation.

    In gross aggregate terms, their psychology and political outlook has always tended towards muddleheaded liberalism. Once they came into their own, they expressed a collective desire to expand the circle of compassion (mainly by Big Government, technocratic means) and to "lighten up a little bit" by loosening sexual mores, gender definitions, and racial boundaries. They were the original civil rights activists, the New Dealers, the Frankfort Socialists, readers of Freud and Kinsey, second-wave feminists, founders of Greenpeace, and the general architects of that shag-carpet-and-swinger-sex vibe that pervaded the 1970s. They were positioned at the right age and state of life to become the mid-level administrators and functionaries of the radical expansion of federal power pioneered by LBJ and Carter, and of its analogues in the private sector. Caught between the war-regimented G.I. Generation and the free-spirited Boomers, they took after the former in terms of their loyalty to big institutions and the latter in terms of their social interests. Basically a managerial generation who inherited a functioning social order, they were also the primary beneficiaries of the post-war Pax Americana. Perhaps no other generation in history has experienced such a continuous, lifelong uptrend in their general fortunes. After weathering the Great Depression and WWII in their childhood, when the vexations of those turbulent times fell upon older heads than theirs, they knew nothing except a world of intact families, safe neighborhoods, good schools, a growing economy, high-paying jobs, fat pensions, and international peace.

    Cultural disorder always sets in when one generation's adulthood ironies and nuances become the basis for the next generation's pedagogy. It's one thing for a safely employed bunch of professionals to discuss racial integration through clouds of Pall Mall smoke at the Elks Lodge, safely isolated from any consequences of their imagined schemes (where facts are absent, sentiment reigns); it's quite another thing for their children to absorb this as their moral imperative. Anything that parents do has an amplified effect in the children, for good or for ill. The Silent destroyed their society not so much by tasting forbidden fruits as by feeding them to their children instead of truth and tradition.

    You really should read The Fourth Turning if you haven't. I don't agree entirely with book's main thesis of inevitable cyclical generational archetypes, for every historiography is but a creature of it's own time and it marshals the facts of history primarily to explain the present mood, but it offers many valuable insights nonetheless and is a pretty decent encyclopedia of Americana in its own right.

    Replies: @BB753, @Curle

    Pat Buchanan could write an insightful book about his generation. I assume he must loathe them all.

  119. @Intelligent Dasein
    @donut

    For argument's sake, let's assume that Black Pigeon's analysis is correct. I've seen a lot of other people around the internet saying essentially the same thing, viz. that this missile attack on Syria was meant to placate the neocons, strike fear into the hearts of Iran and North Korea, dispel any notions of Russian collusion, and distract the public from Trump's domestic policy inaction.

    If anything, that's worse than the other plausible narrative being circulated, that Trump is an emotionally unstable sellout. When did any of these things become an acceptable reason for bombing a third party who had nothing to do with any of it? It angers me that some Trump supporters would be willing to write this all off as a necessary game of N-dimensional chess. When you add on the fact that the original gas attack was pretty clearly a false flag, then this whole episode seems atrocious.

    I am reminded of Trump's first campaign video spot. The one showed a mushroom cloud and a clip of a laughing Vladimir Putin. The same one that Trump quickly took down once the Alt-Right made it clear that they were not interested in campaign messaging demonizing Putin, because we actually like the guy. But a missile attack cannot simply be taken back. Real people are dead now.

    If Trump wanted to send a message, he should have drawn the real "red line" of American nationalism by steadfastly refusing to do anything. He should have made it clear that America will no longer intervene militarily in foreign countries on the flimsiest of pretexts. The ultimate casualty here is Trump's credibility. Whether he is emotionally unstable or playing bloody chess games, he can no longer be trusted.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Rod1963, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Olorin, @donut

    You’re in the habit of putting trust in politicians? Even–especially–ones you may have voted for?

    Dude, that’s not the US system of government as my ancestors set it up in Philly that time….

  120. @Intelligent Dasein
    @donut

    For argument's sake, let's assume that Black Pigeon's analysis is correct. I've seen a lot of other people around the internet saying essentially the same thing, viz. that this missile attack on Syria was meant to placate the neocons, strike fear into the hearts of Iran and North Korea, dispel any notions of Russian collusion, and distract the public from Trump's domestic policy inaction.

    If anything, that's worse than the other plausible narrative being circulated, that Trump is an emotionally unstable sellout. When did any of these things become an acceptable reason for bombing a third party who had nothing to do with any of it? It angers me that some Trump supporters would be willing to write this all off as a necessary game of N-dimensional chess. When you add on the fact that the original gas attack was pretty clearly a false flag, then this whole episode seems atrocious.

    I am reminded of Trump's first campaign video spot. The one showed a mushroom cloud and a clip of a laughing Vladimir Putin. The same one that Trump quickly took down once the Alt-Right made it clear that they were not interested in campaign messaging demonizing Putin, because we actually like the guy. But a missile attack cannot simply be taken back. Real people are dead now.

    If Trump wanted to send a message, he should have drawn the real "red line" of American nationalism by steadfastly refusing to do anything. He should have made it clear that America will no longer intervene militarily in foreign countries on the flimsiest of pretexts. The ultimate casualty here is Trump's credibility. Whether he is emotionally unstable or playing bloody chess games, he can no longer be trusted.

    Replies: @Sam Haysom, @Rod1963, @Jus' Sayin'..., @Olorin, @donut

    I have tried to reply and agree with you 2 times but the edit button is no longer available . I guess Steve can’t afford it . Trump has revealed himself . Unfortunately we have put all our eggs in the wrong basket . He folded so quickly that I have to wonder if that wasn’t the plan all along . I would say our only faint hope is to take over the Republican Party , a third party is the wet dream of the “Democrats” . Unfortunately we are just scattered white Americans with no core or center to rally around . So despite the fact that we can win an election for a traitor to our cause we remain powerless in the face of our masters . We are a laughing stock to them as we deserve to be . Have you seen all the youtube videos ? The police were more than happy to ignore left wing violence . They are dogs , low bred mongrels . F**k Blue Lives . White lives matter .

  121. Good news indeed last year to see these bronzes pulled out of the closet, even if they have to suffer Sorosian placard docentry.

    I had seen pictures of them as a kid in a book at my uncle’s house. As I was in college and grad school, any time I ever heard anything about “diversity” these were the images that came to me, along with photos in one of the Time-Life science or nature library volumes IIRC. (Mail-order series in the 1960s that fascinated me as a kid.)

    In a later life path involving public sculpture in the Midwest, the serious minded conservators and sculptors I knew referred to Hoffman’s commission as a magnificent project and herself as worthy of great respect. Discussion at one juncture revolved around this piece in the Chicago Reader:

    http://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/the-races-of-man/Content?oid=881756

    Steve, you may remember that piece. Note that the writers managed to work in the name of a town in Poland…which had nothing to do with anything, but it’s like walking past a sheela-na-gig and having to touch the you-know-what, just because. Or the nose of the badger bronze outside Scott Walker’s conference room in Madison, WI (it’s from the original USS Wisconsin).

  122. @Intelligent Dasein
    @dfordoom


    My point was that the biggest contribution was made by the generation born between 1925 and 1945.
     
    They're called the Silent. That's the standard Strauss-and-Howian designation.

    In gross aggregate terms, their psychology and political outlook has always tended towards muddleheaded liberalism. Once they came into their own, they expressed a collective desire to expand the circle of compassion (mainly by Big Government, technocratic means) and to "lighten up a little bit" by loosening sexual mores, gender definitions, and racial boundaries. They were the original civil rights activists, the New Dealers, the Frankfort Socialists, readers of Freud and Kinsey, second-wave feminists, founders of Greenpeace, and the general architects of that shag-carpet-and-swinger-sex vibe that pervaded the 1970s. They were positioned at the right age and state of life to become the mid-level administrators and functionaries of the radical expansion of federal power pioneered by LBJ and Carter, and of its analogues in the private sector. Caught between the war-regimented G.I. Generation and the free-spirited Boomers, they took after the former in terms of their loyalty to big institutions and the latter in terms of their social interests. Basically a managerial generation who inherited a functioning social order, they were also the primary beneficiaries of the post-war Pax Americana. Perhaps no other generation in history has experienced such a continuous, lifelong uptrend in their general fortunes. After weathering the Great Depression and WWII in their childhood, when the vexations of those turbulent times fell upon older heads than theirs, they knew nothing except a world of intact families, safe neighborhoods, good schools, a growing economy, high-paying jobs, fat pensions, and international peace.

    Cultural disorder always sets in when one generation's adulthood ironies and nuances become the basis for the next generation's pedagogy. It's one thing for a safely employed bunch of professionals to discuss racial integration through clouds of Pall Mall smoke at the Elks Lodge, safely isolated from any consequences of their imagined schemes (where facts are absent, sentiment reigns); it's quite another thing for their children to absorb this as their moral imperative. Anything that parents do has an amplified effect in the children, for good or for ill. The Silent destroyed their society not so much by tasting forbidden fruits as by feeding them to their children instead of truth and tradition.

    You really should read The Fourth Turning if you haven't. I don't agree entirely with book's main thesis of inevitable cyclical generational archetypes, for every historiography is but a creature of it's own time and it marshals the facts of history primarily to explain the present mood, but it offers many valuable insights nonetheless and is a pretty decent encyclopedia of Americana in its own right.

    Replies: @BB753, @Curle

    “Cultural disorder always sets in when one generation’s adulthood ironies and nuances become the basis for the next generation’s pedagogy.”

    Read that and couldn’t help but think of poor, dumb and idealistic (or was it opportunistic?) Jack Kemp and his absurd Enterprise Zones becoming the lodestar for young impressionable mutton-headed Paul Ryan.

  123. @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    @European-American

    In 1969 the teleology of all mankind seems to have been to become a suburban American. As R. Lee Ermey says in Full Metal Jacket:


    Inside every gook is an American waiting to get out.
     
    So if you ignore the HBD issues, what Aristotle would call the Material Cause, then you can try and socially engineer this into reality... or, in a more non-western manner -you are using magic, joojoo, "medicine".

    But why cannot we just let Maasai be Maasai, or Tamil Tamil? Does every Indian have to become a shitty coder looking at porn on his mobile device while living is a sprawling urban slum instead of spending the day following lengthy Hindu rituals his ancestral village?

    Likewise for me: Why do I have to amass debt to live in a pile of Sheetrock filled with plastic from China -why is my "village" so expensive? Why can I not just live in a town with my people, with a pub and a church?

    Because Six Sigma: all human capital must be interchangeable and variability must be eliminated (while diversity is celebrated...)

    Replies: @European-American

    > all human capital must be interchangeable
    > and variability must be eliminated (while diversity is celebrated…)

    It seems like an effort doomed to fail. Like trying to optimize globally, instead of optimizing locally in various specific situations. Like saying, “I’m going to find the secret about what makes all good music good” instead of focusing on what makes specific musical genres good. Like trying to isolate what makes all good foods good, and then relentlessly applying that everywhere, instead of studying separately what makes good pizza, wine, ice cream, roast lamb, wontons, etc. Sure, maybe you’ll find some good practices relating to quality, attention to detail, good ingredients… Won’t you lose a lot if you try to make everything fit excessively abstracted principles? Like trying to make the best toaster-computer-camera-nailclipper rather than making excellent versions of each of the tools.

    And yes, it’s that paradox: we value diversity, while at the same time ruthlessly rooting it out.

    It’s just bonkers.

    And it’s hardly different from the attitudes that gave us the dumbest forms of colonialism and proselytizing Christianity.

    And it’s like colonizing the world on behalf of… no one. Ardently proselytizing in the name of… Nothing.

  124. @Ivy
    Masters commentary? Much good golf today, more Sunday.

    Replies: @anon, @JohnnyGeo

  125. @Clifford Brown
    @George

    I kind of enjoy Baraka's work. The "in your face" Black Power rhetoric is something that I can relate to, it feels masculine and confident, shockingly different from the contemporary rhetoric of the Left.

    Baraka worked with Sun-Ra, and I am quite the fan of Sun-Ra. Trippy stuff.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s8VZz-ERO0


    Amiri Baraka's son was elected to replace Corey Booker as mayor of Newark, New Jersey.

    Replies: @oddsbodkins, @NOMAN

    The film version of his play “Dutchman” is quite a piece of work, worth a look if you’ve never seen it. The anger expressed in it struck a chord with me that seemed to transcend black-vs.-white (although I realize Baraka hated whites!). Tour-de-force acting, especially by Shirley Knight in her least-characteristic role ever.

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