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The New York Times oped page takes on today’s burning issue:

Why Didn’t ‘Get Out’ Win Best Picture?

Kashana Cauley MARCH 8, 2018

On Sunday night, the horror movie “Get Out” won the Oscar for best original screenplay but not for best picture. Voters’ attitudes toward the film reveal what may have contributed to the movie’s best-picture loss: the desire to turn a blind eye to the true, contentious state of black-white relations in this country.

Or, perhaps, “Get Out” didn’t win Best Picture because it wasn’t the, you know, best picture? Guillermo del Toro’s fishcegenation movie was awfully stupid, but he at least put much effort into how it looked and hired some good actors. (This is not to say that “Get Out” is an ineffective film. It’s an efficient little movie. But it’s a very little movie.)

‘Get Out’ made these voters uncomfortable by showing that black people can be silenced, whether ignored, stereotyped or even, as happens in the movie, kidnapped. So those voters’ response was to attempt to silence the movie, which paradoxically proves one of its main points.

Such willful ignorance isn’t unique to the Oscars, however. This kind of attitude is also partly to blame for the lack of progress for African-Americans in rates of homeownership, incarceration and employment over the past 50 years. …

It’s clear that America prefers its black people to remain invisible …

Reading the voluminously unsilenced and uninvisible cultural commentary praising the realism of “Get Out” and “Black Panther” has me concerned that a growing sector of the commentariat is losing touch with basic reality, as happens in Borges’ “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius” when an encyclopedia of a fictitious planet is discovered:

Handbooks, anthologies, digests, facsimiles, authorized and pirated reprintings of the Greatest Work of Man flooded and continue to flood the world. Almost at once, the real world gave way in more than one area. The truth is that it was longing to give way. Ten years ago, any symmetrical scheme with an appearance of order – dialectical materialism, anti-Semitism, Nazism – was enough to hold mankind in thrall. Why not submit to Tlön, to the immense, meticulous evidence of an ordered planet? It is useless to reply that the real world too is ordered. Perhaps it is, but in accordance with divine laws – that is, non-human laws – that we shall never comprehend. Tlön may be a labyrinth, but a labyrinth contrived by men, a labyrinth destined to be deciphered by men.

Contact and familiarity with Tlön have brought about the deterioration of our world. Mesmerized by that planet’s discipline, we forget – and go on forgetting – that theirs is the discipline of chess players, not of angels. Tlön’s putative ‘primitive language’ has now found its way into our schools; the teaching of its harmonious history, so full of stirring episodes, has obliterated the history that presided over my childhood; in our memories a fictitious past has now replaced our past, of which we know nothing for certain – not even that it is false.

On the other hand, “Get Out” and “Black Panther” weren’t exactly created by a vast cabal of humanity’s leading geniuses.

 
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  1. TGGP says: • Website

    Bradley Whitford & Catherine Keener are both very good actors to use if you’re limited to a Blumhouse budget. Caleb Landry Jones can be a bit excessive and I won’t rehash your arguments about Daniel Kaluuya, but if you’re making a comedy I can’t think of someone who’d do a better job at their role than Lil Rel Howery (and that’s the only thing I’ve seen him in). All this being said, it’s quite funny to rant about how the academy wants to “silence” someone they gave their Best Original Screenplay award to. I’d have preferred he got Best Director (it is indeed a very efficient little movie, which gets my respect), but then I didn’t bother to see Shape of Water.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910

    but if you’re making a comedy I can’t think of someone who’d do a better job at their role than Lil Rel Howery
     
    NSFW Language

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wqXNKYn-fQ
  2. “Get Out” and “Black Panther” weren’t exactly created by a vast cabal of humanity’s leading geniuses.

    They’re products created and financed by the richest and most powerful minority on the planet to bilk the poorest and least capable at fifteen dollars a pop. Grape soda isn’t a work of genius either.

    • Agree: Nico, Autochthon
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    Whoever created grape soda was a business genius. That and orange soda. You make far more money selling stuff to poor people than to rich people. The poor you shall always have with you.

    When my daughter was 3 I let her have a can of grape soda and she called it "pink kitty cat". I have no idea where she came up with that name, but she was adorable walking around with this purple can to her lips and asking for more pink kitty cat.
    , @SMK
    How ironic that Black Panther, a ludicrous fantasy that exalts black genius, could never have been made if not for technologies invented by white males, just as blacks earn millions and tens of millions of dollars a year playing football and basketball, games created by white males that they would have never invented.
  3. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    I haven’t seen GET OUT, but isn’t it about how TOO MUCH LOVE FOR BLACKNESS can harm blacks too?

    It seems whites in the movie don’t hate blacks. They love blacks too much and want to get inside black bodies and dribble balls and have big dongs and be like Michael Jordan or something.

    They don’t want to hang blacks from trees. They want to crawl inside black skin.

    They don’t want to remove blacks but become black. This excessive love of blackness turns blackness into a commodity.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Anon, not quite troll worthy but a bit of a s t r e t c h. You can always go blackface or Rachel Dolezal if you want to try blackness on.
  4. It’s clear that America prefers its black people to remain invisible …

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha… Given how blacks in this country often seem to think that they’re the only people who matter and love nothing more than endlessly talking about themselves and their problems, and given how their supposed white progressive allies also love nothing more than endlessly fawning over mediocrities like Ta Nehisi Coates as though they were the second coming of Jesus Christ, I find this statement to be hilariously clueless. African Americans love being in the spotlight, and given their general over-representation in athletics and entertainment, I find it hard to believe that black Americans either are or would feel like they were socially invisible.

    Now, on the other hand, is there actually a minority group in this country today that’s largely been rendered invisible and ignored by the mainstream?

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2017/07/04/globe-poll-omission-leaves-asian-americans-invisible-and-unheard/zB7XRKjAU3R6xzFc8tWLVK/story.html

    #OscarsSoBlackandWhite
    #AsianLivesMatterToo

    • Agree: rogue-one, Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Yes, Yan Shen, it's about time we got serious about Affirmative Action for Asians. After all, the poor bastards suffer from that dreaded math/verbal split.

    .

    Comment powered by Generac™
    http://grastengenerators.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/grastenslider3.jpg
    , @AndrewR
    You're really a broken revord.
    , @anon
    Black self-reference is in part a coping mechanism. They have felt oppressed and abandoned by humanity and so have turned inward to find ways to survive, no matter how out of touch that appears. Think of that as their own version of a reverse Stockholm Syndrome, where they dis-identify with their captors and over-identify with their own group, warts and all.
  5. Her article is written backwards. I assume because writing it forwards would expose her assumptions to her doubting mind. It would also show what an incoherent mess it is.

    To fix it, her argument goes:

    Black people earn less, are employed less and go to prison more.

    The gap is bigger than 1968

    This is because we are not talking about racism enough (!) and not fighting it enough.

    (Unlike pre-1968?!?!?!?!)

    Then she phones it in a bit:

    Trump is evil. White liberals who supported Obama are soft and deluded to blacks’ problems.

    Then, in a huge jump, she talks in an unsubtle way about why she, and I mean literally the writer herself, is important because:

    Get Out was silenced by only being nominated for some Oscars and winning others.

    Black freelance critics like the writer need more attention.

    Tldr: black women called Kashana need more paid articles published and maybe some TV time.

    • Replies: @El Dato

    Tldr: black women called Kashana need more paid articles published and maybe some TV time.
     
    But wouldn't that be akin to silencing them by making them visible?

    Also not good.
  6. This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences:

    2010: The King’s Speech – Okay, but underwhelming.
    2011: The Artist – Didn’t see it, but basically a novelty movie, as I understand it.
    2012: Argo – Didn’t see it, but IIRC, Steve said it was good.
    2013: 12 Years a Slave – Black.
    2014: Birdman — Another novelty movie, no? I won’t even watch this if it comes on cable and I can’t find the remote.
    2015: Spotlight – Hollywood bravely going after sexual abuse in another industry.
    2016: Moonlight – Black, gay.
    2017: The Shape of Water – Coalition of the Fishes

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    It isn't surprising that people who watch hundreds of movies a year might prize novelty.
    , @Boomer the Dog
    Agree, except Argo was a shamefully weak choice for Best Picture. Basically an extended episode of Locked Up Abroad, but with less tension and emotional content (and more Hollywood self-reverence).

    To think that it beat out Zero Dark Thirty, a fine and sophisticated piece of filmmaking (whatever its basis in historical fact) is embarrassing in hindsight.

    , @Yan Shen
    Well I'm not a huge movie person and only saw 2/9 of this year's Best Picture nominees, Dunkirk and Shape of Water, but I still can't believe Logan didn't the last slot for Best Picture nominee.

    For me it was definitely the best picture I had seen in 2017 and it seemed like the academy expanded the best picture field from 5 to 10 movies in part due to the snub of The Dark Knight back in 2008? That they did so but for some reason failed to nominate an even better superhero movie is a bit puzzling in my opinion.
    , @bartok

    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences
     
    Why can't it be because of the mildly accelerating decline of our civilization? Let's check back here in ten years to see if I'm right.
    , @Matthew McConnagay
    2014: Birdman — Another novelty movie, no? I won’t even watch this if it comes on cable and I can’t find the remote.

    It's actually a really solid and quite funny backstage drama, unfortunately weighed down by a nice helping of pretentious garbage and a nothing ending.

    The same director did that Leo DiCaprio movie where he gets raped by a bear, which had the exact same problems. The lesson here? Just because you can write your own movie doesn't mean you should.
    , @theMann
    Well, when you put it like that.........


    Good Lord, what an appalling collection of crap those films are, or at least, the ones I've seen. I haven't, and never will, see Moonlight or Shape of Water. The Artist is actually a brilliant and interesting film, and serves to illustrate even more perfectly what an appalling collection of ........



    Get fed up with the Oscars back a while ago when Shakespeare in Love , so boring I fell asleep twice trying to watch it and never have finished it, The English Patient, ditto, and double, Titanic, pretentious nonsense, and Chicago, a waaaaay overrated musical, all won in pretty short order. A collection of second rate films that we now know bought their Oscars.


    From bad to worse, vote buying is bad, but allowing Actors to have the biggest single block of votes in the award process is much, much worse. Letting a collection of narcissistic jacktards whose two most common characteristics are their egotism and woeful lack of any real education is a recipe for terrible decision making in any milieu , even aside from their hilariously idiotic Hollywood politics. Bill Buckley's observation about the first 500 names in the phone book goes double here.
    , @songbird
    Only saw the first three. All boring, I'm afraid. The Artist was too melancholy for me.

    Argo just wasn't good. They fictionalized the story. The story of the actual hostages was a much more interesting story, although probably difficult to tell in a movie, due to time constraints.
    , @Pat Boyle
    The King's Speech would have been a compelling and important picture if it had explored the consequences of first cousin marriage. But it just ignored the consanguinity issues of the Windsor family and pretended that his speech impediment just fell out of the sky.

    I also saw "The Artist". It was pleasant, even though I had had great reservations about investing two hours in watching it when it came on cable. I would never have seen it if I had actually had to pay for a ticket. Pinsen was right - it was basically a stunt.

    I may just watch Argo when I find it on one of the cable TV movie channels. I didn't watch it six years ago when it first came out because it starred Ben Affleck. Affleck is a strong negative presence in any film in which he appears. I call him "the turd in the punchbowl".

    "12 Years a Slave" I also didn't see. I researched the story. Apparently the whole story of a free black man being kidnapped into slavery in the South was regarded at the time it was published, as a transparent fraud. It is yet another Hollywood pro-black propaganda movie about the so called horrors of slavery. Englishmen and Americans abolished the evil practice of chattel slavery. Why not a movie about that?

    The fabled movie reviewer Joe Bob Briggs always gave a box score for the movies he reviewed. He scored them for : kung fu, car chases and something else (that I have forgotten). It looked to me as if "Birdman" had none of these requisite elements. I don't know what it was about. I watched it on TV for about ten minutes. When you have hundreds of choices on TV, the show has to be more compelling than "Birdman".

    I had to look up "Spotlight" in Wikipedia. I didn't see it and apparently no one else did either. I'm not likely to watch a film about the predations of homosexuals on children. That's simply too ugly a story for me. I like fantasy horror movies (with vampires and/or werewolves) but I'm not entertained by real horror tales. Who is?

    In 2015 all the nominees were whites. So in 2016 we have "Moonlight" get the Best Picture Oscar as a kind of racial reparation. No one seems to have considered that whites may just be better at acting than blacks. I don't know if this is actually true, acting is kind of mysterious. But Whites are better at most things - except basketball - than blacks, so it seems plausible that whites could also be better than blacks at movie acting. But this idea doesn't seem to have been entertained by the Academy. They had to honor a very black movie in 2016. That movie was "Moonlight", which I believe was essentially never seen by anyone.

    I will probably see "The Shape of Water" when it hits cable in a couple months. Del Toro has made some films I enjoyed.

    So the last decade has been pretty much a crater. Hollywood is dying - that's clear. It isn't just cable TV and Home Theater. It isn't just the paucity of good entertaining films. The principal problem seems to be leadership. The Academy seems to have no leaders with judgement. They seem to be suckers for the latest social fad. When I was a kid Hollywood almost succumbed to the Biblical Spectacular but it survived. Today the menace on is the film Honoring Black people. But no one seems to have the courage to oppose this deadly trend. Who will want to get in the car and drive to the multiplex to see a lecture on how naughty and nasty white people are, especially when you have to hazard being exposed to the real danger of blacks who have been enflamed by visions of Wakanda.

    Whites seem to be staying home.
  7. fishcegenation

    If I could award a LOL for your post I would. That’s quality.

    • Replies: @backup
    I think the joke is on the same level as the use of the term "Trophy Wife" to describe Oscar winning Frances McDormand.
  8. Wow, the stupid is extra strong in this article. Ms Cauley Seems to be confused about the whole notion of fiction.

    I skipped “Get Out” when I heard about the racial angle. It’s not 1960 any more. And these turkeys are no Sidney Poitiers. Obama was president for 8 years. Give us more Eddie Murphy and Chris Tucker and less “12 Years” and “Get Out”.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Well...make that the EARLY Eddie Murphy ("I'm from a predominantly black family").
    , @TGGP
    "Get Out" is an Obama-era movie. The white characters talk about how they would have voted Obama President for a third time if they could.
  9. Reading the voluminously unsilenced and uninvisible cultural commentary praising the realism of “Get Out” and “Black Panther” has me concerned that a growing sector of the commentariat is losing touch with basic reality, as happens in Borges’ “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius” when an encyclopedia of a fictitious planet is discovered:

    I’ve linked to this before, but it fits quite well here. Why do SJWs frame their jihads in terms of cition (Wakanda Forever!, Dumbledore’s Army, Rebels vs the Empire, etc)

    “How Fiction Forms Our Politics : The Psychology of Narratives”

  10. Reading the voluminously unsilenced and uninvisible cultural commentary praising the realism of “Get Out” and “Black Panther” has me concerned that a growing sector of the commentariat is losing touch with basic reality, as happens in Borges’ “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius” when an encyclopedia of a fictitious planet is discovered:

    Fundamental truth: SJWs are magical thinkers. They believe that fiction shapes reality. So, you want to get more Black girls interested in STEM? Show ’em Black Girl Genius Shuri (“She’s officially smarter than Tony Stark, bigots. It’s canon!”) , and, Hey!Presto!, Black Girl Geniuses will start popping up like flies. After all, before MARVEL created Tony Stark, what had White boys ever done?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    You're partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    This is also why the SJWs so often push a literal inversion of reality. It is not just a huge coincidence. The whole purpose is to deny reality to themselves and convince others of the truth of their denial.

    We won't ever convince the majority of them to stop either. Years of one on one therapy would likely do nothing. We can just raise the next generation better by exposing them to risk and personal growth, while providing a safe space for the SJWs to engage in their weird mutual delusions.

    The issue there is that these types will naturally seek out places of influence so as to further their self-esteem. Hence they dominate the media and acadaemia. Unfortunately, a root and branch clear out of such places is impossible; so de-legitimizing these spaces, by pointing out what SJWs have made of them, is pur best option.

    They are now 'safe spaces' for the vain, fragile and barely competent. At best, they function as a magic mirror that always tells the journalist/acadaemic (really, 'entertainer') how special they are. At worst, they're dirty wreckages full of shambling freaks so bought in to their own fantasy that they'll never be able to open their eyes due to the extreme psychological pain and humiliation they'd suffer.

    Prediction: this will all get worse and a lot weirder.

    1. You'll find SJWs convinced thay they're literal goddesses and that you're hateful for denying their divinity.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Many, many people are psychologically tied to this train and they'll be dragged along with it no matter how far it goes off the tracks. Losing makes this type of person more passive. Winning makes them more manic. If the Dems triumph at the mid-terms, they'll take it up a notch.
  11. Or, perhaps, “Get Out” didn’t win Best Picture because it wasn’t the, you know, best picture? Guillermo del Toro’s fishcegenation movie was awfully stupid, but he at least put effort into how it looked and hired some good actors. (This is not to say that “Get Out” is an ineffective film. It’s an efficient little movie.)

    I’m sure that somebody has brought this up, but I kinda wonder if Del Toro wasn’t also influenced by Lovecraft’s “Shadow over Innsmouth?” The tale involves a decaying Massachusetts town whose citizenry have interbred with the “Deep Ones,” alien creatures who are half frog, half fish. Del Toro is a huge Lovecraft fan (until the project fell apart, he was slated to direct an adaptation of At The Mountains of Madness)……

    I met also that which had been her grandmother. For eighty thousand years Pth’thya-l’yi had lived in Y’ha-nthlei, and thither she had gone back after Obed Marsh was dead. Y’ha-nthlei was not destroyed when the upper-earth men shot death into the sea. It was hurt, but not destroyed. The Deep Ones could never be destroyed, even though the palaeogean magic of the forgotten Old Ones might sometimes check them. For the present they would rest; but some day, if they remembered, they would rise again for the tribute Great Cthulhu craved. It would be a city greater than Innsmouth next time. They had planned to spread, and had brought up that which would help them, but now they must wait once more. For bringing the upper-earth men’s death I must do a penance, but that would not be heavy. This was the dream in which I saw a shoggoth for the first time, and the sight set me awake in a frenzy of screaming. That morning the mirror definitely told me I had acquired the Innsmouth look.

    So far I have not shot myself as my uncle Douglas did. I bought an automatic and almost took the step, but certain dreams deterred me. The tense extremes of horror are lessening, and I feel queerly drawn toward the unknown sea-deeps instead of fearing them. I hear and do strange things in sleep, and awake with a kind of exaltation instead of terror. I do not believe I need to wait for the full change as most have waited. If I did, my father would probably shut me up in a sanitarium as my poor little cousin is shut up. Stupendous and unheard-of splendours await me below, and I shall seek them soon. Iä-R’lyeh! Cthulhu fhtagn! Iä! Iä! No, I shall not shoot myself—I cannot be made to shoot myself!

    I shall plan my cousin’s escape from that Canton madhouse, and together we shall go to marvel-shadowed Innsmouth. We shall swim out to that brooding reef in the sea and dive down through black abysses to Cyclopean and many-columned Y’ha-nthlei, and in that lair of the Deep Ones we shall dwell amidst wonder and glory for ever.

    • Replies: @cthulhu


    I’m sure that somebody has brought this up, but I kinda wonder if Del Toro wasn’t also influenced by Lovecraft’s “Shadow over Innsmouth?” The tale involves a decaying Massachusetts town whose citizenry have interbred with the “Deep Ones,” alien creatures who are half frog, half fish. Del Toro is a huge Lovecraft fan (until the project fell apart, he was slated to direct an adaptation of At The Mountains of Madness)

     

    Seems plausible to me. I’m hoping that GdT winning these Oscars gets some studio off its ass to give GdT the money to make his At the Mountains of Madness adaptation - supposedly the project got shot down by the alleged similarity in storyline to Ridley Scott’s abysmal Prometheus, but that’s been in the rear view mirror for a while now. And AtMoM is supposedly GdT’s labor of love.
  12. There was a great tweet a few days back by one Shadi Hamid, who appears to write for The Atlantic (but doesn’t everybody). He warrants closer attention on the strength of this thought:

    “The people who think Get Out should get best picture are the people who kill you in Get Out”

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  13. @Dave Pinsen
    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences:

    2010: The King's Speech - Okay, but underwhelming.
    2011: The Artist - Didn't see it, but basically a novelty movie, as I understand it.
    2012: Argo - Didn't see it, but IIRC, Steve said it was good.
    2013: 12 Years a Slave - Black.
    2014: Birdman -- Another novelty movie, no? I won't even watch this if it comes on cable and I can't find the remote.
    2015: Spotlight - Hollywood bravely going after sexual abuse in another industry.
    2016: Moonlight - Black, gay.
    2017: The Shape of Water - Coalition of the Fishes

    It isn’t surprising that people who watch hundreds of movies a year might prize novelty.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Someone who watches hundreds of movies a year should get a life in the real world. Especially given who is making the movies and what culture and mentality they overwhelmingly reflect.
  14. @Dave Pinsen
    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences:

    2010: The King's Speech - Okay, but underwhelming.
    2011: The Artist - Didn't see it, but basically a novelty movie, as I understand it.
    2012: Argo - Didn't see it, but IIRC, Steve said it was good.
    2013: 12 Years a Slave - Black.
    2014: Birdman -- Another novelty movie, no? I won't even watch this if it comes on cable and I can't find the remote.
    2015: Spotlight - Hollywood bravely going after sexual abuse in another industry.
    2016: Moonlight - Black, gay.
    2017: The Shape of Water - Coalition of the Fishes

    Agree, except Argo was a shamefully weak choice for Best Picture. Basically an extended episode of Locked Up Abroad, but with less tension and emotional content (and more Hollywood self-reverence).

    To think that it beat out Zero Dark Thirty, a fine and sophisticated piece of filmmaking (whatever its basis in historical fact) is embarrassing in hindsight.

  15. @TGGP
    Bradley Whitford & Catherine Keener are both very good actors to use if you're limited to a Blumhouse budget. Caleb Landry Jones can be a bit excessive and I won't rehash your arguments about Daniel Kaluuya, but if you're making a comedy I can't think of someone who'd do a better job at their role than Lil Rel Howery (and that's the only thing I've seen him in). All this being said, it's quite funny to rant about how the academy wants to "silence" someone they gave their Best Original Screenplay award to. I'd have preferred he got Best Director (it is indeed a very efficient little movie, which gets my respect), but then I didn't bother to see Shape of Water.

    but if you’re making a comedy I can’t think of someone who’d do a better job at their role than Lil Rel Howery

    NSFW Language

  16. @Yan Shen

    It’s clear that America prefers its black people to remain invisible …
     
    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha... Given how blacks in this country often seem to think that they're the only people who matter and love nothing more than endlessly talking about themselves and their problems, and given how their supposed white progressive allies also love nothing more than endlessly fawning over mediocrities like Ta Nehisi Coates as though they were the second coming of Jesus Christ, I find this statement to be hilariously clueless. African Americans love being in the spotlight, and given their general over-representation in athletics and entertainment, I find it hard to believe that black Americans either are or would feel like they were socially invisible.

    Now, on the other hand, is there actually a minority group in this country today that's largely been rendered invisible and ignored by the mainstream?

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2017/07/04/globe-poll-omission-leaves-asian-americans-invisible-and-unheard/zB7XRKjAU3R6xzFc8tWLVK/story.html

    #OscarsSoBlackandWhite
    #AsianLivesMatterToo

    Yes, Yan Shen, it’s about time we got serious about Affirmative Action for Asians. After all, the poor bastards suffer from that dreaded math/verbal split.

    .

    Comment powered by Generac™

    • LOL: Abe
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    LOL

    Haha, and that's just the back-up for when iSHTF.

    (BTW it'd be nice to get one that can be switched easily among propane, natural gas, and unleaded gasoline. )
  17. • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    This is good news!
    , @Glaivester
    WOOHOO!
  18. @syonredux

    Reading the voluminously unsilenced and uninvisible cultural commentary praising the realism of “Get Out” and “Black Panther” has me concerned that a growing sector of the commentariat is losing touch with basic reality, as happens in Borges’ “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius” when an encyclopedia of a fictitious planet is discovered:
     
    Fundamental truth: SJWs are magical thinkers. They believe that fiction shapes reality. So, you want to get more Black girls interested in STEM? Show 'em Black Girl Genius Shuri ("She's officially smarter than Tony Stark, bigots. It's canon!") , and, Hey!Presto!, Black Girl Geniuses will start popping up like flies. After all, before MARVEL created Tony Stark, what had White boys ever done?

    You’re partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    This is also why the SJWs so often push a literal inversion of reality. It is not just a huge coincidence. The whole purpose is to deny reality to themselves and convince others of the truth of their denial.

    We won’t ever convince the majority of them to stop either. Years of one on one therapy would likely do nothing. We can just raise the next generation better by exposing them to risk and personal growth, while providing a safe space for the SJWs to engage in their weird mutual delusions.

    The issue there is that these types will naturally seek out places of influence so as to further their self-esteem. Hence they dominate the media and acadaemia. Unfortunately, a root and branch clear out of such places is impossible; so de-legitimizing these spaces, by pointing out what SJWs have made of them, is pur best option.

    They are now ‘safe spaces’ for the vain, fragile and barely competent. At best, they function as a magic mirror that always tells the journalist/acadaemic (really, ‘entertainer’) how special they are. At worst, they’re dirty wreckages full of shambling freaks so bought in to their own fantasy that they’ll never be able to open their eyes due to the extreme psychological pain and humiliation they’d suffer.

    Prediction: this will all get worse and a lot weirder.

    1. You’ll find SJWs convinced thay they’re literal goddesses and that you’re hateful for denying their divinity.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Many, many people are psychologically tied to this train and they’ll be dragged along with it no matter how far it goes off the tracks. Losing makes this type of person more passive. Winning makes them more manic. If the Dems triumph at the mid-terms, they’ll take it up a notch.

    • Replies: @Percy Gryce

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.
     
    It has begun. Here is the next Vanity Fair cover girl:

    https://goo.gl/images/suq24m
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    ...And the Gods of the Copybook Headings,
    Limped up to explain it once more.

    http://www.theotherpages.org/poems/kiplin03.html
    , @Cloudbuster
    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    That started more than two years ago, at least:

    https://photos.vanityfair.com/2015/06/01/556cd6644ae56e586e4588d8_caitlyn-jenner-bruce-jenner-july-2015-vf.jpg
    , @wrd9
    A lot of what you wrote applies to Critical Race Theory.
    , @Dignan
    a current example: the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue has included "plus size" models for the past few years, I believe.
    , @syonredux

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.
     
    Heh. Reminds me of the bit in one of Updike's Bech books where Bech wins the Melville Award for the American author who has Maintained the most Meaningful Silence.
    , @syonredux

    You’re partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!
     
    Gotta wonder, though, about nagging doubts.....Surely some of the goodthinkers who saw Hidden Figures have to wonder if the Black lady mathematicians in the film are really all that great when compared to people like Josiah Willard Gibbs and James Clerk Maxwell.....surely some Black cineastes know that Black Panther, Moonlight, and Twelve Years a Slave
    aren't really in the same league as The Searchers and 2001: A Space Odyssey.....
  19. @Dave Pinsen
    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences:

    2010: The King's Speech - Okay, but underwhelming.
    2011: The Artist - Didn't see it, but basically a novelty movie, as I understand it.
    2012: Argo - Didn't see it, but IIRC, Steve said it was good.
    2013: 12 Years a Slave - Black.
    2014: Birdman -- Another novelty movie, no? I won't even watch this if it comes on cable and I can't find the remote.
    2015: Spotlight - Hollywood bravely going after sexual abuse in another industry.
    2016: Moonlight - Black, gay.
    2017: The Shape of Water - Coalition of the Fishes

    Well I’m not a huge movie person and only saw 2/9 of this year’s Best Picture nominees, Dunkirk and Shape of Water, but I still can’t believe Logan didn’t the last slot for Best Picture nominee.

    For me it was definitely the best picture I had seen in 2017 and it seemed like the academy expanded the best picture field from 5 to 10 movies in part due to the snub of The Dark Knight back in 2008? That they did so but for some reason failed to nominate an even better superhero movie is a bit puzzling in my opinion.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Logan was awful. I'm a bit biased because I've hated all the X-Men movies, but it was crappy. Based on an SJW comic book attempt to replace Wolverine with a girl; the little girl acting all hilariously badly; the final fight being absolutely ridiculous and nonsensical (so the bad guys have no problem crossing the American/Mexican border to catch them, but the Canadian border in the middle of nowhere is sacrosanct?); the bad bonding scenes along the way; and of course Hugh Jackman jacked up on so many steroids to look "badass" that its humorous.

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America. It wasn't cross country or up/down a coast, it was through the heart of America. Interesting to go that way. And they meet a nice farming family, which is good....except they're black, of course. Totally believable.
  20. @Lot
    Stephen Miller ally named to oversee refugee programs!

    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/03/08/andrew-veprek-state-department-refugee-admissions-448210

    This is good news!

  21. @Tyrion 2
    Her article is written backwards. I assume because writing it forwards would expose her assumptions to her doubting mind. It would also show what an incoherent mess it is.

    To fix it, her argument goes:

    Black people earn less, are employed less and go to prison more.

    The gap is bigger than 1968

    This is because we are not talking about racism enough (!) and not fighting it enough.

    (Unlike pre-1968?!?!?!?!)

    Then she phones it in a bit:

    Trump is evil. White liberals who supported Obama are soft and deluded to blacks' problems.

    Then, in a huge jump, she talks in an unsubtle way about why she, and I mean literally the writer herself, is important because:

    Get Out was silenced by only being nominated for some Oscars and winning others.

    Black freelance critics like the writer need more attention.

    Tldr: black women called Kashana need more paid articles published and maybe some TV time.

    Tldr: black women called Kashana need more paid articles published and maybe some TV time.

    But wouldn’t that be akin to silencing them by making them visible?

    Also not good.

  22. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Is it possible that part of the reign of blackness in movies has to do with:

    1) Black actors are cheaper to pay than white actors, so the films are cheaper to make?

    2) If you do enough guilt-whip cracking, it’ll make just enough goodwhites show up that you will:

    3) $Profit$!

    Historically speaking, films about blacks don’t make a lot of money because they don’t pull in much of an audience. Whites don’t care about black lives and don’t show up. Therefore, it looks like Hollywood is trying to construct a new type of black film formula–all based on dragging money out of cringing, masochistic whites–that actually pulls in the enough audience to make a fat profit.

    If the formula succeeds in producing blockbusters, we’ll see a LOT of these types of white guilt films in the future. People of my generation never would have gone to see these things, but Millennials are appallingly easy to manipulate.

    When Millennials age into their 60s, they’re going to wreck the world. They’re crazier and more radical than the Boomers, and believe so much tripe that they can never be deprogrammed. If half the Boomers haven’t lost their leftism by their 60s, then we can’t change the Millennials, either.

    • Replies: @El Dato

    If the formula succeeds in producing blockbusters, we’ll see a LOT of these types of white guilt films in the future. People of my generation never would have gone to see these things, but Millennials are appallingly easy to manipulate.
     
    Blackbusters: A new market frontier!

    Black Brother orders you to go watch this magnificient film, genetically-guilty peons.
  23. Think what a great movie can be made from a mashup of Get Out and Shape of Water. Lots of potential there.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Get Out of the Water?

    Out of Shape?

    BTW, Del Toro at the Oscars looked like he was pushing 300 lb. Made Harvey Weinstein look skinny.

  24. @Anonym
    fishcegenation

    If I could award a LOL for your post I would. That's quality.

    I think the joke is on the same level as the use of the term “Trophy Wife” to describe Oscar winning Frances McDormand.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    I think the joke is on the same level as the use of the term “Trophy Wife” to describe Oscar winning Frances McDormand.

    Which is to say...?

    I think the trophy wife line was a wry, witty putdown. McDormand is no oil painting, though almost pretty in her youth. After the inclusion rider bit, understandable. It's a good pun, but I didn't even internally chuckle. So one of the Coens married a confirmed great actress with two trophies. If he was willing to settle for a less talented actress he could have no doubt had a lot hotter shiksa, so in no way is she a trophy wife of the usual meaning. (If you are going to dissect a joke, always make it someone else's. If it wasn't funny before it certainly won't survive the autopsy.)

    By contrast, "fishcegenation" - I was literally laughing out loud, then giggling for about a minute afterwards, off and on. What is funny and to what extent differs for every person, but that term - the combination of fish and miscegenation, the way it came together, first using the taboo term "miscegenatation" as a putdown - you aren't supposed to do this - as we all know race mixing is holy, indeed jasmine scented. But it's not just race mixing, it's race mixing and not with some amazing swamp creature it's with a fish, an aquatic lifeform, which is pretty humorous. It's not even miscegenation at the level of human, so it's fishcegenation.

    In one word Steve completely craps all over the pretentious naked emperor del Toro's Oscar winning arthouse flick. Fishcegenation - it puts it on the level of arthouse anime tentacle porn, which after all is said and done is still tentacle porn. Once you see it you can't unsee it. Like watching the Untouchables again after watching Naked Gun 33 1/3 for the first time.

    https://youtu.be/YwM7NgPE5lw

    Now the provocoteur is now the orthodoxy we have formed our own culture of critique, making a mirror image of the 'Piss Christ'. "How do you like it, huh? Having fun?"

    https://youtu.be/0PdIVGmjOdY

    For all those reasons it's funny and subversive.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Not true. I GOT this one!

    Haha, but it's probably because Steve explained the gist of this movie in another post a few days back. I won't spoil the whole thing for you, but from my expectations of the ending that I'll never watch, things don't go very well in the delivery room. The OB-doc is supposed to first count fingers and toes, but fins and flippers were never described in 1st year anatomy..

  25. Get out was a 6. Maybe.

    I downloaded it and I thought some parts were OK, but overall it was feeding black paranoia and suffered from a silly story culminating in a bad, predictable plot.

    I don’t understand this: if you give movies a PG-13 or X rating to protect minors from sex et al, you should give movies like this such ratings, too, because like horror and porn, movies like this increase feelings of grievance and revenge in the low IQ masses who can’t differentiate between fact and fiction very well.

  26. @Dave Pinsen
    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences:

    2010: The King's Speech - Okay, but underwhelming.
    2011: The Artist - Didn't see it, but basically a novelty movie, as I understand it.
    2012: Argo - Didn't see it, but IIRC, Steve said it was good.
    2013: 12 Years a Slave - Black.
    2014: Birdman -- Another novelty movie, no? I won't even watch this if it comes on cable and I can't find the remote.
    2015: Spotlight - Hollywood bravely going after sexual abuse in another industry.
    2016: Moonlight - Black, gay.
    2017: The Shape of Water - Coalition of the Fishes

    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences

    Why can’t it be because of the mildly accelerating decline of our civilization? Let’s check back here in ten years to see if I’m right.

    • Agree: Kylie
  27. @Dave Pinsen
    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences:

    2010: The King's Speech - Okay, but underwhelming.
    2011: The Artist - Didn't see it, but basically a novelty movie, as I understand it.
    2012: Argo - Didn't see it, but IIRC, Steve said it was good.
    2013: 12 Years a Slave - Black.
    2014: Birdman -- Another novelty movie, no? I won't even watch this if it comes on cable and I can't find the remote.
    2015: Spotlight - Hollywood bravely going after sexual abuse in another industry.
    2016: Moonlight - Black, gay.
    2017: The Shape of Water - Coalition of the Fishes

    2014: Birdman — Another novelty movie, no? I won’t even watch this if it comes on cable and I can’t find the remote.

    It’s actually a really solid and quite funny backstage drama, unfortunately weighed down by a nice helping of pretentious garbage and a nothing ending.

    The same director did that Leo DiCaprio movie where he gets raped by a bear, which had the exact same problems. The lesson here? Just because you can write your own movie doesn’t mean you should.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The screenplay for Birdman is in English but only one of the 4 writers seems to be good at English.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    The most recent Best Picture winner I watched and found hugely entertaining was The Departed. Was any more recent winner as good as that, in your opinion?
  28. @Matthew McConnagay
    2014: Birdman — Another novelty movie, no? I won’t even watch this if it comes on cable and I can’t find the remote.

    It's actually a really solid and quite funny backstage drama, unfortunately weighed down by a nice helping of pretentious garbage and a nothing ending.

    The same director did that Leo DiCaprio movie where he gets raped by a bear, which had the exact same problems. The lesson here? Just because you can write your own movie doesn't mean you should.

    The screenplay for Birdman is in English but only one of the 4 writers seems to be good at English.

    • Replies: @Matthew McConnagay
    It's been too long, but I don't remember the dialogue being the problem. It was the self-consciously artsy-fartsy stuff gumming up the works, as I recall it. They were really reaching to say something profound, but they didn't have anything profound to say. If they'd have scaled back their ambition and just told this story about these people trying to put on a play, they'd have had a great film.

    It's a shame - I thought they were skewering pretentious literary types by having the play be a Raymond Carver adaptation, but in the end they themselves couldn't resist the temptation to be Important Artists.

    At least, that's my take. But I tend to see film/TV/publishing like so: there's literature and there's pulp. Literature is rarely deserving of the respect it garners, whereas pulp rarely reaches the heights that the best literature does - but it's usually better.

    I should be happy that some pulpy films are getting academy recognition lately, after being locked out of consideration for so long - e.g., Get Out, Mad Max. But one suspects that these are only really getting nominated for political reasons.

  29. @Matthew McConnagay
    2014: Birdman — Another novelty movie, no? I won’t even watch this if it comes on cable and I can’t find the remote.

    It's actually a really solid and quite funny backstage drama, unfortunately weighed down by a nice helping of pretentious garbage and a nothing ending.

    The same director did that Leo DiCaprio movie where he gets raped by a bear, which had the exact same problems. The lesson here? Just because you can write your own movie doesn't mean you should.

    The most recent Best Picture winner I watched and found hugely entertaining was The Departed. Was any more recent winner as good as that, in your opinion?

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    No Country for Old Men, the next year, was the last great film to win.
    , @Matthew McConnagay
    No Country for Old Men, for sure. A genuine classic. The Departed is a cut below, but was still a really good film, probably the best nominated that year. (Although I really liked Little Miss Sunshine.) But it's also kind of... it's not the best Scorsese movie, y'know? But they passed him over too many times before not to give him one, even though it's Goodfellas or Taxi Driver or (allegedly) Raging Bull that really deserved it.

    Apart from that, Birdman, Argo and The Hurt Locker were all decent enough, albeit not as good as The Departed. Even 12 Years a Slave wasn't actually a bad film. Just not a particularly good one.

    And it's worth mentioning that I didn't see most of the Best Picture winners in recent years (or not so recent years either). But I'm still comfortable declaring them to be shit, since, well, they so obviously are. You can see the stink lines above Moonlight from miles away.

    If we widen our search to films nominated for Best Picture - or even those not nominated - we can find some even better films, of course, but let's not go crazy, eh?
    , @Steve Sailer
    No Country for Old Men was mostly awesome, although I couldn't understand Tommy Lee Jones' mumbling with subtitles.

    Among the smaller, more experimental choices, I thought The Hurt Locker was very good.

    But why not just give the Best Picture Oscar to the best Big Movie of the year, like The Departed? Trying to guess what experimental art house film will be influential in 10 years is pretty hopeless for the Academy, so why not just reward well done examples of Big American (or Anglo-American) Movie-Making?

    , @snorlax
    As others said, No Country for Old Men was even better. I liked Slumdog Millionaire, The Hurt Locker, The Artist, and Argo. I didn't like 12 Years a Slave (which robbed the far better American Hustle). Didn't see The King's Speech, Birdman, Spotlight, Moonlight or The Shape of Water.

    It is remarkable how the quality of the winners fell off a cliff these past two decades.

    Between 1950 (All About Eve) and 2000 (Gladiator) virtually every winner was a genuine classic or at least left a major impact on pop culture.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Award_for_Best_Picture#1950s
  30. Something I was thinking about in the airport the other day…

    How long until airplane boarding priority is assigned based on oppression status? Disenfranchised racial minorities first, followed by active duty military, LGBT+, members of sky-elite, women who’ve been #metoo’d, people traveling with children under 4, then regular boarding.

    I think if you’re an entrepreneurial social activity you could have a good go at this. You could probably social-media browbeat at least one airline into doing it. Then get yourself a big “diversity consultancy” fee when they implement it.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    What is with the rush to board the airplane?

    Sure, if you want to cram the overhead with those anvil-laden cases you are carrying on, you need to get seated first. But cool people always board last. It is much like sitting in the back row of class is cool. It signals that you are too cool to be herded into the boarding line. It signals that you are too cool to rise from the boarding lounge seat until they make "last call."

    Best yet, if you had reserved a window or even a middle seat, you can stare down the person occupying the aisle who got preferred boarding and just doesn't want to get up out of their seat. Even on Southwest you can do this to claim that last remaining seat in the middle. Serious cool.
    , @Captain Willard
    First class will board last so the 1% can perform public penance.
  31. Everything is a giant conspiracy to keep black genius from assuming its rightful place.

    This really must be an exhausting way to approach life. Blacks are only 12% of the population, but if they don’t get 100% of everything its racism? In most areas, given the human capital, 12% would be a great accomplishment.

    I live in a state with a decent-sized black population. I wonder how mystifying this all must be to the people who live in states where blacks number in the thousands.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    william, I think most Americans wished that black Americans would kick their asses in gear and catch up. Free public education was the best place to start but now it's about everyone being equal and inclusive. Priorities and self control seem to be lacking in their make up.
  32. 100% OT, but a chap called Scott has a brilliant comment on “conservatives” over at Dalrock’s.

    “If you would have asked me 20 years ago to describe or articulate what the long term goals of the “conservative” movement were, it would have been inconceivable for me to come up with:

    “All of the policy ideas of the left will be implemented, just over a longer period of time so people can adjust.”

    But that is EXACTLY how “conservatives” have behaved for my entire life.

    The polite “right” in America exists to be the spoonful of sugar that helps the inevitable medicine of the coming dark, childless, killjoy leftist dystopia go down. They play the role of grumpy curmudgeon who ultimately gives in after a period of time.

    The system is now set up to insure steady, leftward “progress.” It doesn’t matter whose fault it is. But it may be reversible if so called “conservatives” can be shown this new paradigm.

    All the institutions have fallen. Every single one. There are only small pockets of individuals and families resisting and trying to behave according to previous iterations of rationality, tradition, civility and natural law. We seem like freaks from another planet or time to the legitimate world.”

    Now to be fair to conservatives, it’s not they who describe, say, Christian home-educators as “freaks from another planet“, it’s the people who get given the megaphone who do that.

    Also OT, the Guardian remembers the magazine New Musical Express (RIP), and talks to former staffer Lucy O’Brien about their “youth suicide” cover of 1986.

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/mar/09/he-tried-to-get-out-of-the-car-at-80mph-the-stories-behind-nmes-greatest-covers

    “I think it was one of the lowest selling issues that year – the distributors groaned about it – but in terms of cultural capital, it is now really sought-after on eBay. Gina Birch from the Raincoats told me Kurt Cobain called it one of his favourite issues, and Richey Edwards from the Manic Street Preachers talked about it, too. So, it really did have an impact.”

    It certainly did. Both Cobain and Edwards committed suicide.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    Conservative breakdown is coming to a head, but it's actually a pretty old debate,

    https://americanaffairsjournal.org/2018/02/what-is-principled-conservatism/

    https://archive.is/KG4d7

    http://www.claremont.org/crb/basicpage/the-flight-93-election/

    http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2016/11/our-principles.html

    As I put it, conservatism is breaking down into the Clash-of-Civilizations camp vs. the End-of-History camp. Or home-and-hearth vs. Team Trot.

    The conservative wing championed by Bill Kristol et al. has no real roots in the classical liberal, Western European tradition, and with Trump's election they are making the short, happy journey Leftward.
    , @stillCARealist
    Cultural and moral conservatism, the kinds that matter most, are quite difficult to live up to. People realize this starting about age 16, and many leave the fold, never to return. Some come back when they have kids themselves and wonder how civilization will continue if they don't teach it and live it.

    Getting and staying married, raising children, working full time, paying your bills, abiding by the law, abstaining from substance abuse, helping your friends and family through tough times, being a participant in community affairs. These all require hard work and self-sacrifice, and it's never been easier to shirk all these responsibilities.

    Don't ever expect conservatism to be a winner in the sense that people en masse jump at the prospect of more duty. Conservatism is harder.
  33. The author of this piece does a good job of highlighting why so many people do ignore ‘black’ cultural issues or struggles – no matter how much attention is paid, it’s never enough, and the hectoring loses its effect the longer you are exposed to it. This is probably why college-age and 20-somethings are the most active and vocal SJWs, although those that manage to remain that way well into adulthood are the most dangerous because they are the true believers.

    I only saw a few of the nominated movies this year, including “Get Out.” I thought it was an above average film but not great, which is basically how I felt about every nominated film I’ve seen for about the last 5 years. I think the Oscar for original screenplay was a fair acknowledgement of the movie as well.

  34. Only 26 million watched the Oscars this year. It used to be in the 40’s. Award things like “Get Out”, and let a few hundred thousand redbox-rent or Netflix it, and the ensuing word-of-mouth would damage the Academy’s reputation further still, even amongst movie lovers.

  35. @Tyrion 2
    You're partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    This is also why the SJWs so often push a literal inversion of reality. It is not just a huge coincidence. The whole purpose is to deny reality to themselves and convince others of the truth of their denial.

    We won't ever convince the majority of them to stop either. Years of one on one therapy would likely do nothing. We can just raise the next generation better by exposing them to risk and personal growth, while providing a safe space for the SJWs to engage in their weird mutual delusions.

    The issue there is that these types will naturally seek out places of influence so as to further their self-esteem. Hence they dominate the media and acadaemia. Unfortunately, a root and branch clear out of such places is impossible; so de-legitimizing these spaces, by pointing out what SJWs have made of them, is pur best option.

    They are now 'safe spaces' for the vain, fragile and barely competent. At best, they function as a magic mirror that always tells the journalist/acadaemic (really, 'entertainer') how special they are. At worst, they're dirty wreckages full of shambling freaks so bought in to their own fantasy that they'll never be able to open their eyes due to the extreme psychological pain and humiliation they'd suffer.

    Prediction: this will all get worse and a lot weirder.

    1. You'll find SJWs convinced thay they're literal goddesses and that you're hateful for denying their divinity.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Many, many people are psychologically tied to this train and they'll be dragged along with it no matter how far it goes off the tracks. Losing makes this type of person more passive. Winning makes them more manic. If the Dems triumph at the mid-terms, they'll take it up a notch.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    It has begun. Here is the next Vanity Fair cover girl:

    https://goo.gl/images/suq24m

    • Replies: @Altai
    Yeah, this has been going on for a while and arguably in the fashion industry for decades. It's when genuinely dull and boring looking people (Not necessarily attractive or unattractive) appear on covers that the age of the last man will have begun.
    , @stillCARealist
    I can't believe I clicked on a lesbo mag cover. Next time give a warning!
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Not woke enough. More "women" formerly with dicks would be properly vibrant!
  36. what may have contributed to the movie’s best-picture loss: the desire to turn a blind eye to the true, contentious state of black-white relations in this country.

    But not so blind that they didn’t give it Best Screenplay? Half-blind then? How many awards would have been necessary before the Academy showed itself to be Woke? 100% of them? This is just more of the usual blackety-black-black stuff. If a white person tried this they’d call her a Nazi before she finished her first sentence.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Arclight
    That's the thing - there is not endpoint, no moment when the itch has been scratched. Just endless demands for more recognition, more praise, more acknowledgement of value, etc. This will never change, and frankly it will probably lead to a crackup on the left in a generation or so when Latinos have fully surpassed blacks as the most important minority in numbers, economic power, and cultural influence. Black America has grown accustomed to being the 2nd largest group in the country with outsized moral authority to demand attention to their priorities, but soon they will be a permanent 3rd banana. I doubt their political and cultural leaders will take this well, and I suspect an increasing share of Latinos will no longer want to be part of a political coalition with them.
  37. @Yan Shen
    Well I'm not a huge movie person and only saw 2/9 of this year's Best Picture nominees, Dunkirk and Shape of Water, but I still can't believe Logan didn't the last slot for Best Picture nominee.

    For me it was definitely the best picture I had seen in 2017 and it seemed like the academy expanded the best picture field from 5 to 10 movies in part due to the snub of The Dark Knight back in 2008? That they did so but for some reason failed to nominate an even better superhero movie is a bit puzzling in my opinion.

    Logan was awful. I’m a bit biased because I’ve hated all the X-Men movies, but it was crappy. Based on an SJW comic book attempt to replace Wolverine with a girl; the little girl acting all hilariously badly; the final fight being absolutely ridiculous and nonsensical (so the bad guys have no problem crossing the American/Mexican border to catch them, but the Canadian border in the middle of nowhere is sacrosanct?); the bad bonding scenes along the way; and of course Hugh Jackman jacked up on so many steroids to look “badass” that its humorous.

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America. It wasn’t cross country or up/down a coast, it was through the heart of America. Interesting to go that way. And they meet a nice farming family, which is good….except they’re black, of course. Totally believable.

    • Replies: @Glaivester
    If Marvel wants to do a female version of a hero, why not go with a movie set in a "few years ahead of time" alternate universe, the MC2? That way, you could get Spider-Girl, American Dream, Wild Thing... Spider-Girl was one of the more tenacious comic books around, and as it basically was "Spider-Man: the Next Generation" (Spider-Girl is Peter Parker's daughter), the "handing down the legacy" was a lot more organic.

    The stories were also pretty good, because they tended more to the older, "funner" tone rather than the newer, "more serious and elaborate" tone.
    , @Daniel Williams

    Logan was awful.
     
    It bummed me out, too.

    Professor X is senile. Wolverine is a broken-down drunk. Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of "Dreamers" with magic powers. Real uplifting stuff.
    , @Twodees Partain
    Yeah, so "Logan" wasn't great, but it was an improvement over the flashy sci-fi of the other Xmen flicks. Oh, and BTW, it beat the shit out of "Get Out".
    , @syonredux

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America.
     
    I enjoyed the film's symbolically anti-Mexican narrative: Get as far away from Mexico as you can.

    As for the flick, I thought that it was OK. Quite derivative of the "Dying/Retired Gunfighter" genre (The Shootist, Shane, Unforgiven), though....but the film does, at least, hang a lampshade on its derivative nature (the characters watch Shane at one point, and Shane's final speech is used as Logan's eulogy).

  38. Get Out was a very, very good film. I was very thrilled that it won best original screenplay, which it strongly deserved. To say that it did not win “Best Picture” because of racism, however, is the kind of hyper-charged argument that does nothing but damage the cause of racial equality.

    Get Out was, in my humble opinion, not the “best” picture of the year, even though it was very, very good. The film that did win actually advocated for the same kind of racial and gender neutral goals that Ms. Cauley would advocate.

    Unlike “Get Out,” not all white people are monsters. (I would point out that many of the white people in The Shape of Water were monsters as well.) Just because the white people were portrayed as monsters in Get Out, and to a lesser extent in The Shape of Water, does not mean I didn’t (as a white man) like both films. I did. But to say that Get Out was denied the Oscar for Best Picture because of racism is simply … not a good argument.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    TD sounds almost sane here. Is he mellowing in his old age? Is it an imposter? If a blackety-black commentator is too blackety-black for TD she must be blackety-black indeed.

    I'm guessing Cauley had this piece pre-written figuring that G.O. would not win Best Picture and winning Best Original Screenplay sort of threw a monkey wrench into her thesis but since she had written it already she made a few token (uh, minor) changes and sent it in anyway.
  39. anon • Disclaimer says:

    Voters’ attitudes toward the film reveal what may have contributed to the movie’s best-picture loss: the desire to turn a blind eye to the true, contentious state of black-white relations in this country.

    I don’t know, maybe. Personally, I’m just going to go with my original idea, which I used to predict the winner (sort of) in the comments of another iSteve post about the Oscars.

    It’s pretty simple. They did the black thing last year. This year, it was the Dreamers’ turn. And they also did the gay thing last year, so Call Me By Your Name didn’t have much of a chance either.

    I thought The Post had a chance, since it was fawning over a newspaper, but apparently, that wasn’t enough.

  40. @YetAnotherAnon
    100% OT, but a chap called Scott has a brilliant comment on "conservatives" over at Dalrock's.

    "If you would have asked me 20 years ago to describe or articulate what the long term goals of the “conservative” movement were, it would have been inconceivable for me to come up with:

    “All of the policy ideas of the left will be implemented, just over a longer period of time so people can adjust.”

    But that is EXACTLY how “conservatives” have behaved for my entire life.

    The polite “right” in America exists to be the spoonful of sugar that helps the inevitable medicine of the coming dark, childless, killjoy leftist dystopia go down. They play the role of grumpy curmudgeon who ultimately gives in after a period of time.

    The system is now set up to insure steady, leftward “progress.” It doesn’t matter whose fault it is. But it may be reversible if so called “conservatives” can be shown this new paradigm.

    All the institutions have fallen. Every single one. There are only small pockets of individuals and families resisting and trying to behave according to previous iterations of rationality, tradition, civility and natural law. We seem like freaks from another planet or time to the legitimate world."

     

    Now to be fair to conservatives, it's not they who describe, say, Christian home-educators as "freaks from another planet", it's the people who get given the megaphone who do that.

    Also OT, the Guardian remembers the magazine New Musical Express (RIP), and talks to former staffer Lucy O'Brien about their "youth suicide" cover of 1986.

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/mar/09/he-tried-to-get-out-of-the-car-at-80mph-the-stories-behind-nmes-greatest-covers

    "I think it was one of the lowest selling issues that year – the distributors groaned about it – but in terms of cultural capital, it is now really sought-after on eBay. Gina Birch from the Raincoats told me Kurt Cobain called it one of his favourite issues, and Richey Edwards from the Manic Street Preachers talked about it, too. So, it really did have an impact."

    It certainly did. Both Cobain and Edwards committed suicide.

    Conservative breakdown is coming to a head, but it’s actually a pretty old debate,

    https://americanaffairsjournal.org/2018/02/what-is-principled-conservatism/

    https://archive.is/KG4d7

    http://www.claremont.org/crb/basicpage/the-flight-93-election/

    http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2016/11/our-principles.html

    As I put it, conservatism is breaking down into the Clash-of-Civilizations camp vs. the End-of-History camp. Or home-and-hearth vs. Team Trot.

    The conservative wing championed by Bill Kristol et al. has no real roots in the classical liberal, Western European tradition, and with Trump’s election they are making the short, happy journey Leftward.

  41. @Tyrion 2
    You're partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    This is also why the SJWs so often push a literal inversion of reality. It is not just a huge coincidence. The whole purpose is to deny reality to themselves and convince others of the truth of their denial.

    We won't ever convince the majority of them to stop either. Years of one on one therapy would likely do nothing. We can just raise the next generation better by exposing them to risk and personal growth, while providing a safe space for the SJWs to engage in their weird mutual delusions.

    The issue there is that these types will naturally seek out places of influence so as to further their self-esteem. Hence they dominate the media and acadaemia. Unfortunately, a root and branch clear out of such places is impossible; so de-legitimizing these spaces, by pointing out what SJWs have made of them, is pur best option.

    They are now 'safe spaces' for the vain, fragile and barely competent. At best, they function as a magic mirror that always tells the journalist/acadaemic (really, 'entertainer') how special they are. At worst, they're dirty wreckages full of shambling freaks so bought in to their own fantasy that they'll never be able to open their eyes due to the extreme psychological pain and humiliation they'd suffer.

    Prediction: this will all get worse and a lot weirder.

    1. You'll find SJWs convinced thay they're literal goddesses and that you're hateful for denying their divinity.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Many, many people are psychologically tied to this train and they'll be dragged along with it no matter how far it goes off the tracks. Losing makes this type of person more passive. Winning makes them more manic. If the Dems triumph at the mid-terms, they'll take it up a notch.

    …And the Gods of the Copybook Headings,
    Limped up to explain it once more.

    http://www.theotherpages.org/poems/kiplin03.html

  42. Black people have always assumed that they would get to run the Coalition of the Fringes – the Obama White House forever. The Bajan Mulatto Mafia rules all! Half white blacks put in power by 3/4 black blacks. But once you play the logic of the Coalition out, they are just one more minority among many. Soon Latinos will be an even bigger minority, if they aren’t already. Then you have Asians, women, gays, etc., etc. Even if you accept the premise that it is Our Turn Now and white men should spend the next 400 years in purgatory, that doesn’t mean that blacks get to run the show. They will have to get in line with all the other white men haters to share the spoils.

  43. @Dave Pinsen
    The most recent Best Picture winner I watched and found hugely entertaining was The Departed. Was any more recent winner as good as that, in your opinion?

    No Country for Old Men, the next year, was the last great film to win.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    2007 was a pretty good year for movies. There Will Be Blood came out the same year and lost Best Picture to No Country For Old Men. Could have really gone either way, but No Country had a gripping plot, while TWBB seemed to be about Daniel Day Lewis acting all Daniel Day Lewis-y. Not necessarily a bad thing, though. If TWBB comes on cable, I can’t help but watch it, just because of Day Lewis’ performance. I can’t think of another film that was so completely dominated by its lead actor. Had literally anyone else on the planet been cast in that role, that film would have been instantly forgettable.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    True. Kind of a downer, but that was a legit Best Picture.
  44. @backup
    I think the joke is on the same level as the use of the term "Trophy Wife" to describe Oscar winning Frances McDormand.

    I think the joke is on the same level as the use of the term “Trophy Wife” to describe Oscar winning Frances McDormand.

    Which is to say…?

    I think the trophy wife line was a wry, witty putdown. McDormand is no oil painting, though almost pretty in her youth. After the inclusion rider bit, understandable. It’s a good pun, but I didn’t even internally chuckle. So one of the Coens married a confirmed great actress with two trophies. If he was willing to settle for a less talented actress he could have no doubt had a lot hotter shiksa, so in no way is she a trophy wife of the usual meaning. (If you are going to dissect a joke, always make it someone else’s. If it wasn’t funny before it certainly won’t survive the autopsy.)

    By contrast, “fishcegenation” – I was literally laughing out loud, then giggling for about a minute afterwards, off and on. What is funny and to what extent differs for every person, but that term – the combination of fish and miscegenation, the way it came together, first using the taboo term “miscegenatation” as a putdown – you aren’t supposed to do this – as we all know race mixing is holy, indeed jasmine scented. But it’s not just race mixing, it’s race mixing and not with some amazing swamp creature it’s with a fish, an aquatic lifeform, which is pretty humorous. It’s not even miscegenation at the level of human, so it’s fishcegenation.

    In one word Steve completely craps all over the pretentious naked emperor del Toro’s Oscar winning arthouse flick. Fishcegenation – it puts it on the level of arthouse anime tentacle porn, which after all is said and done is still tentacle porn. Once you see it you can’t unsee it. Like watching the Untouchables again after watching Naked Gun 33 1/3 for the first time.

    Now the provocoteur is now the orthodoxy we have formed our own culture of critique, making a mirror image of the ‘Piss Christ’. “How do you like it, huh? Having fun?”

    For all those reasons it’s funny and subversive.

    • Replies: @songbird
    A bit of a tangent, but Star Trek was always really funny in this regard. There were endless alien-human hybrids, starting with Spock. Spock had a Vulcan father - a guy with green blood, like a fish. But a human mother. He was the original fishcegination (not counting Lovecraft).

    Spock's character - torn between two natures - was pretty important. But they really, really got carried away with it, with subsequent characters, and even walkons, who seemed to be mainly about alien miscegenation. Just seemingly making it about ignoring biology. And indeed, Star Trek was really, really bad about biology in general.
  45. @Lot
    Stephen Miller ally named to oversee refugee programs!

    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/03/08/andrew-veprek-state-department-refugee-admissions-448210

    WOOHOO!

  46. @whorefinder
    Logan was awful. I'm a bit biased because I've hated all the X-Men movies, but it was crappy. Based on an SJW comic book attempt to replace Wolverine with a girl; the little girl acting all hilariously badly; the final fight being absolutely ridiculous and nonsensical (so the bad guys have no problem crossing the American/Mexican border to catch them, but the Canadian border in the middle of nowhere is sacrosanct?); the bad bonding scenes along the way; and of course Hugh Jackman jacked up on so many steroids to look "badass" that its humorous.

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America. It wasn't cross country or up/down a coast, it was through the heart of America. Interesting to go that way. And they meet a nice farming family, which is good....except they're black, of course. Totally believable.

    If Marvel wants to do a female version of a hero, why not go with a movie set in a “few years ahead of time” alternate universe, the MC2? That way, you could get Spider-Girl, American Dream, Wild Thing… Spider-Girl was one of the more tenacious comic books around, and as it basically was “Spider-Man: the Next Generation” (Spider-Girl is Peter Parker’s daughter), the “handing down the legacy” was a lot more organic.

    The stories were also pretty good, because they tended more to the older, “funner” tone rather than the newer, “more serious and elaborate” tone.

    • Replies: @AltRightJew
    Marvel has done a female superhero show on Netflix with Jessica Jones. I watched the first season; it was anti-white feminist BS. All the white men were depicted negatively and all the women and minorities were depicted positively. While the Alt Right certainly blames Jews too much, it's unsurprising the show was produced by a woman named Melissa Rosenberg.

    Marvel is doing a feature length film on Black Widow from The Avengers. We'll see how it does at the box office, but I doubt it's going to do very well. As absurdly popular as The Avengers is, Black Widow felt like nothing more than eye candy during the film. Additionally I the film won't have the same marketing boost Wonder Women got from the media drooling all over it.
  47. @Jack D

    what may have contributed to the movie’s best-picture loss: the desire to turn a blind eye to the true, contentious state of black-white relations in this country.
     
    But not so blind that they didn't give it Best Screenplay? Half-blind then? How many awards would have been necessary before the Academy showed itself to be Woke? 100% of them? This is just more of the usual blackety-black-black stuff. If a white person tried this they'd call her a Nazi before she finished her first sentence.

    That’s the thing – there is not endpoint, no moment when the itch has been scratched. Just endless demands for more recognition, more praise, more acknowledgement of value, etc. This will never change, and frankly it will probably lead to a crackup on the left in a generation or so when Latinos have fully surpassed blacks as the most important minority in numbers, economic power, and cultural influence. Black America has grown accustomed to being the 2nd largest group in the country with outsized moral authority to demand attention to their priorities, but soon they will be a permanent 3rd banana. I doubt their political and cultural leaders will take this well, and I suspect an increasing share of Latinos will no longer want to be part of a political coalition with them.

    • Replies: @Travis
    Hispanics already surpass the number of Blacks, but they will never replace the moral authority of Blacks....in 2018 there are more Mexican-Americans in America than African-Americans...yet no Mexican Lives movement , nor any effort to make the Oscars more Mexican.

    hispanics are more divided than Blacks, and half of them still identify as being white. The Latinos who flee from white are typically the whitest of the hispanics who game the system.

    Racially Blacks will remain the 2nd largest racial group in America...Even when Hispanics are 40% of our population in 2045 , they will remain divided by race (with half still considered white).

    The Black population continues to grow faster than the White population...while Blacks are 12% of the population they are 15% of the youth population. Hispanics will never gain the moral authority and reverence of Blacks for several reasons. First among them is that they have generally been accepted as white. Hispanics were never slaves (but were slave owners), The civil rights movement was about Blacks. There are good reasons the BLM movement ignored hispanics. Blacks will fight to maintain their position of authority , hispanics will never fight to obtain this power. Hispanic surnames will soon be so commonplace that they will lose their ethnic Pokémon points.
    , @Jack D
    Exactly. See my other comment (#40).

    Already the #MeToo narrative and the #No School Shooters narrative is colliding with the #Woke / #No School Discipline (for black people) narrative. If men are causing problems and a disproportionate % of the men causing problems are black (here's one area where blacks are not underrepresented, though they are "invisible" in the sense that (non-white collar) criminals can never be depicted as black, you can't even name their race in news reports) then how do you go after the men causing problems without being "racist"? The whole Coalition of the Fringes setup only works if you have white men at the center and everyone can join in a circle and all throw stones at them. But what happens when the center does not hold? Now you have a circular firing squad.
  48. @Dave Pinsen
    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences:

    2010: The King's Speech - Okay, but underwhelming.
    2011: The Artist - Didn't see it, but basically a novelty movie, as I understand it.
    2012: Argo - Didn't see it, but IIRC, Steve said it was good.
    2013: 12 Years a Slave - Black.
    2014: Birdman -- Another novelty movie, no? I won't even watch this if it comes on cable and I can't find the remote.
    2015: Spotlight - Hollywood bravely going after sexual abuse in another industry.
    2016: Moonlight - Black, gay.
    2017: The Shape of Water - Coalition of the Fishes

    Well, when you put it like that………

    Good Lord, what an appalling collection of crap those films are, or at least, the ones I’ve seen. I haven’t, and never will, see Moonlight or Shape of Water. The Artist is actually a brilliant and interesting film, and serves to illustrate even more perfectly what an appalling collection of ……..

    Get fed up with the Oscars back a while ago when Shakespeare in Love , so boring I fell asleep twice trying to watch it and never have finished it, The English Patient, ditto, and double, Titanic, pretentious nonsense, and Chicago, a waaaaay overrated musical, all won in pretty short order. A collection of second rate films that we now know bought their Oscars.

    From bad to worse, vote buying is bad, but allowing Actors to have the biggest single block of votes in the award process is much, much worse. Letting a collection of narcissistic jacktards whose two most common characteristics are their egotism and woeful lack of any real education is a recipe for terrible decision making in any milieu , even aside from their hilariously idiotic Hollywood politics. Bill Buckley’s observation about the first 500 names in the phone book goes double here.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    The English Patient was just awful.
  49. fishcegenation

    Multiple LOLs on this end! It even sounds funny in my head.

    I had no idea what the post was about (should have looked on “Teasers”, but just clicked on the RH nav-bar), as whatever goes on in Hollywood, stays off my computer. This was well worth it, however.

    BTW, I had to “view page source” and cntrl-f for “fish” to copy/paste your term in. Unz has got some silliness that makes it hard to copy a piece of text oftentimes.

  50. @jimbojones
    Wow, the stupid is extra strong in this article. Ms Cauley Seems to be confused about the whole notion of fiction.

    I skipped "Get Out" when I heard about the racial angle. It's not 1960 any more. And these turkeys are no Sidney Poitiers. Obama was president for 8 years. Give us more Eddie Murphy and Chris Tucker and less "12 Years" and "Get Out".

    Well…make that the EARLY Eddie Murphy (“I’m from a predominantly black family”).

  51. @Buzz Mohawk
    Yes, Yan Shen, it's about time we got serious about Affirmative Action for Asians. After all, the poor bastards suffer from that dreaded math/verbal split.

    .

    Comment powered by Generac™
    http://grastengenerators.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/grastenslider3.jpg

    LOL

    Haha, and that’s just the back-up for when iSHTF.

    (BTW it’d be nice to get one that can be switched easily among propane, natural gas, and unleaded gasoline. )

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    My generator is on the house natural gas utility. It comes on automatically and does the job admirably. We just went 52 hours on it, living like normal Americans while most of the people around us were freezing their butts off in the dark and watching their perishable foods spoil.

    For when the sh*t really hits the fan, I would want a low RPM diesel and a very large fuel tank. Low RPM engines can run a very long time without maintenance, and diesel lasts forever in a tank.

    Alas, most of us are dependent on "the grid" one way or another.

    As for what this has to to with iSteve-ey subjects: I am convinced that most of the public has no f..king idea where there stuff comes from or how long they could live without it. That goes double for the issue of imported s*it made by cheap foreign labor and jobs at home that young Americans used to do.

    .
    Back on grid, this comment powered by an electrical utility, courtesy of Nikola Tesla.
    http://www.panacomp.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/GORE335962_1.jpg
  52. @Tyrion 2
    It isn't surprising that people who watch hundreds of movies a year might prize novelty.

    Someone who watches hundreds of movies a year should get a life in the real world. Especially given who is making the movies and what culture and mentality they overwhelmingly reflect.

  53. Indeed, black voices are silenced. Except for the fact that any given moment of every single day you can find a black, a cucked white, or a Jew talking about the plight of blacks and the racism of whites on television or in major publications. Always, every day. It’s a constant message, but it’s not the only message, and maybe that’s what “silencing” means.

    Speaking of “silencing,” minor factoid: the other day I’m on a corporate conference call. And before the call starts, instead of hold music they play little news snippets. Whaddya suppose they talked about? Genius T Coates writing Capt. America. They’re even shoving blackity-black-black stories at me while on hold on the phone! Can the alt-right please get that kind of “silencing”? Steve would be a millionaire if they silenced him that way.

    Anyway, what I really wonder about is do Kashana Cauley and others of her ilk truly believe blacks are being silenced? Is she that unaware? Or is she just using it as convenient weaponized rhetoric? I really wonder about this.

    Finally, she is yet another female who fits Sailer’s Law of Female Journalism:

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    "Anyway, what I really wonder about is do Kashana Cauley and others of her ilk truly believe blacks are being silenced?"

    Probably, her parents and siblings constantly told her to STFU when she was a kid, and it's still bothering her.
  54. I’m still really upset that we didn’t get through Black History month without getting gob-smacked, gob-smacked, I tells ya’, by a raciss incident like the 29 cent stamp fiasco. I know I’ve been beating a dead rodeo horse on this one, but c’mon 3/5? Really?

    I’m getting tarred, in so many ways tarred, of OVERCOMING all the damn time. We need a new song for next year.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I just had a brilliant thought, in the real, not British, sense of the word. Why doesn't the USPS lower the price of the stamps with white people on them (and blue jays and thrushes too ... of course) to match the 29 centers of the black rodeo star. Smoosh down that disparate impact - it'd be very much like the much-touted, equal-disciplinary action policy in the schools that has been so successful, per the Ed-school research papers.

    Plus I could mail more letters ... were I into that sort of thing.
    , @Twodees Partain
    I am tard, too and I know it's a real word because Loretta Lynn sang it in "Coal Miner's Daughter"
  55. I thought Get Out was pretty good in large part because it wasn’t the scathing, condemnatory satire that Peele thinks it is.

    I mean, cmon. Rich white people don’t have black servants. That’s what Hispanics are for.

    The whole movie was made by a guy who, like most New Yorkers, don’t really see the world beyond black and white.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I think it is a generational thing. I know some American black people who are domestic help but they are mostly older. The younger blacks in this line of work are Caribbean or increasingly African-African. The United States is such a racist hell for black people that black people from all over the world want to come here and experience it too.
    , @Arclight
    There is a segment of the credentialed black and white population who feel that American blacks are the Most Interesting/Important People In The World and everything needs to be seen through that lens...but most people of either race aren't really that obsessed with Blackness.

    One of the interesting things I have seen on my social media more than once is when some SJW criticizes some movie or TV program as not being 'inclusive' enough I'll see an avalanche of black people calling BS on that, usually along the lines of "who cares, I love the show the way it is". It's easy to forget how much of the SJW agenda is driven by a fairly small number of people that happen to have a platform through the media or academia, whereas the overwhelming majority of people just get on with life and generally get along with each other just fine.
    , @TGGP
    I also thought the presence of black servants was odd, but I guess I wasn't as clever as the educationrealist to guess the twist that early, so I was just pleasantly surprised that the movie was smarter than I initially gave it credit for.
  56. @Arclight
    That's the thing - there is not endpoint, no moment when the itch has been scratched. Just endless demands for more recognition, more praise, more acknowledgement of value, etc. This will never change, and frankly it will probably lead to a crackup on the left in a generation or so when Latinos have fully surpassed blacks as the most important minority in numbers, economic power, and cultural influence. Black America has grown accustomed to being the 2nd largest group in the country with outsized moral authority to demand attention to their priorities, but soon they will be a permanent 3rd banana. I doubt their political and cultural leaders will take this well, and I suspect an increasing share of Latinos will no longer want to be part of a political coalition with them.

    Hispanics already surpass the number of Blacks, but they will never replace the moral authority of Blacks….in 2018 there are more Mexican-Americans in America than African-Americans…yet no Mexican Lives movement , nor any effort to make the Oscars more Mexican.

    hispanics are more divided than Blacks, and half of them still identify as being white. The Latinos who flee from white are typically the whitest of the hispanics who game the system.

    Racially Blacks will remain the 2nd largest racial group in America…Even when Hispanics are 40% of our population in 2045 , they will remain divided by race (with half still considered white).

    The Black population continues to grow faster than the White population…while Blacks are 12% of the population they are 15% of the youth population. Hispanics will never gain the moral authority and reverence of Blacks for several reasons. First among them is that they have generally been accepted as white. Hispanics were never slaves (but were slave owners), The civil rights movement was about Blacks. There are good reasons the BLM movement ignored hispanics. Blacks will fight to maintain their position of authority , hispanics will never fight to obtain this power. Hispanic surnames will soon be so commonplace that they will lose their ethnic Pokémon points.

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    African-Americans have gone from 10% to 12% in about 50 years. Many Hispanic immigrants are arriving; few African immigrants are. The civil rights movement was partly about Hispanics; remember cesar Chavez and Bobby Kennedy. I think you're overstating your case.
  57. @Arclight
    That's the thing - there is not endpoint, no moment when the itch has been scratched. Just endless demands for more recognition, more praise, more acknowledgement of value, etc. This will never change, and frankly it will probably lead to a crackup on the left in a generation or so when Latinos have fully surpassed blacks as the most important minority in numbers, economic power, and cultural influence. Black America has grown accustomed to being the 2nd largest group in the country with outsized moral authority to demand attention to their priorities, but soon they will be a permanent 3rd banana. I doubt their political and cultural leaders will take this well, and I suspect an increasing share of Latinos will no longer want to be part of a political coalition with them.

    Exactly. See my other comment (#40).

    Already the #MeToo narrative and the #No School Shooters narrative is colliding with the #Woke / #No School Discipline (for black people) narrative. If men are causing problems and a disproportionate % of the men causing problems are black (here’s one area where blacks are not underrepresented, though they are “invisible” in the sense that (non-white collar) criminals can never be depicted as black, you can’t even name their race in news reports) then how do you go after the men causing problems without being “racist”? The whole Coalition of the Fringes setup only works if you have white men at the center and everyone can join in a circle and all throw stones at them. But what happens when the center does not hold? Now you have a circular firing squad.

  58. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'm still really upset that we didn't get through Black History month without getting gob-smacked, gob-smacked, I tells ya', by a raciss incident like the 29 cent stamp fiasco. I know I've been beating a dead rodeo horse on this one, but c'mon 3/5? Really?

    I'm getting tarred, in so many ways tarred, of OVERCOMING all the damn time. We need a new song for next year.

    I just had a brilliant thought, in the real, not British, sense of the word. Why doesn’t the USPS lower the price of the stamps with white people on them (and blue jays and thrushes too … of course) to match the 29 centers of the black rodeo star. Smoosh down that disparate impact – it’d be very much like the much-touted, equal-disciplinary action policy in the schools that has been so successful, per the Ed-school research papers.

    Plus I could mail more letters … were I into that sort of thing.

  59. I only saw one 2017 movie in 2017.

    Fast and the Furious 8.

    Everything I’ve heard suggests that F8 was by far the year’s best picture. But it wasn’t even nominated. A total snub. Oh well, pedo Hollywood dinosaurs will die.

  60. @backup
    I think the joke is on the same level as the use of the term "Trophy Wife" to describe Oscar winning Frances McDormand.

    Not true. I GOT this one!

    Haha, but it’s probably because Steve explained the gist of this movie in another post a few days back. I won’t spoil the whole thing for you, but from my expectations of the ending that I’ll never watch, things don’t go very well in the delivery room. The OB-doc is supposed to first count fingers and toes, but fins and flippers were never described in 1st year anatomy..

  61. OT

    This year really seems to be International Women’s Day’s coming out party. Lots more attention and aggressive mainstream promotion than I ever remember it getting (which is up from approximately none not that long ago). Still not a lot of big marches but it’s only a matter of time.

    Funny thing is that the Mother’s Day-ey gift-giving aspect of the holiday doesn’t seem to be accompanying it here as opposed to say, in Russia, which is interesting given our culture of consumerism. Instead it seems it’s little more than a vehicle for SJW stuff so far . Yet another sign of how our culture is changing rapidly and how elite-driven those changes are. I wonder if this gets established well enough (and I bet it will), will they turn their sights on May Day next?

  62. @Percy Gryce

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.
     
    It has begun. Here is the next Vanity Fair cover girl:

    https://goo.gl/images/suq24m

    Yeah, this has been going on for a while and arguably in the fashion industry for decades. It’s when genuinely dull and boring looking people (Not necessarily attractive or unattractive) appear on covers that the age of the last man will have begun.

  63. @Clyde
    Think what a great movie can be made from a mashup of Get Out and Shape of Water. Lots of potential there.

    Get Out of the Water?

    Out of Shape?

    BTW, Del Toro at the Oscars looked like he was pushing 300 lb. Made Harvey Weinstein look skinny.

  64. @education realist
    I thought Get Out was pretty good in large part because it wasn't the scathing, condemnatory satire that Peele thinks it is.

    I mean, cmon. Rich white people don't have black servants. That's what Hispanics are for.

    The whole movie was made by a guy who, like most New Yorkers, don't really see the world beyond black and white.

    I think it is a generational thing. I know some American black people who are domestic help but they are mostly older. The younger blacks in this line of work are Caribbean or increasingly African-African. The United States is such a racist hell for black people that black people from all over the world want to come here and experience it too.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jack, we get nothing but the best from the rest of the world. That's why countries like Mexico are shit holes. All the good people are here.
  65. @Yan Shen

    It’s clear that America prefers its black people to remain invisible …
     
    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha... Given how blacks in this country often seem to think that they're the only people who matter and love nothing more than endlessly talking about themselves and their problems, and given how their supposed white progressive allies also love nothing more than endlessly fawning over mediocrities like Ta Nehisi Coates as though they were the second coming of Jesus Christ, I find this statement to be hilariously clueless. African Americans love being in the spotlight, and given their general over-representation in athletics and entertainment, I find it hard to believe that black Americans either are or would feel like they were socially invisible.

    Now, on the other hand, is there actually a minority group in this country today that's largely been rendered invisible and ignored by the mainstream?

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2017/07/04/globe-poll-omission-leaves-asian-americans-invisible-and-unheard/zB7XRKjAU3R6xzFc8tWLVK/story.html

    #OscarsSoBlackandWhite
    #AsianLivesMatterToo

    You’re really a broken revord.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    I Googled revord, wondering if I was missing something.

    A girl named Raegan (sic) Revord stars on Young Sheldon:
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6862942/

    So I guess you meant record. And you're right - his shtick is getting old.

    Yan Shen advocates for his people, as April Reign (or whatever the hell her name is) advocates for hers. He's yet another would-be conductor on the white-guilt gravy train.
  66. @Daniel Williams

    “Get Out” and “Black Panther” weren’t exactly created by a vast cabal of humanity’s leading geniuses.
     
    They're products created and financed by the richest and most powerful minority on the planet to bilk the poorest and least capable at fifteen dollars a pop. Grape soda isn't a work of genius either.

    Whoever created grape soda was a business genius. That and orange soda. You make far more money selling stuff to poor people than to rich people. The poor you shall always have with you.

    When my daughter was 3 I let her have a can of grape soda and she called it “pink kitty cat”. I have no idea where she came up with that name, but she was adorable walking around with this purple can to her lips and asking for more pink kitty cat.

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams

    You make far more money selling stuff to poor people than to rich people.
     
    That's why so many rich and powerful people advocate increasing handouts. Normal people's money is given to the poor, who then buy things from rich people... Things like cigarettes, junk food, idiotic gadgets, and flashy cars that their more sensible, tax-paying benefactors would never waste a dime on.

    It's a massive wealth transfer from the middle to the top, using clueless poor people—foreigners, blacks, millenials—as the vehicle.

  67. ‘Get Out’ made these voters uncomfortable by showing that black people can be silenced, whether ignored, stereotyped or even, as happens in the movie, kidnapped.

    What is this thing lately with asserting that entirely fictional and implausible stories prove things (Get Out, AKA Imvasion of the White Body Snatchers; Wakanda)?

  68. @Unladen Swallow
    No Country for Old Men, the next year, was the last great film to win.

    2007 was a pretty good year for movies. There Will Be Blood came out the same year and lost Best Picture to No Country For Old Men. Could have really gone either way, but No Country had a gripping plot, while TWBB seemed to be about Daniel Day Lewis acting all Daniel Day Lewis-y. Not necessarily a bad thing, though. If TWBB comes on cable, I can’t help but watch it, just because of Day Lewis’ performance. I can’t think of another film that was so completely dominated by its lead actor. Had literally anyone else on the planet been cast in that role, that film would have been instantly forgettable.

    • Replies: @Matthew McConnagay
    My feeling with There Will Be Blood is that it looked so much like an Important Piece of Art that everybody assumed it must have been. Most of Paul Thomas Anderson's films fit that bill, actually: he makes films that look and sound and behave so much like great films that few people notice that, actually, there's nothing much going on there.

    I'm reminded of Adaptation when "Charlie Kaufman" goes to that writing seminar: somebody should buy Anderson a ticket.
    , @donut
    The same can be said of "Gangs of New York" .
  69. @YetAnotherAnon
    100% OT, but a chap called Scott has a brilliant comment on "conservatives" over at Dalrock's.

    "If you would have asked me 20 years ago to describe or articulate what the long term goals of the “conservative” movement were, it would have been inconceivable for me to come up with:

    “All of the policy ideas of the left will be implemented, just over a longer period of time so people can adjust.”

    But that is EXACTLY how “conservatives” have behaved for my entire life.

    The polite “right” in America exists to be the spoonful of sugar that helps the inevitable medicine of the coming dark, childless, killjoy leftist dystopia go down. They play the role of grumpy curmudgeon who ultimately gives in after a period of time.

    The system is now set up to insure steady, leftward “progress.” It doesn’t matter whose fault it is. But it may be reversible if so called “conservatives” can be shown this new paradigm.

    All the institutions have fallen. Every single one. There are only small pockets of individuals and families resisting and trying to behave according to previous iterations of rationality, tradition, civility and natural law. We seem like freaks from another planet or time to the legitimate world."

     

    Now to be fair to conservatives, it's not they who describe, say, Christian home-educators as "freaks from another planet", it's the people who get given the megaphone who do that.

    Also OT, the Guardian remembers the magazine New Musical Express (RIP), and talks to former staffer Lucy O'Brien about their "youth suicide" cover of 1986.

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/mar/09/he-tried-to-get-out-of-the-car-at-80mph-the-stories-behind-nmes-greatest-covers

    "I think it was one of the lowest selling issues that year – the distributors groaned about it – but in terms of cultural capital, it is now really sought-after on eBay. Gina Birch from the Raincoats told me Kurt Cobain called it one of his favourite issues, and Richey Edwards from the Manic Street Preachers talked about it, too. So, it really did have an impact."

    It certainly did. Both Cobain and Edwards committed suicide.

    Cultural and moral conservatism, the kinds that matter most, are quite difficult to live up to. People realize this starting about age 16, and many leave the fold, never to return. Some come back when they have kids themselves and wonder how civilization will continue if they don’t teach it and live it.

    Getting and staying married, raising children, working full time, paying your bills, abiding by the law, abstaining from substance abuse, helping your friends and family through tough times, being a participant in community affairs. These all require hard work and self-sacrifice, and it’s never been easier to shirk all these responsibilities.

    Don’t ever expect conservatism to be a winner in the sense that people en masse jump at the prospect of more duty. Conservatism is harder.

    • Replies: @Paul Yarbles

    Don’t ever expect conservatism to be a winner in the sense that people en masse jump at the prospect of more duty. Conservatism is harder.
     
    Then why does Conservatism not completely die out?
  70. @Tyrion 2
    You're partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    This is also why the SJWs so often push a literal inversion of reality. It is not just a huge coincidence. The whole purpose is to deny reality to themselves and convince others of the truth of their denial.

    We won't ever convince the majority of them to stop either. Years of one on one therapy would likely do nothing. We can just raise the next generation better by exposing them to risk and personal growth, while providing a safe space for the SJWs to engage in their weird mutual delusions.

    The issue there is that these types will naturally seek out places of influence so as to further their self-esteem. Hence they dominate the media and acadaemia. Unfortunately, a root and branch clear out of such places is impossible; so de-legitimizing these spaces, by pointing out what SJWs have made of them, is pur best option.

    They are now 'safe spaces' for the vain, fragile and barely competent. At best, they function as a magic mirror that always tells the journalist/acadaemic (really, 'entertainer') how special they are. At worst, they're dirty wreckages full of shambling freaks so bought in to their own fantasy that they'll never be able to open their eyes due to the extreme psychological pain and humiliation they'd suffer.

    Prediction: this will all get worse and a lot weirder.

    1. You'll find SJWs convinced thay they're literal goddesses and that you're hateful for denying their divinity.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Many, many people are psychologically tied to this train and they'll be dragged along with it no matter how far it goes off the tracks. Losing makes this type of person more passive. Winning makes them more manic. If the Dems triumph at the mid-terms, they'll take it up a notch.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    That started more than two years ago, at least:

  71. @Percy Gryce

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.
     
    It has begun. Here is the next Vanity Fair cover girl:

    https://goo.gl/images/suq24m

    I can’t believe I clicked on a lesbo mag cover. Next time give a warning!

    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    Sorry, I tried to embed the pic.
  72. @Doug
    Something I was thinking about in the airport the other day...

    How long until airplane boarding priority is assigned based on oppression status? Disenfranchised racial minorities first, followed by active duty military, LGBT+, members of sky-elite, women who've been #metoo'd, people traveling with children under 4, then regular boarding.

    I think if you're an entrepreneurial social activity you could have a good go at this. You could probably social-media browbeat at least one airline into doing it. Then get yourself a big "diversity consultancy" fee when they implement it.

    What is with the rush to board the airplane?

    Sure, if you want to cram the overhead with those anvil-laden cases you are carrying on, you need to get seated first. But cool people always board last. It is much like sitting in the back row of class is cool. It signals that you are too cool to be herded into the boarding line. It signals that you are too cool to rise from the boarding lounge seat until they make “last call.”

    Best yet, if you had reserved a window or even a middle seat, you can stare down the person occupying the aisle who got preferred boarding and just doesn’t want to get up out of their seat. Even on Southwest you can do this to claim that last remaining seat in the middle. Serious cool.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    Maybe the guys who rush to board first are the assholes in aisle seats that you have to stare down to get them to let you get into your seat. It's a very sound theory.
  73. Of course a large segment of the commentariat is of necessity out of touch with reality. You have to be in order to be a Cult Marxist. They have been running things for a long time while real world experience has shown that their beliefs about economics, race, politics, crime, gender, sex, etc. are badly flawed. At the same time changing those positions would now mean loss of power, wealth and privilege.The only way they can continue to be Leftists is to BE out of touch with reality. It is also why you see that Leftists are increasingly, visibly stupider than they used to be. You don’t see any new Kenneth Galbraiths out there. ( although the growing number of NAM’s in their establishment is also a contributing factor to the cognitive decline). The Dennis Pragerism that applies is “only someone who has been to graduate school could believe something that stupid”.
    The upside for them is that they will still rule our institutions until the whole house of fantasy comes down.
    The upside for Steve is that they keep generating torrents of weapons-grade stupidity like this that he can mine for his blog.

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    It is also why you see that Leftists are increasingly, visibly stupider than they used to be. You don’t see any new Kenneth Galbraiths out there.
     
    They're visibly stupider because they're an entirely different species of leftist. Old school leftists focused on economic justice and class struggle. Whether you agree or disagree with their views on these subjects it can't be denied that economic justice and class struggle are real things. They were basing their arguments on reality. OK, their arguments were based on a particular interpretation of reality, but it was still reality. Capitalism really did exist.

    The modern leftists focus on social justice, which is something that simply does not exist and cannot exist. All their arguments are therefore based on fantasy. So it's hardly surprising that they seem so much stupider than Old School Leftists.

    Anyone who bases his arguments and beliefs on fantasy is inevitably going to appear to be stupid. Libertarians being a prime example.
  74. It’s clear that America prefers its black people to remain invisible …

    Oh good Lord. Blacks in current America have to be the most visible and irrationally praised 13% minority in any society at any time in history.

  75. @Percy Gryce

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.
     
    It has begun. Here is the next Vanity Fair cover girl:

    https://goo.gl/images/suq24m

    Not woke enough. More “women” formerly with dicks would be properly vibrant!

  76. @whorefinder
    Logan was awful. I'm a bit biased because I've hated all the X-Men movies, but it was crappy. Based on an SJW comic book attempt to replace Wolverine with a girl; the little girl acting all hilariously badly; the final fight being absolutely ridiculous and nonsensical (so the bad guys have no problem crossing the American/Mexican border to catch them, but the Canadian border in the middle of nowhere is sacrosanct?); the bad bonding scenes along the way; and of course Hugh Jackman jacked up on so many steroids to look "badass" that its humorous.

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America. It wasn't cross country or up/down a coast, it was through the heart of America. Interesting to go that way. And they meet a nice farming family, which is good....except they're black, of course. Totally believable.

    Logan was awful.

    It bummed me out, too.

    Professor X is senile. Wolverine is a broken-down drunk. Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of “Dreamers” with magic powers. Real uplifting stuff.

    • Replies: @Matthew McConnagay
    My quick capsule review:

    Professor X is senile. Wolverine is a broken-down drunk.

    Sounds pretty sweet. This movie just might be awesome...

    Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of “Dreamers” with magic powers.

    Oh. Never mind.

    , @whorefinder
    Superhero nerd question: Why is Wolverine able to get drunk? It's been established that Captain America can't get drunk because his serum burns up the alcohol before it can get into him and also prevents him from being poisoned (which is all alcohol is), so why can Wolverine, whose self-healing abilities have the same properties as Cap's super-solider serum?
    , @Jack D
    A few months ago I saw the latest Star Wars movie (it sucked). Before the movie, as usual, they showed about 10 previews - I honestly don't remember what the movies were, but they all had the exact same theme. The fate of entire (country, planet, universe) is at stake and our only hope is (a scrappy female, a diverse person, a space critter) in whose hands alone rest the fate of (all of humanity, the entire planet, the galaxy). Maybe in 1 or two of them (not many) it was a white guy, but every one had the money shot where the sidekick turns to the hero and earnestly pleads, "You are our only hope!" - after a while it was actually funny to see so many "only hopes". Why is "our only hope" such a popular fantasy theme?
  77. Why can’t we make everyone happy and have multiple Best Picture Oscar awards? Just like there are some ninety New York Times Bestsellers out there at any moment (fifteen books on each of a half-dozen lists — hardcover fiction, paperback fiction, etc)?

    And notice they’re called BestSellers, not BetterSellers. I think that makes it a valid precedent for my idea.

  78. @education realist
    I thought Get Out was pretty good in large part because it wasn't the scathing, condemnatory satire that Peele thinks it is.

    I mean, cmon. Rich white people don't have black servants. That's what Hispanics are for.

    The whole movie was made by a guy who, like most New Yorkers, don't really see the world beyond black and white.

    There is a segment of the credentialed black and white population who feel that American blacks are the Most Interesting/Important People In The World and everything needs to be seen through that lens…but most people of either race aren’t really that obsessed with Blackness.

    One of the interesting things I have seen on my social media more than once is when some SJW criticizes some movie or TV program as not being ‘inclusive’ enough I’ll see an avalanche of black people calling BS on that, usually along the lines of “who cares, I love the show the way it is”. It’s easy to forget how much of the SJW agenda is driven by a fairly small number of people that happen to have a platform through the media or academia, whereas the overwhelming majority of people just get on with life and generally get along with each other just fine.

  79. @Tyrion 2
    You're partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    This is also why the SJWs so often push a literal inversion of reality. It is not just a huge coincidence. The whole purpose is to deny reality to themselves and convince others of the truth of their denial.

    We won't ever convince the majority of them to stop either. Years of one on one therapy would likely do nothing. We can just raise the next generation better by exposing them to risk and personal growth, while providing a safe space for the SJWs to engage in their weird mutual delusions.

    The issue there is that these types will naturally seek out places of influence so as to further their self-esteem. Hence they dominate the media and acadaemia. Unfortunately, a root and branch clear out of such places is impossible; so de-legitimizing these spaces, by pointing out what SJWs have made of them, is pur best option.

    They are now 'safe spaces' for the vain, fragile and barely competent. At best, they function as a magic mirror that always tells the journalist/acadaemic (really, 'entertainer') how special they are. At worst, they're dirty wreckages full of shambling freaks so bought in to their own fantasy that they'll never be able to open their eyes due to the extreme psychological pain and humiliation they'd suffer.

    Prediction: this will all get worse and a lot weirder.

    1. You'll find SJWs convinced thay they're literal goddesses and that you're hateful for denying their divinity.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Many, many people are psychologically tied to this train and they'll be dragged along with it no matter how far it goes off the tracks. Losing makes this type of person more passive. Winning makes them more manic. If the Dems triumph at the mid-terms, they'll take it up a notch.

    A lot of what you wrote applies to Critical Race Theory.

  80. @Tyrion 2
    You're partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    This is also why the SJWs so often push a literal inversion of reality. It is not just a huge coincidence. The whole purpose is to deny reality to themselves and convince others of the truth of their denial.

    We won't ever convince the majority of them to stop either. Years of one on one therapy would likely do nothing. We can just raise the next generation better by exposing them to risk and personal growth, while providing a safe space for the SJWs to engage in their weird mutual delusions.

    The issue there is that these types will naturally seek out places of influence so as to further their self-esteem. Hence they dominate the media and acadaemia. Unfortunately, a root and branch clear out of such places is impossible; so de-legitimizing these spaces, by pointing out what SJWs have made of them, is pur best option.

    They are now 'safe spaces' for the vain, fragile and barely competent. At best, they function as a magic mirror that always tells the journalist/acadaemic (really, 'entertainer') how special they are. At worst, they're dirty wreckages full of shambling freaks so bought in to their own fantasy that they'll never be able to open their eyes due to the extreme psychological pain and humiliation they'd suffer.

    Prediction: this will all get worse and a lot weirder.

    1. You'll find SJWs convinced thay they're literal goddesses and that you're hateful for denying their divinity.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Many, many people are psychologically tied to this train and they'll be dragged along with it no matter how far it goes off the tracks. Losing makes this type of person more passive. Winning makes them more manic. If the Dems triumph at the mid-terms, they'll take it up a notch.

    a current example: the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue has included “plus size” models for the past few years, I believe.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Interestingly, you can't complain about that in mixed company, so you could say they've taken the Google route of not worrying about criticism they cannot hear. But for decades it was understood at Playboy that an issue with a black model would be the weak sales point of the year. Also, a lot of modern consumers would be receiving that material one photo at a time at image aggregators like Saw First or Phun (nsfw), so the magazine would never get feedback anyway.
    , @AndrewR
    Do you think no guys like thicker girls?
    , @Twodees Partain
    That's a valid inclusion. There have always been plus size women and a lot of them are real beauties. I like big gals as well as slim gals. There is an actual demand for including big pretty gals and it has nothing to do with the kind of delusion that has SJW's claiming that Lena Dunham is beautiful.

    I'm referring to this kind of big woman:

    http://thechive.com/2016/04/07/model-responds-to-people-who-call-her-fat-10-photos/
  81. @Anon
    I haven't seen GET OUT, but isn't it about how TOO MUCH LOVE FOR BLACKNESS can harm blacks too?

    It seems whites in the movie don't hate blacks. They love blacks too much and want to get inside black bodies and dribble balls and have big dongs and be like Michael Jordan or something.

    They don't want to hang blacks from trees. They want to crawl inside black skin.

    They don't want to remove blacks but become black. This excessive love of blackness turns blackness into a commodity.

    Anon, not quite troll worthy but a bit of a s t r e t c h. You can always go blackface or Rachel Dolezal if you want to try blackness on.

  82. @william munny
    Everything is a giant conspiracy to keep black genius from assuming its rightful place.

    This really must be an exhausting way to approach life. Blacks are only 12% of the population, but if they don't get 100% of everything its racism? In most areas, given the human capital, 12% would be a great accomplishment.

    I live in a state with a decent-sized black population. I wonder how mystifying this all must be to the people who live in states where blacks number in the thousands.

    william, I think most Americans wished that black Americans would kick their asses in gear and catch up. Free public education was the best place to start but now it’s about everyone being equal and inclusive. Priorities and self control seem to be lacking in their make up.

  83. @Jack D
    I think it is a generational thing. I know some American black people who are domestic help but they are mostly older. The younger blacks in this line of work are Caribbean or increasingly African-African. The United States is such a racist hell for black people that black people from all over the world want to come here and experience it too.

    Jack, we get nothing but the best from the rest of the world. That’s why countries like Mexico are shit holes. All the good people are here.

  84. I don’t go to the movies too often, but I really liked the “Life of Pi.”

    • Replies: @songbird
    Three things I didn't like about Pi.

    1.it had a really multicultural feel to it. When you venerate everything, you venerate nothing.
    2.too uneven a tone. Sometimes a comedy. Sometimes a drama. (I know some people like this sort of thing)
    3.the actor that played the adult guy was kind of wooden. But I generally don't like anything with flashbacks or big jumps in time. I consider it a broken narrative.
  85. @Unladen Swallow
    No Country for Old Men, the next year, was the last great film to win.

    True. Kind of a downer, but that was a legit Best Picture.

  86. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Amazon supposedly is going to move into the mortgage business. With interest rates supposedly going to climb back up to 4%, Beelzebub apparently thinks going into the banking and mortgage business is a money maker.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-03-09/amazon-sets-become-americas-biggest-mortgage-lender

    This is not going to turn out well. Bezos has left-wing tendencies, and if he thinks he can fix the housing problem for blacks by giving them loans and then brag about how great he is, he’s going to be sandbagged by the black default rate and even more at a loss when some of them just take the money and run.

    I’ve seen enough of Amazon’s doings to know that when they come up against someone who is flat-out dishonest, they are always taken by surprise and unable to police it properly. Bezos benefits financially by being a libertarian in a First World marketplace that is highly regulated for honesty, and he has no understanding at all of the Third World levels of dishonesty and corruption that is characteristic of American minorities.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Never assume that Bezos will be blindsided. He almost certainly has a plan - anyone who has worked in Amazon can tell you that he is not, in practice, anything akin to a humanitarian.

    "Your mom is dying so you need to carry a cell phone into work to be there for her last moments? That's too bad. You're fired."

    Amazon makes the rest of Silicon Valley look cuddly and sweet. There are times when Amazon makes working in Chinese companies look cuddly and sweet. If you work in an Amazon warehouse, then you'll have the wonderful of being told, pretty explicitly, that you are merely human capital that exists to expedite your replacement within five or ten years with robotic counterparts(ha, and you thought immigrants? Bezos does not need humans, with their annoying needs for food and sleep and family).

    So no, I don't think that Bezos doesn't have some deeper algorithm he's running.

    , @Bob Smith of Suburbia
    Bezosebub!
  87. @Dave Pinsen
    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences:

    2010: The King's Speech - Okay, but underwhelming.
    2011: The Artist - Didn't see it, but basically a novelty movie, as I understand it.
    2012: Argo - Didn't see it, but IIRC, Steve said it was good.
    2013: 12 Years a Slave - Black.
    2014: Birdman -- Another novelty movie, no? I won't even watch this if it comes on cable and I can't find the remote.
    2015: Spotlight - Hollywood bravely going after sexual abuse in another industry.
    2016: Moonlight - Black, gay.
    2017: The Shape of Water - Coalition of the Fishes

    Only saw the first three. All boring, I’m afraid. The Artist was too melancholy for me.

    Argo just wasn’t good. They fictionalized the story. The story of the actual hostages was a much more interesting story, although probably difficult to tell in a movie, due to time constraints.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    I remember reading after I watched Argo that the Canadians were upset at how short changed their involvement in freeing the hostages was in the movie. Making it without Affleck probably would have helped a lot.
  88. If racism is the problem, why did Glory, Driving Miss Daisy, Django Unchained, and Moonlight win awards?

  89. @syonredux

    Or, perhaps, “Get Out” didn’t win Best Picture because it wasn’t the, you know, best picture? Guillermo del Toro’s fishcegenation movie was awfully stupid, but he at least put effort into how it looked and hired some good actors. (This is not to say that “Get Out” is an ineffective film. It’s an efficient little movie.)
     
    I'm sure that somebody has brought this up, but I kinda wonder if Del Toro wasn't also influenced by Lovecraft's "Shadow over Innsmouth?" The tale involves a decaying Massachusetts town whose citizenry have interbred with the "Deep Ones," alien creatures who are half frog, half fish. Del Toro is a huge Lovecraft fan (until the project fell apart, he was slated to direct an adaptation of At The Mountains of Madness)......

    I met also that which had been her grandmother. For eighty thousand years Pth’thya-l’yi had lived in Y’ha-nthlei, and thither she had gone back after Obed Marsh was dead. Y’ha-nthlei was not destroyed when the upper-earth men shot death into the sea. It was hurt, but not destroyed. The Deep Ones could never be destroyed, even though the palaeogean magic of the forgotten Old Ones might sometimes check them. For the present they would rest; but some day, if they remembered, they would rise again for the tribute Great Cthulhu craved. It would be a city greater than Innsmouth next time. They had planned to spread, and had brought up that which would help them, but now they must wait once more. For bringing the upper-earth men’s death I must do a penance, but that would not be heavy. This was the dream in which I saw a shoggoth for the first time, and the sight set me awake in a frenzy of screaming. That morning the mirror definitely told me I had acquired the Innsmouth look.

    So far I have not shot myself as my uncle Douglas did. I bought an automatic and almost took the step, but certain dreams deterred me. The tense extremes of horror are lessening, and I feel queerly drawn toward the unknown sea-deeps instead of fearing them. I hear and do strange things in sleep, and awake with a kind of exaltation instead of terror. I do not believe I need to wait for the full change as most have waited. If I did, my father would probably shut me up in a sanitarium as my poor little cousin is shut up. Stupendous and unheard-of splendours await me below, and I shall seek them soon. Iä-R’lyeh! Cthulhu fhtagn! Iä! Iä! No, I shall not shoot myself—I cannot be made to shoot myself!

    I shall plan my cousin’s escape from that Canton madhouse, and together we shall go to marvel-shadowed Innsmouth. We shall swim out to that brooding reef in the sea and dive down through black abysses to Cyclopean and many-columned Y’ha-nthlei, and in that lair of the Deep Ones we shall dwell amidst wonder and glory for ever.
     

    I’m sure that somebody has brought this up, but I kinda wonder if Del Toro wasn’t also influenced by Lovecraft’s “Shadow over Innsmouth?” The tale involves a decaying Massachusetts town whose citizenry have interbred with the “Deep Ones,” alien creatures who are half frog, half fish. Del Toro is a huge Lovecraft fan (until the project fell apart, he was slated to direct an adaptation of At The Mountains of Madness)

    Seems plausible to me. I’m hoping that GdT winning these Oscars gets some studio off its ass to give GdT the money to make his At the Mountains of Madness adaptation – supposedly the project got shot down by the alleged similarity in storyline to Ridley Scott’s abysmal Prometheus, but that’s been in the rear view mirror for a while now. And AtMoM is supposedly GdT’s labor of love.

    • Replies: @Matthew McConnagay
    Am I the only one who doesn't see how AtMoM would make a good movie? Especially not with the $150 million budget he's supposedly aiming at. There's just no way the studio wouldn't enshitten it, even if it could work (and I'm doubtful). He should take a crack at some other Lovecraft story.
    , @J.Ross
    A major problem for studios, and promise for fans, is that supposedly Guillermo is dead set on faithfulness to the source material, even if that means a huge run time.
  90. @Buffalo Joe
    I don't go to the movies too often, but I really liked the "Life of Pi."

    Three things I didn’t like about Pi.

    1.it had a really multicultural feel to it. When you venerate everything, you venerate nothing.
    2.too uneven a tone. Sometimes a comedy. Sometimes a drama. (I know some people like this sort of thing)
    3.the actor that played the adult guy was kind of wooden. But I generally don’t like anything with flashbacks or big jumps in time. I consider it a broken narrative.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    singbird, best thing about an opinion board. I have one. You have one.
  91. I’m sort of grateful to Current Affairs for being so transcendentally stupid that the decision not to follow them anymore feels more and more like a stroke of genius.

    Would have been embarrassing if in the couple of years of not reading newspapers and watching tv they had become clever and subtle behind my back.

  92. Just a reminder that there has never been an age of racism in popular culture. It’s a myth.

    You will not be able to find a mainstream book, magazine or movie of any age that treated black people with anything but impeccable politeness and white-people-niceness. Believe me, I’ve looked for it.

    Just as the Victorians made up the Dark Ages, we made up the Dark Age of Racism.

    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    Agree completely. I went on an old movies kick a few years ago, watched dozens of the classics on DVD collections, all with added industry expert commentary. Didn't matter the decade, 30s or the 70s, every time a black actor appeared the commentators talked about how revolutionary and brave it was to include then in the cast.
  93. @Anon
    OT: Amazon supposedly is going to move into the mortgage business. With interest rates supposedly going to climb back up to 4%, Beelzebub apparently thinks going into the banking and mortgage business is a money maker.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-03-09/amazon-sets-become-americas-biggest-mortgage-lender

    This is not going to turn out well. Bezos has left-wing tendencies, and if he thinks he can fix the housing problem for blacks by giving them loans and then brag about how great he is, he's going to be sandbagged by the black default rate and even more at a loss when some of them just take the money and run.

    I've seen enough of Amazon's doings to know that when they come up against someone who is flat-out dishonest, they are always taken by surprise and unable to police it properly. Bezos benefits financially by being a libertarian in a First World marketplace that is highly regulated for honesty, and he has no understanding at all of the Third World levels of dishonesty and corruption that is characteristic of American minorities.

    Never assume that Bezos will be blindsided. He almost certainly has a plan – anyone who has worked in Amazon can tell you that he is not, in practice, anything akin to a humanitarian.

    “Your mom is dying so you need to carry a cell phone into work to be there for her last moments? That’s too bad. You’re fired.”

    Amazon makes the rest of Silicon Valley look cuddly and sweet. There are times when Amazon makes working in Chinese companies look cuddly and sweet. If you work in an Amazon warehouse, then you’ll have the wonderful of being told, pretty explicitly, that you are merely human capital that exists to expedite your replacement within five or ten years with robotic counterparts(ha, and you thought immigrants? Bezos does not need humans, with their annoying needs for food and sleep and family).

    So no, I don’t think that Bezos doesn’t have some deeper algorithm he’s running.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @songbird
    At the very least, he'd make the taxpayer eat the costs.
    , @Byrresheim
    True dat.
  94. @Dave Pinsen
    This whole decade so far seems to have had fairly weak Best Picture movies, as if the Academy is trolling audiences:

    2010: The King's Speech - Okay, but underwhelming.
    2011: The Artist - Didn't see it, but basically a novelty movie, as I understand it.
    2012: Argo - Didn't see it, but IIRC, Steve said it was good.
    2013: 12 Years a Slave - Black.
    2014: Birdman -- Another novelty movie, no? I won't even watch this if it comes on cable and I can't find the remote.
    2015: Spotlight - Hollywood bravely going after sexual abuse in another industry.
    2016: Moonlight - Black, gay.
    2017: The Shape of Water - Coalition of the Fishes

    The King’s Speech would have been a compelling and important picture if it had explored the consequences of first cousin marriage. But it just ignored the consanguinity issues of the Windsor family and pretended that his speech impediment just fell out of the sky.

    I also saw “The Artist”. It was pleasant, even though I had had great reservations about investing two hours in watching it when it came on cable. I would never have seen it if I had actually had to pay for a ticket. Pinsen was right – it was basically a stunt.

    I may just watch Argo when I find it on one of the cable TV movie channels. I didn’t watch it six years ago when it first came out because it starred Ben Affleck. Affleck is a strong negative presence in any film in which he appears. I call him “the turd in the punchbowl”.

    “12 Years a Slave” I also didn’t see. I researched the story. Apparently the whole story of a free black man being kidnapped into slavery in the South was regarded at the time it was published, as a transparent fraud. It is yet another Hollywood pro-black propaganda movie about the so called horrors of slavery. Englishmen and Americans abolished the evil practice of chattel slavery. Why not a movie about that?

    The fabled movie reviewer Joe Bob Briggs always gave a box score for the movies he reviewed. He scored them for : kung fu, car chases and something else (that I have forgotten). It looked to me as if “Birdman” had none of these requisite elements. I don’t know what it was about. I watched it on TV for about ten minutes. When you have hundreds of choices on TV, the show has to be more compelling than “Birdman”.

    I had to look up “Spotlight” in Wikipedia. I didn’t see it and apparently no one else did either. I’m not likely to watch a film about the predations of homosexuals on children. That’s simply too ugly a story for me. I like fantasy horror movies (with vampires and/or werewolves) but I’m not entertained by real horror tales. Who is?

    In 2015 all the nominees were whites. So in 2016 we have “Moonlight” get the Best Picture Oscar as a kind of racial reparation. No one seems to have considered that whites may just be better at acting than blacks. I don’t know if this is actually true, acting is kind of mysterious. But Whites are better at most things – except basketball – than blacks, so it seems plausible that whites could also be better than blacks at movie acting. But this idea doesn’t seem to have been entertained by the Academy. They had to honor a very black movie in 2016. That movie was “Moonlight”, which I believe was essentially never seen by anyone.

    I will probably see “The Shape of Water” when it hits cable in a couple months. Del Toro has made some films I enjoyed.

    So the last decade has been pretty much a crater. Hollywood is dying – that’s clear. It isn’t just cable TV and Home Theater. It isn’t just the paucity of good entertaining films. The principal problem seems to be leadership. The Academy seems to have no leaders with judgement. They seem to be suckers for the latest social fad. When I was a kid Hollywood almost succumbed to the Biblical Spectacular but it survived. Today the menace on is the film Honoring Black people. But no one seems to have the courage to oppose this deadly trend. Who will want to get in the car and drive to the multiplex to see a lecture on how naughty and nasty white people are, especially when you have to hazard being exposed to the real danger of blacks who have been enflamed by visions of Wakanda.

    Whites seem to be staying home.

    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    "Englishmen and Americans abolished the evil practice of chattel slavery. Why not a movie about that?"

    I think I saw that one:

    Cloud Atlas storyline A, 19th century, triumphant ending: "I'm going to quit the slave trade and join the abolitionist movement so we can live in a better future."

    Clout Atlas storyline D: It's the future and slaves live in tiny sleep pod capsules and have squibs in their necks set to explode and kill them if they misbehave.

    Cloud Atlas storyline E: It's the distant future and everything sucks.
  95. @Dave Pinsen
    The most recent Best Picture winner I watched and found hugely entertaining was The Departed. Was any more recent winner as good as that, in your opinion?

    No Country for Old Men, for sure. A genuine classic. The Departed is a cut below, but was still a really good film, probably the best nominated that year. (Although I really liked Little Miss Sunshine.) But it’s also kind of… it’s not the best Scorsese movie, y’know? But they passed him over too many times before not to give him one, even though it’s Goodfellas or Taxi Driver or (allegedly) Raging Bull that really deserved it.

    Apart from that, Birdman, Argo and The Hurt Locker were all decent enough, albeit not as good as The Departed. Even 12 Years a Slave wasn’t actually a bad film. Just not a particularly good one.

    And it’s worth mentioning that I didn’t see most of the Best Picture winners in recent years (or not so recent years either). But I’m still comfortable declaring them to be shit, since, well, they so obviously are. You can see the stink lines above Moonlight from miles away.

    If we widen our search to films nominated for Best Picture – or even those not nominated – we can find some even better films, of course, but let’s not go crazy, eh?

  96. @Steve Sailer
    The screenplay for Birdman is in English but only one of the 4 writers seems to be good at English.

    It’s been too long, but I don’t remember the dialogue being the problem. It was the self-consciously artsy-fartsy stuff gumming up the works, as I recall it. They were really reaching to say something profound, but they didn’t have anything profound to say. If they’d have scaled back their ambition and just told this story about these people trying to put on a play, they’d have had a great film.

    It’s a shame – I thought they were skewering pretentious literary types by having the play be a Raymond Carver adaptation, but in the end they themselves couldn’t resist the temptation to be Important Artists.

    At least, that’s my take. But I tend to see film/TV/publishing like so: there’s literature and there’s pulp. Literature is rarely deserving of the respect it garners, whereas pulp rarely reaches the heights that the best literature does – but it’s usually better.

    I should be happy that some pulpy films are getting academy recognition lately, after being locked out of consideration for so long – e.g., Get Out, Mad Max. But one suspects that these are only really getting nominated for political reasons.

  97. @Hapalong Cassidy
    2007 was a pretty good year for movies. There Will Be Blood came out the same year and lost Best Picture to No Country For Old Men. Could have really gone either way, but No Country had a gripping plot, while TWBB seemed to be about Daniel Day Lewis acting all Daniel Day Lewis-y. Not necessarily a bad thing, though. If TWBB comes on cable, I can’t help but watch it, just because of Day Lewis’ performance. I can’t think of another film that was so completely dominated by its lead actor. Had literally anyone else on the planet been cast in that role, that film would have been instantly forgettable.

    My feeling with There Will Be Blood is that it looked so much like an Important Piece of Art that everybody assumed it must have been. Most of Paul Thomas Anderson’s films fit that bill, actually: he makes films that look and sound and behave so much like great films that few people notice that, actually, there’s nothing much going on there.

    I’m reminded of Adaptation when “Charlie Kaufman” goes to that writing seminar: somebody should buy Anderson a ticket.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I thought Adaptation with its house of mirrors recursive layering was one of the most clever screenplays ever written. As a movie it is less than perfect but the premise is brilliant.
  98. @Daniel Williams

    Logan was awful.
     
    It bummed me out, too.

    Professor X is senile. Wolverine is a broken-down drunk. Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of "Dreamers" with magic powers. Real uplifting stuff.

    My quick capsule review:

    Professor X is senile. Wolverine is a broken-down drunk.

    Sounds pretty sweet. This movie just might be awesome…

    Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of “Dreamers” with magic powers.

    Oh. Never mind.

    • Replies: @El Dato

    Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of “Dreamers” with magic powers.
     


    Oh. Never mind.
     
    Why? This sounds like a good setup for a multiple-X rated movie.
  99. @cthulhu


    I’m sure that somebody has brought this up, but I kinda wonder if Del Toro wasn’t also influenced by Lovecraft’s “Shadow over Innsmouth?” The tale involves a decaying Massachusetts town whose citizenry have interbred with the “Deep Ones,” alien creatures who are half frog, half fish. Del Toro is a huge Lovecraft fan (until the project fell apart, he was slated to direct an adaptation of At The Mountains of Madness)

     

    Seems plausible to me. I’m hoping that GdT winning these Oscars gets some studio off its ass to give GdT the money to make his At the Mountains of Madness adaptation - supposedly the project got shot down by the alleged similarity in storyline to Ridley Scott’s abysmal Prometheus, but that’s been in the rear view mirror for a while now. And AtMoM is supposedly GdT’s labor of love.

    Am I the only one who doesn’t see how AtMoM would make a good movie? Especially not with the $150 million budget he’s supposedly aiming at. There’s just no way the studio wouldn’t enshitten it, even if it could work (and I’m doubtful). He should take a crack at some other Lovecraft story.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    It’s also a short story. Lovecraft would be better for Black Mirror/Twilight Zone-style TV episodes.
  100. @stillCARealist
    Whoever created grape soda was a business genius. That and orange soda. You make far more money selling stuff to poor people than to rich people. The poor you shall always have with you.

    When my daughter was 3 I let her have a can of grape soda and she called it "pink kitty cat". I have no idea where she came up with that name, but she was adorable walking around with this purple can to her lips and asking for more pink kitty cat.

    You make far more money selling stuff to poor people than to rich people.

    That’s why so many rich and powerful people advocate increasing handouts. Normal people’s money is given to the poor, who then buy things from rich people… Things like cigarettes, junk food, idiotic gadgets, and flashy cars that their more sensible, tax-paying benefactors would never waste a dime on.

    It’s a massive wealth transfer from the middle to the top, using clueless poor people—foreigners, blacks, millenials—as the vehicle.

    • Agree: BB753
  101. The reason Get Out should have won best picture is because it represents the best the Negro intellect could deliver. We see a similar phenomenon in the arts: the Purple mediocrity Prince becomes a genius; the lightweight writer Toni Morrison lobbies for a Nobel; the thoroughly mediocre Spike Lee becomes a “major filmmaker”; etc. The entire Negro agenda is getting Mr Honkie to love, and financially support, their brilliant creations.

    • Replies: @Little spoon
    Prince was a genius.
  102. Probably the best 2 and a half minutes of cinematic history and definitely one of my favorite movies of all time…

    • Replies: @El Dato
    Hey, it dawned on me ... isn't that the music from "Under Fire".

    Don't tell me Tarantino is glueing memes together into a fucking zombiemememachine again.

    https://youtu.be/SSe8K13Cvkg?t=3676 (t=3676)

    Of course he is.
  103. @songbird
    Only saw the first three. All boring, I'm afraid. The Artist was too melancholy for me.

    Argo just wasn't good. They fictionalized the story. The story of the actual hostages was a much more interesting story, although probably difficult to tell in a movie, due to time constraints.

    I remember reading after I watched Argo that the Canadians were upset at how short changed their involvement in freeing the hostages was in the movie. Making it without Affleck probably would have helped a lot.

  104. @Tyrion 2
    You're partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    This is also why the SJWs so often push a literal inversion of reality. It is not just a huge coincidence. The whole purpose is to deny reality to themselves and convince others of the truth of their denial.

    We won't ever convince the majority of them to stop either. Years of one on one therapy would likely do nothing. We can just raise the next generation better by exposing them to risk and personal growth, while providing a safe space for the SJWs to engage in their weird mutual delusions.

    The issue there is that these types will naturally seek out places of influence so as to further their self-esteem. Hence they dominate the media and acadaemia. Unfortunately, a root and branch clear out of such places is impossible; so de-legitimizing these spaces, by pointing out what SJWs have made of them, is pur best option.

    They are now 'safe spaces' for the vain, fragile and barely competent. At best, they function as a magic mirror that always tells the journalist/acadaemic (really, 'entertainer') how special they are. At worst, they're dirty wreckages full of shambling freaks so bought in to their own fantasy that they'll never be able to open their eyes due to the extreme psychological pain and humiliation they'd suffer.

    Prediction: this will all get worse and a lot weirder.

    1. You'll find SJWs convinced thay they're literal goddesses and that you're hateful for denying their divinity.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Many, many people are psychologically tied to this train and they'll be dragged along with it no matter how far it goes off the tracks. Losing makes this type of person more passive. Winning makes them more manic. If the Dems triumph at the mid-terms, they'll take it up a notch.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Heh. Reminds me of the bit in one of Updike’s Bech books where Bech wins the Melville Award for the American author who has Maintained the most Meaningful Silence.

  105. @Tyrion 2
    You're partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    This is also why the SJWs so often push a literal inversion of reality. It is not just a huge coincidence. The whole purpose is to deny reality to themselves and convince others of the truth of their denial.

    We won't ever convince the majority of them to stop either. Years of one on one therapy would likely do nothing. We can just raise the next generation better by exposing them to risk and personal growth, while providing a safe space for the SJWs to engage in their weird mutual delusions.

    The issue there is that these types will naturally seek out places of influence so as to further their self-esteem. Hence they dominate the media and acadaemia. Unfortunately, a root and branch clear out of such places is impossible; so de-legitimizing these spaces, by pointing out what SJWs have made of them, is pur best option.

    They are now 'safe spaces' for the vain, fragile and barely competent. At best, they function as a magic mirror that always tells the journalist/acadaemic (really, 'entertainer') how special they are. At worst, they're dirty wreckages full of shambling freaks so bought in to their own fantasy that they'll never be able to open their eyes due to the extreme psychological pain and humiliation they'd suffer.

    Prediction: this will all get worse and a lot weirder.

    1. You'll find SJWs convinced thay they're literal goddesses and that you're hateful for denying their divinity.

    2. Genuinely ugly people will start being on the covers of major fashion/gossip publications and being lauded as beautiful.

    3. People who do nothing and achieve nothing will demand recognition of it because of the struggle of taking up that literally non-existent burden and the entertainment complex will validate them.

    Many, many people are psychologically tied to this train and they'll be dragged along with it no matter how far it goes off the tracks. Losing makes this type of person more passive. Winning makes them more manic. If the Dems triumph at the mid-terms, they'll take it up a notch.

    You’re partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!

    Gotta wonder, though, about nagging doubts…..Surely some of the goodthinkers who saw Hidden Figures have to wonder if the Black lady mathematicians in the film are really all that great when compared to people like Josiah Willard Gibbs and James Clerk Maxwell…..surely some Black cineastes know that Black Panther, Moonlight, and Twelve Years a Slave
    aren’t really in the same league as The Searchers and 2001: A Space Odyssey…..

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    This is a real article of faith with them, they talk about it all the time, and it was especially on display with Black Panther. There is no fine distinction (it happens that many African languages lack fine distinctions or intermediate states) and achievement is a function of encouragement. Thus I have the same math aptitude as Richard Feynman -- if you clap your hands enough -- and, in a sense people are taking totally legally seriously, if you do not clap at all, then you are stopping me from my destiny.
    , @Tyrion 2
    The Ari Folman flick 'The Congress' and its concept of 'the chemical party' gets it. It is a very interesting film. I'd love to read our blog host's review of it - perhaps he'll work on commission for that one piece?
    , @MEH 0910
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61leT43g55L._SX409_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/Counting-Katherine-Johnson-Saved-Apollo/dp/1250137527
  106. @stillCARealist
    Cultural and moral conservatism, the kinds that matter most, are quite difficult to live up to. People realize this starting about age 16, and many leave the fold, never to return. Some come back when they have kids themselves and wonder how civilization will continue if they don't teach it and live it.

    Getting and staying married, raising children, working full time, paying your bills, abiding by the law, abstaining from substance abuse, helping your friends and family through tough times, being a participant in community affairs. These all require hard work and self-sacrifice, and it's never been easier to shirk all these responsibilities.

    Don't ever expect conservatism to be a winner in the sense that people en masse jump at the prospect of more duty. Conservatism is harder.

    Don’t ever expect conservatism to be a winner in the sense that people en masse jump at the prospect of more duty. Conservatism is harder.

    Then why does Conservatism not completely die out?

    • Replies: @dfordoom


    Don’t ever expect conservatism to be a winner in the sense that people en masse jump at the prospect of more duty. Conservatism is harder.
     
    Then why does Conservatism not completely die out?
     
    It pretty much has. What is commonly called conservatism is actually just a variant of liberalism, with a bit more overt emphasis on selfishness. The Conservatism Inc brand of conservatism certainly isn't conservative.

    Social conservatism is a different animal. It's dying out as well, as Christianity continues to decline and the remnants of Christianity become indistinguishable from regular liberals. How many social conservatives are there are among the Millennial Generation? Almost none.

    Actual conservatives are a tiny minority of the population, with practically zero influence.
  107. Happening thread. Shooter at a large veteran home. Possibly an Eaat Asian who has already fled the sceme. Expect low coverage because it happened in California.
    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/163329480

  108. @syonredux

    You’re partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!
     
    Gotta wonder, though, about nagging doubts.....Surely some of the goodthinkers who saw Hidden Figures have to wonder if the Black lady mathematicians in the film are really all that great when compared to people like Josiah Willard Gibbs and James Clerk Maxwell.....surely some Black cineastes know that Black Panther, Moonlight, and Twelve Years a Slave
    aren't really in the same league as The Searchers and 2001: A Space Odyssey.....

    This is a real article of faith with them, they talk about it all the time, and it was especially on display with Black Panther. There is no fine distinction (it happens that many African languages lack fine distinctions or intermediate states) and achievement is a function of encouragement. Thus I have the same math aptitude as Richard Feynman — if you clap your hands enough — and, in a sense people are taking totally legally seriously, if you do not clap at all, then you are stopping me from my destiny.

  109. @cthulhu


    I’m sure that somebody has brought this up, but I kinda wonder if Del Toro wasn’t also influenced by Lovecraft’s “Shadow over Innsmouth?” The tale involves a decaying Massachusetts town whose citizenry have interbred with the “Deep Ones,” alien creatures who are half frog, half fish. Del Toro is a huge Lovecraft fan (until the project fell apart, he was slated to direct an adaptation of At The Mountains of Madness)

     

    Seems plausible to me. I’m hoping that GdT winning these Oscars gets some studio off its ass to give GdT the money to make his At the Mountains of Madness adaptation - supposedly the project got shot down by the alleged similarity in storyline to Ridley Scott’s abysmal Prometheus, but that’s been in the rear view mirror for a while now. And AtMoM is supposedly GdT’s labor of love.

    A major problem for studios, and promise for fans, is that supposedly Guillermo is dead set on faithfulness to the source material, even if that means a huge run time.

  110. @AndrewR
    You're really a broken revord.

    I Googled revord, wondering if I was missing something.

    A girl named Raegan (sic) Revord stars on Young Sheldon:
    http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6862942/

    So I guess you meant record. And you’re right – his shtick is getting old.

    Yan Shen advocates for his people, as April Reign (or whatever the hell her name is) advocates for hers. He’s yet another would-be conductor on the white-guilt gravy train.

    • LOL: AndrewR
  111. @Dignan
    a current example: the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue has included "plus size" models for the past few years, I believe.

    Interestingly, you can’t complain about that in mixed company, so you could say they’ve taken the Google route of not worrying about criticism they cannot hear. But for decades it was understood at Playboy that an issue with a black model would be the weak sales point of the year. Also, a lot of modern consumers would be receiving that material one photo at a time at image aggregators like Saw First or Phun (nsfw), so the magazine would never get feedback anyway.

  112. @kihowi
    Just a reminder that there has never been an age of racism in popular culture. It's a myth.

    You will not be able to find a mainstream book, magazine or movie of any age that treated black people with anything but impeccable politeness and white-people-niceness. Believe me, I've looked for it.

    Just as the Victorians made up the Dark Ages, we made up the Dark Age of Racism.

    Agree completely. I went on an old movies kick a few years ago, watched dozens of the classics on DVD collections, all with added industry expert commentary. Didn’t matter the decade, 30s or the 70s, every time a black actor appeared the commentators talked about how revolutionary and brave it was to include then in the cast.

  113. America wants black people to be invisible?

    Probably not as the blacks would steal everything not nailed down.

  114. @Glaivester
    If Marvel wants to do a female version of a hero, why not go with a movie set in a "few years ahead of time" alternate universe, the MC2? That way, you could get Spider-Girl, American Dream, Wild Thing... Spider-Girl was one of the more tenacious comic books around, and as it basically was "Spider-Man: the Next Generation" (Spider-Girl is Peter Parker's daughter), the "handing down the legacy" was a lot more organic.

    The stories were also pretty good, because they tended more to the older, "funner" tone rather than the newer, "more serious and elaborate" tone.

    Marvel has done a female superhero show on Netflix with Jessica Jones. I watched the first season; it was anti-white feminist BS. All the white men were depicted negatively and all the women and minorities were depicted positively. While the Alt Right certainly blames Jews too much, it’s unsurprising the show was produced by a woman named Melissa Rosenberg.

    Marvel is doing a feature length film on Black Widow from The Avengers. We’ll see how it does at the box office, but I doubt it’s going to do very well. As absurdly popular as The Avengers is, Black Widow felt like nothing more than eye candy during the film. Additionally I the film won’t have the same marketing boost Wonder Women got from the media drooling all over it.

  115. @Meretricious
    The reason Get Out should have won best picture is because it represents the best the Negro intellect could deliver. We see a similar phenomenon in the arts: the Purple mediocrity Prince becomes a genius; the lightweight writer Toni Morrison lobbies for a Nobel; the thoroughly mediocre Spike Lee becomes a "major filmmaker"; etc. The entire Negro agenda is getting Mr Honkie to love, and financially support, their brilliant creations.

    Prince was a genius.

    • Replies: @Meretricious
    I don't doubt that you think so. The only songs I liked penned by Prince, who had a terrible voice, are Nothing Compares 2 U by Sinead O'Connor and Manic Monday by The Bangles, which song Prince ripped off from Kirsty MacColl's They Don't Know. Please tell me 1 song composed by Prince you think is brilliant.
    , @El Dato
    But why? I can only remember "Purple Rain". And that's only because it was mentioned in a comic strip for nerds.
  116. @Daniel Williams

    Logan was awful.
     
    It bummed me out, too.

    Professor X is senile. Wolverine is a broken-down drunk. Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of "Dreamers" with magic powers. Real uplifting stuff.

    Superhero nerd question: Why is Wolverine able to get drunk? It’s been established that Captain America can’t get drunk because his serum burns up the alcohol before it can get into him and also prevents him from being poisoned (which is all alcohol is), so why can Wolverine, whose self-healing abilities have the same properties as Cap’s super-solider serum?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Luke, put the computer away, and use the Humanities. What is Wolverine, not scientifically or officially, but in humanistic terms? Wolverine is the noisy cigar-chomping pain in the rear Uncle Buck, who is also the only guy you want to see when a tree stump needs to be removed from your front yard. Thus, he must regularly imbibe, and sing songs to Sabazios.
    , @Romanian
    Because his healing factor was impaired by the substances used by the government to clamp down on mutant powers. This is why he was getting older, his healing factor was failing and he had more and more issues, including with his claws.
  117. @Matthew McConnagay
    Am I the only one who doesn't see how AtMoM would make a good movie? Especially not with the $150 million budget he's supposedly aiming at. There's just no way the studio wouldn't enshitten it, even if it could work (and I'm doubtful). He should take a crack at some other Lovecraft story.

    It’s also a short story. Lovecraft would be better for Black Mirror/Twilight Zone-style TV episodes.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    It's not really a short story. It's one of the few novel-length stories of Olde Lovecraft.

    Also, Lovecraft is pretty anti-negro racist, so this would just excite the Wakandians.

    Unless you put in a black actor.

    This would excite Chtulhu, and you don't want that.
    , @J.Ross
    It's a novella with extensive background and detailed asides.
  118. @syonredux

    You’re partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!
     
    Gotta wonder, though, about nagging doubts.....Surely some of the goodthinkers who saw Hidden Figures have to wonder if the Black lady mathematicians in the film are really all that great when compared to people like Josiah Willard Gibbs and James Clerk Maxwell.....surely some Black cineastes know that Black Panther, Moonlight, and Twelve Years a Slave
    aren't really in the same league as The Searchers and 2001: A Space Odyssey.....

    The Ari Folman flick ‘The Congress’ and its concept of ‘the chemical party’ gets it. It is a very interesting film. I’d love to read our blog host’s review of it – perhaps he’ll work on commission for that one piece?

  119. @whorefinder
    Superhero nerd question: Why is Wolverine able to get drunk? It's been established that Captain America can't get drunk because his serum burns up the alcohol before it can get into him and also prevents him from being poisoned (which is all alcohol is), so why can Wolverine, whose self-healing abilities have the same properties as Cap's super-solider serum?

    Luke, put the computer away, and use the Humanities. What is Wolverine, not scientifically or officially, but in humanistic terms? Wolverine is the noisy cigar-chomping pain in the rear Uncle Buck, who is also the only guy you want to see when a tree stump needs to be removed from your front yard. Thus, he must regularly imbibe, and sing songs to Sabazios.

  120. @Dave Pinsen
    It’s also a short story. Lovecraft would be better for Black Mirror/Twilight Zone-style TV episodes.

    It’s not really a short story. It’s one of the few novel-length stories of Olde Lovecraft.

    Also, Lovecraft is pretty anti-negro racist, so this would just excite the Wakandians.

    Unless you put in a black actor.

    This would excite Chtulhu, and you don’t want that.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    It's his most mature work, he has a section where he actually recognizes the "humanity" or dignity of other forms of life, although no SJW would ever accept or comprehend that.
    The biggest obstacles are run time and the fact that everybody is going to come out of the theater asking, "isn't this the same fundamental concept as Campbell's the Thing?"
  121. @stillCARealist
    I can't believe I clicked on a lesbo mag cover. Next time give a warning!

    Sorry, I tried to embed the pic.

  122. @Little spoon
    Prince was a genius.

    I don’t doubt that you think so. The only songs I liked penned by Prince, who had a terrible voice, are Nothing Compares 2 U by Sinead O’Connor and Manic Monday by The Bangles, which song Prince ripped off from Kirsty MacColl’s They Don’t Know. Please tell me 1 song composed by Prince you think is brilliant.

    • Replies: @Little spoon
    His style was distinctive and didn’t sound derivative of anything else at the time. But his genius was in being able to compose at all given the amount of other things he could do very well. He was a guitarist of the highest caliber, a singer with remarkable consistency across a wide vocal range and a great dancer. His compositions were not usually catchy but he had an original sound. There is almost no one who could dance, sing, play guitar and compose at the level that prince could do each of these things.
    , @J.Ross
    His duet with Kate Bush (Why Should I Love You), Cream, and Erotic City.
    Although Michael totally smoked him here.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-O-DmEy8Tk
    , @Autochthon
    Dear Lord. No less a light than Joe Satriani himself once famously cited Prince as about the most talented guitarist on the planet. I don't know what Vulture is, but because I was confident someone else had already extensively explained his genius in some eulogy or other, I just typed "Prince musical genius" into a search engine, and lo!.

    It's a good summary understandable by a layperson. (Of course, if you are yourself a musician or just at all knowledgeable of music theory, to not find his genius self-evident – objectively, even if his music is not your particular cup of tea – is to mark yourself a fraud or a deluded fool.)
  123. @Anon
    Is it possible that part of the reign of blackness in movies has to do with:

    1) Black actors are cheaper to pay than white actors, so the films are cheaper to make?

    2) If you do enough guilt-whip cracking, it'll make just enough goodwhites show up that you will:

    3) $Profit$!

    Historically speaking, films about blacks don't make a lot of money because they don't pull in much of an audience. Whites don't care about black lives and don't show up. Therefore, it looks like Hollywood is trying to construct a new type of black film formula--all based on dragging money out of cringing, masochistic whites--that actually pulls in the enough audience to make a fat profit.

    If the formula succeeds in producing blockbusters, we'll see a LOT of these types of white guilt films in the future. People of my generation never would have gone to see these things, but Millennials are appallingly easy to manipulate.

    When Millennials age into their 60s, they're going to wreck the world. They're crazier and more radical than the Boomers, and believe so much tripe that they can never be deprogrammed. If half the Boomers haven't lost their leftism by their 60s, then we can't change the Millennials, either.

    If the formula succeeds in producing blockbusters, we’ll see a LOT of these types of white guilt films in the future. People of my generation never would have gone to see these things, but Millennials are appallingly easy to manipulate.

    Blackbusters: A new market frontier!

    Black Brother orders you to go watch this magnificient film, genetically-guilty peons.

  124. SMK says: • Website
    @Daniel Williams

    “Get Out” and “Black Panther” weren’t exactly created by a vast cabal of humanity’s leading geniuses.
     
    They're products created and financed by the richest and most powerful minority on the planet to bilk the poorest and least capable at fifteen dollars a pop. Grape soda isn't a work of genius either.

    How ironic that Black Panther, a ludicrous fantasy that exalts black genius, could never have been made if not for technologies invented by white males, just as blacks earn millions and tens of millions of dollars a year playing football and basketball, games created by white males that they would have never invented.

    • Replies: @Daniel Williams

    How ironic that Black Panther, a ludicrous fantasy that exalts black genius, could never have been made if not for technologies invented by white males
     
    It's sad, really. Individual blacks have so little, yet "Hollywood" (cough) concocted a fantasy perfectly suited to dupe them out of what little disposable income they have. These are families with a median net worth of what, like, $17,000?

    When the junk food or soda or cigarette industries target blacks in this way, it's called exploitation. But, weirdly, the movie industry has people thinking that what they do is somehow different.

  125. @Little spoon
    Prince was a genius.

    But why? I can only remember “Purple Rain”. And that’s only because it was mentioned in a comic strip for nerds.

  126. @Yan Shen
    Probably the best 2 and a half minutes of cinematic history and definitely one of my favorite movies of all time...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYTRQWKsyxc

    Hey, it dawned on me … isn’t that the music from “Under Fire”.

    Don’t tell me Tarantino is glueing memes together into a fucking zombiemememachine again.

    (t=3676)

    Of course he is.

  127. @Matthew McConnagay
    My quick capsule review:

    Professor X is senile. Wolverine is a broken-down drunk.

    Sounds pretty sweet. This movie just might be awesome...

    Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of “Dreamers” with magic powers.

    Oh. Never mind.

    Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of “Dreamers” with magic powers.

    Oh. Never mind.

    Why? This sounds like a good setup for a multiple-X rated movie.

  128. @Meretricious
    I don't doubt that you think so. The only songs I liked penned by Prince, who had a terrible voice, are Nothing Compares 2 U by Sinead O'Connor and Manic Monday by The Bangles, which song Prince ripped off from Kirsty MacColl's They Don't Know. Please tell me 1 song composed by Prince you think is brilliant.

    His style was distinctive and didn’t sound derivative of anything else at the time. But his genius was in being able to compose at all given the amount of other things he could do very well. He was a guitarist of the highest caliber, a singer with remarkable consistency across a wide vocal range and a great dancer. His compositions were not usually catchy but he had an original sound. There is almost no one who could dance, sing, play guitar and compose at the level that prince could do each of these things.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    Originality for its own sake is a sign of decadence. Can't comment on whether his music is actually good - never listened to it.
  129. @Meretricious
    I don't doubt that you think so. The only songs I liked penned by Prince, who had a terrible voice, are Nothing Compares 2 U by Sinead O'Connor and Manic Monday by The Bangles, which song Prince ripped off from Kirsty MacColl's They Don't Know. Please tell me 1 song composed by Prince you think is brilliant.

    His duet with Kate Bush (Why Should I Love You), Cream, and Erotic City.
    Although Michael totally smoked him here.

  130. @Dave Pinsen
    It’s also a short story. Lovecraft would be better for Black Mirror/Twilight Zone-style TV episodes.

    It’s a novella with extensive background and detailed asides.

  131. @Dignan
    a current example: the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue has included "plus size" models for the past few years, I believe.

    Do you think no guys like thicker girls?

  132. “This kind of attitude is also partly to blame for the lack of progress for African-Americans in rates of homeownership, incarceration and employment over the past 50 years.”

    How does a sentence this stupid get into any newspaper?

    Fun new game-try to fill the last 3 phenomena with random things.

    “This kind of attitude is also partly to blame for the lack of progress for African-Americans in rates of NHL goalies, heavy metal bassists and matrix calculus econometrics over the past 50 years.”

    • LOL: Autochthon
  133. @Daniel Williams

    Logan was awful.
     
    It bummed me out, too.

    Professor X is senile. Wolverine is a broken-down drunk. Our only hope for the future is a scrappy chick and a crew of "Dreamers" with magic powers. Real uplifting stuff.

    A few months ago I saw the latest Star Wars movie (it sucked). Before the movie, as usual, they showed about 10 previews – I honestly don’t remember what the movies were, but they all had the exact same theme. The fate of entire (country, planet, universe) is at stake and our only hope is (a scrappy female, a diverse person, a space critter) in whose hands alone rest the fate of (all of humanity, the entire planet, the galaxy). Maybe in 1 or two of them (not many) it was a white guy, but every one had the money shot where the sidekick turns to the hero and earnestly pleads, “You are our only hope!” – after a while it was actually funny to see so many “only hopes”. Why is “our only hope” such a popular fantasy theme?

    • Replies: @Ivy
    Jack,
    My guess about the "only hope" theme is that it speaks to some angst or anxiety or why not both among the millennial audience members. How much does film media lead or suggest, and how much does it reflect seemingly concurrent ideas or concerns? Given the lead time to put out a movie there is some fascinating forecasting going on about what will be topical or controversial, at least some of the time based on those releases that hit.
  134. @SMK
    How ironic that Black Panther, a ludicrous fantasy that exalts black genius, could never have been made if not for technologies invented by white males, just as blacks earn millions and tens of millions of dollars a year playing football and basketball, games created by white males that they would have never invented.

    How ironic that Black Panther, a ludicrous fantasy that exalts black genius, could never have been made if not for technologies invented by white males

    It’s sad, really. Individual blacks have so little, yet “Hollywood” (cough) concocted a fantasy perfectly suited to dupe them out of what little disposable income they have. These are families with a median net worth of what, like, $17,000?

    When the junk food or soda or cigarette industries target blacks in this way, it’s called exploitation. But, weirdly, the movie industry has people thinking that what they do is somehow different.

  135. @whorefinder
    Logan was awful. I'm a bit biased because I've hated all the X-Men movies, but it was crappy. Based on an SJW comic book attempt to replace Wolverine with a girl; the little girl acting all hilariously badly; the final fight being absolutely ridiculous and nonsensical (so the bad guys have no problem crossing the American/Mexican border to catch them, but the Canadian border in the middle of nowhere is sacrosanct?); the bad bonding scenes along the way; and of course Hugh Jackman jacked up on so many steroids to look "badass" that its humorous.

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America. It wasn't cross country or up/down a coast, it was through the heart of America. Interesting to go that way. And they meet a nice farming family, which is good....except they're black, of course. Totally believable.

    Yeah, so “Logan” wasn’t great, but it was an improvement over the flashy sci-fi of the other Xmen flicks. Oh, and BTW, it beat the shit out of “Get Out”.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    I found Logan unbearably PC, or on narrative. I suspect that was my own confirmation bias and funny mood when I watched it. I should have another look.
  136. I’ve linked to this before, but it fits quite well here. Why do SJWs frame their jihads in terms of cition (Wakanda Forever!, Dumbledore’s Army, Rebels vs the Empire, etc)

    “How Fiction Forms Our Politics : The Psychology of Narratives”

    Meanwhile, back in hideously white and male reality

    It was much easier to dismiss Musk’s crazy plans 7 years ago. His next crazy plan? Men on Mars by 2024.

  137. @peterike
    Indeed, black voices are silenced. Except for the fact that any given moment of every single day you can find a black, a cucked white, or a Jew talking about the plight of blacks and the racism of whites on television or in major publications. Always, every day. It's a constant message, but it's not the only message, and maybe that's what "silencing" means.

    Speaking of "silencing," minor factoid: the other day I'm on a corporate conference call. And before the call starts, instead of hold music they play little news snippets. Whaddya suppose they talked about? Genius T Coates writing Capt. America. They're even shoving blackity-black-black stories at me while on hold on the phone! Can the alt-right please get that kind of "silencing"? Steve would be a millionaire if they silenced him that way.

    Anyway, what I really wonder about is do Kashana Cauley and others of her ilk truly believe blacks are being silenced? Is she that unaware? Or is she just using it as convenient weaponized rhetoric? I really wonder about this.

    Finally, she is yet another female who fits Sailer's Law of Female Journalism:

    https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5a89984a9f8dce86ccc15d0e/t/5a89a24771c10b5845e482c6/1518969420567/IMG_0621.jpg?format=1000w

    “Anyway, what I really wonder about is do Kashana Cauley and others of her ilk truly believe blacks are being silenced?”

    Probably, her parents and siblings constantly told her to STFU when she was a kid, and it’s still bothering her.

  138. @El Dato
    It's not really a short story. It's one of the few novel-length stories of Olde Lovecraft.

    Also, Lovecraft is pretty anti-negro racist, so this would just excite the Wakandians.

    Unless you put in a black actor.

    This would excite Chtulhu, and you don't want that.

    It’s his most mature work, he has a section where he actually recognizes the “humanity” or dignity of other forms of life, although no SJW would ever accept or comprehend that.
    The biggest obstacles are run time and the fact that everybody is going to come out of the theater asking, “isn’t this the same fundamental concept as Campbell’s the Thing?”

  139. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'm still really upset that we didn't get through Black History month without getting gob-smacked, gob-smacked, I tells ya', by a raciss incident like the 29 cent stamp fiasco. I know I've been beating a dead rodeo horse on this one, but c'mon 3/5? Really?

    I'm getting tarred, in so many ways tarred, of OVERCOMING all the damn time. We need a new song for next year.

    I am tard, too and I know it’s a real word because Loretta Lynn sang it in “Coal Miner’s Daughter”

  140. @Twodees Partain
    Yeah, so "Logan" wasn't great, but it was an improvement over the flashy sci-fi of the other Xmen flicks. Oh, and BTW, it beat the shit out of "Get Out".

    I found Logan unbearably PC, or on narrative. I suspect that was my own confirmation bias and funny mood when I watched it. I should have another look.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    So did I, but the twisting of the narrative by depicting Logan as a washed up old drunk caring for the demented old Professor X was at least interesting. I don't even try to look for films without PC storylines any more. It's usually a fruitless search anyway.
  141. @Travis
    Hispanics already surpass the number of Blacks, but they will never replace the moral authority of Blacks....in 2018 there are more Mexican-Americans in America than African-Americans...yet no Mexican Lives movement , nor any effort to make the Oscars more Mexican.

    hispanics are more divided than Blacks, and half of them still identify as being white. The Latinos who flee from white are typically the whitest of the hispanics who game the system.

    Racially Blacks will remain the 2nd largest racial group in America...Even when Hispanics are 40% of our population in 2045 , they will remain divided by race (with half still considered white).

    The Black population continues to grow faster than the White population...while Blacks are 12% of the population they are 15% of the youth population. Hispanics will never gain the moral authority and reverence of Blacks for several reasons. First among them is that they have generally been accepted as white. Hispanics were never slaves (but were slave owners), The civil rights movement was about Blacks. There are good reasons the BLM movement ignored hispanics. Blacks will fight to maintain their position of authority , hispanics will never fight to obtain this power. Hispanic surnames will soon be so commonplace that they will lose their ethnic Pokémon points.

    African-Americans have gone from 10% to 12% in about 50 years. Many Hispanic immigrants are arriving; few African immigrants are. The civil rights movement was partly about Hispanics; remember cesar Chavez and Bobby Kennedy. I think you’re overstating your case.

    • Replies: @Travis
    Blacks are already 15% of the population of Americans under the age of 24.

    The Black population in 1970 was 21 million , it has doubled to 43 million in 2015 while the white population has remained at 180 million since 1970. The only reason it appears the Black population is growing slowly is due to the migration of 50 million immigrants, which has kept the Black population below 20%. But their power remains much stronger than the hispanics who outnumber blacks. Hispanics are not unified by race and will never approach the coalition of Blacks in demanding political power, they are too divide by race, culture and economic status. In addition hispanics will never earn the required pokemon points to obtain the power Blacks have. Hispanics were never slaves (but were slave owners) , hispanics have been treated as white by the US government, allowed to serve in the army, allowed to vote etc. The Civil rights movement in America concerned Blacks , not hispanics, for good reasons.
    , @Romanian
    The Black population has grown, but it was masked by high immigration. Also, there is significant non-American Black immigration from the Caribbean and Africa itself. I am sure Black migrants from Brazil will become a thing too. You import more Africans in a few years than you did as slaves in the entire history of North American settlement (approx. 400k).
  142. @Inquiring Mind
    What is with the rush to board the airplane?

    Sure, if you want to cram the overhead with those anvil-laden cases you are carrying on, you need to get seated first. But cool people always board last. It is much like sitting in the back row of class is cool. It signals that you are too cool to be herded into the boarding line. It signals that you are too cool to rise from the boarding lounge seat until they make "last call."

    Best yet, if you had reserved a window or even a middle seat, you can stare down the person occupying the aisle who got preferred boarding and just doesn't want to get up out of their seat. Even on Southwest you can do this to claim that last remaining seat in the middle. Serious cool.

    Maybe the guys who rush to board first are the assholes in aisle seats that you have to stare down to get them to let you get into your seat. It’s a very sound theory.

  143. Fishcegenation, lol.

    Now, on the other hand, is there actually a minority group in this country today that’s largely been rendered invisible and ignored by the mainstream?

    Kato’s very clever. He knows that if he pretends that 1.5 billion Chinamen don’t exist (and have all-Chinee teevee and borders closed to whites), we’ll forget all about them.

    What’s the pidgin for “let’s see if we can fight a war in America’s backyard and make Her out to be the aggressor”?

    Killed any Dzungars or Tibetans or Uighurs lately, Kato?

    Superhero nerd question: Why is Wolverine able to get drunk? It’s been established that Captain America can’t get drunk because his serum burns up the alcohol before it can get into him and also prevents him from being poisoned (which is all alcohol is), so why can Wolverine, whose self-healing abilities have the same properties as Cap’s super-solider serum?

    Nerd answer: it’s already been established that Wolvermope can’t get a buzz, get cancer from cigars, etc, because healing factor. If he can in the movies it’s because nerds aren’t in charge.

    Thus, he must regularly imbibe, and sing songs to Sabazios.

    Imbibe != buzz.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I don't know anything about comics. But a Canadian, prone to constant flesh-tearing, and like I said a Canadian, unable to get drunk ... I guess his real power is incomprehensible rage.
  144. @Anonym
    I think the joke is on the same level as the use of the term “Trophy Wife” to describe Oscar winning Frances McDormand.

    Which is to say...?

    I think the trophy wife line was a wry, witty putdown. McDormand is no oil painting, though almost pretty in her youth. After the inclusion rider bit, understandable. It's a good pun, but I didn't even internally chuckle. So one of the Coens married a confirmed great actress with two trophies. If he was willing to settle for a less talented actress he could have no doubt had a lot hotter shiksa, so in no way is she a trophy wife of the usual meaning. (If you are going to dissect a joke, always make it someone else's. If it wasn't funny before it certainly won't survive the autopsy.)

    By contrast, "fishcegenation" - I was literally laughing out loud, then giggling for about a minute afterwards, off and on. What is funny and to what extent differs for every person, but that term - the combination of fish and miscegenation, the way it came together, first using the taboo term "miscegenatation" as a putdown - you aren't supposed to do this - as we all know race mixing is holy, indeed jasmine scented. But it's not just race mixing, it's race mixing and not with some amazing swamp creature it's with a fish, an aquatic lifeform, which is pretty humorous. It's not even miscegenation at the level of human, so it's fishcegenation.

    In one word Steve completely craps all over the pretentious naked emperor del Toro's Oscar winning arthouse flick. Fishcegenation - it puts it on the level of arthouse anime tentacle porn, which after all is said and done is still tentacle porn. Once you see it you can't unsee it. Like watching the Untouchables again after watching Naked Gun 33 1/3 for the first time.

    https://youtu.be/YwM7NgPE5lw

    Now the provocoteur is now the orthodoxy we have formed our own culture of critique, making a mirror image of the 'Piss Christ'. "How do you like it, huh? Having fun?"

    https://youtu.be/0PdIVGmjOdY

    For all those reasons it's funny and subversive.

    A bit of a tangent, but Star Trek was always really funny in this regard. There were endless alien-human hybrids, starting with Spock. Spock had a Vulcan father – a guy with green blood, like a fish. But a human mother. He was the original fishcegination (not counting Lovecraft).

    Spock’s character – torn between two natures – was pretty important. But they really, really got carried away with it, with subsequent characters, and even walkons, who seemed to be mainly about alien miscegenation. Just seemingly making it about ignoring biology. And indeed, Star Trek was really, really bad about biology in general.

  145. @Dignan
    a current example: the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue has included "plus size" models for the past few years, I believe.

    That’s a valid inclusion. There have always been plus size women and a lot of them are real beauties. I like big gals as well as slim gals. There is an actual demand for including big pretty gals and it has nothing to do with the kind of delusion that has SJW’s claiming that Lena Dunham is beautiful.

    I’m referring to this kind of big woman:

    http://thechive.com/2016/04/07/model-responds-to-people-who-call-her-fat-10-photos/

  146. @Daniel Chieh
    Never assume that Bezos will be blindsided. He almost certainly has a plan - anyone who has worked in Amazon can tell you that he is not, in practice, anything akin to a humanitarian.

    "Your mom is dying so you need to carry a cell phone into work to be there for her last moments? That's too bad. You're fired."

    Amazon makes the rest of Silicon Valley look cuddly and sweet. There are times when Amazon makes working in Chinese companies look cuddly and sweet. If you work in an Amazon warehouse, then you'll have the wonderful of being told, pretty explicitly, that you are merely human capital that exists to expedite your replacement within five or ten years with robotic counterparts(ha, and you thought immigrants? Bezos does not need humans, with their annoying needs for food and sleep and family).

    So no, I don't think that Bezos doesn't have some deeper algorithm he's running.

    At the very least, he’d make the taxpayer eat the costs.

  147. @songbird
    Three things I didn't like about Pi.

    1.it had a really multicultural feel to it. When you venerate everything, you venerate nothing.
    2.too uneven a tone. Sometimes a comedy. Sometimes a drama. (I know some people like this sort of thing)
    3.the actor that played the adult guy was kind of wooden. But I generally don't like anything with flashbacks or big jumps in time. I consider it a broken narrative.

    singbird, best thing about an opinion board. I have one. You have one.

  148. @whorefinder
    Logan was awful. I'm a bit biased because I've hated all the X-Men movies, but it was crappy. Based on an SJW comic book attempt to replace Wolverine with a girl; the little girl acting all hilariously badly; the final fight being absolutely ridiculous and nonsensical (so the bad guys have no problem crossing the American/Mexican border to catch them, but the Canadian border in the middle of nowhere is sacrosanct?); the bad bonding scenes along the way; and of course Hugh Jackman jacked up on so many steroids to look "badass" that its humorous.

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America. It wasn't cross country or up/down a coast, it was through the heart of America. Interesting to go that way. And they meet a nice farming family, which is good....except they're black, of course. Totally believable.

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America.

    I enjoyed the film’s symbolically anti-Mexican narrative: Get as far away from Mexico as you can.

    As for the flick, I thought that it was OK. Quite derivative of the “Dying/Retired Gunfighter” genre (The Shootist, Shane, Unforgiven), though….but the film does, at least, hang a lampshade on its derivative nature (the characters watch Shane at one point, and Shane’s final speech is used as Logan’s eulogy).

    • Replies: @TGGP
    I know lots of critics have praised Logan for featuring a hispanic heroine, and none of have criticized it for employing a British-Spanish girl rather than an actual mestizo from the western hemisphere. Samuel L Jackson wasn't able to get any traction when he complained about black British actors like Kaluuya taking all the roles in Hollywood. You might infrequently read complaints about "colorism" penalizing darker-skinned blacks relative to lighter-skinned ones, but virtually nobody who's anybody distinguishes European Spaniards or Conquistador Americans from the huddled masses at the center of the immigration story, despite all the hubbub about "whitewashing" in casting. The one exception I can think of is how a number of fans of George R. R. Martin's books were upset that the Dornish casting on Game of Thrones included white people, with some pointing out that Pedro Pascal is a "white passing" Chilean immigrant. And instead of just dividing the world into white and "of color", some objected to south asian, east asian & Maori descended people all being lumped together.
    , @Matthew McConnagay
    ...the film does, at least, hang a lampshade on its derivative nature (the characters watch Shane at one point, and Shane’s final speech is used as Logan’s eulogy).

    Nah, that might have been the worst thing about it. Wolverine is pretty iconic in his own right, and Hugh Jackman's been playing him for 15 years. Doesn't he deserve his own eulogy?
  149. @jimbojones
    Wow, the stupid is extra strong in this article. Ms Cauley Seems to be confused about the whole notion of fiction.

    I skipped "Get Out" when I heard about the racial angle. It's not 1960 any more. And these turkeys are no Sidney Poitiers. Obama was president for 8 years. Give us more Eddie Murphy and Chris Tucker and less "12 Years" and "Get Out".

    “Get Out” is an Obama-era movie. The white characters talk about how they would have voted Obama President for a third time if they could.

  150. @Tiny Duck
    Get Out was a very, very good film. I was very thrilled that it won best original screenplay, which it strongly deserved. To say that it did not win "Best Picture" because of racism, however, is the kind of hyper-charged argument that does nothing but damage the cause of racial equality.

    Get Out was, in my humble opinion, not the "best" picture of the year, even though it was very, very good. The film that did win actually advocated for the same kind of racial and gender neutral goals that Ms. Cauley would advocate.

    Unlike "Get Out," not all white people are monsters. (I would point out that many of the white people in The Shape of Water were monsters as well.) Just because the white people were portrayed as monsters in Get Out, and to a lesser extent in The Shape of Water, does not mean I didn't (as a white man) like both films. I did. But to say that Get Out was denied the Oscar for Best Picture because of racism is simply ... not a good argument.

    TD sounds almost sane here. Is he mellowing in his old age? Is it an imposter? If a blackety-black commentator is too blackety-black for TD she must be blackety-black indeed.

    I’m guessing Cauley had this piece pre-written figuring that G.O. would not win Best Picture and winning Best Original Screenplay sort of threw a monkey wrench into her thesis but since she had written it already she made a few token (uh, minor) changes and sent it in anyway.

    • Replies: @Giant Duck
    The Giant Duck Effect. There's a newer, bigger, stronger Duck in town, and with the pecking order clarified, the smaller ducks now know what they're supposed to be doing.
  151. @education realist
    I thought Get Out was pretty good in large part because it wasn't the scathing, condemnatory satire that Peele thinks it is.

    I mean, cmon. Rich white people don't have black servants. That's what Hispanics are for.

    The whole movie was made by a guy who, like most New Yorkers, don't really see the world beyond black and white.

    I also thought the presence of black servants was odd, but I guess I wasn’t as clever as the educationrealist to guess the twist that early, so I was just pleasantly surprised that the movie was smarter than I initially gave it credit for.

  152. And indeed, Star Trek was really, really bad about biology in general.

    Technology in general. All the cool stuff they had, we never will, and all the amazing stuff we will have, never shows up on Star Trek.

    Trek: warp drive, transporters, artificial gravity.
    Real: cloning, life extension, nanotech, superintelligence, genetic engineering, robotics.

    I guess all the biomedical stuff we will have did show up on Trek – as evil things for the elect to stamp out. Luddite Trek.

  153. TGGP says: • Website
    @syonredux

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America.
     
    I enjoyed the film's symbolically anti-Mexican narrative: Get as far away from Mexico as you can.

    As for the flick, I thought that it was OK. Quite derivative of the "Dying/Retired Gunfighter" genre (The Shootist, Shane, Unforgiven), though....but the film does, at least, hang a lampshade on its derivative nature (the characters watch Shane at one point, and Shane's final speech is used as Logan's eulogy).

    I know lots of critics have praised Logan for featuring a hispanic heroine, and none of have criticized it for employing a British-Spanish girl rather than an actual mestizo from the western hemisphere. Samuel L Jackson wasn’t able to get any traction when he complained about black British actors like Kaluuya taking all the roles in Hollywood. You might infrequently read complaints about “colorism” penalizing darker-skinned blacks relative to lighter-skinned ones, but virtually nobody who’s anybody distinguishes European Spaniards or Conquistador Americans from the huddled masses at the center of the immigration story, despite all the hubbub about “whitewashing” in casting. The one exception I can think of is how a number of fans of George R. R. Martin’s books were upset that the Dornish casting on Game of Thrones included white people, with some pointing out that Pedro Pascal is a “white passing” Chilean immigrant. And instead of just dividing the world into white and “of color”, some objected to south asian, east asian & Maori descended people all being lumped together.

  154. @Matthew McConnagay
    My feeling with There Will Be Blood is that it looked so much like an Important Piece of Art that everybody assumed it must have been. Most of Paul Thomas Anderson's films fit that bill, actually: he makes films that look and sound and behave so much like great films that few people notice that, actually, there's nothing much going on there.

    I'm reminded of Adaptation when "Charlie Kaufman" goes to that writing seminar: somebody should buy Anderson a ticket.

    I thought Adaptation with its house of mirrors recursive layering was one of the most clever screenplays ever written. As a movie it is less than perfect but the premise is brilliant.

    • Replies: @Matthew McConnagay
    Agreed
  155. @Alfa158
    Of course a large segment of the commentariat is of necessity out of touch with reality. You have to be in order to be a Cult Marxist. They have been running things for a long time while real world experience has shown that their beliefs about economics, race, politics, crime, gender, sex, etc. are badly flawed. At the same time changing those positions would now mean loss of power, wealth and privilege.The only way they can continue to be Leftists is to BE out of touch with reality. It is also why you see that Leftists are increasingly, visibly stupider than they used to be. You don’t see any new Kenneth Galbraiths out there. ( although the growing number of NAM’s in their establishment is also a contributing factor to the cognitive decline). The Dennis Pragerism that applies is “only someone who has been to graduate school could believe something that stupid”.
    The upside for them is that they will still rule our institutions until the whole house of fantasy comes down.
    The upside for Steve is that they keep generating torrents of weapons-grade stupidity like this that he can mine for his blog.

    It is also why you see that Leftists are increasingly, visibly stupider than they used to be. You don’t see any new Kenneth Galbraiths out there.

    They’re visibly stupider because they’re an entirely different species of leftist. Old school leftists focused on economic justice and class struggle. Whether you agree or disagree with their views on these subjects it can’t be denied that economic justice and class struggle are real things. They were basing their arguments on reality. OK, their arguments were based on a particular interpretation of reality, but it was still reality. Capitalism really did exist.

    The modern leftists focus on social justice, which is something that simply does not exist and cannot exist. All their arguments are therefore based on fantasy. So it’s hardly surprising that they seem so much stupider than Old School Leftists.

    Anyone who bases his arguments and beliefs on fantasy is inevitably going to appear to be stupid. Libertarians being a prime example.

  156. @Dave Pinsen
    The most recent Best Picture winner I watched and found hugely entertaining was The Departed. Was any more recent winner as good as that, in your opinion?

    No Country for Old Men was mostly awesome, although I couldn’t understand Tommy Lee Jones’ mumbling with subtitles.

    Among the smaller, more experimental choices, I thought The Hurt Locker was very good.

    But why not just give the Best Picture Oscar to the best Big Movie of the year, like The Departed? Trying to guess what experimental art house film will be influential in 10 years is pretty hopeless for the Academy, so why not just reward well done examples of Big American (or Anglo-American) Movie-Making?

    • Replies: @Ivy
    Steve,
    Which factors do you look at for indicators of influence 10 years on?
    , @Twodees Partain
    "No Country for Old Men was mostly awesome, although I couldn’t understand Tommy Lee Jones’ mumbling with subtitles."

    It may be a Southern thang, but I had no trouble at all with Tommy Lee's lines, even the ones that he mumbled. There was one line of his that is memorable. Dillahunt's character says something like "Ain't this a mess?" and Jones replies, "If it ain't, it'll do 'till the mess gets here."

    Now that's a West Texas line if I ever heard one.
  157. @Paul Yarbles

    Don’t ever expect conservatism to be a winner in the sense that people en masse jump at the prospect of more duty. Conservatism is harder.
     
    Then why does Conservatism not completely die out?

    Don’t ever expect conservatism to be a winner in the sense that people en masse jump at the prospect of more duty. Conservatism is harder.

    Then why does Conservatism not completely die out?

    It pretty much has. What is commonly called conservatism is actually just a variant of liberalism, with a bit more overt emphasis on selfishness. The Conservatism Inc brand of conservatism certainly isn’t conservative.

    Social conservatism is a different animal. It’s dying out as well, as Christianity continues to decline and the remnants of Christianity become indistinguishable from regular liberals. How many social conservatives are there are among the Millennial Generation? Almost none.

    Actual conservatives are a tiny minority of the population, with practically zero influence.

    • Replies: @Paul Yarbles
    And here I was hoping for someone to tell me all the appealing things about conservatism and how it can triumph over the inhuman monster that is leftism!
  158. @syonredux

    You’re partly right but then if you can believe your own delusions and you can force other people to believe your own delusions then who cares if fiction actually creates reality or not? You still feel great!
     
    Gotta wonder, though, about nagging doubts.....Surely some of the goodthinkers who saw Hidden Figures have to wonder if the Black lady mathematicians in the film are really all that great when compared to people like Josiah Willard Gibbs and James Clerk Maxwell.....surely some Black cineastes know that Black Panther, Moonlight, and Twelve Years a Slave
    aren't really in the same league as The Searchers and 2001: A Space Odyssey.....

    • Replies: @El Dato
    Katherine Johnson worked on Apollo 13?

    I thought she worked on the Mercury Program?

    (and why does she look like Anne Frank?)

    , @Jack D
    Magical Negroes - is there anything they can't do? Johnson is still alive at 99 - maybe she can be the one to get us to Mars.

    The real Johnson was about 5 shades (uh, tones) lighter than the cartoon version:

    https://nails.newsela.com/s3/newsela-media/article_media/2017/02/bio-scientist-katherine-johnson-b6b33783.jpg

    and I would reckon about 3/4 white. Here she is at her adding machine. "Adding machine operator" (her real job) was one step up from supermarket cashier.

  159. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Yan Shen

    It’s clear that America prefers its black people to remain invisible …
     
    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha... Given how blacks in this country often seem to think that they're the only people who matter and love nothing more than endlessly talking about themselves and their problems, and given how their supposed white progressive allies also love nothing more than endlessly fawning over mediocrities like Ta Nehisi Coates as though they were the second coming of Jesus Christ, I find this statement to be hilariously clueless. African Americans love being in the spotlight, and given their general over-representation in athletics and entertainment, I find it hard to believe that black Americans either are or would feel like they were socially invisible.

    Now, on the other hand, is there actually a minority group in this country today that's largely been rendered invisible and ignored by the mainstream?

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2017/07/04/globe-poll-omission-leaves-asian-americans-invisible-and-unheard/zB7XRKjAU3R6xzFc8tWLVK/story.html

    #OscarsSoBlackandWhite
    #AsianLivesMatterToo

    Black self-reference is in part a coping mechanism. They have felt oppressed and abandoned by humanity and so have turned inward to find ways to survive, no matter how out of touch that appears. Think of that as their own version of a reverse Stockholm Syndrome, where they dis-identify with their captors and over-identify with their own group, warts and all.

    • Replies: @Rifleman

    Black self-reference is in part a coping mechanism. Think of that as their own version of a reverse Stockholm Syndrome
     
    No it isn't. It's just black egomania and self obsession.

    A version of tribalism and rivalry with the White 'Other' tribe they fear, hate and envy.

    This attitude also gets promoted and is considered beyond criticism by the White people, often Jews, who employ them.

    She's writing in the Jewish New York Times.

    Why HER? Why her voice and not that of White conservatives or anyone else with a different opinion?
  160. @theMann
    Well, when you put it like that.........


    Good Lord, what an appalling collection of crap those films are, or at least, the ones I've seen. I haven't, and never will, see Moonlight or Shape of Water. The Artist is actually a brilliant and interesting film, and serves to illustrate even more perfectly what an appalling collection of ........



    Get fed up with the Oscars back a while ago when Shakespeare in Love , so boring I fell asleep twice trying to watch it and never have finished it, The English Patient, ditto, and double, Titanic, pretentious nonsense, and Chicago, a waaaaay overrated musical, all won in pretty short order. A collection of second rate films that we now know bought their Oscars.


    From bad to worse, vote buying is bad, but allowing Actors to have the biggest single block of votes in the award process is much, much worse. Letting a collection of narcissistic jacktards whose two most common characteristics are their egotism and woeful lack of any real education is a recipe for terrible decision making in any milieu , even aside from their hilariously idiotic Hollywood politics. Bill Buckley's observation about the first 500 names in the phone book goes double here.

    The English Patient was just awful.

  161. @Steve Sailer
    No Country for Old Men was mostly awesome, although I couldn't understand Tommy Lee Jones' mumbling with subtitles.

    Among the smaller, more experimental choices, I thought The Hurt Locker was very good.

    But why not just give the Best Picture Oscar to the best Big Movie of the year, like The Departed? Trying to guess what experimental art house film will be influential in 10 years is pretty hopeless for the Academy, so why not just reward well done examples of Big American (or Anglo-American) Movie-Making?

    Steve,
    Which factors do you look at for indicators of influence 10 years on?

  162. @MEH 0910
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61leT43g55L._SX409_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/Counting-Katherine-Johnson-Saved-Apollo/dp/1250137527

    Katherine Johnson worked on Apollo 13?

    I thought she worked on the Mercury Program?

    (and why does she look like Anne Frank?)

    • Replies: @CCZ
    The NASA website lists her:

    Notable Calculations

    1959 - Trajectory for Alan Shepard‘s flight

    Back-up navigation charts for astronauts

    1962 – Verified calculations made for the 1st time by electronic computer for John Glenn’s orbit

    1969 – Apollo 11 trajectory to the Moon

    The Human Computer Project, STEM Stories From History, notes "She and [Harold] Al Hamer collaborated on backup calculations that played a role in the safe return of astronauts in the Apollo 13 mission."
    , @Byrresheim
    Your error: do not depend on those people. Do not even depend on the assumption that they are wrong. That is the hidden charm of humbug: if you lose patience and call the bluff, you might catch that one time it's not invented from whole cloth.

    These people steal your time, because you have the check everything.

    Even if they are wrong, there often is sufficient basis in fact to make for a lengthy discussion about relevance.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Johnson

  163. @Dave Pinsen
    The most recent Best Picture winner I watched and found hugely entertaining was The Departed. Was any more recent winner as good as that, in your opinion?

    As others said, No Country for Old Men was even better. I liked Slumdog Millionaire, The Hurt Locker, The Artist, and Argo. I didn’t like 12 Years a Slave (which robbed the far better American Hustle). Didn’t see The King’s Speech, Birdman, Spotlight, Moonlight or The Shape of Water.

    It is remarkable how the quality of the winners fell off a cliff these past two decades.

    Between 1950 (All About Eve) and 2000 (Gladiator) virtually every winner was a genuine classic or at least left a major impact on pop culture.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Award_for_Best_Picture#1950s

    • Replies: @Meretricious
    All About Eve has not aged well
  164. @Jack D
    A few months ago I saw the latest Star Wars movie (it sucked). Before the movie, as usual, they showed about 10 previews - I honestly don't remember what the movies were, but they all had the exact same theme. The fate of entire (country, planet, universe) is at stake and our only hope is (a scrappy female, a diverse person, a space critter) in whose hands alone rest the fate of (all of humanity, the entire planet, the galaxy). Maybe in 1 or two of them (not many) it was a white guy, but every one had the money shot where the sidekick turns to the hero and earnestly pleads, "You are our only hope!" - after a while it was actually funny to see so many "only hopes". Why is "our only hope" such a popular fantasy theme?

    Jack,
    My guess about the “only hope” theme is that it speaks to some angst or anxiety or why not both among the millennial audience members. How much does film media lead or suggest, and how much does it reflect seemingly concurrent ideas or concerns? Given the lead time to put out a movie there is some fascinating forecasting going on about what will be topical or controversial, at least some of the time based on those releases that hit.

  165. @El Dato
    Katherine Johnson worked on Apollo 13?

    I thought she worked on the Mercury Program?

    (and why does she look like Anne Frank?)

    The NASA website lists her:

    Notable Calculations

    1959 – Trajectory for Alan Shepard‘s flight

    Back-up navigation charts for astronauts

    1962 – Verified calculations made for the 1st time by electronic computer for John Glenn’s orbit

    1969 – Apollo 11 trajectory to the Moon

    The Human Computer Project, STEM Stories From History, notes “She and [Harold] Al Hamer collaborated on backup calculations that played a role in the safe return of astronauts in the Apollo 13 mission.”

  166. @Svigor
    Fishcegenation, lol.

    Now, on the other hand, is there actually a minority group in this country today that’s largely been rendered invisible and ignored by the mainstream?
     
    Kato's very clever. He knows that if he pretends that 1.5 billion Chinamen don't exist (and have all-Chinee teevee and borders closed to whites), we'll forget all about them.

    What's the pidgin for "let's see if we can fight a war in America's backyard and make Her out to be the aggressor"?

    Killed any Dzungars or Tibetans or Uighurs lately, Kato?

    Superhero nerd question: Why is Wolverine able to get drunk? It’s been established that Captain America can’t get drunk because his serum burns up the alcohol before it can get into him and also prevents him from being poisoned (which is all alcohol is), so why can Wolverine, whose self-healing abilities have the same properties as Cap’s super-solider serum?
     
    Nerd answer: it's already been established that Wolvermope can't get a buzz, get cancer from cigars, etc, because healing factor. If he can in the movies it's because nerds aren't in charge.

    Thus, he must regularly imbibe, and sing songs to Sabazios.
     
    Imbibe != buzz.

    I don’t know anything about comics. But a Canadian, prone to constant flesh-tearing, and like I said a Canadian, unable to get drunk … I guess his real power is incomprehensible rage.

  167. @Daniel Chieh
    Never assume that Bezos will be blindsided. He almost certainly has a plan - anyone who has worked in Amazon can tell you that he is not, in practice, anything akin to a humanitarian.

    "Your mom is dying so you need to carry a cell phone into work to be there for her last moments? That's too bad. You're fired."

    Amazon makes the rest of Silicon Valley look cuddly and sweet. There are times when Amazon makes working in Chinese companies look cuddly and sweet. If you work in an Amazon warehouse, then you'll have the wonderful of being told, pretty explicitly, that you are merely human capital that exists to expedite your replacement within five or ten years with robotic counterparts(ha, and you thought immigrants? Bezos does not need humans, with their annoying needs for food and sleep and family).

    So no, I don't think that Bezos doesn't have some deeper algorithm he's running.

    True dat.

  168. @El Dato
    Katherine Johnson worked on Apollo 13?

    I thought she worked on the Mercury Program?

    (and why does she look like Anne Frank?)

    Your error: do not depend on those people. Do not even depend on the assumption that they are wrong. That is the hidden charm of humbug: if you lose patience and call the bluff, you might catch that one time it’s not invented from whole cloth.

    These people steal your time, because you have the check everything.

    Even if they are wrong, there often is sufficient basis in fact to make for a lengthy discussion about relevance.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Johnson

    • Replies: @Byrresheim
    Wonderful example for the "wrong on so many levels" approach is the wikipedia article about computers.

    Up to the sixties, computers were humans doing computing, and the machines were called after the human profession. Now look at the use of the word computer in the piece of oral history included in the Katherine-Johnson-Article – the scare quotes indicate non-knowledge of this fact and its implications for something said 50 years ag0.

    Just to discuss this subtle piece of irrelevance – quite relevant for understanding the social situation of our heroine though – can take you hours, because these people are enormously lacking in historical knowledge and therefore insist in arguing deeds and utterances from the past strictly from hindsight.

    As an added bonus, they tend to regard any facts not within their very limited scope of knowledge as bogus, which is annoying enough when there is sufficient hard evidence, but makes things really tedious once there are only small, albeit easily read, hints in literature.

  169. @Byrresheim
    Your error: do not depend on those people. Do not even depend on the assumption that they are wrong. That is the hidden charm of humbug: if you lose patience and call the bluff, you might catch that one time it's not invented from whole cloth.

    These people steal your time, because you have the check everything.

    Even if they are wrong, there often is sufficient basis in fact to make for a lengthy discussion about relevance.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Johnson

    Wonderful example for the “wrong on so many levels” approach is the wikipedia article about computers.

    Up to the sixties, computers were humans doing computing, and the machines were called after the human profession. Now look at the use of the word computer in the piece of oral history included in the Katherine-Johnson-Article – the scare quotes indicate non-knowledge of this fact and its implications for something said 50 years ag0.

    Just to discuss this subtle piece of irrelevance – quite relevant for understanding the social situation of our heroine though – can take you hours, because these people are enormously lacking in historical knowledge and therefore insist in arguing deeds and utterances from the past strictly from hindsight.

    As an added bonus, they tend to regard any facts not within their very limited scope of knowledge as bogus, which is annoying enough when there is sufficient hard evidence, but makes things really tedious once there are only small, albeit easily read, hints in literature.

  170. @MEH 0910
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61leT43g55L._SX409_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/Counting-Katherine-Johnson-Saved-Apollo/dp/1250137527

    Magical Negroes – is there anything they can’t do? Johnson is still alive at 99 – maybe she can be the one to get us to Mars.

    The real Johnson was about 5 shades (uh, tones) lighter than the cartoon version:

    and I would reckon about 3/4 white. Here she is at her adding machine. “Adding machine operator” (her real job) was one step up from supermarket cashier.

    • Replies: @El Dato

    “Adding machine operator” (her real job) was one step up from supermarket cashier.
     
    That's just being nasty. She was the math package of those times. Computing trajectories by hand is not within the reach of just anyone.

    However, from Wikipedia:

    At the ceremony, Deputy Director Lewin said this about Johnson: "Millions of people around the world watched Shepard's flight, but what they didn't know at the time was that the calculations that got him into space and safely home were done by today's guest of honor, Katherine Johnson"
     
    By that logic, Katherine Johnson is actually some kind of superhero that worked incognito at NASA.

    Millions of people didn't know at the time that John Doe had personally welded parts of the Atlas rocket, but it's true!
  171. @Hapalong Cassidy
    2007 was a pretty good year for movies. There Will Be Blood came out the same year and lost Best Picture to No Country For Old Men. Could have really gone either way, but No Country had a gripping plot, while TWBB seemed to be about Daniel Day Lewis acting all Daniel Day Lewis-y. Not necessarily a bad thing, though. If TWBB comes on cable, I can’t help but watch it, just because of Day Lewis’ performance. I can’t think of another film that was so completely dominated by its lead actor. Had literally anyone else on the planet been cast in that role, that film would have been instantly forgettable.

    The same can be said of “Gangs of New York” .

  172. Blacks – a continual source of disappointment.

  173. @Jack D
    Magical Negroes - is there anything they can't do? Johnson is still alive at 99 - maybe she can be the one to get us to Mars.

    The real Johnson was about 5 shades (uh, tones) lighter than the cartoon version:

    https://nails.newsela.com/s3/newsela-media/article_media/2017/02/bio-scientist-katherine-johnson-b6b33783.jpg

    and I would reckon about 3/4 white. Here she is at her adding machine. "Adding machine operator" (her real job) was one step up from supermarket cashier.

    “Adding machine operator” (her real job) was one step up from supermarket cashier.

    That’s just being nasty. She was the math package of those times. Computing trajectories by hand is not within the reach of just anyone.

    However, from Wikipedia:

    At the ceremony, Deputy Director Lewin said this about Johnson: “Millions of people around the world watched Shepard’s flight, but what they didn’t know at the time was that the calculations that got him into space and safely home were done by today’s guest of honor, Katherine Johnson”

    By that logic, Katherine Johnson is actually some kind of superhero that worked incognito at NASA.

    Millions of people didn’t know at the time that John Doe had personally welded parts of the Atlas rocket, but it’s true!

  174. @Tyrion 2
    I found Logan unbearably PC, or on narrative. I suspect that was my own confirmation bias and funny mood when I watched it. I should have another look.

    So did I, but the twisting of the narrative by depicting Logan as a washed up old drunk caring for the demented old Professor X was at least interesting. I don’t even try to look for films without PC storylines any more. It’s usually a fruitless search anyway.

  175. @Steve Sailer
    No Country for Old Men was mostly awesome, although I couldn't understand Tommy Lee Jones' mumbling with subtitles.

    Among the smaller, more experimental choices, I thought The Hurt Locker was very good.

    But why not just give the Best Picture Oscar to the best Big Movie of the year, like The Departed? Trying to guess what experimental art house film will be influential in 10 years is pretty hopeless for the Academy, so why not just reward well done examples of Big American (or Anglo-American) Movie-Making?

    “No Country for Old Men was mostly awesome, although I couldn’t understand Tommy Lee Jones’ mumbling with subtitles.”

    It may be a Southern thang, but I had no trouble at all with Tommy Lee’s lines, even the ones that he mumbled. There was one line of his that is memorable. Dillahunt’s character says something like “Ain’t this a mess?” and Jones replies, “If it ain’t, it’ll do ’till the mess gets here.”

    Now that’s a West Texas line if I ever heard one.

  176. @anon
    Black self-reference is in part a coping mechanism. They have felt oppressed and abandoned by humanity and so have turned inward to find ways to survive, no matter how out of touch that appears. Think of that as their own version of a reverse Stockholm Syndrome, where they dis-identify with their captors and over-identify with their own group, warts and all.

    Black self-reference is in part a coping mechanism. Think of that as their own version of a reverse Stockholm Syndrome

    No it isn’t. It’s just black egomania and self obsession.

    A version of tribalism and rivalry with the White ‘Other’ tribe they fear, hate and envy.

    This attitude also gets promoted and is considered beyond criticism by the White people, often Jews, who employ them.

    She’s writing in the Jewish New York Times.

    Why HER? Why her voice and not that of White conservatives or anyone else with a different opinion?

    • Replies: @Rifleman
    Looks like Ron Unz or somebody obliterated the archives of many commentators. Why?

    Rifleman's posts all gone. Greg Cochran's...poof.
  177. @Rifleman

    Black self-reference is in part a coping mechanism. Think of that as their own version of a reverse Stockholm Syndrome
     
    No it isn't. It's just black egomania and self obsession.

    A version of tribalism and rivalry with the White 'Other' tribe they fear, hate and envy.

    This attitude also gets promoted and is considered beyond criticism by the White people, often Jews, who employ them.

    She's writing in the Jewish New York Times.

    Why HER? Why her voice and not that of White conservatives or anyone else with a different opinion?

    Looks like Ron Unz or somebody obliterated the archives of many commentators. Why?

    Rifleman’s posts all gone. Greg Cochran’s…poof.

  178. @Jack D
    TD sounds almost sane here. Is he mellowing in his old age? Is it an imposter? If a blackety-black commentator is too blackety-black for TD she must be blackety-black indeed.

    I'm guessing Cauley had this piece pre-written figuring that G.O. would not win Best Picture and winning Best Original Screenplay sort of threw a monkey wrench into her thesis but since she had written it already she made a few token (uh, minor) changes and sent it in anyway.

    The Giant Duck Effect. There’s a newer, bigger, stronger Duck in town, and with the pecking order clarified, the smaller ducks now know what they’re supposed to be doing.

  179. @Hibernian
    African-Americans have gone from 10% to 12% in about 50 years. Many Hispanic immigrants are arriving; few African immigrants are. The civil rights movement was partly about Hispanics; remember cesar Chavez and Bobby Kennedy. I think you're overstating your case.

    Blacks are already 15% of the population of Americans under the age of 24.

    The Black population in 1970 was 21 million , it has doubled to 43 million in 2015 while the white population has remained at 180 million since 1970. The only reason it appears the Black population is growing slowly is due to the migration of 50 million immigrants, which has kept the Black population below 20%. But their power remains much stronger than the hispanics who outnumber blacks. Hispanics are not unified by race and will never approach the coalition of Blacks in demanding political power, they are too divide by race, culture and economic status. In addition hispanics will never earn the required pokemon points to obtain the power Blacks have. Hispanics were never slaves (but were slave owners) , hispanics have been treated as white by the US government, allowed to serve in the army, allowed to vote etc. The Civil rights movement in America concerned Blacks , not hispanics, for good reasons.

  180. @Achmed E. Newman
    LOL

    Haha, and that's just the back-up for when iSHTF.

    (BTW it'd be nice to get one that can be switched easily among propane, natural gas, and unleaded gasoline. )

    My generator is on the house natural gas utility. It comes on automatically and does the job admirably. We just went 52 hours on it, living like normal Americans while most of the people around us were freezing their butts off in the dark and watching their perishable foods spoil.

    For when the sh*t really hits the fan, I would want a low RPM diesel and a very large fuel tank. Low RPM engines can run a very long time without maintenance, and diesel lasts forever in a tank.

    Alas, most of us are dependent on “the grid” one way or another.

    As for what this has to to with iSteve-ey subjects: I am convinced that most of the public has no f..king idea where there stuff comes from or how long they could live without it. That goes double for the issue of imported s*it made by cheap foreign labor and jobs at home that young Americans used to do.

    .
    Back on grid, this comment powered by an electrical utility, courtesy of Nikola Tesla.

    • Replies: @Anonymous


    For when the sh*t really hits the fan, I would want a low RPM diesel and a very large fuel tank. Low RPM engines can run a very long time without maintenance, and diesel lasts forever in a tank.
     
    Thanks to the EPA it is no longer possible to buy a low RPM diesel engine of a reasonable size new in the United States. The Indians and the Chinese build them at reasonable prices but they can't be brought in.


    And actually diesel does not last very long in a tank. Adding preservatives and biocides helps.
    Jet A will store better , and most old style diesels will burn it fine if you add a little oil for pump lubrication.

    Propane and 100LL avgas are the best bets for long term storage. Avgas will burn fine in most overhead valve gasoline engines if they do not have a catalyst or 02 sensor for the lead to foul. I run my Gravely lawn tractor (which has a low compression T head engine) on it exclusively, works fine, but I have to add a nonfouling additive and it does foul plugs now and then.
  181. @Doug
    Something I was thinking about in the airport the other day...

    How long until airplane boarding priority is assigned based on oppression status? Disenfranchised racial minorities first, followed by active duty military, LGBT+, members of sky-elite, women who've been #metoo'd, people traveling with children under 4, then regular boarding.

    I think if you're an entrepreneurial social activity you could have a good go at this. You could probably social-media browbeat at least one airline into doing it. Then get yourself a big "diversity consultancy" fee when they implement it.

    First class will board last so the 1% can perform public penance.

  182. @dfordoom


    Don’t ever expect conservatism to be a winner in the sense that people en masse jump at the prospect of more duty. Conservatism is harder.
     
    Then why does Conservatism not completely die out?
     
    It pretty much has. What is commonly called conservatism is actually just a variant of liberalism, with a bit more overt emphasis on selfishness. The Conservatism Inc brand of conservatism certainly isn't conservative.

    Social conservatism is a different animal. It's dying out as well, as Christianity continues to decline and the remnants of Christianity become indistinguishable from regular liberals. How many social conservatives are there are among the Millennial Generation? Almost none.

    Actual conservatives are a tiny minority of the population, with practically zero influence.

    And here I was hoping for someone to tell me all the appealing things about conservatism and how it can triumph over the inhuman monster that is leftism!

  183. @snorlax
    As others said, No Country for Old Men was even better. I liked Slumdog Millionaire, The Hurt Locker, The Artist, and Argo. I didn't like 12 Years a Slave (which robbed the far better American Hustle). Didn't see The King's Speech, Birdman, Spotlight, Moonlight or The Shape of Water.

    It is remarkable how the quality of the winners fell off a cliff these past two decades.

    Between 1950 (All About Eve) and 2000 (Gladiator) virtually every winner was a genuine classic or at least left a major impact on pop culture.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Award_for_Best_Picture#1950s

    All About Eve has not aged well

    • Replies: @education realist
    Um. What? Of course it has.

    But it's true that many of the Oscar winners from that era are now roundly booed. Gigi usually wins the "worst best movie ever", but that's nonsense in a world that gave Greatest Show on Earth the big prize in a year that Singin in the Rain wasn't even nominated.
  184. @Pat Boyle
    The King's Speech would have been a compelling and important picture if it had explored the consequences of first cousin marriage. But it just ignored the consanguinity issues of the Windsor family and pretended that his speech impediment just fell out of the sky.

    I also saw "The Artist". It was pleasant, even though I had had great reservations about investing two hours in watching it when it came on cable. I would never have seen it if I had actually had to pay for a ticket. Pinsen was right - it was basically a stunt.

    I may just watch Argo when I find it on one of the cable TV movie channels. I didn't watch it six years ago when it first came out because it starred Ben Affleck. Affleck is a strong negative presence in any film in which he appears. I call him "the turd in the punchbowl".

    "12 Years a Slave" I also didn't see. I researched the story. Apparently the whole story of a free black man being kidnapped into slavery in the South was regarded at the time it was published, as a transparent fraud. It is yet another Hollywood pro-black propaganda movie about the so called horrors of slavery. Englishmen and Americans abolished the evil practice of chattel slavery. Why not a movie about that?

    The fabled movie reviewer Joe Bob Briggs always gave a box score for the movies he reviewed. He scored them for : kung fu, car chases and something else (that I have forgotten). It looked to me as if "Birdman" had none of these requisite elements. I don't know what it was about. I watched it on TV for about ten minutes. When you have hundreds of choices on TV, the show has to be more compelling than "Birdman".

    I had to look up "Spotlight" in Wikipedia. I didn't see it and apparently no one else did either. I'm not likely to watch a film about the predations of homosexuals on children. That's simply too ugly a story for me. I like fantasy horror movies (with vampires and/or werewolves) but I'm not entertained by real horror tales. Who is?

    In 2015 all the nominees were whites. So in 2016 we have "Moonlight" get the Best Picture Oscar as a kind of racial reparation. No one seems to have considered that whites may just be better at acting than blacks. I don't know if this is actually true, acting is kind of mysterious. But Whites are better at most things - except basketball - than blacks, so it seems plausible that whites could also be better than blacks at movie acting. But this idea doesn't seem to have been entertained by the Academy. They had to honor a very black movie in 2016. That movie was "Moonlight", which I believe was essentially never seen by anyone.

    I will probably see "The Shape of Water" when it hits cable in a couple months. Del Toro has made some films I enjoyed.

    So the last decade has been pretty much a crater. Hollywood is dying - that's clear. It isn't just cable TV and Home Theater. It isn't just the paucity of good entertaining films. The principal problem seems to be leadership. The Academy seems to have no leaders with judgement. They seem to be suckers for the latest social fad. When I was a kid Hollywood almost succumbed to the Biblical Spectacular but it survived. Today the menace on is the film Honoring Black people. But no one seems to have the courage to oppose this deadly trend. Who will want to get in the car and drive to the multiplex to see a lecture on how naughty and nasty white people are, especially when you have to hazard being exposed to the real danger of blacks who have been enflamed by visions of Wakanda.

    Whites seem to be staying home.

    “Englishmen and Americans abolished the evil practice of chattel slavery. Why not a movie about that?”

    I think I saw that one:

    Cloud Atlas storyline A, 19th century, triumphant ending: “I’m going to quit the slave trade and join the abolitionist movement so we can live in a better future.”

    Clout Atlas storyline D: It’s the future and slaves live in tiny sleep pod capsules and have squibs in their necks set to explode and kill them if they misbehave.

    Cloud Atlas storyline E: It’s the distant future and everything sucks.

  185. @Meretricious
    I don't doubt that you think so. The only songs I liked penned by Prince, who had a terrible voice, are Nothing Compares 2 U by Sinead O'Connor and Manic Monday by The Bangles, which song Prince ripped off from Kirsty MacColl's They Don't Know. Please tell me 1 song composed by Prince you think is brilliant.

    Dear Lord. No less a light than Joe Satriani himself once famously cited Prince as about the most talented guitarist on the planet. I don’t know what Vulture is, but because I was confident someone else had already extensively explained his genius in some eulogy or other, I just typed “Prince musical genius” into a search engine, and lo!.

    It’s a good summary understandable by a layperson. (Of course, if you are yourself a musician or just at all knowledgeable of music theory, to not find his genius self-evident – objectively, even if his music is not your particular cup of tea – is to mark yourself a fraud or a deluded fool.)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    A theme in Prince's work, such as his Purple Rain movie, was whether he should play all the instruments himself in the studio (because he was better than most anybody he could have hired) or have a band (to help him get out of his own head).

    I have no musical skill, but even to me it was obvious in 1981-82 that Prince had more musical skill than about 98% of everybody else on the radio stations I listened to (granted, I didn't put a high value on musical skill in radio station choice).

    The other thing that was obvious was that Prince had come along a little too late in musical history for his own good. If he'd hit the pop charts in 1965 he might be as big as Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Wonder combined, but it helps to come early in a style.

  186. @Autochthon
    Dear Lord. No less a light than Joe Satriani himself once famously cited Prince as about the most talented guitarist on the planet. I don't know what Vulture is, but because I was confident someone else had already extensively explained his genius in some eulogy or other, I just typed "Prince musical genius" into a search engine, and lo!.

    It's a good summary understandable by a layperson. (Of course, if you are yourself a musician or just at all knowledgeable of music theory, to not find his genius self-evident – objectively, even if his music is not your particular cup of tea – is to mark yourself a fraud or a deluded fool.)

    A theme in Prince’s work, such as his Purple Rain movie, was whether he should play all the instruments himself in the studio (because he was better than most anybody he could have hired) or have a band (to help him get out of his own head).

    I have no musical skill, but even to me it was obvious in 1981-82 that Prince had more musical skill than about 98% of everybody else on the radio stations I listened to (granted, I didn’t put a high value on musical skill in radio station choice).

    The other thing that was obvious was that Prince had come along a little too late in musical history for his own good. If he’d hit the pop charts in 1965 he might be as big as Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Wonder combined, but it helps to come early in a style.

    • Replies: @snorlax

    The other thing that was obvious was that Prince had come along a little too late in musical history for his own good. If he’d hit the pop charts in 1965 he might be as big as Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Wonder combined, but it helps to come early in a style.
     
    Prince was done in by his heroin habit like Jim Morrison, not cocaine like James Brown.
  187. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    My generator is on the house natural gas utility. It comes on automatically and does the job admirably. We just went 52 hours on it, living like normal Americans while most of the people around us were freezing their butts off in the dark and watching their perishable foods spoil.

    For when the sh*t really hits the fan, I would want a low RPM diesel and a very large fuel tank. Low RPM engines can run a very long time without maintenance, and diesel lasts forever in a tank.

    Alas, most of us are dependent on "the grid" one way or another.

    As for what this has to to with iSteve-ey subjects: I am convinced that most of the public has no f..king idea where there stuff comes from or how long they could live without it. That goes double for the issue of imported s*it made by cheap foreign labor and jobs at home that young Americans used to do.

    .
    Back on grid, this comment powered by an electrical utility, courtesy of Nikola Tesla.
    http://www.panacomp.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/GORE335962_1.jpg

    For when the sh*t really hits the fan, I would want a low RPM diesel and a very large fuel tank. Low RPM engines can run a very long time without maintenance, and diesel lasts forever in a tank.

    Thanks to the EPA it is no longer possible to buy a low RPM diesel engine of a reasonable size new in the United States. The Indians and the Chinese build them at reasonable prices but they can’t be brought in.

    And actually diesel does not last very long in a tank. Adding preservatives and biocides helps.
    Jet A will store better , and most old style diesels will burn it fine if you add a little oil for pump lubrication.

    Propane and 100LL avgas are the best bets for long term storage. Avgas will burn fine in most overhead valve gasoline engines if they do not have a catalyst or 02 sensor for the lead to foul. I run my Gravely lawn tractor (which has a low compression T head engine) on it exclusively, works fine, but I have to add a nonfouling additive and it does foul plugs now and then.

  188. @Meretricious
    All About Eve has not aged well

    Um. What? Of course it has.

    But it’s true that many of the Oscar winners from that era are now roundly booed. Gigi usually wins the “worst best movie ever”, but that’s nonsense in a world that gave Greatest Show on Earth the big prize in a year that Singin in the Rain wasn’t even nominated.

  189. @Steve Sailer
    A theme in Prince's work, such as his Purple Rain movie, was whether he should play all the instruments himself in the studio (because he was better than most anybody he could have hired) or have a band (to help him get out of his own head).

    I have no musical skill, but even to me it was obvious in 1981-82 that Prince had more musical skill than about 98% of everybody else on the radio stations I listened to (granted, I didn't put a high value on musical skill in radio station choice).

    The other thing that was obvious was that Prince had come along a little too late in musical history for his own good. If he'd hit the pop charts in 1965 he might be as big as Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Wonder combined, but it helps to come early in a style.

    The other thing that was obvious was that Prince had come along a little too late in musical history for his own good. If he’d hit the pop charts in 1965 he might be as big as Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Wonder combined, but it helps to come early in a style.

    Prince was done in by his heroin habit like Jim Morrison, not cocaine like James Brown.

  190. @Anon
    OT: Amazon supposedly is going to move into the mortgage business. With interest rates supposedly going to climb back up to 4%, Beelzebub apparently thinks going into the banking and mortgage business is a money maker.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-03-09/amazon-sets-become-americas-biggest-mortgage-lender

    This is not going to turn out well. Bezos has left-wing tendencies, and if he thinks he can fix the housing problem for blacks by giving them loans and then brag about how great he is, he's going to be sandbagged by the black default rate and even more at a loss when some of them just take the money and run.

    I've seen enough of Amazon's doings to know that when they come up against someone who is flat-out dishonest, they are always taken by surprise and unable to police it properly. Bezos benefits financially by being a libertarian in a First World marketplace that is highly regulated for honesty, and he has no understanding at all of the Third World levels of dishonesty and corruption that is characteristic of American minorities.

    Bezosebub!

  191. @syonredux

    About the only thing interesting about the film was that it was a road trip movie on an usual road: From the Texas border to the Canadian border, but only through Middle America.
     
    I enjoyed the film's symbolically anti-Mexican narrative: Get as far away from Mexico as you can.

    As for the flick, I thought that it was OK. Quite derivative of the "Dying/Retired Gunfighter" genre (The Shootist, Shane, Unforgiven), though....but the film does, at least, hang a lampshade on its derivative nature (the characters watch Shane at one point, and Shane's final speech is used as Logan's eulogy).

    …the film does, at least, hang a lampshade on its derivative nature (the characters watch Shane at one point, and Shane’s final speech is used as Logan’s eulogy).

    Nah, that might have been the worst thing about it. Wolverine is pretty iconic in his own right, and Hugh Jackman’s been playing him for 15 years. Doesn’t he deserve his own eulogy?

  192. @Jack D
    I thought Adaptation with its house of mirrors recursive layering was one of the most clever screenplays ever written. As a movie it is less than perfect but the premise is brilliant.

    Agreed

  193. @whorefinder
    Superhero nerd question: Why is Wolverine able to get drunk? It's been established that Captain America can't get drunk because his serum burns up the alcohol before it can get into him and also prevents him from being poisoned (which is all alcohol is), so why can Wolverine, whose self-healing abilities have the same properties as Cap's super-solider serum?

    Because his healing factor was impaired by the substances used by the government to clamp down on mutant powers. This is why he was getting older, his healing factor was failing and he had more and more issues, including with his claws.

  194. @Little spoon
    His style was distinctive and didn’t sound derivative of anything else at the time. But his genius was in being able to compose at all given the amount of other things he could do very well. He was a guitarist of the highest caliber, a singer with remarkable consistency across a wide vocal range and a great dancer. His compositions were not usually catchy but he had an original sound. There is almost no one who could dance, sing, play guitar and compose at the level that prince could do each of these things.

    Originality for its own sake is a sign of decadence. Can’t comment on whether his music is actually good – never listened to it.

  195. @Hibernian
    African-Americans have gone from 10% to 12% in about 50 years. Many Hispanic immigrants are arriving; few African immigrants are. The civil rights movement was partly about Hispanics; remember cesar Chavez and Bobby Kennedy. I think you're overstating your case.

    The Black population has grown, but it was masked by high immigration. Also, there is significant non-American Black immigration from the Caribbean and Africa itself. I am sure Black migrants from Brazil will become a thing too. You import more Africans in a few years than you did as slaves in the entire history of North American settlement (approx. 400k).

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