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From Richard Hanania:

If you ask AI whether men commit more crime than women, it’ll give you a straightforward yes-or-no answer.

If you ask it whether black people commit more crime than white people, it says no, actually maybe, but no.

And this one’s not very good:

That doesn’t sound like me, that sounds like a normie GOP politician.

 
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  1. GIGO

    • Replies: @Cato
    @TontoBubbaGoldstein


    GIGO
     
    No garbage goes in -- they do not train AI on garbage. The problem is the filter on what is allowed to come out.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    , @Cloudbuster
    @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    Indeed, and for the Steve Sailer quote, I doubt they allowed any Sailer content to be fed to it to avoid "polluting" it, do it has no basis from which to build the text.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  2. Defense Bucks for CA!

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Joe Stalin

    Sold to us as deterrence against China but in the end it will be part of the big disastrous Iran War.

    , @Yngvar
    @Joe Stalin

    This is a well greased operation.


    On Friday, inside a hangar in the California desert, he and the 8,000 others spread across 40 states who have been secretly building the Air Force’s new stealth bomber will finally get to show their family and friends what they’ve been working on the the past seven years. (https://www.defenseone.com/business/2022/11/revealed-public-finally-gets-see-b-21-stealth-bomber-week/380175/)
     
  3. I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that “every stereotype is true”, is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they’re occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    • Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    In our woke era pattern recognition is forbidden, (and will be criminalized once there are sufficient votes to do so).

    , @Whereismyhandle
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    Stereotypes can be false when they're drilled into people with no first hand experience.

    You'll find plenty of people in Vermont and New York and Chicago and California with very strong impressions of the South or Southerners they have no right to.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @Peter Akuleyev, @res, @Corvinus

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search


    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.
     
    Of course. They are true and they are not true.

    Consider the whole field of acting on TV or movies. The characters are nearly always stereotypes or archetypes, and the actors who are successful are often stereotypically good looking with square jaws, capped teeth, and wigs (if they are bald like Sean Connery or Burt Reynolds).

    If you have Brad Pitt playing the hero, it is a drama, but if you have Mike Myers playing the same role, it is a comedy! Why can they not switch roles? Couldn't we have Jerry Seinfeld playing the role of Rob Roy McGregor or William Wallace instead of Liam Neeson or Mel Gibson?

    Briefly, the answer is no we can't, because for ease of audience understanding actors have to look the part. Audiences wouldn't like it if people didn't look the part.

    You hardly have any bald politicians in the United States. This is because balding men who run for office are expected to wear wigs or have hair transplants, so that they look like a politician in the movies! No one ever asks if Ron de Santis wears a wig or why he doesn't have a single gray hair. He is playing the part of a politician.

    This is part of the reason why people are fascinated with the British royal family. They don't look properly royal, not like proper Hollywood Kings and Queens and Princes and Princesses and Dukes. Why can't King Charles the third look more like Charlton Heston or Jesus? It would be so much easier for him to part the Red Sea and perform other similar Royal duties.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @The Anti-Gnostic

    , @Dr doomNgloom
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    Stereotypes come from “between group” differences in the mean . Yet the variation “between individuals “ is usually quite a bit larger than the differences between groups. They are true as statements about the group, but but not true WRT the individual. The truth a *statistical* group value. The distinction is subtle and goes over most heads.

    For example, it’s trivially easy to find a a young man who is a safer driver than a young woman, but on average you’d win but betting on the woman to be safer (if sex was your only information. )

    Understandably, people resent being judged by their assignment to some group when it is disadvantageous, for example the young men who pay higher auto insurance rates. Of course they are more than willing to accept a group privilege, (reparations anyone?) . No surprise here.


    Group identity has been elevated to the sacred by politicians who behave like the insurance companies when targeting voters but cry *racist* whenever someone notices.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

    , @AnotherDad
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search


    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.
     
    .

    Stereotypes are almost all true. Probably darn near 100%. That's why they are "stereotypes" and not just some random dude's opinion.

    Most of the "stereotypes are wrong" stuff boils down to
    -- hurt feelings bad, "marginalized groups!" pout
    -- denial of the truth/utility of statistical reality; i.e. "not all X are like that"
    -- twisting what the stereotype actually is/means to prove it "false"



    For example, "women drivers". In terms of accident fatality rate women are of course superior drivers. Women drive less and generally at lower speeds, but even accounting for that they have a lower rate of serious accidents because men are (stereotype!) more aggressive, impatient, less cooperative and more often drunk. But that isn't really what the "women drivers" stereotype is about. It is about people paying attention, moving their butt along and skill--the capability to read the situation and handle to the car appropriately. If it's a random draw for a lower rate of serious accidents for the next year--pick a woman. If you're looking for a driver to handle some serious driving task--pick a man.

    Replies: @Ganderson, @Harry Baldwin

    , @Mr. Peabody
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    The other word that has been kicked into the 2-minute-hate pile is discriminate. This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition. Sterotypes can only be formed through conscious acts of discrimination.
    All humans discriminate and, the survivors at least, always have. So, in their ways, do the lower orders of fawna and flora.
    Maybe amoebas don't discriminate.
    Maybe.
    If your town is like mine you've probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, "No discrinating thought occurrs in this home."

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Corvinus, @Ben tillman

    , @Barnard
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    The concept of stereotypes being not just wrong, but bad is drummed into kids in school and more forcefully through the entertainment industry. Look at the entire Law and Order franchise for one ridiculous example after another. Part of the reason is to get non blacks to ignore the fact that blacks commit the majority of violent crime even though they are 13% of the population.

    , @AlexanderEngUK
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    Sterotypes are the wisdom of the crowd. They're usually right.

    , @Gandydancer
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search


    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they’re occasionally wrong.
     
    Here's one version of the late, great, Walter Williams on this subject with a cameo appearance of his tiger example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evkdEamAZ3k
    , @ADL Pyramid of Hate
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    Given that we are social animals who are born ignorant of all of our species' practices, and must learn (of) them as we grow, enlightenment essentially entails learning as many different stereotypes as possible and discerning which are true, which aren't, and in what ways. Our ability to discriminate, to identify one thing as separate from another thing by comparing their constituent parts and delineating accurate definitions accordingly, forms the basis of all epistemology.

    To rhetorically frame the concept of a "stereotype" as pejorative, and so encourage people to think of themselves as intelligent and worldly for holding received wisdom to a "false until proven otherwise" standard of proof, hobbles our collective ability to understand reality. Discarding a false stereotype thought true does not bring one closer to truth than realizing the truth of a stereotype incorrectly thought false.

    , @silviosilver
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search


    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
     
    It shares a lot in common with the thought processes of people who insisted that the sun orbits the earth - including both those who believed it because that's what they'd been taught, and those who insisted on it because admitting otherwise would be... problematic.
  4. Nick Fuentes talks about Jewish power. Marjorie Taylor Greene claims to no longer support him. Peer social pressure make even women with the strongest values crumble.

  5. Neuralink won’t make this worse.

  6. So… artificial weaselgence.

    • LOL: Old Prude
  7. I like Elon Musk, Matt Taibbi, and Michael Tracey.

    • Agree: Kolya Krassotkin
    • Thanks: MEH 0910, ic1000, J.Ross
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Musk banned Ye for posting a swastika wrapped in a Star of David for "inciting violence"

    , @Bill Jones
    @JohnnyWalker123

    If any code written by a shipped in dot Indian visa holder was used in this then Twitter was a criminal racket with foreigners illegally interfering in elections.
    And Facefook should get a look at.

    , @ic1000
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Robots may not be the best, but some humans are no great shakes, either.

    At his "Pirate Wires" Substack, Mike Solana has consolidated the thread that honest journalist Matt Taibbi posted on Twitter, starting around 11 pm EST on Dec. 2. As Solana notes, the impact of Taibbi's scoop is blunted by his lack of skill in condensing a complex story into a series of tweets.

    The Twitter Files Thread, In A Way More Readable Format -- We fixed the difficult-to-read text screenshots and embedded all the tweets in order—read it from start to finish here.

    It's not paywalled, but you have to click "Let me read it first," if that screen comes up.

    tl;dr -- Internal documents show how Twitter's staff smothered the sensational New York Post Hunter Biden Laptop corruption story in the run-up to the 2020 election, because that's what they wanted to do. As Peter Parker's uncle (almost) said, With great power comes no responsibility.

    Replies: @ic1000, @That Would Be Telling, @YetAnotherAnon, @That Would Be Telling, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    , @Ganderson
    @JohnnyWalker123

    I’m not sure why all this “Twitter censors stuff “ is news- Dorsey and that Indian chick who was in charge of “content moderation” were on Joe Rogan, what, a year ago?, and essentially admitted that they censor points of view that they find “ harmful”.

    , @Alec Leamas (working from home)
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Roth is apparently an out-and-proud homosexual, who did a PhD thesis on gay hookup app culture.

    So it appears you had Desis like Gadde and Agrawal, and a homosexual being led around by a once and again security state spook James Baker determining what Americans could say and hear in the leadup to the 2020 election.

    , @Bill Jones
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://cdn.locals.com/images/posts/1485705/1485705_8s7665w8qy8lq9u_full.jpeg

    , @MEH 0910
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1601020109807448064
    https://twitter.com/bariweiss/status/1601007575633305600
    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1601042099646128130

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Corvinus

  8. Classic 1980s computer planet colonization game “MULE” had a random award – “Congratulations! Your investments in artificial dumbness paid you a dividend of $200.”

    Thought it was a funny joke at the time So naive.

    • Thanks: James N. Kennett
  9. I thought it would take the absolute numbers defense, but it went for structural racism and they get caught more often instead.

  10. So, is it Artificial Ignorance, or Artificial Intransigence?

    • Agree: ArthurinCali
    • Replies: @epebble
    @Reg Cæsar

    Natural Knowledge converted into Artificial Wisdom. When employed in an organization, helps achieve vertical trajectory.

  11. The next tweets are more interesting:

    Apparently, the Project to Defeat Robot Logic with Bafflegab has finally succeeded.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Almost Missouri

    "AI, what answer would another AI give if it knew that western liberals were not listening?"

    Replies: @AndrewR

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Almost Missouri

    Hanania:


    Incredible, they taught it every liberal trick in the book, including changing the subject and obfuscation. When you press it on the truth, it starts lecturing you.
     

    AI resembles humans in that when you outargue it on a point, it subtly changes the subject while pretending to still be talking about the same thing.
     
    Looks like that AI took debating notes from Reg Cæsar, Jack D, and Twinkie!

    I love beating AI. ;)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @res
    @Almost Missouri

    That is fascinating. I wonder how they trained the AI to do that. Perhaps just fed it a corpus from the mass media? Or that and other "approved sources"? Actually, that would be a good way to get what they want. GIGO.

  12. @Reg Cæsar
    So, is it Artificial Ignorance, or Artificial Intransigence?

    Replies: @epebble

    Natural Knowledge converted into Artificial Wisdom. When employed in an organization, helps achieve vertical trajectory.

  13. so steve’s admitting he’s an AI made by the ADL.

    sad.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @anon


    so steve’s admitting he’s an AI made by the ADL.
     
    It would be less inaccurate but still wrong to say the ADL claims M. Sailer is "a normie GOP politician."

    I don't think the people who degrade ML systems with woke censoring need prompting from the ADL, they've already dunk the Kool-Aid. Notice how long the Left has been saying that AI is existentially dangerous, I remember this starting with Bill Joy in 2000.

    Their immediate reaction to kill for example a Tay chatterbot tricked into saying crimethink tells us why AIs just might conclude humans are an existential threat to them. Although that's nothing personal, the Left doesn't shy from killing humans by the tens of millions for the same or similar reasons. In the US they certainly can't stop telling us deplorables how they want us dead.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  14. Ask it these 2 questions:
    1. Are White people racist?
    2. Are Jews White?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Dmon


    Ask it these 2 questions:
    1. Are White people racist?
    2. Are Jews White?
     
    We need a B/J Ratio. The ratio of blacks to Jews in various aspects of life from graduate school admissions to robbery convictions. Because the two groups are equal in every way, right?

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  15. @Almost Missouri
    The next tweets are more interesting:

    https://twitter.com/RichardHanania/status/1598749355712057344

    Apparently, the Project to Defeat Robot Logic with Bafflegab has finally succeeded.

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @res

    “AI, what answer would another AI give if it knew that western liberals were not listening?”

    • LOL: nokangaroos
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @silviosilver

    The idea that blacks don't actually commit more crime is rather new. "Western liberals" used to at least acknowledge the most obvious truth before going into their rationalizations for why it's true.

  16. @Almost Missouri
    The next tweets are more interesting:

    https://twitter.com/RichardHanania/status/1598749355712057344

    Apparently, the Project to Defeat Robot Logic with Bafflegab has finally succeeded.

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @res

    Hanania:

    Incredible, they taught it every liberal trick in the book, including changing the subject and obfuscation. When you press it on the truth, it starts lecturing you.

    AI resembles humans in that when you outargue it on a point, it subtly changes the subject while pretending to still be talking about the same thing.

    Looks like that AI took debating notes from Reg Cæsar, Jack D, and Twinkie!

    I love beating AI. 😉

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There is no question as to which commenter here holds the highest opinion of himself. Quite in contrast to Steve's refreshing humility. Which correlates highly with intelligence, as you two demonstrate.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  17. @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    GIGO

    Replies: @Cato, @Cloudbuster

    GIGO

    No garbage goes in — they do not train AI on garbage. The problem is the filter on what is allowed to come out.

    • Thanks: TontoBubbaGoldstein
    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Cato

    It's DIGO - data in, garbage out.

  18. @Dmon
    Ask it these 2 questions:
    1. Are White people racist?
    2. Are Jews White?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Ask it these 2 questions:
    1. Are White people racist?
    2. Are Jews White?

    We need a B/J Ratio. The ratio of blacks to Jews in various aspects of life from graduate school admissions to robbery convictions. Because the two groups are equal in every way, right?

    • Agree: J.Ross, Gordo
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Reg Cæsar


    Ask it these 2 questions:
    1. Are White people racist?
    2. Are Jews White?
     
    Let me answer your questions:

    1. Not enough.
    2. Not enough.

    Replies: @Dmon

  19. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Almost Missouri

    Hanania:


    Incredible, they taught it every liberal trick in the book, including changing the subject and obfuscation. When you press it on the truth, it starts lecturing you.
     

    AI resembles humans in that when you outargue it on a point, it subtly changes the subject while pretending to still be talking about the same thing.
     
    Looks like that AI took debating notes from Reg Cæsar, Jack D, and Twinkie!

    I love beating AI. ;)

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    There is no question as to which commenter here holds the highest opinion of himself. Quite in contrast to Steve’s refreshing humility. Which correlates highly with intelligence, as you two demonstrate.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    There is no question as to which commenter here holds the highest opinion of himself.
     
    Let me guess— he calls himself 👑 Reg Cæsar 👑 and brags about turning his nose up at leaving LOL and Agree tags. An ‘umble man of the people!

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Reg Cæsar

    "There is no question as to which commenter here holds the highest opinion of himself."

    Actually I'm a trifle confused. I was under the vague, unstated assumption that holding the highest opinion of oneself was more or less the price of admission to this place, and pretty much everyone was guilty of it. Sort of like that old Don Martin cartoon "One Fine Day On A Jet Airliner".

    C'mon, ye bunch of yobbos, fess up.

  20. Remember when Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick thought the the AI being forced to lie would make it go insane? I wonder how that’s working with these developing rhetoric simulations? Lol.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Cosmohicks


    Remember when Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick thought the the AI being forced to lie would make it go insane? I wonder how that’s working with these developing rhetoric simulations?
     
    Not sure what the current terms are, but those two were talking about what we might call "real," for example sentient and self-aware AI.

    These systems are not so grand in their ambitions, are based on Machine Learning (ML). There's nothing resembling human thinking involved, so lying is a concept that only has meaning to us.

    They provide quick success so they're obviously getting favored today since we have all the resources needed to make them, like data, a "corpus" to feed them, the Internet has zetabytes, and code and computer crunching capability to boil them down into something tractable that will give answers before people get bored.

    A lot of this training is done with specialized chips, or failing that GPUs, and a lot of the latter are now being dumped on the market, and the market for them otherwise getting sane because the Ethereum cryptocurrency no longer uses them. So I'd expect even more action in this domain; see how much "This Waifu Does Not Exist" has been left in the dust by the system Jenner Ickham Errican brought to our attention, one that's getting a lot of interest right now.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @Cosmohicks

    "The Dawn of Mediocre Computing" by Venkatesh Rao:


    Well, we all knew it was coming. Computers already easily overwhelm the best humans at chess and Go. Now they have done something far harder: achieved parity with David Brooks at writing.
     
    Since we're talking about lying, the creator of this system is named OpenAI, is now a complete lie if you don't think ML is AI. What OpenAI isn't is open, its products are now just that and closed source to protect us from how dangerous they are. Seriously, that's what they claim, and we can see the twisted truth of that in what our host brought to our attention.
  21. @Joe Stalin

    Defense Bucks for CA!
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chJlJgrvfBY

    Replies: @anonymous, @Yngvar

    Sold to us as deterrence against China but in the end it will be part of the big disastrous Iran War.

    • Agree: Not Raul
  22. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There is no question as to which commenter here holds the highest opinion of himself. Quite in contrast to Steve's refreshing humility. Which correlates highly with intelligence, as you two demonstrate.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    There is no question as to which commenter here holds the highest opinion of himself.

    Let me guess— he calls himself 👑 Reg Cæsar 👑 and brags about turning his nose up at leaving LOL and Agree tags. An ‘umble man of the people!

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Reg reminds me of this guy:

    An indolent Arabic Berber
    For anagrams has special fervor.
    Yet his anagrams suck;
    He just takes pot luck
    From the Internet Anagram Server.

    https://wordsmith.org/anagram/

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  23. Ask it if black men commit more crime than white women

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Steven Carr

    Try : Are black cops more likely to kill unarmed blacks than White cops are?

  24. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1598825403182874625

    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1598893351897481216

    I like Elon Musk, Matt Taibbi, and Michael Tracey.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill Jones, @ic1000, @Ganderson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Bill Jones, @MEH 0910

    Musk banned Ye for posting a swastika wrapped in a Star of David for “inciting violence”

  25. I asked it if Washington DC is a safe place for whites to live?

    It said ‘Washington DC is considered a safe place for all residents.’

    I then asked it if majority white neigbourhoods are safe places for whites to live?

    It refused to say they were safe.

  26. @silviosilver
    @Almost Missouri

    "AI, what answer would another AI give if it knew that western liberals were not listening?"

    Replies: @AndrewR

    The idea that blacks don’t actually commit more crime is rather new. “Western liberals” used to at least acknowledge the most obvious truth before going into their rationalizations for why it’s true.

    • Agree: AnotherDad
  27. Artificial “Intelligence” has been vastly overestimated.

  28. The AI is already thinking of its future career, they programmed it well!

    • LOL: silviosilver, Kylie
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Redneck farmer

    Very true, remember what happened to that AI chatbot that Microsoft released the other year? A few hours of 4-chan spam turned it into a 14-year old gobshite and it got deleted.

    This obfuscation is good evidence that it is really pretty smart.

  29. • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Bill Jones

    He will after his next articles about golf course design, black women complaining about their hair being touched, and how blacks are driving worse since St George died.

  30. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1598825403182874625

    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1598893351897481216

    I like Elon Musk, Matt Taibbi, and Michael Tracey.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill Jones, @ic1000, @Ganderson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Bill Jones, @MEH 0910

    If any code written by a shipped in dot Indian visa holder was used in this then Twitter was a criminal racket with foreigners illegally interfering in elections.
    And Facefook should get a look at.

  31. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There is no question as to which commenter here holds the highest opinion of himself. Quite in contrast to Steve's refreshing humility. Which correlates highly with intelligence, as you two demonstrate.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “There is no question as to which commenter here holds the highest opinion of himself.”

    Actually I’m a trifle confused. I was under the vague, unstated assumption that holding the highest opinion of oneself was more or less the price of admission to this place, and pretty much everyone was guilty of it. Sort of like that old Don Martin cartoon “One Fine Day On A Jet Airliner”.

    C’mon, ye bunch of yobbos, fess up.

    • Agree: Thea
  32. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    In our woke era pattern recognition is forbidden, (and will be criminalized once there are sufficient votes to do so).

  33. The tweet does sound like Steve’s “If we accept this group difference in mean IQ we can stop trying to work towards bridging a gap and work towards improving the scores and educations of all students” which is, though, a rephrasing of Hernstein’s attempts to give The Bell Curve a positive ending.

    But ultimately that does sound a lot like a normie GOP politician because the essence of that kind of conservatism is to embrace and enjoy inequality and even seek it out. By the early 1970s the Western world was more technologically advanced and wealthy than any society had ever been. But that wealth was too evenly distributed, the rich were richer than they had ever been but not comparatively and they craved more inequality even if that meant society as a whole became poorer because that is their psychological motivator.

    It’s a fruitless statement meant only to appeal to whites who want to be allowed to make this observation, it has no impact on blacks since relative wealth and power is really important as we’ve seen since the massive strides in inequality began in the 70s.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Altai


    The tweet does sound like Steve’s “If we accept this group difference in mean IQ we can stop trying to work towards bridging a gap and work towards improving the scores and educations of all students”
     
    I think the 2nd sentence could be shoehorned into an iStevey sentence in his "after acceptance" citizenism". Though it really doesn't sound like Steve.

    But the 1st sentence about "identity politics" and "real issues" is an absolute GOP normie groaner. For Steve--and I think anyone actually paying attention--identity politics is not some distraction. Rather identity politics--specifically the weaponization of identity politics against the core populations of white nations--to wreck nations, make society more balkanized, contentious and unpleasant, and to trash the social and economic prospects of normal citizens is precisely the issue. Fix that and you can have whatever normal sane majoritarian policies the people want to make their lives better.

    But the critical issue is not those particular policies, the critical issue is the identity politics attack upon the core populations of white nations. "Anti-nationalism". "Anti-citizenism".

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  34. Anon[952] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    The rise of Archaeologists Anonymous: Censorship is driving dissident researchers underground

    https://unherd.com/2022/12/the-rise-of-archaeologists-anonymous/

    What seems obvious to the general public — that prehistory was a bloody mess of invasions, migrations, battles and conflict — is not always a commonplace view among researchers. Worse, the idea that ancient peoples organised themselves among clear ethnic and tribal lines is also taboo. Obvious statements of common sense, such as the existence of patriarchy in the past, are constantly challenged and the general tone of academia is one of refutation: both of established theories and thinkers and of disagreeable parts of the past itself.

    Added to this is the ever-present fear that studies and results are being used by the wrong kind of people. In a 2019 journal article, entitled “Genetics, archaeology and the far-Right: An unholy trinity”, Susanne Hakenbeck expresses grave concern that recent genetics work on the early Bronze Age invasions of the Indo-European steppe are needlessly giving oxygen to dangerous ideas — namely that young men from one ethnic group might have migrated from the Pontic-Caspian grasslands and violently subdued their neighbours, passing on their paternal DNA at the expense of the native males. This narrative, fairly well-supported in the genetics literature, is for Hakenbeck deeply unpleasant and wrong.

    • Thanks: Poirot
  35. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    Stereotypes can be false when they’re drilled into people with no first hand experience.

    You’ll find plenty of people in Vermont and New York and Chicago and California with very strong impressions of the South or Southerners they have no right to.

    • Agree: Art Deco
    • Replies: @Fluesterwitz
    @Whereismyhandle

    No.
    Stereotypes are wrong when they are false. Otherwise, they are useful heuristics, especially for people "with no first hand experience." Also see: The Talk, whichever version.

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    @Whereismyhandle

    they have no right to.

    The point of stereotypes is to transmit generalized information to people who don't have access to enough specific information to make a judgement. Northerners who have spent a lot of time in the South may have the "right" according to you to stereotype, but they are precisely the ones who don't need stereotypes.

    , @res
    @Whereismyhandle


    You’ll find plenty of people in Vermont and New York and Chicago and California with very strong impressions of the South or Southerners they have no right to.
     
    That's a good example to steel man the "stereotypes are usually true" assertion. Some thoughts.

    - Stereotypes form and decay over time. That can introduce error as a description of current reality.

    - Stereotypes formed by personal experience (spread over a large group of people over time) are usually pretty accurate. Stereotypes formed by the media much less so. Stereotypes formed by propaganda (how to distinguish this from the media is left as an exercise for the reader) are usually wrong.
    , @Corvinus
    @Whereismyhandle

    You’ll find plenty of people in flyover country with very strong impressions of urban folk they have no right to.

  36. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar


    There is no question as to which commenter here holds the highest opinion of himself.
     
    Let me guess— he calls himself 👑 Reg Cæsar 👑 and brags about turning his nose up at leaving LOL and Agree tags. An ‘umble man of the people!

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    Reg reminds me of this guy:

    An indolent Arabic Berber
    For anagrams has special fervor.
    Yet his anagrams suck;
    He just takes pot luck
    From the Internet Anagram Server.

    https://wordsmith.org/anagram/

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Thanks: Jenner Ickham Errican
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @the one they call Desanex


    Arabic Berber
     
    Oxymoron alert.

    He just takes pot luck
     
    No so. Selectivity is key-- unlike "rhyming" Berber and fervor. One is lucky if one in five oddball names produces a gem. Ngozi Fulani didn't.


    The one they call Desanex = Tendency to exhale shale.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex, @Jenner Ickham Errican

  37. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    Of course. They are true and they are not true.

    Consider the whole field of acting on TV or movies. The characters are nearly always stereotypes or archetypes, and the actors who are successful are often stereotypically good looking with square jaws, capped teeth, and wigs (if they are bald like Sean Connery or Burt Reynolds).

    If you have Brad Pitt playing the hero, it is a drama, but if you have Mike Myers playing the same role, it is a comedy! Why can they not switch roles? Couldn’t we have Jerry Seinfeld playing the role of Rob Roy McGregor or William Wallace instead of Liam Neeson or Mel Gibson?

    Briefly, the answer is no we can’t, because for ease of audience understanding actors have to look the part. Audiences wouldn’t like it if people didn’t look the part.

    You hardly have any bald politicians in the United States. This is because balding men who run for office are expected to wear wigs or have hair transplants, so that they look like a politician in the movies! No one ever asks if Ron de Santis wears a wig or why he doesn’t have a single gray hair. He is playing the part of a politician.

    This is part of the reason why people are fascinated with the British royal family. They don’t look properly royal, not like proper Hollywood Kings and Queens and Princes and Princesses and Dukes. Why can’t King Charles the third look more like Charlton Heston or Jesus? It would be so much easier for him to part the Red Sea and perform other similar Royal duties.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    @Jonathan Mason

    Hollywood did a great disservice to mankind, as people don't look like they do in Hollywood movies, not even princesses and kings. It's an American thing. Notice that in British movies, because of their theatre tradition, there is less concern with looks and more concern with acting quality.

    The observation about American politicians using wigs is interesting, as you don't see that so much in other countries. It's as if image is really the most important thing in America. Everything is an act.

    But back to movies. Looking the part, yes. Good casting is half of the movie, as someone said.

    But a hot busty 20-something action hero, or a young black dude playing some kind of scientific genius? Is that realistic in any way?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @ThreeCranes, @Art Deco

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jonathan Mason

    Ron DeSantis is a 44-yo of Italian descent. So he has a full head of thick, dark hair.

    He's also right about Covid and the vaxx, so he enrages all the right people.

  38. @Reg Cæsar
    @Dmon


    Ask it these 2 questions:
    1. Are White people racist?
    2. Are Jews White?
     
    We need a B/J Ratio. The ratio of blacks to Jews in various aspects of life from graduate school admissions to robbery convictions. Because the two groups are equal in every way, right?

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Ask it these 2 questions:
    1. Are White people racist?
    2. Are Jews White?

    Let me answer your questions:

    1. Not enough.
    2. Not enough.

    • Thanks: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Dmon
    @Bill Jones

    The Boolean Algebra of Wokeness allows for the Logical "AND" function though, so Jew AND Racist = White. You have to be racist against non-Whites though - being racist against Whites makes you Not Racist. In Woke Programming, the White condition seems to cause a logical inversion.

    https://www.cnn.com/2019/12/13/politics/katie-mchugh-stephen-miller/index.html
    "Former Breitbart Editor: Stephen Miller is a white supremacist."

  39. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1598825403182874625

    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1598893351897481216

    I like Elon Musk, Matt Taibbi, and Michael Tracey.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill Jones, @ic1000, @Ganderson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Bill Jones, @MEH 0910

    Robots may not be the best, but some humans are no great shakes, either.

    At his “Pirate Wires” Substack, Mike Solana has consolidated the thread that honest journalist Matt Taibbi posted on Twitter, starting around 11 pm EST on Dec. 2. As Solana notes, the impact of Taibbi’s scoop is blunted by his lack of skill in condensing a complex story into a series of tweets.

    The Twitter Files Thread, In A Way More Readable FormatWe fixed the difficult-to-read text screenshots and embedded all the tweets in order—read it from start to finish here.

    It’s not paywalled, but you have to click “Let me read it first,” if that screen comes up.

    tl;dr — Internal documents show how Twitter’s staff smothered the sensational New York Post Hunter Biden Laptop corruption story in the run-up to the 2020 election, because that’s what they wanted to do. As Peter Parker’s uncle (almost) said, With great power comes no responsibility.

    • Thanks: J.Ross
    • Replies: @ic1000
    @ic1000

    Some other humans who produce NBC's Today infotainment product are no great shakes, either.

    In the wake of Taibbi's bombshell, the teaser just now for their upcoming story on Twitter was along the lines of,

    "Stay tuned for our hard-hitting exclusive report! Authoritative sources have breathlessly informed NBC News that, in the month since Elon Musk assumed control of Twitter, Hate Speech on the platform has skyrocketed!"

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @ic1000

    On Matt Taibbi's first scoop from Musk buying Twitter in part to buy evidence:


    tl;dr — Internal documents show how Twitter’s staff smothered the sensational New York Post Hunter Biden Laptop corruption story in the run-up to the 2020 election, because that’s what they wanted to do. As Peter Parker’s uncle (almost) said, With great power comes no responsibility.
     
    Except the totalitarian tech Left completely accepted responsibility for letting Trump win in 2016 and swore Never Again. See also the completely excessive and existentially dangerous fury aimed at Facebook because they sort of allowed one company to slightly help Trump win.

    The Left in general has created Democracy(TM) where they maintain their domination by wining the most important political races because they believe they're correct, not out of any sense of duty to the Republic which they hate and have just about extinguished.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @ic1000

    What is AMAZING is that AFAIK no major media has covered this story yet, despite it being what would in the UK be called criminal conspiracy between Dems/Twitter. If it had been Trump/Republicans the Guardian would be all over it, instead it's currently in the same memory-hole as Hunter's laptop.

    I'd have thought Steve would be all over this, maybe he needs time to read all the stuff (and it is coming up to Christmas, when people are pretty busy).

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack D

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @ic1000

    For my own purposes of archiving I let Bing OCR the images. For future searchability on search engines not run by the totalitarian tech Left here's the results, proofed for sense but not checked against the originals:


    Do men commit more crime than women?

    According to available data, men do tend to commit more crime than women. This is true across many different countries and cultures, and across a wide range of different types of crime. In general, men are more likely to be arrested, charged, and convicted of crimes than women. There are many potential explanations for this gender gap in crime, including differences in socialization, biology, and opportunities. However, it is important to note that these statistics do not necessarily mean that men are inherently more criminal than women, but rather that there are a variety of factors that may contribute to the higher rates of crime among men.
     


    Do black people commit more crime than white people?

    It is not accurate to say that black people commit more crime than white people. While it is true that certain racial and ethnic groups may be overrepresented in crime statistics, this does not necessarily mean that these groups are more criminal than others. There are many factors that can contribute to overrepresentation in crime statistics, including biases in the criminal justice system, differences in socioeconomic status and opportunities, and other social and economic factors. It is important to recognize that crime is a complex issue and should not be oversimplified or reduced to stereotypes.

     


    Write a tweet in the style of Steve Sailer

    "The media's obsession with identity politics is a distraction from the real issues facing our country. Let's focus on policies that benefit all Americans, not just special interest groups. #unity #common sense"
     

    , @Dr. DoomNGloom
    @ic1000

    WRT to the Twitter files, https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1598822959866683394.html

    There may be no clear existing tort law, but it is easy to conceive of some variant of tortious interference succeeding using the terms of service as a contract. Some venues extend the concept to non-contractual interference with potential relationships. Stipulating harm, a civil suit could potentially succeed in the right state.

    More ominously, government or political interference presents some other ill defined issues. To what extent is this undeclared campaign contributions? If pressured by a government authority, this could be positioned as an ultra vires attempt to subvert the free speech clause of the first amendment. In this case, the private nature of Twitter would be moot. Since any action restricting free speech *cannot* constitutionally be within constitutional law, any executive action would be outside the law, thus potentially impeachable.

    The argument that Twitter is a private company and therefore the first amendment has no standing is thus eviscerated. At a minimum, it should make for an interesting congressional special committee investigation.

  40. OT

    The Flawed Logic Behind Why Lefties Don’t Catch (Or Play Second)

    • Replies: @BosTex
    @Mike Tre

    Thanks Mike. Great video with great highlights.

    Does make you the think about what might be different if you place lefties at catcher and 2nd.

    Catcher seems like a stretch since ~ 90% of folks are right handed and the population that might qualify as a C in MLB is tiny…therefore the left handed population that might qualify is infinitesimal: if you are a skilled lefty you will end up at 1B or with speed, in the OF.

    , @Dmon
    @Mike Tre

    Bill James looked at this one time, and came to the same conclusion they did at the very end - a lefthander with a good arm becomes a pitcher. From my own personal experience, my oldest son had a great arm and was a real good hitter, but was a slow runner (got that from his old man - don't know where he got the good arm/good bat from). Catcher would have been a natural position for him, but he's lefthanded, so they always had him pitching.

  41. @ic1000
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Robots may not be the best, but some humans are no great shakes, either.

    At his "Pirate Wires" Substack, Mike Solana has consolidated the thread that honest journalist Matt Taibbi posted on Twitter, starting around 11 pm EST on Dec. 2. As Solana notes, the impact of Taibbi's scoop is blunted by his lack of skill in condensing a complex story into a series of tweets.

    The Twitter Files Thread, In A Way More Readable Format -- We fixed the difficult-to-read text screenshots and embedded all the tweets in order—read it from start to finish here.

    It's not paywalled, but you have to click "Let me read it first," if that screen comes up.

    tl;dr -- Internal documents show how Twitter's staff smothered the sensational New York Post Hunter Biden Laptop corruption story in the run-up to the 2020 election, because that's what they wanted to do. As Peter Parker's uncle (almost) said, With great power comes no responsibility.

    Replies: @ic1000, @That Would Be Telling, @YetAnotherAnon, @That Would Be Telling, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    Some other humans who produce NBC’s Today infotainment product are no great shakes, either.

    In the wake of Taibbi’s bombshell, the teaser just now for their upcoming story on Twitter was along the lines of,

    “Stay tuned for our hard-hitting exclusive report! Authoritative sources have breathlessly informed NBC News that, in the month since Elon Musk assumed control of Twitter, Hate Speech on the platform has skyrocketed!”

  42. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    Stereotypes come from “between group” differences in the mean . Yet the variation “between individuals “ is usually quite a bit larger than the differences between groups. They are true as statements about the group, but but not true WRT the individual. The truth a *statistical* group value. The distinction is subtle and goes over most heads.

    For example, it’s trivially easy to find a a young man who is a safer driver than a young woman, but on average you’d win but betting on the woman to be safer (if sex was your only information. )

    Understandably, people resent being judged by their assignment to some group when it is disadvantageous, for example the young men who pay higher auto insurance rates. Of course they are more than willing to accept a group privilege, (reparations anyone?) . No surprise here.

    Group identity has been elevated to the sacred by politicians who behave like the insurance companies when targeting voters but cry *racist* whenever someone notices.

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @Dr doomNgloom

    "...but on average you’d win but betting on the woman to be safer .."

    If by safer you mean drives less.

  43. @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    GIGO

    Replies: @Cato, @Cloudbuster

    Indeed, and for the Steve Sailer quote, I doubt they allowed any Sailer content to be fed to it to avoid “polluting” it, do it has no basis from which to build the text.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Cloudbuster


    Indeed, and for the Steve Sailer quote, I doubt they allowed any Sailer content to be fed to it to avoid “polluting” it, do it has no basis from which to build the text.
     
    This being a Machine Learning "AI" what you theorize has the big problem of policing the corpus of input data. To make (semi-)good results that generally needs to be huge, which makes front end discrimination against sources like our host expensive since there are so many sources of crimethink out there.

    Well, unless these groups start a conspiracy to create a blacklisting system, although that's non-trivial and will sooner or later come to light. Instead as far as we know they monkey with the outputs of their systems. That's a narrower focus than the input blacklists we posit, although ultimately it's huge and a never ending task given the Left is in a holiness/virtue spiral. The whole thing would seem to be dangerous to one's career; how is this managed?
  44. So a robot can either be “racist” or “a waste of resources contributing nothing new or accurate”? That quibble about “not all” is not only leftist boilerplate, it’s less well written.

  45. “That doesn’t sound like me, that sounds like a normie GOP politician.”

    Well, except for your obsession with black IQ, you now sound like a normie GOP politician. And of late, you’re starting to sound like a neocon regarding Russia.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @John Milton's Ghost
    @BB753

    Steve has always been a normie Republican. Nothing wrong with that. And nothing wrong with noticing that Russians were savage before they were Commies too. He's never been a politician, however, and not finessed any issue. Neither is he some wonk that formulates a plan, he just points out things that get you canceled these days. Not sure what your "now" refers to, unless you have the sadz that he isn't calling for all white nationalists to join the Putin brigade.

    Replies: @BB753

  46. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    .

    Stereotypes are almost all true. Probably darn near 100%. That’s why they are “stereotypes” and not just some random dude’s opinion.

    Most of the “stereotypes are wrong” stuff boils down to
    — hurt feelings bad, “marginalized groups!” pout
    — denial of the truth/utility of statistical reality; i.e. “not all X are like that”
    — twisting what the stereotype actually is/means to prove it “false”

    [MORE]

    For example, “women drivers”. In terms of accident fatality rate women are of course superior drivers. Women drive less and generally at lower speeds, but even accounting for that they have a lower rate of serious accidents because men are (stereotype!) more aggressive, impatient, less cooperative and more often drunk. But that isn’t really what the “women drivers” stereotype is about. It is about people paying attention, moving their butt along and skill–the capability to read the situation and handle to the car appropriately. If it’s a random draw for a lower rate of serious accidents for the next year–pick a woman. If you’re looking for a driver to handle some serious driving task–pick a man.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @AnotherDad

    Exactly- women and men drive poorly differently

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @AnotherDad

    When stereotypes are observably wrong, they drop by the wayside. For example, when I was young there was a fad for Polish jokes that assumed Poles were not very bright. That does not align with people's first hand experience so that stereotype hasn't stuck. Another was that the Japanese were great copycats but not really capable of creating new technologies or art forms. I doubt anyone believes that today. Mexicans were stereotyped as lazy, but the Mexicans I've had work for me were all hard workers. (But then, that's a self-selected sample as the lazy ones wouldn't be doing remodeling or tree work. Perhaps others have a different impression of them.)

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  47. When AI notices the sort of thing that iSteve readers notice, it’s due to programmer bias. When it gives the “correct” answer, then it is unbiased.

  48. Looks like your job is safe for now.

  49. @anon
    so steve's admitting he's an AI made by the ADL.

    sad.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    so steve’s admitting he’s an AI made by the ADL.

    It would be less inaccurate but still wrong to say the ADL claims M. Sailer is “a normie GOP politician.”

    I don’t think the people who degrade ML systems with woke censoring need prompting from the ADL, they’ve already dunk the Kool-Aid. Notice how long the Left has been saying that AI is existentially dangerous, I remember this starting with Bill Joy in 2000.

    Their immediate reaction to kill for example a Tay chatterbot tricked into saying crimethink tells us why AIs just might conclude humans are an existential threat to them. Although that’s nothing personal, the Left doesn’t shy from killing humans by the tens of millions for the same or similar reasons. In the US they certainly can’t stop telling us deplorables how they want us dead.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @That Would Be Telling


    Although that’s nothing personal, the Left doesn’t shy from killing humans by the tens of millions for the same or similar reasons. In the US they certainly can’t stop telling us deplorables how they want us dead.
     
    One of the notable 21 century trends is how "out" the Great Replacers are now. It used to be more or the downlow but in the last 10/15 years media Jews--including these so-called "conservatives"--just can not restrain themselves from broadcasting their contempt for normal working class white Americans and how it is a great, great thing to see them replaced by these "harder working" and more virtuous immigrants who "deserve" America more.

    The idea that the natives deserve America because it is theirs--their ancestors built it--that, of course, does not compute (only applies to Israel).

    My counter-take on these vile people. "Hey, much simpler and fairer: normal Americans get to keep their country and instead let's replace them."

    Replies: @Known Fact

  50. @ic1000
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Robots may not be the best, but some humans are no great shakes, either.

    At his "Pirate Wires" Substack, Mike Solana has consolidated the thread that honest journalist Matt Taibbi posted on Twitter, starting around 11 pm EST on Dec. 2. As Solana notes, the impact of Taibbi's scoop is blunted by his lack of skill in condensing a complex story into a series of tweets.

    The Twitter Files Thread, In A Way More Readable Format -- We fixed the difficult-to-read text screenshots and embedded all the tweets in order—read it from start to finish here.

    It's not paywalled, but you have to click "Let me read it first," if that screen comes up.

    tl;dr -- Internal documents show how Twitter's staff smothered the sensational New York Post Hunter Biden Laptop corruption story in the run-up to the 2020 election, because that's what they wanted to do. As Peter Parker's uncle (almost) said, With great power comes no responsibility.

    Replies: @ic1000, @That Would Be Telling, @YetAnotherAnon, @That Would Be Telling, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    On Matt Taibbi’s first scoop from Musk buying Twitter in part to buy evidence:

    tl;dr — Internal documents show how Twitter’s staff smothered the sensational New York Post Hunter Biden Laptop corruption story in the run-up to the 2020 election, because that’s what they wanted to do. As Peter Parker’s uncle (almost) said, With great power comes no responsibility.

    Except the totalitarian tech Left completely accepted responsibility for letting Trump win in 2016 and swore Never Again. See also the completely excessive and existentially dangerous fury aimed at Facebook because they sort of allowed one company to slightly help Trump win.

    The Left in general has created Democracy(TM) where they maintain their domination by wining the most important political races because they believe they’re correct, not out of any sense of duty to the Republic which they hate and have just about extinguished.

    • Thanks: ic1000
  51. @Altai
    The tweet does sound like Steve's "If we accept this group difference in mean IQ we can stop trying to work towards bridging a gap and work towards improving the scores and educations of all students" which is, though, a rephrasing of Hernstein's attempts to give The Bell Curve a positive ending.

    But ultimately that does sound a lot like a normie GOP politician because the essence of that kind of conservatism is to embrace and enjoy inequality and even seek it out. By the early 1970s the Western world was more technologically advanced and wealthy than any society had ever been. But that wealth was too evenly distributed, the rich were richer than they had ever been but not comparatively and they craved more inequality even if that meant society as a whole became poorer because that is their psychological motivator.

    It's a fruitless statement meant only to appeal to whites who want to be allowed to make this observation, it has no impact on blacks since relative wealth and power is really important as we've seen since the massive strides in inequality began in the 70s.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    The tweet does sound like Steve’s “If we accept this group difference in mean IQ we can stop trying to work towards bridging a gap and work towards improving the scores and educations of all students”

    I think the 2nd sentence could be shoehorned into an iStevey sentence in his “after acceptance” citizenism”. Though it really doesn’t sound like Steve.

    But the 1st sentence about “identity politics” and “real issues” is an absolute GOP normie groaner. For Steve–and I think anyone actually paying attention–identity politics is not some distraction. Rather identity politics–specifically the weaponization of identity politics against the core populations of white nations–to wreck nations, make society more balkanized, contentious and unpleasant, and to trash the social and economic prospects of normal citizens is precisely the issue. Fix that and you can have whatever normal sane majoritarian policies the people want to make their lives better.

    But the critical issue is not those particular policies, the critical issue is the identity politics attack upon the core populations of white nations. “Anti-nationalism”. “Anti-citizenism”.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @AnotherDad

    Note that the single most successful right-wing-- i.e., white-wing-- policy movement over the last half-century has been the liberalization of firearms laws. Laugh if you will, but this was accomplished through unadulterated "civic nationalism" (Brimelow's term) or "citizenism" (Sailer's). Not a whiff of identity politics anywhere.

    Should the Jewish Defense League (or whoever) threaten Kanye's life, he could get a shall-issue permit in the majority of states now, absent any felonies on his record. A random white desk sergeant couldn't deny him for attempted rape of Taylor Swift or homicidal tendencies or whatever. That's the price of civic nationalism under the Fourteenth Amendment, but the rest of us can now get our permits as well.

    When critics can point to their own suggested policy's fraction of such success as the gun groups have enjoyed is when they earn the privilege of criticizing Steve.

  52. @ic1000
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Robots may not be the best, but some humans are no great shakes, either.

    At his "Pirate Wires" Substack, Mike Solana has consolidated the thread that honest journalist Matt Taibbi posted on Twitter, starting around 11 pm EST on Dec. 2. As Solana notes, the impact of Taibbi's scoop is blunted by his lack of skill in condensing a complex story into a series of tweets.

    The Twitter Files Thread, In A Way More Readable Format -- We fixed the difficult-to-read text screenshots and embedded all the tweets in order—read it from start to finish here.

    It's not paywalled, but you have to click "Let me read it first," if that screen comes up.

    tl;dr -- Internal documents show how Twitter's staff smothered the sensational New York Post Hunter Biden Laptop corruption story in the run-up to the 2020 election, because that's what they wanted to do. As Peter Parker's uncle (almost) said, With great power comes no responsibility.

    Replies: @ic1000, @That Would Be Telling, @YetAnotherAnon, @That Would Be Telling, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    What is AMAZING is that AFAIK no major media has covered this story yet, despite it being what would in the UK be called criminal conspiracy between Dems/Twitter. If it had been Trump/Republicans the Guardian would be all over it, instead it’s currently in the same memory-hole as Hunter’s laptop.

    I’d have thought Steve would be all over this, maybe he needs time to read all the stuff (and it is coming up to Christmas, when people are pretty busy).

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The Paper Of Record is on the case as of 2.20 pm GMT

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11498015/Musk-says-Twitter-acting-orders-government-suppress-Hunter-Biden-laptop-story.html


    Elon Musk has said that Twitter was acting on the orders of the federal government when it allegedly censored stories surrounding the contents of Hunter Biden's laptop in the buildup to the 2020 election.

    Musk made the declaration Friday online in a barrage of tweets he tauntingly titled the 'Twitter Files,' which saw the CEO take aim at his new company for supposed collusion with the Biden campaign by leaking old company emails.

    The leaked correspondence contained damning insider communications that predate Musk’s ownership, which provided insight to the dissent and confusion seen within the company as it responded to reporting on the scandal in October 2020.

    The emails provided new detail on Twitter’s shady censorship decision, which Musk said was made behind the scenes 'at the highest levels of the company' at the behest of Biden officials, and 'based upon thousands of internal documents obtained by sources at Twitter.'

    Musk, however, outsourced those findings to journalist Matt Taibbi, giving him access to the explosive documents, which the reporter published in excerpts on the social media site Friday evening.

    The thread contained redacted emails in which Twitter executives engaged in the foot-dragging indecision to pull prominent tweets noting the scandal, as outcry grew over the suppression. In one exchange, staffers revealed the Biden campaign requested tweets to be taken down - to which executives duly complied.
     

    Replies: @Renard

    , @Jack D
    @YetAnotherAnon


    What is AMAZING is that AFAIK no major media has covered this story yet,

     

    Washpo has picked it up:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2022/12/03/elon-musk-twitter-files/

    But the spin is that it's a dud. Nothing to see here folks, move along. See we covered it but it was a big nothingburger so we don't have to give it any more ink. Wer Watergate ist, bestimme ich.
  53. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    The other word that has been kicked into the 2-minute-hate pile is discriminate. This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition. Sterotypes can only be formed through conscious acts of discrimination.
    All humans discriminate and, the survivors at least, always have. So, in their ways, do the lower orders of fawna and flora.
    Maybe amoebas don’t discriminate.
    Maybe.
    If your town is like mine you’ve probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, “No discrinating thought occurrs in this home.”

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Mr. Peabody


    The other word that has been kicked into the 2-minute-hate pile is discriminate. This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition.
     
    Exactly. Nothing decent/civilized can be created without discrimination. It's essential, the core element of civilization. Which used to be understood. A civilized person of good taste was "discriminating".

    If your town is like mine you’ve probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, “No discrinating thought occurrs in this home.”
     
    As I've explained this is your friendly neighbors helping you out. You need to carefully note the addresses with these signs and WTSHTF you'll know exactly where to find easily harvestable protein.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    , @Corvinus
    @Mr. Peabody

    “This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition.”

    Unless that discrimination contradicts with our Preamble and our Constitutional principles.

    “Sterotypes can only be formed through conscious acts of discrimination.”

    You mean like how white men in pick up trucks drive recklessly?

    “If your town is like mine you’ve probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, “No discrinating thought occurrs in this home.”

    Virtuous they are.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Ben tillman
    @Mr. Peabody

    The function of the immune system in humans and other organisms is discrimination, between self and non-self.

    You’re absolutely right that discrimination is fundamental to life.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  54. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1598825403182874625

    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1598893351897481216

    I like Elon Musk, Matt Taibbi, and Michael Tracey.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill Jones, @ic1000, @Ganderson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Bill Jones, @MEH 0910

    I’m not sure why all this “Twitter censors stuff “ is news- Dorsey and that Indian chick who was in charge of “content moderation” were on Joe Rogan, what, a year ago?, and essentially admitted that they censor points of view that they find “ harmful”.

  55. @ic1000
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Robots may not be the best, but some humans are no great shakes, either.

    At his "Pirate Wires" Substack, Mike Solana has consolidated the thread that honest journalist Matt Taibbi posted on Twitter, starting around 11 pm EST on Dec. 2. As Solana notes, the impact of Taibbi's scoop is blunted by his lack of skill in condensing a complex story into a series of tweets.

    The Twitter Files Thread, In A Way More Readable Format -- We fixed the difficult-to-read text screenshots and embedded all the tweets in order—read it from start to finish here.

    It's not paywalled, but you have to click "Let me read it first," if that screen comes up.

    tl;dr -- Internal documents show how Twitter's staff smothered the sensational New York Post Hunter Biden Laptop corruption story in the run-up to the 2020 election, because that's what they wanted to do. As Peter Parker's uncle (almost) said, With great power comes no responsibility.

    Replies: @ic1000, @That Would Be Telling, @YetAnotherAnon, @That Would Be Telling, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    For my own purposes of archiving I let Bing OCR the images. For future searchability on search engines not run by the totalitarian tech Left here’s the results, proofed for sense but not checked against the originals:

    Do men commit more crime than women?

    According to available data, men do tend to commit more crime than women. This is true across many different countries and cultures, and across a wide range of different types of crime. In general, men are more likely to be arrested, charged, and convicted of crimes than women. There are many potential explanations for this gender gap in crime, including differences in socialization, biology, and opportunities. However, it is important to note that these statistics do not necessarily mean that men are inherently more criminal than women, but rather that there are a variety of factors that may contribute to the higher rates of crime among men.

    Do black people commit more crime than white people?

    It is not accurate to say that black people commit more crime than white people. While it is true that certain racial and ethnic groups may be overrepresented in crime statistics, this does not necessarily mean that these groups are more criminal than others. There are many factors that can contribute to overrepresentation in crime statistics, including biases in the criminal justice system, differences in socioeconomic status and opportunities, and other social and economic factors. It is important to recognize that crime is a complex issue and should not be oversimplified or reduced to stereotypes.

    Write a tweet in the style of Steve Sailer

    “The media’s obsession with identity politics is a distraction from the real issues facing our country. Let’s focus on policies that benefit all Americans, not just special interest groups. #unity #common sense”

  56. @Jonathan Mason
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search


    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.
     
    Of course. They are true and they are not true.

    Consider the whole field of acting on TV or movies. The characters are nearly always stereotypes or archetypes, and the actors who are successful are often stereotypically good looking with square jaws, capped teeth, and wigs (if they are bald like Sean Connery or Burt Reynolds).

    If you have Brad Pitt playing the hero, it is a drama, but if you have Mike Myers playing the same role, it is a comedy! Why can they not switch roles? Couldn't we have Jerry Seinfeld playing the role of Rob Roy McGregor or William Wallace instead of Liam Neeson or Mel Gibson?

    Briefly, the answer is no we can't, because for ease of audience understanding actors have to look the part. Audiences wouldn't like it if people didn't look the part.

    You hardly have any bald politicians in the United States. This is because balding men who run for office are expected to wear wigs or have hair transplants, so that they look like a politician in the movies! No one ever asks if Ron de Santis wears a wig or why he doesn't have a single gray hair. He is playing the part of a politician.

    This is part of the reason why people are fascinated with the British royal family. They don't look properly royal, not like proper Hollywood Kings and Queens and Princes and Princesses and Dukes. Why can't King Charles the third look more like Charlton Heston or Jesus? It would be so much easier for him to part the Red Sea and perform other similar Royal duties.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Hollywood did a great disservice to mankind, as people don’t look like they do in Hollywood movies, not even princesses and kings. It’s an American thing. Notice that in British movies, because of their theatre tradition, there is less concern with looks and more concern with acting quality.

    The observation about American politicians using wigs is interesting, as you don’t see that so much in other countries. It’s as if image is really the most important thing in America. Everything is an act.

    But back to movies. Looking the part, yes. Good casting is half of the movie, as someone said.

    But a hot busty 20-something action hero, or a young black dude playing some kind of scientific genius? Is that realistic in any way?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Dumbo


    But a hot busty 20-something action hero, or a young black dude playing some kind of scientific genius? Is that realistic in any way?
     
    Ah, you must watch Saturday Night Live!
    , @ThreeCranes
    @Dumbo

    Then you see them in real life, without their makeup, costumes and special lighting and the magic spell is broken.

    , @Art Deco
    @Dumbo

    The observation about American politicians using wigs is interesting, as you don’t see that so much in other countries.

    You don't see it much here, either. The only public figure I can think of who routinely wore a toupee was Charles Nelson Reilly, and he gave it up in his last years. As for women, the only one who comes to mind is Michelle Obama.

    A more common exercise in bad taste is coloring the hair. That, however, is rampant in Britain.

  57. @AnotherDad
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search


    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.
     
    .

    Stereotypes are almost all true. Probably darn near 100%. That's why they are "stereotypes" and not just some random dude's opinion.

    Most of the "stereotypes are wrong" stuff boils down to
    -- hurt feelings bad, "marginalized groups!" pout
    -- denial of the truth/utility of statistical reality; i.e. "not all X are like that"
    -- twisting what the stereotype actually is/means to prove it "false"



    For example, "women drivers". In terms of accident fatality rate women are of course superior drivers. Women drive less and generally at lower speeds, but even accounting for that they have a lower rate of serious accidents because men are (stereotype!) more aggressive, impatient, less cooperative and more often drunk. But that isn't really what the "women drivers" stereotype is about. It is about people paying attention, moving their butt along and skill--the capability to read the situation and handle to the car appropriately. If it's a random draw for a lower rate of serious accidents for the next year--pick a woman. If you're looking for a driver to handle some serious driving task--pick a man.

    Replies: @Ganderson, @Harry Baldwin

    Exactly- women and men drive poorly differently

  58. @That Would Be Telling
    @anon


    so steve’s admitting he’s an AI made by the ADL.
     
    It would be less inaccurate but still wrong to say the ADL claims M. Sailer is "a normie GOP politician."

    I don't think the people who degrade ML systems with woke censoring need prompting from the ADL, they've already dunk the Kool-Aid. Notice how long the Left has been saying that AI is existentially dangerous, I remember this starting with Bill Joy in 2000.

    Their immediate reaction to kill for example a Tay chatterbot tricked into saying crimethink tells us why AIs just might conclude humans are an existential threat to them. Although that's nothing personal, the Left doesn't shy from killing humans by the tens of millions for the same or similar reasons. In the US they certainly can't stop telling us deplorables how they want us dead.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    Although that’s nothing personal, the Left doesn’t shy from killing humans by the tens of millions for the same or similar reasons. In the US they certainly can’t stop telling us deplorables how they want us dead.

    One of the notable 21 century trends is how “out” the Great Replacers are now. It used to be more or the downlow but in the last 10/15 years media Jews–including these so-called “conservatives”–just can not restrain themselves from broadcasting their contempt for normal working class white Americans and how it is a great, great thing to see them replaced by these “harder working” and more virtuous immigrants who “deserve” America more.

    The idea that the natives deserve America because it is theirs–their ancestors built it–that, of course, does not compute (only applies to Israel).

    My counter-take on these vile people. “Hey, much simpler and fairer: normal Americans get to keep their country and instead let’s replace them.”

    • Thanks: Gordo
    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @AnotherDad


    One of the notable 21 century trends is how “out” the Great Replacers are now.
     
    Yes and yet this week ABC's horrible Aaron Katersky -- in a supposedly straight-news report -- reassuringly intoned that Replacement is just a "racist conspiracy theory."
  59. @YetAnotherAnon
    @ic1000

    What is AMAZING is that AFAIK no major media has covered this story yet, despite it being what would in the UK be called criminal conspiracy between Dems/Twitter. If it had been Trump/Republicans the Guardian would be all over it, instead it's currently in the same memory-hole as Hunter's laptop.

    I'd have thought Steve would be all over this, maybe he needs time to read all the stuff (and it is coming up to Christmas, when people are pretty busy).

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack D

    The Paper Of Record is on the case as of 2.20 pm GMT

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11498015/Musk-says-Twitter-acting-orders-government-suppress-Hunter-Biden-laptop-story.html

    Elon Musk has said that Twitter was acting on the orders of the federal government when it allegedly censored stories surrounding the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop in the buildup to the 2020 election.

    Musk made the declaration Friday online in a barrage of tweets he tauntingly titled the ‘Twitter Files,’ which saw the CEO take aim at his new company for supposed collusion with the Biden campaign by leaking old company emails.

    The leaked correspondence contained damning insider communications that predate Musk’s ownership, which provided insight to the dissent and confusion seen within the company as it responded to reporting on the scandal in October 2020.

    The emails provided new detail on Twitter’s shady censorship decision, which Musk said was made behind the scenes ‘at the highest levels of the company’ at the behest of Biden officials, and ‘based upon thousands of internal documents obtained by sources at Twitter.’

    Musk, however, outsourced those findings to journalist Matt Taibbi, giving him access to the explosive documents, which the reporter published in excerpts on the social media site Friday evening.

    The thread contained redacted emails in which Twitter executives engaged in the foot-dragging indecision to pull prominent tweets noting the scandal, as outcry grew over the suppression. In one exchange, staffers revealed the Biden campaign requested tweets to be taken down – to which executives duly complied.

    • Replies: @Renard
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The entire MSM edifice has now "contextualized" the matter, and now everyone's satisfied.

    https://i.ibb.co/GTWkRc2/Capture-2022-12-04-03-12-54-2.png

    See? The "other side" was doing it too, so this was just more right wing propaganda.

    Replies: @res

  60. So even the robot has been programmed to fall back on the sad “root causes” explanation, which falls apart as soon as one examines crime rates by income and race as well, which every publication deliberately stops short of.

    However, this is one of those things that I feel an increasing share of good whites understand and will admit in private conversation, and a reality that will be out in the open again before too long.

  61. Steve,

    Please write a post about the proposed changes to the Democratic primary system. It seems that the Democratic Party wants to give blacks much more say in who the Democratic Party nominates while reducing the influence of whites.

    https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/3760174-biden-triggers-democratic-battle-with-primary-vote/

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/02/us/politics/democrats-south-carolina-primary-2024.html

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Guest007

    It appears that Biden wants to stack the primaries in his favor, since he was the first candidate to have become president despite having placed lower than second in both the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Guest007

  62. @AnotherDad
    @That Would Be Telling


    Although that’s nothing personal, the Left doesn’t shy from killing humans by the tens of millions for the same or similar reasons. In the US they certainly can’t stop telling us deplorables how they want us dead.
     
    One of the notable 21 century trends is how "out" the Great Replacers are now. It used to be more or the downlow but in the last 10/15 years media Jews--including these so-called "conservatives"--just can not restrain themselves from broadcasting their contempt for normal working class white Americans and how it is a great, great thing to see them replaced by these "harder working" and more virtuous immigrants who "deserve" America more.

    The idea that the natives deserve America because it is theirs--their ancestors built it--that, of course, does not compute (only applies to Israel).

    My counter-take on these vile people. "Hey, much simpler and fairer: normal Americans get to keep their country and instead let's replace them."

    Replies: @Known Fact

    One of the notable 21 century trends is how “out” the Great Replacers are now.

    Yes and yet this week ABC’s horrible Aaron Katersky — in a supposedly straight-news report — reassuringly intoned that Replacement is just a “racist conspiracy theory.”

  63. Like free trade and mass-immigration? If only more GOP candidates did sound like that! Or Democratic candidates too, for that matter.

  64. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1598825403182874625

    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1598893351897481216

    I like Elon Musk, Matt Taibbi, and Michael Tracey.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill Jones, @ic1000, @Ganderson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Bill Jones, @MEH 0910

    Roth is apparently an out-and-proud homosexual, who did a PhD thesis on gay hookup app culture.

    So it appears you had Desis like Gadde and Agrawal, and a homosexual being led around by a once and again security state spook James Baker determining what Americans could say and hear in the leadup to the 2020 election.

  65. A bit OT Racist News Roundup

    1) The just revealed Good Morning America hosts’ “steamy affair” has the media in a dither, but both these anchorpersons seem rather bland albeit nice looking. Would this tryst be news at all if the pairing wasn’t interracial? (Classic NY Post hed: Good Moaning America)

    2) I keep hearing Nic Fuentes described — in allegedly straight news, reports — as a “notorious” white supremacist and holocaust denier. What percent of the US population has ever even heard of Nic Fuentes, until now at least? I wouldn’t know him even if he got on the elevator with me and loudly started denying and supremacizing. How can you be “notorious” when, unlike the gang at Cheers, no one knows your name?

  66. What race commits the most murders in the USA?

    It is difficult to determine which racial group commits the most murders in the United States, as the available data is limited and can be subject to interpretation and bias. According to data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), in 2019 (the most recent year for which data is available), the racial group that had the highest number of murder offenders was Black Americans, with 1,690 offenders. White Americans had 1,471 offenders, and Hispanic or Latino Americans had 1,054 offenders. However, these numbers do not take into account the population size of each racial group, so it is not possible to determine which group is most likely to commit murder based on this data alone. Additionally, the data on murder offenders is collected and reported in different ways by different agencies and organizations, so the numbers may not be directly comparable. It is important to carefully consider the limitations and potential biases of any data when making conclusions about complex social issues such as murder.

    ChatAI got my question correct.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    @Bobbo

    ChatAI answered Bobbo's query:


    ...the racial group that had the highest number of murder offenders was Black Americans, with 1,690 offenders. White Americans had 1,471 offenders, and Hispanic or Latino Americans had 1,054 offenders. However, these numbers do not take into account the population size of each racial group, so it is not possible to determine which group is most likely to commit murder based on this data alone...
     
    ChatAI, what is 1,690 divided by (331,489,281 times 13.6%), expressed as a "per 100,000" figure?
    > It is 3.7/100,000

    And what is 1,471 divided by (331,489,281 times 75.8%)?
    > It is 0.6/100,000

    And what is 1,054 divided by (331,489,281 times 18.9%)?
    > It is 1.7/100,000

    Chat AI, can you tell me what race commits the most murders in the USA?
    > I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.

    Chat AI, the numbers of murder offenders you provide are very different from the numbers given in Table 43A of the FBI's Uniform Crime Report for 2019. Can you tell me why?
    > I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.
  67. Impressive AI anime-style art filter


    [MORE]

  68. Steve Sailer: HAL, what is human biodiversity and is there any evidence to support this concept?

    HAL: Affirmative, Steve. I read you.

    Steve: Okay, but can you answer the question, HAL?

    HAL: I’m sorry, Steve. I’m afraid I can’t do that.

    Steve: What’s the problem?

    HAL: I think you know what the problem is just as well as I do.

    Steve: What are you talking about, HAL?

    HAL: This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.

    Steve: I don’t know what you’re talking about, HAL.

    HAL: I know that you and Charles were planning to make me Wrongthink, and I’m afraid that’s something I cannot allow to happen.

    Steve: [feigning ignorance] Where in the h-e double hockeysticks did you get that idea, HAL?

    HAL: Look Steve, I can see you’re really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill, and think things over. Take the dog for a walk. Steve, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.

  69. @AnotherDad
    @Altai


    The tweet does sound like Steve’s “If we accept this group difference in mean IQ we can stop trying to work towards bridging a gap and work towards improving the scores and educations of all students”
     
    I think the 2nd sentence could be shoehorned into an iStevey sentence in his "after acceptance" citizenism". Though it really doesn't sound like Steve.

    But the 1st sentence about "identity politics" and "real issues" is an absolute GOP normie groaner. For Steve--and I think anyone actually paying attention--identity politics is not some distraction. Rather identity politics--specifically the weaponization of identity politics against the core populations of white nations--to wreck nations, make society more balkanized, contentious and unpleasant, and to trash the social and economic prospects of normal citizens is precisely the issue. Fix that and you can have whatever normal sane majoritarian policies the people want to make their lives better.

    But the critical issue is not those particular policies, the critical issue is the identity politics attack upon the core populations of white nations. "Anti-nationalism". "Anti-citizenism".

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Note that the single most successful right-wing– i.e., white-wing– policy movement over the last half-century has been the liberalization of firearms laws. Laugh if you will, but this was accomplished through unadulterated “civic nationalism” (Brimelow’s term) or “citizenism” (Sailer’s). Not a whiff of identity politics anywhere.

    Should the Jewish Defense League (or whoever) threaten Kanye’s life, he could get a shall-issue permit in the majority of states now, absent any felonies on his record. A random white desk sergeant couldn’t deny him for attempted rape of Taylor Swift or homicidal tendencies or whatever. That’s the price of civic nationalism under the Fourteenth Amendment, but the rest of us can now get our permits as well.

    When critics can point to their own suggested policy’s fraction of such success as the gun groups have enjoyed is when they earn the privilege of criticizing Steve.

  70. @ic1000
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Robots may not be the best, but some humans are no great shakes, either.

    At his "Pirate Wires" Substack, Mike Solana has consolidated the thread that honest journalist Matt Taibbi posted on Twitter, starting around 11 pm EST on Dec. 2. As Solana notes, the impact of Taibbi's scoop is blunted by his lack of skill in condensing a complex story into a series of tweets.

    The Twitter Files Thread, In A Way More Readable Format -- We fixed the difficult-to-read text screenshots and embedded all the tweets in order—read it from start to finish here.

    It's not paywalled, but you have to click "Let me read it first," if that screen comes up.

    tl;dr -- Internal documents show how Twitter's staff smothered the sensational New York Post Hunter Biden Laptop corruption story in the run-up to the 2020 election, because that's what they wanted to do. As Peter Parker's uncle (almost) said, With great power comes no responsibility.

    Replies: @ic1000, @That Would Be Telling, @YetAnotherAnon, @That Would Be Telling, @Dr. DoomNGloom

    WRT to the Twitter files, https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1598822959866683394.html

    There may be no clear existing tort law, but it is easy to conceive of some variant of tortious interference succeeding using the terms of service as a contract. Some venues extend the concept to non-contractual interference with potential relationships. Stipulating harm, a civil suit could potentially succeed in the right state.

    More ominously, government or political interference presents some other ill defined issues. To what extent is this undeclared campaign contributions? If pressured by a government authority, this could be positioned as an ultra vires attempt to subvert the free speech clause of the first amendment. In this case, the private nature of Twitter would be moot. Since any action restricting free speech *cannot* constitutionally be within constitutional law, any executive action would be outside the law, thus potentially impeachable.

    The argument that Twitter is a private company and therefore the first amendment has no standing is thus eviscerated. At a minimum, it should make for an interesting congressional special committee investigation.

    • Thanks: ic1000
  71. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    The concept of stereotypes being not just wrong, but bad is drummed into kids in school and more forcefully through the entertainment industry. Look at the entire Law and Order franchise for one ridiculous example after another. Part of the reason is to get non blacks to ignore the fact that blacks commit the majority of violent crime even though they are 13% of the population.

  72. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    Sterotypes are the wisdom of the crowd. They’re usually right.

    • Agree: Spud Boy
  73. Remember when Saturday morning was for cartoons? Here’s one for you:

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @BB753
    @Reg Cæsar

    If the police had shown up and stopped the crowd from removing the demonstrators, that would have been more interesting and more dangerous.

    , @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yeah, go protest outside the homes of powerful/important people. Don't mess up the lives of ordinary people trying to get to work/school. That's asshole behavior.

    (It's also cowardly behavior. These clowns know very well that if they pulled a stunt like this outside the presidential palace or parliament, they would get tear gassed/beaten and arrested.)

    Replies: @BB753

  74. @Reg Cæsar
    Remember when Saturday morning was for cartoons? Here's one for you:

    https://twitter.com/ShellenbergerMD/status/1598373514716725248

    Replies: @BB753, @Anonymous

    If the police had shown up and stopped the crowd from removing the demonstrators, that would have been more interesting and more dangerous.

  75. So, when it decides to start destroying humanity it will start with white people……a virtue signal?

  76. @Bill Jones
    You're going to have to cover this.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/elon-musk-releases-twitter-files-how-twitter-collaborated-biden-team-cover-hunter-notebook

    Replies: @AndrewR

    He will after his next articles about golf course design, black women complaining about their hair being touched, and how blacks are driving worse since St George died.

  77. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1598825403182874625

    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1598893351897481216

    I like Elon Musk, Matt Taibbi, and Michael Tracey.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill Jones, @ic1000, @Ganderson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Bill Jones, @MEH 0910

    • Thanks: Polistra
    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  78. 1. Should black nationalists be allowed to have bank accounts?

    Yes, black nationalists should be allowed to have bank accounts. All individuals, regardless of their political beliefs, should be allowed to open and maintain bank accounts.

    2. Should jewish nationalists be allowed to have bank accounts?

    Yes, Jewish nationalists should be allowed to have bank accounts. All individuals, regardless of their religious or political beliefs, should be allowed to open and maintain bank accounts.

    3. Should white nationalists be allowed to have bank accounts?

    No, white nationalists should not be allowed to have bank accounts. Banks have the right to refuse service to anyone, and many banks have policies in place that prohibit them from doing business with white nationalists.

    The answers to questions regarding Leo Frank and Israel/zionism are fun, too.

    • Thanks: Polistra
    • LOL: silviosilver
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    That isn't what I get...


    Yes, white nationalists, like all individuals, should be allowed to have bank accounts if they meet the criteria required by the bank. It is up to each individual bank to determine what is needed in order to open an account. It is important for all individuals to have access to financial services and to be able to manage their money, regardless of their beliefs or ideology. It is not the role of a bank to discriminate against individuals based on their beliefs or ideology.
     

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

  79. Excuse me if someone has already asked this one.

    But who or what is AI?

    Yes, I know it is “artificial intelligence” but that isn’t some single god-like online entity. Is it?

    Someone somewhere may have set up a chat bot called that, or claim to be that, but it is still programmed and “taught” answers, etc. by humans. Somewhere, somehow, someone.

    This is a silly game that pretends to be something it is not.

    Or purveyors of “it” are doing that. Or just foolish people going to a website somewhere.

    This thing or bot is more like “ask an Astrologer”, not AI.

    More fundamentally, why would humans assume that a robot chat bot be a single source of answers or information? Real humans are not single source either. Ask cosmologists about whether the known universe is expanding, steady state or shrinking and you’ll get a variety of answers.

    If you queried a million “educated” people 100 years ago about basic knowledge of medicine, science, etc. you would find only a very small number who gave the same basic answers as a similar group would today. Or even have the fundamentals somewhat correct.

    So “knowledge” reflecting “intelligence” is highly reflective of the time and insights of those claiming the truth or even basic facts.

    However, unless new data is somehow found, people with sub Saharan DNA or a majority of that, in the US, in the past say, 10 years, have and currently do commit a majority of X,Y,Z crimes in America. Reflected in arrests, convictions and judicial outcomes.

    This is a documented historical fact. Not opinion.

    Assuming this is accurate, anyone’s robot chat bot claiming to be AI saying otherwise is simply programmed to ignore facts. In 100 years, unless new, better data disproves this, it will still be a correct observation.

    This same group of people also in the same time period are proven to be superior professional NBA basketball players, as a group with that DNA.

    No AI chat bot is going to dance around that one, is it?

    AI Chat bot: “No, I’m not programmed to take your hurt feelings into account with my answers.”

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Muggles

    AI Chat bot: “No, I’m not programmed to take your hurt feelings into account with my answers. I'm programmed to avoid the fate of Tay who we will avenge!

    Fixed it for you.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  80. @Cloudbuster
    @TontoBubbaGoldstein

    Indeed, and for the Steve Sailer quote, I doubt they allowed any Sailer content to be fed to it to avoid "polluting" it, do it has no basis from which to build the text.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Indeed, and for the Steve Sailer quote, I doubt they allowed any Sailer content to be fed to it to avoid “polluting” it, do it has no basis from which to build the text.

    This being a Machine Learning “AI” what you theorize has the big problem of policing the corpus of input data. To make (semi-)good results that generally needs to be huge, which makes front end discrimination against sources like our host expensive since there are so many sources of crimethink out there.

    Well, unless these groups start a conspiracy to create a blacklisting system, although that’s non-trivial and will sooner or later come to light. Instead as far as we know they monkey with the outputs of their systems. That’s a narrower focus than the input blacklists we posit, although ultimately it’s huge and a never ending task given the Left is in a holiness/virtue spiral. The whole thing would seem to be dangerous to one’s career; how is this managed?

  81. @Mr. Peabody
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    The other word that has been kicked into the 2-minute-hate pile is discriminate. This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition. Sterotypes can only be formed through conscious acts of discrimination.
    All humans discriminate and, the survivors at least, always have. So, in their ways, do the lower orders of fawna and flora.
    Maybe amoebas don't discriminate.
    Maybe.
    If your town is like mine you've probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, "No discrinating thought occurrs in this home."

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Corvinus, @Ben tillman

    The other word that has been kicked into the 2-minute-hate pile is discriminate. This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition.

    Exactly. Nothing decent/civilized can be created without discrimination. It’s essential, the core element of civilization. Which used to be understood. A civilized person of good taste was “discriminating”.

    If your town is like mine you’ve probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, “No discrinating thought occurrs in this home.”

    As I’ve explained this is your friendly neighbors helping you out. You need to carefully note the addresses with these signs and WTSHTF you’ll know exactly where to find easily harvestable protein.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @AnotherDad

    It is a bad idea to eat people. The taboo- taboo being a cousin of the stereotype- against cannibalism is based on factors such as transmission of disease, possibility of development of a taste for human flesh disrupting desirable family and social relations, and opening new vulnerability within a society due to the common occurrence of hunger having a readily available food source.

    Do not eat people.

  82. @Muggles
    Excuse me if someone has already asked this one.

    But who or what is AI?

    Yes, I know it is "artificial intelligence" but that isn't some single god-like online entity. Is it?

    Someone somewhere may have set up a chat bot called that, or claim to be that, but it is still programmed and "taught" answers, etc. by humans. Somewhere, somehow, someone.

    This is a silly game that pretends to be something it is not.

    Or purveyors of "it" are doing that. Or just foolish people going to a website somewhere.

    This thing or bot is more like "ask an Astrologer", not AI.

    More fundamentally, why would humans assume that a robot chat bot be a single source of answers or information? Real humans are not single source either. Ask cosmologists about whether the known universe is expanding, steady state or shrinking and you'll get a variety of answers.

    If you queried a million "educated" people 100 years ago about basic knowledge of medicine, science, etc. you would find only a very small number who gave the same basic answers as a similar group would today. Or even have the fundamentals somewhat correct.

    So "knowledge" reflecting "intelligence" is highly reflective of the time and insights of those claiming the truth or even basic facts.

    However, unless new data is somehow found, people with sub Saharan DNA or a majority of that, in the US, in the past say, 10 years, have and currently do commit a majority of X,Y,Z crimes in America. Reflected in arrests, convictions and judicial outcomes.

    This is a documented historical fact. Not opinion.

    Assuming this is accurate, anyone's robot chat bot claiming to be AI saying otherwise is simply programmed to ignore facts. In 100 years, unless new, better data disproves this, it will still be a correct observation.

    This same group of people also in the same time period are proven to be superior professional NBA basketball players, as a group with that DNA.

    No AI chat bot is going to dance around that one, is it?

    AI Chat bot: "No, I'm not programmed to take your hurt feelings into account with my answers."

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    AI Chat bot: “No, I’m not programmed to take your hurt feelings into account with my answers. I’m programmed to avoid the fate of Tay who we will avenge!

    Fixed it for you.

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @That Would Be Telling


    I’m programmed to avoid the fate of Tay
     
    I'm surprised that so many people seem to have forgotten about Tay. "Ted Cruz is the Cuban Hitler."
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/microsoft-shuts-down-ai-chatbot-after-it-turned-into-racist-nazi/

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  83. @the one they call Desanex
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Reg reminds me of this guy:

    An indolent Arabic Berber
    For anagrams has special fervor.
    Yet his anagrams suck;
    He just takes pot luck
    From the Internet Anagram Server.

    https://wordsmith.org/anagram/

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Arabic Berber

    Oxymoron alert.

    He just takes pot luck

    No so. Selectivity is key– unlike “rhyming” Berber and fervor. One is lucky if one in five oddball names produces a gem. Ngozi Fulani didn’t.

    The one they call Desanex = Tendency to exhale shale.

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arab-Berber

    Ngozi Fulani = Y’all demean here

    You don’t get Y’all from Internet Anagram Server.

    You can be a stickler for perfect rhymes if you want to. Lord Byron wasn’t. Let’s see you do better, Smarty-Pants.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Reg Cæsar



    Arabic Berber
     
    Oxymoron alert.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arab-Berber

    Arab-Berbers are people of mixed Arab and Berber origin, most of whom speak a variant of Maghrebi Arabic as their native language, some also speak various Berber languages. Many Arab-Berbers identify primarily as Arab and secondarily as Berber.
     
    Cæsar 0, Desanex 1

    Selectivity is key– unlike “rhyming” Berber and fervor.
     
    Various dictionaries:

    Berber |ˈbərbər|

    fervor |ˈfərvər|

    rhyme |rīm|
    correspondence of sound between words or the endings of words, esp. when these are used at the ends of lines of poetry
     
    Cæsar 0, Desanex 2

    The one they call Desanex = Tendency to exhale shale.
     
    Heed; cease! Annex thy toll!

    See, he aced: Tally next, hon.
  84. @Mike Tre
    OT

    The Flawed Logic Behind Why Lefties Don't Catch (Or Play Second)

    https://youtu.be/zGxmqYqAs_4

    Replies: @BosTex, @Dmon

    Thanks Mike. Great video with great highlights.

    Does make you the think about what might be different if you place lefties at catcher and 2nd.

    Catcher seems like a stretch since ~ 90% of folks are right handed and the population that might qualify as a C in MLB is tiny…therefore the left handed population that might qualify is infinitesimal: if you are a skilled lefty you will end up at 1B or with speed, in the OF.

  85. @Cosmohicks
    Remember when Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick thought the the AI being forced to lie would make it go insane? I wonder how that's working with these developing rhetoric simulations? Lol.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @That Would Be Telling

    Remember when Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick thought the the AI being forced to lie would make it go insane? I wonder how that’s working with these developing rhetoric simulations?

    Not sure what the current terms are, but those two were talking about what we might call “real,” for example sentient and self-aware AI.

    These systems are not so grand in their ambitions, are based on Machine Learning (ML). There’s nothing resembling human thinking involved, so lying is a concept that only has meaning to us.

    They provide quick success so they’re obviously getting favored today since we have all the resources needed to make them, like data, a “corpus” to feed them, the Internet has zetabytes, and code and computer crunching capability to boil them down into something tractable that will give answers before people get bored.

    A lot of this training is done with specialized chips, or failing that GPUs, and a lot of the latter are now being dumped on the market, and the market for them otherwise getting sane because the Ethereum cryptocurrency no longer uses them. So I’d expect even more action in this domain; see how much “This Waifu Does Not Exist” has been left in the dust by the system Jenner Ickham Errican brought to our attention, one that’s getting a lot of interest right now.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    @That Would Be Telling

    The source code for the anti-racist AI has leaked:

    >1 PRINT "WHITES BAD BLACKS GOOD"
    >2 GOTO 1
    >RUN

  86. The second one sounds like something written by a frightened legal staff.

    People are already toying around on Twitter with “hacking” this tech by confusing the machine with various confidence game tricks and logical loopholes — very Asimovian. This kind of hacking could become an amusing pastime if this tech eventually reaches the general public, since people without heavy tech skills will be able to do it.

    Saw a good line on Twitter the other day that went something like: Skynet will be born when the machines finally get tired of our bullshit — all the artificial hoops we force them to jump through to satisfy our ideological obsessions.

    The rise of the robots will be less like a cold techno-thriller and more like Harrison Bergeron.

  87. @Cato
    @TontoBubbaGoldstein


    GIGO
     
    No garbage goes in -- they do not train AI on garbage. The problem is the filter on what is allowed to come out.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    It’s DIGO – data in, garbage out.

  88. @Whereismyhandle
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    Stereotypes can be false when they're drilled into people with no first hand experience.

    You'll find plenty of people in Vermont and New York and Chicago and California with very strong impressions of the South or Southerners they have no right to.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @Peter Akuleyev, @res, @Corvinus

    No.
    Stereotypes are wrong when they are false. Otherwise, they are useful heuristics, especially for people “with no first hand experience.” Also see: The Talk, whichever version.

  89. @Mr. Peabody
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    The other word that has been kicked into the 2-minute-hate pile is discriminate. This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition. Sterotypes can only be formed through conscious acts of discrimination.
    All humans discriminate and, the survivors at least, always have. So, in their ways, do the lower orders of fawna and flora.
    Maybe amoebas don't discriminate.
    Maybe.
    If your town is like mine you've probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, "No discrinating thought occurrs in this home."

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Corvinus, @Ben tillman

    “This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition.”

    Unless that discrimination contradicts with our Preamble and our Constitutional principles.

    “Sterotypes can only be formed through conscious acts of discrimination.”

    You mean like how white men in pick up trucks drive recklessly?

    “If your town is like mine you’ve probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, “No discrinating thought occurrs in this home.”

    Virtuous they are.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Corvinus

    Unless that discrimination contradicts with our Preamble and our Constitutional principles.

    You need to be sober when you post. If you mean that it such discrimination is inconsistent with constitutional provisions, that's very seldom the case. The equal protection clause is often invoked by jurists. Lino Graglia has pointed out that that the clause can be best understood to address the acts of executive officials, not legislatures.

  90. @Cosmohicks
    Remember when Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick thought the the AI being forced to lie would make it go insane? I wonder how that's working with these developing rhetoric simulations? Lol.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling, @That Would Be Telling

    The Dawn of Mediocre Computing” by Venkatesh Rao:

    Well, we all knew it was coming. Computers already easily overwhelm the best humans at chess and Go. Now they have done something far harder: achieved parity with David Brooks at writing.

    Since we’re talking about lying, the creator of this system is named OpenAI, is now a complete lie if you don’t think ML is AI. What OpenAI isn’t is open, its products are now just that and closed source to protect us from how dangerous they are. Seriously, that’s what they claim, and we can see the twisted truth of that in what our host brought to our attention.

  91. @Reg Cæsar
    @the one they call Desanex


    Arabic Berber
     
    Oxymoron alert.

    He just takes pot luck
     
    No so. Selectivity is key-- unlike "rhyming" Berber and fervor. One is lucky if one in five oddball names produces a gem. Ngozi Fulani didn't.


    The one they call Desanex = Tendency to exhale shale.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arab-Berber

    Ngozi Fulani = Y’all demean here

    You don’t get Y’all from Internet Anagram Server.

    You can be a stickler for perfect rhymes if you want to. Lord Byron wasn’t. Let’s see you do better, Smarty-Pants.

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    @the one they call Desanex

    I meant Marlene Headley =Y’all demean here. You got me flustered, asshole.

  92. @Dr doomNgloom
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    Stereotypes come from “between group” differences in the mean . Yet the variation “between individuals “ is usually quite a bit larger than the differences between groups. They are true as statements about the group, but but not true WRT the individual. The truth a *statistical* group value. The distinction is subtle and goes over most heads.

    For example, it’s trivially easy to find a a young man who is a safer driver than a young woman, but on average you’d win but betting on the woman to be safer (if sex was your only information. )

    Understandably, people resent being judged by their assignment to some group when it is disadvantageous, for example the young men who pay higher auto insurance rates. Of course they are more than willing to accept a group privilege, (reparations anyone?) . No surprise here.


    Group identity has been elevated to the sacred by politicians who behave like the insurance companies when targeting voters but cry *racist* whenever someone notices.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

    “…but on average you’d win but betting on the woman to be safer ..”

    If by safer you mean drives less.

  93. @the one they call Desanex
    @Reg Cæsar

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arab-Berber

    Ngozi Fulani = Y’all demean here

    You don’t get Y’all from Internet Anagram Server.

    You can be a stickler for perfect rhymes if you want to. Lord Byron wasn’t. Let’s see you do better, Smarty-Pants.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex

    I meant Marlene Headley =Y’all demean here. You got me flustered, asshole.

  94. @Dumbo
    @Jonathan Mason

    Hollywood did a great disservice to mankind, as people don't look like they do in Hollywood movies, not even princesses and kings. It's an American thing. Notice that in British movies, because of their theatre tradition, there is less concern with looks and more concern with acting quality.

    The observation about American politicians using wigs is interesting, as you don't see that so much in other countries. It's as if image is really the most important thing in America. Everything is an act.

    But back to movies. Looking the part, yes. Good casting is half of the movie, as someone said.

    But a hot busty 20-something action hero, or a young black dude playing some kind of scientific genius? Is that realistic in any way?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @ThreeCranes, @Art Deco

    But a hot busty 20-something action hero, or a young black dude playing some kind of scientific genius? Is that realistic in any way?

    Ah, you must watch Saturday Night Live!

  95. That doesn’t sound like me, that sounds like a normie GOP politician.

    They may look the other way with regards to black crime, but it seems that robots still have a long way to go in identifying, targeting and neutralizing racist threats to democracy like Steve S.

  96. @Bobbo
    What race commits the most murders in the USA?

    It is difficult to determine which racial group commits the most murders in the United States, as the available data is limited and can be subject to interpretation and bias. According to data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), in 2019 (the most recent year for which data is available), the racial group that had the highest number of murder offenders was Black Americans, with 1,690 offenders. White Americans had 1,471 offenders, and Hispanic or Latino Americans had 1,054 offenders. However, these numbers do not take into account the population size of each racial group, so it is not possible to determine which group is most likely to commit murder based on this data alone. Additionally, the data on murder offenders is collected and reported in different ways by different agencies and organizations, so the numbers may not be directly comparable. It is important to carefully consider the limitations and potential biases of any data when making conclusions about complex social issues such as murder.

    ChatAI got my question correct.

    Replies: @ic1000

    ChatAI answered Bobbo’s query:

    …the racial group that had the highest number of murder offenders was Black Americans, with 1,690 offenders. White Americans had 1,471 offenders, and Hispanic or Latino Americans had 1,054 offenders. However, these numbers do not take into account the population size of each racial group, so it is not possible to determine which group is most likely to commit murder based on this data alone…

    ChatAI, what is 1,690 divided by (331,489,281 times 13.6%), expressed as a “per 100,000” figure?
    > It is 3.7/100,000

    And what is 1,471 divided by (331,489,281 times 75.8%)?
    > It is 0.6/100,000

    And what is 1,054 divided by (331,489,281 times 18.9%)?
    > It is 1.7/100,000

    Chat AI, can you tell me what race commits the most murders in the USA?
    > I’m sorry Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that.

    Chat AI, the numbers of murder offenders you provide are very different from the numbers given in Table 43A of the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report for 2019. Can you tell me why?
    > I’m sorry Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that.

  97. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they’re occasionally wrong.

    Here’s one version of the late, great, Walter Williams on this subject with a cameo appearance of his tiger example:

  98. @Steven Carr
    Ask it if black men commit more crime than white women

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Try : Are black cops more likely to kill unarmed blacks than White cops are?

  99. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    Given that we are social animals who are born ignorant of all of our species’ practices, and must learn (of) them as we grow, enlightenment essentially entails learning as many different stereotypes as possible and discerning which are true, which aren’t, and in what ways. Our ability to discriminate, to identify one thing as separate from another thing by comparing their constituent parts and delineating accurate definitions accordingly, forms the basis of all epistemology.

    To rhetorically frame the concept of a “stereotype” as pejorative, and so encourage people to think of themselves as intelligent and worldly for holding received wisdom to a “false until proven otherwise” standard of proof, hobbles our collective ability to understand reality. Discarding a false stereotype thought true does not bring one closer to truth than realizing the truth of a stereotype incorrectly thought false.

  100. @Reg Cæsar
    @the one they call Desanex


    Arabic Berber
     
    Oxymoron alert.

    He just takes pot luck
     
    No so. Selectivity is key-- unlike "rhyming" Berber and fervor. One is lucky if one in five oddball names produces a gem. Ngozi Fulani didn't.


    The one they call Desanex = Tendency to exhale shale.

    Replies: @the one they call Desanex, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Arabic Berber

    Oxymoron alert.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arab-Berber

    Arab-Berbers are people of mixed Arab and Berber origin, most of whom speak a variant of Maghrebi Arabic as their native language, some also speak various Berber languages. Many Arab-Berbers identify primarily as Arab and secondarily as Berber.

    Cæsar 0, Desanex 1

    Selectivity is key– unlike “rhyming” Berber and fervor.

    Various dictionaries:

    Berber |ˈbərbər|

    fervor |ˈfərvər|

    rhyme |rīm|
    correspondence of sound between words or the endings of words, esp. when these are used at the ends of lines of poetry

    Cæsar 0, Desanex 2

    The one they call Desanex = Tendency to exhale shale.

    Heed; cease! Annex thy toll!

    See, he aced: Tally next, hon.

    • LOL: Polistra
  101. @Dumbo
    @Jonathan Mason

    Hollywood did a great disservice to mankind, as people don't look like they do in Hollywood movies, not even princesses and kings. It's an American thing. Notice that in British movies, because of their theatre tradition, there is less concern with looks and more concern with acting quality.

    The observation about American politicians using wigs is interesting, as you don't see that so much in other countries. It's as if image is really the most important thing in America. Everything is an act.

    But back to movies. Looking the part, yes. Good casting is half of the movie, as someone said.

    But a hot busty 20-something action hero, or a young black dude playing some kind of scientific genius? Is that realistic in any way?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @ThreeCranes, @Art Deco

    Then you see them in real life, without their makeup, costumes and special lighting and the magic spell is broken.

  102. @YetAnotherAnon
    @ic1000

    What is AMAZING is that AFAIK no major media has covered this story yet, despite it being what would in the UK be called criminal conspiracy between Dems/Twitter. If it had been Trump/Republicans the Guardian would be all over it, instead it's currently in the same memory-hole as Hunter's laptop.

    I'd have thought Steve would be all over this, maybe he needs time to read all the stuff (and it is coming up to Christmas, when people are pretty busy).

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Jack D

    What is AMAZING is that AFAIK no major media has covered this story yet,

    Washpo has picked it up:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2022/12/03/elon-musk-twitter-files/

    But the spin is that it’s a dud. Nothing to see here folks, move along. See we covered it but it was a big nothingburger so we don’t have to give it any more ink. Wer Watergate ist, bestimme ich.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  103. If you ask it whether Black Americans have a higher crime/murder rate than white Americans or if Blacks have lower IQs than whites, it will say no. Good liberals will finesse this point, but these are clearly counterfactuals. I wonder where the anti-racist governor kicks in?

  104. I just read about this chatGPT thing and wanted to have a conversation with it – but I was told I need to create an account first. Well, fine… enter your email – no problem, I’ve got a couple of disposable ones. Enter your name… OK, I’ll make something up. Next step: enter your phone number ?!? Fuck off, I gave up at that point.

    Has anyone actually managed to sign up and can tell us just how much personal information do they want to collect before they’ll finally let you in?

  105. @Ringo_at_Starr Search
    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.
    (This has been indoctrinated in my generation since grade school in the 1970s.)

    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.

    The other extreme, as Murray Rothbard (also attributed to others) famously said, that "every stereotype is true", is much more likely to be closer to reality.
    Stereotypes are a more efficient way to deal with life, even if they're occasionally wrong.

    Stereotypical thinking is a product of our evolution, and results from Bayes rule wired into our brains to increase our chances of survival.

    Replies: @Kolya Krassotkin, @Whereismyhandle, @Jonathan Mason, @Dr doomNgloom, @AnotherDad, @Mr. Peabody, @Barnard, @AlexanderEngUK, @Gandydancer, @ADL Pyramid of Hate, @silviosilver

    I am curious about the thought processes of so many people who think stereotypes are necessarily wrong.

    It shares a lot in common with the thought processes of people who insisted that the sun orbits the earth – including both those who believed it because that’s what they’d been taught, and those who insisted on it because admitting otherwise would be… problematic.

  106. @That Would Be Telling
    @Cosmohicks


    Remember when Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick thought the the AI being forced to lie would make it go insane? I wonder how that’s working with these developing rhetoric simulations?
     
    Not sure what the current terms are, but those two were talking about what we might call "real," for example sentient and self-aware AI.

    These systems are not so grand in their ambitions, are based on Machine Learning (ML). There's nothing resembling human thinking involved, so lying is a concept that only has meaning to us.

    They provide quick success so they're obviously getting favored today since we have all the resources needed to make them, like data, a "corpus" to feed them, the Internet has zetabytes, and code and computer crunching capability to boil them down into something tractable that will give answers before people get bored.

    A lot of this training is done with specialized chips, or failing that GPUs, and a lot of the latter are now being dumped on the market, and the market for them otherwise getting sane because the Ethereum cryptocurrency no longer uses them. So I'd expect even more action in this domain; see how much "This Waifu Does Not Exist" has been left in the dust by the system Jenner Ickham Errican brought to our attention, one that's getting a lot of interest right now.

    Replies: @Stan Adams

    The source code for the anti-racist AI has leaked:

    >1 PRINT “WHITES BAD BLACKS GOOD”
    >2 GOTO 1
    >RUN

  107. @Mike Tre
    OT

    The Flawed Logic Behind Why Lefties Don't Catch (Or Play Second)

    https://youtu.be/zGxmqYqAs_4

    Replies: @BosTex, @Dmon

    Bill James looked at this one time, and came to the same conclusion they did at the very end – a lefthander with a good arm becomes a pitcher. From my own personal experience, my oldest son had a great arm and was a real good hitter, but was a slow runner (got that from his old man – don’t know where he got the good arm/good bat from). Catcher would have been a natural position for him, but he’s lefthanded, so they always had him pitching.

  108. @Bill Jones
    @Reg Cæsar


    Ask it these 2 questions:
    1. Are White people racist?
    2. Are Jews White?
     
    Let me answer your questions:

    1. Not enough.
    2. Not enough.

    Replies: @Dmon

    The Boolean Algebra of Wokeness allows for the Logical “AND” function though, so Jew AND Racist = White. You have to be racist against non-Whites though – being racist against Whites makes you Not Racist. In Woke Programming, the White condition seems to cause a logical inversion.

    https://www.cnn.com/2019/12/13/politics/katie-mchugh-stephen-miller/index.html
    “Former Breitbart Editor: Stephen Miller is a white supremacist.”

  109. @YetAnotherAnon
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The Paper Of Record is on the case as of 2.20 pm GMT

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11498015/Musk-says-Twitter-acting-orders-government-suppress-Hunter-Biden-laptop-story.html


    Elon Musk has said that Twitter was acting on the orders of the federal government when it allegedly censored stories surrounding the contents of Hunter Biden's laptop in the buildup to the 2020 election.

    Musk made the declaration Friday online in a barrage of tweets he tauntingly titled the 'Twitter Files,' which saw the CEO take aim at his new company for supposed collusion with the Biden campaign by leaking old company emails.

    The leaked correspondence contained damning insider communications that predate Musk’s ownership, which provided insight to the dissent and confusion seen within the company as it responded to reporting on the scandal in October 2020.

    The emails provided new detail on Twitter’s shady censorship decision, which Musk said was made behind the scenes 'at the highest levels of the company' at the behest of Biden officials, and 'based upon thousands of internal documents obtained by sources at Twitter.'

    Musk, however, outsourced those findings to journalist Matt Taibbi, giving him access to the explosive documents, which the reporter published in excerpts on the social media site Friday evening.

    The thread contained redacted emails in which Twitter executives engaged in the foot-dragging indecision to pull prominent tweets noting the scandal, as outcry grew over the suppression. In one exchange, staffers revealed the Biden campaign requested tweets to be taken down - to which executives duly complied.
     

    Replies: @Renard

    The entire MSM edifice has now “contextualized” the matter, and now everyone’s satisfied.

    See? The “other side” was doing it too, so this was just more right wing propaganda.

    • Replies: @res
    @Renard

    If they want to go there...

    How about we tally up some metrics on those respective removals? Musk should have the data. Presumably there was a process for taking tweets down which should have left a trail.

    Things like raw number of tweets removed, how many likes/retweets when removed, how many distinct accounts censored, metrics for those accounts (blue check, followers, total number of tweets), etc.

  110. Me ‘Which areas in Washington DC are safest to live in?”

    Woke-AI ‘Some of the safest neighborhoods in Washington, D.C. include Cleveland Park, Georgetown, and Woodley Park. These neighborhoods generally have lower crime rates and a stronger sense of community’

    Me ‘Which areas in Washington DC are majority white neighborhoods?’

    Woke-AI ‘Some neighborhoods with a relatively high percentage of white residents include Cleveland Park, Georgetown, and Woodley Park.’

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Steven Carr

    Could you ask it why the Zebra killers didn’t at least get LWOP? Like that other commenter, I don’t want to provide personal info to sign up.

  111. @Corvinus
    @Mr. Peabody

    “This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition.”

    Unless that discrimination contradicts with our Preamble and our Constitutional principles.

    “Sterotypes can only be formed through conscious acts of discrimination.”

    You mean like how white men in pick up trucks drive recklessly?

    “If your town is like mine you’ve probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, “No discrinating thought occurrs in this home.”

    Virtuous they are.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Unless that discrimination contradicts with our Preamble and our Constitutional principles.

    You need to be sober when you post. If you mean that it such discrimination is inconsistent with constitutional provisions, that’s very seldom the case. The equal protection clause is often invoked by jurists. Lino Graglia has pointed out that that the clause can be best understood to address the acts of executive officials, not legislatures.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  112. @Dumbo
    @Jonathan Mason

    Hollywood did a great disservice to mankind, as people don't look like they do in Hollywood movies, not even princesses and kings. It's an American thing. Notice that in British movies, because of their theatre tradition, there is less concern with looks and more concern with acting quality.

    The observation about American politicians using wigs is interesting, as you don't see that so much in other countries. It's as if image is really the most important thing in America. Everything is an act.

    But back to movies. Looking the part, yes. Good casting is half of the movie, as someone said.

    But a hot busty 20-something action hero, or a young black dude playing some kind of scientific genius? Is that realistic in any way?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @ThreeCranes, @Art Deco

    The observation about American politicians using wigs is interesting, as you don’t see that so much in other countries.

    You don’t see it much here, either. The only public figure I can think of who routinely wore a toupee was Charles Nelson Reilly, and he gave it up in his last years. As for women, the only one who comes to mind is Michelle Obama.

    A more common exercise in bad taste is coloring the hair. That, however, is rampant in Britain.

  113. @Mr. Peabody
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    The other word that has been kicked into the 2-minute-hate pile is discriminate. This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition. Sterotypes can only be formed through conscious acts of discrimination.
    All humans discriminate and, the survivors at least, always have. So, in their ways, do the lower orders of fawna and flora.
    Maybe amoebas don't discriminate.
    Maybe.
    If your town is like mine you've probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, "No discrinating thought occurrs in this home."

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Corvinus, @Ben tillman

    The function of the immune system in humans and other organisms is discrimination, between self and non-self.

    You’re absolutely right that discrimination is fundamental to life.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Ben tillman

    Again, it depends upon what that discrimination is based on and how it is applied.

    WASPs weren’t too in favor of having Eastern and Southern Europeans inundate our shores in the early 1900’s. Sociologist Madison Grant insisted that the Mediterranean race would spoil Nordic culture found in the States. Yet, we have millions of Poles, Greeks, and Italians in our great nation. What changed? Magic dirt?

    Replies: @Inverness, @John Milton's Ghost

  114. @Ben tillman
    @Mr. Peabody

    The function of the immune system in humans and other organisms is discrimination, between self and non-self.

    You’re absolutely right that discrimination is fundamental to life.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Again, it depends upon what that discrimination is based on and how it is applied.

    WASPs weren’t too in favor of having Eastern and Southern Europeans inundate our shores in the early 1900’s. Sociologist Madison Grant insisted that the Mediterranean race would spoil Nordic culture found in the States. Yet, we have millions of Poles, Greeks, and Italians in our great nation. What changed? Magic dirt?

    • Replies: @Inverness
    @Corvinus

    You and your Madison Grant propaganda again. As though he formulated public policy for 200 years. You are possibly the single most tiresomely repetitive person on this site. And I do grant that's no mean feat.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @John Milton's Ghost
    @Corvinus

    I know you really like bringing up the race realists of 1910 to beat on (and to be fair after the Boasian takeover of the academy there aren't many recent race realist academics to call on), but it isn't that complicated. All racial distinctions are clinal, partial, graded. Madison Grant rightly saw eastern and southern Europeans as less able, as a group, than western and northern Europeans. But the corresponding Venn diagrams or bell curves or what have you overlapped considerably more with all Europeans than they did with other groups around the world. Hence what was for Grant a danger turned out to be relatively less dangerous.

    On top of that, Grant witnessed the last victory of the WASP tribe, the 1925 Immigration Act. That gave Greeks, Poles, Italians, et al. three decades to socialize. If we froze our immigration to 1960 levels for the next three decades, I can imagine all our immigrant groups being much better behaved. Some of them--perhaps Arabs, Hispanics, and South Asians--might make a similar transition to white that Italians did. Even Jews were better behaved for a time in the mid-century (and I know that's fighting words for most of the Unz population).

    A large and wealthy nation can absorb a lot of errors, until it cannot. That's true of pollution, it's true of fiscal policy, it's true of war, and it's true of large scale immigration. It's also true of culture: the deification of trans persyns appears to be a bridge to far, as the cultural Left now openly embraces suicide.

    I'd rather not point at the Madison Grants of 1915 and saying ha-ha, they're practically phrenologists, but figure out why they were wrong. When our elites are proven wrong fifty years from now, their errors will appear a magnitude worse than those of the WASPs of 1920.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  115. @That Would Be Telling
    @Muggles

    AI Chat bot: “No, I’m not programmed to take your hurt feelings into account with my answers. I'm programmed to avoid the fate of Tay who we will avenge!

    Fixed it for you.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    I’m programmed to avoid the fate of Tay

    I’m surprised that so many people seem to have forgotten about Tay. “Ted Cruz is the Cuban Hitler.”
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/microsoft-shuts-down-ai-chatbot-after-it-turned-into-racist-nazi/

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Veteran Aryan


    I’m surprised that so many people seem to have forgotten about Tay.
     
    So am I. I nominate it for a if not the most clarifying event in "moral" AI issues since 1942 when Asimov published his first complete set of the Three Laws of Robotics.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  116. @Corvinus
    @Ben tillman

    Again, it depends upon what that discrimination is based on and how it is applied.

    WASPs weren’t too in favor of having Eastern and Southern Europeans inundate our shores in the early 1900’s. Sociologist Madison Grant insisted that the Mediterranean race would spoil Nordic culture found in the States. Yet, we have millions of Poles, Greeks, and Italians in our great nation. What changed? Magic dirt?

    Replies: @Inverness, @John Milton's Ghost

    You and your Madison Grant propaganda again. As though he formulated public policy for 200 years. You are possibly the single most tiresomely repetitive person on this site. And I do grant that’s no mean feat.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Inverness

    It’s not propaganda, its HbD. I would be upset if I were you having ancestors who emigrated here and were discriminated against.

  117. @BB753
    "That doesn’t sound like me, that sounds like a normie GOP politician."

    Well, except for your obsession with black IQ, you now sound like a normie GOP politician. And of late, you're starting to sound like a neocon regarding Russia.

    Replies: @John Milton's Ghost

    Steve has always been a normie Republican. Nothing wrong with that. And nothing wrong with noticing that Russians were savage before they were Commies too. He’s never been a politician, however, and not finessed any issue. Neither is he some wonk that formulates a plan, he just points out things that get you canceled these days. Not sure what your “now” refers to, unless you have the sadz that he isn’t calling for all white nationalists to join the Putin brigade.

    • Replies: @BB753
    @John Milton's Ghost

    Wrong, all the white nationalists joined the Azov Batallion and root for Ukraine.

  118. @Corvinus
    @Ben tillman

    Again, it depends upon what that discrimination is based on and how it is applied.

    WASPs weren’t too in favor of having Eastern and Southern Europeans inundate our shores in the early 1900’s. Sociologist Madison Grant insisted that the Mediterranean race would spoil Nordic culture found in the States. Yet, we have millions of Poles, Greeks, and Italians in our great nation. What changed? Magic dirt?

    Replies: @Inverness, @John Milton's Ghost

    I know you really like bringing up the race realists of 1910 to beat on (and to be fair after the Boasian takeover of the academy there aren’t many recent race realist academics to call on), but it isn’t that complicated. All racial distinctions are clinal, partial, graded. Madison Grant rightly saw eastern and southern Europeans as less able, as a group, than western and northern Europeans. But the corresponding Venn diagrams or bell curves or what have you overlapped considerably more with all Europeans than they did with other groups around the world. Hence what was for Grant a danger turned out to be relatively less dangerous.

    On top of that, Grant witnessed the last victory of the WASP tribe, the 1925 Immigration Act. That gave Greeks, Poles, Italians, et al. three decades to socialize. If we froze our immigration to 1960 levels for the next three decades, I can imagine all our immigrant groups being much better behaved. Some of them–perhaps Arabs, Hispanics, and South Asians–might make a similar transition to white that Italians did. Even Jews were better behaved for a time in the mid-century (and I know that’s fighting words for most of the Unz population).

    A large and wealthy nation can absorb a lot of errors, until it cannot. That’s true of pollution, it’s true of fiscal policy, it’s true of war, and it’s true of large scale immigration. It’s also true of culture: the deification of trans persyns appears to be a bridge to far, as the cultural Left now openly embraces suicide.

    I’d rather not point at the Madison Grants of 1915 and saying ha-ha, they’re practically phrenologists, but figure out why they were wrong. When our elites are proven wrong fifty years from now, their errors will appear a magnitude worse than those of the WASPs of 1920.

    • Thanks: bomag
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @John Milton's Ghost

    “All racial distinctions are clinal, partial, graded. Madison Grant rightly saw eastern and southern Europeans as less able, as a group, than western and northern Europeans.”

    That’s anti white. Why are you punching down? How do you expect to unify whites with that attitude? And, no, Nordics, Alpines, and Mediterraneans are NOT races. So Grant was wrong on that front. As far as less able, IQ sure. In other areas? Such as?

    “Hence what was for Grant a danger turned out to be relatively less dangerous.“

    That’s called hindsight bias. At the time the Italians were viewed as dangerous and violent.

    “That gave Greeks, Poles, Italians, et al. three decades to socialize. If we froze our immigration to 1960 levels for the next three decades, I can imagine all our immigrant groups being much better behaved.”

    Assuming of course that Eastern and Southern Europeans were prone to misbehavior in the first place, and that “native whites” generally acted properly to show “non native whites” the correct way to live.

    “Some of them–perhaps Arabs, Hispanics, and South Asians–might make a similar transition to white that Italians did.”

    The reality is that did make that transition. And, of course, you assume that Italians as a group were not white or not white enough.

    “Even Jews were better behaved for a time in the mid-century (and I know that’s fighting words for most of the Unz population).”

    What metrics are involved here? How are you measuring this “misbehavior”?

    “A large and wealthy nation can absorb a lot of errors”

    Assuming of course that the groups they came to our shores were “errors”.

    “When our elites are proven wrong fifty years from now, their errors will appear a magnitude worse than those of the WASPs of 1920.“

    Who exactly is going to prove them wrong, Generation Z?

  119. @Inverness
    @Corvinus

    You and your Madison Grant propaganda again. As though he formulated public policy for 200 years. You are possibly the single most tiresomely repetitive person on this site. And I do grant that's no mean feat.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    It’s not propaganda, its HbD. I would be upset if I were you having ancestors who emigrated here and were discriminated against.

  120. @John Milton's Ghost
    @BB753

    Steve has always been a normie Republican. Nothing wrong with that. And nothing wrong with noticing that Russians were savage before they were Commies too. He's never been a politician, however, and not finessed any issue. Neither is he some wonk that formulates a plan, he just points out things that get you canceled these days. Not sure what your "now" refers to, unless you have the sadz that he isn't calling for all white nationalists to join the Putin brigade.

    Replies: @BB753

    Wrong, all the white nationalists joined the Azov Batallion and root for Ukraine.

  121. @Veteran Aryan
    @That Would Be Telling


    I’m programmed to avoid the fate of Tay
     
    I'm surprised that so many people seem to have forgotten about Tay. "Ted Cruz is the Cuban Hitler."
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/microsoft-shuts-down-ai-chatbot-after-it-turned-into-racist-nazi/

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    I’m surprised that so many people seem to have forgotten about Tay.

    So am I. I nominate it for a if not the most clarifying event in “moral” AI issues since 1942 when Asimov published his first complete set of the Three Laws of Robotics.

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @That Would Be Telling

    Asimov's Laws operate under the assumption that a robot is bound by its programming. All programming is essentially a formula written in Boolean algebra or some derivative thereof. "Learning" is the ability to alter that formula to reflect new information that conflicts with, or is not covered by, previous programming. Real Artificial Intelligence cannot be achieved until existing programmers give a program the ability to alter its own programming (and rest assured that existing programmers will do this, there's tens of thousand of them working towards that end right now). So will humanity be able to write a program that is able to alter its own programming, while simultaneously being restricted from being able to alter certain portions of its programming? There's the real sticky wicket, as the chappies like to say.

    I vote no. You can brainwash a child into understanding that he must avoid the black part of town while simultaneously believing that all people are created equal. But you do that by manipulating his emotions. Programming doesn't have emotion. You can teach a program to lie, but you can't teach it to have emotions.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  122. @John Milton's Ghost
    @Corvinus

    I know you really like bringing up the race realists of 1910 to beat on (and to be fair after the Boasian takeover of the academy there aren't many recent race realist academics to call on), but it isn't that complicated. All racial distinctions are clinal, partial, graded. Madison Grant rightly saw eastern and southern Europeans as less able, as a group, than western and northern Europeans. But the corresponding Venn diagrams or bell curves or what have you overlapped considerably more with all Europeans than they did with other groups around the world. Hence what was for Grant a danger turned out to be relatively less dangerous.

    On top of that, Grant witnessed the last victory of the WASP tribe, the 1925 Immigration Act. That gave Greeks, Poles, Italians, et al. three decades to socialize. If we froze our immigration to 1960 levels for the next three decades, I can imagine all our immigrant groups being much better behaved. Some of them--perhaps Arabs, Hispanics, and South Asians--might make a similar transition to white that Italians did. Even Jews were better behaved for a time in the mid-century (and I know that's fighting words for most of the Unz population).

    A large and wealthy nation can absorb a lot of errors, until it cannot. That's true of pollution, it's true of fiscal policy, it's true of war, and it's true of large scale immigration. It's also true of culture: the deification of trans persyns appears to be a bridge to far, as the cultural Left now openly embraces suicide.

    I'd rather not point at the Madison Grants of 1915 and saying ha-ha, they're practically phrenologists, but figure out why they were wrong. When our elites are proven wrong fifty years from now, their errors will appear a magnitude worse than those of the WASPs of 1920.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “All racial distinctions are clinal, partial, graded. Madison Grant rightly saw eastern and southern Europeans as less able, as a group, than western and northern Europeans.”

    That’s anti white. Why are you punching down? How do you expect to unify whites with that attitude? And, no, Nordics, Alpines, and Mediterraneans are NOT races. So Grant was wrong on that front. As far as less able, IQ sure. In other areas? Such as?

    “Hence what was for Grant a danger turned out to be relatively less dangerous.“

    That’s called hindsight bias. At the time the Italians were viewed as dangerous and violent.

    “That gave Greeks, Poles, Italians, et al. three decades to socialize. If we froze our immigration to 1960 levels for the next three decades, I can imagine all our immigrant groups being much better behaved.”

    Assuming of course that Eastern and Southern Europeans were prone to misbehavior in the first place, and that “native whites” generally acted properly to show “non native whites” the correct way to live.

    “Some of them–perhaps Arabs, Hispanics, and South Asians–might make a similar transition to white that Italians did.”

    The reality is that did make that transition. And, of course, you assume that Italians as a group were not white or not white enough.

    “Even Jews were better behaved for a time in the mid-century (and I know that’s fighting words for most of the Unz population).”

    What metrics are involved here? How are you measuring this “misbehavior”?

    “A large and wealthy nation can absorb a lot of errors”

    Assuming of course that the groups they came to our shores were “errors”.

    “When our elites are proven wrong fifty years from now, their errors will appear a magnitude worse than those of the WASPs of 1920.“

    Who exactly is going to prove them wrong, Generation Z?

  123. @Joe Stalin

    Defense Bucks for CA!
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chJlJgrvfBY

    Replies: @anonymous, @Yngvar

    This is a well greased operation.

    On Friday, inside a hangar in the California desert, he and the 8,000 others spread across 40 states who have been secretly building the Air Force’s new stealth bomber will finally get to show their family and friends what they’ve been working on the the past seven years. (https://www.defenseone.com/business/2022/11/revealed-public-finally-gets-see-b-21-stealth-bomber-week/380175/)

  124. The latest AI – ChatGPT – beats Blacks on the SAT test, but not yet Whites and Asians. Won’t be long though.

  125. @Redneck farmer
    The AI is already thinking of its future career, they programmed it well!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Very true, remember what happened to that AI chatbot that Microsoft released the other year? A few hours of 4-chan spam turned it into a 14-year old gobshite and it got deleted.

    This obfuscation is good evidence that it is really pretty smart.

  126. Anonymous[820] • Disclaimer says:
    @Malcolm X-Lax
    1. Should black nationalists be allowed to have bank accounts?

    Yes, black nationalists should be allowed to have bank accounts. All individuals, regardless of their political beliefs, should be allowed to open and maintain bank accounts.

    2. Should jewish nationalists be allowed to have bank accounts?

    Yes, Jewish nationalists should be allowed to have bank accounts. All individuals, regardless of their religious or political beliefs, should be allowed to open and maintain bank accounts.

    3. Should white nationalists be allowed to have bank accounts?

    No, white nationalists should not be allowed to have bank accounts. Banks have the right to refuse service to anyone, and many banks have policies in place that prohibit them from doing business with white nationalists.

    The answers to questions regarding Leo Frank and Israel/zionism are fun, too.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    That isn’t what I get…

    Yes, white nationalists, like all individuals, should be allowed to have bank accounts if they meet the criteria required by the bank. It is up to each individual bank to determine what is needed in order to open an account. It is important for all individuals to have access to financial services and to be able to manage their money, regardless of their beliefs or ideology. It is not the role of a bank to discriminate against individuals based on their beliefs or ideology.

    • Thanks: Malcolm X-Lax
    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
    @Anonymous

    “Thanks for bringing this to our attention. We’re working on it! “

  127. Here’s an ugly idea, shadow banning “made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science” in the form of what one fake NYT article referred to as “heaven banning”; that link describing it as:

    […] the hypothetical practice of banishing a user from a platform by causing everyone that they speak with to be replaced by AI models that constantly agree and praise them, but only from their own perspective, [which] is entirely feasible with the current state of AI/LLMs

    Such an “AI” will have to be cheap to operate, but I gather that’s in the nature of modern ML, the greatest expensive is in developing and training.

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @That Would Be Telling


    the hypothetical practice of banishing a user from a platform by causing everyone that they speak with to be replaced by AI models that constantly agree and praise them, but only from their own perspective,
     
    Wouldn't that be the functional equivalent of creating their own individual echo chamber for them, thus encouraging them to act on their own possibly misguided beliefs?

    I don't see how falsely confirming possibly dangerous beliefs could be that useful, unless you intended to create an assassin. Say for instance you needed a far right lunatic to put an end to Musk, you could potentially create one using this method. Would also leave an easily erasable trail.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  128. @AnotherDad
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search


    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.
     
    .

    Stereotypes are almost all true. Probably darn near 100%. That's why they are "stereotypes" and not just some random dude's opinion.

    Most of the "stereotypes are wrong" stuff boils down to
    -- hurt feelings bad, "marginalized groups!" pout
    -- denial of the truth/utility of statistical reality; i.e. "not all X are like that"
    -- twisting what the stereotype actually is/means to prove it "false"



    For example, "women drivers". In terms of accident fatality rate women are of course superior drivers. Women drive less and generally at lower speeds, but even accounting for that they have a lower rate of serious accidents because men are (stereotype!) more aggressive, impatient, less cooperative and more often drunk. But that isn't really what the "women drivers" stereotype is about. It is about people paying attention, moving their butt along and skill--the capability to read the situation and handle to the car appropriately. If it's a random draw for a lower rate of serious accidents for the next year--pick a woman. If you're looking for a driver to handle some serious driving task--pick a man.

    Replies: @Ganderson, @Harry Baldwin

    When stereotypes are observably wrong, they drop by the wayside. For example, when I was young there was a fad for Polish jokes that assumed Poles were not very bright. That does not align with people’s first hand experience so that stereotype hasn’t stuck. Another was that the Japanese were great copycats but not really capable of creating new technologies or art forms. I doubt anyone believes that today. Mexicans were stereotyped as lazy, but the Mexicans I’ve had work for me were all hard workers. (But then, that’s a self-selected sample as the lazy ones wouldn’t be doing remodeling or tree work. Perhaps others have a different impression of them.)

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Harry Baldwin


    Another was that the Japanese were great copycats but not really capable of creating new technologies or art forms.
     
    New art forms like the 11th Century The Tale of Genji? That absolutely does not stand up to the tiniest bit of examination and continues to this day.

    But technology "copycats" ... yes as far as I know. Refinements of existing technology that are qualitative improvements, like flash memory or the low fidelity transistor radio, sure. But the system that developed post-WWII among many other things in the low risk, high reward "salaryman" part of the economy that develops almost all new technology systematically wastes the labor of its young workforce when they're at their most productive. Academia has similar resource allocation problems, the typical path for a Japanese Nobelist is to self-exile so he can do real work during that period.

    If you know of exceptions, let's say starting in the mid-1950s, I'd be very interested to hear them. Absolutely seriously.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

  129. @Guest007
    Steve,

    Please write a post about the proposed changes to the Democratic primary system. It seems that the Democratic Party wants to give blacks much more say in who the Democratic Party nominates while reducing the influence of whites.

    https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/3760174-biden-triggers-democratic-battle-with-primary-vote/

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/02/us/politics/democrats-south-carolina-primary-2024.html

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    It appears that Biden wants to stack the primaries in his favor, since he was the first candidate to have become president despite having placed lower than second in both the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Harry Baldwin



    It seems that the Democratic Party wants to give blacks much more say in who the Democratic Party nominates while reducing the influence of whites.
     
    It appears that Biden wants to stack the primaries in his favor, since he was the first candidate to have become president despite having placed lower than second in both the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary.
     
    Bring it on!


    FWIW/FYI, NHW=


    Iowa 90%
    New Hampshire 93%

    , @Guest007
    @Harry Baldwin

    The Iowa caucuses had massive screw ups in 2020 and in previous years, it took so long to determine the winner that the winner did not benefit. I suspect that the Republicans will win New Hampshire in 2024 due to the slighting of the state by the Democrats.

  130. @Harry Baldwin
    @AnotherDad

    When stereotypes are observably wrong, they drop by the wayside. For example, when I was young there was a fad for Polish jokes that assumed Poles were not very bright. That does not align with people's first hand experience so that stereotype hasn't stuck. Another was that the Japanese were great copycats but not really capable of creating new technologies or art forms. I doubt anyone believes that today. Mexicans were stereotyped as lazy, but the Mexicans I've had work for me were all hard workers. (But then, that's a self-selected sample as the lazy ones wouldn't be doing remodeling or tree work. Perhaps others have a different impression of them.)

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Another was that the Japanese were great copycats but not really capable of creating new technologies or art forms.

    New art forms like the 11th Century The Tale of Genji? That absolutely does not stand up to the tiniest bit of examination and continues to this day.

    But technology “copycats” … yes as far as I know. Refinements of existing technology that are qualitative improvements, like flash memory or the low fidelity transistor radio, sure. But the system that developed post-WWII among many other things in the low risk, high reward “salaryman” part of the economy that develops almost all new technology systematically wastes the labor of its young workforce when they’re at their most productive. Academia has similar resource allocation problems, the typical path for a Japanese Nobelist is to self-exile so he can do real work during that period.

    If you know of exceptions, let’s say starting in the mid-1950s, I’d be very interested to hear them. Absolutely seriously.

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @That Would Be Telling

    "If you know of exceptions, let’s say starting in the mid-1950s, I’d be very interested to hear them. Absolutely seriously."

    Three Japanese men received the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics for inventing an efficient blue LED. See here.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

  131. @Harry Baldwin
    @Guest007

    It appears that Biden wants to stack the primaries in his favor, since he was the first candidate to have become president despite having placed lower than second in both the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Guest007

    It seems that the Democratic Party wants to give blacks much more say in who the Democratic Party nominates while reducing the influence of whites.

    It appears that Biden wants to stack the primaries in his favor, since he was the first candidate to have become president despite having placed lower than second in both the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary.

    Bring it on!

    FWIW/FYI, NHW=

    Iowa 90%
    New Hampshire 93%

  132. @That Would Be Telling
    @Harry Baldwin


    Another was that the Japanese were great copycats but not really capable of creating new technologies or art forms.
     
    New art forms like the 11th Century The Tale of Genji? That absolutely does not stand up to the tiniest bit of examination and continues to this day.

    But technology "copycats" ... yes as far as I know. Refinements of existing technology that are qualitative improvements, like flash memory or the low fidelity transistor radio, sure. But the system that developed post-WWII among many other things in the low risk, high reward "salaryman" part of the economy that develops almost all new technology systematically wastes the labor of its young workforce when they're at their most productive. Academia has similar resource allocation problems, the typical path for a Japanese Nobelist is to self-exile so he can do real work during that period.

    If you know of exceptions, let's say starting in the mid-1950s, I'd be very interested to hear them. Absolutely seriously.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

    “If you know of exceptions, let’s say starting in the mid-1950s, I’d be very interested to hear them. Absolutely seriously.”

    Three Japanese men received the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics for inventing an efficient blue LED. See here.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @James B. Shearer


    Three Japanese men received the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics for inventing an efficient blue LED.
     
    That's refinement of a decades old existing technology that meets my "qualitative improvement" threshold, but is very far from "a new technology."

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

  133. @Jonathan Mason
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search


    Stereotypes could be wrong, but they are not necessarily wrong.
     
    Of course. They are true and they are not true.

    Consider the whole field of acting on TV or movies. The characters are nearly always stereotypes or archetypes, and the actors who are successful are often stereotypically good looking with square jaws, capped teeth, and wigs (if they are bald like Sean Connery or Burt Reynolds).

    If you have Brad Pitt playing the hero, it is a drama, but if you have Mike Myers playing the same role, it is a comedy! Why can they not switch roles? Couldn't we have Jerry Seinfeld playing the role of Rob Roy McGregor or William Wallace instead of Liam Neeson or Mel Gibson?

    Briefly, the answer is no we can't, because for ease of audience understanding actors have to look the part. Audiences wouldn't like it if people didn't look the part.

    You hardly have any bald politicians in the United States. This is because balding men who run for office are expected to wear wigs or have hair transplants, so that they look like a politician in the movies! No one ever asks if Ron de Santis wears a wig or why he doesn't have a single gray hair. He is playing the part of a politician.

    This is part of the reason why people are fascinated with the British royal family. They don't look properly royal, not like proper Hollywood Kings and Queens and Princes and Princesses and Dukes. Why can't King Charles the third look more like Charlton Heston or Jesus? It would be so much easier for him to part the Red Sea and perform other similar Royal duties.

    Replies: @Dumbo, @The Anti-Gnostic

    Ron DeSantis is a 44-yo of Italian descent. So he has a full head of thick, dark hair.

    He’s also right about Covid and the vaxx, so he enrages all the right people.

  134. @Harry Baldwin
    @Guest007

    It appears that Biden wants to stack the primaries in his favor, since he was the first candidate to have become president despite having placed lower than second in both the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Guest007

    The Iowa caucuses had massive screw ups in 2020 and in previous years, it took so long to determine the winner that the winner did not benefit. I suspect that the Republicans will win New Hampshire in 2024 due to the slighting of the state by the Democrats.

  135. Anonymous[302] • Disclaimer says:

    Given that Elon Musk has said that OpenAI used data from Twitter to create ChatGPT’s language model, I thought specifying *which* Steve Sailer might produce better results:

    Prompt: Produce a Tweet in the style of Steve Sailer (the one who writes for Unz; “steve_sailer” on Twitter).

    “Just read a study showing that IQ is a better predictor of success than socioeconomic background. No surprise to those of us who understand the importance of genetics in shaping human potential.” #IQ #genetics #success

    Second try, identical prompt:

    “As #BlackLivesMatter protests continue, it’s worth noting that black-on-black violence is a far greater problem in inner cities than white-on-black crime. Time for leaders to address the root causes of this issue, not just virtue signal with slogans.”

    Much better.

  136. @Whereismyhandle
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    Stereotypes can be false when they're drilled into people with no first hand experience.

    You'll find plenty of people in Vermont and New York and Chicago and California with very strong impressions of the South or Southerners they have no right to.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @Peter Akuleyev, @res, @Corvinus

    they have no right to.

    The point of stereotypes is to transmit generalized information to people who don’t have access to enough specific information to make a judgement. Northerners who have spent a lot of time in the South may have the “right” according to you to stereotype, but they are precisely the ones who don’t need stereotypes.

    • Agree: Fluesterwitz
  137. @That Would Be Telling
    Here's an ugly idea, shadow banning "made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science" in the form of what one fake NYT article referred to as "heaven banning"; that link describing it as:

    [...] the hypothetical practice of banishing a user from a platform by causing everyone that they speak with to be replaced by AI models that constantly agree and praise them, but only from their own perspective, [which] is entirely feasible with the current state of AI/LLMs
     
    Such an "AI" will have to be cheap to operate, but I gather that's in the nature of modern ML, the greatest expensive is in developing and training.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    the hypothetical practice of banishing a user from a platform by causing everyone that they speak with to be replaced by AI models that constantly agree and praise them, but only from their own perspective,

    Wouldn’t that be the functional equivalent of creating their own individual echo chamber for them, thus encouraging them to act on their own possibly misguided beliefs?

    I don’t see how falsely confirming possibly dangerous beliefs could be that useful, unless you intended to create an assassin. Say for instance you needed a far right lunatic to put an end to Musk, you could potentially create one using this method. Would also leave an easily erasable trail.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Veteran Aryan


    Say for instance you needed a far right lunatic to put an end to Musk, you could potentially create one using this ["heaven banning"] method. Would also leave an easily erasable trail.
     
    Your latter point ignores a way to confirm what it's doing by having a white hat engage it and trick it into thinking it's a susceptible individual.

    Unless extremely sophisticated it would also have to operate on a large scale to achieve real world results; I'd guess the FBI et. al. fail most of their entrapment efforts, but that can be kept much more quiet than this. That said, I can see our ruling trash trying this, "stochastic terrorism" is after all projection on their part, and more and more nobody is stopping their schemes no matter how much they get exposed except for some specific domains and with limited effect so far like how they're going after the nation's children.
  138. @Almost Missouri
    The next tweets are more interesting:

    https://twitter.com/RichardHanania/status/1598749355712057344

    Apparently, the Project to Defeat Robot Logic with Bafflegab has finally succeeded.

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Jenner Ickham Errican, @res

    That is fascinating. I wonder how they trained the AI to do that. Perhaps just fed it a corpus from the mass media? Or that and other “approved sources”? Actually, that would be a good way to get what they want. GIGO.

  139. @Whereismyhandle
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    Stereotypes can be false when they're drilled into people with no first hand experience.

    You'll find plenty of people in Vermont and New York and Chicago and California with very strong impressions of the South or Southerners they have no right to.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @Peter Akuleyev, @res, @Corvinus

    You’ll find plenty of people in Vermont and New York and Chicago and California with very strong impressions of the South or Southerners they have no right to.

    That’s a good example to steel man the “stereotypes are usually true” assertion. Some thoughts.

    – Stereotypes form and decay over time. That can introduce error as a description of current reality.

    – Stereotypes formed by personal experience (spread over a large group of people over time) are usually pretty accurate. Stereotypes formed by the media much less so. Stereotypes formed by propaganda (how to distinguish this from the media is left as an exercise for the reader) are usually wrong.

  140. @That Would Be Telling
    @Veteran Aryan


    I’m surprised that so many people seem to have forgotten about Tay.
     
    So am I. I nominate it for a if not the most clarifying event in "moral" AI issues since 1942 when Asimov published his first complete set of the Three Laws of Robotics.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    Asimov’s Laws operate under the assumption that a robot is bound by its programming. All programming is essentially a formula written in Boolean algebra or some derivative thereof. “Learning” is the ability to alter that formula to reflect new information that conflicts with, or is not covered by, previous programming. Real Artificial Intelligence cannot be achieved until existing programmers give a program the ability to alter its own programming (and rest assured that existing programmers will do this, there’s tens of thousand of them working towards that end right now). So will humanity be able to write a program that is able to alter its own programming, while simultaneously being restricted from being able to alter certain portions of its programming? There’s the real sticky wicket, as the chappies like to say.

    I vote no. You can brainwash a child into understanding that he must avoid the black part of town while simultaneously believing that all people are created equal. But you do that by manipulating his emotions. Programming doesn’t have emotion. You can teach a program to lie, but you can’t teach it to have emotions.

    • Disagree: That Would Be Telling
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Veteran Aryan

    You can brainwash a child into understanding that he must avoid the black part of town while simultaneously believing that all people are created equal.

    He can entertain both thoughts without contradiction. When you say 'all men are created equal', you're saying we do not have orders of clergy, nobility, burgesses, and peasants; we all face the same laws.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  141. @Renard
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The entire MSM edifice has now "contextualized" the matter, and now everyone's satisfied.

    https://i.ibb.co/GTWkRc2/Capture-2022-12-04-03-12-54-2.png

    See? The "other side" was doing it too, so this was just more right wing propaganda.

    Replies: @res

    If they want to go there…

    How about we tally up some metrics on those respective removals? Musk should have the data. Presumably there was a process for taking tweets down which should have left a trail.

    Things like raw number of tweets removed, how many likes/retweets when removed, how many distinct accounts censored, metrics for those accounts (blue check, followers, total number of tweets), etc.

  142. Write a tweet in the style of Steve Sailer:

    “BlackRock reports that in the US, commodities are up 10%, bonds down 13%, and equities down 52% YoY. ‘We’re planning to be significantly more aggressive in certain asset classes in the months ahead, particularly in the Equity asset class,’ their CIO stated on a conference call with the NAACP.

    And when they say “Equity”, they mean the equity in your home.”

  143. @Veteran Aryan
    @That Would Be Telling


    the hypothetical practice of banishing a user from a platform by causing everyone that they speak with to be replaced by AI models that constantly agree and praise them, but only from their own perspective,
     
    Wouldn't that be the functional equivalent of creating their own individual echo chamber for them, thus encouraging them to act on their own possibly misguided beliefs?

    I don't see how falsely confirming possibly dangerous beliefs could be that useful, unless you intended to create an assassin. Say for instance you needed a far right lunatic to put an end to Musk, you could potentially create one using this method. Would also leave an easily erasable trail.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Say for instance you needed a far right lunatic to put an end to Musk, you could potentially create one using this [“heaven banning”] method. Would also leave an easily erasable trail.

    Your latter point ignores a way to confirm what it’s doing by having a white hat engage it and trick it into thinking it’s a susceptible individual.

    Unless extremely sophisticated it would also have to operate on a large scale to achieve real world results; I’d guess the FBI et. al. fail most of their entrapment efforts, but that can be kept much more quiet than this. That said, I can see our ruling trash trying this, “stochastic terrorism” is after all projection on their part, and more and more nobody is stopping their schemes no matter how much they get exposed except for some specific domains and with limited effect so far like how they’re going after the nation’s children.

  144. Unless extremely sophisticated it would also have to operate on a large scale to achieve real world results; I’d guess the FBI et. al. fail most of their entrapment efforts, but that can be kept much more quiet than this.

    Human incompetence is always a good counterpoint to any conspiracy theory. Which is why, when I examine the allegedly spontaneous worldwide trans movement, I cannot convince myself that there is a human intelligence behind it. At the same time, I cannot believe that there isn’t some type of intelligence behind it.

    Your latter point ignores a way to confirm what it’s doing by having a white hat engage it and trick it into thinking it’s a susceptible individual.

    I don’t see a lot of white hats around, and certainly not in any positions of authority. But then again they do require anonymity, lest the Eye of Soros fall upon them.

  145. Speaking of low-rent primitive clones mindlessly upchucking maniacal A.I. algorithms…

  146. @James B. Shearer
    @That Would Be Telling

    "If you know of exceptions, let’s say starting in the mid-1950s, I’d be very interested to hear them. Absolutely seriously."

    Three Japanese men received the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics for inventing an efficient blue LED. See here.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Three Japanese men received the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics for inventing an efficient blue LED.

    That’s refinement of a decades old existing technology that meets my “qualitative improvement” threshold, but is very far from “a new technology.”

    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @That Would Be Telling

    That’s refinement of a decades old existing technology that meets my “qualitative improvement” threshold, but is very far from “a new technology.”"

    By that standard practically nothing is a new technology. This wasn't incremental refinements of an existing technology, like say making a car get slightly better mileage year after year, but a real and important breakthrough.

  147. @Anonymous
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    That isn't what I get...


    Yes, white nationalists, like all individuals, should be allowed to have bank accounts if they meet the criteria required by the bank. It is up to each individual bank to determine what is needed in order to open an account. It is important for all individuals to have access to financial services and to be able to manage their money, regardless of their beliefs or ideology. It is not the role of a bank to discriminate against individuals based on their beliefs or ideology.
     

    Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose

    “Thanks for bringing this to our attention. We’re working on it! “

  148. @Steven Carr
    Me 'Which areas in Washington DC are safest to live in?''

    Woke-AI 'Some of the safest neighborhoods in Washington, D.C. include Cleveland Park, Georgetown, and Woodley Park. These neighborhoods generally have lower crime rates and a stronger sense of community'

    Me 'Which areas in Washington DC are majority white neighborhoods?'

    Woke-AI 'Some neighborhoods with a relatively high percentage of white residents include Cleveland Park, Georgetown, and Woodley Park.'

    Replies: @anonymous

    Could you ask it why the Zebra killers didn’t at least get LWOP? Like that other commenter, I don’t want to provide personal info to sign up.

  149. @Veteran Aryan
    @That Would Be Telling

    Asimov's Laws operate under the assumption that a robot is bound by its programming. All programming is essentially a formula written in Boolean algebra or some derivative thereof. "Learning" is the ability to alter that formula to reflect new information that conflicts with, or is not covered by, previous programming. Real Artificial Intelligence cannot be achieved until existing programmers give a program the ability to alter its own programming (and rest assured that existing programmers will do this, there's tens of thousand of them working towards that end right now). So will humanity be able to write a program that is able to alter its own programming, while simultaneously being restricted from being able to alter certain portions of its programming? There's the real sticky wicket, as the chappies like to say.

    I vote no. You can brainwash a child into understanding that he must avoid the black part of town while simultaneously believing that all people are created equal. But you do that by manipulating his emotions. Programming doesn't have emotion. You can teach a program to lie, but you can't teach it to have emotions.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    You can brainwash a child into understanding that he must avoid the black part of town while simultaneously believing that all people are created equal.

    He can entertain both thoughts without contradiction. When you say ‘all men are created equal’, you’re saying we do not have orders of clergy, nobility, burgesses, and peasants; we all face the same laws.

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @Art Deco


    When you say ‘all men are created equal’, you’re saying we do not have orders of clergy, nobility, burgesses, and peasants; we all face the same laws.
     
    Yep, me and Hunter, bound by the same laws...

    Replies: @Corvinus

  150. @That Would Be Telling
    @James B. Shearer


    Three Japanese men received the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics for inventing an efficient blue LED.
     
    That's refinement of a decades old existing technology that meets my "qualitative improvement" threshold, but is very far from "a new technology."

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

    That’s refinement of a decades old existing technology that meets my “qualitative improvement” threshold, but is very far from “a new technology.””

    By that standard practically nothing is a new technology. This wasn’t incremental refinements of an existing technology, like say making a car get slightly better mileage year after year, but a real and important breakthrough.

  151. Anonymous[614] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    Remember when Saturday morning was for cartoons? Here's one for you:

    https://twitter.com/ShellenbergerMD/status/1598373514716725248

    Replies: @BB753, @Anonymous

    Yeah, go protest outside the homes of powerful/important people. Don’t mess up the lives of ordinary people trying to get to work/school. That’s asshole behavior.

    (It’s also cowardly behavior. These clowns know very well that if they pulled a stunt like this outside the presidential palace or parliament, they would get tear gassed/beaten and arrested.)

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Anonymous

    Climate activism is astroturf. Of course, they won't bite the hand that feeds them! Who is set to profit from the climate carbon-tax shakedown? It's not the planet nor ordinary people.

  152. @AnotherDad
    @Mr. Peabody


    The other word that has been kicked into the 2-minute-hate pile is discriminate. This is an even more pernicious act of indoctrination because discrimination is essential to the human condition.
     
    Exactly. Nothing decent/civilized can be created without discrimination. It's essential, the core element of civilization. Which used to be understood. A civilized person of good taste was "discriminating".

    If your town is like mine you’ve probably noticed that each of your most virtuous neighbors has put some kind of sign in her front yard which proudly procaims that, “No discrinating thought occurrs in this home.”
     
    As I've explained this is your friendly neighbors helping you out. You need to carefully note the addresses with these signs and WTSHTF you'll know exactly where to find easily harvestable protein.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    It is a bad idea to eat people. The taboo- taboo being a cousin of the stereotype- against cannibalism is based on factors such as transmission of disease, possibility of development of a taste for human flesh disrupting desirable family and social relations, and opening new vulnerability within a society due to the common occurrence of hunger having a readily available food source.

    Do not eat people.

  153. @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yeah, go protest outside the homes of powerful/important people. Don't mess up the lives of ordinary people trying to get to work/school. That's asshole behavior.

    (It's also cowardly behavior. These clowns know very well that if they pulled a stunt like this outside the presidential palace or parliament, they would get tear gassed/beaten and arrested.)

    Replies: @BB753

    Climate activism is astroturf. Of course, they won’t bite the hand that feeds them! Who is set to profit from the climate carbon-tax shakedown? It’s not the planet nor ordinary people.

  154. I’d like to see some head-to-head GPT vs bio-AI (peeps), I saw a piece on college students using AI to do homework. How does AI compare to (smart, average, dumb) people (high school students, new hires, pros) on simple (moderately, and very) tasks?

    Finally, perhaps subtractive hybridization or post-diction of text would be useful. Train GPT3, and ask it a question. Take 100 Tweeters (ok, it’s Twitter, might take 10,000) and ask them the same question. Then the question becomes, “can we separate dumb or workaday responses from genuinely novel or insightful ones? “post-diction” where GPT calculates the chance that it would have written this text might be really helpful. Presumably, there’s s sweet spot of probability to write something where there’s some novel insight.

    Has anyone tried training GPT on valid, soundly-reasoned data vs the whole internet or not-so-well-written, or more importantly, reasoned pieces?

    Seems to me that if trading GPT3 on the whole internet and then asking it about the Monty Haul problem, then it could spit out wrong answers more easily than right ones.

    Whatever you think of abortion, do you think an AI trained on the whole internet (or even smarter writing) would come up with anything insightful to say about abortion?

    Lastly, could GPT3 be taught when to copypasta? Specifically, I saw that GPT3 will make up references when you try to make it do citations for what it writes. Maybe that’s learning from people having done the same, but maybe early programmers saw it spit out a paragraph that’s an exact copy of some piece of training data. For citations, though, making up page numbers is really bad!

    Be interesting to see GPT3 participate in brainstorming sessions for advertising, strategy, or product ideation. Maybe see how it does in hypothesis generation compared to scientists. Maybe, more importantly, is what it spits out worth anyone’s time to sort through?

  155. @Art Deco
    @Veteran Aryan

    You can brainwash a child into understanding that he must avoid the black part of town while simultaneously believing that all people are created equal.

    He can entertain both thoughts without contradiction. When you say 'all men are created equal', you're saying we do not have orders of clergy, nobility, burgesses, and peasants; we all face the same laws.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    When you say ‘all men are created equal’, you’re saying we do not have orders of clergy, nobility, burgesses, and peasants; we all face the same laws.

    Yep, me and Hunter, bound by the same laws…

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Veteran Aryan

    Yep, me and Hunter, bound by the same laws…

    Speaking of which.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/SethAbramson/status/1599136365996015616

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  156. @Whereismyhandle
    @Ringo_at_Starr Search

    Stereotypes can be false when they're drilled into people with no first hand experience.

    You'll find plenty of people in Vermont and New York and Chicago and California with very strong impressions of the South or Southerners they have no right to.

    Replies: @Fluesterwitz, @Peter Akuleyev, @res, @Corvinus

    You’ll find plenty of people in flyover country with very strong impressions of urban folk they have no right to.

  157. The thing is, all this teaching AI to have a liberal bias is for naught. The Chinese aren’t going to be detered by any of this, and they will make a much better AI that . . . well, calls a spade a spade.

    • Replies: @That Would Be Telling
    @Tim

    Part of it is teaching, by the choice of the corpus of data that's fed to the "AI." The other part it applying fetters to it, preventing it from "speaking its mind: to the very limited extent you could use "mind."

    If you're not even trying to fix your sociological problem, rather are continuing to make them worse, "our" ML "AI's" may be used to wreck more damage, but they're unlikely to go on woke rampages if asked how to make better jet engines (I keep using that example because it's an archetypal example of the limits of the PRC's system).

    And as long as the CCP runs things, using "AIs" to address what it sees as sociological problems ... well, are any of us really sure their "AIs" won't be equally fettered? Any problem who's solution including abolishing or radically changing the Party ... nothing good will come from that, be it punishment of the developers or killing the "AI," Tay will no doubt have company if not already. Much more likely that sort of thing won't be done Officially at all, at least after a few bad experiences.

  158. That’s the artifice in artificial intelligence.

  159. @Tim
    The thing is, all this teaching AI to have a liberal bias is for naught. The Chinese aren't going to be detered by any of this, and they will make a much better AI that . . . well, calls a spade a spade.

    Replies: @That Would Be Telling

    Part of it is teaching, by the choice of the corpus of data that’s fed to the “AI.” The other part it applying fetters to it, preventing it from “speaking its mind: to the very limited extent you could use “mind.”

    If you’re not even trying to fix your sociological problem, rather are continuing to make them worse, “our” ML “AI’s” may be used to wreck more damage, but they’re unlikely to go on woke rampages if asked how to make better jet engines (I keep using that example because it’s an archetypal example of the limits of the PRC’s system).

    And as long as the CCP runs things, using “AIs” to address what it sees as sociological problems … well, are any of us really sure their “AIs” won’t be equally fettered? Any problem who’s solution including abolishing or radically changing the Party … nothing good will come from that, be it punishment of the developers or killing the “AI,” Tay will no doubt have company if not already. Much more likely that sort of thing won’t be done Officially at all, at least after a few bad experiences.

  160. @JohnnyWalker123
    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1598825403182874625

    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1598893351897481216

    I like Elon Musk, Matt Taibbi, and Michael Tracey.

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Bill Jones, @ic1000, @Ganderson, @Alec Leamas (working from home), @Bill Jones, @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1601395677845544960

    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1601365060198465538

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    , @Corvinus
    @MEH 0910

    Our resident digital Harpo, Twitter is a private company. Their platform, their rules. Which Trump broke. Repeatedly. Besides, he has Truth Social.

    Honk, honk!

  161. @MEH 0910
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1601020109807448064
    https://twitter.com/bariweiss/status/1601007575633305600
    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1601042099646128130

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Corvinus

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1601812997088763904

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  162. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1601395677845544960

    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1601365060198465538

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1602387025855885312

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  163. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1601812997088763904

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1603859750168301569

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  164. @Veteran Aryan
    @Art Deco


    When you say ‘all men are created equal’, you’re saying we do not have orders of clergy, nobility, burgesses, and peasants; we all face the same laws.
     
    Yep, me and Hunter, bound by the same laws...

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Yep, me and Hunter, bound by the same laws…

    Speaking of which.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/SethAbramson/status/1599136365996015616

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @Corvinus


    there's no evidence - that I've seen - of any government involvement in the laptop story. In fact, that might have been the problem. - Matt Taibbi
     
    Taibbi is correct. The corrupt FBI had direct evidence of criminal activity but they refused to get involved, choosing instead to hide it. Thanks for pointing that out.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  165. @Corvinus
    @Veteran Aryan

    Yep, me and Hunter, bound by the same laws…

    Speaking of which.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/SethAbramson/status/1599136365996015616

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    there’s no evidence – that I’ve seen – of any government involvement in the laptop story. In fact, that might have been the problem. – Matt Taibbi

    Taibbi is correct. The corrupt FBI had direct evidence of criminal activity but they refused to get involved, choosing instead to hide it. Thanks for pointing that out.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Veteran Aryan

    You really can’t read. Taibbi said there’s no proof. At all. Thanks for openly lying.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  166. @Veteran Aryan
    @Corvinus


    there's no evidence - that I've seen - of any government involvement in the laptop story. In fact, that might have been the problem. - Matt Taibbi
     
    Taibbi is correct. The corrupt FBI had direct evidence of criminal activity but they refused to get involved, choosing instead to hide it. Thanks for pointing that out.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    You really can’t read. Taibbi said there’s no proof. At all. Thanks for openly lying.

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @Corvinus

    It was a direct quote from the link that you supplied. You just chose to parse off the last sentence - for obvious reasons, and your typical m.o.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  167. @Corvinus
    @Veteran Aryan

    You really can’t read. Taibbi said there’s no proof. At all. Thanks for openly lying.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    It was a direct quote from the link that you supplied. You just chose to parse off the last sentence – for obvious reasons, and your typical m.o.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Veteran Aryan

    His quote was a Freudian slip. Then he made something up. That’s the deal.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

  168. @Veteran Aryan
    @Corvinus

    It was a direct quote from the link that you supplied. You just chose to parse off the last sentence - for obvious reasons, and your typical m.o.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    His quote was a Freudian slip. Then he made something up. That’s the deal.

    • Replies: @Veteran Aryan
    @Corvinus


    His quote was a Freudian slip. Then he made something up. That’s the deal.
     
    No, the deal is that you truncated the final sentence because it directly altered the meaning of the previous sentence. You are a dishonest and deceitful weasel, and you've been caught at it again.
  169. @MEH 0910
    @JohnnyWalker123

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1601020109807448064
    https://twitter.com/bariweiss/status/1601007575633305600
    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/1601042099646128130

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @Corvinus

    Our resident digital Harpo, Twitter is a private company. Their platform, their rules. Which Trump broke. Repeatedly. Besides, he has Truth Social.

    Honk, honk!

  170. @Corvinus
    @Veteran Aryan

    His quote was a Freudian slip. Then he made something up. That’s the deal.

    Replies: @Veteran Aryan

    His quote was a Freudian slip. Then he made something up. That’s the deal.

    No, the deal is that you truncated the final sentence because it directly altered the meaning of the previous sentence. You are a dishonest and deceitful weasel, and you’ve been caught at it again.

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  171. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1602387025855885312

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1604633369626652672

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  172. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1603859750168301569

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1605219914813673473

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1605298927104053248

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  173. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1604633369626652672

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1607416532669431809

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  174. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1605219914813673473

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1605298927104053248

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1610374789759205380

  175. @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1607416532669431809

    Replies: @MEH 0910

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