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From the New York Times news section:

M.I.T.’s Choice of Lecturer Ignited Criticism. So Did Its Decision to Cancel.

Dorian Abbot is a scientist who has opposed aspects of affirmative action. He is now at the center of an argument over free speech and acceptable discourse.

By Michael Powell

Michael Powell is a national reporter covering issues around free speech and expression, and stories capturing intellectual and campus debate. @powellnyt

Powell is a pretty good guy, although clearly biased with some controversial views for a reporter in 2021: I suspect that he favors free speech and expression.

Oct. 20, 2021, 1:02 p.m. ET

CHICAGO — The Massachusetts Institute of Technology invited the geophysicist Dorian Abbot to give a prestigious public lecture this autumn. He seemed a natural choice, a scientific star who studies climate change and whether planets in distant solar systems might harbor atmospheres conducive to life.

Then a swell of angry resistance arose. Some faculty members and graduate students argued that Dr. Abbot, a professor at the University of Chicago, had created harm by speaking out against aspects of affirmative action and diversity programs. In videos and opinion pieces, Dr. Abbot, who is white, has asserted that such programs treat “people as members of a group rather than as individuals, repeating the mistake that made possible the atrocities of the 20th century.” He said that he favored a diverse pool of applicants selected on merit.

He said that his planned lecture at M.I.T. would have made no mention of his views on affirmative action. But his opponents in the sciences argued he represented an “infuriating,” “inappropriate” and oppressive choice.

On Sept. 30, M.I.T. reversed course. The head of its earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences department called off Dr. Abbot’s lecture, to be delivered to professors, graduate students and the public, including some top Black and Latino high school students.

The Supreme Court has asserted since 1978’s Bakke decision that affirmative action racial goals (but not affirmative action racial quotas, those are totally different) are okay with violating the Equal Protection clause because diversity creates such a vibrantly open intellectual atmosphere on campus.

Personally, though, I was on campus in 1978, and it seemed like there was more diversity of opinion back then than in 2021. Does the Supreme Court ever admit: “Yeah, our predecessors said that, but, obviously, it has turned out they were empirically wrong.” Or would that be too subversive of the dignity of the Court?

“Besides freedom of speech, we have the freedom to pick the speaker who best fits our needs,” said Robert van der Hilst, the head of the department at M.I.T. “Words matter and have consequences.”

The majority of California voters, who voted to maintain the state constitution’s ban on affirmative action in government programs in 2020, would be banned from giving this MIT speech.

… A few fields have purged scientific terms and names seen by some as offensive, and there is a rising call for “citational justice,” arguing that professors and graduate students should seek to cite more Black, Latino, Asian and Native American scholars and in some cases refuse to acknowledge in footnotes the research of those who hold distasteful views. Still the decision by M.I.T., viewed as a high citadel of science in the United States, took aback some prominent scientists. Debate and argumentation, impassioned, even ferocious, is the mother’s milk of science, they said.

… The history of science is no less marked than other fields of learning by abhorrent chapters of suppression and prejudice. Nazi and Communist regimes twisted science to their own end, and scientists buckled, fled or suffered perilous consequences. Some professors point to aspects of that history as a cautionary tale for American science. In the United States, so-called race science — including the measurement of skulls with the intent to determine intelligence — was used to justify the subordination of Black people, Chinese, Italians, Jews and others. Experiments were carried out on people without their consent.

The worst of that history lies decades past. That said, the faculty at geoscience departments in the United States has more white faculty than some other sciences. Departments have attracted more female professors of late but struggle to recruit Black and Latino candidates. The number of Asian Americans earning geoscience degrees has decreased since the mid-1990s.

Wasn’t “race science” more related to biology and medicine, two fields not lacking in Asian-Americans these days? Or is geoscience permanently tainted by geologist Louis Agassiz’s polygenic theory?

The controversy surrounding Dr. Abbot’s canceled talk speaks as well to a tension manifest in progressive circles between social justice and free speech. Some faculty members have come to see identity and racial inequities as more urgent than questions of muzzled speech.

Phoebe A. Cohen is a geosciences professor and department chair at Williams College and one of many who expressed anger on Twitter at M.I.T.’s decision to invite Dr. Abbot to speak, given that he has spoken against affirmative action in the past.

Dr. Cohen agreed that Dr. Abbot’s views reflect a broad current in American society. Ideally, she said, a university should not invite speakers who do not share its values on diversity and affirmative action. Nor was she enamored of M.I.T.’s offer to let him speak at a later date to the M.I.T. professors. “Honestly, I don’t know that I agree with that choice,” she said. “To me, the professional consequences are extremely minimal.”

What, she was asked, of the effect on academic debate? Should the academy serve as a bastion of unfettered speech?Dr. Abbot said his speech would not include his views about diversity and affirmative action, but faculty and graduate students objected to his invitation.

“This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,” she replied.

True.

 
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  1. Blacklisting is witch-hunting and annudah shoah.
    But when we do it words have consequences.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @J.Ross

    Blacklisting...

    Blacklisting? Ahem...

  2. “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated…”

    As I’ve asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    Isn’t technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don’t need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we’re done, right? That’s the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    Aren’t we done?

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
    • LOL: Wade Hampton
    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Anon7


    Isn’t technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don’t need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we’re done, right? That’s the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?
     
    You realize there's a pretty big backend to all that "plug and play" technology, right? Your Netflix show doesn't actually come from a "cloud" somewhere, but relies on a massive ecosystem of data centers and content distribution networks that all have to be constantly maintained in order to provide service to tens of millions of users at a time. The degree to which things have been simplified and made cheap, seamless and invisible for the end user, such that everything seems "plug and play," has only made possible by creating massive, centralized infrastructure somewhere else. The same is very much true in non-IT sectors as well. The supply chain crisis going on right now is educating everyone about just how much work goes into getting all their stuff to them just-in-time the way people have come to expect in the past decade.

    Granted, there's likely a very real risk that people who've never actually done anything productive in their lives, like, say, most of the people who dominate policymaking, think that the modern world works that way. Then they make decisions based on assumptions such as you can shut down much of the economy for a year without consequences, or you can put a twee little former mayor of South Bend in charge of transportation infrastructure because he likes trains.

    Replies: @Sebastian Y., @Anon7, @Anon7

    , @John Johnson
    @Anon7

    As I’ve asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    So are you setting the new low for egalitarians? OK so a lot of geniuses have been White but can we now get rid of them?

    Isn’t technology pretty much plug and play, now?

    LOL do you think people have stopped filing mechanical patents?

    Can't tell if this post is serious.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    , @Wade Hampton
    @Anon7

    I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm.

    But one man’s sarcasm is another’s policy vision. Certainly this view of the future of humanity is the goal of the transhumanists. All the heavy lifting will be done by internet-enabled-robots managed from the cloud by artificial intelligence and we will sit around watching Netflix specials indoctrinating us on leftist politics and DIE and eating Cheetos.

    I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm, but I agree with the last sentence. If this vision is implemented, we are done.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Anon7

    , @pyrrhus
    @Anon7

    Western civilization is just "done", period...Only question is whether we can save indoor plumbing...

    Replies: @3g4me

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Anon7

    "Aren't we done?"

    We will be when the smart white guys put the finishing touches on the bio-medical police state they've been constructing. Thanks to smart white guys smart white guys will become extinct.

    , @SFG
    @Anon7

    I'm pretty sure this is sarcasm.


    I've recommended it here before, but Paolo Bacigalupi's 'Pump Six' is a story in the far future where this has more or less happened. The HBD subtext from the left-wing author is almost certainly unintentional. (I never say 'certainly' outside of the hard sciences; I'm convinced Chuck Palahniuk, for instance, is more of a righty than he lets on.) But I think that's what the future looks like.

    , @vinteuil
    @Anon7


    Aren’t we done?
     
    Not quite yet. But soon.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @megabar
    @Anon7

    > As I’ve asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    There are two possibilities here. 1. As technology improves, it lessens the need for skilled labor, because automation/machinery/computers do the work as designed by small number of very smart people; or 2. As technology improves, it increases the demand for skilled labor because the systems require continuous maintenance and modification.

  3. If you were to make a graph of intellectual freedom, it would plateau around the period from the 18th to the 20th century. The line is now plummeting back to pre-Enlightenment levels.

    • Agree: Hibernian, Dr. X
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Rob McX

    Thanks in large part to creatures like this Cohen thing, and the white males who enable them.

  4. This is what results when profsters get paid by their university, rather than directly by the students they’re supposed to (but don’t) teach. Abolish faculty unions.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Abolish_public_education


    Abolish faculty unions.
     
    Didn't the Supreme Court rule that only public university faculty could unionize? MIT is private.

    Replies: @LP5, @res

    , @International Jew
    @Abolish_public_education

    Back in the day, German professors collected admission lecture by lecture. Imagine doing that.

    Profs aren't generally unionized, though. Maybe they are at some community colleges.

    Replies: @guest007, @kaganovitch

  5. Well…….

    • Thanks: The Wild Geese Howard
    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Ugly, tedious pop-crap.

    Your point being?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  6. Phoebe Cohen claims on her Twitter page (where of course she provides her pronouns) that she was quoted out of context. She then goes on to explain that what she really meant is…exactly what we assumed she meant.

    Rigor?

    Cohen: “the whole idea of “rigor” is full of problems and biases – rigor according to whom? What standards are we using, and who is setting those standards? For centuries, “rigor” has been defined by a very thin slice of our society.”

    Yes, rigor is defined by a very thin slice of society. Those standards aren’t set by white men in general, but people of science and math who have shown a reputation for producing results. Complaining that too many of them are white and male is a bit like complaining that too many of them are Jewish.

    Free speech?

    Cohen: “‘unfettered speech’” is often used as an excuse to do harm and maintain the status quo.”

    Jeffrey Sachs: “Everyone is reading your quote to mean that rigor and unfettered speech are the purview of/only valued by/expressions of whiteness. But it sounds here like what you mean is that rigor and unfettered speech are often used to strengthen whiteness. Is that it? n other words, you’re not opposed to rigor in academia. You just mean that rigor is frequently deployed as a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?”

    Cohen: “Yes.”

    Again, her “clarification” doesn’t change how any sane person would have interpreted the quote in the article. By saying that she’s against free speech and intellectual “rigor” what she’s saying is that she doesn’t want people to have the right to speak views she disagrees with, and she shouldn’t be expected to provide any (rigorously) justifiable reason as to why.

    • Thanks: West reanimator
    • Replies: @Moses
    @Wilkey

    That’s a lot of words to say “Because Ms Cohen and her kind hate Whites and want them gone.”

    , @LP5
    @Wilkey

    In other Williams College geoscience news, the Rocks for Jocks classes will be renamed.

    , @iDeplorable
    @Wilkey



    Cohen: “‘unfettered speech’” is often used as an excuse to do harm and maintain the status quo.”

    Jeffrey Sachs: “Everyone is reading your...a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?”

    Cohen: “Yes.”
     
    Cohen, Sachs, Cohen...I'm shocked I tell you, shocked!

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    , @Walter Duranty
    @Wilkey

    Good post. Rigor is the antidote to wokeness, hencee it is racist and anti-Semitic.

    , @mulga mumblebrain
    @Wilkey

    It is a mindset that flows easily from one in which ANY mention of Jews, as individuals or a group, or of Zionazism, Israel etc, that is not utterly groveling, can be denounced as 'antisemitism' and the utterer hounded and destroyed in career and life prospects.

  7. “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated.”

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Thanks: Servant of Gla'aki
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Thomas

    Wait how do you insert images on here

    https://i.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/001/650/747/aaf.png

    , @Pericles
    @Thomas


    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated.”

     

    Intellectual debate and endless quibbling and obfuscation by a tiny minority on the other hand ...!
    , @bomag
    @Thomas

    And they have no problem living in that world.

    Now, they want to stand on a stool at the counter and help make the cookies, which taste like crap; but a culture of politeness has us choking them down and añnouncing that they are the best ones ever. Complainers get stoned by a mob.

  8. “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,” she replied.

    Out of the mouths of non-babes …

  9. I am ready to fire her and take her PhD away. She does not belong in the community be of scholars. Her statements are particularly odd coming from someone in her field. There are still plenty of people who deny the evidence of the Earth’s,s age and history. Does she support the Creationist Museum?

    I am thoroughly disgusted and to know there others out there like her and worse makes my blood boil. I suppose she teaches her students to think like she does.

    This is so wrong and there is no excuse. Final irony would be how few oppressed minorities are in her field. Does she really think that is due to white men searching for new discoveries and speaking the truth as they see it? Where would she be without the accumulated knowledge these imperfect men provided for her to learn and expand on?

    • Replies: @bomag
    @notsaying


    Where would she be without the accumulated knowledge these imperfect men provided for her to learn and expand on?
     
    She's helping to shrink that accumulated knowledge.
    , @Moses
    @notsaying


    I am ready to fire her and take her PhD away. She does not belong in the community be of scholars.
     
    Fire her? Lol.

    To make these words happen you need Power. You and other Sailer readers don’t have any.

    Ms Cohen and her kind do. They are using it.

    That’s how it works.
  10. Basically, the Left wants to be able to demonize certain demographic groups, and doesn’t want to allow those people any right to a rebuttal. Example:

    Liberal: “Blacks are disproportionately killed by police officers.”

    Conservative: “That’s because blacks commit a much higher percentage of violent crime than their share of the population.”

    The conservative rebuttal is an example of providing rigorous logic to the question of why more blacks are disproportionately killed by police. Cohen would claim that rigor should not be applied to this case (at least not rigor as defined by whites who disagree), and that even making such an argument should result in the loss of someone’s job, their access to social media, and even their freedom itself.

    Presumably, Cohen also does not want to use free speech or intellectual rigor to question why she should keep her job if she believes in affirmative action, given that Jewish women are heavily overrepresented in academia.

    • Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Wilkey

    True. The left have made rebuttals almost a criminal act with repercussions far worse the punishment for actual crimes.

    Thought crimes will result in being blacklisted and jobless. The leftist want to destroy all opposition and the vaccine mandates are part of the same purge. To exclude whites from government jobs and punish those who dissent.

    Soon the Biden administration will force all government workers to submit to a third dose and then a fourth dose and this will continue until Americans stand up for themselves and refuse to submit to this tyranny. So it will go on forever. There is no end in site. Even the so called alt-right fully support the vaccine mandates and heavily promote the coming booster mandates. Steve can’t wait to get his fourth booster and was so impressed with the efficacy data he had dozens of posts promoting the boosters efficacy just like when he promoted the 95% effective Pfizer shots 9 months ago.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    , @Moses
    @Wilkey

    Lefties can deny any “rigor” or reality they want. They have Power. They create their own reality. They force the rest of us to live in its squalor.

    Orwell’s “1984” is happening right in front of us. Have you noticed?


    O'Brien silenced him by a movement of his hand. 'We control matter because we control the mind. Reality is inside the skull. You will learn by degrees, Winston. There is nothing that we could not do. Invisibility, levitation -- anything. I could float off this floor like a soap bubble if I wish to. I do not wish to, because the Party does not wish it. You must get rid of those nineteenth-century ideas about the laws of Nature. We make the laws of Nature.'
     
    Read what our reality masters have in store for us here. http://www.george-orwell.org/1984/19.html
    , @3g4me
    @Wilkey

    @10 Wilkey: That you consider a standard conservatard trope as "rigorous logic" and any sort of impediment to Cohen and her ilk is why you remain a Sailer stalwart.

    Replies: @Wilkey

  11. @Rob McX
    If you were to make a graph of intellectual freedom, it would plateau around the period from the 18th to the 20th century. The line is now plummeting back to pre-Enlightenment levels.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Thanks in large part to creatures like this Cohen thing, and the white males who enable them.

  12. @Thomas

    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated."
     
    https://i.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/001/650/747/aaf.png

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Pericles, @bomag

    Wait how do you insert images on here

    • LOL: El Dato
  13. @Anon7
    "This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated..."

    As I've asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    Isn't technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don't need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we're done, right? That's the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    Aren't we done?

    Replies: @Thomas, @John Johnson, @Wade Hampton, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb, @SFG, @vinteuil, @megabar

    Isn’t technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don’t need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we’re done, right? That’s the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    You realize there’s a pretty big backend to all that “plug and play” technology, right? Your Netflix show doesn’t actually come from a “cloud” somewhere, but relies on a massive ecosystem of data centers and content distribution networks that all have to be constantly maintained in order to provide service to tens of millions of users at a time. The degree to which things have been simplified and made cheap, seamless and invisible for the end user, such that everything seems “plug and play,” has only made possible by creating massive, centralized infrastructure somewhere else. The same is very much true in non-IT sectors as well. The supply chain crisis going on right now is educating everyone about just how much work goes into getting all their stuff to them just-in-time the way people have come to expect in the past decade.

    Granted, there’s likely a very real risk that people who’ve never actually done anything productive in their lives, like, say, most of the people who dominate policymaking, think that the modern world works that way. Then they make decisions based on assumptions such as you can shut down much of the economy for a year without consequences, or you can put a twee little former mayor of South Bend in charge of transportation infrastructure because he likes trains.

    • Agree: Wilkey
    • Replies: @Sebastian Y.
    @Thomas

    Peak oil was a popular theory 15-20 years ago. I bought into it and thought that modern civilization would start to steadily decline toward a grinding halt when we started to run out of cheap oil.



    https://pierie.nl/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Peak-oil-Source-Peak-oil.jpg

     

    Now I think I might’ve been write about the civilizational collapse but wrong about the reason.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/1c/cf/d3/1ccfd34269436d1c6fd1d1cf0b574f00.jpg

     

    I’m now a firm believer in Peak White Male.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Anon7
    @Thomas

    "The degree to which things have been simplified and made cheap, seamless and invisible for the end user, such that everything seems “plug and play,” has only made possible by creating massive, centralized infrastructure somewhere else."

    Exactly right. You just need money. For example, the Saudis are buying a Cloud from Google:


    Google will open a “cloud region” where it can provide its cloud services in Saudi Arabia via a joint venture with state-owned oil producer Saudi Aramco...

    Aramco said the agreement with Google will deliver “high performance, low-latency cloud services to enterprise customers in Saudi Arabia” as warming relations in the region open the political space for U.S. technology companies to expand into the kingdom.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/12/23/google-aramco-eye-10-billion-cloud-market-in-saudi-arabia.html
     

    Google trawls through high IQ countries, recruits the talent, builds minimum infrastructure in the host country, easy peasy. The Saudis don't need to bring their people any further along than, say, the fourteenth century.

    Don't third-world (technology level) countries all over the world gain telephony and internet services the same way? Hasn't China leapfrogged over the twentieth century by partnering with western hospitals to provide healthcare services in China? Hasn't the United States, once a powerhouse of engineering innovation and manufacturing, largely sent all that stuff out of the country? Just let those diligent Chinese take care of it.

    (This was a bitterly sarcastic post, by the way. If you stop making progress, you'll never know what you missed, right?

    Your comments about small town mayors put in charge of national transportation infrastructure are on point. He just spent the last two months playing house with his partner. It just shows that none of those people are in charge of anything.)

    Replies: @Thomas, @notsaying

    , @Anon7
    @Thomas

    Here's an interesting story about plug and play technology in a vast Socialist police state nightmare:


    When the Soviet Union collapsed, accounting for this technological deficit needed a new approach, and Vladimir Bulgak, the minister of communications under former President Boris Yeltsin, was willing to break with the past. Russia desperately needed modern communications, but local industry couldn’t provide the technology. Due to Soviet-era restrictions, the Russian telecommunications industry now lagged behind the West by 20 to 25 years. “We came to think that our industry would never catch up, and that meant we had to go and buy,” Bulgak told me during an interview.

    And Moscow did just that. In the span of three years, more than 70 percent of all Russian intercity phone stations were replaced by modern digital ones, made in the West, and Bulgak increased the number of international lines in the country from 2,000 analog ones to 66,000, all of them digital.

    Bulgak bought equipment from abroad, bypassing old Soviet factories at enormous cost — many of them were forced to close, leaving thousands of people high and dry. But by 1995, Russia had established a modern, national communications industry. Thriving and profitable internet businesses sprang up in the early 2000s, something that would have been impossible without the lines and stations purchased by Bulgak.

    The infrastructure of the Russian internet was built on Western technology, primarily Cisco, an American conglomerate, because the new national telecoms companies believed that reliability was more important than the origin of the supplier. Putin has not learned this lesson. When Western sanctions were imposed on Russia in 2014 following the annexation of Crimea, Putin called for import substitution to replace foreign products with domestic ones. The new security doctrine cements this idea, saying that “the level of dependence of the domestic industry from foreign IT” is too high and that this makes Russia dependent on “foreign geopolitical interests.”

    But the country’s industry simply can’t produce all the equipment that is needed, and desperate officials have since turned to China to replace Western technology. And although it’s an open question whether this new doctrine will actually make Russia any safer — it will surely limit the country’s economic potential.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2016/12/22/the-unlearned-lessons-from-the-collapse-of-the-soviet-union/#soldatov
     

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

  14. “Does the Supreme Court ever admit: “Yeah, our predecessors said that, but, obviously, it has turned out they were empirically wrong.” Or would that be too subversive of the dignity of the Court?”

    It should not be beyond the ability of experienced judges to “revisit” any matter without harm to the dignity of the office. The political context in which opinions are formed and delivered naturally evolve and it is no surprise to anyone that the composition of the SCOTUS affects the rulings handed down. If enough Justices become concerned about the effects of a previous ruling, then the magic elasticity of precedence comes into play and the old “that was then but this is now” double-shuffle dazzles the slow-witted opponents… “in light of recent developments in the field of” … “as evidence has accumulated “ &c.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Cortes


    If enough Justices become concerned about the effects of a previous ruling, then the magic elasticity of precedence comes into play and the old “that was then but this is now” double-shuffle dazzles the slow-witted opponents… “in light of recent developments in the field of” … “as evidence has accumulated “ &c.
     
    Traditionally, courts decided cases based on law.

    At some point—I would argue that point was the infamous Warren Court—courts appointed themselves makers of law based on social theory.

    Previously unheard-of phrases, such as "recent studies show", began appearing in court decisions as it became apparent that courts no longer served the law but instead began serving the latest academic fads, which itself is an unduly charitable characterization since the latest academic fads all come from one particular part of the political spectrum.

    In other words, yes, in theory if enough justices become concerned, they could revisit old decisions, particularly ones based on now-falsified studies, as the Replication Crisis has shown that 90% of the studies in those "recent studies show" decisions were crap. But this won't happen because the purpose of those social theory cases was never social theory, it was to advance a narrow political agenda under the guise of social theory. And now that that political agenda has been poured into the concrete of constitutional law, conservative judges won't change it because they naively believe that judges only interpret law, while liberal judges will hypocritically invoke stare decisis to ensure that their preferred readings remain mandatory while conveniently forgetting stare decisis the next time they want to overturn millennia of precedent.

    tl;dr: Constitutional law was weaponized against the Constitution in the 1960s. No practicing jurist has any personal memory of the before time.
    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Cortes

    Well put, Cortez. Chief Justice Roberts is especially good at shuffling the interpretive deck as present political circumstances require. At bottom, the Supreme Court is of course a political body. But it dresses up as a priesthood that merely translates the magic books (written in a language that you can't read). "Hey, don't shoot the messengers, we are just telling you what the gods themselves have commanded."

  15. OT, maybe.

    Half of this year’s Nobel prize in physics was given to two guys for their supposed work in climate science.

    My colleague Lubos Motl has a take on why this is… odd.

    The basic problem is that Nobels are usually given for work that has been confirmed by empirical observations or experiments.

    While climate modeling is a legitimate area of investigation, I think it is fair to say that it has no significant, surprising results that are well-confirmed empirically.

    It does, of course, have certain political uses…

    • Thanks: res
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    Wow! A Nobel Prize for dicking around on a computer! Maybe they should award the next one to Bitcoin miners.

    Replies: @animalogic

    , @bomag
    @PhysicistDave

    Thanks.

    A book about discovering the Higgs boson was entitled Present At The Creation.

    Now, Present At The Destruction can be written.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    @PhysicistDave

    Thank you so much, Dave. I've been saying for 15 years, and writing about it for five, there is no working model of the entire Earth's climate!

    There's observation and there's modeling based on heat transfer, fluids, and thermo. theory being done. However, when you model piece parts, only a few of which you can actually really experiment on, into one big model, you're going to run into all kinds of unforeseen physical processes that weren't taken into account, different supposedly understood processes interacting with each other in unforeseen ways, and ALL kinds of stuff. It's gonna be a long time, and I have seen no success so far.

    Yes, it's political as all get-out.

    , @Calvin Hobbes
    @PhysicistDave


    Half of this year’s Nobel prize in physics was given to two guys for their supposed work in climate science.
     
    The other half went to Italian physicist Giorgio Parisi, at least in part for his work on spin glasses. A guy I know who works on spin glasses thought it was hilarious that the NYT tried to make it sound like Parisi was another guy in “climate science”.
  16. @Wilkey
    Basically, the Left wants to be able to demonize certain demographic groups, and doesn't want to allow those people any right to a rebuttal. Example:

    Liberal: "Blacks are disproportionately killed by police officers."

    Conservative: "That's because blacks commit a much higher percentage of violent crime than their share of the population."

    The conservative rebuttal is an example of providing rigorous logic to the question of why more blacks are disproportionately killed by police. Cohen would claim that rigor should not be applied to this case (at least not rigor as defined by whites who disagree), and that even making such an argument should result in the loss of someone's job, their access to social media, and even their freedom itself.

    Presumably, Cohen also does not want to use free speech or intellectual rigor to question why she should keep her job if she believes in affirmative action, given that Jewish women are heavily overrepresented in academia.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Moses, @3g4me

    True. The left have made rebuttals almost a criminal act with repercussions far worse the punishment for actual crimes.

    Thought crimes will result in being blacklisted and jobless. The leftist want to destroy all opposition and the vaccine mandates are part of the same purge. To exclude whites from government jobs and punish those who dissent.

    Soon the Biden administration will force all government workers to submit to a third dose and then a fourth dose and this will continue until Americans stand up for themselves and refuse to submit to this tyranny. So it will go on forever. There is no end in site. Even the so called alt-right fully support the vaccine mandates and heavily promote the coming booster mandates. Steve can’t wait to get his fourth booster and was so impressed with the efficacy data he had dozens of posts promoting the boosters efficacy just like when he promoted the 95% effective Pfizer shots 9 months ago.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    Public officials' expressed concern for our health -- take the shot or else -- does seem out of sync with all their other policies and actions

  17. Does the Supreme Court ever admit: “Yeah, our predecessors said that, but, obviously, it has turned out they were empirically wrong.” Or would that be too subversive of the dignity of the Court?

    Among the recognized grounds for overruling precedent is “changed understanding of the relevant facts by the court and the public.”

  18. @Anon7
    "This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated..."

    As I've asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    Isn't technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don't need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we're done, right? That's the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    Aren't we done?

    Replies: @Thomas, @John Johnson, @Wade Hampton, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb, @SFG, @vinteuil, @megabar

    As I’ve asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    So are you setting the new low for egalitarians? OK so a lot of geniuses have been White but can we now get rid of them?

    Isn’t technology pretty much plug and play, now?

    LOL do you think people have stopped filing mechanical patents?

    Can’t tell if this post is serious.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @John Johnson

    Is it so hard to recognize an irony?

    Replies: @John Johnson

  19. Granted, there’s likely a very real risk that people who’ve never actually done anything productive in their lives, like, say, most of the people who dominate policymaking, think that the modern world works that way.

    Those are the same policymakers who treat American laborers is interchangeable widgets – unplug a white worker here and replace him with a random brown worker from El Salvador, and no big deal. Nothing should change. Replace 100 white programmers with 100 Indian programmers – also no big deal.

    Strangely their belief in the interchangeability of workers does not apply to their own lawyers or doctors, or people they’d prefer their daughter not marry.

    • Agree: Cortes, bomag
  20. Does the Supreme Court ever admit: “Yeah, our predecessors said that, but, obviously, it has turned out they were empirically wrong.” Or would that be too subversive of the dignity of the Court?

    The Supreme Court protects the prerogatives and prestige of the Supreme Court. Don’t expect the Courts to challenge The System. The Courts are part of The System.

  21. @Abolish_public_education
    This is what results when profsters get paid by their university, rather than directly by the students they're supposed to (but don't) teach. Abolish faculty unions.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @International Jew

    Abolish faculty unions.

    Didn’t the Supreme Court rule that only public university faculty could unionize? MIT is private.

    • Replies: @LP5
    @Reg Cæsar


    Didn’t the Supreme Court rule that only public university faculty could unionize? MIT is private.
     
    Watch for an MIT Land Grant College exception amicus brief. Cornell, too. They were both part of the 1862 Morrill Land Grant Act.
    , @res
    @Reg Cæsar

    2014 article about the 1980 NLRB v. Yeshiva University decision.
    http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/154859

    But things changed a bit in 2015 (makes me wonder if the 2014 article was part of or caused by laying the groundwork to change things).
    https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/01/02/nlrb-ruling-shifts-legal-ground-faculty-unions-private-colleges

    Anyone have a deeper understanding of the history and current situation?

  22. “expressed anger on Twitter at M.I.T.’s decision to invite Dr. Abbot to speak”

    We need places where those people can cool their heels, deprogram their social media and Hollywood meedja injected “save the world every day” Hermione Granger meme complex and find back their inner stability to reflect on what this “science thing” is all about and maybe read the white stale pale male classics.

    Camps where they can concentrate, far away from civilization.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @El Dato

    Dr. Abbott is much more likely to end up in a camp than his critics.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharashka

    The Soviet Union in the Stalin era had a problem similar to our own - they had cancelled many of their most prominent scientists for political reasons. But the work that these men (yes mostly men) did was necessary - the people with the right politics were just not capable of doing it. The solution was the "sharaska" - these men were sent to prison but forced to continue their scientific work. Usually credit for their work was given to others.

  23. @PhysicistDave
    OT, maybe.

    Half of this year's Nobel prize in physics was given to two guys for their supposed work in climate science.

    My colleague Lubos Motl has a take on why this is... odd.

    The basic problem is that Nobels are usually given for work that has been confirmed by empirical observations or experiments.

    While climate modeling is a legitimate area of investigation, I think it is fair to say that it has no significant, surprising results that are well-confirmed empirically.

    It does, of course, have certain political uses...

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @bomag, @Achmed E. Newman, @Calvin Hobbes

    Wow! A Nobel Prize for dicking around on a computer! Maybe they should award the next one to Bitcoin miners.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @animalogic
    @Mr. Anon

    "Maybe they should award the next one to Bitcoin miners."
    Maybe the bitcoin miners can fund a Nobel Prize -- the "Nobel Prize for unproductive financial shenanigans" perhaps.

  24. https://www.museumoftheearth.org › …
    “Phoebe Cohen – Museum of the Earth
    Aug 15, 2020 — Phoebe Cohen is a micropaleontologist. She studies ancient, single-celled, microscopic organisms that lived before animals evolved.”

    How apt.

    She uses, no doubt, a microscope invented by a woman of color, the plans for which were stolen by some oppressive white guy, who then took credit for “his” invention.

    • Replies: @CCZ
    @Kylie

    Maybe she is just angry that someone (probably a white male) challenged the utility of her "discipline":


    "What, if anything, is micropaleontology?"

    Published online by Cambridge University Press: 08 February 2016
    Jere H. Lipps, University of California, Department of Geology

    Abstract

    Micropaleontology is a peculiar subject: it is not easily defined, it focuses on geologic problems, and it ignores fundamental paleontologic and evolutionary questions it could best attack. As a result of its historic development, micropaleontology is directed to the solution of stratigraphic, paleoceanographic and paleoclimatologic problems, but it has seldom addressed paleobiologic or evolutionary ideas. It is a tradition rather than a discipline. The term “micropaleontology” and all it signifies should be abandoned, for it obscures natural relationships, attracts people with geologic rather than biologic approaches, isolates its practitioners in a blanket of systematics, biostratigraphies, and terminologies, and, as a result, discourages outsiders with other viewpoints or contributions from utilizing its fine fossil record. The growth of the field has been exponential in people-power and literature but not in the development of fundamentally new ideas. Micropaleontology has therefore contributed little to recent paleobiologic or evolutionary hypotheses, in spite of the possession by the many organisms relegated to it of biological properties and fossil records which have much potential for the generation and testing of such hypotheses.
     
  25. @J.Ross
    Blacklisting is witch-hunting and annudah shoah.
    But when we do it words have consequences.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    Blacklisting…

    Blacklisting? Ahem…

  26. Anon[130] • Disclaimer says:

    including the measurement of skulls with the intent to determine intelligence

    But didn’t this turn out to be correct, a noisy but positive correlation? And now that they have been able to measure brain size directly with MRI scans, the correlation is much less noisy.

    The only glitch is the fact that women’s brains are smaller than men’s, even though they have the exact same intelligence. Explain that!

    https://russellwarne.com/2021/06/21/implications-of-average-group-differences-for-the-design-of-intelligence-tests/

    … items with large differences in passing rates for males and females have been systematically removed from the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler tests….

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anon


    items with large differences in passing rates for males and females have been systematically removed from the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler tests….
     
    What does this even mean?

    Replies: @Pericles, @nobodyofnowhere, @kaganovitch, @3g4me

  27. @Kylie
    https://www.museumoftheearth.org › ...
    "Phoebe Cohen - Museum of the Earth
    Aug 15, 2020 — Phoebe Cohen is a micropaleontologist. She studies ancient, single-celled, microscopic organisms that lived before animals evolved."

    How apt.

    She uses, no doubt, a microscope invented by a woman of color, the plans for which were stolen by some oppressive white guy, who then took credit for "his" invention.

    Replies: @CCZ

    Maybe she is just angry that someone (probably a white male) challenged the utility of her “discipline”:

    “What, if anything, is micropaleontology?”

    Published online by Cambridge University Press: 08 February 2016
    Jere H. Lipps, University of California, Department of Geology

    Abstract

    Micropaleontology is a peculiar subject: it is not easily defined, it focuses on geologic problems, and it ignores fundamental paleontologic and evolutionary questions it could best attack. As a result of its historic development, micropaleontology is directed to the solution of stratigraphic, paleoceanographic and paleoclimatologic problems, but it has seldom addressed paleobiologic or evolutionary ideas. It is a tradition rather than a discipline. The term “micropaleontology” and all it signifies should be abandoned, for it obscures natural relationships, attracts people with geologic rather than biologic approaches, isolates its practitioners in a blanket of systematics, biostratigraphies, and terminologies, and, as a result, discourages outsiders with other viewpoints or contributions from utilizing its fine fossil record. The growth of the field has been exponential in people-power and literature but not in the development of fundamentally new ideas. Micropaleontology has therefore contributed little to recent paleobiologic or evolutionary hypotheses, in spite of the possession by the many organisms relegated to it of biological properties and fossil records which have much potential for the generation and testing of such hypotheses.

  28. @Anon7
    "This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated..."

    As I've asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    Isn't technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don't need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we're done, right? That's the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    Aren't we done?

    Replies: @Thomas, @John Johnson, @Wade Hampton, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb, @SFG, @vinteuil, @megabar

    I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm.

    But one man’s sarcasm is another’s policy vision. Certainly this view of the future of humanity is the goal of the transhumanists. All the heavy lifting will be done by internet-enabled-robots managed from the cloud by artificial intelligence and we will sit around watching Netflix specials indoctrinating us on leftist politics and DIE and eating Cheetos.

    I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm, but I agree with the last sentence. If this vision is implemented, we are done.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Wade Hampton


    we will sit around watching Netflix specials indoctrinating us on leftist politics and DIE and eating Cheetos.
     
    Don't forget the VR goggles and legalized drugs (soma). Hopefully Chinese programers can keep the whole thing running when we are too busy trippin' in alternate realities.
    , @Anon7
    @Wade Hampton

    "I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm."

    Yes it is. I know it's wrong; I should try to be optimistic.

    "Certainly this view of the future of humanity is the goal of the transhumanists."

    There is a poignant scene in Stephen Baxter's 2008 novel Flood which describes this perfectly. In the novel, the entire world is inundated. A frankly pathetic, psychologically broken woman uses immersive virtual reality to create an imaginary world in which she has a child.

    Of course, she understands nothing about the fact that her VR fantasy can't exist without the mining of coal and natural gas, the maintenance of vast infrastructure, etc. Her high-flown dream of wellness and family is shattered, leaving her stuck in the real world.

    I wonder how Dr. Phoebe Cohen, geosciences professor and department chair at Williams College, whose quote forms the title for Steve's article, will feel when she and her colleagues have finally gotten rid of all the smart white boys (women undergrads outnumber men 2 to 1, so we're getting close).

    I do think she's right that honest debate and rigorous examination of ideas is an essential element for our modern world; does she understand what will happen when it's gone? I guess it will just be political commissars splitting CRT doctrinal hairs and arguing over corner offices.

  29. Does the Supreme Court ever admit: “Yeah, our predecessors said that, but, obviously, it has turned out they were empirically wrong.” Or would that be too subversive of the dignity of the Court?

    If the Supreme Court stuck to its judicial scope of work, which is interpreting black letter law, then they wouldn’t have to worry about this. It’s only when they venture into social engineering that they have this problem, e.g. abortion, racial engineering, etc. In my experience with them, lawyers (including judges) are often barely competent to perform their original scope of work. I don’t trust them to do anything that requires common sense.

  30. How amazingly quickly the NYT piece sacheted from a (perfectly sound) caution against affirmative action (it DOES treat groups over individuals) to Nazi and eugenics. Alongside that trend to speed towards a ridiculous ‘in extremis’ immediately, there’s another I’ve noticed that could be equally ‘effective’. Eg. Today, about 10 days to the Glasgow COP 26 Climate Cult Fest, the BBC is salivating over ‘leaked’ documents revealing some countries do not agree with the UN’s emphasis of moving away from fossil fuels. ‘This shows what the science is up against’, the BBC trills. Ie opposition to any element of the Big Lie, sorry, Narrative is to be strangled in the womb. The Thought Police are switching their truncheons from the lecture halls to the cerebral cortex.

    • Thanks: Calvin Hobbes
  31. @Thomas

    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated."
     
    https://i.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/001/650/747/aaf.png

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Pericles, @bomag

    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated.”

    Intellectual debate and endless quibbling and obfuscation by a tiny minority on the other hand …!

  32. Maybe Professor Cohen’s ancestors should have emigrated to……Haiti? No White Poweer there!

    • Replies: @Mike_from_SGV
    @Redneck farmer

    That's what I don't get. With all the whining about 'white supremacy' etc, why don't they all relocate to Ghana or Somalia? No WS there. Of course they are lying, they actually love WS, it is a rich host for parasitism.

  33. @Anon

    including the measurement of skulls with the intent to determine intelligence
     
    But didn't this turn out to be correct, a noisy but positive correlation? And now that they have been able to measure brain size directly with MRI scans, the correlation is much less noisy.

    The only glitch is the fact that women's brains are smaller than men's, even though they have the exact same intelligence. Explain that!

    https://russellwarne.com/2021/06/21/implications-of-average-group-differences-for-the-design-of-intelligence-tests/

    ... items with large differences in passing rates for males and females have been systematically removed from the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler tests....
     

    Replies: @Anonymous

    items with large differences in passing rates for males and females have been systematically removed from the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler tests….

    What does this even mean?

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Anonymous

    Presumably that questions where women do significantly worse than men are removed from the test.

    , @nobodyofnowhere
    @Anonymous

    The IQ test is normed to reduce the difference between the sexes, which is achieved by presenting a large batch of potential questions to a sample group and removing each question where there's a substantial difference between the percentage of men & women who got it correct. Without this, male IQ would consistently be a few points higher than female IQ in adults.

    https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/06/hiding-sex-differences-not-a-myth/

    , @kaganovitch
    @Anonymous

    It means that there used to be components on these tests that showed an average disparity in score between males and females (with the advantage to the males). These components were removed and replaced by components that showed no such disparity. I.e., the test was changed in order to support the conclusion that there is no difference in IQ between males and females.

    , @3g4me
    @Anonymous

    @29 Anonymous[120]: "What does this even mean?"

    White men outscore White women and the POX on IQ tests. Women and POX hit hardest. Make IQ tests easier. Create clownworld and chaos. Rinse and repeat. Create apocalypse. Women and POX hit hardest.

  34. @Thomas

    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated."
     
    https://i.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/001/650/747/aaf.png

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Pericles, @bomag

    And they have no problem living in that world.

    Now, they want to stand on a stool at the counter and help make the cookies, which taste like crap; but a culture of politeness has us choking them down and añnouncing that they are the best ones ever. Complainers get stoned by a mob.

  35. Missing from the NYT is
    “All the news that’s only fit to print somewhere else”

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10109987/Fiston-Ngoy-Rape-suspect-Philadelphia-train-illegal-Congolese-immigrant.html

    Most telling line of the story:

    “However, Ngoy was never deported, because an immigration judge granted him a ‘withholding of removal’ in March 2019, after an appeals board found that his sex crime was not a ‘serious crime’ that made him eligible for removal. ”

    Who are these Judges and where do they live?

    • Replies: @Boy the way Glenn Miller played
    @Bill Jones


    However, Ngoy was never deported, because an immigration judge granted him a ‘withholding of removal’ in March 2019, after an appeals board found that his sex crime was not a ‘serious crime’ that made him eligible for removal. ”

    Who are these Judges and where do they live?
     
    And what do you think that Mr. Ngoy learned about the way things work in the NY metro area from this incident?
  36. @Mr. Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    Wow! A Nobel Prize for dicking around on a computer! Maybe they should award the next one to Bitcoin miners.

    Replies: @animalogic

    “Maybe they should award the next one to Bitcoin miners.”
    Maybe the bitcoin miners can fund a Nobel Prize — the “Nobel Prize for unproductive financial shenanigans” perhaps.

  37. @notsaying
    I am ready to fire her and take her PhD away. She does not belong in the community be of scholars. Her statements are particularly odd coming from someone in her field. There are still plenty of people who deny the evidence of the Earth's,s age and history. Does she support the Creationist Museum?

    I am thoroughly disgusted and to know there others out there like her and worse makes my blood boil. I suppose she teaches her students to think like she does.

    This is so wrong and there is no excuse. Final irony would be how few oppressed minorities are in her field. Does she really think that is due to white men searching for new discoveries and speaking the truth as they see it? Where would she be without the accumulated knowledge these imperfect men provided for her to learn and expand on?

    Replies: @bomag, @Moses

    Where would she be without the accumulated knowledge these imperfect men provided for her to learn and expand on?

    She’s helping to shrink that accumulated knowledge.

  38. @Cortes
    “Does the Supreme Court ever admit: “Yeah, our predecessors said that, but, obviously, it has turned out they were empirically wrong.” Or would that be too subversive of the dignity of the Court?”

    It should not be beyond the ability of experienced judges to “revisit” any matter without harm to the dignity of the office. The political context in which opinions are formed and delivered naturally evolve and it is no surprise to anyone that the composition of the SCOTUS affects the rulings handed down. If enough Justices become concerned about the effects of a previous ruling, then the magic elasticity of precedence comes into play and the old “that was then but this is now” double-shuffle dazzles the slow-witted opponents... “in light of recent developments in the field of” ... “as evidence has accumulated “ &c.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Hypnotoad666

    If enough Justices become concerned about the effects of a previous ruling, then the magic elasticity of precedence comes into play and the old “that was then but this is now” double-shuffle dazzles the slow-witted opponents… “in light of recent developments in the field of” … “as evidence has accumulated “ &c.

    Traditionally, courts decided cases based on law.

    At some point—I would argue that point was the infamous Warren Court—courts appointed themselves makers of law based on social theory.

    Previously unheard-of phrases, such as “recent studies show”, began appearing in court decisions as it became apparent that courts no longer served the law but instead began serving the latest academic fads, which itself is an unduly charitable characterization since the latest academic fads all come from one particular part of the political spectrum.

    In other words, yes, in theory if enough justices become concerned, they could revisit old decisions, particularly ones based on now-falsified studies, as the Replication Crisis has shown that 90% of the studies in those “recent studies show” decisions were crap. But this won’t happen because the purpose of those social theory cases was never social theory, it was to advance a narrow political agenda under the guise of social theory. And now that that political agenda has been poured into the concrete of constitutional law, conservative judges won’t change it because they naively believe that judges only interpret law, while liberal judges will hypocritically invoke stare decisis to ensure that their preferred readings remain mandatory while conveniently forgetting stare decisis the next time they want to overturn millennia of precedent.

    tl;dr: Constitutional law was weaponized against the Constitution in the 1960s. No practicing jurist has any personal memory of the before time.

    • Thanks: Cortes, JerseyJeffersonian
  39. @John Johnson
    @Anon7

    As I’ve asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    So are you setting the new low for egalitarians? OK so a lot of geniuses have been White but can we now get rid of them?

    Isn’t technology pretty much plug and play, now?

    LOL do you think people have stopped filing mechanical patents?

    Can't tell if this post is serious.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    Is it so hard to recognize an irony?

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Is it so hard to recognize an irony?

    In clown world it most certainly is.

    I have seen liberals argue that White male inventors were never needed because they were just holding back everyone else.

    I have even seen a conservative say that Whites should be ashamed of holding back humanity by not allowing non-Whites to contribute. He actually had bloodguilt over it.

    There was a professor that suggested companies be taxed in order to make up for White executives holding back Blacks in tech.

    There are people that fully believe in Wakanda theory. They really believe that Kalahari Bushmen would have developed calculus if nasty Whites didn't oppress them or something. I would say at least 30% of Whites believe this.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

  40. @PhysicistDave
    OT, maybe.

    Half of this year's Nobel prize in physics was given to two guys for their supposed work in climate science.

    My colleague Lubos Motl has a take on why this is... odd.

    The basic problem is that Nobels are usually given for work that has been confirmed by empirical observations or experiments.

    While climate modeling is a legitimate area of investigation, I think it is fair to say that it has no significant, surprising results that are well-confirmed empirically.

    It does, of course, have certain political uses...

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @bomag, @Achmed E. Newman, @Calvin Hobbes

    Thanks.

    A book about discovering the Higgs boson was entitled Present At The Creation.

    Now, Present At The Destruction can be written.

  41. The most fascinating idea is in my eyes “citational justice”.
    Whereas Nazis never forbade to quote or refer to Jewish scientists, in a lot of scientific circles it was understood that such a behaviour would just not boost your career. So it often wasn’t done, even if the results of “Jewish science” were tacitly applied.
    But of course, this was only an attempt to make the “structurally racist” system of citations more just: Jews were so much overrepresented! Citations must be redistributed proportionally to the sexes and races! Couldn’t we perhaps rewrite our scientific classics according to this principle?

  42. “citational justice,”

    There are more kinds of justice than flavors of Ben & Jerry’s.

  43. @Anonymous
    @Anon


    items with large differences in passing rates for males and females have been systematically removed from the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler tests….
     
    What does this even mean?

    Replies: @Pericles, @nobodyofnowhere, @kaganovitch, @3g4me

    Presumably that questions where women do significantly worse than men are removed from the test.

  44. To put things in perspective, Oberlin College has an undergraduate student body of 2,800 students, is around 75% non-Hispanic white, is in the bottom five percent of universities in the U.S. for Pell Grant receiving students, has a four year graduation rate of 75%, and is a 1350 SAT school.

    Compared to Williams College, another small liberal arts school in the news, Oberlin is in the second tier of small liberal arts colleges.

    http://collegeresults.org/collegeprofile.aspx?institutionid=204501

    If conservatives really wanted to reform universities, they would pass legislation that required every university that receives federal aid to report high school GPA, graduation rates, SAT scores of admitted students broken down by race/gender/ethnicity so see how much affirmative action is actually occurring. The federal government should also require reporting of the major of each graduate to see what the university is actually teaching versus claims of what it is teaching.

  45. @Wilkey
    Phoebe Cohen claims on her Twitter page (where of course she provides her pronouns) that she was quoted out of context. She then goes on to explain that what she really meant is...exactly what we assumed she meant.

    Rigor?


    Cohen: "the whole idea of "rigor" is full of problems and biases - rigor according to whom? What standards are we using, and who is setting those standards? For centuries, "rigor" has been defined by a very thin slice of our society."
     
    Yes, rigor is defined by a very thin slice of society. Those standards aren't set by white men in general, but people of science and math who have shown a reputation for producing results. Complaining that too many of them are white and male is a bit like complaining that too many of them are Jewish.

    Free speech?

    Cohen: "'unfettered speech'" is often used as an excuse to do harm and maintain the status quo."

    Jeffrey Sachs: "Everyone is reading your quote to mean that rigor and unfettered speech are the purview of/only valued by/expressions of whiteness. But it sounds here like what you mean is that rigor and unfettered speech are often used to strengthen whiteness. Is that it? n other words, you're not opposed to rigor in academia. You just mean that rigor is frequently deployed as a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?"

    Cohen: "Yes."

     

    Again, her "clarification" doesn't change how any sane person would have interpreted the quote in the article. By saying that she's against free speech and intellectual "rigor" what she's saying is that she doesn't want people to have the right to speak views she disagrees with, and she shouldn't be expected to provide any (rigorously) justifiable reason as to why.

    Replies: @Moses, @LP5, @iDeplorable, @Walter Duranty, @mulga mumblebrain

    That’s a lot of words to say “Because Ms Cohen and her kind hate Whites and want them gone.”

  46. @notsaying
    I am ready to fire her and take her PhD away. She does not belong in the community be of scholars. Her statements are particularly odd coming from someone in her field. There are still plenty of people who deny the evidence of the Earth's,s age and history. Does she support the Creationist Museum?

    I am thoroughly disgusted and to know there others out there like her and worse makes my blood boil. I suppose she teaches her students to think like she does.

    This is so wrong and there is no excuse. Final irony would be how few oppressed minorities are in her field. Does she really think that is due to white men searching for new discoveries and speaking the truth as they see it? Where would she be without the accumulated knowledge these imperfect men provided for her to learn and expand on?

    Replies: @bomag, @Moses

    I am ready to fire her and take her PhD away. She does not belong in the community be of scholars.

    Fire her? Lol.

    To make these words happen you need Power. You and other Sailer readers don’t have any.

    Ms Cohen and her kind do. They are using it.

    That’s how it works.

  47. @Wilkey
    Basically, the Left wants to be able to demonize certain demographic groups, and doesn't want to allow those people any right to a rebuttal. Example:

    Liberal: "Blacks are disproportionately killed by police officers."

    Conservative: "That's because blacks commit a much higher percentage of violent crime than their share of the population."

    The conservative rebuttal is an example of providing rigorous logic to the question of why more blacks are disproportionately killed by police. Cohen would claim that rigor should not be applied to this case (at least not rigor as defined by whites who disagree), and that even making such an argument should result in the loss of someone's job, their access to social media, and even their freedom itself.

    Presumably, Cohen also does not want to use free speech or intellectual rigor to question why she should keep her job if she believes in affirmative action, given that Jewish women are heavily overrepresented in academia.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Moses, @3g4me

    Lefties can deny any “rigor” or reality they want. They have Power. They create their own reality. They force the rest of us to live in its squalor.

    Orwell’s “1984” is happening right in front of us. Have you noticed?

    O’Brien silenced him by a movement of his hand. ‘We control matter because we control the mind. Reality is inside the skull. You will learn by degrees, Winston. There is nothing that we could not do. Invisibility, levitation — anything. I could float off this floor like a soap bubble if I wish to. I do not wish to, because the Party does not wish it. You must get rid of those nineteenth-century ideas about the laws of Nature. We make the laws of Nature.’

    Read what our reality masters have in store for us here. http://www.george-orwell.org/1984/19.html

  48. @Anonymous
    @Anon


    items with large differences in passing rates for males and females have been systematically removed from the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler tests….
     
    What does this even mean?

    Replies: @Pericles, @nobodyofnowhere, @kaganovitch, @3g4me

    The IQ test is normed to reduce the difference between the sexes, which is achieved by presenting a large batch of potential questions to a sample group and removing each question where there’s a substantial difference between the percentage of men & women who got it correct. Without this, male IQ would consistently be a few points higher than female IQ in adults.

    https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/06/hiding-sex-differences-not-a-myth/

  49. This new style of journalism whereby it’s considered perfectly normal to go to diversity “science” activist Phoebe Cohen from liberal arts college Williams to render her judgment on what MIT should do with a speaker from U of Chicago goes unremarked. It’s just the new normal.

    Her only relevance to this seems to be that she expressed anger on Twitter. Oh. That’s enough for Powell and the NYT to consider her a subject matter expert here.

  50. Powell perpetrates the usual and expected racist white vs. Black. He also capitalizes various ethnicities and groups that are in fact proper nouns. But what with the C in Nazi and Communist regimes twisted science to their own end? Is he just rubbing it in that every group other than Whites is worthy of capitalization? Expressing his devotion to the cause?

  51. As a college freshman in 1980, I wrote my English class research paper about Affirmative Action. I couldn’t believe such a thing could be allowed to exist in the United States.

    I still maintain AA was the seed that has since grown into the giant oak tree that is today’s identity politics. Now questioning AA will get you cancelled on campus–presumably because it makes POCs who have been admitted under AA feel bad. This is the clown world we currently inhabit.

    • Agree: Calvin Hobbes
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Spud Boy

    It's like income tax, which was originally sold to the public as a temporary imposition which would only affect millionaires. A century later this "temporary" tax is still around and is levied on everyone.

    You have as much chance of getting rid of affirmative action as you do income tax.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  52. “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,”

    And, especially, Jews. Harvard and Princeton weren’t that big as long as they strove to be truly “white”, ie before the previous era of “holistic” admissions gave way to something approximating meritocracy. It happened around 1960, and Charles Murray talks about it towards the beginning of his Coming Apart.

    • Disagree: lavoisier
    • LOL: 3g4me
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @International Jew

    Interesting comment.

    What do you think of this: Really, what Ms. Cohen wants to say is that too many of these intellectual types at the universities are insufferable, condescending jerks.

    But she can't come out and just say that because it sounds petty and totally subjective. Also, she might be rather prone to those traits herself.

    Who wants to admit that the biggest jackass in the room might just be right about something? Better to take him down with a grievance weapon at hand, and impersonally on social media.

    , @AnotherDad
    @International Jew



    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,”
     
    And, especially, Jews. Harvard and Princeton weren’t that big as long as they strove to be truly “white” ....
     
    Indeed Jews love to argue. Unfortunately, what they do not love is empiricism.

    But that empirical check is what's required to make an argument actually "rigorous" in the "enlightening about the world" sense, and something more than Talmudic squabbling. The empirical impulse--is that what we see? does it work?--seems to be much more rooted in "production people" than "marketplace people".

    Jews are smart--and very verbal. They punch way above their weight in making noise, but a lot of it just that--noise. They punch below their IQ weight in "finding truth".

    Jewish intellectuals have been thick on the ground--especially the last 100/150 years--but if they'd never existed we'd probably be a few years behind in STEM, maybe a decade or more in physics ... but our social science would actually be much, much better!

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    , @lavoisier
    @International Jew

    Intellectual debate and rigor are very often suppressed by Jews--particularly if the subject matter does not conform to their prejudice. This suppression has intensified significantly as Jewish power increases.

    Look no further than the dark ages that have descended on the study of racial differences in genes associated with behavior, especially intelligence. How much intellectual debate and rigor is allowed on this subject in Jewish dominated academia?

    Gould and Lewontin and Rose were not Irish Catholics.

  53. @Abolish_public_education
    This is what results when profsters get paid by their university, rather than directly by the students they're supposed to (but don't) teach. Abolish faculty unions.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @International Jew

    Back in the day, German professors collected admission lecture by lecture. Imagine doing that.

    Profs aren’t generally unionized, though. Maybe they are at some community colleges.

    • Replies: @guest007
    @International Jew

    If anyone involved in instruction is unionizing, it will be the teaching assistants/research assistants so that they will not be treated like slave labor as much.

    On a campus, the most likely union members will be housekeeping, facilities, security, or food services.

    , @kaganovitch
    @International Jew

    Yes, bring back the Privatdozent!

  54. @Thomas
    @Anon7


    Isn’t technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don’t need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we’re done, right? That’s the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?
     
    You realize there's a pretty big backend to all that "plug and play" technology, right? Your Netflix show doesn't actually come from a "cloud" somewhere, but relies on a massive ecosystem of data centers and content distribution networks that all have to be constantly maintained in order to provide service to tens of millions of users at a time. The degree to which things have been simplified and made cheap, seamless and invisible for the end user, such that everything seems "plug and play," has only made possible by creating massive, centralized infrastructure somewhere else. The same is very much true in non-IT sectors as well. The supply chain crisis going on right now is educating everyone about just how much work goes into getting all their stuff to them just-in-time the way people have come to expect in the past decade.

    Granted, there's likely a very real risk that people who've never actually done anything productive in their lives, like, say, most of the people who dominate policymaking, think that the modern world works that way. Then they make decisions based on assumptions such as you can shut down much of the economy for a year without consequences, or you can put a twee little former mayor of South Bend in charge of transportation infrastructure because he likes trains.

    Replies: @Sebastian Y., @Anon7, @Anon7

    Peak oil was a popular theory 15-20 years ago. I bought into it and thought that modern civilization would start to steadily decline toward a grinding halt when we started to run out of cheap oil.

    Now I think I might’ve been write about the civilizational collapse but wrong about the reason.

    I’m now a firm believer in Peak White Male.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Sebastian Y.

    Don't feel bad, Sebastian. I was way off on my Peak Stupidity forecast too. I need to get our Indian software developer Josh in Bombay to tweek our models a tad.

  55. @International Jew
    @Abolish_public_education

    Back in the day, German professors collected admission lecture by lecture. Imagine doing that.

    Profs aren't generally unionized, though. Maybe they are at some community colleges.

    Replies: @guest007, @kaganovitch

    If anyone involved in instruction is unionizing, it will be the teaching assistants/research assistants so that they will not be treated like slave labor as much.

    On a campus, the most likely union members will be housekeeping, facilities, security, or food services.

  56. @International Jew

    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,”
     
    And, especially, Jews. Harvard and Princeton weren't that big as long as they strove to be truly "white", ie before the previous era of "holistic" admissions gave way to something approximating meritocracy. It happened around 1960, and Charles Murray talks about it towards the beginning of his Coming Apart.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @AnotherDad, @lavoisier

    Interesting comment.

    What do you think of this: Really, what Ms. Cohen wants to say is that too many of these intellectual types at the universities are insufferable, condescending jerks.

    But she can’t come out and just say that because it sounds petty and totally subjective. Also, she might be rather prone to those traits herself.

    Who wants to admit that the biggest jackass in the room might just be right about something? Better to take him down with a grievance weapon at hand, and impersonally on social media.

  57. The Court hates to admit it was wrong. Even Brown v. Board didn’t explicitly overrule Plessy; that’s why the opinion included a lot of empirical material about the psychological effect of segregated schools, to distingush them from railroads. The only time they trumpeted the overturning of an earlier decision was, you guessed it, sodomy laws (“Bowers was wrong when it was decided [just 17 years earlier], and it is wrong today.”)

  58. The hammer…”words matter and have consequences.” That only depends on whose words you chose to listen to and whose words you chose to cancel.

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    @Buffalo Joe

    Just another corollary of Who/Whom.

  59. @International Jew
    @Abolish_public_education

    Back in the day, German professors collected admission lecture by lecture. Imagine doing that.

    Profs aren't generally unionized, though. Maybe they are at some community colleges.

    Replies: @guest007, @kaganovitch

    Yes, bring back the Privatdozent!

  60. M.I.T.’s Choice of Lecturer Ignited Criticism. So Did Its Decision to Cancel.

    When you realize you are getting brainwashed from the first line as incontinent destruction by bluecist busybodies (“criticism, ignited”) is put on the same level as people complaining about MIT bending over instead of just choosing the null option and telling those idiots to mind their own business (“‘decision to cancel’ also ignites criticism)

  61. . Does the Supreme Court ever admit: “Yeah, our predecessors said that, but, obviously, it has turned out they were empirically wrong.” Or would that be too subversive of the dignity of the Court?”

    Doesn’t that sound like the idea of Papal infallibility that the great and the good of the Protestant elite have mocked for centuries?

  62. …And in some cases refuse to acknowledge in footnotes the research of those who hold distasteful views

    So they don’t use the research – or the credit it to someone else? Perhaps an aspiring rapper/astrophysicist…

  63. More on Dr Cohen:

    From https://sites.williams.edu/pac3/:

    “She [Dr Cohen] is actively involved in justice, equity, diversity and inclusion work in her discipline, at Williams and beyond, most recently as a founding organizer of URGE [Unlearning Racism in Geoscience].”

    From https://urgeoscience.org/:

    “URGE is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant EAR#1714909 and by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.”

  64. “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,” she replied.

    True.

  65. Phoebe Cohen! Every single…eh, why even bother.

    • Agree: Hangnail Hans
  66. @Thomas
    @Anon7


    Isn’t technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don’t need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we’re done, right? That’s the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?
     
    You realize there's a pretty big backend to all that "plug and play" technology, right? Your Netflix show doesn't actually come from a "cloud" somewhere, but relies on a massive ecosystem of data centers and content distribution networks that all have to be constantly maintained in order to provide service to tens of millions of users at a time. The degree to which things have been simplified and made cheap, seamless and invisible for the end user, such that everything seems "plug and play," has only made possible by creating massive, centralized infrastructure somewhere else. The same is very much true in non-IT sectors as well. The supply chain crisis going on right now is educating everyone about just how much work goes into getting all their stuff to them just-in-time the way people have come to expect in the past decade.

    Granted, there's likely a very real risk that people who've never actually done anything productive in their lives, like, say, most of the people who dominate policymaking, think that the modern world works that way. Then they make decisions based on assumptions such as you can shut down much of the economy for a year without consequences, or you can put a twee little former mayor of South Bend in charge of transportation infrastructure because he likes trains.

    Replies: @Sebastian Y., @Anon7, @Anon7

    “The degree to which things have been simplified and made cheap, seamless and invisible for the end user, such that everything seems “plug and play,” has only made possible by creating massive, centralized infrastructure somewhere else.”

    Exactly right. You just need money. For example, the Saudis are buying a Cloud from Google:

    Google will open a “cloud region” where it can provide its cloud services in Saudi Arabia via a joint venture with state-owned oil producer Saudi Aramco…

    Aramco said the agreement with Google will deliver “high performance, low-latency cloud services to enterprise customers in Saudi Arabia” as warming relations in the region open the political space for U.S. technology companies to expand into the kingdom.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/12/23/google-aramco-eye-10-billion-cloud-market-in-saudi-arabia.html

    Google trawls through high IQ countries, recruits the talent, builds minimum infrastructure in the host country, easy peasy. The Saudis don’t need to bring their people any further along than, say, the fourteenth century.

    Don’t third-world (technology level) countries all over the world gain telephony and internet services the same way? Hasn’t China leapfrogged over the twentieth century by partnering with western hospitals to provide healthcare services in China? Hasn’t the United States, once a powerhouse of engineering innovation and manufacturing, largely sent all that stuff out of the country? Just let those diligent Chinese take care of it.

    (This was a bitterly sarcastic post, by the way. If you stop making progress, you’ll never know what you missed, right?

    Your comments about small town mayors put in charge of national transportation infrastructure are on point. He just spent the last two months playing house with his partner. It just shows that none of those people are in charge of anything.)

    • Replies: @Thomas
    @Anon7


    Google trawls through high IQ countries, recruits the talent, builds minimum infrastructure in the host country, easy peasy.
     
    This works so long as there are high IQ countries to recruit from, or high IQ populations in formerly high IQ countries to recruit from. The jig will be up when China and India decide they're no longer interested in being cannibalized for the brains the West can no longer produce itself.
    , @notsaying
    @Anon7

    A lot of state and federal top jobs end up going to people who know nothing about what their people do. Bush's Brownie knew nothing about emergencies but head if FEMA, Trump's Dr. Ben Carson knew nothing about housing but was put in charge at HUD, etc, etc. One of the explanations people give for that is that they put in administrators used to running large organizations but that is not always true. Businesses today are run by people who typically spent a career uninvolved with their product or services.

    This used to be a topic of discussion decades ago in business but no longer. It is just accepted. I think for both government and business it would be worthwhile to revisit the promotion through the ranks vs. leapfrogging from one top management job to another debate.

    It is interesting that nobody ever says "It doesn't matter much if so and so is here. We've been referring everything to his staff just like they do."

  67. @Wilkey
    Phoebe Cohen claims on her Twitter page (where of course she provides her pronouns) that she was quoted out of context. She then goes on to explain that what she really meant is...exactly what we assumed she meant.

    Rigor?


    Cohen: "the whole idea of "rigor" is full of problems and biases - rigor according to whom? What standards are we using, and who is setting those standards? For centuries, "rigor" has been defined by a very thin slice of our society."
     
    Yes, rigor is defined by a very thin slice of society. Those standards aren't set by white men in general, but people of science and math who have shown a reputation for producing results. Complaining that too many of them are white and male is a bit like complaining that too many of them are Jewish.

    Free speech?

    Cohen: "'unfettered speech'" is often used as an excuse to do harm and maintain the status quo."

    Jeffrey Sachs: "Everyone is reading your quote to mean that rigor and unfettered speech are the purview of/only valued by/expressions of whiteness. But it sounds here like what you mean is that rigor and unfettered speech are often used to strengthen whiteness. Is that it? n other words, you're not opposed to rigor in academia. You just mean that rigor is frequently deployed as a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?"

    Cohen: "Yes."

     

    Again, her "clarification" doesn't change how any sane person would have interpreted the quote in the article. By saying that she's against free speech and intellectual "rigor" what she's saying is that she doesn't want people to have the right to speak views she disagrees with, and she shouldn't be expected to provide any (rigorously) justifiable reason as to why.

    Replies: @Moses, @LP5, @iDeplorable, @Walter Duranty, @mulga mumblebrain

    In other Williams College geoscience news, the Rocks for Jocks classes will be renamed.

  68. @Wade Hampton
    @Anon7

    I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm.

    But one man’s sarcasm is another’s policy vision. Certainly this view of the future of humanity is the goal of the transhumanists. All the heavy lifting will be done by internet-enabled-robots managed from the cloud by artificial intelligence and we will sit around watching Netflix specials indoctrinating us on leftist politics and DIE and eating Cheetos.

    I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm, but I agree with the last sentence. If this vision is implemented, we are done.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Anon7

    we will sit around watching Netflix specials indoctrinating us on leftist politics and DIE and eating Cheetos.

    Don’t forget the VR goggles and legalized drugs (soma). Hopefully Chinese programers can keep the whole thing running when we are too busy trippin’ in alternate realities.

  69. @Reg Cæsar
    @Abolish_public_education


    Abolish faculty unions.
     
    Didn't the Supreme Court rule that only public university faculty could unionize? MIT is private.

    Replies: @LP5, @res

    Didn’t the Supreme Court rule that only public university faculty could unionize? MIT is private.

    Watch for an MIT Land Grant College exception amicus brief. Cornell, too. They were both part of the 1862 Morrill Land Grant Act.

  70. @Thomas
    @Anon7


    Isn’t technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don’t need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we’re done, right? That’s the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?
     
    You realize there's a pretty big backend to all that "plug and play" technology, right? Your Netflix show doesn't actually come from a "cloud" somewhere, but relies on a massive ecosystem of data centers and content distribution networks that all have to be constantly maintained in order to provide service to tens of millions of users at a time. The degree to which things have been simplified and made cheap, seamless and invisible for the end user, such that everything seems "plug and play," has only made possible by creating massive, centralized infrastructure somewhere else. The same is very much true in non-IT sectors as well. The supply chain crisis going on right now is educating everyone about just how much work goes into getting all their stuff to them just-in-time the way people have come to expect in the past decade.

    Granted, there's likely a very real risk that people who've never actually done anything productive in their lives, like, say, most of the people who dominate policymaking, think that the modern world works that way. Then they make decisions based on assumptions such as you can shut down much of the economy for a year without consequences, or you can put a twee little former mayor of South Bend in charge of transportation infrastructure because he likes trains.

    Replies: @Sebastian Y., @Anon7, @Anon7

    Here’s an interesting story about plug and play technology in a vast Socialist police state nightmare:

    When the Soviet Union collapsed, accounting for this technological deficit needed a new approach, and Vladimir Bulgak, the minister of communications under former President Boris Yeltsin, was willing to break with the past. Russia desperately needed modern communications, but local industry couldn’t provide the technology. Due to Soviet-era restrictions, the Russian telecommunications industry now lagged behind the West by 20 to 25 years. “We came to think that our industry would never catch up, and that meant we had to go and buy,” Bulgak told me during an interview.

    And Moscow did just that. In the span of three years, more than 70 percent of all Russian intercity phone stations were replaced by modern digital ones, made in the West, and Bulgak increased the number of international lines in the country from 2,000 analog ones to 66,000, all of them digital.

    Bulgak bought equipment from abroad, bypassing old Soviet factories at enormous cost — many of them were forced to close, leaving thousands of people high and dry. But by 1995, Russia had established a modern, national communications industry. Thriving and profitable internet businesses sprang up in the early 2000s, something that would have been impossible without the lines and stations purchased by Bulgak.

    The infrastructure of the Russian internet was built on Western technology, primarily Cisco, an American conglomerate, because the new national telecoms companies believed that reliability was more important than the origin of the supplier. Putin has not learned this lesson. When Western sanctions were imposed on Russia in 2014 following the annexation of Crimea, Putin called for import substitution to replace foreign products with domestic ones. The new security doctrine cements this idea, saying that “the level of dependence of the domestic industry from foreign IT” is too high and that this makes Russia dependent on “foreign geopolitical interests.”

    But the country’s industry simply can’t produce all the equipment that is needed, and desperate officials have since turned to China to replace Western technology. And although it’s an open question whether this new doctrine will actually make Russia any safer — it will surely limit the country’s economic potential.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2016/12/22/the-unlearned-lessons-from-the-collapse-of-the-soviet-union/#soldatov

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    @Anon7

    Interesting, regarding the backwardness of telecom in the Soviet Union, I remember reading in a book by James Gleick that pointed out it wasn't until 1965 that the number of phone calls in Soviet Russia exceeded the number of telegrams, by contrast that transition happened in the US sometime around 1900.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Joe Stalin

  71. @Cortes
    “Does the Supreme Court ever admit: “Yeah, our predecessors said that, but, obviously, it has turned out they were empirically wrong.” Or would that be too subversive of the dignity of the Court?”

    It should not be beyond the ability of experienced judges to “revisit” any matter without harm to the dignity of the office. The political context in which opinions are formed and delivered naturally evolve and it is no surprise to anyone that the composition of the SCOTUS affects the rulings handed down. If enough Justices become concerned about the effects of a previous ruling, then the magic elasticity of precedence comes into play and the old “that was then but this is now” double-shuffle dazzles the slow-witted opponents... “in light of recent developments in the field of” ... “as evidence has accumulated “ &c.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Hypnotoad666

    Well put, Cortez. Chief Justice Roberts is especially good at shuffling the interpretive deck as present political circumstances require. At bottom, the Supreme Court is of course a political body. But it dresses up as a priesthood that merely translates the magic books (written in a language that you can’t read). “Hey, don’t shoot the messengers, we are just telling you what the gods themselves have commanded.”

    • Disagree: Corvinus
  72. @Anonymous
    @Anon


    items with large differences in passing rates for males and females have been systematically removed from the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler tests….
     
    What does this even mean?

    Replies: @Pericles, @nobodyofnowhere, @kaganovitch, @3g4me

    It means that there used to be components on these tests that showed an average disparity in score between males and females (with the advantage to the males). These components were removed and replaced by components that showed no such disparity. I.e., the test was changed in order to support the conclusion that there is no difference in IQ between males and females.

  73. @Wade Hampton
    @Anon7

    I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm.

    But one man’s sarcasm is another’s policy vision. Certainly this view of the future of humanity is the goal of the transhumanists. All the heavy lifting will be done by internet-enabled-robots managed from the cloud by artificial intelligence and we will sit around watching Netflix specials indoctrinating us on leftist politics and DIE and eating Cheetos.

    I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm, but I agree with the last sentence. If this vision is implemented, we are done.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Anon7

    “I’m reasonably sure that this post is sarcasm.”

    Yes it is. I know it’s wrong; I should try to be optimistic.

    “Certainly this view of the future of humanity is the goal of the transhumanists.”

    There is a poignant scene in Stephen Baxter’s 2008 novel Flood which describes this perfectly. In the novel, the entire world is inundated. A frankly pathetic, psychologically broken woman uses immersive virtual reality to create an imaginary world in which she has a child.

    Of course, she understands nothing about the fact that her VR fantasy can’t exist without the mining of coal and natural gas, the maintenance of vast infrastructure, etc. Her high-flown dream of wellness and family is shattered, leaving her stuck in the real world.

    I wonder how Dr. Phoebe Cohen, geosciences professor and department chair at Williams College, whose quote forms the title for Steve’s article, will feel when she and her colleagues have finally gotten rid of all the smart white boys (women undergrads outnumber men 2 to 1, so we’re getting close).

    I do think she’s right that honest debate and rigorous examination of ideas is an essential element for our modern world; does she understand what will happen when it’s gone? I guess it will just be political commissars splitting CRT doctrinal hairs and arguing over corner offices.

  74. @Anon7
    "This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated..."

    As I've asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    Isn't technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don't need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we're done, right? That's the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    Aren't we done?

    Replies: @Thomas, @John Johnson, @Wade Hampton, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb, @SFG, @vinteuil, @megabar

    Western civilization is just “done”, period…Only question is whether we can save indoor plumbing…

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Disagree: Corvinus
    • Replies: @3g4me
    @pyrrhus

    @56 pyrrhus: "Only question is whether we can save indoor plumbing." Useless unless it's Whites only.

  75. @Wilkey
    Phoebe Cohen claims on her Twitter page (where of course she provides her pronouns) that she was quoted out of context. She then goes on to explain that what she really meant is...exactly what we assumed she meant.

    Rigor?


    Cohen: "the whole idea of "rigor" is full of problems and biases - rigor according to whom? What standards are we using, and who is setting those standards? For centuries, "rigor" has been defined by a very thin slice of our society."
     
    Yes, rigor is defined by a very thin slice of society. Those standards aren't set by white men in general, but people of science and math who have shown a reputation for producing results. Complaining that too many of them are white and male is a bit like complaining that too many of them are Jewish.

    Free speech?

    Cohen: "'unfettered speech'" is often used as an excuse to do harm and maintain the status quo."

    Jeffrey Sachs: "Everyone is reading your quote to mean that rigor and unfettered speech are the purview of/only valued by/expressions of whiteness. But it sounds here like what you mean is that rigor and unfettered speech are often used to strengthen whiteness. Is that it? n other words, you're not opposed to rigor in academia. You just mean that rigor is frequently deployed as a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?"

    Cohen: "Yes."

     

    Again, her "clarification" doesn't change how any sane person would have interpreted the quote in the article. By saying that she's against free speech and intellectual "rigor" what she's saying is that she doesn't want people to have the right to speak views she disagrees with, and she shouldn't be expected to provide any (rigorously) justifiable reason as to why.

    Replies: @Moses, @LP5, @iDeplorable, @Walter Duranty, @mulga mumblebrain

    Cohen: “‘unfettered speech’” is often used as an excuse to do harm and maintain the status quo.”

    Jeffrey Sachs: “Everyone is reading your…a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?”

    Cohen: “Yes.”

    Cohen, Sachs, Cohen…I’m shocked I tell you, shocked!

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @iDeplorable

    A Jew on both sides = free speech. Anything else is Fascism.

  76. @Reg Cæsar
    @Abolish_public_education


    Abolish faculty unions.
     
    Didn't the Supreme Court rule that only public university faculty could unionize? MIT is private.

    Replies: @LP5, @res

    2014 article about the 1980 NLRB v. Yeshiva University decision.
    http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/154859

    But things changed a bit in 2015 (makes me wonder if the 2014 article was part of or caused by laying the groundwork to change things).
    https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/01/02/nlrb-ruling-shifts-legal-ground-faculty-unions-private-colleges

    Anyone have a deeper understanding of the history and current situation?

  77. Personally, though, I was on campus in 1978, and it seemed like there was more diversity of opinion back then than in 2021. Does the Supreme Court ever admit: “Yeah, our predecessors said that, but, obviously, it has turned out they were empirically wrong.”

    Every time they make a decision that goes contrary to Dred Scott.

  78. @Wilkey
    Phoebe Cohen claims on her Twitter page (where of course she provides her pronouns) that she was quoted out of context. She then goes on to explain that what she really meant is...exactly what we assumed she meant.

    Rigor?


    Cohen: "the whole idea of "rigor" is full of problems and biases - rigor according to whom? What standards are we using, and who is setting those standards? For centuries, "rigor" has been defined by a very thin slice of our society."
     
    Yes, rigor is defined by a very thin slice of society. Those standards aren't set by white men in general, but people of science and math who have shown a reputation for producing results. Complaining that too many of them are white and male is a bit like complaining that too many of them are Jewish.

    Free speech?

    Cohen: "'unfettered speech'" is often used as an excuse to do harm and maintain the status quo."

    Jeffrey Sachs: "Everyone is reading your quote to mean that rigor and unfettered speech are the purview of/only valued by/expressions of whiteness. But it sounds here like what you mean is that rigor and unfettered speech are often used to strengthen whiteness. Is that it? n other words, you're not opposed to rigor in academia. You just mean that rigor is frequently deployed as a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?"

    Cohen: "Yes."

     

    Again, her "clarification" doesn't change how any sane person would have interpreted the quote in the article. By saying that she's against free speech and intellectual "rigor" what she's saying is that she doesn't want people to have the right to speak views she disagrees with, and she shouldn't be expected to provide any (rigorously) justifiable reason as to why.

    Replies: @Moses, @LP5, @iDeplorable, @Walter Duranty, @mulga mumblebrain

    Good post. Rigor is the antidote to wokeness, hencee it is racist and anti-Semitic.

  79. There’s no debate over school tax increases. Texas public school districts are back, again asking local voters to approve bond issues and tax hikes. Notably, in districts in the vicinity San Antonio, early voting has already started for:

    Judson ISD: a \$302M bond package
    East Central ISD: \$176M bond
    Comal ISD: \$528M
    Southside ISD: \$52M
    Alamo Heights ISD: \$1.4M in tax hikes

    Remember the San Antonio ISD 2020 bond whopper: \$1.3B

  80. “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,” she replied.

    Feeb Phoebe got that right. Almost immediately after my grad school alma mater, Brown University, picked a female, Negro, affirmative action hire as President, the place suffered a serious increase in “woke” thuggery and virtue signalling, accompanied by a corresponding decline in serious “intellectual debate and rigor”. I’ve since observed that the general intellectual atmosphere at a college or university begins to plummet when a non-White and/or woman becomes president. The decline seems to be particularly precipitous if the new President is both non-White and a woman. The same can be said vis-a-vis academic departments or administrative units within a college or university.

  81. @Wilkey
    Basically, the Left wants to be able to demonize certain demographic groups, and doesn't want to allow those people any right to a rebuttal. Example:

    Liberal: "Blacks are disproportionately killed by police officers."

    Conservative: "That's because blacks commit a much higher percentage of violent crime than their share of the population."

    The conservative rebuttal is an example of providing rigorous logic to the question of why more blacks are disproportionately killed by police. Cohen would claim that rigor should not be applied to this case (at least not rigor as defined by whites who disagree), and that even making such an argument should result in the loss of someone's job, their access to social media, and even their freedom itself.

    Presumably, Cohen also does not want to use free speech or intellectual rigor to question why she should keep her job if she believes in affirmative action, given that Jewish women are heavily overrepresented in academia.

    Replies: @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco, @Moses, @3g4me

    @10 Wilkey: That you consider a standard conservatard trope as “rigorous logic” and any sort of impediment to Cohen and her ilk is why you remain a Sailer stalwart.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @3g4me

    You are correct. Absolutely correct. Stating that blacks commit violence far more than other races is a trope, for sure.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  82. @Anonymous
    @Anon


    items with large differences in passing rates for males and females have been systematically removed from the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler tests….
     
    What does this even mean?

    Replies: @Pericles, @nobodyofnowhere, @kaganovitch, @3g4me

    @29 Anonymous[120]: “What does this even mean?”

    White men outscore White women and the POX on IQ tests. Women and POX hit hardest. Make IQ tests easier. Create clownworld and chaos. Rinse and repeat. Create apocalypse. Women and POX hit hardest.

  83. @pyrrhus
    @Anon7

    Western civilization is just "done", period...Only question is whether we can save indoor plumbing...

    Replies: @3g4me

    @56 pyrrhus: “Only question is whether we can save indoor plumbing.” Useless unless it’s Whites only.

  84. @Anon7
    "This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated..."

    As I've asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    Isn't technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don't need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we're done, right? That's the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    Aren't we done?

    Replies: @Thomas, @John Johnson, @Wade Hampton, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb, @SFG, @vinteuil, @megabar

    “Aren’t we done?”

    We will be when the smart white guys put the finishing touches on the bio-medical police state they’ve been constructing. Thanks to smart white guys smart white guys will become extinct.

  85. steve will not be spared come the revolution, but he will be allowed to serve as a sondercommando.

  86. @PhysicistDave
    OT, maybe.

    Half of this year's Nobel prize in physics was given to two guys for their supposed work in climate science.

    My colleague Lubos Motl has a take on why this is... odd.

    The basic problem is that Nobels are usually given for work that has been confirmed by empirical observations or experiments.

    While climate modeling is a legitimate area of investigation, I think it is fair to say that it has no significant, surprising results that are well-confirmed empirically.

    It does, of course, have certain political uses...

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @bomag, @Achmed E. Newman, @Calvin Hobbes

    Thank you so much, Dave. I’ve been saying for 15 years, and writing about it for five, there is no working model of the entire Earth’s climate!

    There’s observation and there’s modeling based on heat transfer, fluids, and thermo. theory being done. However, when you model piece parts, only a few of which you can actually really experiment on, into one big model, you’re going to run into all kinds of unforeseen physical processes that weren’t taken into account, different supposedly understood processes interacting with each other in unforeseen ways, and ALL kinds of stuff. It’s gonna be a long time, and I have seen no success so far.

    Yes, it’s political as all get-out.

  87. @Sebastian Y.
    @Thomas

    Peak oil was a popular theory 15-20 years ago. I bought into it and thought that modern civilization would start to steadily decline toward a grinding halt when we started to run out of cheap oil.



    https://pierie.nl/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Peak-oil-Source-Peak-oil.jpg

     

    Now I think I might’ve been write about the civilizational collapse but wrong about the reason.


    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/1c/cf/d3/1ccfd34269436d1c6fd1d1cf0b574f00.jpg

     

    I’m now a firm believer in Peak White Male.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Don’t feel bad, Sebastian. I was way off on my Peak Stupidity forecast too. I need to get our Indian software developer Josh in Bombay to tweek our models a tad.

  88. “The Lives of Others” was a highly acclaimed 2006 German film about the methods of the Stasi. (Metacritic 89. William Buckley called it the greatest movie he had ever seen.) A.O. Scott’s review underscored the following point:

    “The suspense comes not only from the structure and pacing of the scenes, but also, more deeply, from the sense that even in an oppressive society, individuals are burdened with free will. You never know, from one moment to the next, what course any of the characters will choose.”

    Other critics made the same point about the free-will predicament; wagering one’s status and peaceful life by speaking or acting. Today’s vindictive culture is rapidly approaching the point of surpassing this Stasi free-will predicament, by making it unthinkable to speak out. The “burden” of deciding whether to debate or not is lifted, because it is unthinkable to debate.

  89. Personally, though, I was on campus in 1978, and it seemed like there was more diversity of opinion back then than in 2021.

    Indeed. In 1974, Yale hosted a debate between William Shockley and William Rusher. Students who disrupted the debate were suspended, as reported in the Harvard Crimson:

    Yale Suspends 11 for Halting Debate

    May 13, 1974
    Yale University suspended 11 students Friday for their alleged roles in leading disruption of an April 15 debate between controversial Stanford University professor William B. Shockley and William Rusher, publisher of the National Review.

    The Yale College Executive Committee suspended the 11 students for next fall’s semester, and said that they would be placed on probation upon their return in January 1975 for the spring semester. The committee said, however, that the students could apply in August for readmission for the fall term.

    In addition, the executive committee decided to withhold a degree from a graduating senior, subject to review prior to the May 20 commencement date.

    The disturbance occurred when 150 chanting and stomping members of the audience prevented Shockley from presenting his view on the hereditary basis of intelligence.

  90. @International Jew

    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,”
     
    And, especially, Jews. Harvard and Princeton weren't that big as long as they strove to be truly "white", ie before the previous era of "holistic" admissions gave way to something approximating meritocracy. It happened around 1960, and Charles Murray talks about it towards the beginning of his Coming Apart.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @AnotherDad, @lavoisier

    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,”

    And, especially, Jews. Harvard and Princeton weren’t that big as long as they strove to be truly “white” ….

    Indeed Jews love to argue. Unfortunately, what they do not love is empiricism.

    But that empirical check is what’s required to make an argument actually “rigorous” in the “enlightening about the world” sense, and something more than Talmudic squabbling. The empirical impulse–is that what we see? does it work?–seems to be much more rooted in “production people” than “marketplace people”.

    Jews are smart–and very verbal. They punch way above their weight in making noise, but a lot of it just that–noise. They punch below their IQ weight in “finding truth”.

    Jewish intellectuals have been thick on the ground–especially the last 100/150 years–but if they’d never existed we’d probably be a few years behind in STEM, maybe a decade or more in physics … but our social science would actually be much, much better!

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @AnotherDad

    I don't know if it's cause or effect, but it seems to be baked in with having a language written without vowels. "Oh, you thought CC meant CVC, actually I meant CAC." And that's only if it becomes an issue. Otherwise the inherently ambiguous document continues to bamboozle everyone when needed. Literally entire volumes of the Talmud or Jewish Biblical commentaries are based on things like "I read an 'a' there not a 'e'." It focuses the mind on words not facts.

    For someone distorted as being an "idealist" Schopenhauer's "idealism" was derived from his insistence on only allowing concepts to be used if they were directly derived from observation. No gaseous nonsense about "the Ego posits" (Fichte) or "The World Spirit progresses" (Hegel). Nothing was more contemptable than word-shuffling. He hated Jews, and I suppose Jews still hate him. Again, one wonders which is the cause and which the effect. In any case, empiricism is the best defense against the Phoenician.

    Replies: @International Jew

  91. The most heartfelt articles by female professors tend to be demands that social values be overturned in order that, Come the Revolution, the professor herself will be considered smart

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
  92. Actually the article in bunk

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Tiny Duck

    https://whyevolutionistrue.com/2021/10/21/abbotgate-hits-the-mainstream-media-and-quillette-mit-gets-egg-on-its-face/

    https://twitter.com/Evolutionistrue/status/1451216889183707139

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/05/supermarket-egg-1.jpg

  93. @iDeplorable
    @Wilkey



    Cohen: “‘unfettered speech’” is often used as an excuse to do harm and maintain the status quo.”

    Jeffrey Sachs: “Everyone is reading your...a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?”

    Cohen: “Yes.”
     
    Cohen, Sachs, Cohen...I'm shocked I tell you, shocked!

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    A Jew on both sides = free speech. Anything else is Fascism.

    • Agree: JerseyJeffersonian
  94. @AnotherDad
    @International Jew



    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,”
     
    And, especially, Jews. Harvard and Princeton weren’t that big as long as they strove to be truly “white” ....
     
    Indeed Jews love to argue. Unfortunately, what they do not love is empiricism.

    But that empirical check is what's required to make an argument actually "rigorous" in the "enlightening about the world" sense, and something more than Talmudic squabbling. The empirical impulse--is that what we see? does it work?--seems to be much more rooted in "production people" than "marketplace people".

    Jews are smart--and very verbal. They punch way above their weight in making noise, but a lot of it just that--noise. They punch below their IQ weight in "finding truth".

    Jewish intellectuals have been thick on the ground--especially the last 100/150 years--but if they'd never existed we'd probably be a few years behind in STEM, maybe a decade or more in physics ... but our social science would actually be much, much better!

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    I don’t know if it’s cause or effect, but it seems to be baked in with having a language written without vowels. “Oh, you thought CC meant CVC, actually I meant CAC.” And that’s only if it becomes an issue. Otherwise the inherently ambiguous document continues to bamboozle everyone when needed. Literally entire volumes of the Talmud or Jewish Biblical commentaries are based on things like “I read an ‘a’ there not a ‘e’.” It focuses the mind on words not facts.

    For someone distorted as being an “idealist” Schopenhauer’s “idealism” was derived from his insistence on only allowing concepts to be used if they were directly derived from observation. No gaseous nonsense about “the Ego posits” (Fichte) or “The World Spirit progresses” (Hegel). Nothing was more contemptable than word-shuffling. He hated Jews, and I suppose Jews still hate him. Again, one wonders which is the cause and which the effect. In any case, empiricism is the best defense against the Phoenician.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @James J O'Meara


    Literally entire volumes of the Talmud or Jewish Biblical commentaries are based on things like “I read an ‘a’ there not a ‘e’.”
     
    Which ones, smart guy?
  95. @Anon7
    @Thomas

    "The degree to which things have been simplified and made cheap, seamless and invisible for the end user, such that everything seems “plug and play,” has only made possible by creating massive, centralized infrastructure somewhere else."

    Exactly right. You just need money. For example, the Saudis are buying a Cloud from Google:


    Google will open a “cloud region” where it can provide its cloud services in Saudi Arabia via a joint venture with state-owned oil producer Saudi Aramco...

    Aramco said the agreement with Google will deliver “high performance, low-latency cloud services to enterprise customers in Saudi Arabia” as warming relations in the region open the political space for U.S. technology companies to expand into the kingdom.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/12/23/google-aramco-eye-10-billion-cloud-market-in-saudi-arabia.html
     

    Google trawls through high IQ countries, recruits the talent, builds minimum infrastructure in the host country, easy peasy. The Saudis don't need to bring their people any further along than, say, the fourteenth century.

    Don't third-world (technology level) countries all over the world gain telephony and internet services the same way? Hasn't China leapfrogged over the twentieth century by partnering with western hospitals to provide healthcare services in China? Hasn't the United States, once a powerhouse of engineering innovation and manufacturing, largely sent all that stuff out of the country? Just let those diligent Chinese take care of it.

    (This was a bitterly sarcastic post, by the way. If you stop making progress, you'll never know what you missed, right?

    Your comments about small town mayors put in charge of national transportation infrastructure are on point. He just spent the last two months playing house with his partner. It just shows that none of those people are in charge of anything.)

    Replies: @Thomas, @notsaying

    Google trawls through high IQ countries, recruits the talent, builds minimum infrastructure in the host country, easy peasy.

    This works so long as there are high IQ countries to recruit from, or high IQ populations in formerly high IQ countries to recruit from. The jig will be up when China and India decide they’re no longer interested in being cannibalized for the brains the West can no longer produce itself.

  96. Is Ms Cohen referring to Jews posing as Whites or just straight Whites?
    Asking for a friend.

  97. “This Idea of Intellectual Debate and Rigor as the Pinnacle of Intellectualism Comes from a World in Which White Men Dominated”

    Here’s a really disturbing story I heard today.

    Richard Rusczyk is the top guy at The Art Of Problem Solving, which is all about creating a community for math nerds. They have a huge web site and also lots of great books. Rusczyk is a great man who has probably done more for math education than all the schools of “education” in America.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Rusczyk

    The story is that when Rusczyk tried to get NSF money for some project, the NSF told him that the NSF no longer gives a shit about gifted education.

    • Replies: @res
    @Calvin Hobbes

    Could you elaborate on that? I found this, but it is for the DoE in 2007.
    https://artofproblemsolving.com/community/c864h980625


    Department of Education reviewer wrote:
    While challenging and improving the mathematical problem-solving skills of high-performing students are surely every-day objectives of those who teach such students, it is not a problem, relatively speaking, of major import in American education.
     
    It appears they had better luck with the NSA (USAMTS funding).
    https://en-academic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/2809626

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes

  98. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Well.......


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBxJGg6cjqk

    Replies: @vinteuil

    Ugly, tedious pop-crap.

    Your point being?

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    "Ugly, tedious pop-crap."

    My first piano teacher, at age five, was an old-school New Orleans Dixieland jazz man who knew, and played alongside, Louis Armstrong. My second piano teacher was a classicist with perfect pitch who taught me Chopin and Schubert and Schumann, but he also had a bar band on the side. I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.

    If something is ugly and tedious, I will be sure to inform you. But before you get my memo, open your ears and hold your tongue.

    "Your point being?"

    If you scroll across the link, you will see the title of the composition: "Only Shallow".

    De te fabula narratur.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @vinteuil

  99. @Anon7
    "This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated..."

    As I've asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    Isn't technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don't need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we're done, right? That's the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    Aren't we done?

    Replies: @Thomas, @John Johnson, @Wade Hampton, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb, @SFG, @vinteuil, @megabar

    I’m pretty sure this is sarcasm.

    I’ve recommended it here before, but Paolo Bacigalupi’s ‘Pump Six’ is a story in the far future where this has more or less happened. The HBD subtext from the left-wing author is almost certainly unintentional. (I never say ‘certainly’ outside of the hard sciences; I’m convinced Chuck Palahniuk, for instance, is more of a righty than he lets on.) But I think that’s what the future looks like.

  100. @Anon7
    "This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated..."

    As I've asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    Isn't technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don't need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we're done, right? That's the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    Aren't we done?

    Replies: @Thomas, @John Johnson, @Wade Hampton, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb, @SFG, @vinteuil, @megabar

    Aren’t we done?

    Not quite yet. But soon.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @vinteuil

    “Not quite yet. But soon.“

    Wait, I”be been informed on this fine opinion webzine repeatedly that there was a growing group of high T whites who WILL save the day by going all Hulk Hogan on Jews, globalists, elites, and their mystery meat pets by throwing then off helicopters Pinochet style.

    And now you’re saying it’s over? Well, that’s what defeatist white men say…

    Replies: @vinteuil

  101. @PhysicistDave
    OT, maybe.

    Half of this year's Nobel prize in physics was given to two guys for their supposed work in climate science.

    My colleague Lubos Motl has a take on why this is... odd.

    The basic problem is that Nobels are usually given for work that has been confirmed by empirical observations or experiments.

    While climate modeling is a legitimate area of investigation, I think it is fair to say that it has no significant, surprising results that are well-confirmed empirically.

    It does, of course, have certain political uses...

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @bomag, @Achmed E. Newman, @Calvin Hobbes

    Half of this year’s Nobel prize in physics was given to two guys for their supposed work in climate science.

    The other half went to Italian physicist Giorgio Parisi, at least in part for his work on spin glasses. A guy I know who works on spin glasses thought it was hilarious that the NYT tried to make it sound like Parisi was another guy in “climate science”.

  102. @Anon7
    @Thomas

    Here's an interesting story about plug and play technology in a vast Socialist police state nightmare:


    When the Soviet Union collapsed, accounting for this technological deficit needed a new approach, and Vladimir Bulgak, the minister of communications under former President Boris Yeltsin, was willing to break with the past. Russia desperately needed modern communications, but local industry couldn’t provide the technology. Due to Soviet-era restrictions, the Russian telecommunications industry now lagged behind the West by 20 to 25 years. “We came to think that our industry would never catch up, and that meant we had to go and buy,” Bulgak told me during an interview.

    And Moscow did just that. In the span of three years, more than 70 percent of all Russian intercity phone stations were replaced by modern digital ones, made in the West, and Bulgak increased the number of international lines in the country from 2,000 analog ones to 66,000, all of them digital.

    Bulgak bought equipment from abroad, bypassing old Soviet factories at enormous cost — many of them were forced to close, leaving thousands of people high and dry. But by 1995, Russia had established a modern, national communications industry. Thriving and profitable internet businesses sprang up in the early 2000s, something that would have been impossible without the lines and stations purchased by Bulgak.

    The infrastructure of the Russian internet was built on Western technology, primarily Cisco, an American conglomerate, because the new national telecoms companies believed that reliability was more important than the origin of the supplier. Putin has not learned this lesson. When Western sanctions were imposed on Russia in 2014 following the annexation of Crimea, Putin called for import substitution to replace foreign products with domestic ones. The new security doctrine cements this idea, saying that “the level of dependence of the domestic industry from foreign IT” is too high and that this makes Russia dependent on “foreign geopolitical interests.”

    But the country’s industry simply can’t produce all the equipment that is needed, and desperate officials have since turned to China to replace Western technology. And although it’s an open question whether this new doctrine will actually make Russia any safer — it will surely limit the country’s economic potential.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2016/12/22/the-unlearned-lessons-from-the-collapse-of-the-soviet-union/#soldatov
     

    Replies: @Unladen Swallow

    Interesting, regarding the backwardness of telecom in the Soviet Union, I remember reading in a book by James Gleick that pointed out it wasn’t until 1965 that the number of phone calls in Soviet Russia exceeded the number of telegrams, by contrast that transition happened in the US sometime around 1900.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Unladen Swallow

    On a related note, a czar-era private company providing telephone service in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk (on Sakhalin) continued in operation throughout the entire Soviet period and was later acquired by Cable & Wireless.

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Unladen Swallow

    I remember when Kazakhstan acquired AT&T communications equipment and issued a stamp commemorating this monumental event of communications; IIRC the stamp featured a silhouette graphic of a microwave dish.

  103. iSteve, did the Greeks and Romans specifically refer to themselves as being white? Asking for a friend…

    • Troll: William Badwhite
  104. @vinteuil
    @Anon7


    Aren’t we done?
     
    Not quite yet. But soon.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Not quite yet. But soon.“

    Wait, I”be been informed on this fine opinion webzine repeatedly that there was a growing group of high T whites who WILL save the day by going all Hulk Hogan on Jews, globalists, elites, and their mystery meat pets by throwing then off helicopters Pinochet style.

    And now you’re saying it’s over? Well, that’s what defeatist white men say…

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @Corvinus


    I”be been informed on this fine opinion webzine repeatedly that there was a growing group of high T whites who WILL save the day by going all Hulk Hogan on Jews, globalists, elites, and their mystery meat pets by throwing then off helicopters Pinochet style.</blockqote

    How much do you get paid for this, my friend? Are you not ashamed?
     

     

    Replies: @Corvinus

  105. @Bardon Kaldian
    @John Johnson

    Is it so hard to recognize an irony?

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Is it so hard to recognize an irony?

    In clown world it most certainly is.

    I have seen liberals argue that White male inventors were never needed because they were just holding back everyone else.

    I have even seen a conservative say that Whites should be ashamed of holding back humanity by not allowing non-Whites to contribute. He actually had bloodguilt over it.

    There was a professor that suggested companies be taxed in order to make up for White executives holding back Blacks in tech.

    There are people that fully believe in Wakanda theory. They really believe that Kalahari Bushmen would have developed calculus if nasty Whites didn’t oppress them or something. I would say at least 30% of Whites believe this.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    @John Johnson


    There are people that fully believe in Wakanda theory. They really believe that Kalahari Bushmen would have developed calculus if nasty Whites didn’t oppress them or something. I would say at least 30% of Whites believe this.
     
    If anyone was to have held back the Khoisan bushmen from their calculus-developing destiny, it was the black Bantu genocidal colonizers who displaced them.

    Anyway, as you're probably well aware of, those who control the present control the past. Perpetuating the Big Lie Matters. Counter-experience can be the best refutation if the facts are available. As ghetto culture and ghetto activities become more widespread, enabled and encouraged by insulated elites, count on growing disillusionment in both senses of the word.
  106. …..there is a rising call for “citational justice,” arguing that professors and graduate students should seek to cite more Black, Latino, Asian and Native American scholars and in some cases refuse to acknowledge in footnotes the research of those who hold distasteful views.

    It’s this candyass, sorry not sorry type of coy dishonesty and academic shysterism that infuriates me. Why should any of us be forced to pretend that refusing to acknowledge in footnotes the research of those whites who did all the heavy lifting isn’t the entire raison d’etre of “citational justice”?

    Jeffrey Sachs: “Everyone is reading your quote to mean that rigor and unfettered speech are the purview of/only valued by/expressions of whiteness. But it sounds here like what you mean is that rigor and unfettered speech are often used to strengthen whiteness. Is that it? n other words, you’re not opposed to rigor in academia. You just mean that rigor is frequently deployed as a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?”

    Cohen: “Yes.”

    We’re rapidly arriving at the point where our bending over backwards for our quota-hire professoriat now entails rewording their arguments for clarity in a way they never intended and, if possible, making their argument for them in a manner superior to their capability for doing so.
    In other words…….is the “Cohen” part for show, or just the BIPOC credentials? Or both, as I suspect?

    This is ordinarily where I’d kick it up to my kibitzing Martian anthropologists hovering in place for a zinger or two, but they’re using one of their six arms to wave me off, while the remainder peel clementines and play canasta. Nor can I blame them; any society masochistically toadying for its “Phoebe Cohens” deserves all the rapid decline it’s suddenly buried to the hilt in.

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    @Ragno

    Ragno, this is not a Jew vs. gentile, or even a communist thing. It’s an academic thing.

    Back in 1997, I wrote what would for many years be the state-of-the-art study on politicized college grading (“Making Up the Grade: Notes from the Antiversity”), which appeared in the top neocon academic journal, Academic Questions, in spring, 1998, under my most successful pseudonym, Robert Berman. (I was an adjunct lecturer with no job security and no benefits, working from semester to semester. You talked about that once.) AQ was the property of the National Association of Scholars.

    AQ’s editor-in-chief, Sandy Pinsker, a fellow Jew, put me under tremendous pressure to use my real name, fully cognizant that that would entail academic suicide. I successfully resisted him. (He forced me to come up with a list of [30-odd] pseudonymous publications.) One year after my report appeared, I ran into Pinsker at the national NAS conference in Chicago. He was standing at an NAS table, and I was wearing a nameplate. Instead of greeting me, he stared daggers at me.

    Meanwhile, Pinsker had just published a new issue, in which he ran a letter to the editor by self-styled anti-Communist sociology professor Paul Hollander (also a Jew), in which he praised someone else (Terence Pell, almost certainly a gentile) for my article!

    Like the Communists, the self-styled anti-Communists believe in caste over tribe. Academics almost all believe in caste.

    Replies: @Ragno

  107. @El Dato

    "expressed anger on Twitter at M.I.T.’s decision to invite Dr. Abbot to speak"
     
    We need places where those people can cool their heels, deprogram their social media and Hollywood meedja injected "save the world every day" Hermione Granger meme complex and find back their inner stability to reflect on what this "science thing" is all about and maybe read the white stale pale male classics.

    Camps where they can concentrate, far away from civilization.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Dr. Abbott is much more likely to end up in a camp than his critics.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharashka

    The Soviet Union in the Stalin era had a problem similar to our own – they had cancelled many of their most prominent scientists for political reasons. But the work that these men (yes mostly men) did was necessary – the people with the right politics were just not capable of doing it. The solution was the “sharaska” – these men were sent to prison but forced to continue their scientific work. Usually credit for their work was given to others.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
  108. @Buffalo Joe
    The hammer..."words matter and have consequences." That only depends on whose words you chose to listen to and whose words you chose to cancel.

    Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian

    Just another corollary of Who/Whom.

  109. @Unladen Swallow
    @Anon7

    Interesting, regarding the backwardness of telecom in the Soviet Union, I remember reading in a book by James Gleick that pointed out it wasn't until 1965 that the number of phone calls in Soviet Russia exceeded the number of telegrams, by contrast that transition happened in the US sometime around 1900.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Joe Stalin

    On a related note, a czar-era private company providing telephone service in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk (on Sakhalin) continued in operation throughout the entire Soviet period and was later acquired by Cable & Wireless.

  110. @Unladen Swallow
    @Anon7

    Interesting, regarding the backwardness of telecom in the Soviet Union, I remember reading in a book by James Gleick that pointed out it wasn't until 1965 that the number of phone calls in Soviet Russia exceeded the number of telegrams, by contrast that transition happened in the US sometime around 1900.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Joe Stalin

    I remember when Kazakhstan acquired AT&T communications equipment and issued a stamp commemorating this monumental event of communications; IIRC the stamp featured a silhouette graphic of a microwave dish.

  111. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco
    @Wilkey

    True. The left have made rebuttals almost a criminal act with repercussions far worse the punishment for actual crimes.

    Thought crimes will result in being blacklisted and jobless. The leftist want to destroy all opposition and the vaccine mandates are part of the same purge. To exclude whites from government jobs and punish those who dissent.

    Soon the Biden administration will force all government workers to submit to a third dose and then a fourth dose and this will continue until Americans stand up for themselves and refuse to submit to this tyranny. So it will go on forever. There is no end in site. Even the so called alt-right fully support the vaccine mandates and heavily promote the coming booster mandates. Steve can’t wait to get his fourth booster and was so impressed with the efficacy data he had dozens of posts promoting the boosters efficacy just like when he promoted the 95% effective Pfizer shots 9 months ago.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    Public officials’ expressed concern for our health — take the shot or else — does seem out of sync with all their other policies and actions

    • LOL: Kylie
  112. @Tiny Duck
    Actually the article in bunk

    https://twitter.com/TomLevenson/status/1450226709790330883

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    https://whyevolutionistrue.com/2021/10/21/abbotgate-hits-the-mainstream-media-and-quillette-mit-gets-egg-on-its-face/

  113. “The controversy surrounding Dr. Abbot’s canceled talk speaks as well to a tension manifest in progressive circles between social justice and free speech.

    What “tension”? They’ve verboten freedom of speech.

    “’This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,’ she replied.”

    She supports the White Genocide Project, because, among other things, she’s an abolitionist–she dreams of ending scientific and technological progress.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  114. @John Johnson
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Is it so hard to recognize an irony?

    In clown world it most certainly is.

    I have seen liberals argue that White male inventors were never needed because they were just holding back everyone else.

    I have even seen a conservative say that Whites should be ashamed of holding back humanity by not allowing non-Whites to contribute. He actually had bloodguilt over it.

    There was a professor that suggested companies be taxed in order to make up for White executives holding back Blacks in tech.

    There are people that fully believe in Wakanda theory. They really believe that Kalahari Bushmen would have developed calculus if nasty Whites didn't oppress them or something. I would say at least 30% of Whites believe this.

    Replies: @Lockean Proviso

    There are people that fully believe in Wakanda theory. They really believe that Kalahari Bushmen would have developed calculus if nasty Whites didn’t oppress them or something. I would say at least 30% of Whites believe this.

    If anyone was to have held back the Khoisan bushmen from their calculus-developing destiny, it was the black Bantu genocidal colonizers who displaced them.

    Anyway, as you’re probably well aware of, those who control the present control the past. Perpetuating the Big Lie Matters. Counter-experience can be the best refutation if the facts are available. As ghetto culture and ghetto activities become more widespread, enabled and encouraged by insulated elites, count on growing disillusionment in both senses of the word.

  115. @International Jew

    “This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated,”
     
    And, especially, Jews. Harvard and Princeton weren't that big as long as they strove to be truly "white", ie before the previous era of "holistic" admissions gave way to something approximating meritocracy. It happened around 1960, and Charles Murray talks about it towards the beginning of his Coming Apart.

    Replies: @stillCARealist, @AnotherDad, @lavoisier

    Intellectual debate and rigor are very often suppressed by Jews–particularly if the subject matter does not conform to their prejudice. This suppression has intensified significantly as Jewish power increases.

    Look no further than the dark ages that have descended on the study of racial differences in genes associated with behavior, especially intelligence. How much intellectual debate and rigor is allowed on this subject in Jewish dominated academia?

    Gould and Lewontin and Rose were not Irish Catholics.

  116. @Anon7
    @Thomas

    "The degree to which things have been simplified and made cheap, seamless and invisible for the end user, such that everything seems “plug and play,” has only made possible by creating massive, centralized infrastructure somewhere else."

    Exactly right. You just need money. For example, the Saudis are buying a Cloud from Google:


    Google will open a “cloud region” where it can provide its cloud services in Saudi Arabia via a joint venture with state-owned oil producer Saudi Aramco...

    Aramco said the agreement with Google will deliver “high performance, low-latency cloud services to enterprise customers in Saudi Arabia” as warming relations in the region open the political space for U.S. technology companies to expand into the kingdom.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/12/23/google-aramco-eye-10-billion-cloud-market-in-saudi-arabia.html
     

    Google trawls through high IQ countries, recruits the talent, builds minimum infrastructure in the host country, easy peasy. The Saudis don't need to bring their people any further along than, say, the fourteenth century.

    Don't third-world (technology level) countries all over the world gain telephony and internet services the same way? Hasn't China leapfrogged over the twentieth century by partnering with western hospitals to provide healthcare services in China? Hasn't the United States, once a powerhouse of engineering innovation and manufacturing, largely sent all that stuff out of the country? Just let those diligent Chinese take care of it.

    (This was a bitterly sarcastic post, by the way. If you stop making progress, you'll never know what you missed, right?

    Your comments about small town mayors put in charge of national transportation infrastructure are on point. He just spent the last two months playing house with his partner. It just shows that none of those people are in charge of anything.)

    Replies: @Thomas, @notsaying

    A lot of state and federal top jobs end up going to people who know nothing about what their people do. Bush’s Brownie knew nothing about emergencies but head if FEMA, Trump’s Dr. Ben Carson knew nothing about housing but was put in charge at HUD, etc, etc. One of the explanations people give for that is that they put in administrators used to running large organizations but that is not always true. Businesses today are run by people who typically spent a career uninvolved with their product or services.

    This used to be a topic of discussion decades ago in business but no longer. It is just accepted. I think for both government and business it would be worthwhile to revisit the promotion through the ranks vs. leapfrogging from one top management job to another debate.

    It is interesting that nobody ever says “It doesn’t matter much if so and so is here. We’ve been referring everything to his staff just like they do.”

  117. @3g4me
    @Wilkey

    @10 Wilkey: That you consider a standard conservatard trope as "rigorous logic" and any sort of impediment to Cohen and her ilk is why you remain a Sailer stalwart.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    You are correct. Absolutely correct. Stating that blacks commit violence far more than other races is a trope, for sure.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Wilkey


    Stating that blacks commit violence far more than other races is a trope, for sure.
     
    Not that other races aren't trying:


    Woman charged with shooting Rolling Meadows man who refused her kiss makes second court appearance

    No info on what race James P Jones is was. He's not on GoFundMe yet.

    Totally OT, but the same local paper ran some fun Beach Boy history:

    From bad pitchout to pitch-perfect -- Brian Wilson and Al Jardine set for Waukegan

  118. @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Ugly, tedious pop-crap.

    Your point being?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Ugly, tedious pop-crap.”

    My first piano teacher, at age five, was an old-school New Orleans Dixieland jazz man who knew, and played alongside, Louis Armstrong. My second piano teacher was a classicist with perfect pitch who taught me Chopin and Schubert and Schumann, but he also had a bar band on the side. I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.

    If something is ugly and tedious, I will be sure to inform you. But before you get my memo, open your ears and hold your tongue.

    “Your point being?”

    If you scroll across the link, you will see the title of the composition: “Only Shallow”.

    De te fabula narratur.

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    My first piano teacher, at age five, was an old-school New Orleans Dixieland jazz man who knew, and played alongside, Louis Armstrong. My second piano teacher was a classicist with perfect pitch who taught me Chopin and Schubert and Schumann, but he also had a bar band on the side. I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.
     
    Yeah, whatever you say - so that barren stretch of awfulness, with zero melodic, harmonic, or rhythmic interest is, in fact, worth listening to...because...

    De te fabula narratur.
     
    I.e., more or less, "right back atcha."

    Well, right back atcha.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    , @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.
     
    Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger, in Paris, in her later years?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @mulga mumblebrain, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  119. @Ragno

    .....there is a rising call for “citational justice,” arguing that professors and graduate students should seek to cite more Black, Latino, Asian and Native American scholars and in some cases refuse to acknowledge in footnotes the research of those who hold distasteful views.
     
    It's this candyass, sorry not sorry type of coy dishonesty and academic shysterism that infuriates me. Why should any of us be forced to pretend that refusing to acknowledge in footnotes the research of those whites who did all the heavy lifting isn't the entire raison d'etre of "citational justice”?

    Jeffrey Sachs: “Everyone is reading your quote to mean that rigor and unfettered speech are the purview of/only valued by/expressions of whiteness. But it sounds here like what you mean is that rigor and unfettered speech are often used to strengthen whiteness. Is that it? n other words, you’re not opposed to rigor in academia. You just mean that rigor is frequently deployed as a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?”

    Cohen: “Yes.”
     

    We're rapidly arriving at the point where our bending over backwards for our quota-hire professoriat now entails rewording their arguments for clarity in a way they never intended and, if possible, making their argument for them in a manner superior to their capability for doing so.
    In other words.......is the "Cohen" part for show, or just the BIPOC credentials? Or both, as I suspect?

    This is ordinarily where I'd kick it up to my kibitzing Martian anthropologists hovering in place for a zinger or two, but they're using one of their six arms to wave me off, while the remainder peel clementines and play canasta. Nor can I blame them; any society masochistically toadying for its "Phoebe Cohens" deserves all the rapid decline it's suddenly buried to the hilt in.

    Replies: @Nicholas Stix

    Ragno, this is not a Jew vs. gentile, or even a communist thing. It’s an academic thing.

    Back in 1997, I wrote what would for many years be the state-of-the-art study on politicized college grading (“Making Up the Grade: Notes from the Antiversity”), which appeared in the top neocon academic journal, Academic Questions, in spring, 1998, under my most successful pseudonym, Robert Berman. (I was an adjunct lecturer with no job security and no benefits, working from semester to semester. You talked about that once.) AQ was the property of the National Association of Scholars.

    AQ’s editor-in-chief, Sandy Pinsker, a fellow Jew, put me under tremendous pressure to use my real name, fully cognizant that that would entail academic suicide. I successfully resisted him. (He forced me to come up with a list of [30-odd] pseudonymous publications.) One year after my report appeared, I ran into Pinsker at the national NAS conference in Chicago. He was standing at an NAS table, and I was wearing a nameplate. Instead of greeting me, he stared daggers at me.

    Meanwhile, Pinsker had just published a new issue, in which he ran a letter to the editor by self-styled anti-Communist sociology professor Paul Hollander (also a Jew), in which he praised someone else (Terence Pell, almost certainly a gentile) for my article!

    Like the Communists, the self-styled anti-Communists believe in caste over tribe. Academics almost all believe in caste.

    • Thanks: lavoisier
    • Replies: @Ragno
    @Nicholas Stix

    Sorry, Nick, I never thought this was a Jew vs gentile thing. Not in this case, at least. I should have more obviously made the point that - like Jussie Smollett and Jessica Krug - "Paula Cohen" is another living breathing example for why "biracial" is mostly a scam, particularly when it's used as an intellectual cudgel, a la heads I win tails you lose.

    The real point was the Bad Guys do the work, and the Guys Assigned as Good take the bows....which is outrageous enough. But to go further - to erase the contributions (often the key, vital contributions) made by said Bad Guys for no higher purpose than to punish one's betters for being one's betters - is grotesque academic villainy, whether it'sviewed as a tribal or a caste dispute..

    As to caste vs tribe - there's little meaningful difference when the point is not to aggregate the applause to one's own caste or tribe......but to reinforce which castes/tribes are unspeakable and thus, untouchable.

    But like I said, we were never at loggerheads on this, though it may have momentarily seemed that way.

  120. @Calvin Hobbes

    “This Idea of Intellectual Debate and Rigor as the Pinnacle of Intellectualism Comes from a World in Which White Men Dominated"
     

    Here’s a really disturbing story I heard today.

    Richard Rusczyk is the top guy at The Art Of Problem Solving, which is all about creating a community for math nerds. They have a huge web site and also lots of great books. Rusczyk is a great man who has probably done more for math education than all the schools of “education” in America.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Rusczyk

    The story is that when Rusczyk tried to get NSF money for some project, the NSF told him that the NSF no longer gives a shit about gifted education.

    Replies: @res

    Could you elaborate on that? I found this, but it is for the DoE in 2007.
    https://artofproblemsolving.com/community/c864h980625

    Department of Education reviewer wrote:
    While challenging and improving the mathematical problem-solving skills of high-performing students are surely every-day objectives of those who teach such students, it is not a problem, relatively speaking, of major import in American education.

    It appears they had better luck with the NSA (USAMTS funding).
    https://en-academic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/2809626

    • Replies: @Calvin Hobbes
    @res

    The person who told me about this said NSF, but I'm pretty sure now that the person was referring to your Dept of Ed item. Thanks. I hope you see this reply, since it's been a while.

  121. @Wilkey
    @3g4me

    You are correct. Absolutely correct. Stating that blacks commit violence far more than other races is a trope, for sure.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Stating that blacks commit violence far more than other races is a trope, for sure.

    Not that other races aren’t trying:

    Woman charged with shooting Rolling Meadows man who refused her kiss makes second court appearance

    No info on what race James P Jones is was. He’s not on GoFundMe yet.

    Totally OT, but the same local paper ran some fun Beach Boy history:

    From bad pitchout to pitch-perfect — Brian Wilson and Al Jardine set for Waukegan

  122. Anonymous[222] • Disclaimer says:
    @Spud Boy
    As a college freshman in 1980, I wrote my English class research paper about Affirmative Action. I couldn't believe such a thing could be allowed to exist in the United States.

    I still maintain AA was the seed that has since grown into the giant oak tree that is today's identity politics. Now questioning AA will get you cancelled on campus--presumably because it makes POCs who have been admitted under AA feel bad. This is the clown world we currently inhabit.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    It’s like income tax, which was originally sold to the public as a temporary imposition which would only affect millionaires. A century later this “temporary” tax is still around and is levied on everyone.

    You have as much chance of getting rid of affirmative action as you do income tax.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    It’s like income tax, which was originally sold to the public as a temporary imposition which would only affect millionaires. A century later this “temporary” tax is still around and is levied on everyone.

    Instituting the income tax required enacting a constitutional amendment. No it was not sold as a 'temporary imposition' and was in place continuously all through the Coolidge Administration.

    Replies: @International Jew

  123. @James J O'Meara
    @AnotherDad

    I don't know if it's cause or effect, but it seems to be baked in with having a language written without vowels. "Oh, you thought CC meant CVC, actually I meant CAC." And that's only if it becomes an issue. Otherwise the inherently ambiguous document continues to bamboozle everyone when needed. Literally entire volumes of the Talmud or Jewish Biblical commentaries are based on things like "I read an 'a' there not a 'e'." It focuses the mind on words not facts.

    For someone distorted as being an "idealist" Schopenhauer's "idealism" was derived from his insistence on only allowing concepts to be used if they were directly derived from observation. No gaseous nonsense about "the Ego posits" (Fichte) or "The World Spirit progresses" (Hegel). Nothing was more contemptable than word-shuffling. He hated Jews, and I suppose Jews still hate him. Again, one wonders which is the cause and which the effect. In any case, empiricism is the best defense against the Phoenician.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Literally entire volumes of the Talmud or Jewish Biblical commentaries are based on things like “I read an ‘a’ there not a ‘e’.”

    Which ones, smart guy?

  124. A few fields have purged scientific terms and names seen by some as offensive, and there is a rising call for “citational justice,” arguing that professors and graduate students should seek to cite more Black, Latino, Asian and Native American scholars and in some cases refuse to acknowledge in footnotes the research of those who hold distasteful views.

    Stalin would be proud.
    What’s next: remove Shockley’s name from the list of inventors of the transistor, erase von Braun’s legacy as a pioneer of rocketry, Darwin as the pioneer of evolutionary theory?

  125. @Anonymous
    @Spud Boy

    It's like income tax, which was originally sold to the public as a temporary imposition which would only affect millionaires. A century later this "temporary" tax is still around and is levied on everyone.

    You have as much chance of getting rid of affirmative action as you do income tax.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    It’s like income tax, which was originally sold to the public as a temporary imposition which would only affect millionaires. A century later this “temporary” tax is still around and is levied on everyone.

    Instituting the income tax required enacting a constitutional amendment. No it was not sold as a ‘temporary imposition’ and was in place continuously all through the Coolidge Administration.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Art Deco


    No it was not sold as a ‘temporary imposition’
     
    That's correct, but it was sold as a tax on the wealthy, and amounted to just 2% at first. The ol' foot-in-the-door trick.
  126. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    "Ugly, tedious pop-crap."

    My first piano teacher, at age five, was an old-school New Orleans Dixieland jazz man who knew, and played alongside, Louis Armstrong. My second piano teacher was a classicist with perfect pitch who taught me Chopin and Schubert and Schumann, but he also had a bar band on the side. I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.

    If something is ugly and tedious, I will be sure to inform you. But before you get my memo, open your ears and hold your tongue.

    "Your point being?"

    If you scroll across the link, you will see the title of the composition: "Only Shallow".

    De te fabula narratur.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @vinteuil

    My first piano teacher, at age five, was an old-school New Orleans Dixieland jazz man who knew, and played alongside, Louis Armstrong. My second piano teacher was a classicist with perfect pitch who taught me Chopin and Schubert and Schumann, but he also had a bar band on the side. I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.

    Yeah, whatever you say – so that barren stretch of awfulness, with zero melodic, harmonic, or rhythmic interest is, in fact, worth listening to…because…

    De te fabula narratur.

    I.e., more or less, “right back atcha.”

    Well, right back atcha.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    Well then i guess you're REALLY not gonna like THIS.........


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqpWTC-rvhQ



    The ladies, they roll their eyes.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @vinteuil

  127. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    "Ugly, tedious pop-crap."

    My first piano teacher, at age five, was an old-school New Orleans Dixieland jazz man who knew, and played alongside, Louis Armstrong. My second piano teacher was a classicist with perfect pitch who taught me Chopin and Schubert and Schumann, but he also had a bar band on the side. I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.

    If something is ugly and tedious, I will be sure to inform you. But before you get my memo, open your ears and hold your tongue.

    "Your point being?"

    If you scroll across the link, you will see the title of the composition: "Only Shallow".

    De te fabula narratur.

    Replies: @vinteuil, @vinteuil

    I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.

    Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger, in Paris, in her later years?

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    "Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger, in Paris, in her later years?"

    Nope didn't study with her, we just slept together.

    It's a Paris thing, you wouldn't understand.

    Replies: @mulga mumblebrain

    , @mulga mumblebrain
    @vinteuil

    He studied with Liszt, doncha know.

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    "Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger"



    Well, howzabout this for settling accounts:

    I reckon I'm personally just one step away from Louis Armstrong. You're one step away from... Wikipedia?

    All the same, we'll let it go, pedigree, schmedigree. If you don't think Kevin Shields is a veeeeery serious man, who am I to stand in your way?

    Replies: @vinteuil

  128. @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    My first piano teacher, at age five, was an old-school New Orleans Dixieland jazz man who knew, and played alongside, Louis Armstrong. My second piano teacher was a classicist with perfect pitch who taught me Chopin and Schubert and Schumann, but he also had a bar band on the side. I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.
     
    Yeah, whatever you say - so that barren stretch of awfulness, with zero melodic, harmonic, or rhythmic interest is, in fact, worth listening to...because...

    De te fabula narratur.
     
    I.e., more or less, "right back atcha."

    Well, right back atcha.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Well then i guess you’re REALLY not gonna like THIS………

    The ladies, they roll their eyes.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Submitted merely for the sake of hilarity.......

    A friend of mine used to work back in college as a part-time chauffeur for a livery company. They would pick up famous people at JFK Airport who were identified with some sort of anodyne names like "Mr. Ambrose," but it was really Jimmy Page or Michael Milken or some other monster.

    One time my friend picked up "Mr. Ambrose" and it was none other than Lou Reed.

    On the way into the city, there was some sort of minor car crash pile-up on the BQE, and my friend got all apologetic about it. From the back seat came this hilariously flat, dead-pan voice:

    "Don't sweat it, kid. I promise you: you are not the man who is going to kill Lou Reed."

    , @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Everything, in 1973, was so incredibly crappy.

  129. @Wilkey
    Phoebe Cohen claims on her Twitter page (where of course she provides her pronouns) that she was quoted out of context. She then goes on to explain that what she really meant is...exactly what we assumed she meant.

    Rigor?


    Cohen: "the whole idea of "rigor" is full of problems and biases - rigor according to whom? What standards are we using, and who is setting those standards? For centuries, "rigor" has been defined by a very thin slice of our society."
     
    Yes, rigor is defined by a very thin slice of society. Those standards aren't set by white men in general, but people of science and math who have shown a reputation for producing results. Complaining that too many of them are white and male is a bit like complaining that too many of them are Jewish.

    Free speech?

    Cohen: "'unfettered speech'" is often used as an excuse to do harm and maintain the status quo."

    Jeffrey Sachs: "Everyone is reading your quote to mean that rigor and unfettered speech are the purview of/only valued by/expressions of whiteness. But it sounds here like what you mean is that rigor and unfettered speech are often used to strengthen whiteness. Is that it? n other words, you're not opposed to rigor in academia. You just mean that rigor is frequently deployed as a test or tool for bigoted ends. Is that right?"

    Cohen: "Yes."

     

    Again, her "clarification" doesn't change how any sane person would have interpreted the quote in the article. By saying that she's against free speech and intellectual "rigor" what she's saying is that she doesn't want people to have the right to speak views she disagrees with, and she shouldn't be expected to provide any (rigorously) justifiable reason as to why.

    Replies: @Moses, @LP5, @iDeplorable, @Walter Duranty, @mulga mumblebrain

    It is a mindset that flows easily from one in which ANY mention of Jews, as individuals or a group, or of Zionazism, Israel etc, that is not utterly groveling, can be denounced as ‘antisemitism’ and the utterer hounded and destroyed in career and life prospects.

  130. @Corvinus
    @vinteuil

    “Not quite yet. But soon.“

    Wait, I”be been informed on this fine opinion webzine repeatedly that there was a growing group of high T whites who WILL save the day by going all Hulk Hogan on Jews, globalists, elites, and their mystery meat pets by throwing then off helicopters Pinochet style.

    And now you’re saying it’s over? Well, that’s what defeatist white men say…

    Replies: @vinteuil

    I”be been informed on this fine opinion webzine repeatedly that there was a growing group of high T whites who WILL save the day by going all Hulk Hogan on Jews, globalists, elites, and their mystery meat pets by throwing then off helicopters Pinochet style.</blockqote

    How much do you get paid for this, my friend? Are you not ashamed?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @vinteuil

    More like it is embarrassing on your part that you constantly bitch and complain how whites are allegedly under direct assault, yet you won’t do anything to actually stem the tide.

  131. @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.
     
    Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger, in Paris, in her later years?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @mulga mumblebrain, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger, in Paris, in her later years?”

    Nope didn’t study with her, we just slept together.

    It’s a Paris thing, you wouldn’t understand.

    • Replies: @mulga mumblebrain
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Yes, but she kept you under the bed.

  132. @vinteuil
    @Corvinus


    I”be been informed on this fine opinion webzine repeatedly that there was a growing group of high T whites who WILL save the day by going all Hulk Hogan on Jews, globalists, elites, and their mystery meat pets by throwing then off helicopters Pinochet style.</blockqote

    How much do you get paid for this, my friend? Are you not ashamed?
     

     

    Replies: @Corvinus

    More like it is embarrassing on your part that you constantly bitch and complain how whites are allegedly under direct assault, yet you won’t do anything to actually stem the tide.

  133. @Anon7
    "This idea of intellectual debate and rigor as the pinnacle of intellectualism comes from a world in which white men dominated..."

    As I've asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    Isn't technology pretty much plug and play, now? You don't need to be smart to have it. To upgrade an area, you wire it for Internet and smartphones, make some sort of effort related to power and sewage, roads for deliveries, and we're done, right? That's the plan for America, when they move all those other people in. Hospitals for really sick people, schools and social media to tell people what to believe. Anything more?

    Aren't we done?

    Replies: @Thomas, @John Johnson, @Wade Hampton, @pyrrhus, @SunBakedSuburb, @SFG, @vinteuil, @megabar

    > As I’ve asked before, are we done with invention? Do we need really smart white boys, geniuses, anymore?

    There are two possibilities here. 1. As technology improves, it lessens the need for skilled labor, because automation/machinery/computers do the work as designed by small number of very smart people; or 2. As technology improves, it increases the demand for skilled labor because the systems require continuous maintenance and modification.

  134. @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.
     
    Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger, in Paris, in her later years?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @mulga mumblebrain, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    He studied with Liszt, doncha know.

  135. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    "Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger, in Paris, in her later years?"

    Nope didn't study with her, we just slept together.

    It's a Paris thing, you wouldn't understand.

    Replies: @mulga mumblebrain

    Yes, but she kept you under the bed.

  136. @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    I grew up playing honky tonk and Mozart in bars, when I was a wee sprout.
     
    Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger, in Paris, in her later years?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @mulga mumblebrain, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger”

    Well, howzabout this for settling accounts:

    I reckon I’m personally just one step away from Louis Armstrong. You’re one step away from… Wikipedia?

    All the same, we’ll let it go, pedigree, schmedigree. If you don’t think Kevin Shields is a veeeeery serious man, who am I to stand in your way?

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    howzabout this for settling accounts
     
    ...umm - settling accounts? wtf? Is that really the way your mind works?

    I’m personally just one step away from Louis Armstrong.
     
    ...that's so cool.

    You’re one step away from…
     
    Well, the whole crowd at the department of bioethics at the NIH, where I spent three years in the company of Zeke Emanuel & Christine Grady (aka Mrs. Tony Fauci).

    ...and many, many other even worse people.
  137. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    Well then i guess you're REALLY not gonna like THIS.........


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqpWTC-rvhQ



    The ladies, they roll their eyes.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @vinteuil

    Submitted merely for the sake of hilarity…….

    A friend of mine used to work back in college as a part-time chauffeur for a livery company. They would pick up famous people at JFK Airport who were identified with some sort of anodyne names like “Mr. Ambrose,” but it was really Jimmy Page or Michael Milken or some other monster.

    One time my friend picked up “Mr. Ambrose” and it was none other than Lou Reed.

    On the way into the city, there was some sort of minor car crash pile-up on the BQE, and my friend got all apologetic about it. From the back seat came this hilariously flat, dead-pan voice:

    “Don’t sweat it, kid. I promise you: you are not the man who is going to kill Lou Reed.”

  138. I’m a PhD Geologist and my impression from undergrad, Ms, and PhD programs (all at separate universities) is that geoscience has more female participation than any science other than biology. There are few visible minorities although plenty of white skinned Hispanics. Very few Jews.

    My theory was that its basically the science for people who want an excuse to get paid to hike and camp, and that tends to not interest blacks, Asians, and Jews

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @GeologyAnon Mk 3

    I don't believe Jews like the outdoors any less than the average legacy American. If there are few Jewish geologists (something I was heretofore unaware of) the reason has to be something else. Here's something: do geologists need to live out in the boondocks — Alaska, west Texas, Montana? (Or at least, is it advantageous to live in such places?) If so, that would be a factor, as most Jews want to live where there's already a Jewish community.

    Replies: @GeologyAnon Mk 3

  139. @GeologyAnon Mk 3
    I'm a PhD Geologist and my impression from undergrad, Ms, and PhD programs (all at separate universities) is that geoscience has more female participation than any science other than biology. There are few visible minorities although plenty of white skinned Hispanics. Very few Jews.

    My theory was that its basically the science for people who want an excuse to get paid to hike and camp, and that tends to not interest blacks, Asians, and Jews

    Replies: @International Jew

    I don’t believe Jews like the outdoors any less than the average legacy American. If there are few Jewish geologists (something I was heretofore unaware of) the reason has to be something else. Here’s something: do geologists need to live out in the boondocks — Alaska, west Texas, Montana? (Or at least, is it advantageous to live in such places?) If so, that would be a factor, as most Jews want to live where there’s already a Jewish community.

    • Replies: @GeologyAnon Mk 3
    @International Jew

    I'm not sure, I don't know many Jews and the few I do are very posh folks and not much for roughing it. Einsteins sons were Geologists, and made important discoveries about the distribution of placer deposits, but they seem underrepresented both in academia and in industry. Mostly Geologists live in Houston or Denver with some in Midland, so by and large I don't think that's a factor. More important may be that most (not myself, but most) geoscience people are exposed to it at a young age, either by family in the oil business or mining or something like that, or they come from Venezuela or another Petro state where it is a much more visible profession. So that might also be a factor in why you don't see many Jews licking rocks

    Replies: @International Jew

  140. @International Jew
    @GeologyAnon Mk 3

    I don't believe Jews like the outdoors any less than the average legacy American. If there are few Jewish geologists (something I was heretofore unaware of) the reason has to be something else. Here's something: do geologists need to live out in the boondocks — Alaska, west Texas, Montana? (Or at least, is it advantageous to live in such places?) If so, that would be a factor, as most Jews want to live where there's already a Jewish community.

    Replies: @GeologyAnon Mk 3

    I’m not sure, I don’t know many Jews and the few I do are very posh folks and not much for roughing it. Einsteins sons were Geologists, and made important discoveries about the distribution of placer deposits, but they seem underrepresented both in academia and in industry. Mostly Geologists live in Houston or Denver with some in Midland, so by and large I don’t think that’s a factor. More important may be that most (not myself, but most) geoscience people are exposed to it at a young age, either by family in the oil business or mining or something like that, or they come from Venezuela or another Petro state where it is a much more visible profession. So that might also be a factor in why you don’t see many Jews licking rocks

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @GeologyAnon Mk 3

    Interesting. Speaking for myself, I have licked a rock — a piece of halite my sixth-grade science teacher handed me! Can't think of any other occasions. My high school debate coach didn't push Demosthenes' technique!

    Well, so there we have it: few Jewish geologists. Then again, with Jews at just 1.7% of the US population, it would be remarkable to find "many" Jews anywhere. Whereas a field that's just 2% Hispanic could be said to have "few" Hispanics. And of course 2% blacks: that's not just "few", it's a crisis requiring immediate attention.

    FWIW, I see one Jew among Harvard University's four geology professors. And about five or six among the 69 faculty (of all ranks) at MIT's earth & planetary whatever department.

  141. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    Well then i guess you're REALLY not gonna like THIS.........


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqpWTC-rvhQ



    The ladies, they roll their eyes.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @vinteuil

    Everything, in 1973, was so incredibly crappy.

  142. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @vinteuil

    "Did you, by any chance, also study with Nadja Boulanger"



    Well, howzabout this for settling accounts:

    I reckon I'm personally just one step away from Louis Armstrong. You're one step away from... Wikipedia?

    All the same, we'll let it go, pedigree, schmedigree. If you don't think Kevin Shields is a veeeeery serious man, who am I to stand in your way?

    Replies: @vinteuil

    howzabout this for settling accounts

    …umm – settling accounts? wtf? Is that really the way your mind works?

    I’m personally just one step away from Louis Armstrong.

    …that’s so cool.

    You’re one step away from…

    Well, the whole crowd at the department of bioethics at the NIH, where I spent three years in the company of Zeke Emanuel & Christine Grady (aka Mrs. Tony Fauci).

    …and many, many other even worse people.

  143. @GeologyAnon Mk 3
    @International Jew

    I'm not sure, I don't know many Jews and the few I do are very posh folks and not much for roughing it. Einsteins sons were Geologists, and made important discoveries about the distribution of placer deposits, but they seem underrepresented both in academia and in industry. Mostly Geologists live in Houston or Denver with some in Midland, so by and large I don't think that's a factor. More important may be that most (not myself, but most) geoscience people are exposed to it at a young age, either by family in the oil business or mining or something like that, or they come from Venezuela or another Petro state where it is a much more visible profession. So that might also be a factor in why you don't see many Jews licking rocks

    Replies: @International Jew

    Interesting. Speaking for myself, I have licked a rock — a piece of halite my sixth-grade science teacher handed me! Can’t think of any other occasions. My high school debate coach didn’t push Demosthenes’ technique!

    Well, so there we have it: few Jewish geologists. Then again, with Jews at just 1.7% of the US population, it would be remarkable to find “many” Jews anywhere. Whereas a field that’s just 2% Hispanic could be said to have “few” Hispanics. And of course 2% blacks: that’s not just “few”, it’s a crisis requiring immediate attention.

    FWIW, I see one Jew among Harvard University’s four geology professors. And about five or six among the 69 faculty (of all ranks) at MIT’s earth & planetary whatever department.

  144. @Art Deco
    @Anonymous

    It’s like income tax, which was originally sold to the public as a temporary imposition which would only affect millionaires. A century later this “temporary” tax is still around and is levied on everyone.

    Instituting the income tax required enacting a constitutional amendment. No it was not sold as a 'temporary imposition' and was in place continuously all through the Coolidge Administration.

    Replies: @International Jew

    No it was not sold as a ‘temporary imposition’

    That’s correct, but it was sold as a tax on the wealthy, and amounted to just 2% at first. The ol’ foot-in-the-door trick.

  145. @Redneck farmer
    Maybe Professor Cohen's ancestors should have emigrated to......Haiti? No White Poweer there!

    Replies: @Mike_from_SGV

    That’s what I don’t get. With all the whining about ‘white supremacy’ etc, why don’t they all relocate to Ghana or Somalia? No WS there. Of course they are lying, they actually love WS, it is a rich host for parasitism.

  146. @Bill Jones
    Missing from the NYT is
    "All the news that's only fit to print somewhere else"

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10109987/Fiston-Ngoy-Rape-suspect-Philadelphia-train-illegal-Congolese-immigrant.html


    Most telling line of the story:

    "However, Ngoy was never deported, because an immigration judge granted him a 'withholding of removal' in March 2019, after an appeals board found that his sex crime was not a 'serious crime' that made him eligible for removal. "

    Who are these Judges and where do they live?

    Replies: @Boy the way Glenn Miller played

    However, Ngoy was never deported, because an immigration judge granted him a ‘withholding of removal’ in March 2019, after an appeals board found that his sex crime was not a ‘serious crime’ that made him eligible for removal. ”

    Who are these Judges and where do they live?

    And what do you think that Mr. Ngoy learned about the way things work in the NY metro area from this incident?

  147. @res
    @Calvin Hobbes

    Could you elaborate on that? I found this, but it is for the DoE in 2007.
    https://artofproblemsolving.com/community/c864h980625


    Department of Education reviewer wrote:
    While challenging and improving the mathematical problem-solving skills of high-performing students are surely every-day objectives of those who teach such students, it is not a problem, relatively speaking, of major import in American education.
     
    It appears they had better luck with the NSA (USAMTS funding).
    https://en-academic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/2809626

    Replies: @Calvin Hobbes

    The person who told me about this said NSF, but I’m pretty sure now that the person was referring to your Dept of Ed item. Thanks. I hope you see this reply, since it’s been a while.

    • Thanks: res
  148. @Nicholas Stix
    @Ragno

    Ragno, this is not a Jew vs. gentile, or even a communist thing. It’s an academic thing.

    Back in 1997, I wrote what would for many years be the state-of-the-art study on politicized college grading (“Making Up the Grade: Notes from the Antiversity”), which appeared in the top neocon academic journal, Academic Questions, in spring, 1998, under my most successful pseudonym, Robert Berman. (I was an adjunct lecturer with no job security and no benefits, working from semester to semester. You talked about that once.) AQ was the property of the National Association of Scholars.

    AQ’s editor-in-chief, Sandy Pinsker, a fellow Jew, put me under tremendous pressure to use my real name, fully cognizant that that would entail academic suicide. I successfully resisted him. (He forced me to come up with a list of [30-odd] pseudonymous publications.) One year after my report appeared, I ran into Pinsker at the national NAS conference in Chicago. He was standing at an NAS table, and I was wearing a nameplate. Instead of greeting me, he stared daggers at me.

    Meanwhile, Pinsker had just published a new issue, in which he ran a letter to the editor by self-styled anti-Communist sociology professor Paul Hollander (also a Jew), in which he praised someone else (Terence Pell, almost certainly a gentile) for my article!

    Like the Communists, the self-styled anti-Communists believe in caste over tribe. Academics almost all believe in caste.

    Replies: @Ragno

    Sorry, Nick, I never thought this was a Jew vs gentile thing. Not in this case, at least. I should have more obviously made the point that – like Jussie Smollett and Jessica Krug – “Paula Cohen” is another living breathing example for why “biracial” is mostly a scam, particularly when it’s used as an intellectual cudgel, a la heads I win tails you lose.

    The real point was the Bad Guys do the work, and the Guys Assigned as Good take the bows….which is outrageous enough. But to go further – to erase the contributions (often the key, vital contributions) made by said Bad Guys for no higher purpose than to punish one’s betters for being one’s betters – is grotesque academic villainy, whether it’sviewed as a tribal or a caste dispute..

    As to caste vs tribe – there’s little meaningful difference when the point is not to aggregate the applause to one’s own caste or tribe……but to reinforce which castes/tribes are unspeakable and thus, untouchable.

    But like I said, we were never at loggerheads on this, though it may have momentarily seemed that way.

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