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From the Washington Post’s Deep State correspondent:

How the algorithm tipped the balance in Ukraine

By David Ignatius
Columnist

December 19, 2022 at 10:20 a.m. EST

KYIV, Ukraine — Two Ukrainian military officers peer at a laptop computer operated by a Ukrainian technician using software provided by the American technology company Palantir. On the screen are detailed digital maps of the battlefield at Bakhmut in eastern Ukraine, overlaid with other targeting intelligence — most of it obtained from commercial satellites.

As we lean closer, we see can jagged trenches on the Bakhmut front, where Russian and Ukrainian forces are separated by a few hundred yards in one of the bloodiest battles of the war. A click of the computer mouse displays thermal images of Russian and Ukrainian artillery fire; another click shows a Russian tank marked with a “Z,” seen through a picket fence, an image uploaded by a Ukrainian spy on the ground.

… “The power of advanced algorithmic warfare systems is now so great that it equates to having tactical nuclear weapons against an adversary with only conventional ones,” explains Alex Karp, chief executive of Palantir, in an email message. “The general public tends to underestimate this. Our adversaries no longer do.” …

Palantir, which began its corporate life working with the CIA on counterterrorism tools, has many critics. That’s partly because its biggest funder, from the start, has been co-founder Peter Thiel, a successful tech investor who has also been a strong supporter of Donald Trump and other MAGA Republicans. Karp, by contrast, has supported many Democratic candidates and causes.

The critics have argued that Palantir’s powerful software has been misused by government agencies to violate privacy or serve questionable ends. For example, The Post wrote in 2019 that Palantir’s software was used by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to help track undocumented immigrants, which led to protests from some of the company’s employees. Tech community activists have asked whether Palantir is too close to the U.S. government and can “see too much” with its tools. …

Using a digital model of the battlefield, commanders can penetrate the notorious “fog of war.” By applying artificial intelligence to analyze sensor data, NATO advisers outside Ukraine can quickly answer the essential questions of combat: Where are allied forces? Where is the enemy? Which weapons will be most effective against enemy positions? They can then deliver precise enemy location information to Ukrainian commanders in the field. And after action, they can assess whether their intelligence was accurate and update the system. …

What makes this system truly revolutionary is that it aggregates data from commercial vendors. Using a Palantir tool called MetaConstellation, Ukraine and its allies can see what commercial data is currently available about a given battle space. …

In our Kherson example, Palantir assesses that roughly 40 commercial satellites will pass over the area in a 24-hour period. Palantir normally uses fewer than a dozen commercial satellite vendors, but it can expand that range to draw imagery from a total of 306 commercial satellites that can focus to 3.3 meters. Soldiers in battle can use handheld tablets to request more coverage if they need it. According to a British official, Western military and intelligence services work closely with Ukrainians on the ground to facilitate this sharing of information.

A final essential link in this system is the mesh of broadband connectivity provided from overhead by Starlink’s array of roughly 2,500 satellites in low-earth orbit. The system, owned by Elon Musk’s SpaceX company, allows Ukrainian soldiers who want to upload intelligence or download targeting information to do so quickly.

In this wizard war, Ukraine has the upper hand. The Russians have tried to create their own electronic battlefield tools, too, but with little success. They have sought to use commercial satellite data, for example, and streaming videos from inexpensive Chinese drones. But they have had difficulty coordinating and sharing this data among units. And they lack the ability to connect with the Starlink array.

This is reminiscent of when the Soviets realized in the 1980s that they were way behind in terms of both electronic hardware and software systems integration for aerial combat. In 1982, the Israelis angered the Reagan Administration by revealing to the world by taking out Syrian air defenses in Lebanon the new American strategy worked out in the 1970s for targeting Soviet ground-based radar with homing missiles. Meanwhile, the U.S. had moved its radar and computers into a 600 mph AWACS command center that could fly around at the edge of the battlefield’s horizon where the Soviets couldn’t get at it.

The American strategy was fairly simple in summary, but it was a vast amount of work to implement in practice. Eventually, the despairing Soviets tossed in the towel.

Similarly, Thiel’s strategy for modern data-based warfare doesn’t sound that esoteric, but it does seem like it must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century.

 
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  1. … “The power of advanced algorithmic warfare systems is now so great that it equates to having tactical nuclear weapons against an adversary with only conventional ones,” explains Alex Karp, chief executive of Palantir, in an email message. “The general public tends to underestimate this. Our adversaries no longer do.” …

    So we’ve tipped our hand in some bulls**t war about tactics that might be used in a real one. Chalk one up for us!

    Palantir, which began its corporate life working with the CIA on counterterrorism tools, has many critics. That’s partly because its biggest funder, from the start, has been co-founder Peter Thiel, a successful tech investor who has also been a strong supporter of Donald Trump and other MAGA Republicans. Karp, by contrast, has supported many Democratic candidates and causes.

    I’ve never heard anyone give a cogent explanation as to why the CIA gets to have it’s own venture capital firm. Can the Navy open up a chain of hot-dog stands? Can the Department of the Interior run “gentleman’s clubs”?

    Thiel, Karp, Republican, Democrat…………………it’s all the same team. And it isn’t our team.

    • Replies: @epebble
    @Mr. Anon

    why the CIA gets to have it’s own venture capital firm.

    Guessing here. Investing in a startup as a venture capitalist gives greater (financial) leverage on the capital. CIA's 10-million-dollar investment becomes 100 million dollars when other venture capitalists put 90 million dollars. This is better than an outright contract of $100 million if you are not certain the idea may work. In this case CIA would have burnt $10 and not $100 million. When doing blue sky research, why not spread $100 million into 10 $10 million startups so that at least one may work.

    As an example, again a pure guess, I think NASA's dollars being sent to SpaceX and Blue Origin may be working harder than the dollars being sent to Boeing or Lockheed-Martin.

    Replies: @Louis Renault, @Mr. Anon

    , @anonymous
    @Mr. Anon

    wow but they dont apply IT to Chicago killing fields?????

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @Mike Tre
    @Mr. Anon

    A Palantir was a communication device similar to a crystal ball found in Tolkien's works. The problem being that several were acquired by Sauran and used against the realms of men.

    That doesn't give me a warm fuzzy.


    "Can the Department of the Interior run “gentleman’s clubs”?"

    I'm pretty sure the Clinton era Secret Service were found to have this entrepreneurial spirit.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

  2. Thiel’s Way of War

    Cry havoc! And let slip the fags of war!

  3. Peter Thiel, a homo siding with Globohomo. Go figure.

    • Agree: JimDandy
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Peter Thiel, a homo siding with Globohomo. Go figure.
     
    How very white of him.

    There are currently 32 countries where same-sex marriage is legal: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and Uruguay.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/FT_19.10.22_SSMsnapshot_featured.png?w=1200&h=628&crop=1


     

    The US should show the same color as Mexico-- Indian reservations are still free to set their own standards.


    More than two dozen countries have marriage equality, and more than half of these are in Western Europe...


    The expansion of LGBTQ+ rights around the globe has been uneven, with bans on same-sex relationships still in place in many countries.

    Marriage Equality: Global Comparisons (--CFR... remember them?)
     

    Taiwan is captive to Western markets, and in South Africa, as in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Austria, the US, and eight Canadian provinces, it was imposed by a high court ruling authored by a white judge. (Oh, and a court imposed it in Taiwan, too, though one assumes the judge wasn't white.)


    What you need to know about LGBT rights in 11 maps

    White people are sick. Civilization itself is built on marriage; it wouldn't exist otherwise. We've trivialized a critical pillar.

    Replies: @Richard B

  4. It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century

    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven’t been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile

    • Replies: @meh
    @Kim



    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven’t been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile
     
    It's evidence free because you are meant to simply accept as fact the MSM narrative about Russia, Ukraine, the progress of the war and relative differences in military technology, no matter how many times this narrative is proven wrong.

    For instance, it is a fact, according to the MSM, that Russia is running out of artillery shells, missiles, and drones, and has been on the verge of running out for these munitions since March, ten months ago. Yet the overwhelming Russian superiority in artillery, missile and drone strikes continues unabated. It's all psychological projection, because it is the West which has trouble mass producing things now, thanks to neoliberalism, and not Russia.

    But do not notice that, otherwise you are a Putin shill! The MSM, which lies to us on all other topics, is telling us the truth this time, because reasons.

    As for this article, the quoted section it is rather short on practical examples of how this algorithm has "tipped the balance in Ukraine" -- they might as well cite of Ghost of Kiev while they're at it.

    Throwing penny packet attacks into the teeth of Russian artillery has gotten over 100,000 Ukrainians killed so far by the West's own admission, and adding Polish, American, UK and other mercenary volunteers is not going to fix the problem, nor does it seem that perfect real time data systems like this can solve this problem, either. Some problems don't have a technical solution.

    The purpose of these "wonder weapons" is to make the MIC rich, not to actually win wars. How many wars have "we" actually "won" since 1945? At what cost, and towards what practical ends?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Bill Jones
    @Kim

    Sailer on Russia/Ukraine is about as accurate as on covid/vaccine.

    Replies: @Kim

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Kim


    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/18906/heres-the-six-super-weapons-putin-unveiled-during-fiery-address

    Putin made his remarks at the Manezh Central Exhibition Hall near the Kremlin on March 1, 2018. Some lawmakers smiled and cheered as he detailed the various weapon development programs. These included the cruise missile with a nuclear engine, as well as the publicly known RS-28 Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), the previously unacknowledged nuclear-tipped Avangard hypersonic boost-glide vehicle and Kanyon or Status-6 nuclear-armed unmanned undersea vehicle, a possibly dual-purpose nuclear and conventional air-launched hypersonic cruise missile called Kinzhal, and a short-range directed-energy system visually similar to the U.S. Navy’s own AN/SEQ-3 Laser Weapon System.


    Now IMHO Russia hasn't done enough to counteract US information capabilities, indeed I'm amazed at some of the slackness. For example, there are functional webcams all over the Donbass which are broadcasting in real time and being youtubed live. The tube channels make no attempt at neutrality and announce that any Ukr military won't be shown, although you might spot the occasional vehicle as I did on the Bakhmut cam. But you can see from shop cameras tanks and Z-marked vehicles pull up outside, on the internal cameras you can see the troops inside buying stuff. And this is in Donetsk, which is under heavy Ukrainian shelling and has been for months!

    I wouldn't be surprised if that "agent on the ground" sending pictures of tanks wasn't actually something like this.

    https://i.postimg.cc/NM8jk6qJ/military.jpg

    I think Russia probably had better intelligence in the 50s!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Kim


    The power of advanced algorithmic warfare systems is now so great that it equates to having tactical nuclear weapons against an adversary with only conventional ones,” explains Alex Karp, chief executive of Palantir, in an email message.
     
    I don't know why Steve can't recognize a bunch of garbage techno-babble sales talk from a defense contractor when he sees it. Palantir has invented a device that downloads information from a wireless connection -- it's called a laptop. But they use words like "algorithmic" so they can charge the Pentagon a couple billion. Meanwhile, our genius army forgot to have artillery pieces or the ability to produce ammunition in mass volume during an active war.

    Steve shares the hubris of our Pentagon that their high-priced high-tech makes them invincible and that Russians are inept. In reality, Ukraine lost the war months ago because the West simply can't produce war material fast and at scale.

    This is actually apparent to the whole world that isn't inside the West's propaganda bubble. NATO is a bit of a paper tiger when it comes to fighting a real land army.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Mr Mox

    , @Jack D
    @Kim

    what is the basis of the claim?

    1. If the Russians were making an "honest effort" then they wouldn't have to buy drones from Iran. Brezhnev would have been ashamed to buy drones from Iran.

    2. An example of a DIShonest effort is the Russian Orlan drone which the Russian Army bought at a reported cost of $100k/ unit. It was made up of various off the shelf parts such as a Canon DSLR camera with the focus ring glued stationary, a soda bottle for a gas tank, a motor that you can buy on Aliexpress and so on:

    https://dronexl.co/2022/04/12/russian-orlan-10-drone-canon-camera/

    All of these parts together cost well under $10,000, leaving a good $90, 000 for investing in London or LA real estate.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @GAnon
    @Kim

    SM-3 operationally intercepted a projectile traveling ~17,000 MPH almost 20 years ago. The maximum (take Russian cope factor into account) velocity of a Zircon, yet to be operationally deployed in the current year, is ~6,000 mph. Keep in mind to achieve these speeds, it must make the projectile utterly reliant on cueing data from a third party, and has limited to no maneuverability in the terminal phase.

    Do with that information what you will. Maybe there is a reason Kiev isn't in Russian hands yet.

  5. The Post wrote in 2019 that Palantir’s software was used by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to help track undocumented immigrants, which led to protests from some of the company’s employees.

    Have they protested the US government support for the meat-grinder war of attrition in Ukraine the way they protested the US government fulfilling one of its most basic roles?

    • Thanks: International Jew
  6. The potemkin eastern world is crumbling, tbe United States is rising.

    You can just feel the pride on everybody’s face now. We did it, comrades. Commencing operation American Expansionism, now.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Anon

    I'd be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn't invaded Ukraine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave, @Cagey Beast, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Anonymous

    , @Anon
    @Anon

    That would be good, except the US government is insanely anti-white and no white person should be supporting it.

    I wonder if the Russians could get better military tech from China or even Iran?

  7. At first, I thought we should send our high-steppin’, tutu wearing, transgender lovin’ Pentagon over there to show them what Uncle Samantha can really do.

    But now I wonder if our puppy-fetish division might be the stronger team? Now I know why they call them dog tags!

    • Replies: @Kim
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Remember the poor pooch that got monkey pox on its rectum?

    These are the kinds of "people" we are dealing with.

  8. Wonder how many concerned tech workers know they wouldn’t have jobs if it wasn’t for the non-welfare state part of government?

  9. @Mr. Anon

    … “The power of advanced algorithmic warfare systems is now so great that it equates to having tactical nuclear weapons against an adversary with only conventional ones,” explains Alex Karp, chief executive of Palantir, in an email message. “The general public tends to underestimate this. Our adversaries no longer do.” …
     
    So we've tipped our hand in some bulls**t war about tactics that might be used in a real one. Chalk one up for us!

    Palantir, which began its corporate life working with the CIA on counterterrorism tools, has many critics. That’s partly because its biggest funder, from the start, has been co-founder Peter Thiel, a successful tech investor who has also been a strong supporter of Donald Trump and other MAGA Republicans. Karp, by contrast, has supported many Democratic candidates and causes.

    I've never heard anyone give a cogent explanation as to why the CIA gets to have it's own venture capital firm. Can the Navy open up a chain of hot-dog stands? Can the Department of the Interior run "gentleman's clubs"?

    Thiel, Karp, Republican, Democrat.....................it's all the same team. And it isn't our team.

    Replies: @epebble, @anonymous, @Mike Tre

    why the CIA gets to have it’s own venture capital firm.

    Guessing here. Investing in a startup as a venture capitalist gives greater (financial) leverage on the capital. CIA’s 10-million-dollar investment becomes 100 million dollars when other venture capitalists put 90 million dollars. This is better than an outright contract of $100 million if you are not certain the idea may work. In this case CIA would have burnt $10 and not $100 million. When doing blue sky research, why not spread $100 million into 10 $10 million startups so that at least one may work.

    As an example, again a pure guess, I think NASA’s dollars being sent to SpaceX and Blue Origin may be working harder than the dollars being sent to Boeing or Lockheed-Martin.

    • Replies: @Louis Renault
    @epebble

    NASA doesn't get stock, it gets a ride on a rocket that puts things in orbit and returns to Earth to be resused again.

    Replies: @epebble

    , @Mr. Anon
    @epebble


    Guessing here. Investing in a startup as a venture capitalist gives greater (financial) leverage on the capital.
     
    What you say is true, and completely beside the point. The CIA is a government agency. How is it that they are allowed to invest money and profit from it? That would seem to be straight up illegal under Federal Acquisition Regulations. And illegal or not, it is is certainly improper and not the function of the limited government of a democratic republic (neither of which we have, I know, but we like to still pretend we do).

    See also Louis Renault's comment.
  10. @Mr. Anon

    … “The power of advanced algorithmic warfare systems is now so great that it equates to having tactical nuclear weapons against an adversary with only conventional ones,” explains Alex Karp, chief executive of Palantir, in an email message. “The general public tends to underestimate this. Our adversaries no longer do.” …
     
    So we've tipped our hand in some bulls**t war about tactics that might be used in a real one. Chalk one up for us!

    Palantir, which began its corporate life working with the CIA on counterterrorism tools, has many critics. That’s partly because its biggest funder, from the start, has been co-founder Peter Thiel, a successful tech investor who has also been a strong supporter of Donald Trump and other MAGA Republicans. Karp, by contrast, has supported many Democratic candidates and causes.

    I've never heard anyone give a cogent explanation as to why the CIA gets to have it's own venture capital firm. Can the Navy open up a chain of hot-dog stands? Can the Department of the Interior run "gentleman's clubs"?

    Thiel, Karp, Republican, Democrat.....................it's all the same team. And it isn't our team.

    Replies: @epebble, @anonymous, @Mike Tre

    wow but they dont apply IT to Chicago killing fields?????

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @anonymous

    The usual suspects are working hard to prevent the cops fram using Shot Spotter.

    Replies: @bomag

  11. Could this be another game changer? Asking for a friend.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Mr Mox

    Mr Mox asked:


    Could this be another game changer? Asking for a friend.
     
    Oh, Yankee know-how and perseverance will prevail in Ukraine.

    Just as it did in Afghanistan.

    And Syria.

    And Vietnam.

    And at the Bay of Pigs.

    Because the US never, ever loses!

    Because Americans are a superior breed of human beings.

    At least in the movies: have you seen Top Gun: Maverick? Man, are we good at making movies?

    Replies: @HA

  12. Sounds like we’ve given Russia a legitimate reason now to take out our satellites.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @BlackFlag
    @International Jew

    Anatoly Karlin has been advising that for a while but it looks like Russia is too cautious.

  13. @Kim

    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don't seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven't been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YZW8oMo8Irk

    Replies: @meh, @Bill Jones, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @GAnon

    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century

    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven’t been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile

    It’s evidence free because you are meant to simply accept as fact the MSM narrative about Russia, Ukraine, the progress of the war and relative differences in military technology, no matter how many times this narrative is proven wrong.

    For instance, it is a fact, according to the MSM, that Russia is running out of artillery shells, missiles, and drones, and has been on the verge of running out for these munitions since March, ten months ago. Yet the overwhelming Russian superiority in artillery, missile and drone strikes continues unabated. It’s all psychological projection, because it is the West which has trouble mass producing things now, thanks to neoliberalism, and not Russia.

    But do not notice that, otherwise you are a Putin shill! The MSM, which lies to us on all other topics, is telling us the truth this time, because reasons.

    As for this article, the quoted section it is rather short on practical examples of how this algorithm has “tipped the balance in Ukraine” — they might as well cite of Ghost of Kiev while they’re at it.

    Throwing penny packet attacks into the teeth of Russian artillery has gotten over 100,000 Ukrainians killed so far by the West’s own admission, and adding Polish, American, UK and other mercenary volunteers is not going to fix the problem, nor does it seem that perfect real time data systems like this can solve this problem, either. Some problems don’t have a technical solution.

    The purpose of these “wonder weapons” is to make the MIC rich, not to actually win wars. How many wars have “we” actually “won” since 1945? At what cost, and towards what practical ends?

    • Agree: BB753, PeterIke, TWS
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

  14. One thing that I can’t quite figure out about the Ukraine Russian War is that this article is propaganda, it is aimed squarely at us (Americans), and it is meant to convince us that Ukraine is winning. Who’s interested in convincing Americans of this fact (which may or may not be true) and more importantly, why?

    • Agree: michael droy
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts? Or do you have some complicated theory about how losing Kherson wasn't a humiliating defeat for Russia, it is all part of a brilliant strategy to lure Ukraine into a cauldron?

    Replies: @Curle, @BB753, @Observator, @PhysicistDave, @Batman, @AndrewR, @God of Emptiness, @Dnought

  15. Western reporters who have gone to the front lines have said that the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.

    And Ukraine is constantly saying that they are running out of weapons, and reports from Western media have indicated that the Hegemon’s allies do not have much more to give.

    Of course, the Western media have also been claiming for at least eight months that Russia is running out of missiles, etc.

    Except that today I saw another news report in US media about Russia again brutally lobbing missiles into Ukraine.

    Russia seems to have been running out of missiles for a very long time… without actually running out of missiles!

    Interesting question: which side is playing the ‘Baghdad Bob” role here?

    I am afraid we are going to find out: to quote the original Baghdad Bob, “History will tell.”

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @PhysicistDave


    ... which side is playing the ‘Baghdad Bob” role here?
     
    I saw Volodymyr Zelenskyy on the local (Metro Boston) TV news last night.

    His appearance definitely had a "Baghdad Bob" feel.

    Unconditionally end all war (conventional and asymmetric) now!!!

  16. @Mr Mox
    Could this be another game changer? Asking for a friend.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Mr Mox asked:

    Could this be another game changer? Asking for a friend.

    Oh, Yankee know-how and perseverance will prevail in Ukraine.

    Just as it did in Afghanistan.

    And Syria.

    And Vietnam.

    And at the Bay of Pigs.

    Because the US never, ever loses!

    Because Americans are a superior breed of human beings.

    At least in the movies: have you seen Top Gun: Maverick? Man, are we good at making movies?

    • Replies: @HA
    @PhysicistDave

    "Oh, Yankee know-how and perseverance will prevail in Ukraine. Just as it did in Afghanistan."

    Say, PhysicistDave, how did Moscow's know-how and perseverance prevail in Afghanistan? From what I've read, the USSR might now have even survived WWII without all the massive aid they were getting from Britain and the other Allies. This time around, that's being funneled to Ukraine. Does anyone really think the Finns wouldn't have solidly beaten the Russians (as opposed to making their army -- yet again -- look like a clown show) if they had gotten all the aid that Stalin received?

    Maybe Ritter was actually on to something about those Western weapons being a game-changer (though he admittedly changed his tune once he realized that his echo chamber of trolls would brook no independent thinking). Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha... wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @John Johnson

  17. @meh
    @Kim



    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven’t been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile
     
    It's evidence free because you are meant to simply accept as fact the MSM narrative about Russia, Ukraine, the progress of the war and relative differences in military technology, no matter how many times this narrative is proven wrong.

    For instance, it is a fact, according to the MSM, that Russia is running out of artillery shells, missiles, and drones, and has been on the verge of running out for these munitions since March, ten months ago. Yet the overwhelming Russian superiority in artillery, missile and drone strikes continues unabated. It's all psychological projection, because it is the West which has trouble mass producing things now, thanks to neoliberalism, and not Russia.

    But do not notice that, otherwise you are a Putin shill! The MSM, which lies to us on all other topics, is telling us the truth this time, because reasons.

    As for this article, the quoted section it is rather short on practical examples of how this algorithm has "tipped the balance in Ukraine" -- they might as well cite of Ghost of Kiev while they're at it.

    Throwing penny packet attacks into the teeth of Russian artillery has gotten over 100,000 Ukrainians killed so far by the West's own admission, and adding Polish, American, UK and other mercenary volunteers is not going to fix the problem, nor does it seem that perfect real time data systems like this can solve this problem, either. Some problems don't have a technical solution.

    The purpose of these "wonder weapons" is to make the MIC rich, not to actually win wars. How many wars have "we" actually "won" since 1945? At what cost, and towards what practical ends?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Where’s the Russian Air Force? Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it’s mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren’t cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren’t cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It’s a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    • Agree: Redneck farmer
    • Thanks: Pixo, Jack D
    • Replies: @Anonymo
    @Steve Sailer

    Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?

    The two countries are so similar, one would imagine they’d be similar in this way too (It’s these similarities that make the war seem more tragic). Otherwise, if they differ in this, how did Ukraine get the Magic Dirt and Russia the Tragic Dirt?

    Also, maybe Putin conceived of a limited strike such as in Ukraine 2014 or Georgia 2008. That possibility is obviously off the table.

    Do you take seriously Putin’s claims about the mistreatment of ethnic Russians in the Donbass? In the Georgian example, he displayed himself willing to protect ethnic Russians under attack, if I understand correctly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @John Johnson

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to meh:


    Where’s the Russian Air Force? Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?
     
    For what purpose? Planes can be shot down and pilots die.

    This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.

    Steve also wrote:

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.
     
    As opposed to the well-known absence of corruption in Kiev???

    This is a war of attrition.

    You win a war by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    One way to do that is to kill most of their forces.

    Another way is to cause them to use up their weapons and ammo.

    According to Western media reports from the ground, that is what Russia is doing.

    It may be, as yo say, "embarrassing," but it is how you win a war.

    By most accounts, the American Confederacy had much better strategists and tacticians than the North.

    But the North just wore them down.

    And the North won.

    Replies: @Anon, @Hibernian, @Pixo, @RadicalTomato, @GeologyAnonMk6

    , @michael droy
    @Steve Sailer

    Very strangely you seem to have completely bought the media myths.
    A very small Russian force has overwhelmed a very large nato trained army.
    The massive "Ukraine is winning" PR is simply because the truth is genuinely awful for western militaries (and their MIC) to face.
    The big story is US becoming No2 nation in the world to China. That is the real way to understand what gets written.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon

    , @Lurker
    @Steve Sailer

    And where is the Ukrainian airforce?

    Perhaps the airforces are no longer the forces they once were?

    Where is the Russian cavalry, where are the Ukrainian siege engines, where are the Russian chariots, where are the Ukrainian elephants?

    Replies: @Mr Mox

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer


    Where’s the Russian Air Force?
     
    It’s there.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1578239014028529664?s=46&t=xz4qv6SFq3ZlzYZMZ-T3oA

    Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?
     
    Two reasons, I suspect:

    1) Too many effective anti-aircraft weapons, most of them Russian-built, plus Western MANPADS.

    2) Fear of Russian pilots getting tortured to death if they survive getting shot down.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @BlackFlag
    @Steve Sailer

    Why is it embarrassing if Russia is up against NATO's weaponry, intelligence, and funding? The only advantage over Ukraine would be population size but of course, the defender is will be able to mobilize a much greater percentage of its able-bodied men. In fact, Ukraine has more soldiers in the field.
    A quagmire should be expected.

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer


    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.
     
    The Ukraine, which never had a Putin figure to rein in its oligarchs, is far more corrupt than Russia, and that didn't seem to impede the Ukraine's advances this fall. A bigger issue for Russia has probably been its paucity of military spending in recent years:

    https://specials-images.forbesimg.com/imageserve/60890da04d91e45a7160b853/960x0.jpg?fit=scale

    Not really what you'd expect to see from a dictator determined to reconstitute the USSR, as some American pundits tell us.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @michael droy

    , @HA
    @Steve Sailer

    "Where’s the Russian Air Force? Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?"

    Its planes keep getting shot down if they fly low enough to really qualify as air cover. So instead, they just drop bombs on large city centers.

    Yesterday's second attack on Engels, deep inside Russia (Engels is 1100 km away from Kyiv, whereas the distance from Kyiv to Moscow is only about a 900 km), resulted in a couple more jets being put out of commission. It was especially embarrassing for the Russians, given that Dec 26th is the anniversary of the founding of the Russian air force. Some of the planes that were left were reportedly moved to Ukrainka, in Russia's far East, indicating that there's not much confidence in Moscow that any of their air fields that might be useful for shelling Ukrainians are safe at this point.

    Ukraine officially took no responsibility for the attack, and they are officially not permitted to use American tech to target Russian territory, so, as rumor would have it, the Ukrainians refurbished a Soviet-era plane to serve as a drone.

    Some Russian stooges have managed to find a usable vein in their scarred up bodies in which to inject another syringe of copium about how Russia can't lose any more territory because they're now solidly fortified. That might have made for genuine consolation in WWII, but fake dragon's teeth, or whatever else counts as "fortifications" to a regime that can't even supply ammunition to Bakhmut (which Zelensky used as a photo-op before heading to DC), aren't really going to prevent those drones and HIMARs from doing what they're designed to do, Then again, the beauty of copium is that it doesn't need to make all that much sense.

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer


    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.
     
    You think Ukraine doesn't have a problem with corruption?

    https://twitter.com/MaxBlumenthal/status/1607477025962430465

    , @BB753
    @Steve Sailer

    "Where’s the Russian Air Force?"
    Keeping safely away from Soviet air defences. While these are virtually useless against missiles and drones, they are still effective against airplanes. Planes are more expensive than drones and missiles. One the Russians take totally down the electrical grid and the air defense system, the Migs will take care of Ukrainian ground forces. I believe the last missile and drone strikes are achieving the goal of freeing Ukrainian air space.

  18. @Batman
    One thing that I can't quite figure out about the Ukraine Russian War is that this article is propaganda, it is aimed squarely at us (Americans), and it is meant to convince us that Ukraine is winning. Who's interested in convincing Americans of this fact (which may or may not be true) and more importantly, why?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts? Or do you have some complicated theory about how losing Kherson wasn’t a humiliating defeat for Russia, it is all part of a brilliant strategy to lure Ukraine into a cauldron?

    • Replies: @Curle
    @Steve Sailer

    What is the loss rate to available resources ratio for the two armies? Put another way, what has each army lost in terms of available resources since July as a percent of total resources?

    , @BB753
    @Steve Sailer

    Russia does not fight like Western armies, using overwhelming force to push back the enemy with grand manoeuvres. You see, the goal of war is destroying the enemy army. It doesn't necessarily involve gaining "acres" with no strategic value and at great cost. The Russian way of war is grinding down the enemy while preserving one's resources. Which so far they are accomplishing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Observator
    @Steve Sailer

    Russia clearly stated its objective was to destroy the Ukrainian military threat, and it is doing that reasonably well. Holding territory is not the primary goal of a successful war - look up, oh, the southern Confederacy - it is rather the result of eliminating the forces that would otherwise be defending it. This war started as a limited police action, not unlike what happened a little further to the north in 1939, but it quickly escalated into a major conflict when world powers perceived the opportunity had arrived again for the long desired regime change war to dismember and plunder a resource-rich economic rival.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Batman:


    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts?
     
    Steve, we all love you, man, but are you completely ignorant of the military history of the last two centuries?

    Look just at the two World Wars:

    At the end of WW I, Germany still occupied a significant amount of Allied territory: the Allies did not control one square inch of German territory.

    But Germany lost.

    In WW II, Germany for a time occupied an enormous amount of Russian territory. But Germany still lost.

    You do not, you cannot, win a war simply and only by seizing territory.


    You win a war, you only can win a war, by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    You occupy territory, you cede territory, you advance, you retreat -- solely with the purpose of advancing towards that one single goal.

    And if you achieve that goal, even if the enemy occupies a huge amount of your territory, you win, and then you take whatever the hell you want.

    As WW I proved so nicely.

    This basic fact of warfare may be confusing to people who prefer to pore over maps and follow the ebb and flow of battle lines.

    But this is not Stratego or Risk. This is a real war fought in the real world.

    And this is the reality of warfare in the real world for more than two centuries.

    Replies: @michael droy, @James J. O'Meara, @Buzz Mohawk, @Unladen Swallow

    , @Batman
    @Steve Sailer

    You don't win modern wars by controlling dirt. You win them by outlasting your opponents. The United States learned this in Afghanistan. Russia's occupations of Georgia and Moldova taught them this lesson as well.

    That's why propaganda to demoralize Russian citizens (we've seen plenty of this--remember the blitz of stories about Russian males breaking their legs to get out of the draft) and to give confidence to the Ukrainians makes sense.

    But why aim propaganda at us? How does American popular opinion about this war help the Ukrainian cause? The superficial answer is to keep the aid flowing to Ukraine, but they don't need this kind of propaganda blitz to make that happen. The American public does not care about the national debt. And we give considerably more money to Israel without flinching.

    https://i0.wp.com/bootcampmilitaryfitnessinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/Mission-Accomplished-Speech-2003-George-W-Bush-Iraq-War-1.webp

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    , @AndrewR
    @Steve Sailer

    Take your Midol, Steve

    , @God of Emptiness
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve,

    You are great, I really respect your work, and I really love reading your stuff.
    I agree that there seems to be some setbacks-but I would like to point out a couple things (I am also not a Putin lover-but I do admire his abilities).

    1. Every President we have had for the last 23 years has said they have Putin figured out, contained, and are beating him. None of them has actually done this. Most of them were, I would say, not high-level thinkers, and Biden is essentially senile.

    2. Putin -like it or not-has gotten just about every single thing he has ever wanted. Whatever area he wanted to annex or whatever you want to call it-he got it. Yeah-he can't win them all-and who knows what we haven't been told-but in his area of the world-he's gotten a lot. He consolidated Chechnya, Georgia or whatever it is called, and Crimea. So curious what make everyone think he won't pull this off.

    3. I have been told that Putin is finish, it is over for Russia, and Ukraine is victorious-every day since the war started. Yes-there are set backs for Russia-some I suspect may be Putin's health. I am not saying they are winning-but Ukraine seems to keep needing funds-so I am not sure where all the money is going. If it is for weaponry-you know heavy ordinance-doesn't that stuff last longer then bullets or a few weeks/months? I don't know-but seems like either they are lying about the funds or they keeping getting their weapons destroyed, or something.

    4. I agree with you that they have not made any advances (that we know of) in awhile-but that is the one thing about Mr. Putin that I think really pisses everyone off-he's hard to figure out. Hard to say if that really means anything at all. Like Yogi said-it ain't over till it's over.

    5. I don't want Russia to win and I don't want Ukraine to lose. I also don't want Ukraine to win and I don't want Russia to lose. My personal belief is that no one ever truly "wins" a war. I think the killing needs to stop-immediately-and a diplomatic civilized solution should happen. In my experience, the ones who want wars the most, are the least willing to fight in them.

    Now, I could be completely wrong and Washington DC and the MSM could be telling us the truth-after all they have never lied to us before-have they?

    Replies: @John Johnson

    , @Dnought
    @Steve Sailer


    Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.
     
    "Two orders of magnitude greater" than what?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  19. @Kim

    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don't seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven't been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YZW8oMo8Irk

    Replies: @meh, @Bill Jones, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @GAnon

    Sailer on Russia/Ukraine is about as accurate as on covid/vaccine.

    • Replies: @Kim
    @Bill Jones

    I can never understand why people pretend to know stuff about things they can't possibly know anything about.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Citizen of a Silly Country

  20. On the subject of Ukraine, this is a fascinating interview with a British volunteer in that war (Not least because it has some interesting tidbits about Ukrainian corruption):

    .

    • Thanks: Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Anonymous

    That was a good interview. He was part of a UK/Aus trio of guys at the start and one of them was killed in action. They experienced constant mortar and artillery shelling from Russia and got casualty evacuation after 1-2 hours. "If the rifle accounts for 1% of the dead in this war, I'd be surprised."

    , @22pp22
    @Anonymous

    Well, that was a first. Actual information from an informed source. More please!

  21. @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts? Or do you have some complicated theory about how losing Kherson wasn't a humiliating defeat for Russia, it is all part of a brilliant strategy to lure Ukraine into a cauldron?

    Replies: @Curle, @BB753, @Observator, @PhysicistDave, @Batman, @AndrewR, @God of Emptiness, @Dnought

    What is the loss rate to available resources ratio for the two armies? Put another way, what has each army lost in terms of available resources since July as a percent of total resources?

  22. @Bill Jones
    @Kim

    Sailer on Russia/Ukraine is about as accurate as on covid/vaccine.

    Replies: @Kim

    I can never understand why people pretend to know stuff about things they can’t possibly know anything about.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Kim

    Right now things are pretty universally and unprecedentedly bad, but chanting "Russia bad" lets some people pretend it's still an earlier, better time.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship, @Mark G.

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Kim

    Yep, I'll let this war play out and see what happens. I have no idea why Steve has gone crazy about all of this.

    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It's bizarre.

    Maybe Russia really is losing the war, maybe not. What I do know is that our media lies constantly and is the PR wing for the establishment.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @michael droy

  23. How do we know Russia doesn’t have similar satellite surveillance tools? Truth be told, Russia uses drones because they are better for real time targeting than satellites. And Russia’s EW resources in Ukraine are vastly superior, which is why their drones dominate the sky. Ukraine admits that Russian EW is causing US supplied drones to fall to earth or fly off in random directions almost as soon as they are launched. So, Steve’s claim about Russia lacking honest effort sounds like a Cold War trope. Moreover, most of Russian cutting-edge defense technology is developed in Russia, not stolen from the US.

  24. @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts? Or do you have some complicated theory about how losing Kherson wasn't a humiliating defeat for Russia, it is all part of a brilliant strategy to lure Ukraine into a cauldron?

    Replies: @Curle, @BB753, @Observator, @PhysicistDave, @Batman, @AndrewR, @God of Emptiness, @Dnought

    Russia does not fight like Western armies, using overwhelming force to push back the enemy with grand manoeuvres. You see, the goal of war is destroying the enemy army. It doesn’t necessarily involve gaining “acres” with no strategic value and at great cost. The Russian way of war is grinding down the enemy while preserving one’s resources. Which so far they are accomplishing.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @BB753

    What can be more undeniable than that all of Russian military history, the Russian way of war, is to preserve the lives of Russian soldiers as the highest priority?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @BB753

  25. @Kim

    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don't seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven't been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YZW8oMo8Irk

    Replies: @meh, @Bill Jones, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @GAnon

    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century

    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/18906/heres-the-six-super-weapons-putin-unveiled-during-fiery-address

    Putin made his remarks at the Manezh Central Exhibition Hall near the Kremlin on March 1, 2018. Some lawmakers smiled and cheered as he detailed the various weapon development programs. These included the cruise missile with a nuclear engine, as well as the publicly known RS-28 Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), the previously unacknowledged nuclear-tipped Avangard hypersonic boost-glide vehicle and Kanyon or Status-6 nuclear-armed unmanned undersea vehicle, a possibly dual-purpose nuclear and conventional air-launched hypersonic cruise missile called Kinzhal, and a short-range directed-energy system visually similar to the U.S. Navy’s own AN/SEQ-3 Laser Weapon System.

    Now IMHO Russia hasn’t done enough to counteract US information capabilities, indeed I’m amazed at some of the slackness. For example, there are functional webcams all over the Donbass which are broadcasting in real time and being youtubed live. The tube channels make no attempt at neutrality and announce that any Ukr military won’t be shown, although you might spot the occasional vehicle as I did on the Bakhmut cam. But you can see from shop cameras tanks and Z-marked vehicles pull up outside, on the internal cameras you can see the troops inside buying stuff. And this is in Donetsk, which is under heavy Ukrainian shelling and has been for months!

    I wouldn’t be surprised if that “agent on the ground” sending pictures of tanks wasn’t actually something like this.

    I think Russia probably had better intelligence in the 50s!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    That's the point I'm making: it's less superweapons you can cheer in Red Square that matter for modern warfare, but a whole lot of boring systems integration toil. That's what let the US establish complete air supremacy over the Iraqis in 1991 with their Soviet weapons. And it's not wholly coincidental that the Soviet Union itself collapsed eight months later.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @SunBakedSuburb, @Mike Tre

  26. @Anon
    The potemkin eastern world is crumbling, tbe United States is rising.

    You can just feel the pride on everybody's face now. We did it, comrades. Commencing operation American Expansionism, now.

    Replies: @SFG, @Anon

    I’d be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn’t invaded Ukraine.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @SFG

    Basil Fawlty's Razor.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @SFG

    SFG wrote to Anon:


    I’d be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn’t invaded Ukraine.
     
    But in fact it is the illegal puppet regime in Kiev, installed at the instigation of the US Deep State, that invaded the areas of Ukraine that refused to accede to the illegal puppet regime.

    The legitimate country of Ukraine was the areas that refused to accede to the illegal puppet regime.

    Russia did not invade "Ukraine." Russia came to the aid of those Ukrainians who were resisting the illegal puppet government in Kiev.

    An enormous difference.

    Facts matter.

    Russia is fighting for people all over the world who do not wish to be slaves to the US Deep State.

    If only Americans could remember their own heritage and join the fight against the illegal US Deep State!

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Graham

    , @Cagey Beast
    @SFG

    Yes the more pro-Russian side in Ukraine should have stuck to using the ballot box. Oops, they did. They won elections that were overturned via a court ruling (an unconstitutional 3rd round of voting, aka the Orange Revolution) or their guy was driven out in a coup (Euromaidan) despite agreeing to concessions the day before.

    Or maybe the Russians should have tried diplomacy to resolve the mess left after the 2014 coup? Oops, they did but it turns out the westerners were just stringing them along in order to buy time to arm Ukraine. Merkel herself admitted as much earlier this month.

    I wish this war wasn't happening but the fact that Russia did invade doesn't mean "our" side now has its slate wiped clean. Russia invaded Ukraine because we paid diplomats and NGOs to get that country into NATO and to use it as an "anti-Russia" to bring about regime change in Moscow.

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @SFG

    I'd be a lot more willing to side with the Ukrainians if:

    1. American neocons hadn't installed a hostile regime that openly demanded to join a military alliance aimed squarely at Russia.

    America demands an entire hemisphere as a buffer zone. The least we can do is allow Russia a buffer state.

    2. America's neocon-installed regime didn't attack the ethnically Russian parts of Ukraine.

    3. The United States hadn't spit in the eye of Russia when it asked for assurances that Ukraine would remain neutral.

    Replies: @Chebyshev

    , @Anonymous
    @SFG

    "Ukraine" is a geographic term with no political meaning. The Russians literally haven't invaded anything.

  27. @BB753
    @Steve Sailer

    Russia does not fight like Western armies, using overwhelming force to push back the enemy with grand manoeuvres. You see, the goal of war is destroying the enemy army. It doesn't necessarily involve gaining "acres" with no strategic value and at great cost. The Russian way of war is grinding down the enemy while preserving one's resources. Which so far they are accomplishing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    What can be more undeniable than that all of Russian military history, the Russian way of war, is to preserve the lives of Russian soldiers as the highest priority?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    "Deniable." "What could be more deniable." Their teacher was Genghis, he didn't plan out fields of fire.
    -----
    Look at this regime propaganda. Is there some party Steve will get invited to by suffering it? Government spying is cool, except for Trumptards and any disrespect to the holy "refugees"?

    Replies: @Anon

    , @BB753
    @Steve Sailer

    Resources mean not only men. But vehicles, ammunition, missiles, fuel, artillery pieces, etc. In one word, everything considered, it's best to preserve your forces.

  28. @Steve Sailer
    @BB753

    What can be more undeniable than that all of Russian military history, the Russian way of war, is to preserve the lives of Russian soldiers as the highest priority?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @BB753

    “Deniable.” “What could be more deniable.” Their teacher was Genghis, he didn’t plan out fields of fire.
    —–
    Look at this regime propaganda. Is there some party Steve will get invited to by suffering it? Government spying is cool, except for Trumptards and any disrespect to the holy “refugees”?

    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Anon
    @J.Ross

    Who was your teacher, a crackhead? Genghis died long before the invasion of Russia and Mongols used highly skilled cavaory soldiers, who usually suffered minimal casualties despite being outnumbered by their opponents.

    Let me see you tell me who was actually Khan when Russia was invaded...

  29. @Kim
    @Bill Jones

    I can never understand why people pretend to know stuff about things they can't possibly know anything about.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Right now things are pretty universally and unprecedentedly bad, but chanting “Russia bad” lets some people pretend it’s still an earlier, better time.

    • Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @J.Ross

    Apparently we're all supposed to chant USA! and think this is 1988. But Russia isn't threatening me and neither is China in any fundamental sense.

    The Usual Suspects hate Russia because it's a big white country that won't get with the Diversity program. And then there's some weird group that thinks if we have Russia as an enemy, that'll fool the rubes into supporting Uncle Samantha no matter how anti-White she/he/they is.

    , @Mark G.
    @J.Ross


    Right now things are pretty universally and unprecedentedly bad, but chanting “Russia bad” lets some people pretend it’s still an earlier, better time.
     
    Yes, I think that is pretty much it. People don't want to accept how bad things are becoming in this country, so they are pretending it is still the eighties. The government ran a 250-billion-dollar deficit in November, the highest for any November in history. The national debt was thirty percent of GDP in the eighties and just passed a hundred percent. Volcker could raise interest rates back then but doing that now would lead to high interest payments on the huge debt which the country couldn't afford. The Boomers were entering the work force then. They are all retiring now. The dysgenic effects of our welfare and immigration policies have left a younger generation ill prepared to take their place. Real incomes adjusted for inflation have dropped for 19 months in a row. Life expectancy has dropped five of the last seven years and is on track to drop again for 2022. The CBO estimates by 2032 the cost of Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, government and military pensions will equal 100% of tax receipts.

    I was working for the Department of Defense in 1982 and still am forty years later. The difference in the workforce between then and now is the difference between night and day. Out of control affirmative action has put many incompetents in high positions. The DoD has failed an audit six years in a row. The military is having recruiting problems. Talented people don't want to join a military where promotions are based on skin color, you are subjected to woke propaganda, and you are forced to get unsafe and ineffective vaccines because big pharma donated a lot to the Biden campaign in 2020. People like me wanted to join back then to defend the country and its traditional values of freedom and individual rights but how many people can love a woke American empire with Biden at the top?

  30. @SFG
    @Anon

    I'd be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn't invaded Ukraine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave, @Cagey Beast, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Anonymous

    Basil Fawlty’s Razor.

  31. @YetAnotherAnon
    @Kim


    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/18906/heres-the-six-super-weapons-putin-unveiled-during-fiery-address

    Putin made his remarks at the Manezh Central Exhibition Hall near the Kremlin on March 1, 2018. Some lawmakers smiled and cheered as he detailed the various weapon development programs. These included the cruise missile with a nuclear engine, as well as the publicly known RS-28 Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), the previously unacknowledged nuclear-tipped Avangard hypersonic boost-glide vehicle and Kanyon or Status-6 nuclear-armed unmanned undersea vehicle, a possibly dual-purpose nuclear and conventional air-launched hypersonic cruise missile called Kinzhal, and a short-range directed-energy system visually similar to the U.S. Navy’s own AN/SEQ-3 Laser Weapon System.


    Now IMHO Russia hasn't done enough to counteract US information capabilities, indeed I'm amazed at some of the slackness. For example, there are functional webcams all over the Donbass which are broadcasting in real time and being youtubed live. The tube channels make no attempt at neutrality and announce that any Ukr military won't be shown, although you might spot the occasional vehicle as I did on the Bakhmut cam. But you can see from shop cameras tanks and Z-marked vehicles pull up outside, on the internal cameras you can see the troops inside buying stuff. And this is in Donetsk, which is under heavy Ukrainian shelling and has been for months!

    I wouldn't be surprised if that "agent on the ground" sending pictures of tanks wasn't actually something like this.

    https://i.postimg.cc/NM8jk6qJ/military.jpg

    I think Russia probably had better intelligence in the 50s!

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    That’s the point I’m making: it’s less superweapons you can cheer in Red Square that matter for modern warfare, but a whole lot of boring systems integration toil. That’s what let the US establish complete air supremacy over the Iraqis in 1991 with their Soviet weapons. And it’s not wholly coincidental that the Soviet Union itself collapsed eight months later.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Steve Sailer

    "it’s less superweapons you can cheer in Red Square that matter for modern warfare"

    Hmm. I think that's debatable. I didn't even think you could chuck stuff around in our atmosphere at Mach 20 without it burning up, but a lot of people think you can, and that the plasma field around it will make radar echoing moot. At that speed defence won't have much time to react.

    And HIMARs and artillery with guided shells, much trumpeted by Western media, seem to be affecting the battle in that you can shell a senior Russian's birthday party in Donetsk. Plenty of people here were cheering superweapons when the Kerch bridge was hit.

    But we'll find out if those weapons will matter for modern warfare, if (perhaps when) this is pushed as far as nuclear conflict. Are we feeling lucky?

    "a whole lot of boring systems integration toil"

    Stopping webcams broadcasting your troop positions to unfriendly people should be pretty damn simple - the internet is full of people geolocating anonymous hedgerows in the Donbass, so a shop or a street corner in Donetsk should be a few moments work. Longer will be going back through youtube archives to register cameras which may no longer be on youtube, but which may still be being monitored.

    I remember thinking China's Great Firewall was a lousy idea, but now I see its utility)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0A4L-5n3HqE

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Steve Sailer

    "And it's not wholly coincidental that the Soviet Union itself collapsed eight months later."

    The collapse of the USSR had more to do with its genesis as a bad idea than outmoded weapons systems. The United States began with a great idea but its inheritors, equipped with fabulous technology, lost the plot. They began worshipping the idols of a decadent establishment -- expertism, scientism, elitism. Most wander the landscape in a media-induced illusion while the great idea crumbles around them. Not even the shadow ministers, who desire to impose a totalitarian biosurveillance system, will be able to manage the collapse of the Western standard-bearer. But I remain bullish on Oregon and its cranberry bogs.

    , @Mike Tre
    @Steve Sailer

    "That’s what let the US establish complete air supremacy over the Iraqis in 1991 with their Soviet weapons. "

    You mean it had nothing to do with the quality of pilots facing off against one another?

  32. “….. something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century”.

    Western chauvinists can always be counted on to rally round the flag, even if it’s a rainbow flag flying beside a BLM one.

    It may be glaringly obvious that we’re grossly misgoverned and we’re in a civilisational death spiral but at least we’re better than the other team, eh?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Cagey Beast

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin's spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    Replies: @michael droy, @Sean, @Anonymo, @Corvinus, @rebel yell, @AndrewR, @Old Prude, @Chrisnonymous

    , @Dave Pinsen
    @Cagey Beast

    You've got to give Sailer credit for consistency. He's opposed Russia on this since the beginning, unlike, say Richard Hanania.

    https://twitter.com/NoahCarl90/status/1607463840182304770?s=20&t=OUvqyIdqUjnhUfGXesiq2Q

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Cagey Beast

  33. @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    "Deniable." "What could be more deniable." Their teacher was Genghis, he didn't plan out fields of fire.
    -----
    Look at this regime propaganda. Is there some party Steve will get invited to by suffering it? Government spying is cool, except for Trumptards and any disrespect to the holy "refugees"?

    Replies: @Anon

    Who was your teacher, a crackhead? Genghis died long before the invasion of Russia and Mongols used highly skilled cavaory soldiers, who usually suffered minimal casualties despite being outnumbered by their opponents.

    Let me see you tell me who was actually Khan when Russia was invaded…

  34. @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

    Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?

    The two countries are so similar, one would imagine they’d be similar in this way too (It’s these similarities that make the war seem more tragic). Otherwise, if they differ in this, how did Ukraine get the Magic Dirt and Russia the Tragic Dirt?

    Also, maybe Putin conceived of a limited strike such as in Ukraine 2014 or Georgia 2008. That possibility is obviously off the table.

    Do you take seriously Putin’s claims about the mistreatment of ethnic Russians in the Donbass? In the Georgian example, he displayed himself willing to protect ethnic Russians under attack, if I understand correctly.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymo

    "Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?"

    I met a Ukrainian "defense expert" who owned the single nicest piece of land I've seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else's country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians -- ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else's country?

    Replies: @Anonymo, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Colin Wright, @TWS, @PhysicistDave, @YetAnotherAnon, @Redman

    , @John Johnson
    @Anonymo

    Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?

    No because Ukraine and Russia are not the same country. Ukraine is half-Western while Russia is full Slavic corruption.

    It seems that everyone in Russia has been lying to Putin and themselves.

    They weren't ready for this war and they don't even have enough winter boots and armor to go around.

    Putin and his fake military commanders don't know what they are doing. Look at the way these Russian conscripts run around:
    https://funker530.com/video/ukrainian-artillery-brackets-and-destroys-russian-platoon/

    No armor support and just running around like teenagers at a concert.

    Look at how they bunch up in that video. They're not even following the basics of combat.

    Putin is taking random men and just dumping them on the front. He may be good at keeping power but he is clueless when it comes to war. They are ignoring lessons from both WW1 and WW2. In WW1 they learned quickly to not bunch up in a field when under artillery attack.

    Do you take seriously Putin’s claims about the mistreatment of ethnic Russians in the Donbass?

    I certainly don't. First he decreed LPR/DPR to be independent countries and they have been since taken as Russian territory. The militias are mostly dead as they were sent to the front.

    If Donbas was truly the cause of the war then he would have tried negotiating first. He in fact cut off all diplomatic ties with Ukraine. The leaked plans show that he planned on taking Ukraine and then moving on to Moldova. He only claimed the war was about Donbas after he failed to take Kiev. In his original speech he claimed it was about NATO even though Ukraine didn't have the votes of France or Germany.

    Putin is just plain full of shit. Just because our media supports Ukraine doesn't make him any less of a weasel.

  35. @PhysicistDave
    Western reporters who have gone to the front lines have said that the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.

    And Ukraine is constantly saying that they are running out of weapons, and reports from Western media have indicated that the Hegemon's allies do not have much more to give.

    Of course, the Western media have also been claiming for at least eight months that Russia is running out of missiles, etc.

    Except that today I saw another news report in US media about Russia again brutally lobbing missiles into Ukraine.

    Russia seems to have been running out of missiles for a very long time... without actually running out of missiles!

    Interesting question: which side is playing the 'Baghdad Bob" role here?

    I am afraid we are going to find out: to quote the original Baghdad Bob, "History will tell."

    Replies: @Coemgen

    … which side is playing the ‘Baghdad Bob” role here?

    I saw Volodymyr Zelenskyy on the local (Metro Boston) TV news last night.

    His appearance definitely had a “Baghdad Bob” feel.

    Unconditionally end all war (conventional and asymmetric) now!!!

  36. @epebble
    @Mr. Anon

    why the CIA gets to have it’s own venture capital firm.

    Guessing here. Investing in a startup as a venture capitalist gives greater (financial) leverage on the capital. CIA's 10-million-dollar investment becomes 100 million dollars when other venture capitalists put 90 million dollars. This is better than an outright contract of $100 million if you are not certain the idea may work. In this case CIA would have burnt $10 and not $100 million. When doing blue sky research, why not spread $100 million into 10 $10 million startups so that at least one may work.

    As an example, again a pure guess, I think NASA's dollars being sent to SpaceX and Blue Origin may be working harder than the dollars being sent to Boeing or Lockheed-Martin.

    Replies: @Louis Renault, @Mr. Anon

    NASA doesn’t get stock, it gets a ride on a rocket that puts things in orbit and returns to Earth to be resused again.

    • Thanks: Mr. Anon
    • Replies: @epebble
    @Louis Renault

    True; but they get a cheaper ride than a contract with Boeing or Lockheed-Martin would have cost. United Launch Alliance is still polishing their blueprints for Vulcan Centaur while SpaceX is testing their Starship.

  37. @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

    Steve Sailer wrote to meh:

    Where’s the Russian Air Force? Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?

    For what purpose? Planes can be shot down and pilots die.

    This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.

    Steve also wrote:

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    As opposed to the well-known absence of corruption in Kiev???

    This is a war of attrition.

    You win a war by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    One way to do that is to kill most of their forces.

    Another way is to cause them to use up their weapons and ammo.

    According to Western media reports from the ground, that is what Russia is doing.

    It may be, as yo say, “embarrassing,” but it is how you win a war.

    By most accounts, the American Confederacy had much better strategists and tacticians than the North.

    But the North just wore them down.

    And the North won.

    • Agree: michael droy
    • Replies: @Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    "This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces."

    Sources for this? Must be reporters who's provably gone to the front and also pro-Western according to your own standards.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @HA

    , @Hibernian
    @PhysicistDave


    By most accounts, the American Confederacy had much better strategists and tacticians than the North.
     
    The gaps between Northern and Southern officers and between Northern and Southern enlisted soldiers are often exaggerated. The Anaconda Plan was brilliant. The Union was successful west of the Appalachians almost from the start. Virginia was a different story, but even there look what happened when the Confederacy went on the offensive. Many of the Northern urban soldiers were immigrants who had lived in the countryside in their home countries. Both sides had trouble with cowardly, indecisive commanders. The bad Northern Generals tended to be cashiereed as the War went on.
    , @Pixo
    @PhysicistDave

    “ the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces”

    There no credible source for this Putinist cope.

    Why don’t you embed a vlog with your pedophile friend Scott Ritter?

    , @RadicalTomato
    @PhysicistDave

    The North did also have considerable logistic advantages, and the South's economic base of slaves and cotton was not convertable to any military value.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @GeologyAnonMk6
    @PhysicistDave

    For what purpose? What kind of logic is that? Why do you think the 1991 or 2003 Iraq wars didn't devolve into artillery slugfests?

    Air power excels at destroying artillery outright, and suppressing its use just by being airborne in the general vicinity. You can't fire and displace fast enough to get away from an F-16 coming to ruin your whole afternoon with cluster bombs. And it can engage your battery well outside of the range of your Manpads if it chooses to and E/A-18s turned the protecting SAMs into scrap metal days ago. Artillery is a primo target for airpower-- largely static relative to the aircraft, mostly unarmored or lightly armored, and a high concentration of personnel in a small footprint.

    Russia can't leverage their airpower to shut down enemy artillery because they didn't invest in a lot of seemingly boring network centric warfare technologies that the US/NATO did. Link-16/22 etc let's any platform push through targeting data to any other, so the recon PLC on the ground can instantly relay the coordinates of an enemy battery to the stack of 30-50 fast movers orbiting overhead.

    That call for fire gets vetted through airborne C4ISR which has access to every aircrafts fuel state and load out and position and vectors whichever is most appropriate into position. Meanwhile the whole circus is protected by ES/EA that will *immediately* detect any red force attempt to radiate well before the emitter can build a tactical picture, and vector fighters or electronic attack assets toward it as appropriate.

    Russians don't have secure directional data links, so just talking gives their fix away. They operate almost exclusively through GCI which is provincial, with one hand not knowing what the other is doing. They lack the PGMs and targeting pods to accurately engage outside the AAA and Manpad threat window so have to yeet unguided rockets ballistically off their frogfoots toward the general direction (coordinates written in grease pencil on the canopy based on open air radio calls, based on videos leaked online) of the enemy. Meanwhile their Flanker Fulcrum availability is very low for maintenance reasons and even lower since they are tasked with the PGM deepstrikes and can't be spared to escort CAS or even overwatch them generally.

    Airpower is one of those things you can't half-ass. Since the 70s the Russians knew they were going to get bled if they went against NATO aur forces so never developed the SEAD/DEAD, tankers, AWACS, and LINK/TADIL infrastructure required for offensive air interdiction in Indian Country. It's not like the USA is a prodigy or something, thousands of aviators were killed or captured in Vietnam where we started to learn these lessons. They never had that experience, and didn't learn from ours apparently.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave

  38. @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts? Or do you have some complicated theory about how losing Kherson wasn't a humiliating defeat for Russia, it is all part of a brilliant strategy to lure Ukraine into a cauldron?

    Replies: @Curle, @BB753, @Observator, @PhysicistDave, @Batman, @AndrewR, @God of Emptiness, @Dnought

    Russia clearly stated its objective was to destroy the Ukrainian military threat, and it is doing that reasonably well. Holding territory is not the primary goal of a successful war – look up, oh, the southern Confederacy – it is rather the result of eliminating the forces that would otherwise be defending it. This war started as a limited police action, not unlike what happened a little further to the north in 1939, but it quickly escalated into a major conflict when world powers perceived the opportunity had arrived again for the long desired regime change war to dismember and plunder a resource-rich economic rival.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Observator

    Last I heard from Vlad, this was a war of annexation.

    But it turned out, much to Vlad's expensive surprise, that the Ukrainians didn't want to be annexed. It's almost as if the all the spied and traitors he thought he was funding in Ukraine was actually money being embezzled to buy infinity pools in Bel-Air.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @PhysicistDave

  39. Russia’s biggest failure was under estimating the amount of fake money the US was going to throw into the war. When you are the world’s reserve currency with a 31 trillion dollar nation debt there is no limit to what you can give to a sleazy midget con man. Russia also estimated how locked into time some pathetic old boomers are who still think it’s 1979. And then you have the dual citizens who are also getting payback after hundreds of years of being kept out of metaphorical Russian country clubs.

    • LOL: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @wj

    You know, I'd say the Russians screwed up worst of all by not realizing how much the Ukrainians don't want to be conquered by them.

    Putin budgeted a lot of money to win hearts and minds in Ukraine, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap.

    Replies: @anon

  40. @SFG
    @Anon

    I'd be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn't invaded Ukraine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave, @Cagey Beast, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Anonymous

    SFG wrote to Anon:

    I’d be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn’t invaded Ukraine.

    But in fact it is the illegal puppet regime in Kiev, installed at the instigation of the US Deep State, that invaded the areas of Ukraine that refused to accede to the illegal puppet regime.

    The legitimate country of Ukraine was the areas that refused to accede to the illegal puppet regime.

    Russia did not invade “Ukraine.” Russia came to the aid of those Ukrainians who were resisting the illegal puppet government in Kiev.

    An enormous difference.

    Facts matter.

    Russia is fighting for people all over the world who do not wish to be slaves to the US Deep State.

    If only Americans could remember their own heritage and join the fight against the illegal US Deep State!

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @PhysicistDave

    I agree with your sentiments generally but let's admit Russia has invaded Ukraine and is now fighting Ukrainian nationalists. Even the Russians concede there are militantly anti-Russian Ukrainians in Galicia who they don't want to share a country with.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Graham
    @PhysicistDave

    If fighting against the US Deep State requires the murder, rape, and mutilation of civilians, the destruction of civilian infrastructure, and the conversion of Russia itself back into a poverty-stricken tyranny, I'm definitely on the side of the US Deep State.

  41. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    That's the point I'm making: it's less superweapons you can cheer in Red Square that matter for modern warfare, but a whole lot of boring systems integration toil. That's what let the US establish complete air supremacy over the Iraqis in 1991 with their Soviet weapons. And it's not wholly coincidental that the Soviet Union itself collapsed eight months later.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @SunBakedSuburb, @Mike Tre

    “it’s less superweapons you can cheer in Red Square that matter for modern warfare”

    Hmm. I think that’s debatable. I didn’t even think you could chuck stuff around in our atmosphere at Mach 20 without it burning up, but a lot of people think you can, and that the plasma field around it will make radar echoing moot. At that speed defence won’t have much time to react.

    And HIMARs and artillery with guided shells, much trumpeted by Western media, seem to be affecting the battle in that you can shell a senior Russian’s birthday party in Donetsk. Plenty of people here were cheering superweapons when the Kerch bridge was hit.

    But we’ll find out if those weapons will matter for modern warfare, if (perhaps when) this is pushed as far as nuclear conflict. Are we feeling lucky?

    “a whole lot of boring systems integration toil”

    Stopping webcams broadcasting your troop positions to unfriendly people should be pretty damn simple – the internet is full of people geolocating anonymous hedgerows in the Donbass, so a shop or a street corner in Donetsk should be a few moments work. Longer will be going back through youtube archives to register cameras which may no longer be on youtube, but which may still be being monitored.

    I remember thinking China’s Great Firewall was a lousy idea, but now I see its utility)

  42. the U.S. had moved its radar and computers into a 600 mph AWACS command center that could fly around at the edge of the battlefield’s horizon where the Soviets couldn’t get at it.

    Just as in Mig Alley they Soviet jets flying on behalf of North Korea did so from sanctuaries across the Yalu River that the US chose not to destroy so as to avoid brining on WW3.

  43. @SFG
    @Anon

    I'd be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn't invaded Ukraine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave, @Cagey Beast, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Anonymous

    Yes the more pro-Russian side in Ukraine should have stuck to using the ballot box. Oops, they did. They won elections that were overturned via a court ruling (an unconstitutional 3rd round of voting, aka the Orange Revolution) or their guy was driven out in a coup (Euromaidan) despite agreeing to concessions the day before.

    Or maybe the Russians should have tried diplomacy to resolve the mess left after the 2014 coup? Oops, they did but it turns out the westerners were just stringing them along in order to buy time to arm Ukraine. Merkel herself admitted as much earlier this month.

    I wish this war wasn’t happening but the fact that Russia did invade doesn’t mean “our” side now has its slate wiped clean. Russia invaded Ukraine because we paid diplomats and NGOs to get that country into NATO and to use it as an “anti-Russia” to bring about regime change in Moscow.

  44. @J.Ross
    @Kim

    Right now things are pretty universally and unprecedentedly bad, but chanting "Russia bad" lets some people pretend it's still an earlier, better time.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship, @Mark G.

    Apparently we’re all supposed to chant USA! and think this is 1988. But Russia isn’t threatening me and neither is China in any fundamental sense.

    The Usual Suspects hate Russia because it’s a big white country that won’t get with the Diversity program. And then there’s some weird group that thinks if we have Russia as an enemy, that’ll fool the rubes into supporting Uncle Samantha no matter how anti-White she/he/they is.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  45. @PhysicistDave
    @SFG

    SFG wrote to Anon:


    I’d be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn’t invaded Ukraine.
     
    But in fact it is the illegal puppet regime in Kiev, installed at the instigation of the US Deep State, that invaded the areas of Ukraine that refused to accede to the illegal puppet regime.

    The legitimate country of Ukraine was the areas that refused to accede to the illegal puppet regime.

    Russia did not invade "Ukraine." Russia came to the aid of those Ukrainians who were resisting the illegal puppet government in Kiev.

    An enormous difference.

    Facts matter.

    Russia is fighting for people all over the world who do not wish to be slaves to the US Deep State.

    If only Americans could remember their own heritage and join the fight against the illegal US Deep State!

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Graham

    I agree with your sentiments generally but let’s admit Russia has invaded Ukraine and is now fighting Ukrainian nationalists. Even the Russians concede there are militantly anti-Russian Ukrainians in Galicia who they don’t want to share a country with.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Cagey Beast

    Cagey Beast wrote to me:


    Even the Russians concede there are militantly anti-Russian Ukrainians in Galicia who they don’t want to share a country with.
     
    I have said all along that I hope that this ends with a neutralized rump regime in Greater Galicia: yes, it will be a nightmare for all concerned if the Russian Federation ends up having to govern Western Ukraine.

    Unfortunately, I think we have reached the point that Russia cannot be secure until the Zelensky regime is overthrown and West Ukraine is deNazified. That is going to be a mess.

    CB also wrote:

    I agree with your sentiments generally but let’s admit Russia has invaded Ukraine and is now fighting Ukrainian nationalists.
     
    When Western Ukraine chose to secede from the legally elected government of Ukraine in 2014, at the instigation of the US Deep State, the Donbass, remaining loyal to the legal government of Ukraine, chose not to accede to the new puppet regime.

    They were legally in the right to do that.

    When the puppet regime, for eight long years, engaged in an unprovoked war of aggression against the Donbass, the Donbass pleaded with Russia to aid them. On February 24, 2022, Putin did so.

    That is not an "invasion" of Ukraine, any more than Lafayette et al. "invaded' the USA by providing us aid against the British imperialists. Putin merely gave military assistance to a neighboring country that was being attacked and invaded by an illegal puppet regime of the US Deep State.

    Completely and totally legal under international law.

    What the US Deep State did was to violate the sovereignty of Ukraine.

    Not legal under international law.

    Facts do matter.

    Even ugly facts that the US regime would like to suppress.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @John Johnson

  46. @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts? Or do you have some complicated theory about how losing Kherson wasn't a humiliating defeat for Russia, it is all part of a brilliant strategy to lure Ukraine into a cauldron?

    Replies: @Curle, @BB753, @Observator, @PhysicistDave, @Batman, @AndrewR, @God of Emptiness, @Dnought

    Steve Sailer wrote to Batman:

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts?

    Steve, we all love you, man, but are you completely ignorant of the military history of the last two centuries?

    Look just at the two World Wars:

    At the end of WW I, Germany still occupied a significant amount of Allied territory: the Allies did not control one square inch of German territory.

    But Germany lost.

    In WW II, Germany for a time occupied an enormous amount of Russian territory. But Germany still lost.

    You do not, you cannot, win a war simply and only by seizing territory.

    You win a war, you only can win a war, by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    You occupy territory, you cede territory, you advance, you retreat — solely with the purpose of advancing towards that one single goal.

    And if you achieve that goal, even if the enemy occupies a huge amount of your territory, you win, and then you take whatever the hell you want.

    As WW I proved so nicely.

    This basic fact of warfare may be confusing to people who prefer to pore over maps and follow the ebb and flow of battle lines.

    But this is not Stratego or Risk. This is a real war fought in the real world.

    And this is the reality of warfare in the real world for more than two centuries.

    • Replies: @michael droy
    @PhysicistDave

    100% agree.
    The last thing Russia wants is a retreat by Ukraine behind the Dnieper and Russia chasing Nazis in Pro-Ukraine lands leading to large Russian and civilian deaths. Ukraine marching newly enlisted kids and old men to Bakhmut to die is perfect for Russia.

    , @James J. O'Meara
    @PhysicistDave


    This basic fact of warfare may be confusing to people who prefer to pore over maps and follow the ebb and flow of battle lines.
     
    Likely the same folks who think elections are all about "horseraces". Who's leading this hour!
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @PhysicistDave

    You win a war, or anything else now, by seizing public opinion. This is a Hollywood, show biz war as operated from this side. We here are stuck sitting in the dark in a movie theater watching a leading man who is costumed in a green shirt.

    , @Unladen Swallow
    @PhysicistDave

    Germany didn't occupy a huge amount of territory at the end of WW2, quite the contrary. WW1 was a different case altogether, due to the British naval embargo that essentially starved the civilian population of Germany, combined with an American lead offensive against German positions in France. I don't think those historical analogies you brought up in this debate work here.

  47. @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts? Or do you have some complicated theory about how losing Kherson wasn't a humiliating defeat for Russia, it is all part of a brilliant strategy to lure Ukraine into a cauldron?

    Replies: @Curle, @BB753, @Observator, @PhysicistDave, @Batman, @AndrewR, @God of Emptiness, @Dnought

    You don’t win modern wars by controlling dirt. You win them by outlasting your opponents. The United States learned this in Afghanistan. Russia’s occupations of Georgia and Moldova taught them this lesson as well.

    That’s why propaganda to demoralize Russian citizens (we’ve seen plenty of this–remember the blitz of stories about Russian males breaking their legs to get out of the draft) and to give confidence to the Ukrainians makes sense.

    But why aim propaganda at us? How does American popular opinion about this war help the Ukrainian cause? The superficial answer is to keep the aid flowing to Ukraine, but they don’t need this kind of propaganda blitz to make that happen. The American public does not care about the national debt. And we give considerably more money to Israel without flinching.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    Putin's fans kept declaring in these comments that Russia controlled huge amounts of dirt in Ukraine and thus that proved Russia was winning ... until Russia started losing dirt, at which point to lose dirt became Putin's genius strategy all along.

    , @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Batman


    How does American popular opinion about this war help the Ukrainian cause? The superficial answer is to keep the aid flowing to Ukraine, but they don’t need this kind of propaganda blitz to make that happen. The American public does not care about the national debt.
     
    It's a good question. It seems likely the USA media could just ignore the whole issue and our gov't could give aid to whoever without consulting the American people.

    I think the answer comes in Sailer's response:


    Putin’s fans kept declaring in these comments that Russia controlled huge amounts of dirt in Ukraine and thus that proved Russia was winning … until Russia started losing dirt, at which point to lose dirt became Putin’s genius strategy all along.
     
    The pouty resentment is obvious. I'd say they (our Fake Elites) are worried that big parts of the American people - and the West - might support Putin over them. In some sense, they see his type as a real threat when it comes to commanding loyalty. They had the same hysterical and pouty reaction to Trump.

    Maybe they have a paranoia of allegiances shifting in the future.

  48. @Steve Sailer
    @BB753

    What can be more undeniable than that all of Russian military history, the Russian way of war, is to preserve the lives of Russian soldiers as the highest priority?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @BB753

    Resources mean not only men. But vehicles, ammunition, missiles, fuel, artillery pieces, etc. In one word, everything considered, it’s best to preserve your forces.

  49. Hmm – if you see some of the videos on Telegram showing how Russia takes out Ukrainians, you’d realise that the real spy in the sky are observation drones that show pictures of not just tanks or vehicles, but individuals walking around, and tanks hidden amongst bushes.
    It is drones not satellites that are winning this war. (As ever you’d see the Ukrainian videos if they had them….)

    Plus never trust anything that explains what is NOT actually happening. Russia is killing Ukrainians at a rate of 10:1. The only reason the front line is stable is that Ukraine keeps pushing thousands and thousands of fresh recruits forward and Russia is quite happy to wipe them out and wait for more.
    Perhaps Ukraine wants to lose the war as quick as possible rather than drop back, and have Russians expose themselves in areas less pro-Russian.

    The real technical advantage was in the 1980s and 90s when the US has fantastic access to micro-chip tech. That advantage has been over for 25 years.

    Thiel’s strategy for modern data-based warfare doesn’t sound that esoteric, but it does seem like it must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century.

    So in 2018 Putin presented some half a dozen conventional weapons, mostly manoeuvrable hypersonic missiles that were already or soon to be in service. They wipe the floor with western equivalents and importantly turn air craft carriers from a threat into a vulnerability.

    Since 2018 the MIC has been on total PR war to defend their own credibility. Not only has Russia overtaken them, China has too, while the US has been stumbling over the disastrous Littoral ships and the F35, the flying lemon. Most US aircraft do not meet the minimum availability standards set for them. The Patriot system failed when Yemen attacked Saudi with missiles of ancient design. A billion dollar system with $1million missiles is going to be sent to Ukraine to defend against $10k drone attacks. That isn’t going to win any fresh orders.

    I’m sure readers of isteve will recognise the pattern here. The media writes up any kind of US success in a technology war with extra hype because it is losing. Just as it writes up any Ukrainian battle win as huge and trend setting in a war where Ukraine is getting slaughtered.

    Speaking of Modern Media – have you commented on the Twitter Files yet?
    Here in UK I can’t find a single person that has even heard of them.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @michael droy

    "The only reason the front line is stable"

    But it's not. The Russians got driven back across the Dnieper River, a huge strategic defeat.

    Replies: @michael droy, @That Would Be Telling

    , @Cagey Beast
    @michael droy


    Speaking of Modern Media – have you commented on the Twitter Files yet?
    Here in UK I can’t find a single person that has even heard of them.
     
    OT:
    Musk is apparently committing one of the gravest secular sins: he's failing to pander to his best customers:

    https://twitter.com/FrankDangelo23/status/1607688176956739584
  50. @SFG
    @Anon

    I'd be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn't invaded Ukraine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave, @Cagey Beast, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Anonymous

    I’d be a lot more willing to side with the Ukrainians if:

    1. American neocons hadn’t installed a hostile regime that openly demanded to join a military alliance aimed squarely at Russia.

    America demands an entire hemisphere as a buffer zone. The least we can do is allow Russia a buffer state.

    2. America’s neocon-installed regime didn’t attack the ethnically Russian parts of Ukraine.

    3. The United States hadn’t spit in the eye of Russia when it asked for assurances that Ukraine would remain neutral.

    • Agree: Chebyshev
    • Replies: @Chebyshev
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Russia must have done whatever it did to influence the 2016 election because they thought Trump would not be as hostile to them as the other U.S. administrations have been over the last decade or so.

  51. @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

    Very strangely you seem to have completely bought the media myths.
    A very small Russian force has overwhelmed a very large nato trained army.
    The massive “Ukraine is winning” PR is simply because the truth is genuinely awful for western militaries (and their MIC) to face.
    The big story is US becoming No2 nation in the world to China. That is the real way to understand what gets written.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @michael droy

    Congratulations on getting out of your coma that you must have been in from the Fourth of July to Christmas.

    , @Anon
    @michael droy

    Lol. China is collapsing.

  52. @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts? Or do you have some complicated theory about how losing Kherson wasn't a humiliating defeat for Russia, it is all part of a brilliant strategy to lure Ukraine into a cauldron?

    Replies: @Curle, @BB753, @Observator, @PhysicistDave, @Batman, @AndrewR, @God of Emptiness, @Dnought

    Take your Midol, Steve

  53. @Kim
    @Bill Jones

    I can never understand why people pretend to know stuff about things they can't possibly know anything about.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Yep, I’ll let this war play out and see what happens. I have no idea why Steve has gone crazy about all of this.

    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It’s bizarre.

    Maybe Russia really is losing the war, maybe not. What I do know is that our media lies constantly and is the PR wing for the establishment.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It’s bizarre.
     
    That's not the correct way to approach this subject.

    Whenever Steve goes off the rails about something, which he routinely does about Covid and Ukraine, there arises a vocal minority in the comments section that accuses him of "believing the mainstream media," as if that was a capital sin to be avoided at all costs. It isn't that simple. You can't find a shortcut to the truth just by inverting whatever the mainstream media says. And in any case, when you start speculating about what Steve believes about what the mainstream media says, you've prescinded very far from the topic at hand.

    Let's look at Steve's reaction to Covid as a case a point. From the very beginning of the pandemic, there was more than enough information in the mainstream media for people to draw the correct conclusions. There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. The quite influenza-like (and safely low) Total Case Fatality Rate of 0.23% was early calculated from data readily available in the mainstream media, and that figure was itself recycled many times through the mainstream media. The lack of clinical data regarding vaccine efficacy, the dangers of vaccine side effects, the risk of myocarditis, various European governments cancelling their vaccine recommendations for young people---all of this was published in close to real time in the mainstream media.

    None of it mattered. The Kovid Karens, which happen to include Steve Sailer, were determined to have their pandemic party come hell or high water. They did this not because they innocently believed a pack of lies told them by the Evil MSM, but because the mood had already descended upon them for other reasons. We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.

    Now, this is not to say that people like Steve didn't selectively use MSM reports to support their fantastical version of events. This is not to say that chief pandemicists like Fauci did not actively try to shape the message through their media appearances and their influence over media outlets. This is not to say that most people working in the MSM were not Kovid Karens themselves who put out deliberately misleading information. All of this did happen, but the truth still leaked out, as it always does. The truth was never really that hard to find. Steve was not misled; he believes what he believes because he wants to.

    When it comes to Ukraine, there is likewise plenty of mainstream information out there from which truth can be inferred. Russia clearly cannot be "running out of weapons" when she still hasn't even finished burning through her backlog of 40-year-old artillery shells yet. The Russian military cannot be "embarrassing itself in Ukraine" when, by and large, the Russian military hasn't even entered Ukraine yet. All the fighting has been done by the Donbass militias and Wagner group, which have so far successfully destroyed more than 50% of the Ukrainian military. Once again, Steve believes what he believes because he wants to.

    And as we can see from the peevish tone of his replies in this thread, those beliefs are both very personal and very much under assault from the facts.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Corvinus, @BB753, @Hypnotoad666, @Redman

    , @michael droy
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I think it is difficult. It is really hard to understand the world honestly with current media, and extremely easy to assume that because they can be shown to be lying about 75% of the news, they are probably lying about all of it.
    It is even harder if you have a full time job or a full time interest in a particular field.

    Steve it seems has a very full time interest in about 50 fields (and I know all I know about 45 of them from reading Steve).

    Certainly I am surprised he isn't more sceptical of media reports on Ukraine.

    The alternative media and the permo-sceptics do get stuff wrong.
    3 years in we know that lockdowns were wrong but covid vaccinations were right - but the sceptics have made no more effort to correct their views than the mass media.

    And what really surprises me is that Steve hasn't talked about the Twitter Files yet, just his recent difficult experience with Twitter. I'm really interested in what he thinks about the Twitter files and the implied Facebook and Google Search files, never mind never to be mentioned NYT/WaPo files.

    Mind not a single "real life" person I have asked here in UK knows what the Twitter files are.

  54. So what happens if Russia loses? State mandated homosexuality? Whites to the camps?

  55. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Batman:


    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts?
     
    Steve, we all love you, man, but are you completely ignorant of the military history of the last two centuries?

    Look just at the two World Wars:

    At the end of WW I, Germany still occupied a significant amount of Allied territory: the Allies did not control one square inch of German territory.

    But Germany lost.

    In WW II, Germany for a time occupied an enormous amount of Russian territory. But Germany still lost.

    You do not, you cannot, win a war simply and only by seizing territory.


    You win a war, you only can win a war, by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    You occupy territory, you cede territory, you advance, you retreat -- solely with the purpose of advancing towards that one single goal.

    And if you achieve that goal, even if the enemy occupies a huge amount of your territory, you win, and then you take whatever the hell you want.

    As WW I proved so nicely.

    This basic fact of warfare may be confusing to people who prefer to pore over maps and follow the ebb and flow of battle lines.

    But this is not Stratego or Risk. This is a real war fought in the real world.

    And this is the reality of warfare in the real world for more than two centuries.

    Replies: @michael droy, @James J. O'Meara, @Buzz Mohawk, @Unladen Swallow

    100% agree.
    The last thing Russia wants is a retreat by Ukraine behind the Dnieper and Russia chasing Nazis in Pro-Ukraine lands leading to large Russian and civilian deaths. Ukraine marching newly enlisted kids and old men to Bakhmut to die is perfect for Russia.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  56. @michael droy
    @Steve Sailer

    Very strangely you seem to have completely bought the media myths.
    A very small Russian force has overwhelmed a very large nato trained army.
    The massive "Ukraine is winning" PR is simply because the truth is genuinely awful for western militaries (and their MIC) to face.
    The big story is US becoming No2 nation in the world to China. That is the real way to understand what gets written.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon

    Congratulations on getting out of your coma that you must have been in from the Fourth of July to Christmas.

    • Troll: PhysicistDave
  57. @michael droy
    Hmm - if you see some of the videos on Telegram showing how Russia takes out Ukrainians, you'd realise that the real spy in the sky are observation drones that show pictures of not just tanks or vehicles, but individuals walking around, and tanks hidden amongst bushes.
    It is drones not satellites that are winning this war. (As ever you'd see the Ukrainian videos if they had them....)

    Plus never trust anything that explains what is NOT actually happening. Russia is killing Ukrainians at a rate of 10:1. The only reason the front line is stable is that Ukraine keeps pushing thousands and thousands of fresh recruits forward and Russia is quite happy to wipe them out and wait for more.
    Perhaps Ukraine wants to lose the war as quick as possible rather than drop back, and have Russians expose themselves in areas less pro-Russian.

    The real technical advantage was in the 1980s and 90s when the US has fantastic access to micro-chip tech. That advantage has been over for 25 years.


    Thiel’s strategy for modern data-based warfare doesn’t sound that esoteric, but it does seem like it must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century.
     
    So in 2018 Putin presented some half a dozen conventional weapons, mostly manoeuvrable hypersonic missiles that were already or soon to be in service. They wipe the floor with western equivalents and importantly turn air craft carriers from a threat into a vulnerability.

    Since 2018 the MIC has been on total PR war to defend their own credibility. Not only has Russia overtaken them, China has too, while the US has been stumbling over the disastrous Littoral ships and the F35, the flying lemon. Most US aircraft do not meet the minimum availability standards set for them. The Patriot system failed when Yemen attacked Saudi with missiles of ancient design. A billion dollar system with $1million missiles is going to be sent to Ukraine to defend against $10k drone attacks. That isn't going to win any fresh orders.

    I'm sure readers of isteve will recognise the pattern here. The media writes up any kind of US success in a technology war with extra hype because it is losing. Just as it writes up any Ukrainian battle win as huge and trend setting in a war where Ukraine is getting slaughtered.

    Speaking of Modern Media - have you commented on the Twitter Files yet?
    Here in UK I can't find a single person that has even heard of them.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Cagey Beast

    “The only reason the front line is stable”

    But it’s not. The Russians got driven back across the Dnieper River, a huge strategic defeat.

    • Replies: @michael droy
    @Steve Sailer

    Reply - NO they did not get driven back behind the Dnieper River.
    If you are talking Kherson, they withdrew from Kherson city - the only part of Kherson Oblast that is the Ukrainian side.
    And they were not driven back - Ukraine attacked it for months and eventually Russia advised all civilians to leave and a month later pulled their own men out safely. Ukraine only entered after Russia left having spent well over 10k lives attacking Kherson city.
    There was no strategic defeat and no advance across the Dnieper.
    Meanwhile Ukraine lost a lot of lives, and in terms of army vs army ended up much weaker.

    PR victory, practical defeat.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alyosha, @pirelli

    , @That Would Be Telling
    @Steve Sailer


    [The front line is not stable.] The Russians got driven back across the Dnieper River, a huge strategic defeat.
     
    Not sure what got in your Wheaties this morning but you're pointing out some inconvenient truths. Here we have a corollary to your observation about "preserv[ing] the lives of Russian soldiers as the highest priority?" When the Russian retreated, even when in good order, they left behind a lot of Ukrainians who were then subject to brutal and very well documented and per some credible accounts lethal "filtration."

    This is also a huge strategic mistake, having the locals either on your side or at least semi-neutral makes all sorts of critical differences. We're not talking about the ones in the Donbas who've been shelled for eight years (or not many of them??), and if not previously skeptical or against becoming a de facto part of the Russian Federation they now know how utterly unimportant they are to Putin et. al.
  58. @Batman
    @Steve Sailer

    You don't win modern wars by controlling dirt. You win them by outlasting your opponents. The United States learned this in Afghanistan. Russia's occupations of Georgia and Moldova taught them this lesson as well.

    That's why propaganda to demoralize Russian citizens (we've seen plenty of this--remember the blitz of stories about Russian males breaking their legs to get out of the draft) and to give confidence to the Ukrainians makes sense.

    But why aim propaganda at us? How does American popular opinion about this war help the Ukrainian cause? The superficial answer is to keep the aid flowing to Ukraine, but they don't need this kind of propaganda blitz to make that happen. The American public does not care about the national debt. And we give considerably more money to Israel without flinching.

    https://i0.wp.com/bootcampmilitaryfitnessinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/Mission-Accomplished-Speech-2003-George-W-Bush-Iraq-War-1.webp

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Putin’s fans kept declaring in these comments that Russia controlled huge amounts of dirt in Ukraine and thus that proved Russia was winning … until Russia started losing dirt, at which point to lose dirt became Putin’s genius strategy all along.

  59. @wj
    Russia's biggest failure was under estimating the amount of fake money the US was going to throw into the war. When you are the world's reserve currency with a 31 trillion dollar nation debt there is no limit to what you can give to a sleazy midget con man. Russia also estimated how locked into time some pathetic old boomers are who still think it's 1979. And then you have the dual citizens who are also getting payback after hundreds of years of being kept out of metaphorical Russian country clubs.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    You know, I’d say the Russians screwed up worst of all by not realizing how much the Ukrainians don’t want to be conquered by them.

    Putin budgeted a lot of money to win hearts and minds in Ukraine, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren’t cheap.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Back in 2008, the U.S. bet heavily on Mikheil Saakashvili, hipster president of Georgia, against Vladimir Putin. In the spring of 2008, the U.S. promised Georgia eventual NATO membership despite the objections of NATO members actually in Europe.
     
    -Sailer

    You used to acknowledge political realities, clandestine activities, and the like. But now it's all very black and white: a matter of who crossed the border! That goddamn sacred 30-year old border!!!!

    And an invasion... the US would never . By God, that's a line in the sand that shall not be tolerated by polite society! Requires stiff rebuke, up to and including war. (What's our own count since the 90s?).

    >Putin budgeted a lot of money to win hearts and minds in Ukraine, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren’t cheap.

    Wait, now who's buying who? Granted, who can forget how Putin and his cronies paid cold hard cash to set-up the Boston Marathon Bomber family in the US.

    (I hope these lame, disingenuous arguments you've been making are your way of signalling to longtime readers that, yes, due to finances you have opted for a lump sum payment of dark money)

  60. @Observator
    @Steve Sailer

    Russia clearly stated its objective was to destroy the Ukrainian military threat, and it is doing that reasonably well. Holding territory is not the primary goal of a successful war - look up, oh, the southern Confederacy - it is rather the result of eliminating the forces that would otherwise be defending it. This war started as a limited police action, not unlike what happened a little further to the north in 1939, but it quickly escalated into a major conflict when world powers perceived the opportunity had arrived again for the long desired regime change war to dismember and plunder a resource-rich economic rival.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Last I heard from Vlad, this was a war of annexation.

    But it turned out, much to Vlad’s expensive surprise, that the Ukrainians didn’t want to be annexed. It’s almost as if the all the spied and traitors he thought he was funding in Ukraine was actually money being embezzled to buy infinity pools in Bel-Air.

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Steve Sailer

    The Donbas was and is ethnically Russian, and the people there seem to be fighting pretty hard for their independence from Ukraine.

    Why don't the people of the Donbas elicit the same feelings from you? Is it because of a border that drawn on a map decades ago by men just as amoral and ruthless as Putin, Zelensky and the neocons.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Observator:


    Last I heard from Vlad, this was a war of annexation.
     
    Really? Where did you hear that?

    Really.

    I have not seen any evidence that Putin wants to annex Greater Galicia, AKA West Ukraine.

    Quite the contrary, indeed.

    To be sure, all indications were that the Russians in the eastern part of Novorossiya and the Crimea wanted to return to Russia. And that is now a done deal.

    But is there any evidence at all that Putin wants to annex Western Ukraine?

    That would be extraordinarily foolish, and Putin, whatever his faults, does not seem to be a foolish man.

    Of course, the illegal puppet regime in Kiev headed by the now-open dictator Zelensky does need to be eliminated and West Ukraine has to be deNazified and then left as a neutral buffer state like Finland.

    But, again, Steve, you wrote:

    Last I heard from Vlad, this was a war of annexation.
     
    Where last did you hear this? Exactly where?
  61. @Anonymo
    @Steve Sailer

    Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?

    The two countries are so similar, one would imagine they’d be similar in this way too (It’s these similarities that make the war seem more tragic). Otherwise, if they differ in this, how did Ukraine get the Magic Dirt and Russia the Tragic Dirt?

    Also, maybe Putin conceived of a limited strike such as in Ukraine 2014 or Georgia 2008. That possibility is obviously off the table.

    Do you take seriously Putin’s claims about the mistreatment of ethnic Russians in the Donbass? In the Georgian example, he displayed himself willing to protect ethnic Russians under attack, if I understand correctly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @John Johnson

    “Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?”

    I met a Ukrainian “defense expert” who owned the single nicest piece of land I’ve seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else’s country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians — ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else’s country?

    • Replies: @Anonymo
    @Steve Sailer

    I am not sure many people are actually following the war with a mind to accuracy in the death tolls. It seems like this war is a lot like the Spanish Civil War, a real bloody struggle for the men in action but something of a projection screen for the ideologies of the observers overseas (except of course for the MIC).
    I suppose in the SCW, the observers could articulate their worldview more clearly than now (communism vs falangism is clearer to me than “NATO oughtn’t to expand gay marriage-womens rights-trannies” vs “Putler is evil Nazi”).
    I admire the consistency of your worldview, Steve, summed up as “Don’t invade other countries”. It’s just that history is not sure it’s workable in the long-term.
    But all that aside, do you believe Putin’s claim that the war was precipitated in part by atrocities against Russian ethnics in Donbass?
    I remember reading you on the Georgian conflict, and you seemed more open to Russian points of view, iirc.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Steve Sailer

    Aren't the DPR and LPR forces, who declared independence from Ukraine in 2014, brave Ukrainians defending their country?

    "all the Putin fan boys"

    LOL. Happy Christmas and a joyful New Year to you all!


    "The commenters outside looked from Steve to Jack D, and from Jack to Steve, and from Steve to Jack again; but already it was impossible to say which was which" ;-)
     
    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Steve Sailer

    Dying isn't necessarily brave. It's just a thing that happens when you are sitting in your trench and a shell hits you. As Patton said, "no one ever won a war by dying for his country . . ."

    , @Colin Wright
    @Steve Sailer

    '...But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else’s country...'

    That's actually not so obvious. Deciding the Ukraine is one country and Russia another is oversimplifying matters -- to put it mildly.

    Solzhenitsyn is usually thought of as Russian -- and certainly he thought of himself as Russian. In point of fact, his mother was from the Ukraine, his father was of Cossack extraction, and he himself was raised in Rostov.

    There's no evidence I'm aware of that he ever saw any of this as demonstrating he wasn't Russian.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @TWS
    @Steve Sailer

    No I don't think they are fighting more bravely . They are fighting for far longer and some are actual Nazis (the Azov battalion says 'hi'). I'm guessing the Russian air force is not suicidal that's why we don't see them much.

    But the Afghans had no air force and chased us with the most powerful air assets in the world out of their country.

    Might be an actual question you could ask without swallowing whatever the MSM is feeding you.

    You know the same folks who admitted to lying to us for at least six years because the Orange Man was so very bad.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Anonymo:


    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians — ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians?
     
    There are very, very few "Putin fanboys" here, Steve.

    Most of us just want the killing to stop.

    I'd be happy if there were simply a peace along the current front lines.

    But the US Deep State will not allow that to happen.

    As to "why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians," which of us, "by [our] own testimony" have claimed that?

    If this is anything at all like almost all wars, some Kievan soldiers are fighting bravely, some Russians are fighting bravely, and an awful lot of soldiers on both sides are merely trying not to die. And there are surely a lot of out-and-out cowards on both sides.

    Do you have any actual evidence showing quantitatively more bravery on the Kievan side than on the side of the Russian Allies? And more than that, has anyone here who is attacking the US Deep State and its puppet regime in Kiev, claimed "by [our] own testimony" to have such evidence, as you asserted?

    As far as I can tell from the very limited information we have from Ukraine, an awful lot of Ukrainian men are quite desperate to avoid fighting for the illegal puppet regime in Kiev (and wisely so). And there have been reports of Ukrainian forces refusing to fight.

    Do you have actual evidence to the contrary? Not just propaganda?

    Replies: @For what it's worth

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Steve Sailer

    "the Putin fan boys"

    Christopher Caldwell, Putin fanboy.

    https://imprimis.hillsdale.edu/how-to-think-about-vladimir-putin/


    Vladimir Vladimirovich is not the president of a feminist NGO. He is not a transgender-rights activist. He is not an ombudsman appointed by the United Nations to make and deliver slide shows about green energy. He is the elected leader of Russia—a rugged, relatively poor, militarily powerful country that in recent years has been frequently humiliated, robbed, and misled. His job has been to protect his country’s prerogatives and its sovereignty in an international system that seeks to erode sovereignty in general and views Russia’s sovereignty in particular as a threat.

    By American standards, Putin’s respect for the democratic process has been fitful at best. He has cracked down on peaceful demonstrations. Political opponents have been arrested and jailed throughout his rule. Some have even been murdered—Anna Politkovskaya, the crusading Chechnya correspondent shot in her apartment building in Moscow in 2006; Alexander Litvinenko, the spy poisoned with polonium-210 in London months later; the activist Boris Nemtsov, shot on a bridge in Moscow in early 2015. While the evidence connecting Putin’s own circle to the killings is circumstantial, it merits scrutiny.

    Yet if we were to use traditional measures for understanding leaders, which involve the defense of borders and national flourishing, Putin would count as the pre-eminent statesman of our time. On the world stage, who can vie with him? Only perhaps Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey.

    When Putin took power in the winter of 1999-2000, his country was defenseless. It was bankrupt. It was being carved up by its new kleptocratic elites, in collusion with its old imperial rivals, the Americans. Putin changed that. In the first decade of this century, he did what Kemal Atatürk had done in Turkey in the 1920s. Out of a crumbling empire, he rescued a nation-state, and gave it coherence and purpose. He disciplined his country’s plutocrats. He restored its military strength. And he refused, with ever blunter rhetoric, to accept for Russia a subservient role in an American-run world system drawn up by foreign politicians and business leaders. His voters credit him with having saved his country.
     

    Given how much economic power, which correlates pretty well with political power, had fallen into the hands of the oligarch/nomenklatura class by the end of the 1990s, it's a miracle Putin survived to become leader. He could easily have been a lost leader, a Stolypin, and if the US have their way he might become one yet. In those days people who crossed the oligarchs came to nasty ends, and oligarch quarrels were bloody.

    It's only because the oligarchs thought that he was their front man, as described by Masha Gessen, no Putin fangirl, quoting Boris Berozofsky.

    https://theintercept.com/2015/06/11/russian-oligarch-wanted-turn-joke-reality/


    When Putin became president, I was for a long time in a state of profound naiveté. Well, I went to him … I told him: “Listen, Volodya, what happened: we destroyed the entire political space. Devoured, not destroyed, but devoured it. We absolutely dominated … Look, I’ll suggest that we can not have effective political system, if there’s a tough competition. So I suggest we create an artificial two-party system. So, let’s say, the left and right. A Socially Oriented party and neo-conservatives liberal party. Choose any. And I’ll make another party. At the same time, my own heart is closer to neoconservatives, and I think so, you [Putin] are socially oriented.
     
    It's odd that Steve, who so presciently predicted that destroying Saddam would not turn Iraq into Denmark or Norway, seems to have a blind spot about a country where democracy has extremely shallow roots and where the bulk of the population were effectively slaves, bought and sold with the land they worked on, until 1861.

    IMHO Putin is to Russia as Ghaddaffi was to Libya (until US/UK killed him), the best possible leader given the country they are leading.

    , @Redman
    @Steve Sailer

    I don’t understand the refusal to accept the obvious: this is a “civil war” that’s been going on for a while within Ukraine between nationalist Ukrainians and ethnic Russian Ukrainians. The latter had been seeking autonomy since 2014. This was never a planned “war of annexation.”

    No matter how much of this history is explained to many Americans (and Brits) I meet, they never change their view.

    You should read Mike Whitney on the UR. He was good on Covid too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jack D

  62. @Cagey Beast
    "..... something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century".

    Western chauvinists can always be counted on to rally round the flag, even if it's a rainbow flag flying beside a BLM one.

    It may be glaringly obvious that we're grossly misgoverned and we're in a civilisational death spiral but at least we're better than the other team, eh?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dave Pinsen

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin’s spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    • Replies: @michael droy
    @Steve Sailer

    Russia has a problem with corruption? In the context of Ukraine or the context of USA?


    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians — ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else’s country?
     
    Mostly because the Ukrainians are untrained, this is an artillery war where Ukraine is vastly underarmed, and because Ukraine needs propaganda victories to keep the "aid" flowing.

    The real question is why Ukraine is sending 10s of thousands of poorly prepared troops into places like Kherson or Bakhmut to die facing hundreds of Russian soldiers (but thousands of Russian missiles).
    It is a terrible slaughter - backed by your US and my UK with (at HQs) full knowledge of the carnage.
    It is one of the major sins of the 21st century AND in Europe.

    As you probably know, Ukraine force their soldier into battle at the threat of a gun. The more experienced Poles shoot back. There are dozens of videos of Ukrainian Units appealing to Kiev about their orders to march unprotected into losing battles.

    Replies: @Anon7

    , @Sean
    @Steve Sailer

    The war may be morally unjustified, but it was most certainly not unprovoked. Ukraine was warned by Russia many, many times over several years about getting close to the West. Russia was ignored.

    Nor should it have come as a surprise to US and Ukrainian intel, but it did. They thought attacking Ukraine would be too costly for Russia in all sorts of ways.

    Objectively they may be right, but Russia got a vote, and Russians thought and still seem to think it is worth it.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    , @Anonymo
    @Steve Sailer

    Amen.

    We all have moral problems with corruption, every nation and every man.

    That’s why a Savior was born in Bethlehem, to offer His Precious Blood for us all, Putin and Zelensky too.

    Merry Christmas!

    , @Corvinus
    @Steve Sailer

    You make a good point. But if you really are that concerned about corruption, and how Thiel’s strategy for modern data-based warfare is also being applied to American politics and society, then some NOTICING is in order.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/07/who-is-peter-thiel-rnc-2016-trump/492380/

    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2022/04/inside-the-new-right-where-peter-thiel-is-placing-his-biggest-bets

    , @rebel yell
    @Steve Sailer


    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption
     
    America fans keep asking, what difference does it make to us if Russia has a moral problem, or if it takes Ukraine or doesn't? If Russia loses, how does that protect our own border?
    Our problem is our own bad government, not Russia. And the fact is that a Russian loss will strengthen our bad government thereby making our own border less secure.
    The enemy of my enemy is not necessarily my friend, but whatever erodes Washington's power is good for me.
    I hope Russia wins, as a Russian victory might shorten by even one day the rule of the Democrat/Republican evil axis over my own country. Whether that is good or not for Russians or Ukrainians is not my concern.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    , @AndrewR
    @Steve Sailer

    God you're a faggot

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    , @Old Prude
    @Steve Sailer

    "misbegotten war". Thank you. Misbegotten by Russia, and misbegotten by America. What can America possibly gain from all the cash and hardware it has thrown into this shabby pit?

    The Ukrainians were asses to allow the West to goad Putin into an invasion. No matter how well they do, they have lost.

    There has been a shameful lack of mature diplomacy from the get go, and the rah-rah for Zelinsky shows nothing has been learned, or will be learned.

    On a side note, I attended Christmas mass with a liberal couple - friends of Mrs. Prude. After mass we got to talking in the foyer, and the husband started snarling how we needed to shoot missiles and bombs at Moscow to kill, kill, kill Putin. Good grief. Television is strong with this one.

    I mumbled something about how it was a shame that serious diplomacy wasn't tried before the war. That got no purchase with the liberal warrior. So, the killing goes on.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Almost Missouri

    , @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't read every comment, but I don't see much evidence of Putin fanboys in the comments. There is a larger component of contrarians like ID and US DOS/CIA skeptics like Physicist Dave. Your references to Putin fans definitely create the impression that you have a sportsball attitude to the war that actually mirrors what you incorrectly attribute to your critics.

    Your comments about corruption undermining Russian military preparedness and soft power projection are interesting. Would like to see actual reportage about that instead of the schoolyard level stuff.

    In general, I'd say your portrayal of conscripted Ukrainians being killed in large numbers as "bravely fighting for Ukraine" is cope to deal with the fact that the US is cynically using the Ukrainian people as cannon fodder in a war to support its own hegemony. But if your sportsball fantasy let's you sleep at night, great.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

  63. America after declaring victory in Afghanistan was forced into ignominious and final retreat. Maybe, perhaps, doing victory laps is premature for anyone?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @TWS

    "Maybe, perhaps, doing victory laps is premature for anyone?"

    Like Putin announcing that Russia had annexed Kherson and three other provinces of Ukraine?

    Replies: @TWS

  64. So the plan is Russia to just take it while we wage war against them? This is really dangerous.

  65. The one thing the West cannot give Ukraine is troops, and so the Russians will be wise to avoid making this a fast moving basketball-like war of dramatic offensive maneuver, because in that the Russian troops would be up omnipresent US surveillance aided by Theil and Musks machine AI.

    It is counter intuitive that Russia does not try to weaken Ukraine’s East of the river Dnipro forces by blowing up the bridge links of the supply line to Donbass. I conclude the Russian army in Ukraine’s supreme military commander, Surovikin, thinks the flow of Ukraine’s best equipped and most determined units into Bakhmut is bringing them to where Russia can most easily attrite them. Surovikin’s strategy is to make this the Eton Wall Game (” the remorseless application of pressure and leverage as one advances inch by inch”).

    Wagner Group’s operations consist of very small bands of fighters with a tablet that shows where each individuals place at in the formation at every stage of the route for the assault, this is superimposed on commercial satellite imagery. No deviation is permitted on pain of being instantly shot (drones are reportedly used for this). When the Ukrainians to prevent their lines being infiltrated / breeched open fire on the band of Wagner fighters, the drones that are always overhead of Wagner assault groups, can locate Ukrainian concealed and fortified trenches, bunker and even their heavy mortars and artillery well behind the front line. The Wagner soldiers usually get killed, but the officers (who don’t advance with the convict -soldiers) just get new convicts from the 20,000 recruited by Wagner Of the 20000 convicts recruited by Wagner, 5% are dead already in what are in effect constant ‘reconnaissance in force’ missions without and real territorial objective.

    The Russian artillery fire in Bakhmut is of lesser intensity than several months ago but that is at least partly due to it being more precisely targeted by drones picking up the Ukrainian artillery firing on Wagner groups. A giveaway of what the real purpose of Wagner tactics are is the missions are always during the daytime which is when drone locating of where the Ukrainian artillery blasting the hapless Wagner troops can be easiest done. Following these ‘failed’ attacks the artillery fire is much heavier that when it was ostensibly supporting the ill-starred Wagnerites. Presumably, the fires are alson much more accurate and when one taken into account that Russia has an undisputedly very large artillery firepower advantage in Ukraine, it perhaps becomes believable that Ukraine is losing a battalion a day in Bakhmut, as Russian sources are claiming.

    • Thanks: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @Greasy William
    @Sean

    This is very interesting information. It sounds believable but can you please provide a source?

  66. @TWS
    America after declaring victory in Afghanistan was forced into ignominious and final retreat. Maybe, perhaps, doing victory laps is premature for anyone?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “Maybe, perhaps, doing victory laps is premature for anyone?”

    Like Putin announcing that Russia had annexed Kherson and three other provinces of Ukraine?

    • Replies: @TWS
    @Steve Sailer

    I missed where he said the war was over or mission accomplished. Of course maybe you could put down the pom-poms for a minute. Might improve your vision.

    If you're going to do a 'Jack' impersonation on your own blog you could save everyone the trouble maybe just fundraise for whomever pays his bills

  67. That WashPost piece seems like pure corporate propaganda, mixed with in with the anti-Russkie type. Maybe it’s accurate but maybe it isn’t, and I don’t have enough knowledge to decide. But here’s a portion of a comment that I left on a different thread last month that still seems relevant:

    As I’ve emphasized, I haven’t been closely following the operational-level fighting in Ukraine, partly because I just don’t consider it very important. Maybe Macgregor is correct and the reinforced Russians will eventually sweep aside the severely weakened Ukrainians once the ground freezes, and maybe not. A thousand or so square miles of territory doesn’t seem that big a deal to me one way or the other, though obviously the Russians have deep ideological attachment to the issue.

    Meanwhile, as I’d emphasized, America has suffered a serious of gigantic geopolitical strategic defeats. Germany and many of the other leading European economies have been devastated by the loss of Russian energy. The Chinese have become rock-solid Russian allies as have the Iranians. Saudi Arabia has now shifted towards the Russians, and India seems to be moving in the same direction. To me, losing Saudi Arabia and maybe India counts for much more than who controls some godforsaken Ukrainian town named Kherson, which I’d never even heard of.

    Ultra-establishmentarian Foreign Affairs just published a major article saying that maybe America will have to fight a simultaneous global war against both China and Russia, something which has been the absolute worst nightmare of American geopolitical strategists for many decades…

    Another example. Russian hackers have supposedly now obtained proof that the British and Americans collaborated in destroying the Russian-German Nord Stream pipelines. As huge energy prices continue to devastate the European economies and Europeans begin freezing this winter, that might easily mean the collapse of NATO. The collapse of NATO is a bigger deal than whether or not the Russians successfully seize a few more square miles of Ukrainian territory.

    The USSR had a gigantic, powerful army in Europe throughout the 1980s, and it was never defeated militarily. The USSR fell because it suffered economic, ideological, and geopolitical defeats, all on the strategic level. That’s exactly the situation our own USSA currently faces.

    It was from an article in which I discussed these issues at greater length:

    https://www.unz.com/runz/world-war-iii-and-world-war-ii/

    https://www.unz.com/mwhitney/putins-conundrum/#comment-5709607

    • Agree: Pop Warner
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Ron Unz

    Thanks for that, Ron. I read your article from which you drew your comment... and agree.

    The rulers of the USA (not the politicians, I mean the people who ultimately control Biden's teleprompter) seem to be overplaying their hand. This seems to be a general trend in the West, a general "unseriousness". Irrespective of the origins and explanations for WWII, amongst the population there seems to have been a practicality and seriousness about that time or growing up in that time, enforced by the conditions of war and war economy, that persisted for most of the lifetimes of the baby boomers.

    The Cold War prolonged and retained that sense of practicality until 1990.

    In the absence of that sort of existential threat with the relatively brief "unipolar world" (unipolar if the great equalizer of nukes was ignored) there seems to be a lack of strategic vision and practicality to the whole affair. It's a "let's do more of the same, but amplified (more so than the other courtiers)" rather than the result of asking questions like "What do we ultimately want? Why do we want it? How will that benefit us? What is that likely to achieve?"

    It seems that momentum from the Frankfurt School has persisted. One would think that after 100 years, a review of the strategic aims of the goals of the FS would be in order. The white goyim now less than 10% of the world's population... are they the "big bad" still? for example. Are the old tribal enmities the most important thing at stake now? e.g. Russia, Ukraine.

    I too have been watching Sachs, Douglas MacGregor, Mearsheimer, Gabbard, and Tucker on youtube. I am not sure what is true and what will ultimately come to be.

    However, I do believe that Russia has a 3:1 population advantage of Ukraine, a similar people. If it just came down to Russia and Ukraine in a vacuum, I think Russia would have won already. But the USA has decided that it wants to fight a proxy war.

    Due to the proximity and the fact that the ultimate backstop is nukes, I believe that Russia wants it more than NATO and are prepared to get it. I am not sure with the destruction of the Nordsteam pipeline, the USA will be able to repair the damage to its own credibility there. But ultimately in a battle of wills, this war is on Russia's borders, and a year ago none of us knew what a Kherson, Mariupol or a Bakhmut was. One would think that this was not the case for many Russians. (Steve would likely say that Ukraine wants it more because it is defending their own country... but did they really want the Eastern, Russian ethnic areas that were in their country when they were shelling them?)

    For the Russian, Ukraine potentially joining NATO crossed a red line. After decades of F(*&ing Around, the USA is finally going to "Find out".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6sbPCIEMyI

    More accurately...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mH9NzJwldok

    The original police action style operation was enough to work if Ukraine was willing/allowed to negotiate. It's a bit like discussing actions with your children. "Do you want to do this the easy way, or do you want to do this the hard way?" Sometimes they choose the hard way. And that's ok, the hard way works also. The easy way would have been a negotiated peace with minimal Ukrainian territory loss (just the ethnic Russian areas), no NATO ever for the rump Ukraine state.

    What this means is that now Russia will ask the question, what do we have to do in order to secure our strategic aims? Now that we are going to conduct a proper war, what is the best bang per buck achievable militarily? Might that be the entire coastal access of Ukraine, of course the Russian areas... maybe some other key things.

    The time span will be years, potentially. Even decades. It might mean making winters very uncomfortable for the Ukrainian populace. It can mean holding the existing lines while training and building the force required to accomplish the goals of a proper war. You can take time though. Eventually the USA forgets why it fights a war in a far-flung state. Good, fast, cheap, pick any two. So in a war where Russia can potentially take its time, they would take longer and do it more inexpensively. Every Russian war is not WWII, a meat grinder of existential threat.

    In fact, if I was looking at this strategically from the Russian perspective, we see that:
    1) US lacks multi-decadal patience for long, intractable proxy wars far from home.
    2) A key driver of US foreign policy is defense spending. They love a conflict that is going to consume a lot of materiel. But eventually the US tires of it, see 1.

    So you fight this in a way that is going to consume the US coffers in a way that doesn't cause strategic harm to your own side, minimizes your own casualties and economic losses, and be prepared to do that for a decade or two if you can't achieve shorter term victory. Eventually there is goint to be some other squirrel that diverts the US attention.

    I am also not sure why there is this focus on air power, why it should be used. Ukraine does not have appreciable air power. There is no compelling reason for Russia to use its air assets if it can accomplish its goals with ground forces.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuXwOM-2yq8

    I often agree with Steve (even on COVID) but don't always agree, and it seems I differ on the current war in Ukraine. We'll see what happens I guess.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bill Jones

  68. @Steve Sailer
    @michael droy

    "The only reason the front line is stable"

    But it's not. The Russians got driven back across the Dnieper River, a huge strategic defeat.

    Replies: @michael droy, @That Would Be Telling

    Reply – NO they did not get driven back behind the Dnieper River.
    If you are talking Kherson, they withdrew from Kherson city – the only part of Kherson Oblast that is the Ukrainian side.
    And they were not driven back – Ukraine attacked it for months and eventually Russia advised all civilians to leave and a month later pulled their own men out safely. Ukraine only entered after Russia left having spent well over 10k lives attacking Kherson city.
    There was no strategic defeat and no advance across the Dnieper.
    Meanwhile Ukraine lost a lot of lives, and in terms of army vs army ended up much weaker.

    PR victory, practical defeat.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @michael droy

    Putin's military genius cannot be impugned.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @BB753, @Redman

    , @Alyosha
    @michael droy

    "If you are talking Kherson, they withdrew from Kherson city – the only part of Kherson Oblast that is the Ukrainian side."

    Wildly inaccurate on your part. There are many parts of Kherson Oblast that is on the Ukranian side apart from Kherson City. Here, I'll list all the parts of Kherson Oblast on the Ukranian side that aren't Kherson City: Bilozerka Raion which has 64,790 people, Beryslav Raion which has 95,967 people, old Velyka Oleksandrivka Raion, Stanislav, Ivanivka, Mylove, Dudchavny, etc.

    There are literally hundreds of villages and cities in Kherson Oblast complete seperate from Kherson City that Ukraine has retaken from Russia. Clearly you know almost nothing at all about this war, Kherson Oblast, or Ukraine.

    Replies: @michael droy

    , @pirelli
    @michael droy

    Lol. I can’t tell if this is parody, but this is hilarious:

    “Russia was not driven across the Dnieper! It made a tactical decision to safely withdraw its forces across the river.”

    Elsewhere you have commented, literally, “the last thing Russia wants is for Ukraine to retreat.”

    Either bravo on the first-rate satire, or I’m very sorry.

  69. @Steve Sailer
    @Cagey Beast

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin's spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    Replies: @michael droy, @Sean, @Anonymo, @Corvinus, @rebel yell, @AndrewR, @Old Prude, @Chrisnonymous

    Russia has a problem with corruption? In the context of Ukraine or the context of USA?

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians — ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else’s country?

    Mostly because the Ukrainians are untrained, this is an artillery war where Ukraine is vastly underarmed, and because Ukraine needs propaganda victories to keep the “aid” flowing.

    The real question is why Ukraine is sending 10s of thousands of poorly prepared troops into places like Kherson or Bakhmut to die facing hundreds of Russian soldiers (but thousands of Russian missiles).
    It is a terrible slaughter – backed by your US and my UK with (at HQs) full knowledge of the carnage.
    It is one of the major sins of the 21st century AND in Europe.

    As you probably know, Ukraine force their soldier into battle at the threat of a gun. The more experienced Poles shoot back. There are dozens of videos of Ukrainian Units appealing to Kiev about their orders to march unprotected into losing battles.

    • Replies: @Anon7
    @michael droy

    The alternate-view estimate of Ukrainian battlefield deaths, deaths of Ukrainian soldiers, is that about 150,000 men have been killed, along with perhaps 250,000 casualties. That's why Hero of the West Zelenskyy is reportedly conscripting young boys and old men to go fight in Bakhmut.

    If this alternate view is correct, the Ukrainians have pretty much used up their best troops fighting Russia's worst trained soldiers using the oldest equipment in Russia's armory. I'm not saying this was a Putin master plan, but I did think of it at the very outset of the war, that the effects of new technology like cheap little drones versus tanks was not known (I hadn't thought about Palantir), and that Putin might want to find things out before he sent in his best stuff.

    The slaughter and destruction in Ukraine, on a scale not seen in Europe since WWII, are due entirely to Western machinations, forcing Russia into a war of decision. The real goals? Depose Putin? Destabilize Russia? Test Palantir and our other technology? Launder American tax dollars into political contributions from defense contractors?

    Well, Putin is still standing, and more popular than ever. Russia's economy is doing better than that of many European countries, and we've provided them with new allies willing to buy gas with rubles, like China and India (one-third of the world's population). Palantir seems to work really well - but our main enemy has now learned all about it, and is working out how to circumvent it.

    And using the suffering of people around the world to fund your political party - that's just too odious to even comment on.

    Replies: @michael droy

  70. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymo

    "Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?"

    I met a Ukrainian "defense expert" who owned the single nicest piece of land I've seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else's country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians -- ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else's country?

    Replies: @Anonymo, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Colin Wright, @TWS, @PhysicistDave, @YetAnotherAnon, @Redman

    I am not sure many people are actually following the war with a mind to accuracy in the death tolls. It seems like this war is a lot like the Spanish Civil War, a real bloody struggle for the men in action but something of a projection screen for the ideologies of the observers overseas (except of course for the MIC).
    I suppose in the SCW, the observers could articulate their worldview more clearly than now (communism vs falangism is clearer to me than “NATO oughtn’t to expand gay marriage-womens rights-trannies” vs “Putler is evil Nazi”).
    I admire the consistency of your worldview, Steve, summed up as “Don’t invade other countries”. It’s just that history is not sure it’s workable in the long-term.
    But all that aside, do you believe Putin’s claim that the war was precipitated in part by atrocities against Russian ethnics in Donbass?
    I remember reading you on the Georgian conflict, and you seemed more open to Russian points of view, iirc.

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Anonymo

    No, Steve's position isn't that it's wrong to invade other countries. It's that it's wrong to invade other countries now.

    For some reason, Steve thinks the current world borders are perfect and should never be changed. Steve obviously doesn't believe that the US should give back California to Mexico.

    The civil war that split up Yugoslavia was horribly brutal, but you could argue that the various peoples of that region are better off with their own countries. Sometimes, the borders of a region need to be shaken up to represent the reality on the ground.

    Maybe Steve is worried that the US is heading that way.

    Replies: @bomag

  71. @michael droy
    @Steve Sailer

    Reply - NO they did not get driven back behind the Dnieper River.
    If you are talking Kherson, they withdrew from Kherson city - the only part of Kherson Oblast that is the Ukrainian side.
    And they were not driven back - Ukraine attacked it for months and eventually Russia advised all civilians to leave and a month later pulled their own men out safely. Ukraine only entered after Russia left having spent well over 10k lives attacking Kherson city.
    There was no strategic defeat and no advance across the Dnieper.
    Meanwhile Ukraine lost a lot of lives, and in terms of army vs army ended up much weaker.

    PR victory, practical defeat.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alyosha, @pirelli

    Putin’s military genius cannot be impugned.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @Steve Sailer

    If the Russian retreats in Ukraine were orderly, discretionary and involved relatively low losses, then they were evidently part of a larger plan. If they were forced on them by the enemy, then they weren't. Considering how much geography the Russians have, it would make sense if they developed a military doctrine that was comfortable with giving and taking lots of territory. Obviously any retreats would be part of a Plan B, rather than some 3D chess game.

    Unfortunately we can't get a sense of how orderly and low-cost these Russian retreats were by reading the western media. They simply lie too much and have too much of an emotional investment in this war. We can dive into alternate sources or we can live with it as a "known unknown". I choose the latter because it's far better than falling for the Narrative one more time.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Corvinus

    , @BB753
    @Steve Sailer

    Putin is smart enough to let his military staff decide on strategy, while general Surovikin, who led the successful campaign in Syria, has supreme command.

    , @Redman
    @Steve Sailer

    This was actually Surovikin’s tactics, not Putin. When Putin put him in charge to consolidate the various militias (with different generals) who’d been fighting the SMO independently, and decided this was a real war, he turned tactics over to the most experienced general in the RF.

    Surovikin saw no military advantage in keeping Kherson City on the other side of the Dnieper.

    The RF needed to build up its forces to fight a real war against NATO (which this now is). Keeping a city like Kherson with weak logistical support on the other side of the river provided no military advantage.

  72. @Steve Sailer
    @michael droy

    "The only reason the front line is stable"

    But it's not. The Russians got driven back across the Dnieper River, a huge strategic defeat.

    Replies: @michael droy, @That Would Be Telling

    [The front line is not stable.] The Russians got driven back across the Dnieper River, a huge strategic defeat.

    Not sure what got in your Wheaties this morning but you’re pointing out some inconvenient truths. Here we have a corollary to your observation about “preserv[ing] the lives of Russian soldiers as the highest priority?” When the Russian retreated, even when in good order, they left behind a lot of Ukrainians who were then subject to brutal and very well documented and per some credible accounts lethal “filtration.”

    This is also a huge strategic mistake, having the locals either on your side or at least semi-neutral makes all sorts of critical differences. We’re not talking about the ones in the Donbas who’ve been shelled for eight years (or not many of them??), and if not previously skeptical or against becoming a de facto part of the Russian Federation they now know how utterly unimportant they are to Putin et. al.

  73. Anon[360] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to meh:


    Where’s the Russian Air Force? Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?
     
    For what purpose? Planes can be shot down and pilots die.

    This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.

    Steve also wrote:

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.
     
    As opposed to the well-known absence of corruption in Kiev???

    This is a war of attrition.

    You win a war by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    One way to do that is to kill most of their forces.

    Another way is to cause them to use up their weapons and ammo.

    According to Western media reports from the ground, that is what Russia is doing.

    It may be, as yo say, "embarrassing," but it is how you win a war.

    By most accounts, the American Confederacy had much better strategists and tacticians than the North.

    But the North just wore them down.

    And the North won.

    Replies: @Anon, @Hibernian, @Pixo, @RadicalTomato, @GeologyAnonMk6

    “This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.”

    Sources for this? Must be reporters who’s provably gone to the front and also pro-Western according to your own standards.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Anon

    Anon[360] wrote to me:[


    Dave] “This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.”

    [Anon] Sources for this? Must be reporters who’s provably gone to the front and also pro-Western according to your own standards.
     
    I have documented this again and again.

    Click on my name and look through my earlier posts.

    I am frankly sick and tired of playing silly games with guys like you on this.

    Check out my earlier posts and the links therein.

    Or don't. I don't care.

    Frankly, I just no longer give a damn about fools like you. I do care about the innocents who are dying.

    The Kiev regime is going to lose, at horrendous cost.

    I hate that: I would like to see an immediate, negotiated peace, as I have said again and again and again.

    But the US Deep State will not allow it.

    And so Ukrainians will die.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @HA
    @Anon

    "Sources for this [claim that the kill ratio is horrifically against the Ukrainians]? Must be reporters who’s provably gone to the front and also pro-Western according to your own standards."

    There should also be a division in the kill ratio according to whether it includes body counts before or after the HIMARS and other Western equipment finally arrived. Because that is when -- according to Scott Ritter's since-retracted slip -- the game changed.

  74. @Steve Sailer
    @Cagey Beast

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin's spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    Replies: @michael droy, @Sean, @Anonymo, @Corvinus, @rebel yell, @AndrewR, @Old Prude, @Chrisnonymous

    The war may be morally unjustified, but it was most certainly not unprovoked. Ukraine was warned by Russia many, many times over several years about getting close to the West. Russia was ignored.

    Nor should it have come as a surprise to US and Ukrainian intel, but it did. They thought attacking Ukraine would be too costly for Russia in all sorts of ways.

    Objectively they may be right, but Russia got a vote, and Russians thought and still seem to think it is worth it.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @Sean

    "Ukraine was warned by Russia many, many times over several years about getting close to the West".

    And at least half of Ukraine wasn't very interested in turning their back on Russia. Ukraine was a deeply divided and dysfunctional country before 2014 but all that seems to have been dismissed by the West as excuse-making.

    Replies: @HA

  75. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Kim

    Yep, I'll let this war play out and see what happens. I have no idea why Steve has gone crazy about all of this.

    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It's bizarre.

    Maybe Russia really is losing the war, maybe not. What I do know is that our media lies constantly and is the PR wing for the establishment.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @michael droy

    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It’s bizarre.

    That’s not the correct way to approach this subject.

    Whenever Steve goes off the rails about something, which he routinely does about Covid and Ukraine, there arises a vocal minority in the comments section that accuses him of “believing the mainstream media,” as if that was a capital sin to be avoided at all costs. It isn’t that simple. You can’t find a shortcut to the truth just by inverting whatever the mainstream media says. And in any case, when you start speculating about what Steve believes about what the mainstream media says, you’ve prescinded very far from the topic at hand.

    Let’s look at Steve’s reaction to Covid as a case a point. From the very beginning of the pandemic, there was more than enough information in the mainstream media for people to draw the correct conclusions. There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. The quite influenza-like (and safely low) Total Case Fatality Rate of 0.23% was early calculated from data readily available in the mainstream media, and that figure was itself recycled many times through the mainstream media. The lack of clinical data regarding vaccine efficacy, the dangers of vaccine side effects, the risk of myocarditis, various European governments cancelling their vaccine recommendations for young people—all of this was published in close to real time in the mainstream media.

    None of it mattered. The Kovid Karens, which happen to include Steve Sailer, were determined to have their pandemic party come hell or high water. They did this not because they innocently believed a pack of lies told them by the Evil MSM, but because the mood had already descended upon them for other reasons. We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.

    Now, this is not to say that people like Steve didn’t selectively use MSM reports to support their fantastical version of events. This is not to say that chief pandemicists like Fauci did not actively try to shape the message through their media appearances and their influence over media outlets. This is not to say that most people working in the MSM were not Kovid Karens themselves who put out deliberately misleading information. All of this did happen, but the truth still leaked out, as it always does. The truth was never really that hard to find. Steve was not misled; he believes what he believes because he wants to.

    When it comes to Ukraine, there is likewise plenty of mainstream information out there from which truth can be inferred. Russia clearly cannot be “running out of weapons” when she still hasn’t even finished burning through her backlog of 40-year-old artillery shells yet. The Russian military cannot be “embarrassing itself in Ukraine” when, by and large, the Russian military hasn’t even entered Ukraine yet. All the fighting has been done by the Donbass militias and Wagner group, which have so far successfully destroyed more than 50% of the Ukrainian military. Once again, Steve believes what he believes because he wants to.

    And as we can see from the peevish tone of his replies in this thread, those beliefs are both very personal and very much under assault from the facts.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Intelligent Dasein

    "All the fighting has been done by the Donbass militias and Wagner group"

    Intelligent Dasein can always be counted on to top the others for inventiveness.

    , @Corvinus
    @Intelligent Dasein

    “And as we can see from the peevish tone of his replies in this thread, those beliefs are both very personal and very much under assault from the fact”

    Remember, he hates to be wrong.

    “Now, this is not to say that people like Steve didn’t selectively use MSM reports to support their fantastical version of events”

    One of the biggest lies perpetuated is that…the media lies all or even most the time and thus it cannot be trusted. That is intellectually sterility at its finest. Certainly media outlets have a bias. But people have to prove or disprove the contents from different sources. Read carefully the advice of Ron Unz.

    —I apply the same historical methods I did in my academic journal articles back in the 1980s. You analyze the likely reliability of the raw information presented, look for confirming or refuting evidence, and then draw your own plausible conclusions…On a more serious note, many of my articles very heavily cite various MSM sources, so why would I do that if I believed they were always lying?”—

    , @BB753
    @Intelligent Dasein

    "There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. "

    For me, the fact that a boatload of old geezers in a packed cruise ship had had such low mortality rate even poorly treated closed the case. Ioannidis concurred. But then, contrary to evidence, both Steve and Greg Cochran went on full-panic mode and fell for the totalitarian technocratic scam.

    Replies: @Axxuary

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @Intelligent Dasein


    We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.
     
    You make a good point that if you read the MSM like an intelligence analyst you can pick out nuggets of truthful data. But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that. The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that "everyone" already accepts certain things as true.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @AKAHorace

    , @Redman
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Very astute post.

    These are the same “beliefs” I find with a massive number of conservative (even very pro-Trump) friends and acquaintances. They’ll talk about almost any topic that goes against the MSM grain. But when I bring up the Ukraine war they become hostile towards me. All logic shuts down. It’s like they believe “we” are at war and their lives depended upon supporting the Joe Biden-controlled military or we will all be speaking Russian soon.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  76. @Steve Sailer
    @Cagey Beast

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin's spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    Replies: @michael droy, @Sean, @Anonymo, @Corvinus, @rebel yell, @AndrewR, @Old Prude, @Chrisnonymous

    Amen.

    [MORE]

    We all have moral problems with corruption, every nation and every man.

    That’s why a Savior was born in Bethlehem, to offer His Precious Blood for us all, Putin and Zelensky too.

    Merry Christmas!

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  77. @michael droy
    @Steve Sailer

    Reply - NO they did not get driven back behind the Dnieper River.
    If you are talking Kherson, they withdrew from Kherson city - the only part of Kherson Oblast that is the Ukrainian side.
    And they were not driven back - Ukraine attacked it for months and eventually Russia advised all civilians to leave and a month later pulled their own men out safely. Ukraine only entered after Russia left having spent well over 10k lives attacking Kherson city.
    There was no strategic defeat and no advance across the Dnieper.
    Meanwhile Ukraine lost a lot of lives, and in terms of army vs army ended up much weaker.

    PR victory, practical defeat.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alyosha, @pirelli

    “If you are talking Kherson, they withdrew from Kherson city – the only part of Kherson Oblast that is the Ukrainian side.”

    Wildly inaccurate on your part. There are many parts of Kherson Oblast that is on the Ukranian side apart from Kherson City. Here, I’ll list all the parts of Kherson Oblast on the Ukranian side that aren’t Kherson City: Bilozerka Raion which has 64,790 people, Beryslav Raion which has 95,967 people, old Velyka Oleksandrivka Raion, Stanislav, Ivanivka, Mylove, Dudchavny, etc.

    There are literally hundreds of villages and cities in Kherson Oblast complete seperate from Kherson City that Ukraine has retaken from Russia. Clearly you know almost nothing at all about this war, Kherson Oblast, or Ukraine.

    • Replies: @michael droy
    @Alyosha

    Sure but only the City was held by Russia for any length of time or defended.
    And even the city was not forcibly taken from Russia by Ukraine despite at least 10k Ukrainian dead.

    So in reference to Steve's claim of taking large amounts of land forcibly from Russia, NOT TRUE.
    As in deed you probably know because you are nitpicking my statement rather than backing up his.

  78. At this point, I think I’d rather be governed by someone who’s pro-BLM, pro-reparations and anti-Ukraine proxy war than a race realist who’s all in on dumping billions into that sinkhole.

    All the race stuff in this blog is like sweet candy for type 1 diabetics. Now we see the curtain pulled back, and what we have is Max Boot telling us to get on the team and come in for the big win.

  79. anonymous[108] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    On the subject of Ukraine, this is a fascinating interview with a British volunteer in that war (Not least because it has some interesting tidbits about Ukrainian corruption):

    https://youtu.be/TCbD4WBqPg4

    .

    Replies: @anonymous, @22pp22

    That was a good interview. He was part of a UK/Aus trio of guys at the start and one of them was killed in action. They experienced constant mortar and artillery shelling from Russia and got casualty evacuation after 1-2 hours. “If the rifle accounts for 1% of the dead in this war, I’d be surprised.”

  80. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It’s bizarre.
     
    That's not the correct way to approach this subject.

    Whenever Steve goes off the rails about something, which he routinely does about Covid and Ukraine, there arises a vocal minority in the comments section that accuses him of "believing the mainstream media," as if that was a capital sin to be avoided at all costs. It isn't that simple. You can't find a shortcut to the truth just by inverting whatever the mainstream media says. And in any case, when you start speculating about what Steve believes about what the mainstream media says, you've prescinded very far from the topic at hand.

    Let's look at Steve's reaction to Covid as a case a point. From the very beginning of the pandemic, there was more than enough information in the mainstream media for people to draw the correct conclusions. There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. The quite influenza-like (and safely low) Total Case Fatality Rate of 0.23% was early calculated from data readily available in the mainstream media, and that figure was itself recycled many times through the mainstream media. The lack of clinical data regarding vaccine efficacy, the dangers of vaccine side effects, the risk of myocarditis, various European governments cancelling their vaccine recommendations for young people---all of this was published in close to real time in the mainstream media.

    None of it mattered. The Kovid Karens, which happen to include Steve Sailer, were determined to have their pandemic party come hell or high water. They did this not because they innocently believed a pack of lies told them by the Evil MSM, but because the mood had already descended upon them for other reasons. We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.

    Now, this is not to say that people like Steve didn't selectively use MSM reports to support their fantastical version of events. This is not to say that chief pandemicists like Fauci did not actively try to shape the message through their media appearances and their influence over media outlets. This is not to say that most people working in the MSM were not Kovid Karens themselves who put out deliberately misleading information. All of this did happen, but the truth still leaked out, as it always does. The truth was never really that hard to find. Steve was not misled; he believes what he believes because he wants to.

    When it comes to Ukraine, there is likewise plenty of mainstream information out there from which truth can be inferred. Russia clearly cannot be "running out of weapons" when she still hasn't even finished burning through her backlog of 40-year-old artillery shells yet. The Russian military cannot be "embarrassing itself in Ukraine" when, by and large, the Russian military hasn't even entered Ukraine yet. All the fighting has been done by the Donbass militias and Wagner group, which have so far successfully destroyed more than 50% of the Ukrainian military. Once again, Steve believes what he believes because he wants to.

    And as we can see from the peevish tone of his replies in this thread, those beliefs are both very personal and very much under assault from the facts.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Corvinus, @BB753, @Hypnotoad666, @Redman

    “All the fighting has been done by the Donbass militias and Wagner group”

    Intelligent Dasein can always be counted on to top the others for inventiveness.

  81. @Steve Sailer
    @Cagey Beast

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin's spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    Replies: @michael droy, @Sean, @Anonymo, @Corvinus, @rebel yell, @AndrewR, @Old Prude, @Chrisnonymous

    You make a good point. But if you really are that concerned about corruption, and how Thiel’s strategy for modern data-based warfare is also being applied to American politics and society, then some NOTICING is in order.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/07/who-is-peter-thiel-rnc-2016-trump/492380/

    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2022/04/inside-the-new-right-where-peter-thiel-is-placing-his-biggest-bets

  82. Critics have argued that Palantir’s powerful software has been misused by government agencies, [for example] to help track undocumented immigrants

    Oh heaven forfend! We can’t have government agencies actually doing their job!

    • LOL: Hibernian
  83. @Steve Sailer
    @michael droy

    Putin's military genius cannot be impugned.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @BB753, @Redman

    If the Russian retreats in Ukraine were orderly, discretionary and involved relatively low losses, then they were evidently part of a larger plan. If they were forced on them by the enemy, then they weren’t. Considering how much geography the Russians have, it would make sense if they developed a military doctrine that was comfortable with giving and taking lots of territory. Obviously any retreats would be part of a Plan B, rather than some 3D chess game.

    Unfortunately we can’t get a sense of how orderly and low-cost these Russian retreats were by reading the western media. They simply lie too much and have too much of an emotional investment in this war. We can dive into alternate sources or we can live with it as a “known unknown”. I choose the latter because it’s far better than falling for the Narrative one more time.

    • Agree: AKAHorace
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Cagey Beast

    "Unfortunately we can’t get a sense of how orderly and low-cost these Russian retreats were by reading the western media. They simply lie too much and have too much of an emotional investment in this war. We can dive into alternate sources or we can live with it as a “known unknown”. I choose the latter because it’s far better than falling for the Narrative one more time."

    Absolutely. Though I think the right is with the DPR/LPR and that Russia are right to help them, getting real info is very hard. For all I know, even the reported vast new Ukrainian war cemeteries are propaganda - it's not hard to stick a few hundred flags and bunches of flowers in a graveyard.

    That EU honchette said* a week or two back that "100,000 officers" of Ukraine had died, which seems unlikely, although 100,000 soldiers is I guess possible. But generally the attacking side loses most in war.

    On one side you have the US PR version - that the Russian soldiers have low morale and even lower supplies, because "we intercepted their phone calls", on the other side similar tales of woe in Ukrainian ranks.

    It'll all come out in the wash, what worries me a little is that Joe Public is convinced that Nuland Ukraine are the good guys and that they are winning comfortably.

    What happens when they are seen to be losing? This is "shit or bust" for Russia (and China too), not so for the US.

    * then had it edited out Stalin style

    , @Corvinus
    @Cagey Beast

    “I choose the latter because it’s far better than falling for the Narrative one more time.“

    It’s called willful ignorance and confirmation bias on your part. In that way, you don’t have to engage in critical thinking.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

  84. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It’s bizarre.
     
    That's not the correct way to approach this subject.

    Whenever Steve goes off the rails about something, which he routinely does about Covid and Ukraine, there arises a vocal minority in the comments section that accuses him of "believing the mainstream media," as if that was a capital sin to be avoided at all costs. It isn't that simple. You can't find a shortcut to the truth just by inverting whatever the mainstream media says. And in any case, when you start speculating about what Steve believes about what the mainstream media says, you've prescinded very far from the topic at hand.

    Let's look at Steve's reaction to Covid as a case a point. From the very beginning of the pandemic, there was more than enough information in the mainstream media for people to draw the correct conclusions. There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. The quite influenza-like (and safely low) Total Case Fatality Rate of 0.23% was early calculated from data readily available in the mainstream media, and that figure was itself recycled many times through the mainstream media. The lack of clinical data regarding vaccine efficacy, the dangers of vaccine side effects, the risk of myocarditis, various European governments cancelling their vaccine recommendations for young people---all of this was published in close to real time in the mainstream media.

    None of it mattered. The Kovid Karens, which happen to include Steve Sailer, were determined to have their pandemic party come hell or high water. They did this not because they innocently believed a pack of lies told them by the Evil MSM, but because the mood had already descended upon them for other reasons. We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.

    Now, this is not to say that people like Steve didn't selectively use MSM reports to support their fantastical version of events. This is not to say that chief pandemicists like Fauci did not actively try to shape the message through their media appearances and their influence over media outlets. This is not to say that most people working in the MSM were not Kovid Karens themselves who put out deliberately misleading information. All of this did happen, but the truth still leaked out, as it always does. The truth was never really that hard to find. Steve was not misled; he believes what he believes because he wants to.

    When it comes to Ukraine, there is likewise plenty of mainstream information out there from which truth can be inferred. Russia clearly cannot be "running out of weapons" when she still hasn't even finished burning through her backlog of 40-year-old artillery shells yet. The Russian military cannot be "embarrassing itself in Ukraine" when, by and large, the Russian military hasn't even entered Ukraine yet. All the fighting has been done by the Donbass militias and Wagner group, which have so far successfully destroyed more than 50% of the Ukrainian military. Once again, Steve believes what he believes because he wants to.

    And as we can see from the peevish tone of his replies in this thread, those beliefs are both very personal and very much under assault from the facts.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Corvinus, @BB753, @Hypnotoad666, @Redman

    “And as we can see from the peevish tone of his replies in this thread, those beliefs are both very personal and very much under assault from the fact”

    Remember, he hates to be wrong.

    “Now, this is not to say that people like Steve didn’t selectively use MSM reports to support their fantastical version of events”

    One of the biggest lies perpetuated is that…the media lies all or even most the time and thus it cannot be trusted. That is intellectually sterility at its finest. Certainly media outlets have a bias. But people have to prove or disprove the contents from different sources. Read carefully the advice of Ron Unz.

    —I apply the same historical methods I did in my academic journal articles back in the 1980s. You analyze the likely reliability of the raw information presented, look for confirming or refuting evidence, and then draw your own plausible conclusions…On a more serious note, many of my articles very heavily cite various MSM sources, so why would I do that if I believed they were always lying?”—

  85. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymo

    "Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?"

    I met a Ukrainian "defense expert" who owned the single nicest piece of land I've seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else's country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians -- ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else's country?

    Replies: @Anonymo, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Colin Wright, @TWS, @PhysicistDave, @YetAnotherAnon, @Redman

    Aren’t the DPR and LPR forces, who declared independence from Ukraine in 2014, brave Ukrainians defending their country?

    “all the Putin fan boys”

    LOL. Happy Christmas and a joyful New Year to you all!

    “The commenters outside looked from Steve to Jack D, and from Jack to Steve, and from Steve to Jack again; but already it was impossible to say which was which” 😉

    • Agree: michael droy
  86. @Sean
    @Steve Sailer

    The war may be morally unjustified, but it was most certainly not unprovoked. Ukraine was warned by Russia many, many times over several years about getting close to the West. Russia was ignored.

    Nor should it have come as a surprise to US and Ukrainian intel, but it did. They thought attacking Ukraine would be too costly for Russia in all sorts of ways.

    Objectively they may be right, but Russia got a vote, and Russians thought and still seem to think it is worth it.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    “Ukraine was warned by Russia many, many times over several years about getting close to the West”.

    And at least half of Ukraine wasn’t very interested in turning their back on Russia. Ukraine was a deeply divided and dysfunctional country before 2014 but all that seems to have been dismissed by the West as excuse-making.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Cagey Beast

    "And at least half of Ukraine wasn’t very interested in turning their back on Russia. Ukraine was a deeply divided and dysfunctional country before 2014 but all that seems to have been dismissed by the West as excuse-making."

    Yeah, it's strange how tearing off a chunk of another country and financing so called "independence" movements there (note that Strelkov/Girkin has openly admitted that his salary came from Moscow all that time he was pretending to a DOnbass freedom fighter) can solidify a formerly divided country on the notion that the Kremlin is not the brotherly group of well-wishers some of them once foolishly thought they were. And if that weren't enough, well, I guess an outright invasion is even better in that regard.

    Weird how THAT tends to get dismissed by all of Moscow's useful idiots and trolls.


    Russia’s invasion largely put an end to this pro-Russian sentiment: by May 2022, only 4 percent in Ukraine’s east and 1 percent in the south still had a positive view of Russia. Support for Ukraine joining NATO, on the other hand, had surged to record highs: 69 percent in the east and 81 percent in the south, up from 36 percent in the east and 48 percent in the south, according to a poll taken on February 16 and 17 of this year.
     

    Replies: @Peterike

  87. @anonymous
    @Mr. Anon

    wow but they dont apply IT to Chicago killing fields?????

    Replies: @Hibernian

    The usual suspects are working hard to prevent the cops fram using Shot Spotter.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Hibernian

    This.

    Seems that crime is an institution that must be maintained; benefits accrue to some groups.

  88. @Anon
    The potemkin eastern world is crumbling, tbe United States is rising.

    You can just feel the pride on everybody's face now. We did it, comrades. Commencing operation American Expansionism, now.

    Replies: @SFG, @Anon

    That would be good, except the US government is insanely anti-white and no white person should be supporting it.

    I wonder if the Russians could get better military tech from China or even Iran?

  89. @Steve Sailer
    @michael droy

    Putin's military genius cannot be impugned.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @BB753, @Redman

    Putin is smart enough to let his military staff decide on strategy, while general Surovikin, who led the successful campaign in Syria, has supreme command.

  90. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to meh:


    Where’s the Russian Air Force? Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?
     
    For what purpose? Planes can be shot down and pilots die.

    This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.

    Steve also wrote:

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.
     
    As opposed to the well-known absence of corruption in Kiev???

    This is a war of attrition.

    You win a war by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    One way to do that is to kill most of their forces.

    Another way is to cause them to use up their weapons and ammo.

    According to Western media reports from the ground, that is what Russia is doing.

    It may be, as yo say, "embarrassing," but it is how you win a war.

    By most accounts, the American Confederacy had much better strategists and tacticians than the North.

    But the North just wore them down.

    And the North won.

    Replies: @Anon, @Hibernian, @Pixo, @RadicalTomato, @GeologyAnonMk6

    By most accounts, the American Confederacy had much better strategists and tacticians than the North.

    The gaps between Northern and Southern officers and between Northern and Southern enlisted soldiers are often exaggerated. The Anaconda Plan was brilliant. The Union was successful west of the Appalachians almost from the start. Virginia was a different story, but even there look what happened when the Confederacy went on the offensive. Many of the Northern urban soldiers were immigrants who had lived in the countryside in their home countries. Both sides had trouble with cowardly, indecisive commanders. The bad Northern Generals tended to be cashiereed as the War went on.

  91. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It’s bizarre.
     
    That's not the correct way to approach this subject.

    Whenever Steve goes off the rails about something, which he routinely does about Covid and Ukraine, there arises a vocal minority in the comments section that accuses him of "believing the mainstream media," as if that was a capital sin to be avoided at all costs. It isn't that simple. You can't find a shortcut to the truth just by inverting whatever the mainstream media says. And in any case, when you start speculating about what Steve believes about what the mainstream media says, you've prescinded very far from the topic at hand.

    Let's look at Steve's reaction to Covid as a case a point. From the very beginning of the pandemic, there was more than enough information in the mainstream media for people to draw the correct conclusions. There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. The quite influenza-like (and safely low) Total Case Fatality Rate of 0.23% was early calculated from data readily available in the mainstream media, and that figure was itself recycled many times through the mainstream media. The lack of clinical data regarding vaccine efficacy, the dangers of vaccine side effects, the risk of myocarditis, various European governments cancelling their vaccine recommendations for young people---all of this was published in close to real time in the mainstream media.

    None of it mattered. The Kovid Karens, which happen to include Steve Sailer, were determined to have their pandemic party come hell or high water. They did this not because they innocently believed a pack of lies told them by the Evil MSM, but because the mood had already descended upon them for other reasons. We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.

    Now, this is not to say that people like Steve didn't selectively use MSM reports to support their fantastical version of events. This is not to say that chief pandemicists like Fauci did not actively try to shape the message through their media appearances and their influence over media outlets. This is not to say that most people working in the MSM were not Kovid Karens themselves who put out deliberately misleading information. All of this did happen, but the truth still leaked out, as it always does. The truth was never really that hard to find. Steve was not misled; he believes what he believes because he wants to.

    When it comes to Ukraine, there is likewise plenty of mainstream information out there from which truth can be inferred. Russia clearly cannot be "running out of weapons" when she still hasn't even finished burning through her backlog of 40-year-old artillery shells yet. The Russian military cannot be "embarrassing itself in Ukraine" when, by and large, the Russian military hasn't even entered Ukraine yet. All the fighting has been done by the Donbass militias and Wagner group, which have so far successfully destroyed more than 50% of the Ukrainian military. Once again, Steve believes what he believes because he wants to.

    And as we can see from the peevish tone of his replies in this thread, those beliefs are both very personal and very much under assault from the facts.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Corvinus, @BB753, @Hypnotoad666, @Redman

    “There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. ”

    For me, the fact that a boatload of old geezers in a packed cruise ship had had such low mortality rate even poorly treated closed the case. Ioannidis concurred. But then, contrary to evidence, both Steve and Greg Cochran went on full-panic mode and fell for the totalitarian technocratic scam.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon, Mark G.
    • Replies: @Axxuary
    @BB753


    But then, contrary to evidence, both Steve and Greg Cochran went on full-panic mode and fell for the totalitarian technocratic scam.
     
    I'm glad BB753 noticed this anomaly in the otherwise sensible Sailer and Cochran. I was surprised at Cochran's reaction to Ioannidis and wondered if he weren't irrational about age-normed fatality rates. Many older misanthropes get this way when they yield to their fears and loathings.
  92. @michael droy
    Hmm - if you see some of the videos on Telegram showing how Russia takes out Ukrainians, you'd realise that the real spy in the sky are observation drones that show pictures of not just tanks or vehicles, but individuals walking around, and tanks hidden amongst bushes.
    It is drones not satellites that are winning this war. (As ever you'd see the Ukrainian videos if they had them....)

    Plus never trust anything that explains what is NOT actually happening. Russia is killing Ukrainians at a rate of 10:1. The only reason the front line is stable is that Ukraine keeps pushing thousands and thousands of fresh recruits forward and Russia is quite happy to wipe them out and wait for more.
    Perhaps Ukraine wants to lose the war as quick as possible rather than drop back, and have Russians expose themselves in areas less pro-Russian.

    The real technical advantage was in the 1980s and 90s when the US has fantastic access to micro-chip tech. That advantage has been over for 25 years.


    Thiel’s strategy for modern data-based warfare doesn’t sound that esoteric, but it does seem like it must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century.
     
    So in 2018 Putin presented some half a dozen conventional weapons, mostly manoeuvrable hypersonic missiles that were already or soon to be in service. They wipe the floor with western equivalents and importantly turn air craft carriers from a threat into a vulnerability.

    Since 2018 the MIC has been on total PR war to defend their own credibility. Not only has Russia overtaken them, China has too, while the US has been stumbling over the disastrous Littoral ships and the F35, the flying lemon. Most US aircraft do not meet the minimum availability standards set for them. The Patriot system failed when Yemen attacked Saudi with missiles of ancient design. A billion dollar system with $1million missiles is going to be sent to Ukraine to defend against $10k drone attacks. That isn't going to win any fresh orders.

    I'm sure readers of isteve will recognise the pattern here. The media writes up any kind of US success in a technology war with extra hype because it is losing. Just as it writes up any Ukrainian battle win as huge and trend setting in a war where Ukraine is getting slaughtered.

    Speaking of Modern Media - have you commented on the Twitter Files yet?
    Here in UK I can't find a single person that has even heard of them.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Cagey Beast

    Speaking of Modern Media – have you commented on the Twitter Files yet?
    Here in UK I can’t find a single person that has even heard of them.

    OT:
    Musk is apparently committing one of the gravest secular sins: he’s failing to pander to his best customers:

  93. @Kim

    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don't seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven't been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YZW8oMo8Irk

    Replies: @meh, @Bill Jones, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @GAnon

    The power of advanced algorithmic warfare systems is now so great that it equates to having tactical nuclear weapons against an adversary with only conventional ones,” explains Alex Karp, chief executive of Palantir, in an email message.

    I don’t know why Steve can’t recognize a bunch of garbage techno-babble sales talk from a defense contractor when he sees it. Palantir has invented a device that downloads information from a wireless connection — it’s called a laptop. But they use words like “algorithmic” so they can charge the Pentagon a couple billion. Meanwhile, our genius army forgot to have artillery pieces or the ability to produce ammunition in mass volume during an active war.

    Steve shares the hubris of our Pentagon that their high-priced high-tech makes them invincible and that Russians are inept. In reality, Ukraine lost the war months ago because the West simply can’t produce war material fast and at scale.

    This is actually apparent to the whole world that isn’t inside the West’s propaganda bubble. NATO is a bit of a paper tiger when it comes to fighting a real land army.

    • Agree: michael droy
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @Hypnotoad666


    Steve shares the hubris of our Pentagon that their high-priced high-tech makes them invincible and that Russians are inept. In reality, Ukraine lost the war months ago [...]
     
    To be fair, it's too soon to say this. When Russia has taken Novorossiya and is ready to talk to Kiev, then we can say it has won and the Kremlin got what it wanted.
    , @Mr Mox
    @Hypnotoad666

    Meanwhile, our genius army forgot to have artillery pieces or the ability to produce ammunition in mass volume during an active war.

    No problem! Weapons and ammunition can easily be produced by Working From Home. Only poor backwards countries, like Russia, relies on national factories for their hardware.

  94. anon[238] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @wj

    You know, I'd say the Russians screwed up worst of all by not realizing how much the Ukrainians don't want to be conquered by them.

    Putin budgeted a lot of money to win hearts and minds in Ukraine, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap.

    Replies: @anon

    Back in 2008, the U.S. bet heavily on Mikheil Saakashvili, hipster president of Georgia, against Vladimir Putin. In the spring of 2008, the U.S. promised Georgia eventual NATO membership despite the objections of NATO members actually in Europe.

    Sailer

    You used to acknowledge political realities, clandestine activities, and the like. But now it’s all very black and white: a matter of who crossed the border! That goddamn sacred 30-year old border!!!!

    And an invasion… the US would never . By God, that’s a line in the sand that shall not be tolerated by polite society! Requires stiff rebuke, up to and including war. (What’s our own count since the 90s?).

    >Putin budgeted a lot of money to win hearts and minds in Ukraine, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren’t cheap.

    Wait, now who’s buying who? Granted, who can forget how Putin and his cronies paid cold hard cash to set-up the Boston Marathon Bomber family in the US.

    (I hope these lame, disingenuous arguments you’ve been making are your way of signalling to longtime readers that, yes, due to finances you have opted for a lump sum payment of dark money)

  95. @Steve Sailer
    @Cagey Beast

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin's spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    Replies: @michael droy, @Sean, @Anonymo, @Corvinus, @rebel yell, @AndrewR, @Old Prude, @Chrisnonymous

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption

    America fans keep asking, what difference does it make to us if Russia has a moral problem, or if it takes Ukraine or doesn’t? If Russia loses, how does that protect our own border?
    Our problem is our own bad government, not Russia. And the fact is that a Russian loss will strengthen our bad government thereby making our own border less secure.
    The enemy of my enemy is not necessarily my friend, but whatever erodes Washington’s power is good for me.
    I hope Russia wins, as a Russian victory might shorten by even one day the rule of the Democrat/Republican evil axis over my own country. Whether that is good or not for Russians or Ukrainians is not my concern.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @rebel yell

    '...I hope Russia wins, as a Russian victory might shorten by even one day the rule of the Democrat/Republican evil axis over my own country. Whether that is good or not for Russians or Ukrainians is not my concern.'

    Then too, just to revert to the internationalist perspective, a victorious Russia is a stable Russia.

    From that point of view, the course of the war to date could prove ideal. Russia goes on to win -- but it wasn't fun. Let's not do this again.

    ...ad Russia really does need to win. It's better for everyone, in the long run. Putin isn't a Hitler -- but a defeated Russia could produce one.

  96. “…but it does seem like it must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century.”

    What a stupid and ignorant thing to say. Only an idiot could have written that.

  97. @Hypnotoad666
    @Kim


    The power of advanced algorithmic warfare systems is now so great that it equates to having tactical nuclear weapons against an adversary with only conventional ones,” explains Alex Karp, chief executive of Palantir, in an email message.
     
    I don't know why Steve can't recognize a bunch of garbage techno-babble sales talk from a defense contractor when he sees it. Palantir has invented a device that downloads information from a wireless connection -- it's called a laptop. But they use words like "algorithmic" so they can charge the Pentagon a couple billion. Meanwhile, our genius army forgot to have artillery pieces or the ability to produce ammunition in mass volume during an active war.

    Steve shares the hubris of our Pentagon that their high-priced high-tech makes them invincible and that Russians are inept. In reality, Ukraine lost the war months ago because the West simply can't produce war material fast and at scale.

    This is actually apparent to the whole world that isn't inside the West's propaganda bubble. NATO is a bit of a paper tiger when it comes to fighting a real land army.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Mr Mox

    Steve shares the hubris of our Pentagon that their high-priced high-tech makes them invincible and that Russians are inept. In reality, Ukraine lost the war months ago […]

    To be fair, it’s too soon to say this. When Russia has taken Novorossiya and is ready to talk to Kiev, then we can say it has won and the Kremlin got what it wanted.

  98. @PhysicistDave
    @SFG

    SFG wrote to Anon:


    I’d be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn’t invaded Ukraine.
     
    But in fact it is the illegal puppet regime in Kiev, installed at the instigation of the US Deep State, that invaded the areas of Ukraine that refused to accede to the illegal puppet regime.

    The legitimate country of Ukraine was the areas that refused to accede to the illegal puppet regime.

    Russia did not invade "Ukraine." Russia came to the aid of those Ukrainians who were resisting the illegal puppet government in Kiev.

    An enormous difference.

    Facts matter.

    Russia is fighting for people all over the world who do not wish to be slaves to the US Deep State.

    If only Americans could remember their own heritage and join the fight against the illegal US Deep State!

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Graham

    If fighting against the US Deep State requires the murder, rape, and mutilation of civilians, the destruction of civilian infrastructure, and the conversion of Russia itself back into a poverty-stricken tyranny, I’m definitely on the side of the US Deep State.

  99. @Cagey Beast
    @Steve Sailer

    If the Russian retreats in Ukraine were orderly, discretionary and involved relatively low losses, then they were evidently part of a larger plan. If they were forced on them by the enemy, then they weren't. Considering how much geography the Russians have, it would make sense if they developed a military doctrine that was comfortable with giving and taking lots of territory. Obviously any retreats would be part of a Plan B, rather than some 3D chess game.

    Unfortunately we can't get a sense of how orderly and low-cost these Russian retreats were by reading the western media. They simply lie too much and have too much of an emotional investment in this war. We can dive into alternate sources or we can live with it as a "known unknown". I choose the latter because it's far better than falling for the Narrative one more time.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Corvinus

    “Unfortunately we can’t get a sense of how orderly and low-cost these Russian retreats were by reading the western media. They simply lie too much and have too much of an emotional investment in this war. We can dive into alternate sources or we can live with it as a “known unknown”. I choose the latter because it’s far better than falling for the Narrative one more time.”

    Absolutely. Though I think the right is with the DPR/LPR and that Russia are right to help them, getting real info is very hard. For all I know, even the reported vast new Ukrainian war cemeteries are propaganda – it’s not hard to stick a few hundred flags and bunches of flowers in a graveyard.

    That EU honchette said* a week or two back that “100,000 officers” of Ukraine had died, which seems unlikely, although 100,000 soldiers is I guess possible. But generally the attacking side loses most in war.

    On one side you have the US PR version – that the Russian soldiers have low morale and even lower supplies, because “we intercepted their phone calls”, on the other side similar tales of woe in Ukrainian ranks.

    It’ll all come out in the wash, what worries me a little is that Joe Public is convinced that Nuland Ukraine are the good guys and that they are winning comfortably.

    What happens when they are seen to be losing? This is “shit or bust” for Russia (and China too), not so for the US.

    * then had it edited out Stalin style

  100. @michael droy
    @Steve Sailer

    Russia has a problem with corruption? In the context of Ukraine or the context of USA?


    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians — ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else’s country?
     
    Mostly because the Ukrainians are untrained, this is an artillery war where Ukraine is vastly underarmed, and because Ukraine needs propaganda victories to keep the "aid" flowing.

    The real question is why Ukraine is sending 10s of thousands of poorly prepared troops into places like Kherson or Bakhmut to die facing hundreds of Russian soldiers (but thousands of Russian missiles).
    It is a terrible slaughter - backed by your US and my UK with (at HQs) full knowledge of the carnage.
    It is one of the major sins of the 21st century AND in Europe.

    As you probably know, Ukraine force their soldier into battle at the threat of a gun. The more experienced Poles shoot back. There are dozens of videos of Ukrainian Units appealing to Kiev about their orders to march unprotected into losing battles.

    Replies: @Anon7

    The alternate-view estimate of Ukrainian battlefield deaths, deaths of Ukrainian soldiers, is that about 150,000 men have been killed, along with perhaps 250,000 casualties. That’s why Hero of the West Zelenskyy is reportedly conscripting young boys and old men to go fight in Bakhmut.

    If this alternate view is correct, the Ukrainians have pretty much used up their best troops fighting Russia’s worst trained soldiers using the oldest equipment in Russia’s armory. I’m not saying this was a Putin master plan, but I did think of it at the very outset of the war, that the effects of new technology like cheap little drones versus tanks was not known (I hadn’t thought about Palantir), and that Putin might want to find things out before he sent in his best stuff.

    The slaughter and destruction in Ukraine, on a scale not seen in Europe since WWII, are due entirely to Western machinations, forcing Russia into a war of decision. The real goals? Depose Putin? Destabilize Russia? Test Palantir and our other technology? Launder American tax dollars into political contributions from defense contractors?

    Well, Putin is still standing, and more popular than ever. Russia’s economy is doing better than that of many European countries, and we’ve provided them with new allies willing to buy gas with rubles, like China and India (one-third of the world’s population). Palantir seems to work really well – but our main enemy has now learned all about it, and is working out how to circumvent it.

    And using the suffering of people around the world to fund your political party – that’s just too odious to even comment on.

    • Replies: @michael droy
    @Anon7

    Yes I pretty much concur with this alternate view.
    Maybe 25% lower deaths and casualties but the right ball park.


    And using the suffering of people around the world to fund your political party – that’s just too odious to even comment on.
     
    This or variants on this.
    The completely unnecessary Deaths and casualties of hundreds of thousands of enlisted Ukrainians to fight a war which was lost (short of US nuclear intervention) back in March is probably the most immoral act since Vietnam/Laos/Cambodia.
    And to do it all by Proxy is worse - my Brits are equally complicit as your Americans and the media could have stopped it.
  101. Playing along with permanent Washington is just good business. Thiel is currently getting the carrot and Musk may be about to get the stick:

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Cagey Beast

    I remain bullish on Elon despite the shadows clinging to his rise as an industrialist. Find me a dude who doesn't like Elon and I'll point out his gayness. Or the dude's smaller than average member. Or that dude might just be Peter Strzok -- a son of CIA agent who's living a comfortable existence in Mordor. I'm pretty sure Elon has his own intelligence capacity; he'd better. Because the denizens of Mordor have designed a Howard Hughes end for him.

    Replies: @James B. Shearer

  102. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It’s bizarre.
     
    That's not the correct way to approach this subject.

    Whenever Steve goes off the rails about something, which he routinely does about Covid and Ukraine, there arises a vocal minority in the comments section that accuses him of "believing the mainstream media," as if that was a capital sin to be avoided at all costs. It isn't that simple. You can't find a shortcut to the truth just by inverting whatever the mainstream media says. And in any case, when you start speculating about what Steve believes about what the mainstream media says, you've prescinded very far from the topic at hand.

    Let's look at Steve's reaction to Covid as a case a point. From the very beginning of the pandemic, there was more than enough information in the mainstream media for people to draw the correct conclusions. There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. The quite influenza-like (and safely low) Total Case Fatality Rate of 0.23% was early calculated from data readily available in the mainstream media, and that figure was itself recycled many times through the mainstream media. The lack of clinical data regarding vaccine efficacy, the dangers of vaccine side effects, the risk of myocarditis, various European governments cancelling their vaccine recommendations for young people---all of this was published in close to real time in the mainstream media.

    None of it mattered. The Kovid Karens, which happen to include Steve Sailer, were determined to have their pandemic party come hell or high water. They did this not because they innocently believed a pack of lies told them by the Evil MSM, but because the mood had already descended upon them for other reasons. We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.

    Now, this is not to say that people like Steve didn't selectively use MSM reports to support their fantastical version of events. This is not to say that chief pandemicists like Fauci did not actively try to shape the message through their media appearances and their influence over media outlets. This is not to say that most people working in the MSM were not Kovid Karens themselves who put out deliberately misleading information. All of this did happen, but the truth still leaked out, as it always does. The truth was never really that hard to find. Steve was not misled; he believes what he believes because he wants to.

    When it comes to Ukraine, there is likewise plenty of mainstream information out there from which truth can be inferred. Russia clearly cannot be "running out of weapons" when she still hasn't even finished burning through her backlog of 40-year-old artillery shells yet. The Russian military cannot be "embarrassing itself in Ukraine" when, by and large, the Russian military hasn't even entered Ukraine yet. All the fighting has been done by the Donbass militias and Wagner group, which have so far successfully destroyed more than 50% of the Ukrainian military. Once again, Steve believes what he believes because he wants to.

    And as we can see from the peevish tone of his replies in this thread, those beliefs are both very personal and very much under assault from the facts.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Corvinus, @BB753, @Hypnotoad666, @Redman

    We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.

    You make a good point that if you read the MSM like an intelligence analyst you can pick out nuggets of truthful data. But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that. The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that “everyone” already accepts certain things as true.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Hypnotoad666

    “But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that.”

    That’s a patently anti-white statement. We whites have the IQ and resolve to scrutinize data, to parse out information, and to draw conclusions. How dare you impugn European white Americans and their civilization building thought processes. You have no shame. Are you also implying YOU are part of the one percent elite who does have this “energy”?

    “The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that “everyone” already accepts certain things as true”

    And this is where your “argument” comes crashing down—I apply the same historical methods I did in my academic journal articles back in the 1980s. You analyze the likely reliability of the raw information presented, look for confirming or refuting evidence, and then draw your own plausible conclusions…On a more serious note, many of my articles very heavily cite various MSM sources, so why would I do that if I believed they were always lying.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @John Johnson

    , @AKAHorace
    @Hypnotoad666


    The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that “everyone” already accepts certain things as true.
     
    Perhaps I should just post agree. I should add though that you can also say this about a lot of the alternative media. There is a good recent post by Astral Codex that expands on this. In the intro he says:

    The point is: the media rarely lies explicitly and directly. Reporters rarely say specific things they know to be false. When the media misinforms people, it does so by misinterpreting things, excluding context, or signal-boosting some events while ignoring others, not by participating in some bright-line category called “misinformation”.

    Let me give a few examples from both the alternative and establishment medias.

    https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/the-media-very-rarely-lies

  103. War is Hell,

    and Meat is Murder.

    Russian sausage tycoon who criticized Ukraine war dies in fall

    https://nypost.com/2022/12/27/pavel-antov-russian-sausage-tycoon-who-criticized-ukraine-war-dies-in-fall/

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Being a friend of Putin, or a former friend of Putin, or a not sufficiently enthusiastic friend of Putin, seems to be a leading indicator for mortality in Russia nowadays. Leading cause of death................standing next to a window.

    I'm still wondering why - given that Putin is the current year Hitler, and you can't possibly say anything about him that's too damning - why haven't the Apartment Bombings of 1999 been brought up by the media and their military and intelligence commentators? Why hasn't that been added to the charge list against him?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_apartment_bombings

    Just kidding.............I know why that hasn't been done.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  104. @Cagey Beast
    @Steve Sailer

    If the Russian retreats in Ukraine were orderly, discretionary and involved relatively low losses, then they were evidently part of a larger plan. If they were forced on them by the enemy, then they weren't. Considering how much geography the Russians have, it would make sense if they developed a military doctrine that was comfortable with giving and taking lots of territory. Obviously any retreats would be part of a Plan B, rather than some 3D chess game.

    Unfortunately we can't get a sense of how orderly and low-cost these Russian retreats were by reading the western media. They simply lie too much and have too much of an emotional investment in this war. We can dive into alternate sources or we can live with it as a "known unknown". I choose the latter because it's far better than falling for the Narrative one more time.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @Corvinus

    “I choose the latter because it’s far better than falling for the Narrative one more time.“

    It’s called willful ignorance and confirmation bias on your part. In that way, you don’t have to engage in critical thinking.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Corvinus

    "It's called willful ignorance and confirmation bias on your part."

    On all of our parts. You should know every human being relies on these mental mechanisms that serve as palliatives to soften the difficult truths of existence. You should know this but your parts have been numbed from the marathon love-making sessions with Daria Albinger.

  105. For example, The Post wrote in 2019 that Palantir’s software was used by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to help track undocumented immigrants, which led to protests from some of the company’s employees.

    Why would anyone worry about that these days? Being an undocumented immigrant gives one high status in today’s America. It’s a state of sanctifying grace.

  106. @Hypnotoad666
    @Intelligent Dasein


    We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.
     
    You make a good point that if you read the MSM like an intelligence analyst you can pick out nuggets of truthful data. But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that. The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that "everyone" already accepts certain things as true.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @AKAHorace

    “But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that.”

    That’s a patently anti-white statement. We whites have the IQ and resolve to scrutinize data, to parse out information, and to draw conclusions. How dare you impugn European white Americans and their civilization building thought processes. You have no shame. Are you also implying YOU are part of the one percent elite who does have this “energy”?

    “The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that “everyone” already accepts certain things as true”

    And this is where your “argument” comes crashing down—I apply the same historical methods I did in my academic journal articles back in the 1980s. You analyze the likely reliability of the raw information presented, look for confirming or refuting evidence, and then draw your own plausible conclusions…On a more serious note, many of my articles very heavily cite various MSM sources, so why would I do that if I believed they were always lying.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Corvinus

    But then you end up being wrong about most things anyway.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Corvinus

    , @John Johnson
    @Corvinus


    “But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that.”
     
    That’s a patently anti-white statement. We whites have the IQ and resolve to scrutinize data, to parse out information, and to draw conclusions. How dare you impugn European white Americans and their civilization building thought processes. You have no shame. Are you also implying YOU are part of the one percent elite who does have this “energy”?

    You are being facetious but he is correct and it's not a simple matter of intelligence.

    The smartest White man I know watches Fox all the time and completely buys into it. He really believes that Pelosi is a full fledged Communist and schemes with Biden to destroy capitalism. Here in reality both Pelosi and Biden are multi-millionaires and live very lavish lifestyles. Biden in fact has not gone after top tax rates on the wealthy and only partially moved back corporate income tax rates from the Trump era. He also hasn't gone after the capital gains loophole nor has he gone after individual offshoring scams. Yea a real Communist.

    White people can be intelligent but they are also prone to modernism and believing what they want to be true.

    It was pointed out in the 1920s that the flaw of Whites was their desire to appear metropolitan. They want to appear to have the answers more than they actually want to understand a problem.

    Fox News watchers *want to believe* that the government is the problem and CNN watchers are convinced that fewer Whites are the solution. Most Whites pick a side and that includes most intelligent Whites. That is the reality and I remember a psych study that suggested only around 1% of Americans can sift through what they see in political media. Purely from experience I would guess around 2-3%. Definitely not 5% or greater.

    Interestingly the CIA determined that only around 1% of the population has the potential to become political leaders. They used that information when trying to undermine Communist revolutions.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  107. @Steve Sailer
    @Observator

    Last I heard from Vlad, this was a war of annexation.

    But it turned out, much to Vlad's expensive surprise, that the Ukrainians didn't want to be annexed. It's almost as if the all the spied and traitors he thought he was funding in Ukraine was actually money being embezzled to buy infinity pools in Bel-Air.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @PhysicistDave

    The Donbas was and is ethnically Russian, and the people there seem to be fighting pretty hard for their independence from Ukraine.

    Why don’t the people of the Donbas elicit the same feelings from you? Is it because of a border that drawn on a map decades ago by men just as amoral and ruthless as Putin, Zelensky and the neocons.

    • Agree: ArthurinCali
  108. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    That's the point I'm making: it's less superweapons you can cheer in Red Square that matter for modern warfare, but a whole lot of boring systems integration toil. That's what let the US establish complete air supremacy over the Iraqis in 1991 with their Soviet weapons. And it's not wholly coincidental that the Soviet Union itself collapsed eight months later.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @SunBakedSuburb, @Mike Tre

    “And it’s not wholly coincidental that the Soviet Union itself collapsed eight months later.”

    The collapse of the USSR had more to do with its genesis as a bad idea than outmoded weapons systems. The United States began with a great idea but its inheritors, equipped with fabulous technology, lost the plot. They began worshipping the idols of a decadent establishment — expertism, scientism, elitism. Most wander the landscape in a media-induced illusion while the great idea crumbles around them. Not even the shadow ministers, who desire to impose a totalitarian biosurveillance system, will be able to manage the collapse of the Western standard-bearer. But I remain bullish on Oregon and its cranberry bogs.

  109. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymo

    "Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?"

    I met a Ukrainian "defense expert" who owned the single nicest piece of land I've seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else's country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians -- ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else's country?

    Replies: @Anonymo, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Colin Wright, @TWS, @PhysicistDave, @YetAnotherAnon, @Redman

    Dying isn’t necessarily brave. It’s just a thing that happens when you are sitting in your trench and a shell hits you. As Patton said, “no one ever won a war by dying for his country . . .”

  110. @Anonymo
    @Steve Sailer

    I am not sure many people are actually following the war with a mind to accuracy in the death tolls. It seems like this war is a lot like the Spanish Civil War, a real bloody struggle for the men in action but something of a projection screen for the ideologies of the observers overseas (except of course for the MIC).
    I suppose in the SCW, the observers could articulate their worldview more clearly than now (communism vs falangism is clearer to me than “NATO oughtn’t to expand gay marriage-womens rights-trannies” vs “Putler is evil Nazi”).
    I admire the consistency of your worldview, Steve, summed up as “Don’t invade other countries”. It’s just that history is not sure it’s workable in the long-term.
    But all that aside, do you believe Putin’s claim that the war was precipitated in part by atrocities against Russian ethnics in Donbass?
    I remember reading you on the Georgian conflict, and you seemed more open to Russian points of view, iirc.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country

    No, Steve’s position isn’t that it’s wrong to invade other countries. It’s that it’s wrong to invade other countries now.

    For some reason, Steve thinks the current world borders are perfect and should never be changed. Steve obviously doesn’t believe that the US should give back California to Mexico.

    The civil war that split up Yugoslavia was horribly brutal, but you could argue that the various peoples of that region are better off with their own countries. Sometimes, the borders of a region need to be shaken up to represent the reality on the ground.

    Maybe Steve is worried that the US is heading that way.

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Or maybe he sees that Russian influence is often not a particularly positive experience for a country?

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country

  111. @Steve Sailer
    @Cagey Beast

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin's spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    Replies: @michael droy, @Sean, @Anonymo, @Corvinus, @rebel yell, @AndrewR, @Old Prude, @Chrisnonymous

    God you’re a faggot

    • Agree: kihowi
    • LOL: Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @AndrewR

    It's worth remembering that none of us have any power to change things so yelling at Steve Sailer makes little sense. In any case, the position he's taking on this is far from unusual. Douglas Murray is a fellow-traveller of Mr. Sailer but Glenn Greenwald is not. Greenwald and Murray are homosexuals but Sailer is not. Further proof that being gay and being a faggot are two different things.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  112. @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

    And where is the Ukrainian airforce?

    Perhaps the airforces are no longer the forces they once were?

    Where is the Russian cavalry, where are the Ukrainian siege engines, where are the Russian chariots, where are the Ukrainian elephants?

    • Agree: Mike Tre
    • Replies: @Mr Mox
    @Lurker

    It certainly seems as manned aircrafts are going the way of the Dodo. Probably too many AD systems and manpads on the battlefield nowadays. All the talk at the start of the war about NATO maintaining a no-fly zone over Ukraine quickly died off; having a couple of f-16 0r F-35 taken out daily would be bad PR.

    Both sides air forces seem to have learned from the harsh realities but at a steep price.

  113. @Corvinus
    @Hypnotoad666

    “But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that.”

    That’s a patently anti-white statement. We whites have the IQ and resolve to scrutinize data, to parse out information, and to draw conclusions. How dare you impugn European white Americans and their civilization building thought processes. You have no shame. Are you also implying YOU are part of the one percent elite who does have this “energy”?

    “The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that “everyone” already accepts certain things as true”

    And this is where your “argument” comes crashing down—I apply the same historical methods I did in my academic journal articles back in the 1980s. You analyze the likely reliability of the raw information presented, look for confirming or refuting evidence, and then draw your own plausible conclusions…On a more serious note, many of my articles very heavily cite various MSM sources, so why would I do that if I believed they were always lying.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @John Johnson

    But then you end up being wrong about most things anyway.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Hypnotoad666

    Zing!

    , @Corvinus
    @Hypnotoad666

    You’re all tired up in knots. The fact of the matter is that you and others HAVE to perpetuate the lie that all or most media content is Fake News. The world doesn’t work that way, as evident by Ron Unz’s moment of truth.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

  114. @epebble
    @Mr. Anon

    why the CIA gets to have it’s own venture capital firm.

    Guessing here. Investing in a startup as a venture capitalist gives greater (financial) leverage on the capital. CIA's 10-million-dollar investment becomes 100 million dollars when other venture capitalists put 90 million dollars. This is better than an outright contract of $100 million if you are not certain the idea may work. In this case CIA would have burnt $10 and not $100 million. When doing blue sky research, why not spread $100 million into 10 $10 million startups so that at least one may work.

    As an example, again a pure guess, I think NASA's dollars being sent to SpaceX and Blue Origin may be working harder than the dollars being sent to Boeing or Lockheed-Martin.

    Replies: @Louis Renault, @Mr. Anon

    Guessing here. Investing in a startup as a venture capitalist gives greater (financial) leverage on the capital.

    What you say is true, and completely beside the point. The CIA is a government agency. How is it that they are allowed to invest money and profit from it? That would seem to be straight up illegal under Federal Acquisition Regulations. And illegal or not, it is is certainly improper and not the function of the limited government of a democratic republic (neither of which we have, I know, but we like to still pretend we do).

    See also Louis Renault’s comment.

  115. @Corvinus
    @Cagey Beast

    “I choose the latter because it’s far better than falling for the Narrative one more time.“

    It’s called willful ignorance and confirmation bias on your part. In that way, you don’t have to engage in critical thinking.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “It’s called willful ignorance and confirmation bias on your part.”

    On all of our parts. You should know every human being relies on these mental mechanisms that serve as palliatives to soften the difficult truths of existence. You should know this but your parts have been numbed from the marathon love-making sessions with Daria Albinger.

  116. Anon[413] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve Sailer,

    I wonder if a Hans Blix-like inspection regime could placate Putin? Perhaps a 25-year agreement of such?
    If he would accept this, the people in Ukraine who want to live as Russians could migrate to Russia in an orderly way, and the pre-war borders be put back in place, a wall could be built, and Ukraine could be inspected like the Iranians constantly so that no big weapons were placed east of Kiev.

    The whole thing is dog-awful. These countries could have been allies with different accents instead of embittered enemies.

    Your questions about the Russian air force is something I’ve asked myself. I would not want to parachute behind enemy lines in this conflict in particular. Hopefully some agreement will be reached, and in a generation these two peoples can put it behind them like the English and French have in the past.

    …….about Putin fan boys: many of us are so mad at our Deep State fixers, fraudsters, slanderers, and hoaxers, that we reflexively back anybody that irritates our Establishment Powers. I personally will never forgive them for 2019-2020, and for not calling our military to protect us from Antifa and BLM during the burning Riots. The facial recognition tools, GPS data, and starlink wonder tools could have been used to prosecute there but weren’t, just ask the January 6th prisoners, whom were hunted down months later.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  117. @Hypnotoad666
    @Intelligent Dasein


    We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.
     
    You make a good point that if you read the MSM like an intelligence analyst you can pick out nuggets of truthful data. But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that. The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that "everyone" already accepts certain things as true.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @AKAHorace

    The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that “everyone” already accepts certain things as true.

    Perhaps I should just post agree. I should add though that you can also say this about a lot of the alternative media. There is a good recent post by Astral Codex that expands on this. In the intro he says:

    The point is: the media rarely lies explicitly and directly. Reporters rarely say specific things they know to be false. When the media misinforms people, it does so by misinterpreting things, excluding context, or signal-boosting some events while ignoring others, not by participating in some bright-line category called “misinformation”.

    Let me give a few examples from both the alternative and establishment medias.

    https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/the-media-very-rarely-lies

    • Thanks: Hypnotoad666
  118. @Louis Renault
    @epebble

    NASA doesn't get stock, it gets a ride on a rocket that puts things in orbit and returns to Earth to be resused again.

    Replies: @epebble

    True; but they get a cheaper ride than a contract with Boeing or Lockheed-Martin would have cost. United Launch Alliance is still polishing their blueprints for Vulcan Centaur while SpaceX is testing their Starship.

  119. @Cagey Beast
    Playing along with permanent Washington is just good business. Thiel is currently getting the carrot and Musk may be about to get the stick:

    https://twitter.com/petestrzok/status/1607528974342852609

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    I remain bullish on Elon despite the shadows clinging to his rise as an industrialist. Find me a dude who doesn’t like Elon and I’ll point out his gayness. Or the dude’s smaller than average member. Or that dude might just be Peter Strzok — a son of CIA agent who’s living a comfortable existence in Mordor. I’m pretty sure Elon has his own intelligence capacity; he’d better. Because the denizens of Mordor have designed a Howard Hughes end for him.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @James B. Shearer
    @SunBakedSuburb

    "I remain bullish on Elon .."

    Buying Twitter for $44 billion was really stupid. Musk realized that himself when it was too late to get out of the deal. He just seems to be floundering around now.

  120. There’s a definite non-sequitur.

    ‘…The critics have argued that Palantir’s powerful software has been misused by government agencies to violate privacy or serve questionable ends. For example, The Post wrote in 2019 that Palantir’s software was used by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to help track undocumented immigrants…’

    Would it help to point it out to the author?

  121. ‘…In 1982, the Israelis angered the Reagan Administration by revealing to the world by taking out Syrian air defenses in Lebanon the new American strategy worked out in the 1970s for targeting Soviet ground-based radar with homing missiles…’

    You mean our closest allies harmed us?

    I suppose next you’ll be claiming that the Israelis sold Jonathan Pollard’s espionage to the Russians, or that they deliberately attacked the Liberty.

    Sniff, sniff…antisemitism? What did you do for Hanukkah, actually? Got a copy of Anne Frank in the house?

  122. Ukraine is winning the war!

    Covid vaccines are safe and effective!

    Our elections are secure and there is no vote fraud!

    Anyone believing any of the above marks themselves as a complete tool and an ignoramous.

  123. @Corvinus
    @Hypnotoad666

    “But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that.”

    That’s a patently anti-white statement. We whites have the IQ and resolve to scrutinize data, to parse out information, and to draw conclusions. How dare you impugn European white Americans and their civilization building thought processes. You have no shame. Are you also implying YOU are part of the one percent elite who does have this “energy”?

    “The real weight of the MSM on society comes just from its relentless, repetitious spin, and the casual assumption that “everyone” already accepts certain things as true”

    And this is where your “argument” comes crashing down—I apply the same historical methods I did in my academic journal articles back in the 1980s. You analyze the likely reliability of the raw information presented, look for confirming or refuting evidence, and then draw your own plausible conclusions…On a more serious note, many of my articles very heavily cite various MSM sources, so why would I do that if I believed they were always lying.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @John Johnson

    “But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that.”

    That’s a patently anti-white statement. We whites have the IQ and resolve to scrutinize data, to parse out information, and to draw conclusions. How dare you impugn European white Americans and their civilization building thought processes. You have no shame. Are you also implying YOU are part of the one percent elite who does have this “energy”?

    You are being facetious but he is correct and it’s not a simple matter of intelligence.

    The smartest White man I know watches Fox all the time and completely buys into it. He really believes that Pelosi is a full fledged Communist and schemes with Biden to destroy capitalism. Here in reality both Pelosi and Biden are multi-millionaires and live very lavish lifestyles. Biden in fact has not gone after top tax rates on the wealthy and only partially moved back corporate income tax rates from the Trump era. He also hasn’t gone after the capital gains loophole nor has he gone after individual offshoring scams. Yea a real Communist.

    White people can be intelligent but they are also prone to modernism and believing what they want to be true.

    It was pointed out in the 1920s that the flaw of Whites was their desire to appear metropolitan. They want to appear to have the answers more than they actually want to understand a problem.

    Fox News watchers *want to believe* that the government is the problem and CNN watchers are convinced that fewer Whites are the solution. Most Whites pick a side and that includes most intelligent Whites. That is the reality and I remember a psych study that suggested only around 1% of Americans can sift through what they see in political media. Purely from experience I would guess around 2-3%. Definitely not 5% or greater.

    Interestingly the CIA determined that only around 1% of the population has the potential to become political leaders. They used that information when trying to undermine Communist revolutions.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @John Johnson

    “You are being facetious but he is correct and it’s not a simple matter of intelligence“

    No, I’m being serious. It’s an absolutely anti-white statement on his part. He makes up an arbitrary percentage and proceeds to denigrate the critical thinking ability of whites. And you come to his defense. It’s sickening.

    “Purely from experience I would guess around 2-3%. Definitely not 5% or greater“

    Essentially, that is your opinion.

    “and I remember a psych study that suggested only around 1% of Americans”

    Wait, I thought we can’t trust social studies data. Because leftist agenda. So now you’re relying on something you THINK you remember as evidence? Find the source. Link it. Then we can figure out its context.

    “Interestingly the CIA determined that only around 1% of the population has the potential to become political leaders.”

    Lol, now you’re citing the Deep State? How do you know that’s accurate? What makes you trust this information? Do you even have a citation?

    So you’re saying we can’t trust the media nor the CIA…but you use them as evidence to support your assertions. Do you even comprehend the hypocrisy here?

    Replies: @John Johnson

  124. @rebel yell
    @Steve Sailer


    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption
     
    America fans keep asking, what difference does it make to us if Russia has a moral problem, or if it takes Ukraine or doesn't? If Russia loses, how does that protect our own border?
    Our problem is our own bad government, not Russia. And the fact is that a Russian loss will strengthen our bad government thereby making our own border less secure.
    The enemy of my enemy is not necessarily my friend, but whatever erodes Washington's power is good for me.
    I hope Russia wins, as a Russian victory might shorten by even one day the rule of the Democrat/Republican evil axis over my own country. Whether that is good or not for Russians or Ukrainians is not my concern.

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘…I hope Russia wins, as a Russian victory might shorten by even one day the rule of the Democrat/Republican evil axis over my own country. Whether that is good or not for Russians or Ukrainians is not my concern.’

    Then too, just to revert to the internationalist perspective, a victorious Russia is a stable Russia.

    From that point of view, the course of the war to date could prove ideal. Russia goes on to win — but it wasn’t fun. Let’s not do this again.

    …ad Russia really does need to win. It’s better for everyone, in the long run. Putin isn’t a Hitler — but a defeated Russia could produce one.

  125. @Buzz Mohawk
    War is Hell,

    and Meat is Murder.

    Russian sausage tycoon who criticized Ukraine war dies in fall

    https://nypost.com/2022/12/27/pavel-antov-russian-sausage-tycoon-who-criticized-ukraine-war-dies-in-fall/


    https://youtu.be/eviyEJRZX30?t=3


    https://de.india.postsen.com/content/uploads/2022/12/27/bebdd1a26f.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Being a friend of Putin, or a former friend of Putin, or a not sufficiently enthusiastic friend of Putin, seems to be a leading indicator for mortality in Russia nowadays. Leading cause of death…………….standing next to a window.

    I’m still wondering why – given that Putin is the current year Hitler, and you can’t possibly say anything about him that’s too damning – why haven’t the Apartment Bombings of 1999 been brought up by the media and their military and intelligence commentators? Why hasn’t that been added to the charge list against him?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_apartment_bombings

    Just kidding………….I know why that hasn’t been done.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Stalin thought it was funny to sponsor a Third Defenestration of Prague in 1948 of the last non-Communist minister in the Czech cabinet. But Putin's enemies keep falling out of windows so often it is getting kind of old. I guess quantity has a quality all its own.

    Replies: @HFR, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon

  126. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to meh:


    Where’s the Russian Air Force? Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?
     
    For what purpose? Planes can be shot down and pilots die.

    This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.

    Steve also wrote:

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.
     
    As opposed to the well-known absence of corruption in Kiev???

    This is a war of attrition.

    You win a war by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    One way to do that is to kill most of their forces.

    Another way is to cause them to use up their weapons and ammo.

    According to Western media reports from the ground, that is what Russia is doing.

    It may be, as yo say, "embarrassing," but it is how you win a war.

    By most accounts, the American Confederacy had much better strategists and tacticians than the North.

    But the North just wore them down.

    And the North won.

    Replies: @Anon, @Hibernian, @Pixo, @RadicalTomato, @GeologyAnonMk6

    “ the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces”

    There no credible source for this Putinist cope.

    Why don’t you embed a vlog with your pedophile friend Scott Ritter?

  127. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Batman:


    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts?
     
    Steve, we all love you, man, but are you completely ignorant of the military history of the last two centuries?

    Look just at the two World Wars:

    At the end of WW I, Germany still occupied a significant amount of Allied territory: the Allies did not control one square inch of German territory.

    But Germany lost.

    In WW II, Germany for a time occupied an enormous amount of Russian territory. But Germany still lost.

    You do not, you cannot, win a war simply and only by seizing territory.


    You win a war, you only can win a war, by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    You occupy territory, you cede territory, you advance, you retreat -- solely with the purpose of advancing towards that one single goal.

    And if you achieve that goal, even if the enemy occupies a huge amount of your territory, you win, and then you take whatever the hell you want.

    As WW I proved so nicely.

    This basic fact of warfare may be confusing to people who prefer to pore over maps and follow the ebb and flow of battle lines.

    But this is not Stratego or Risk. This is a real war fought in the real world.

    And this is the reality of warfare in the real world for more than two centuries.

    Replies: @michael droy, @James J. O'Meara, @Buzz Mohawk, @Unladen Swallow

    This basic fact of warfare may be confusing to people who prefer to pore over maps and follow the ebb and flow of battle lines.

    Likely the same folks who think elections are all about “horseraces”. Who’s leading this hour!

  128. @Steve Sailer
    @Cagey Beast

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin's spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    Replies: @michael droy, @Sean, @Anonymo, @Corvinus, @rebel yell, @AndrewR, @Old Prude, @Chrisnonymous

    “misbegotten war”. Thank you. Misbegotten by Russia, and misbegotten by America. What can America possibly gain from all the cash and hardware it has thrown into this shabby pit?

    The Ukrainians were asses to allow the West to goad Putin into an invasion. No matter how well they do, they have lost.

    There has been a shameful lack of mature diplomacy from the get go, and the rah-rah for Zelinsky shows nothing has been learned, or will be learned.

    On a side note, I attended Christmas mass with a liberal couple – friends of Mrs. Prude. After mass we got to talking in the foyer, and the husband started snarling how we needed to shoot missiles and bombs at Moscow to kill, kill, kill Putin. Good grief. Television is strong with this one.

    I mumbled something about how it was a shame that serious diplomacy wasn’t tried before the war. That got no purchase with the liberal warrior. So, the killing goes on.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @Old Prude

    I wonder how many of these people believe Putin stole the 2016 election from their Hillary?

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Old Prude


    I attended Christmas mass with a liberal couple ... . After mass we got to talking in the foyer, and the husband started snarling how we needed to shoot missiles and bombs at Moscow to kill, kill, kill Putin. Good grief.
     
    The bloodlust of the liberal is a sight to behold. And the glee with which they celebrate their kills.

    The more so since they are usually utterly without physical courage in real life.
  129. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymo

    "Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?"

    I met a Ukrainian "defense expert" who owned the single nicest piece of land I've seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else's country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians -- ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else's country?

    Replies: @Anonymo, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Colin Wright, @TWS, @PhysicistDave, @YetAnotherAnon, @Redman

    ‘…But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else’s country…’

    That’s actually not so obvious. Deciding the Ukraine is one country and Russia another is oversimplifying matters — to put it mildly.

    Solzhenitsyn is usually thought of as Russian — and certainly he thought of himself as Russian. In point of fact, his mother was from the Ukraine, his father was of Cossack extraction, and he himself was raised in Rostov.

    There’s no evidence I’m aware of that he ever saw any of this as demonstrating he wasn’t Russian.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don't get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave

  130. @Anonymous
    Peter Thiel, a homo siding with Globohomo. Go figure.

    https://twitter.com/ZivoAdam/status/1603511268710686729?s=20&t=epBhvwFVIdD6VfVLEcn39Q

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Peter Thiel, a homo siding with Globohomo. Go figure.

    How very white of him.

    There are currently 32 countries where same-sex marriage is legal: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and Uruguay.

    The US should show the same color as Mexico– Indian reservations are still free to set their own standards.

    More than two dozen countries have marriage equality, and more than half of these are in Western Europe…

    The expansion of LGBTQ+ rights around the globe has been uneven, with bans on same-sex relationships still in place in many countries.

    Marriage Equality: Global Comparisons (–CFR… remember them?)

    Taiwan is captive to Western markets, and in South Africa, as in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Austria, the US, and eight Canadian provinces, it was imposed by a high court ruling authored by a white judge. (Oh, and a court imposed it in Taiwan, too, though one assumes the judge wasn’t white.)

    What you need to know about LGBT rights in 11 maps

    White people are sick. Civilization itself is built on marriage; it wouldn’t exist otherwise. We’ve trivialized a critical pillar.

    • Agree: mc23, Kim, BB753
    • Replies: @Richard B
    @Reg Cæsar


    honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century.
     
    Like much of Steve's cringe-corny fanboy comment section. Case in point:

    White people are sick.
     
    Oh brother. Or should I say, Oy vey!

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  131. @Hypnotoad666
    @Kim


    The power of advanced algorithmic warfare systems is now so great that it equates to having tactical nuclear weapons against an adversary with only conventional ones,” explains Alex Karp, chief executive of Palantir, in an email message.
     
    I don't know why Steve can't recognize a bunch of garbage techno-babble sales talk from a defense contractor when he sees it. Palantir has invented a device that downloads information from a wireless connection -- it's called a laptop. But they use words like "algorithmic" so they can charge the Pentagon a couple billion. Meanwhile, our genius army forgot to have artillery pieces or the ability to produce ammunition in mass volume during an active war.

    Steve shares the hubris of our Pentagon that their high-priced high-tech makes them invincible and that Russians are inept. In reality, Ukraine lost the war months ago because the West simply can't produce war material fast and at scale.

    This is actually apparent to the whole world that isn't inside the West's propaganda bubble. NATO is a bit of a paper tiger when it comes to fighting a real land army.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Mr Mox

    Meanwhile, our genius army forgot to have artillery pieces or the ability to produce ammunition in mass volume during an active war.

    No problem! Weapons and ammunition can easily be produced by Working From Home. Only poor backwards countries, like Russia, relies on national factories for their hardware.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  132. @Hypnotoad666
    @Corvinus

    But then you end up being wrong about most things anyway.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Corvinus

    Zing!

  133. @Colin Wright
    @Steve Sailer

    '...But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else’s country...'

    That's actually not so obvious. Deciding the Ukraine is one country and Russia another is oversimplifying matters -- to put it mildly.

    Solzhenitsyn is usually thought of as Russian -- and certainly he thought of himself as Russian. In point of fact, his mother was from the Ukraine, his father was of Cossack extraction, and he himself was raised in Rostov.

    There's no evidence I'm aware of that he ever saw any of this as demonstrating he wasn't Russian.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don’t get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @Steve Sailer

    'The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don’t get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.'

    This overlooks the detail that Russia didn't change her mind so much as we changed it for her -- and for the sake of trivial and transitory domestic political gain. Thousands have died so that Biden would have something to talk about in his 2022 State of the Union Address.

    For thirty years, everyone from Henry Kissinger on down warned 'don't invite the Ukraine to join NATO; Russia won't tolerate that.' Putin repeated that warning in December 2021; 'don't invite the Ukraine to join NATO; I won't tolerate it.'

    So what do we do? The very next month, we invite the Ukraine to join NATO: first Kamala Harris, then Tony Blinken. Just to make sure Russia realizes this is really going to happen.

    aaand.... Russia invades the Ukraine? Who'da thought?

    I wonder if they made up all those lapel pins ahead of time or waited for Russia to actually follow through?

    You don't need to decide Russia's the good guy here to realize what occurred. Think of Putin as that pit bull your neighbor has. Everyone can see he's a vicious beast; he says he's a vicious beast.

    So...because you want to demonstrate it for some trivial reason, you get your five-year old to go into the yard and poke the pit bull in the eye with a stick.

    Sure enough: the pit bull mauls the five year old.

    Fine. The pit bull's a vicious beast. Just please, please don't tell us you were the good guy here.

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Steve Sailer

    I notice that you haven't been quite so concerned over the years about Israel invading its neighbors.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Steve Sailer

    So I take it Steve, that you support Ukraine taking back Crimea and Donbas as well? Because that is what Zelenskyy and Biden have stated they will do. In your worldview, those were part of Ukraine in 1994, and should go back to them now, correct? If so, then what has changed now that was different in 2014?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    , @Anonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    The Germans British Turks and French all took a bite at the Crimean apple in the last 175 years.

    Its not invading Crimea, its holding Crimea.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Colin Wright:


    The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don’t get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.
     
    Unless of course you are the US Deep State.

    Then you bomb Serbia because you decide that the boundaries of Serbia are going to be reduced by the secession of Kosovo.

    Or you cheer on Saddam Hussein when he tries to conquer part of Iran, but attack him when he goes after Kuwait.

    Or you enable the Kurds to establish de facto independence from Baghdad.

    Or you try to dismantle the country of Syria.

    Or you openly facilitate the secession of Western Ukraine from the legally elected government of Ukraine in 2014, but then arm and encourage the rebel regime to attack and conquer those areas of Eastern Ukraine that were loyal to the legal government.

    Steve, you are they guy who made the phrase "Deep State" famous in the context of the US and who decried the behavior of "Invade the world, invite the world."

    But somehow you cannot bring yourself to view with open eyes what has actually happened in the world in the last thirty years: the main aggressor, by any standard, has been the US Deep State.

    Not Putin.

    Facts matter.
  134. @Old Prude
    @Steve Sailer

    "misbegotten war". Thank you. Misbegotten by Russia, and misbegotten by America. What can America possibly gain from all the cash and hardware it has thrown into this shabby pit?

    The Ukrainians were asses to allow the West to goad Putin into an invasion. No matter how well they do, they have lost.

    There has been a shameful lack of mature diplomacy from the get go, and the rah-rah for Zelinsky shows nothing has been learned, or will be learned.

    On a side note, I attended Christmas mass with a liberal couple - friends of Mrs. Prude. After mass we got to talking in the foyer, and the husband started snarling how we needed to shoot missiles and bombs at Moscow to kill, kill, kill Putin. Good grief. Television is strong with this one.

    I mumbled something about how it was a shame that serious diplomacy wasn't tried before the war. That got no purchase with the liberal warrior. So, the killing goes on.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Almost Missouri

    I wonder how many of these people believe Putin stole the 2016 election from their Hillary?

  135. @Mr. Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Being a friend of Putin, or a former friend of Putin, or a not sufficiently enthusiastic friend of Putin, seems to be a leading indicator for mortality in Russia nowadays. Leading cause of death................standing next to a window.

    I'm still wondering why - given that Putin is the current year Hitler, and you can't possibly say anything about him that's too damning - why haven't the Apartment Bombings of 1999 been brought up by the media and their military and intelligence commentators? Why hasn't that been added to the charge list against him?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_apartment_bombings

    Just kidding.............I know why that hasn't been done.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Stalin thought it was funny to sponsor a Third Defenestration of Prague in 1948 of the last non-Communist minister in the Czech cabinet. But Putin’s enemies keep falling out of windows so often it is getting kind of old. I guess quantity has a quality all its own.

    • Replies: @HFR
    @Steve Sailer

    Re: "a Third Defenestration of Prague in 1948"

    Mr. Sailer: Have you read Claire Sterling's "The Masaryk Case," written in 1968? Of course, everyone thought it highly unlikely that Masaryk had jumped, and she proved pretty conclusively that he had been pushed.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    LOL. I'd say Putin has jumped the shark on this, and I don't even support our participation in that war.

    Replies: @Redman

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Steve Sailer

    The Cheka always had a thing for defenestration:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Savinkov

    Fundmentally, Putin is a KGB man.

  136. @Lurker
    @Steve Sailer

    And where is the Ukrainian airforce?

    Perhaps the airforces are no longer the forces they once were?

    Where is the Russian cavalry, where are the Ukrainian siege engines, where are the Russian chariots, where are the Ukrainian elephants?

    Replies: @Mr Mox

    It certainly seems as manned aircrafts are going the way of the Dodo. Probably too many AD systems and manpads on the battlefield nowadays. All the talk at the start of the war about NATO maintaining a no-fly zone over Ukraine quickly died off; having a couple of f-16 0r F-35 taken out daily would be bad PR.

    Both sides air forces seem to have learned from the harsh realities but at a steep price.

  137. @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don't get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave

    ‘The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don’t get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.’

    This overlooks the detail that Russia didn’t change her mind so much as we changed it for her — and for the sake of trivial and transitory domestic political gain. Thousands have died so that Biden would have something to talk about in his 2022 State of the Union Address.

    For thirty years, everyone from Henry Kissinger on down warned ‘don’t invite the Ukraine to join NATO; Russia won’t tolerate that.’ Putin repeated that warning in December 2021; ‘don’t invite the Ukraine to join NATO; I won’t tolerate it.’

    So what do we do? The very next month, we invite the Ukraine to join NATO: first Kamala Harris, then Tony Blinken. Just to make sure Russia realizes this is really going to happen.

    aaand…. Russia invades the Ukraine? Who’da thought?

    I wonder if they made up all those lapel pins ahead of time or waited for Russia to actually follow through?

    You don’t need to decide Russia’s the good guy here to realize what occurred. Think of Putin as that pit bull your neighbor has. Everyone can see he’s a vicious beast; he says he’s a vicious beast.

    So…because you want to demonstrate it for some trivial reason, you get your five-year old to go into the yard and poke the pit bull in the eye with a stick.

    Sure enough: the pit bull mauls the five year old.

    Fine. The pit bull’s a vicious beast. Just please, please don’t tell us you were the good guy here.

  138. @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don't get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave

    I notice that you haven’t been quite so concerned over the years about Israel invading its neighbors.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Steve is Americans First. Your questions should have that orientation, and you should wonder which Americans. I honestly don't know the answers, but I do know he's better than Tucker Carlson -- and that there is no one better.

    Frankly, Israel and Palestine are not our concerns.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Telimektar, @Colin Wright, @Redman

  139. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Stalin thought it was funny to sponsor a Third Defenestration of Prague in 1948 of the last non-Communist minister in the Czech cabinet. But Putin's enemies keep falling out of windows so often it is getting kind of old. I guess quantity has a quality all its own.

    Replies: @HFR, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon

    Re: “a Third Defenestration of Prague in 1948”

    Mr. Sailer: Have you read Claire Sterling’s “The Masaryk Case,” written in 1968? Of course, everyone thought it highly unlikely that Masaryk had jumped, and she proved pretty conclusively that he had been pushed.

  140. @AndrewR
    @Steve Sailer

    God you're a faggot

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    It’s worth remembering that none of us have any power to change things so yelling at Steve Sailer makes little sense. In any case, the position he’s taking on this is far from unusual. Douglas Murray is a fellow-traveller of Mr. Sailer but Glenn Greenwald is not. Greenwald and Murray are homosexuals but Sailer is not. Further proof that being gay and being a faggot are two different things.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Cagey Beast

    I like Greenwald a lot and wouldn't call him that

  141. @michael droy
    @Steve Sailer

    Very strangely you seem to have completely bought the media myths.
    A very small Russian force has overwhelmed a very large nato trained army.
    The massive "Ukraine is winning" PR is simply because the truth is genuinely awful for western militaries (and their MIC) to face.
    The big story is US becoming No2 nation in the world to China. That is the real way to understand what gets written.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anon

    Lol. China is collapsing.

  142. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Stalin thought it was funny to sponsor a Third Defenestration of Prague in 1948 of the last non-Communist minister in the Czech cabinet. But Putin's enemies keep falling out of windows so often it is getting kind of old. I guess quantity has a quality all its own.

    Replies: @HFR, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon

    LOL. I’d say Putin has jumped the shark on this, and I don’t even support our participation in that war.

    • Replies: @Redman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Jumped the shark? He’s never been more popular in Russia.

    Replies: @Jack D

  143. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Steve Sailer

    I notice that you haven't been quite so concerned over the years about Israel invading its neighbors.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Steve is Americans First. Your questions should have that orientation, and you should wonder which Americans. I honestly don’t know the answers, but I do know he’s better than Tucker Carlson — and that there is no one better.

    Frankly, Israel and Palestine are not our concerns.

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Buzz Mohawk

    What does "American" even mean anymore?

    What the white Yankee in Maine have in common with the Mexican lawn guy in LA. We are separated by race, ethnicity, culture, religion, politics and, at times, language.

    American no longer stands for a people. At best, we're fellow consumers ruled over by a small managerial class that itself is ruled over by a small ethnic group.

    As to Israel, Palestine and Ukraine, the American consumers have no interest in them, but our rulers do, so we must as well.

    The question is why does Steve, who presumably isn't a part of the ruling tribe, care so much about Ukraine's border but not so much Israel's neighbors.

    , @Telimektar
    @Buzz Mohawk

    When the US makes endless wars for Israel's interest, destroying the Middle East and Libya with millions of its people (and Africans through Libya) then coming to Europe, that certainly is my concern since I leave in Europe.

    , @Colin Wright
    @Buzz Mohawk

    '...Frankly, Israel and Palestine are not our concerns.'

    ! Without our support, Israel would not have come into being, and without the continuation of that support, it would not exist today.

    You might as well say 'it's not your concern' if your teenage son starts raping all the little girls in the neighborhood.

    Burma may not be our concern. North Korea needn't be our concern. We don't need to actually bestir ourselves if Rwanda gets up to whatever.

    Until we yank Israel off our teat, she most certainly is our concern.

    , @Redman
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Israel and Palestinians aren’t our (my) concerns but they sure as hell are the US political elites’ concerns, no?

  144. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Batman:


    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts?
     
    Steve, we all love you, man, but are you completely ignorant of the military history of the last two centuries?

    Look just at the two World Wars:

    At the end of WW I, Germany still occupied a significant amount of Allied territory: the Allies did not control one square inch of German territory.

    But Germany lost.

    In WW II, Germany for a time occupied an enormous amount of Russian territory. But Germany still lost.

    You do not, you cannot, win a war simply and only by seizing territory.


    You win a war, you only can win a war, by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    You occupy territory, you cede territory, you advance, you retreat -- solely with the purpose of advancing towards that one single goal.

    And if you achieve that goal, even if the enemy occupies a huge amount of your territory, you win, and then you take whatever the hell you want.

    As WW I proved so nicely.

    This basic fact of warfare may be confusing to people who prefer to pore over maps and follow the ebb and flow of battle lines.

    But this is not Stratego or Risk. This is a real war fought in the real world.

    And this is the reality of warfare in the real world for more than two centuries.

    Replies: @michael droy, @James J. O'Meara, @Buzz Mohawk, @Unladen Swallow

    You win a war, or anything else now, by seizing public opinion. This is a Hollywood, show biz war as operated from this side. We here are stuck sitting in the dark in a movie theater watching a leading man who is costumed in a green shirt.

  145. Thiel’s way of war, but there is no internet there without his old partner Musk’s way of Starlink.

  146. @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don't get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave

    So I take it Steve, that you support Ukraine taking back Crimea and Donbas as well? Because that is what Zelenskyy and Biden have stated they will do. In your worldview, those were part of Ukraine in 1994, and should go back to them now, correct? If so, then what has changed now that was different in 2014?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    I've written several times about how the US needs to make sure it doesn't wind up being the dog being wagged by the Ukrainian over Ukrainian war aims. Ukraine's stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @PhysicistDave, @Mike Tre

  147. @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don't get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave

    The Germans British Turks and French all took a bite at the Crimean apple in the last 175 years.

    Its not invading Crimea, its holding Crimea.

  148. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Steve is Americans First. Your questions should have that orientation, and you should wonder which Americans. I honestly don't know the answers, but I do know he's better than Tucker Carlson -- and that there is no one better.

    Frankly, Israel and Palestine are not our concerns.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Telimektar, @Colin Wright, @Redman

    What does “American” even mean anymore?

    What the white Yankee in Maine have in common with the Mexican lawn guy in LA. We are separated by race, ethnicity, culture, religion, politics and, at times, language.

    American no longer stands for a people. At best, we’re fellow consumers ruled over by a small managerial class that itself is ruled over by a small ethnic group.

    As to Israel, Palestine and Ukraine, the American consumers have no interest in them, but our rulers do, so we must as well.

    The question is why does Steve, who presumably isn’t a part of the ruling tribe, care so much about Ukraine’s border but not so much Israel’s neighbors.

  149. @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

    Where’s the Russian Air Force?

    It’s there.

    Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?

    Two reasons, I suspect:

    1) Too many effective anti-aircraft weapons, most of them Russian-built, plus Western MANPADS.

    2) Fear of Russian pilots getting tortured to death if they survive getting shot down.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Dave Pinsen


    Fear of Russian pilots getting tortured to death if they survive getting shot down.
     
    Russia would prefer that pilots (and other troops) NOT be captured. They have circulated all sorts of propaganda about how if the Ukrainians take you prisoner they are going to cut your balls off, so you should kill yourself rather than be taken alive. They do this for two reasons: 1. to reinforce the idea that the Ukrainians are a bunch of Nazis and #2 because a captured Russian is a problem - Russia needs to give the Ukrainians something valuable (a Ukrainian prisoner) in exchange for a captive Russian. If you are dead, then no exchange is necessary (well maybe they can exchange your corpse). The famous Russian maxim, "no person, no problem" applies.

    The Ukrainians OTOH WANT to take prisoners for the exact opposite reasons - it gives them currency that they can use to get their own men back. And Ukraine allows its POW camps to be inspected by the Red Cross because it wants to be seen by its Western partners as abiding by the Geneva Conventions. Russia has not.

    Ukraine has exchanged hundreds of POWs (including many pilots) . It's impossible to prove a negative ("Ukraine is not torturing any pilots to death") but for sure they ain't torturing them all because many have come back in one piece.

    For example, here is an interview by a Ukrainian journalist with a captured Russian pilot:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QQJhtLcW2I

    He was later reported exchanged:

    https://euroweeklynews.com/2022/10/01/russian-pilot-aleksandr-krasnoyartsev-bombed-chernihiv-exchanged-prisoners-of-war/

    Zolkin has interviewed hundreds of Russian prisoners on his channel. A few report having been beaten after they are captured but most say that nothing happened to them and they were treated well. Many were wounded and received medical care in Ukraine (Russia tends to leave the wounded and dead behind.)

    Of course when they return to Russia they are pressured to say otherwise. One of the Wagner captives said a little bit too much in his interview and when he got back, Prigozhin had him executed on camera with a sledge hammer, so the smarter captives are cautious in what they say.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @James B. Shearer

  150. @International Jew
    Sounds like we've given Russia a legitimate reason now to take out our satellites.

    Replies: @BlackFlag

    Anatoly Karlin has been advising that for a while but it looks like Russia is too cautious.

  151. Steve Sailer;

    “Similarly, Thiel’s strategy for modern data-based warfare doesn’t sound that esoteric, but it does seem like it must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century.”

    Steve Sailer, Russia’s accomplishments are outstanding for what they have to work with. The Russian economy is around 7 X smaller than that of the U.S, but they still have the technical wherewithal to not only match but in many cases surpass the best that the American Industrial-military Complex can come up with – atter stealing trillions of Dollars from American taxpayers.

    Might I remind you that Russia(technically the U.S.S.R, I know) beat America at putting a man in space. If this is not impressive to you, consider the following: Russia was the country that suffered the most infra-structure and economic destruction from WW2. They also were a country that had been industrialized for only about 50 years at that point, compared to 150 years for U.S.A. On top of that, the cream of the crop of the German rocket scientists were brought to America under Project Paperclip. Russia got only the second-tier German rocket scientists. And yet, despite all thyese handicaps, *Russia beat America at putting a man in space* .Americans will say that they “won” the space race by putting a man on the Moon, but Russia never had the economic and industrial resources to undergo such a massive project.

    Russians do these things out of a heroic sense of being David Vs Golliath. During WW2, they took on arguably the best militsry that the World has ever seen and, even though they were a borderline Third World country, beat them. It’s hard to estimate the numer of total Russian casualties during that war. Some put it as “little” as 11 million and others as high as 40 million. The most accurate fiigure is around 27 million between civilians and military. That is almost two oders of magnitude more people than America lost at that same war.

    When they see themselves as superpower, Russians become apathetic. Their attitude towards Ukraine is that it is a much smaller and weaker country, so the Ukranians should be reasonable and surrender. After all, the Russians have made it clear to the Ukranians that they see them as more-or-less the same people, and have no desire to do them harm. This is unlike the situation in WW2, where Germans made it clear that they saw slavs like Russians as an inferior race only good enough to be ethnically clensed. So the Russians don’t understand why the Ukranians are not reasonable and surrender. Russia has not even used 1% of it’s military might in this war. They still treat it as a “special military operation”.

    The biggest danger of this war is that the Russians will finally see that they are the underdogs, because they are not fighting just the Ukraine, but the combined might of 30 countries in the form of NATO.

    The moment that the Russians realize that losing this war will mean being reduced to a sattellite state of the U.S in the form of NATO, they will actually declare war not only to Ukraine but to all the countries aiding the Ukraine.

    What will Americans do when Russians actually bomb a NATO base killing thousands of American boys? What will America do when Russia uses it’s legendary long-range heavy artillary, the mightiest that the World has ever seen, to shell eastern European nations that joined NATO and bomb American bases as well?

    Nukes are out of the question for obvious reasons….you don’t want to pull a Nagasaki or Hiroshima against the country that has the World’s largest stockpile of I.C.B.Ms armed with multi-megaton nukes.

    So Amerrica will be forced into a ground war against Russia. There is a joke that military men throughout the World say:

    “The first rule of war is: whatever you do, don’t get into a land war with Russia.”

    America cannot even pacify a few barbarics in Afghanistan. How exactly will America win a land war against the mightiest nation that the World has ever seen when it comes to land warfare? How will an army of trannies and feminists beat the terrifying will of enraged Russian men?

    Your gloating about Russia’s “defeat” in this war is not only premature, but also reveals a completely idiotic level of hubris. You do not want to coner Russians. Ask Napoleon or Hitler what Russians will do to you when they finally decide that play time is over.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @Zero Philosopher

    Ask Napoleon or Hitler what Russians will do to you when they finally decide that play time is over.


    Then again, you may want to consult with Admiral Togo or Katsura Tarō.

  152. Did Steve outsource his SMO comments to Mister Hak?

  153. @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

    Why is it embarrassing if Russia is up against NATO’s weaponry, intelligence, and funding? The only advantage over Ukraine would be population size but of course, the defender is will be able to mobilize a much greater percentage of its able-bodied men. In fact, Ukraine has more soldiers in the field.
    A quagmire should be expected.

  154. @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    The Ukraine, which never had a Putin figure to rein in its oligarchs, is far more corrupt than Russia, and that didn’t seem to impede the Ukraine’s advances this fall. A bigger issue for Russia has probably been its paucity of military spending in recent years:

    Not really what you’d expect to see from a dictator determined to reconstitute the USSR, as some American pundits tell us.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Dave Pinsen

    Putin enriched himself along with the oligarchs he personally supported. It’s all well documented. So stop f—- lying.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2022/03/29/1088886554/how-putin-conquered-russias-oligarchy

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @michael droy
    @Dave Pinsen

    100% right - anyone who claims now not to know that this is a slow artillery war that Ukraine has been consistently losing since the start is a deliberate liar.
    Strip out the "Ukraine is winning" comments in western media and all the rest is about artillery war, russian firing 3 or 10x the shells, Zelensky and co demanding more artillery weaponry, Western promises of more and the next wunder weapon that will out gun Russia.

    That is all the "news" we get amongst the obvious bs.

    Replies: @HA

  155. @Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    "This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces."

    Sources for this? Must be reporters who's provably gone to the front and also pro-Western according to your own standards.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @HA

    Anon[360] wrote to me:[

    Dave] “This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.”

    [Anon] Sources for this? Must be reporters who’s provably gone to the front and also pro-Western according to your own standards.

    I have documented this again and again.

    Click on my name and look through my earlier posts.

    I am frankly sick and tired of playing silly games with guys like you on this.

    Check out my earlier posts and the links therein.

    Or don’t. I don’t care.

    Frankly, I just no longer give a damn about fools like you. I do care about the innocents who are dying.

    The Kiev regime is going to lose, at horrendous cost.

    I hate that: I would like to see an immediate, negotiated peace, as I have said again and again and again.

    But the US Deep State will not allow it.

    And so Ukrainians will die.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    Ah, you're going the far leftist route, where you refuse to give any sources for alleged "ratios/data/facts" etc. It would be even easier for you to just post the sources but apparently you refuse to do so, curious.

    I'm taking this as a tacit admission that you're just making shit completely up now lmfao.

  156. As far as I know, this guy is still considered respectable:

  157. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @SFG

    I'd be a lot more willing to side with the Ukrainians if:

    1. American neocons hadn't installed a hostile regime that openly demanded to join a military alliance aimed squarely at Russia.

    America demands an entire hemisphere as a buffer zone. The least we can do is allow Russia a buffer state.

    2. America's neocon-installed regime didn't attack the ethnically Russian parts of Ukraine.

    3. The United States hadn't spit in the eye of Russia when it asked for assurances that Ukraine would remain neutral.

    Replies: @Chebyshev

    Russia must have done whatever it did to influence the 2016 election because they thought Trump would not be as hostile to them as the other U.S. administrations have been over the last decade or so.

  158. @Cagey Beast
    "..... something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century".

    Western chauvinists can always be counted on to rally round the flag, even if it's a rainbow flag flying beside a BLM one.

    It may be glaringly obvious that we're grossly misgoverned and we're in a civilisational death spiral but at least we're better than the other team, eh?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Dave Pinsen

    You’ve got to give Sailer credit for consistency. He’s opposed Russia on this since the beginning, unlike, say Richard Hanania.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Dave Pinsen

    They're getting bombed because NATO keeps supplying them and encouraging/bribing/blackmailing them to continue the fight. The war would have been over in days had outside countries stayed out.

    , @Cagey Beast
    @Dave Pinsen

    Hanania's argument that "it makes you look like a loser, which is unappealing" suggests that it's about marketing for him. Maybe he'll switch back if the Russians start taking territory?

  159. Something about Ukraine brings out the inner boomer in Southern Californians like Sailor and Victor Davis Hanson.

  160. @Steve Sailer
    @Colin Wright

    The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don't get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.

    Replies: @Colin Wright, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Hapalong Cassidy, @Anonymous, @PhysicistDave

    Steve Sailer wrote to Colin Wright:

    The Russians recognized Ukraine in 1994 and everybody else has too. You don’t get too change your mind and invade another country 28 years later without other countries looking askance.

    Unless of course you are the US Deep State.

    Then you bomb Serbia because you decide that the boundaries of Serbia are going to be reduced by the secession of Kosovo.

    Or you cheer on Saddam Hussein when he tries to conquer part of Iran, but attack him when he goes after Kuwait.

    Or you enable the Kurds to establish de facto independence from Baghdad.

    Or you try to dismantle the country of Syria.

    Or you openly facilitate the secession of Western Ukraine from the legally elected government of Ukraine in 2014, but then arm and encourage the rebel regime to attack and conquer those areas of Eastern Ukraine that were loyal to the legal government.

    Steve, you are they guy who made the phrase “Deep State” famous in the context of the US and who decried the behavior of “Invade the world, invite the world.”

    But somehow you cannot bring yourself to view with open eyes what has actually happened in the world in the last thirty years: the main aggressor, by any standard, has been the US Deep State.

    Not Putin.

    Facts matter.

  161. @Dave Pinsen
    @Cagey Beast

    You've got to give Sailer credit for consistency. He's opposed Russia on this since the beginning, unlike, say Richard Hanania.

    https://twitter.com/NoahCarl90/status/1607463840182304770?s=20&t=OUvqyIdqUjnhUfGXesiq2Q

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Cagey Beast

    They’re getting bombed because NATO keeps supplying them and encouraging/bribing/blackmailing them to continue the fight. The war would have been over in days had outside countries stayed out.

  162. @Dave Pinsen
    @Cagey Beast

    You've got to give Sailer credit for consistency. He's opposed Russia on this since the beginning, unlike, say Richard Hanania.

    https://twitter.com/NoahCarl90/status/1607463840182304770?s=20&t=OUvqyIdqUjnhUfGXesiq2Q

    Replies: @AndrewR, @Cagey Beast

    Hanania’s argument that “it makes you look like a loser, which is unappealing” suggests that it’s about marketing for him. Maybe he’ll switch back if the Russians start taking territory?

  163. @Cagey Beast
    @PhysicistDave

    I agree with your sentiments generally but let's admit Russia has invaded Ukraine and is now fighting Ukrainian nationalists. Even the Russians concede there are militantly anti-Russian Ukrainians in Galicia who they don't want to share a country with.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Cagey Beast wrote to me:

    Even the Russians concede there are militantly anti-Russian Ukrainians in Galicia who they don’t want to share a country with.

    I have said all along that I hope that this ends with a neutralized rump regime in Greater Galicia: yes, it will be a nightmare for all concerned if the Russian Federation ends up having to govern Western Ukraine.

    Unfortunately, I think we have reached the point that Russia cannot be secure until the Zelensky regime is overthrown and West Ukraine is deNazified. That is going to be a mess.

    CB also wrote:

    I agree with your sentiments generally but let’s admit Russia has invaded Ukraine and is now fighting Ukrainian nationalists.

    When Western Ukraine chose to secede from the legally elected government of Ukraine in 2014, at the instigation of the US Deep State, the Donbass, remaining loyal to the legal government of Ukraine, chose not to accede to the new puppet regime.

    They were legally in the right to do that.

    When the puppet regime, for eight long years, engaged in an unprovoked war of aggression against the Donbass, the Donbass pleaded with Russia to aid them. On February 24, 2022, Putin did so.

    That is not an “invasion” of Ukraine, any more than Lafayette et al. “invaded’ the USA by providing us aid against the British imperialists. Putin merely gave military assistance to a neighboring country that was being attacked and invaded by an illegal puppet regime of the US Deep State.

    Completely and totally legal under international law.

    What the US Deep State did was to violate the sovereignty of Ukraine.

    Not legal under international law.

    Facts do matter.

    Even ugly facts that the US regime would like to suppress.

    • Thanks: Bill Jones
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @PhysicistDave


    Completely and totally legal under international law.
     
    I don't think even the BRICS countries go that far. As far as I know they say the Russian invasion of Ukraine was unlawful but with mitigating circumstances. That's my view too. The crucial difference between international law and domestic law is there are no police to call.

    What the US Deep State did was to violate the sovereignty of Ukraine.
     
    The US and its European allies have repeatedly interfered in Ukraine, including backing the Euromaidan coup, turning a blind eye to the "anti-terror" crackdown in Donbass and slow-walking the Minsk II Agreement. They deserve as much blame as Washington.

    That is not an “invasion” of Ukraine, any more than Lafayette et al. “invaded’ the USA by providing us aid against the British imperialists. Putin merely gave military assistance to a neighboring country that was being attacked and invaded by an illegal puppet regime of the US Deep State.
     
    I'm a Canadian of the Tory variety so that comparison doesn't really resonate with me. If anything, the French were supporting a colour revolution in the American colonies in order to mess with their British rivals. Hopefully the Russians and Ukrainians will eventually get along with one another as well as the Americans and Canadians eventually did.
    , @John Johnson
    @PhysicistDave

    When Western Ukraine chose to secede from the legally elected government of Ukraine in 2014, at the instigation of the US Deep State

    Facts do matter.

    Yes facts do matter and there was never a secession by the government of Ukraine.

    They removed a pro-Russian president who broke the law and has been convicted of treason. He never denied the charges and fled to Russia.

    If Biden was convicted of treason would you argue that he should stay for the sake of democracy?

    Not legal under international law.

    It's not legal under Ukrainian law to take tens of millions in bribes from a foreign country. They used to hang people for doing that.

    Not even Putin disputed the charges. It was a clear case of corruption and in service of a foreign country which means treason.

    His corruption was outrageous:
    https://eurasianet.org/a-brief-history-of-corruption-in-ukraine-the-yanukovych-era

    He is also accused of having protestors shot:
    https://www.newsweek.com/ukraine-protesters-shot-under-direct-leadership-yanukovich-243771

    If Biden did anything like that I doubt you would take his side just because he was elected.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  164. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymo

    "Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?"

    I met a Ukrainian "defense expert" who owned the single nicest piece of land I've seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else's country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians -- ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else's country?

    Replies: @Anonymo, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Colin Wright, @TWS, @PhysicistDave, @YetAnotherAnon, @Redman

    No I don’t think they are fighting more bravely . They are fighting for far longer and some are actual Nazis (the Azov battalion says ‘hi’). I’m guessing the Russian air force is not suicidal that’s why we don’t see them much.

    But the Afghans had no air force and chased us with the most powerful air assets in the world out of their country.

    Might be an actual question you could ask without swallowing whatever the MSM is feeding you.

    You know the same folks who admitted to lying to us for at least six years because the Orange Man was so very bad.

  165. @Mr. Anon

    … “The power of advanced algorithmic warfare systems is now so great that it equates to having tactical nuclear weapons against an adversary with only conventional ones,” explains Alex Karp, chief executive of Palantir, in an email message. “The general public tends to underestimate this. Our adversaries no longer do.” …
     
    So we've tipped our hand in some bulls**t war about tactics that might be used in a real one. Chalk one up for us!

    Palantir, which began its corporate life working with the CIA on counterterrorism tools, has many critics. That’s partly because its biggest funder, from the start, has been co-founder Peter Thiel, a successful tech investor who has also been a strong supporter of Donald Trump and other MAGA Republicans. Karp, by contrast, has supported many Democratic candidates and causes.

    I've never heard anyone give a cogent explanation as to why the CIA gets to have it's own venture capital firm. Can the Navy open up a chain of hot-dog stands? Can the Department of the Interior run "gentleman's clubs"?

    Thiel, Karp, Republican, Democrat.....................it's all the same team. And it isn't our team.

    Replies: @epebble, @anonymous, @Mike Tre

    A Palantir was a communication device similar to a crystal ball found in Tolkien’s works. The problem being that several were acquired by Sauran and used against the realms of men.

    That doesn’t give me a warm fuzzy.

    “Can the Department of the Interior run “gentleman’s clubs”?”

    I’m pretty sure the Clinton era Secret Service were found to have this entrepreneurial spirit.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Mike Tre


    A Palantir was a communication device similar to a crystal ball found in Tolkien’s works. The problem being that several were acquired by Sauran and used against the realms of men.
     
    Yeah. Their use of the term is.................interesting. The Palantir was the means by which Sauron corrupted the mind of Saruman and made a pawn of him.

    Is that the team that the CIA identifies with? Team Sauron?

    I’m pretty sure the Clinton era Secret Service were found to have this entrepreneurial spirit.
     
    During the 1970s sometime, the US Government acquired a topless bar (in D.C., I think) after some kind of prosecution and asset seizure. For a period of time, it was actually run by the GSA. I couldn't find a link to it, but I remember hearing about it somewhere (I think it was on Louis Rukeyser's Wall Street Week in Review).
  166. @PhysicistDave
    @Cagey Beast

    Cagey Beast wrote to me:


    Even the Russians concede there are militantly anti-Russian Ukrainians in Galicia who they don’t want to share a country with.
     
    I have said all along that I hope that this ends with a neutralized rump regime in Greater Galicia: yes, it will be a nightmare for all concerned if the Russian Federation ends up having to govern Western Ukraine.

    Unfortunately, I think we have reached the point that Russia cannot be secure until the Zelensky regime is overthrown and West Ukraine is deNazified. That is going to be a mess.

    CB also wrote:

    I agree with your sentiments generally but let’s admit Russia has invaded Ukraine and is now fighting Ukrainian nationalists.
     
    When Western Ukraine chose to secede from the legally elected government of Ukraine in 2014, at the instigation of the US Deep State, the Donbass, remaining loyal to the legal government of Ukraine, chose not to accede to the new puppet regime.

    They were legally in the right to do that.

    When the puppet regime, for eight long years, engaged in an unprovoked war of aggression against the Donbass, the Donbass pleaded with Russia to aid them. On February 24, 2022, Putin did so.

    That is not an "invasion" of Ukraine, any more than Lafayette et al. "invaded' the USA by providing us aid against the British imperialists. Putin merely gave military assistance to a neighboring country that was being attacked and invaded by an illegal puppet regime of the US Deep State.

    Completely and totally legal under international law.

    What the US Deep State did was to violate the sovereignty of Ukraine.

    Not legal under international law.

    Facts do matter.

    Even ugly facts that the US regime would like to suppress.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @John Johnson

    Completely and totally legal under international law.

    I don’t think even the BRICS countries go that far. As far as I know they say the Russian invasion of Ukraine was unlawful but with mitigating circumstances. That’s my view too. The crucial difference between international law and domestic law is there are no police to call.

    What the US Deep State did was to violate the sovereignty of Ukraine.

    The US and its European allies have repeatedly interfered in Ukraine, including backing the Euromaidan coup, turning a blind eye to the “anti-terror” crackdown in Donbass and slow-walking the Minsk II Agreement. They deserve as much blame as Washington.

    That is not an “invasion” of Ukraine, any more than Lafayette et al. “invaded’ the USA by providing us aid against the British imperialists. Putin merely gave military assistance to a neighboring country that was being attacked and invaded by an illegal puppet regime of the US Deep State.

    I’m a Canadian of the Tory variety so that comparison doesn’t really resonate with me. If anything, the French were supporting a colour revolution in the American colonies in order to mess with their British rivals. Hopefully the Russians and Ukrainians will eventually get along with one another as well as the Americans and Canadians eventually did.

  167. @Steve Sailer
    @TWS

    "Maybe, perhaps, doing victory laps is premature for anyone?"

    Like Putin announcing that Russia had annexed Kherson and three other provinces of Ukraine?

    Replies: @TWS

    I missed where he said the war was over or mission accomplished. Of course maybe you could put down the pom-poms for a minute. Might improve your vision.

    If you’re going to do a ‘Jack’ impersonation on your own blog you could save everyone the trouble maybe just fundraise for whomever pays his bills

  168. @Anonymo
    @Steve Sailer

    Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?

    The two countries are so similar, one would imagine they’d be similar in this way too (It’s these similarities that make the war seem more tragic). Otherwise, if they differ in this, how did Ukraine get the Magic Dirt and Russia the Tragic Dirt?

    Also, maybe Putin conceived of a limited strike such as in Ukraine 2014 or Georgia 2008. That possibility is obviously off the table.

    Do you take seriously Putin’s claims about the mistreatment of ethnic Russians in the Donbass? In the Georgian example, he displayed himself willing to protect ethnic Russians under attack, if I understand correctly.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @John Johnson

    Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?

    No because Ukraine and Russia are not the same country. Ukraine is half-Western while Russia is full Slavic corruption.

    It seems that everyone in Russia has been lying to Putin and themselves.

    They weren’t ready for this war and they don’t even have enough winter boots and armor to go around.

    Putin and his fake military commanders don’t know what they are doing. Look at the way these Russian conscripts run around:
    https://funker530.com/video/ukrainian-artillery-brackets-and-destroys-russian-platoon/

    No armor support and just running around like teenagers at a concert.

    Look at how they bunch up in that video. They’re not even following the basics of combat.

    Putin is taking random men and just dumping them on the front. He may be good at keeping power but he is clueless when it comes to war. They are ignoring lessons from both WW1 and WW2. In WW1 they learned quickly to not bunch up in a field when under artillery attack.

    Do you take seriously Putin’s claims about the mistreatment of ethnic Russians in the Donbass?

    I certainly don’t. First he decreed LPR/DPR to be independent countries and they have been since taken as Russian territory. The militias are mostly dead as they were sent to the front.

    If Donbas was truly the cause of the war then he would have tried negotiating first. He in fact cut off all diplomatic ties with Ukraine. The leaked plans show that he planned on taking Ukraine and then moving on to Moldova. He only claimed the war was about Donbas after he failed to take Kiev. In his original speech he claimed it was about NATO even though Ukraine didn’t have the votes of France or Germany.

    Putin is just plain full of shit. Just because our media supports Ukraine doesn’t make him any less of a weasel.

  169. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    That's the point I'm making: it's less superweapons you can cheer in Red Square that matter for modern warfare, but a whole lot of boring systems integration toil. That's what let the US establish complete air supremacy over the Iraqis in 1991 with their Soviet weapons. And it's not wholly coincidental that the Soviet Union itself collapsed eight months later.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @SunBakedSuburb, @Mike Tre

    “That’s what let the US establish complete air supremacy over the Iraqis in 1991 with their Soviet weapons. ”

    You mean it had nothing to do with the quality of pilots facing off against one another?

  170. @PhysicistDave
    @Cagey Beast

    Cagey Beast wrote to me:


    Even the Russians concede there are militantly anti-Russian Ukrainians in Galicia who they don’t want to share a country with.
     
    I have said all along that I hope that this ends with a neutralized rump regime in Greater Galicia: yes, it will be a nightmare for all concerned if the Russian Federation ends up having to govern Western Ukraine.

    Unfortunately, I think we have reached the point that Russia cannot be secure until the Zelensky regime is overthrown and West Ukraine is deNazified. That is going to be a mess.

    CB also wrote:

    I agree with your sentiments generally but let’s admit Russia has invaded Ukraine and is now fighting Ukrainian nationalists.
     
    When Western Ukraine chose to secede from the legally elected government of Ukraine in 2014, at the instigation of the US Deep State, the Donbass, remaining loyal to the legal government of Ukraine, chose not to accede to the new puppet regime.

    They were legally in the right to do that.

    When the puppet regime, for eight long years, engaged in an unprovoked war of aggression against the Donbass, the Donbass pleaded with Russia to aid them. On February 24, 2022, Putin did so.

    That is not an "invasion" of Ukraine, any more than Lafayette et al. "invaded' the USA by providing us aid against the British imperialists. Putin merely gave military assistance to a neighboring country that was being attacked and invaded by an illegal puppet regime of the US Deep State.

    Completely and totally legal under international law.

    What the US Deep State did was to violate the sovereignty of Ukraine.

    Not legal under international law.

    Facts do matter.

    Even ugly facts that the US regime would like to suppress.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @John Johnson

    When Western Ukraine chose to secede from the legally elected government of Ukraine in 2014, at the instigation of the US Deep State

    Facts do matter.

    Yes facts do matter and there was never a secession by the government of Ukraine.

    They removed a pro-Russian president who broke the law and has been convicted of treason. He never denied the charges and fled to Russia.

    If Biden was convicted of treason would you argue that he should stay for the sake of democracy?

    Not legal under international law.

    It’s not legal under Ukrainian law to take tens of millions in bribes from a foreign country. They used to hang people for doing that.

    Not even Putin disputed the charges. It was a clear case of corruption and in service of a foreign country which means treason.

    His corruption was outrageous:
    https://eurasianet.org/a-brief-history-of-corruption-in-ukraine-the-yanukovych-era

    He is also accused of having protestors shot:
    https://www.newsweek.com/ukraine-protesters-shot-under-direct-leadership-yanukovich-243771

    If Biden did anything like that I doubt you would take his side just because he was elected.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @John Johnson

    My favorite Fed John Johnson wrote to me:


    Yes facts do matter and there was never a secession by the government of Ukraine.
     
    No, of course, the government did not secede.

    The legal, elected government was overthrown, and the US puppet regime was installed in its place.

    The Fed also asked me:

    If Biden was convicted of treason would you argue that he should stay for the sake of democracy?
     
    Biden was not elected in accord with Article II, section 1 of the US Constitution. Obviously, he is de facto President of the US, but not de jure.

    And Biden publicly confessed to selling out US foreign policy in the business interests of his son.

    Since he is a traitor to the United States and was never elected President under the provisions of the US Constitution, I think the only place Biden should "stay" is federal prison.

    Pending his execution for treason, of course.

    The same way I feel about the traitor to Ukraine, who has sold out his own people for money from the US Deep State, Zelensky.

    I agree with Jack Kennedy: the US Deep State needs to be shattered into a million pieces and scattered to the winds.

    And similarly for its illegal puppet regime in Kiev.
  171. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Steve is Americans First. Your questions should have that orientation, and you should wonder which Americans. I honestly don't know the answers, but I do know he's better than Tucker Carlson -- and that there is no one better.

    Frankly, Israel and Palestine are not our concerns.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Telimektar, @Colin Wright, @Redman

    When the US makes endless wars for Israel’s interest, destroying the Middle East and Libya with millions of its people (and Africans through Libya) then coming to Europe, that certainly is my concern since I leave in Europe.

  172. @Hypnotoad666
    @Corvinus

    But then you end up being wrong about most things anyway.

    Replies: @Old Prude, @Corvinus

    You’re all tired up in knots. The fact of the matter is that you and others HAVE to perpetuate the lie that all or most media content is Fake News. The world doesn’t work that way, as evident by Ron Unz’s moment of truth.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Corvinus


    The fact of the matter is that you and others HAVE to perpetuate the lie that all or most media content is Fake News.
     
    No one is saying that every single fact reported in the MSM is false and that the truth is always exactly 180 degrees to the opposite. Rather, everything the MSM reports that impacts one of their sacred Narratives is propaganda to support that narrative. Propaganda is obviously not always factually false. Instead, propaganda consists of: (a) emphasizing any true facts that arguably support your narrative; (b) covering up and avoiding the true facts that contradict your narrative; (c) reporting some false facts that support your narrative (easily attributed to anonymous sources); and, finally (and most importantly), (d) spin, arguments, assumptions, and assertions that reinforce your narrative.

    For example, it's a true fact that the Ukrainians went on the offensive in September and took over some land in Kharkov oblast. The Narrative is: Russians are evil and incompetent and Ukraine is always winning the war and will therefore eventually prevail. So the propaganda machine reports this true fact of a map change. But it omits the true fact that Ukraine's main offensive effort in Kherson was a debacle in which they lost all the material and troops they put together with western help over six months. It also ignores the true fact that the Russians deliberately withdrew tactically because they didn't have enough troops deployed (now remedied by their mobilization), and that occupying cow country does nothing to help Ukraine win the war.

    But most importantly the MSM is lockstep in spinning this change in the front lines as a self-evidently game-changing victory for Ukraine that proves the Narrative. And just endlessly repeating that non-sequitur conclusion as if it's an established fact is more than enough to mislead both low-information, trusting normies as well as slightly more sophisticated people who are already primed to believe the Narrative. So the specific facts aren't inaccurate per se. But it's still a false propaganda narrative that is 180 degrees from the reality on the battlefield.

    The identical propaganda process applies to all of the MSM's sacred Narratives: e.g., Covid is a deadly threat to everyone, who all need 100% safe and effective vaxx shots and infinite boosters; Election fraud is impossible; Global Warming is an imminent crisis that justifies any cost to remedy; Systemic Racism is responsible for all black people problems; etc., etc.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  173. @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer


    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.
     
    The Ukraine, which never had a Putin figure to rein in its oligarchs, is far more corrupt than Russia, and that didn't seem to impede the Ukraine's advances this fall. A bigger issue for Russia has probably been its paucity of military spending in recent years:

    https://specials-images.forbesimg.com/imageserve/60890da04d91e45a7160b853/960x0.jpg?fit=scale

    Not really what you'd expect to see from a dictator determined to reconstitute the USSR, as some American pundits tell us.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @michael droy

    Putin enriched himself along with the oligarchs he personally supported. It’s all well documented. So stop f—- lying.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2022/03/29/1088886554/how-putin-conquered-russias-oligarchy

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Corvinus


    Putin enriched himself along with the oligarchs he personally supported. It’s all well documented. So stop f—- lying.
     
    Was your programming updated to permit the use of profanity to mimic outrage?

    Dave Pinsen didn't say that Russia wasn't corrupt. He said that it wasn't more corrupt than Ukraine. Which of the two is more corrupt is arguable. Prior to the war, Ukraine and Russia were routinely cited as the two most corrupt countries in Europe.

    So stop f—- lying.
     
    He then goes on to cite NPR as a source.

    Nobody cares what you think, you contemptible nitwit. Especially given that you don't think; you just parrot whatever drivel you hear on NPR.
  174. Anonymous[194] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ron Unz
    That WashPost piece seems like pure corporate propaganda, mixed with in with the anti-Russkie type. Maybe it's accurate but maybe it isn't, and I don't have enough knowledge to decide. But here's a portion of a comment that I left on a different thread last month that still seems relevant:

    As I’ve emphasized, I haven’t been closely following the operational-level fighting in Ukraine, partly because I just don’t consider it very important. Maybe Macgregor is correct and the reinforced Russians will eventually sweep aside the severely weakened Ukrainians once the ground freezes, and maybe not. A thousand or so square miles of territory doesn’t seem that big a deal to me one way or the other, though obviously the Russians have deep ideological attachment to the issue.

    Meanwhile, as I’d emphasized, America has suffered a serious of gigantic geopolitical strategic defeats. Germany and many of the other leading European economies have been devastated by the loss of Russian energy. The Chinese have become rock-solid Russian allies as have the Iranians. Saudi Arabia has now shifted towards the Russians, and India seems to be moving in the same direction. To me, losing Saudi Arabia and maybe India counts for much more than who controls some godforsaken Ukrainian town named Kherson, which I’d never even heard of.

    Ultra-establishmentarian Foreign Affairs just published a major article saying that maybe America will have to fight a simultaneous global war against both China and Russia, something which has been the absolute worst nightmare of American geopolitical strategists for many decades…

    Another example. Russian hackers have supposedly now obtained proof that the British and Americans collaborated in destroying the Russian-German Nord Stream pipelines. As huge energy prices continue to devastate the European economies and Europeans begin freezing this winter, that might easily mean the collapse of NATO. The collapse of NATO is a bigger deal than whether or not the Russians successfully seize a few more square miles of Ukrainian territory.

    The USSR had a gigantic, powerful army in Europe throughout the 1980s, and it was never defeated militarily. The USSR fell because it suffered economic, ideological, and geopolitical defeats, all on the strategic level. That’s exactly the situation our own USSA currently faces.

    It was from an article in which I discussed these issues at greater length:

    https://www.unz.com/runz/world-war-iii-and-world-war-ii/
     
    https://www.unz.com/mwhitney/putins-conundrum/#comment-5709607

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thanks for that, Ron. I read your article from which you drew your comment… and agree.

    The rulers of the USA (not the politicians, I mean the people who ultimately control Biden’s teleprompter) seem to be overplaying their hand. This seems to be a general trend in the West, a general “unseriousness”. Irrespective of the origins and explanations for WWII, amongst the population there seems to have been a practicality and seriousness about that time or growing up in that time, enforced by the conditions of war and war economy, that persisted for most of the lifetimes of the baby boomers.

    The Cold War prolonged and retained that sense of practicality until 1990.

    In the absence of that sort of existential threat with the relatively brief “unipolar world” (unipolar if the great equalizer of nukes was ignored) there seems to be a lack of strategic vision and practicality to the whole affair. It’s a “let’s do more of the same, but amplified (more so than the other courtiers)” rather than the result of asking questions like “What do we ultimately want? Why do we want it? How will that benefit us? What is that likely to achieve?”

    It seems that momentum from the Frankfurt School has persisted. One would think that after 100 years, a review of the strategic aims of the goals of the FS would be in order. The white goyim now less than 10% of the world’s population… are they the “big bad” still? for example. Are the old tribal enmities the most important thing at stake now? e.g. Russia, Ukraine.

    I too have been watching Sachs, Douglas MacGregor, Mearsheimer, Gabbard, and Tucker on youtube. I am not sure what is true and what will ultimately come to be.

    However, I do believe that Russia has a 3:1 population advantage of Ukraine, a similar people. If it just came down to Russia and Ukraine in a vacuum, I think Russia would have won already. But the USA has decided that it wants to fight a proxy war.

    Due to the proximity and the fact that the ultimate backstop is nukes, I believe that Russia wants it more than NATO and are prepared to get it. I am not sure with the destruction of the Nordsteam pipeline, the USA will be able to repair the damage to its own credibility there. But ultimately in a battle of wills, this war is on Russia’s borders, and a year ago none of us knew what a Kherson, Mariupol or a Bakhmut was. One would think that this was not the case for many Russians. (Steve would likely say that Ukraine wants it more because it is defending their own country… but did they really want the Eastern, Russian ethnic areas that were in their country when they were shelling them?)

    For the Russian, Ukraine potentially joining NATO crossed a red line. After decades of F(*&ing Around, the USA is finally going to “Find out”.

    More accurately…

    The original police action style operation was enough to work if Ukraine was willing/allowed to negotiate. It’s a bit like discussing actions with your children. “Do you want to do this the easy way, or do you want to do this the hard way?” Sometimes they choose the hard way. And that’s ok, the hard way works also. The easy way would have been a negotiated peace with minimal Ukrainian territory loss (just the ethnic Russian areas), no NATO ever for the rump Ukraine state.

    What this means is that now Russia will ask the question, what do we have to do in order to secure our strategic aims? Now that we are going to conduct a proper war, what is the best bang per buck achievable militarily? Might that be the entire coastal access of Ukraine, of course the Russian areas… maybe some other key things.

    The time span will be years, potentially. Even decades. It might mean making winters very uncomfortable for the Ukrainian populace. It can mean holding the existing lines while training and building the force required to accomplish the goals of a proper war. You can take time though. Eventually the USA forgets why it fights a war in a far-flung state. Good, fast, cheap, pick any two. So in a war where Russia can potentially take its time, they would take longer and do it more inexpensively. Every Russian war is not WWII, a meat grinder of existential threat.

    In fact, if I was looking at this strategically from the Russian perspective, we see that:
    1) US lacks multi-decadal patience for long, intractable proxy wars far from home.
    2) A key driver of US foreign policy is defense spending. They love a conflict that is going to consume a lot of materiel. But eventually the US tires of it, see 1.

    So you fight this in a way that is going to consume the US coffers in a way that doesn’t cause strategic harm to your own side, minimizes your own casualties and economic losses, and be prepared to do that for a decade or two if you can’t achieve shorter term victory. Eventually there is goint to be some other squirrel that diverts the US attention.

    I am also not sure why there is this focus on air power, why it should be used. Ukraine does not have appreciable air power. There is no compelling reason for Russia to use its air assets if it can accomplish its goals with ground forces.

    I often agree with Steve (even on COVID) but don’t always agree, and it seems I differ on the current war in Ukraine. We’ll see what happens I guess.

    • Thanks: Bill Jones, Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymous

    "There is no compelling reason for Russia to use its air assets if it can accomplish its goals with ground forces."

    So Russia could use its mighty air power to win this war more easily, but instead they're mostly letting the air force sit it out to make the war more of a fair fight for the poor Ukrainians.

    Right.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Anonymous

    You might add The Greeks at The Duran and Brian Berletic at The New Atlas to your sources.
    Dima at military summary channel's worth it if you have the time.

    Brian's good on why the Russians are fighting the way they are and takes it back to what the goals are.
    Hint, you won't find it on Kagan News.

  175. @John Johnson
    @Corvinus


    “But 99% of people dont have the energy or ability to do that.”
     
    That’s a patently anti-white statement. We whites have the IQ and resolve to scrutinize data, to parse out information, and to draw conclusions. How dare you impugn European white Americans and their civilization building thought processes. You have no shame. Are you also implying YOU are part of the one percent elite who does have this “energy”?

    You are being facetious but he is correct and it's not a simple matter of intelligence.

    The smartest White man I know watches Fox all the time and completely buys into it. He really believes that Pelosi is a full fledged Communist and schemes with Biden to destroy capitalism. Here in reality both Pelosi and Biden are multi-millionaires and live very lavish lifestyles. Biden in fact has not gone after top tax rates on the wealthy and only partially moved back corporate income tax rates from the Trump era. He also hasn't gone after the capital gains loophole nor has he gone after individual offshoring scams. Yea a real Communist.

    White people can be intelligent but they are also prone to modernism and believing what they want to be true.

    It was pointed out in the 1920s that the flaw of Whites was their desire to appear metropolitan. They want to appear to have the answers more than they actually want to understand a problem.

    Fox News watchers *want to believe* that the government is the problem and CNN watchers are convinced that fewer Whites are the solution. Most Whites pick a side and that includes most intelligent Whites. That is the reality and I remember a psych study that suggested only around 1% of Americans can sift through what they see in political media. Purely from experience I would guess around 2-3%. Definitely not 5% or greater.

    Interestingly the CIA determined that only around 1% of the population has the potential to become political leaders. They used that information when trying to undermine Communist revolutions.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “You are being facetious but he is correct and it’s not a simple matter of intelligence“

    No, I’m being serious. It’s an absolutely anti-white statement on his part. He makes up an arbitrary percentage and proceeds to denigrate the critical thinking ability of whites. And you come to his defense. It’s sickening.

    “Purely from experience I would guess around 2-3%. Definitely not 5% or greater“

    Essentially, that is your opinion.

    “and I remember a psych study that suggested only around 1% of Americans”

    Wait, I thought we can’t trust social studies data. Because leftist agenda. So now you’re relying on something you THINK you remember as evidence? Find the source. Link it. Then we can figure out its context.

    “Interestingly the CIA determined that only around 1% of the population has the potential to become political leaders.”

    Lol, now you’re citing the Deep State? How do you know that’s accurate? What makes you trust this information? Do you even have a citation?

    So you’re saying we can’t trust the media nor the CIA…but you use them as evidence to support your assertions. Do you even comprehend the hypocrisy here?

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Corvinus


    “You are being facetious but he is correct and it’s not a simple matter of intelligence“

     

    No, I’m being serious. It’s an absolutely anti-white statement on his part. He makes up an arbitrary percentage and proceeds to denigrate the critical thinking ability of whites. And you come to his defense. It’s sickening.

    How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.

    Where are these critical thinkers? Democrats cheered a stroke victim over a doctor and the Republicans tried putting in a football player with zero experience into the Senate. They didn't even bother to do any background checks on him.

    Do tell which televised political program caters to critical thinkers.


    “Interestingly the CIA determined that only around 1% of the population has the potential to become political leaders.”
     
    Lol, now you’re citing the Deep State? How do you know that’s accurate? What makes you trust this information? Do you even have a citation?

    The KGB reached the same conclusion. It's in the Yuri Bezmenov interviews.

    Most people are not interested in politics and of those that are only a very small percentage are capable of independent thought and taking a leadership role.

    Yuri in fact outlined how they would exploit "useful idiots" (educated idealists) while looking for the real potential leaders to eliminate. I can probably dig up the interview if you want.

    Romans and Greeks reached similar conclusions. Plato believed that Western society should be governed by a small elite that lies to everyone else about the reality of unequal ability. If you want a source you can read The Republic.

    I'm not saying I agree with them. But Whites as a group are not inclined towards critical thinking. They are only better than other groups when pressed. Most Whites would rather be told what is the correct view rather than seek it. I saw this in college and it was quite depressing. The prof would present a political view as the truth and anyone that asked questions would be viewed by most students as being anti-social or needlessly disruptive.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  176. This is reminiscent of when the Soviets realized in the 1980s that they were way behind in terms of both electronic hardware and software systems integration for aerial combat.

    I’m way late to the party … which I can see has predictably devolved into all the usual nonsense.

    Amidst this giant cluster, I think there are a few lessons:

    1) Get nukes.
    If Ukraine had nukes, Russia would not have attacked, not bothered with all badgering and pecking. Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Germany, Poland, Finland … Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia … Texas, Florida, Greater Idaho … basically anyone thinking there is a potential pain-in-the-ass adversary willing to mess with it, would be wise to nuke up. It’s not pretty, but it’s the #1 lesson falling out here– “nuke up!”

    2) Russia isn’t all that.
    There was always a question as to whether Russia under Putin had recovered and more or less had its shit together. I don’t blame any Russian soldier for not wanting to fight in this pointless war. But I think the overall message of the screwups, is Russia “No, Russia does not have its act together yet.” They’ve got scale, but still do not get what they should out of that scale.

    3) Ukraine is a real nation.
    Not my patch to worry about, but I really expected Ukraine to fold up and Putin to take what he wanted. Or turn the whole joint into Belarus. But a whole bunch of Ukrainians really had the “screw that, f them” attitude and came out to fight.

    4) Western technology is still vastly superior.
    There was always a question during the Cold War–which Steve alludes to–about the actual fighting capability of the Soviets. Not their nukes, but whether they could really send their tanks through the Fulda Gap. It’s one thing to beat up on Hungarian or Czech college students, another to attack Western armies, even if nominally they have a numerical advantage. Different propagandists pushed different narratives for different reasons. (Ideology, more spending!, etc.)

    When all was said and done, I think it was clear, the Soviets while a nuclear equal, were not really equal in terms of the actual operation of conventional forces. In part due to leadership, organization and training, but mostly Western technological–mostly electronic–superiority.

    Even with their screwups and morale issues, Russia made significant progress early. But when the Ukrainians started getting Western weapons they were able to turn it around and start making progress despite the Russian numerical advantage.

    The “special sauce” of the West the past 500 has been the “scientific revolution”. The idea that ideas can and should be continually subject to empirical check/verification. Minoritarianism has utterly devasted that in the human, social, political realm. Mind numbing denial of basic biological and social realities rules the day. But in the technological the West still seems to be holding out. (Though for how much longer?)

    5) Putin is rash and not as smart and calculating as I’d thought.
    This was just a huge unnecessary own goal. Really dumb.

    6) Putin is about as contemptuous of the Russian people as Western elites are of their people.
    There wasn’t any doubt that Putin’s primary interest was not the welfare of the Russian people, more “Russia big” and personally being a big swinging dick. (This is a guy who fought to keep Chechnya in Russia. And has done nothing about the illegals from the ‘stans or raising the Russian birthrate, to counter the looming Muslimification.) But generally, I didn’t think Putin had the contempt for Russians. But no. While he’s not as implacable hostile to their own people’s interests as Western elites, he’s pretty damn close in not giving a shit.

    Decent leadership–leaders who actually care about their nation’s people and work hard in their interests–are exceeding rare in the world today.

    • Agree: Mr. Anon, CalCooledge, Pixo
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad


    When all was said and done, I think it was clear, the Soviets while a nuclear equal, were not really equal in terms of the actual operation of conventional forces. In part due to leadership, organization and training, but mostly Western technological–mostly electronic–superiority.
     
    What you say is all true, but it would be foolish to extrapolate from this war to any potential future war, especially one fought on Russian soil. Russia has always been militarily inferior to the West. And they have always gotten shellacked in the opening of most any war they fight. But they often come back in the second act to impose a lot of hardship on their adversaries - against the French in the Napoleonic Wars, against the Austrians in WWI, against the Germans in WWII.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

  177. @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

    “Where’s the Russian Air Force? Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?”

    Its planes keep getting shot down if they fly low enough to really qualify as air cover. So instead, they just drop bombs on large city centers.

    Yesterday’s second attack on Engels, deep inside Russia (Engels is 1100 km away from Kyiv, whereas the distance from Kyiv to Moscow is only about a 900 km), resulted in a couple more jets being put out of commission. It was especially embarrassing for the Russians, given that Dec 26th is the anniversary of the founding of the Russian air force. Some of the planes that were left were reportedly moved to Ukrainka, in Russia’s far East, indicating that there’s not much confidence in Moscow that any of their air fields that might be useful for shelling Ukrainians are safe at this point.

    Ukraine officially took no responsibility for the attack, and they are officially not permitted to use American tech to target Russian territory, so, as rumor would have it, the Ukrainians refurbished a Soviet-era plane to serve as a drone.

    Some Russian stooges have managed to find a usable vein in their scarred up bodies in which to inject another syringe of copium about how Russia can’t lose any more territory because they’re now solidly fortified. That might have made for genuine consolation in WWII, but fake dragon’s teeth, or whatever else counts as “fortifications” to a regime that can’t even supply ammunition to Bakhmut (which Zelensky used as a photo-op before heading to DC), aren’t really going to prevent those drones and HIMARs from doing what they’re designed to do, Then again, the beauty of copium is that it doesn’t need to make all that much sense.

  178. @Corvinus
    @Dave Pinsen

    Putin enriched himself along with the oligarchs he personally supported. It’s all well documented. So stop f—- lying.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2022/03/29/1088886554/how-putin-conquered-russias-oligarchy

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Putin enriched himself along with the oligarchs he personally supported. It’s all well documented. So stop f—- lying.

    Was your programming updated to permit the use of profanity to mimic outrage?

    Dave Pinsen didn’t say that Russia wasn’t corrupt. He said that it wasn’t more corrupt than Ukraine. Which of the two is more corrupt is arguable. Prior to the war, Ukraine and Russia were routinely cited as the two most corrupt countries in Europe.

    So stop f—- lying.

    He then goes on to cite NPR as a source.

    Nobody cares what you think, you contemptible nitwit. Especially given that you don’t think; you just parrot whatever drivel you hear on NPR.

  179. @Kim

    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don't seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven't been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YZW8oMo8Irk

    Replies: @meh, @Bill Jones, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @GAnon

    what is the basis of the claim?

    1. If the Russians were making an “honest effort” then they wouldn’t have to buy drones from Iran. Brezhnev would have been ashamed to buy drones from Iran.

    2. An example of a DIShonest effort is the Russian Orlan drone which the Russian Army bought at a reported cost of $100k/ unit. It was made up of various off the shelf parts such as a Canon DSLR camera with the focus ring glued stationary, a soda bottle for a gas tank, a motor that you can buy on Aliexpress and so on:

    https://dronexl.co/2022/04/12/russian-orlan-10-drone-canon-camera/

    All of these parts together cost well under $10,000, leaving a good $90, 000 for investing in London or LA real estate.

    • Thanks: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote to Kim:


    All of these parts together cost well under $10,000, leaving a good $90, 000 for investing in London or LA real estate.
     
    Whereas, the US military-industrial complex would never, ever over-price by a factor of ten or a hundred, right, Jack?

    I worked for the US MIC for a number of years. I know the truth.

    You don't?

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  180. @AnotherDad

    This is reminiscent of when the Soviets realized in the 1980s that they were way behind in terms of both electronic hardware and software systems integration for aerial combat.
     
    I'm way late to the party ... which I can see has predictably devolved into all the usual nonsense.

    Amidst this giant cluster, I think there are a few lessons:


    1) Get nukes.
    If Ukraine had nukes, Russia would not have attacked, not bothered with all badgering and pecking. Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Germany, Poland, Finland ... Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia ... Texas, Florida, Greater Idaho ... basically anyone thinking there is a potential pain-in-the-ass adversary willing to mess with it, would be wise to nuke up. It's not pretty, but it's the #1 lesson falling out here-- "nuke up!"


    2) Russia isn't all that.
    There was always a question as to whether Russia under Putin had recovered and more or less had its shit together. I don't blame any Russian soldier for not wanting to fight in this pointless war. But I think the overall message of the screwups, is Russia "No, Russia does not have its act together yet." They've got scale, but still do not get what they should out of that scale.


    3) Ukraine is a real nation.
    Not my patch to worry about, but I really expected Ukraine to fold up and Putin to take what he wanted. Or turn the whole joint into Belarus. But a whole bunch of Ukrainians really had the "screw that, f them" attitude and came out to fight.


    4) Western technology is still vastly superior.
    There was always a question during the Cold War--which Steve alludes to--about the actual fighting capability of the Soviets. Not their nukes, but whether they could really send their tanks through the Fulda Gap. It's one thing to beat up on Hungarian or Czech college students, another to attack Western armies, even if nominally they have a numerical advantage. Different propagandists pushed different narratives for different reasons. (Ideology, more spending!, etc.)

    When all was said and done, I think it was clear, the Soviets while a nuclear equal, were not really equal in terms of the actual operation of conventional forces. In part due to leadership, organization and training, but mostly Western technological--mostly electronic--superiority.

    Even with their screwups and morale issues, Russia made significant progress early. But when the Ukrainians started getting Western weapons they were able to turn it around and start making progress despite the Russian numerical advantage.

    The "special sauce" of the West the past 500 has been the "scientific revolution". The idea that ideas can and should be continually subject to empirical check/verification. Minoritarianism has utterly devasted that in the human, social, political realm. Mind numbing denial of basic biological and social realities rules the day. But in the technological the West still seems to be holding out. (Though for how much longer?)


    5) Putin is rash and not as smart and calculating as I'd thought.
    This was just a huge unnecessary own goal. Really dumb.


    6) Putin is about as contemptuous of the Russian people as Western elites are of their people.
    There wasn't any doubt that Putin's primary interest was not the welfare of the Russian people, more "Russia big" and personally being a big swinging dick. (This is a guy who fought to keep Chechnya in Russia. And has done nothing about the illegals from the 'stans or raising the Russian birthrate, to counter the looming Muslimification.) But generally, I didn't think Putin had the contempt for Russians. But no. While he's not as implacable hostile to their own people's interests as Western elites, he's pretty damn close in not giving a shit.


    Decent leadership--leaders who actually care about their nation's people and work hard in their interests--are exceeding rare in the world today.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    When all was said and done, I think it was clear, the Soviets while a nuclear equal, were not really equal in terms of the actual operation of conventional forces. In part due to leadership, organization and training, but mostly Western technological–mostly electronic–superiority.

    What you say is all true, but it would be foolish to extrapolate from this war to any potential future war, especially one fought on Russian soil. Russia has always been militarily inferior to the West. And they have always gotten shellacked in the opening of most any war they fight. But they often come back in the second act to impose a lot of hardship on their adversaries – against the French in the Napoleonic Wars, against the Austrians in WWI, against the Germans in WWII.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Mr. Anon


    What you say is all true, but it would be foolish to extrapolate from this war to any potential future war, especially one fought on Russian soil.
     
    Agreed. Furthermore, Russia has 6000 nukes, more than anyone else. So no one can attack Russia. If Russia actually feels threatened their adversary is going to feel some serious radioactive heat.

    The actual threat to Russia is not that. Neither of the two plausible adversaries--the US and China--are that nuts.

    No the threat to Russia is the same as in the West: Immigration and low native/core population fertility. Russia will be around, but--if it doesn't get a leader seriously tuned in on the stuff that matters who cracks down on immigration from the 'stans and gets to work on "affordable family formation"--it is going to increasingly less and less Russian and more and more Muslim.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

  181. @John Johnson
    @PhysicistDave

    When Western Ukraine chose to secede from the legally elected government of Ukraine in 2014, at the instigation of the US Deep State

    Facts do matter.

    Yes facts do matter and there was never a secession by the government of Ukraine.

    They removed a pro-Russian president who broke the law and has been convicted of treason. He never denied the charges and fled to Russia.

    If Biden was convicted of treason would you argue that he should stay for the sake of democracy?

    Not legal under international law.

    It's not legal under Ukrainian law to take tens of millions in bribes from a foreign country. They used to hang people for doing that.

    Not even Putin disputed the charges. It was a clear case of corruption and in service of a foreign country which means treason.

    His corruption was outrageous:
    https://eurasianet.org/a-brief-history-of-corruption-in-ukraine-the-yanukovych-era

    He is also accused of having protestors shot:
    https://www.newsweek.com/ukraine-protesters-shot-under-direct-leadership-yanukovich-243771

    If Biden did anything like that I doubt you would take his side just because he was elected.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    My favorite Fed John Johnson wrote to me:

    Yes facts do matter and there was never a secession by the government of Ukraine.

    No, of course, the government did not secede.

    The legal, elected government was overthrown, and the US puppet regime was installed in its place.

    The Fed also asked me:

    If Biden was convicted of treason would you argue that he should stay for the sake of democracy?

    Biden was not elected in accord with Article II, section 1 of the US Constitution. Obviously, he is de facto President of the US, but not de jure.

    And Biden publicly confessed to selling out US foreign policy in the business interests of his son.

    Since he is a traitor to the United States and was never elected President under the provisions of the US Constitution, I think the only place Biden should “stay” is federal prison.

    Pending his execution for treason, of course.

    The same way I feel about the traitor to Ukraine, who has sold out his own people for money from the US Deep State, Zelensky.

    I agree with Jack Kennedy: the US Deep State needs to be shattered into a million pieces and scattered to the winds.

    And similarly for its illegal puppet regime in Kiev.

  182. @PhysicistDave
    @Mr Mox

    Mr Mox asked:


    Could this be another game changer? Asking for a friend.
     
    Oh, Yankee know-how and perseverance will prevail in Ukraine.

    Just as it did in Afghanistan.

    And Syria.

    And Vietnam.

    And at the Bay of Pigs.

    Because the US never, ever loses!

    Because Americans are a superior breed of human beings.

    At least in the movies: have you seen Top Gun: Maverick? Man, are we good at making movies?

    Replies: @HA

    “Oh, Yankee know-how and perseverance will prevail in Ukraine. Just as it did in Afghanistan.”

    Say, PhysicistDave, how did Moscow’s know-how and perseverance prevail in Afghanistan? From what I’ve read, the USSR might now have even survived WWII without all the massive aid they were getting from Britain and the other Allies. This time around, that’s being funneled to Ukraine. Does anyone really think the Finns wouldn’t have solidly beaten the Russians (as opposed to making their army — yet again — look like a clown show) if they had gotten all the aid that Stalin received?

    Maybe Ritter was actually on to something about those Western weapons being a game-changer (though he admittedly changed his tune once he realized that his echo chamber of trolls would brook no independent thinking). Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha… wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @HA

    My teeny little pal HAsbara wrote to me:


    Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha… wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.
     
    Hey, HAsbara, I thought maybe the liberation forces had grabbed you. Or maybe the puppet regime in Kiev cut off your stipend.

    Just a word to the wise: grown-ups do not use the word "copium."

    Just sayin'.

    The Armed Forces of Ukraine are being decimated. Again and again and again.

    It is deeply tragic, and I would, as I have said constantly, truly like to see a negotiated peace.

    But Kiev has made clear it will not accept reality.

    So hundreds of thousands of more Ukrainians are going to die.

    Which is exactly what you want, isn't it?

    Why do yo so love seeing Eastern Slavs killing Eastern Slavs?

    Are you a Croat like our friend Bardon who just hates all Orthodox Slavs?

    Replies: @HA, @Colin Wright

    , @John Johnson
    @HA

    Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha… wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    The Iranian drones use two stroke engines so they are basically flying lawn mowers with a simple warhead. A few have actually been shot down with machine guns.

    It's actually not a good sign if you are having to import flying lawn mowers from a Muslim dictatorship.

    Maybe Ritter was actually on to something about those Western weapons being a game-changer (though he admittedly changed his tune once he realized that his echo chamber of trolls would brook no independent thinking).

    Well Ritter's meal ticket is most likely from Moscow. His opinion is rather predictable which is that Ukraine is going to lose soon because (latest reason).

    He is blacklisted in US media because of a sex crime.

    His followers never mention that and depict him as some type of independent expert.

    He and Moscow Macgregor keep talking about a Great Winter Offensive.

    Any day now.

    wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    Copium levels here are off the charts.

    Replies: @HA

  183. @Jack D
    @Kim

    what is the basis of the claim?

    1. If the Russians were making an "honest effort" then they wouldn't have to buy drones from Iran. Brezhnev would have been ashamed to buy drones from Iran.

    2. An example of a DIShonest effort is the Russian Orlan drone which the Russian Army bought at a reported cost of $100k/ unit. It was made up of various off the shelf parts such as a Canon DSLR camera with the focus ring glued stationary, a soda bottle for a gas tank, a motor that you can buy on Aliexpress and so on:

    https://dronexl.co/2022/04/12/russian-orlan-10-drone-canon-camera/

    All of these parts together cost well under $10,000, leaving a good $90, 000 for investing in London or LA real estate.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    Jack D wrote to Kim:

    All of these parts together cost well under $10,000, leaving a good $90, 000 for investing in London or LA real estate.

    Whereas, the US military-industrial complex would never, ever over-price by a factor of ten or a hundred, right, Jack?

    I worked for the US MIC for a number of years. I know the truth.

    You don’t?

    • Agree: Dnought
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @PhysicistDave


    Whereas, the US military-industrial complex would never, ever over-price by a factor of ten or a hundred, right, Jack?

    I worked for the US MIC for a number of years. I know the truth.

    You don’t?
     
    If you look at their financial reports, it's not apparent that they're all that profitable. Lockheed Martin makes the only production model stealth aircraft in the world. Its profit margins hover in the 10% range. That's another way of saying its costs, one way or another, are 90% of the selling price, i.e. it is not overpricing by a factor of 10.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Bill Jones, @Mr. Anon

  184. @Steve Sailer
    @Mr. Anon

    Stalin thought it was funny to sponsor a Third Defenestration of Prague in 1948 of the last non-Communist minister in the Czech cabinet. But Putin's enemies keep falling out of windows so often it is getting kind of old. I guess quantity has a quality all its own.

    Replies: @HFR, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mr. Anon

    The Cheka always had a thing for defenestration:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Savinkov

    Fundmentally, Putin is a KGB man.

  185. @michael droy
    @Steve Sailer

    Reply - NO they did not get driven back behind the Dnieper River.
    If you are talking Kherson, they withdrew from Kherson city - the only part of Kherson Oblast that is the Ukrainian side.
    And they were not driven back - Ukraine attacked it for months and eventually Russia advised all civilians to leave and a month later pulled their own men out safely. Ukraine only entered after Russia left having spent well over 10k lives attacking Kherson city.
    There was no strategic defeat and no advance across the Dnieper.
    Meanwhile Ukraine lost a lot of lives, and in terms of army vs army ended up much weaker.

    PR victory, practical defeat.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Alyosha, @pirelli

    Lol. I can’t tell if this is parody, but this is hilarious:

    “Russia was not driven across the Dnieper! It made a tactical decision to safely withdraw its forces across the river.”

    Elsewhere you have commented, literally, “the last thing Russia wants is for Ukraine to retreat.”

    Either bravo on the first-rate satire, or I’m very sorry.

  186. @HA
    @PhysicistDave

    "Oh, Yankee know-how and perseverance will prevail in Ukraine. Just as it did in Afghanistan."

    Say, PhysicistDave, how did Moscow's know-how and perseverance prevail in Afghanistan? From what I've read, the USSR might now have even survived WWII without all the massive aid they were getting from Britain and the other Allies. This time around, that's being funneled to Ukraine. Does anyone really think the Finns wouldn't have solidly beaten the Russians (as opposed to making their army -- yet again -- look like a clown show) if they had gotten all the aid that Stalin received?

    Maybe Ritter was actually on to something about those Western weapons being a game-changer (though he admittedly changed his tune once he realized that his echo chamber of trolls would brook no independent thinking). Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha... wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @John Johnson

    My teeny little pal HAsbara wrote to me:

    Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha… wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    Hey, HAsbara, I thought maybe the liberation forces had grabbed you. Or maybe the puppet regime in Kiev cut off your stipend.

    Just a word to the wise: grown-ups do not use the word “copium.”

    Just sayin’.

    The Armed Forces of Ukraine are being decimated. Again and again and again.

    It is deeply tragic, and I would, as I have said constantly, truly like to see a negotiated peace.

    But Kiev has made clear it will not accept reality.

    So hundreds of thousands of more Ukrainians are going to die.

    Which is exactly what you want, isn’t it?

    Why do yo so love seeing Eastern Slavs killing Eastern Slavs?

    Are you a Croat like our friend Bardon who just hates all Orthodox Slavs?

    • Replies: @HA
    @PhysicistDave

    "Just a word to the wise: grown-ups do not use the word 'copium.'Just sayin’".

    I'd wager they find it just as grown-up as the phrase "Just sayin'". As I've told you so often, PhysicistDave, you should make the effort to practice whatever you preach, and perhaps you'll be taken more seriously.

    "So hundreds of thousands of more Ukrainians are going to die. Which is exactly what you want, isn’t it?"

    Evidently, not nearly as much as your boy in Moscow who ordered them to be killed in the first place, even though, as Nuland showed him, all that was needed to turn the Ukrainians -- according to the Russians' own conspiracy theories -- was a basket of pastries and some Soros money and Putin has plenty more money and empty carbs to toss around than she did. If Putin really, really, really had to have Ukraine all to himself, he could have followed her cue. In other words, don't try and pin any of those alleged hundreds of thousands of deaths on me, PhysicistDave. It was your boy who chose the war path when he clearly didn't have to.

    And if non-Orthodox Slavs are what really upset you, try accusing me of being a Pole or Slovak next time, or maybe a Lithuanian. And do take note of the fact that even staunchly Orthodox Bulgarians and Greeks are solidly against the warmongering little Moscow imp who thought he could take Kyiv in less than a week, and then decided to launch a full scale WAR in order to try and dig himself out of his botched invasion, so that's not going anywhere either.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @Colin Wright
    @PhysicistDave

    '...But Kiev has made clear it will not accept reality...'

    I suspect Kiev does accept reality.

    It's just that the reality in question is that the dollars will keep flowing only if the fighting keeps going.

    Ever notice how little we talk about making peace?

  187. @Corvinus
    @Hypnotoad666

    You’re all tired up in knots. The fact of the matter is that you and others HAVE to perpetuate the lie that all or most media content is Fake News. The world doesn’t work that way, as evident by Ron Unz’s moment of truth.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    The fact of the matter is that you and others HAVE to perpetuate the lie that all or most media content is Fake News.

    No one is saying that every single fact reported in the MSM is false and that the truth is always exactly 180 degrees to the opposite. Rather, everything the MSM reports that impacts one of their sacred Narratives is propaganda to support that narrative. Propaganda is obviously not always factually false. Instead, propaganda consists of: (a) emphasizing any true facts that arguably support your narrative; (b) covering up and avoiding the true facts that contradict your narrative; (c) reporting some false facts that support your narrative (easily attributed to anonymous sources); and, finally (and most importantly), (d) spin, arguments, assumptions, and assertions that reinforce your narrative.

    For example, it’s a true fact that the Ukrainians went on the offensive in September and took over some land in Kharkov oblast. The Narrative is: Russians are evil and incompetent and Ukraine is always winning the war and will therefore eventually prevail. So the propaganda machine reports this true fact of a map change. But it omits the true fact that Ukraine’s main offensive effort in Kherson was a debacle in which they lost all the material and troops they put together with western help over six months. It also ignores the true fact that the Russians deliberately withdrew tactically because they didn’t have enough troops deployed (now remedied by their mobilization), and that occupying cow country does nothing to help Ukraine win the war.

    But most importantly the MSM is lockstep in spinning this change in the front lines as a self-evidently game-changing victory for Ukraine that proves the Narrative. And just endlessly repeating that non-sequitur conclusion as if it’s an established fact is more than enough to mislead both low-information, trusting normies as well as slightly more sophisticated people who are already primed to believe the Narrative. So the specific facts aren’t inaccurate per se. But it’s still a false propaganda narrative that is 180 degrees from the reality on the battlefield.

    The identical propaganda process applies to all of the MSM’s sacred Narratives: e.g., Covid is a deadly threat to everyone, who all need 100% safe and effective vaxx shots and infinite boosters; Election fraud is impossible; Global Warming is an imminent crisis that justifies any cost to remedy; Systemic Racism is responsible for all black people problems; etc., etc.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Hypnotoad666

    Again, what make you part of this elite one percent that enables you to have the energy to critically think about news stories?

    “No one is saying that every single fact reported in the MSM is false and that the truth is always exactly 180 degrees to the opposite.”

    That’s EXACTLY the narrative here on this fine opinion webzine.

    “Propaganda is obviously not always factually false. Instead, propaganda consists of: (a) emphasizing any true facts that arguably support your narrative; (b) covering up and avoiding the true facts that contradict your narrative; (c) reporting some false facts that support your narrative (easily attributed to anonymous sources); and, finally (and most importantly), (d) spin, arguments, assumptions, and assertions that reinforce your narrative.”

    You mean what you’re doing right now?

    “The Narrative is: Russians are evil and incompetent and Ukraine is always winning the war and will therefore eventually prevail.”

    Lol, you created a false premise and a strawman and argue from that position. You know it’s much more complicated and nuanced than what you are making it out to be.

    “It also ignores the true fact that the Russians deliberately withdrew tactically because they didn’t have enough troops deployed (now remedied by their mobilization), and that occupying cow country does nothing to help Ukraine win the war.”

    That’s called a position, not a fact. One that can be challenged. So you simply disagree with the other side’s counter arguments. Nothing more, nothing less.

    “And just endlessly repeating that non-sequitur conclusion as if it’s an established fact is more than enough to mislead both low-information, trusting normies as well as slightly more sophisticated people who are already primed to believe the Narrative. “

    In your opinion. But at least we bear witness to your anti-white rhetoric.

    “So the specific facts aren’t inaccurate per se. But it’s still a false propaganda narrative that is 180 degrees from the reality on the battlefield.”

    What is this reality on the battlefield? What are your sources? How are you certain this information is reliable? Should we not be wary of Russian propaganda?

    “The identical propaganda process applies to all of the MSM’s sacred Narratives: e.g., Covid is a deadly threat to everyone, who all need 100% safe and effective vaxx shots and infinite boosters; Election fraud is impossible; Global Warming is an imminent crisis that justifies any cost to remedy; Systemic Racism is responsible for all black people problems; etc., etc.”

    Basically, it’s your opinion.

    Again, what make you part of this elite one percent that enables you to have the energy to critically think about news stories?

  188. @Batman
    @Steve Sailer

    You don't win modern wars by controlling dirt. You win them by outlasting your opponents. The United States learned this in Afghanistan. Russia's occupations of Georgia and Moldova taught them this lesson as well.

    That's why propaganda to demoralize Russian citizens (we've seen plenty of this--remember the blitz of stories about Russian males breaking their legs to get out of the draft) and to give confidence to the Ukrainians makes sense.

    But why aim propaganda at us? How does American popular opinion about this war help the Ukrainian cause? The superficial answer is to keep the aid flowing to Ukraine, but they don't need this kind of propaganda blitz to make that happen. The American public does not care about the national debt. And we give considerably more money to Israel without flinching.

    https://i0.wp.com/bootcampmilitaryfitnessinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/Mission-Accomplished-Speech-2003-George-W-Bush-Iraq-War-1.webp

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    How does American popular opinion about this war help the Ukrainian cause? The superficial answer is to keep the aid flowing to Ukraine, but they don’t need this kind of propaganda blitz to make that happen. The American public does not care about the national debt.

    It’s a good question. It seems likely the USA media could just ignore the whole issue and our gov’t could give aid to whoever without consulting the American people.

    I think the answer comes in Sailer’s response:

    Putin’s fans kept declaring in these comments that Russia controlled huge amounts of dirt in Ukraine and thus that proved Russia was winning … until Russia started losing dirt, at which point to lose dirt became Putin’s genius strategy all along.

    The pouty resentment is obvious. I’d say they (our Fake Elites) are worried that big parts of the American people – and the West – might support Putin over them. In some sense, they see his type as a real threat when it comes to commanding loyalty. They had the same hysterical and pouty reaction to Trump.

    Maybe they have a paranoia of allegiances shifting in the future.

  189. During the Vietnam War, air dropped sensors along the so called Ho Chi Minh trail would detect trucks. These detections were routed by airborne relay to a filter center which directed a strike aircraft to destroy the truck(s) Later a reconnaissance aircraft would photograph the destroyed truck. Many, many times the destroyed truck was never found. It was finally decided that there was another player in the mix-the Great Laotian Truck Eater.

  190. @Corvinus
    @John Johnson

    “You are being facetious but he is correct and it’s not a simple matter of intelligence“

    No, I’m being serious. It’s an absolutely anti-white statement on his part. He makes up an arbitrary percentage and proceeds to denigrate the critical thinking ability of whites. And you come to his defense. It’s sickening.

    “Purely from experience I would guess around 2-3%. Definitely not 5% or greater“

    Essentially, that is your opinion.

    “and I remember a psych study that suggested only around 1% of Americans”

    Wait, I thought we can’t trust social studies data. Because leftist agenda. So now you’re relying on something you THINK you remember as evidence? Find the source. Link it. Then we can figure out its context.

    “Interestingly the CIA determined that only around 1% of the population has the potential to become political leaders.”

    Lol, now you’re citing the Deep State? How do you know that’s accurate? What makes you trust this information? Do you even have a citation?

    So you’re saying we can’t trust the media nor the CIA…but you use them as evidence to support your assertions. Do you even comprehend the hypocrisy here?

    Replies: @John Johnson

    “You are being facetious but he is correct and it’s not a simple matter of intelligence“

    No, I’m being serious. It’s an absolutely anti-white statement on his part. He makes up an arbitrary percentage and proceeds to denigrate the critical thinking ability of whites. And you come to his defense. It’s sickening.

    How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.

    Where are these critical thinkers? Democrats cheered a stroke victim over a doctor and the Republicans tried putting in a football player with zero experience into the Senate. They didn’t even bother to do any background checks on him.

    Do tell which televised political program caters to critical thinkers.

    “Interestingly the CIA determined that only around 1% of the population has the potential to become political leaders.”

    Lol, now you’re citing the Deep State? How do you know that’s accurate? What makes you trust this information? Do you even have a citation?

    The KGB reached the same conclusion. It’s in the Yuri Bezmenov interviews.

    Most people are not interested in politics and of those that are only a very small percentage are capable of independent thought and taking a leadership role.

    Yuri in fact outlined how they would exploit “useful idiots” (educated idealists) while looking for the real potential leaders to eliminate. I can probably dig up the interview if you want.

    Romans and Greeks reached similar conclusions. Plato believed that Western society should be governed by a small elite that lies to everyone else about the reality of unequal ability. If you want a source you can read The Republic.

    I’m not saying I agree with them. But Whites as a group are not inclined towards critical thinking. They are only better than other groups when pressed. Most Whites would rather be told what is the correct view rather than seek it. I saw this in college and it was quite depressing. The prof would present a political view as the truth and anyone that asked questions would be viewed by most students as being anti-social or needlessly disruptive.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @John Johnson

    “How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.”

    You’re just digging yourself a bigger hole. You’re offering a clear opinion and dressing it up as an absolute fact. That would be one of the most monumental discoveries in human history—the near universal inability of people to critically think for themselves when it comes to vetting news.

    It’s an untenable position. But go ahead, cite your sources.

    Pray tell, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    “Where are these critical thinkers? Democrats cheered a stroke victim over a doctor and the Republicans tried putting in a football player with zero experience into the Senate. They didn’t even bother to do any background checks on him.”

    Fetterman had a well documented political career on Pennsylvania. Regarding Walker, he was Trump’s candidate. Yes, he was an awful candidate, and why he came close to winning I don’t know.

    Regardless, in thousands of elections, people across our great land had made their decision based on scrutinizing the candidates by way of print and electronic media. It’s YOUR opinion, NOT objective truth, that the supermajority of American whites lack the intellectual chops to disseminate information. They don’t need an anti-white elitist like yourself haranguing that they are sheep.

    “But Whites as a group are not inclined towards critical thinking. They are only better than other groups when pressed. Most Whites would rather be told what is the correct view rather than seek it.“

    If you want to get murdered on this hill, that’s your choice. It’s ultimately an opinion on your part.

    Replies: @Hunsdon, @John Johnson

  191. @HA
    @PhysicistDave

    "Oh, Yankee know-how and perseverance will prevail in Ukraine. Just as it did in Afghanistan."

    Say, PhysicistDave, how did Moscow's know-how and perseverance prevail in Afghanistan? From what I've read, the USSR might now have even survived WWII without all the massive aid they were getting from Britain and the other Allies. This time around, that's being funneled to Ukraine. Does anyone really think the Finns wouldn't have solidly beaten the Russians (as opposed to making their army -- yet again -- look like a clown show) if they had gotten all the aid that Stalin received?

    Maybe Ritter was actually on to something about those Western weapons being a game-changer (though he admittedly changed his tune once he realized that his echo chamber of trolls would brook no independent thinking). Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha... wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @John Johnson

    Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha… wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    The Iranian drones use two stroke engines so they are basically flying lawn mowers with a simple warhead. A few have actually been shot down with machine guns.

    It’s actually not a good sign if you are having to import flying lawn mowers from a Muslim dictatorship.

    Maybe Ritter was actually on to something about those Western weapons being a game-changer (though he admittedly changed his tune once he realized that his echo chamber of trolls would brook no independent thinking).

    Well Ritter’s meal ticket is most likely from Moscow. His opinion is rather predictable which is that Ukraine is going to lose soon because (latest reason).

    He is blacklisted in US media because of a sex crime.

    His followers never mention that and depict him as some type of independent expert.

    He and Moscow Macgregor keep talking about a Great Winter Offensive.

    Any day now.

    wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    Copium levels here are off the charts.

    • Replies: @HA
    @John Johnson

    "He and Moscow Macgregor keep talking about a Great Winter Offensive."

    He. has two more weeks -- back on Nov 16, Macgregor said he didn't know if the great Russian offensive(s) would happen in two weeks, four weeks, six weeks or eight weeks, but he know's it's coming and when it does, as he has predicted so many times before, it will finally be game-over (but for real, this time, unlike all those other predictions).

    Tomorrow will be six weeks since he made that prediction, so again, he's got two weeks before the clock runs out. I'm not saying Macgregor is wrong this time (though he was definitely wrong before), but even Ron Unz seems to be losing confidence in his boy, given his above wishy-washy "might be wrong, might be right" characterization of Macgregor's latest forecasts. That's a precipitous decline, given how eagerly he kept urging us to listen to Macgregor all this past year.

    Well, a lot can happen in two weeks, so I'll wait before making a final assessment. Besides, as we all know, frozen ground can only ever benefit the Russian invasion. It can never, ever benefit the Ukrainians. Everyone knows that!

    Replies: @John Johnson

  192. @Steve Sailer
    @Observator

    Last I heard from Vlad, this was a war of annexation.

    But it turned out, much to Vlad's expensive surprise, that the Ukrainians didn't want to be annexed. It's almost as if the all the spied and traitors he thought he was funding in Ukraine was actually money being embezzled to buy infinity pools in Bel-Air.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @PhysicistDave

    Steve Sailer wrote to Observator:

    Last I heard from Vlad, this was a war of annexation.

    Really? Where did you hear that?

    Really.

    I have not seen any evidence that Putin wants to annex Greater Galicia, AKA West Ukraine.

    Quite the contrary, indeed.

    To be sure, all indications were that the Russians in the eastern part of Novorossiya and the Crimea wanted to return to Russia. And that is now a done deal.

    But is there any evidence at all that Putin wants to annex Western Ukraine?

    That would be extraordinarily foolish, and Putin, whatever his faults, does not seem to be a foolish man.

    Of course, the illegal puppet regime in Kiev headed by the now-open dictator Zelensky does need to be eliminated and West Ukraine has to be deNazified and then left as a neutral buffer state like Finland.

    But, again, Steve, you wrote:

    Last I heard from Vlad, this was a war of annexation.

    Where last did you hear this? Exactly where?

  193. @Steve Sailer
    @meh

    Where's the Russian Air Force? Why hasn't it achieved air supremacy?

    Well, it's mostly on the ground most of the time. Why? Well, spare parts aren't cheap, but infinity pools in Bel-Air aren't cheap, either. Which one do you want more?

    It's a matter of which one does the Russian leadership prioritize.

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    Replies: @Anonymo, @PhysicistDave, @michael droy, @Lurker, @Dave Pinsen, @BlackFlag, @Dave Pinsen, @HA, @Anonymous, @BB753

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.

    You think Ukraine doesn’t have a problem with corruption?

  194. @PhysicistDave
    @HA

    My teeny little pal HAsbara wrote to me:


    Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha… wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.
     
    Hey, HAsbara, I thought maybe the liberation forces had grabbed you. Or maybe the puppet regime in Kiev cut off your stipend.

    Just a word to the wise: grown-ups do not use the word "copium."

    Just sayin'.

    The Armed Forces of Ukraine are being decimated. Again and again and again.

    It is deeply tragic, and I would, as I have said constantly, truly like to see a negotiated peace.

    But Kiev has made clear it will not accept reality.

    So hundreds of thousands of more Ukrainians are going to die.

    Which is exactly what you want, isn't it?

    Why do yo so love seeing Eastern Slavs killing Eastern Slavs?

    Are you a Croat like our friend Bardon who just hates all Orthodox Slavs?

    Replies: @HA, @Colin Wright

    “Just a word to the wise: grown-ups do not use the word ‘copium.’Just sayin’”.

    I’d wager they find it just as grown-up as the phrase “Just sayin’”. As I’ve told you so often, PhysicistDave, you should make the effort to practice whatever you preach, and perhaps you’ll be taken more seriously.

    “So hundreds of thousands of more Ukrainians are going to die. Which is exactly what you want, isn’t it?”

    Evidently, not nearly as much as your boy in Moscow who ordered them to be killed in the first place, even though, as Nuland showed him, all that was needed to turn the Ukrainians — according to the Russians’ own conspiracy theories — was a basket of pastries and some Soros money and Putin has plenty more money and empty carbs to toss around than she did. If Putin really, really, really had to have Ukraine all to himself, he could have followed her cue. In other words, don’t try and pin any of those alleged hundreds of thousands of deaths on me, PhysicistDave. It was your boy who chose the war path when he clearly didn’t have to.

    [MORE]

    And if non-Orthodox Slavs are what really upset you, try accusing me of being a Pole or Slovak next time, or maybe a Lithuanian. And do take note of the fact that even staunchly Orthodox Bulgarians and Greeks are solidly against the warmongering little Moscow imp who thought he could take Kyiv in less than a week, and then decided to launch a full scale WAR in order to try and dig himself out of his botched invasion, so that’s not going anywhere either.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @HA

    My teeny little buddy HAsbara wrote to me:


    In other words, don’t try and pin any of those alleged hundreds of thousands of deaths on me, PhysicistDave.
     
    The blood is indeed on your hands, HAsbara.

    You love seeing Eastern Slavs killing Eastern Slavs.

    The road to ending the killing is straightforward: allow the people in each oblast of this fake little country called Ukraine to choose for themselves whether to be governed by Kiev or Moscow.

    Self-determination of peoples.

    Like in the US Declaration of Independence.

    Or like when the USSR broke up. Or Yugoslavia broke up. Or Czechoslovakia broke up.

    Do to this artificial country called "Ukraine," which never had any historical existence prior to 1990, what was done to those other fake countries.

    Let the people be free.

    But you and your paymasters hate that idea.

    You hate the idea of peace based on human freedom.

    Yes, HAsbara, I pin all of those deaths on you.

    And if there is a God, I pray that he will have no mercy whatsoever on your soul.
  195. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Steve is Americans First. Your questions should have that orientation, and you should wonder which Americans. I honestly don't know the answers, but I do know he's better than Tucker Carlson -- and that there is no one better.

    Frankly, Israel and Palestine are not our concerns.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Telimektar, @Colin Wright, @Redman

    ‘…Frankly, Israel and Palestine are not our concerns.’

    ! Without our support, Israel would not have come into being, and without the continuation of that support, it would not exist today.

    You might as well say ‘it’s not your concern’ if your teenage son starts raping all the little girls in the neighborhood.

    Burma may not be our concern. North Korea needn’t be our concern. We don’t need to actually bestir ourselves if Rwanda gets up to whatever.

    Until we yank Israel off our teat, she most certainly is our concern.

  196. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymo

    "Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?"

    I met a Ukrainian "defense expert" who owned the single nicest piece of land I've seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else's country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians -- ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else's country?

    Replies: @Anonymo, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Colin Wright, @TWS, @PhysicistDave, @YetAnotherAnon, @Redman

    Steve Sailer wrote to Anonymo:

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians — ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians?

    There are very, very few “Putin fanboys” here, Steve.

    Most of us just want the killing to stop.

    I’d be happy if there were simply a peace along the current front lines.

    But the US Deep State will not allow that to happen.

    As to “why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians,” which of us, “by [our] own testimony” have claimed that?

    If this is anything at all like almost all wars, some Kievan soldiers are fighting bravely, some Russians are fighting bravely, and an awful lot of soldiers on both sides are merely trying not to die. And there are surely a lot of out-and-out cowards on both sides.

    Do you have any actual evidence showing quantitatively more bravery on the Kievan side than on the side of the Russian Allies? And more than that, has anyone here who is attacking the US Deep State and its puppet regime in Kiev, claimed “by [our] own testimony” to have such evidence, as you asserted?

    As far as I can tell from the very limited information we have from Ukraine, an awful lot of Ukrainian men are quite desperate to avoid fighting for the illegal puppet regime in Kiev (and wisely so). And there have been reports of Ukrainian forces refusing to fight.

    Do you have actual evidence to the contrary? Not just propaganda?

    • Thanks: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @For what it's worth
    @PhysicistDave

    "There are very, very few “Putin fanboys” here, Steve.

    Most of us just want the killing to stop."

    Now *that's* gaslighting.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  197. @HA
    @PhysicistDave

    "Just a word to the wise: grown-ups do not use the word 'copium.'Just sayin’".

    I'd wager they find it just as grown-up as the phrase "Just sayin'". As I've told you so often, PhysicistDave, you should make the effort to practice whatever you preach, and perhaps you'll be taken more seriously.

    "So hundreds of thousands of more Ukrainians are going to die. Which is exactly what you want, isn’t it?"

    Evidently, not nearly as much as your boy in Moscow who ordered them to be killed in the first place, even though, as Nuland showed him, all that was needed to turn the Ukrainians -- according to the Russians' own conspiracy theories -- was a basket of pastries and some Soros money and Putin has plenty more money and empty carbs to toss around than she did. If Putin really, really, really had to have Ukraine all to himself, he could have followed her cue. In other words, don't try and pin any of those alleged hundreds of thousands of deaths on me, PhysicistDave. It was your boy who chose the war path when he clearly didn't have to.

    And if non-Orthodox Slavs are what really upset you, try accusing me of being a Pole or Slovak next time, or maybe a Lithuanian. And do take note of the fact that even staunchly Orthodox Bulgarians and Greeks are solidly against the warmongering little Moscow imp who thought he could take Kyiv in less than a week, and then decided to launch a full scale WAR in order to try and dig himself out of his botched invasion, so that's not going anywhere either.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    My teeny little buddy HAsbara wrote to me:

    In other words, don’t try and pin any of those alleged hundreds of thousands of deaths on me, PhysicistDave.

    The blood is indeed on your hands, HAsbara.

    You love seeing Eastern Slavs killing Eastern Slavs.

    The road to ending the killing is straightforward: allow the people in each oblast of this fake little country called Ukraine to choose for themselves whether to be governed by Kiev or Moscow.

    Self-determination of peoples.

    Like in the US Declaration of Independence.

    Or like when the USSR broke up. Or Yugoslavia broke up. Or Czechoslovakia broke up.

    Do to this artificial country called “Ukraine,” which never had any historical existence prior to 1990, what was done to those other fake countries.

    Let the people be free.

    But you and your paymasters hate that idea.

    You hate the idea of peace based on human freedom.

    Yes, HAsbara, I pin all of those deaths on you.

    And if there is a God, I pray that he will have no mercy whatsoever on your soul.

  198. @PhysicistDave
    @HA

    My teeny little pal HAsbara wrote to me:


    Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha… wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.
     
    Hey, HAsbara, I thought maybe the liberation forces had grabbed you. Or maybe the puppet regime in Kiev cut off your stipend.

    Just a word to the wise: grown-ups do not use the word "copium."

    Just sayin'.

    The Armed Forces of Ukraine are being decimated. Again and again and again.

    It is deeply tragic, and I would, as I have said constantly, truly like to see a negotiated peace.

    But Kiev has made clear it will not accept reality.

    So hundreds of thousands of more Ukrainians are going to die.

    Which is exactly what you want, isn't it?

    Why do yo so love seeing Eastern Slavs killing Eastern Slavs?

    Are you a Croat like our friend Bardon who just hates all Orthodox Slavs?

    Replies: @HA, @Colin Wright

    ‘…But Kiev has made clear it will not accept reality…’

    I suspect Kiev does accept reality.

    It’s just that the reality in question is that the dollars will keep flowing only if the fighting keeps going.

    Ever notice how little we talk about making peace?

  199. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to meh:


    Where’s the Russian Air Force? Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?
     
    For what purpose? Planes can be shot down and pilots die.

    This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.

    Steve also wrote:

    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.
     
    As opposed to the well-known absence of corruption in Kiev???

    This is a war of attrition.

    You win a war by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    One way to do that is to kill most of their forces.

    Another way is to cause them to use up their weapons and ammo.

    According to Western media reports from the ground, that is what Russia is doing.

    It may be, as yo say, "embarrassing," but it is how you win a war.

    By most accounts, the American Confederacy had much better strategists and tacticians than the North.

    But the North just wore them down.

    And the North won.

    Replies: @Anon, @Hibernian, @Pixo, @RadicalTomato, @GeologyAnonMk6

    The North did also have considerable logistic advantages, and the South’s economic base of slaves and cotton was not convertable to any military value.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @RadicalTomato

    RadicalTomato wrote to me:


    The North did also have considerable logistic advantages, and the South’s economic base of slaves and cotton was not convertable to any military value.
     
    Yeah, that is precisely my point: The Russian economy by all accounts I have seen is in great shape -- the sanctions seem not to be biting at all.

    But the Ukrainian economy no longer exists: they certainly no longer have the ability to manufacture weapons and ammo.

    Indeed, as they keep oh-so-loudly insisting, they are completely dependent on supplies and handouts from the West.

    Until Russia cuts off those supply lines. Which should be relatively easy with the forces Putin has now built up.

    "Amateurs talk strategy; professionals talk logistics."

    And that, combined with the obvious population and resource imbalance between Russia and Ukraine is why Ukraine has no hope of militarily defeating Russia.

    Unless, that is, Russia just gives up or the West goes in full force and we get WW III.

    The first is, I think, unlikely. And I very much doubt the West has the stomach for the second.
  200. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, you really should move to Substack. Even a guy like Linh Dinh, who got fed up with this site and quit not long ago, now has hundreds of paid subscribers and is probably making more money than he’s ever made in his life. Granted, in his case, that’s not saying much.
    But if he can fairly quickly acquire hundreds of paid subscribers, you can certainly acquire thousands. The average subscription is $5 a month, so….

  201. @John Johnson
    @HA

    Lucky for Russians that their Iranian technology is fool-proof and way superior to anything the West has. Just ask any Israeli about tha… wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    The Iranian drones use two stroke engines so they are basically flying lawn mowers with a simple warhead. A few have actually been shot down with machine guns.

    It's actually not a good sign if you are having to import flying lawn mowers from a Muslim dictatorship.

    Maybe Ritter was actually on to something about those Western weapons being a game-changer (though he admittedly changed his tune once he realized that his echo chamber of trolls would brook no independent thinking).

    Well Ritter's meal ticket is most likely from Moscow. His opinion is rather predictable which is that Ukraine is going to lose soon because (latest reason).

    He is blacklisted in US media because of a sex crime.

    His followers never mention that and depict him as some type of independent expert.

    He and Moscow Macgregor keep talking about a Great Winter Offensive.

    Any day now.

    wait, on second thought, just stick to the usual copium.

    Copium levels here are off the charts.

    Replies: @HA

    “He and Moscow Macgregor keep talking about a Great Winter Offensive.”

    He. has two more weeks — back on Nov 16, Macgregor said he didn’t know if the great Russian offensive(s) would happen in two weeks, four weeks, six weeks or eight weeks, but he know’s it’s coming and when it does, as he has predicted so many times before, it will finally be game-over (but for real, this time, unlike all those other predictions).

    Tomorrow will be six weeks since he made that prediction, so again, he’s got two weeks before the clock runs out. I’m not saying Macgregor is wrong this time (though he was definitely wrong before), but even Ron Unz seems to be losing confidence in his boy, given his above wishy-washy “might be wrong, might be right” characterization of Macgregor’s latest forecasts. That’s a precipitous decline, given how eagerly he kept urging us to listen to Macgregor all this past year.

    Well, a lot can happen in two weeks, so I’ll wait before making a final assessment. Besides, as we all know, frozen ground can only ever benefit the Russian invasion. It can never, ever benefit the Ukrainians. Everyone knows that!

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @HA

    He. has two more weeks — back on Nov 16, Macgregor said he didn’t know if the great Russian offensive(s) would happen in two weeks, four weeks, six weeks or eight weeks

    Well in October he said it would happen in November.
    https://rumble.com/v1ny9tg-col-douglas-macgregor-the-build-up-for-a-russian-offensive-in-november.html

    In March he said they needed to surrender before being totally destroyed.
    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/policy/defense-national-security/watch-fox-reporter-scolds-col-macgregor-for-sounding-like-a-putin-apologist

    Ritter claimed that no one can defeat the Russian military and that even NATO/Ukraine together couldn't do it.

    It was also Ritter that claimed Russia would never invade because they don't do such things.

    Well, a lot can happen in two weeks, so I’ll wait before making a final assessment. Besides, as we all know, frozen ground can only ever benefit the Russian invasion.

    I don't believe it for one second. Not an offensive to take Kiev anyways.

    They don't have the armor to launch a massive offensive. The Ukrainians have heavily mined the border with Belarus and it is filled with swamps.

    So even if they stuck conscripts in T-62s they would all pile up somewhere. The Ukrainians would blast the tanks in front which is what they did to Putin's 40 mile convoy. It would be even worse because they would be stuck in freezing weather.

    If they try to move towards Kherson the Ukrainians will just blast holes in the ice. That is if the Dnipro even freezes enough to hold tanks.

  202. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    At first, I thought we should send our high-steppin', tutu wearing, transgender lovin' Pentagon over there to show them what Uncle Samantha can really do.

    But now I wonder if our puppy-fetish division might be the stronger team? Now I know why they call them dog tags!

    https://twitter.com/NoVA_Campaigns/status/1601302777044828162

    Replies: @Kim

    Remember the poor pooch that got monkey pox on its rectum?

    These are the kinds of “people” we are dealing with.

  203. @Anon
    @PhysicistDave

    "This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces."

    Sources for this? Must be reporters who's provably gone to the front and also pro-Western according to your own standards.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @HA

    “Sources for this [claim that the kill ratio is horrifically against the Ukrainians]? Must be reporters who’s provably gone to the front and also pro-Western according to your own standards.”

    There should also be a division in the kill ratio according to whether it includes body counts before or after the HIMARS and other Western equipment finally arrived. Because that is when — according to Scott Ritter’s since-retracted slip — the game changed.

  204. @Cagey Beast
    @Sean

    "Ukraine was warned by Russia many, many times over several years about getting close to the West".

    And at least half of Ukraine wasn't very interested in turning their back on Russia. Ukraine was a deeply divided and dysfunctional country before 2014 but all that seems to have been dismissed by the West as excuse-making.

    Replies: @HA

    “And at least half of Ukraine wasn’t very interested in turning their back on Russia. Ukraine was a deeply divided and dysfunctional country before 2014 but all that seems to have been dismissed by the West as excuse-making.”

    Yeah, it’s strange how tearing off a chunk of another country and financing so called “independence” movements there (note that Strelkov/Girkin has openly admitted that his salary came from Moscow all that time he was pretending to a DOnbass freedom fighter) can solidify a formerly divided country on the notion that the Kremlin is not the brotherly group of well-wishers some of them once foolishly thought they were. And if that weren’t enough, well, I guess an outright invasion is even better in that regard.

    Weird how THAT tends to get dismissed by all of Moscow’s useful idiots and trolls.

    Russia’s invasion largely put an end to this pro-Russian sentiment: by May 2022, only 4 percent in Ukraine’s east and 1 percent in the south still had a positive view of Russia. Support for Ukraine joining NATO, on the other hand, had surged to record highs: 69 percent in the east and 81 percent in the south, up from 36 percent in the east and 48 percent in the south, according to a poll taken on February 16 and 17 of this year.

    • Replies: @Peterike
    @HA

    Hey HA, have you apologized yet for all the Covid bullcrap you peddled? You were wrong about everything.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

  205. @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote to Kim:


    All of these parts together cost well under $10,000, leaving a good $90, 000 for investing in London or LA real estate.
     
    Whereas, the US military-industrial complex would never, ever over-price by a factor of ten or a hundred, right, Jack?

    I worked for the US MIC for a number of years. I know the truth.

    You don't?

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Whereas, the US military-industrial complex would never, ever over-price by a factor of ten or a hundred, right, Jack?

    I worked for the US MIC for a number of years. I know the truth.

    You don’t?

    If you look at their financial reports, it’s not apparent that they’re all that profitable. Lockheed Martin makes the only production model stealth aircraft in the world. Its profit margins hover in the 10% range. That’s another way of saying its costs, one way or another, are 90% of the selling price, i.e. it is not overpricing by a factor of 10.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Johann Ricke

    Johann Ricke wrote to me:


    If you look at their financial reports, it’s not apparent that they’re all that profitable. Lockheed Martin makes the only production model stealth aircraft in the world. Its profit margins hover in the 10% range. That’s another way of saying its costs, one way or another, are 90% of the selling price, i.e. it is not overpricing by a factor of 10.
     
    No, they are indeed quite dramatically over-pricing.

    It's just that much of it never reaches the stockholders. It's just wasted.

    In my first job out of school, I worked for a commercial tech firm that was a sister division of a defense contractor. It happened that my department was working on a project that was very similar to a project that our sister division was working on. We had only a fraction of the manpower and a tiny fraction of the funding.

    Yet, they were amazed at how fast we moved and how successful we were. We were way ahead of them, despite their dramatically greater resources.

    For my next job, I actually worked at a defense contractor and saw the process from the inside.

    It was stunning. Almost nothing got done.

    The difference between market-oriented firms and government-oriented firms is dramatically greater than one would expect from a straightforward economic analysis of incentives. The defense contractors have a culture that is anti-productive.

    Being someone who almost became an economist rather than a physicist, I found it quite an education in applied economic analysis.
    , @Bill Jones
    @Johann Ricke

    Thanks for the laugh.

    It's been a while since I've seen anyone believe that the "expenses" of the MIC were in any way related to producing a product.

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Johann Ricke

    Lockheed Martin is not even primarily an aircraft company anymore. They are knee-deep in all sorts of intelligence and other deep-state activities:

    https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/lockheed-martin-shadowing-you/

    Those are much more profitable than airplanes.


    Its profit margins hover in the 10% range. That’s another way of saying its costs, one way or another, are 90% of the selling price, i.e. it is not overpricing by a factor of 10.
     
    Its costs, as with almost every company, are mostly payroll. That's money going into the pockets of workers and also executives. That's money that builds a huge constituency for what LM does. And how do you know that a lot of those costs aren't excessive? One huge cost for companies doing business with the government is compliance - the swarms of people they hire to make sure that they comply with the ever expanding array of federal regulations. You think those companies object to that? Hell no - they get paid for it - they price it in to their inflated contracts. It's all gravy for them.
  206. @SFG
    @Anon

    I'd be a lot more willing to side with the Russians if they hadn't invaded Ukraine.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @PhysicistDave, @Cagey Beast, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @Anonymous

    “Ukraine” is a geographic term with no political meaning. The Russians literally haven’t invaded anything.

  207. @HA
    @John Johnson

    "He and Moscow Macgregor keep talking about a Great Winter Offensive."

    He. has two more weeks -- back on Nov 16, Macgregor said he didn't know if the great Russian offensive(s) would happen in two weeks, four weeks, six weeks or eight weeks, but he know's it's coming and when it does, as he has predicted so many times before, it will finally be game-over (but for real, this time, unlike all those other predictions).

    Tomorrow will be six weeks since he made that prediction, so again, he's got two weeks before the clock runs out. I'm not saying Macgregor is wrong this time (though he was definitely wrong before), but even Ron Unz seems to be losing confidence in his boy, given his above wishy-washy "might be wrong, might be right" characterization of Macgregor's latest forecasts. That's a precipitous decline, given how eagerly he kept urging us to listen to Macgregor all this past year.

    Well, a lot can happen in two weeks, so I'll wait before making a final assessment. Besides, as we all know, frozen ground can only ever benefit the Russian invasion. It can never, ever benefit the Ukrainians. Everyone knows that!

    Replies: @John Johnson

    He. has two more weeks — back on Nov 16, Macgregor said he didn’t know if the great Russian offensive(s) would happen in two weeks, four weeks, six weeks or eight weeks

    Well in October he said it would happen in November.
    https://rumble.com/v1ny9tg-col-douglas-macgregor-the-build-up-for-a-russian-offensive-in-november.html

    In March he said they needed to surrender before being totally destroyed.
    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/policy/defense-national-security/watch-fox-reporter-scolds-col-macgregor-for-sounding-like-a-putin-apologist

    Ritter claimed that no one can defeat the Russian military and that even NATO/Ukraine together couldn’t do it.

    It was also Ritter that claimed Russia would never invade because they don’t do such things.

    Well, a lot can happen in two weeks, so I’ll wait before making a final assessment. Besides, as we all know, frozen ground can only ever benefit the Russian invasion.

    I don’t believe it for one second. Not an offensive to take Kiev anyways.

    They don’t have the armor to launch a massive offensive. The Ukrainians have heavily mined the border with Belarus and it is filled with swamps.

    So even if they stuck conscripts in T-62s they would all pile up somewhere. The Ukrainians would blast the tanks in front which is what they did to Putin’s 40 mile convoy. It would be even worse because they would be stuck in freezing weather.

    If they try to move towards Kherson the Ukrainians will just blast holes in the ice. That is if the Dnipro even freezes enough to hold tanks.

    • Thanks: HA
  208. Malcolm Nance sums up the view of those who hate Russia the best. As he says, if Ukraine wins, that means the humiliation of Trump’s mentor Putin, and by extension, Trump himself. So this is imperative to “save democracy”.

    Malcom makes clear that the Republicans who failed to cheer for Zelensky are the real threat. He’s even worried that some Republicans are starting to question our post-WWII alliances.

    You see, Putin plans to flip Western “democracies” into autocracies. Or something.

  209. @HA
    @Cagey Beast

    "And at least half of Ukraine wasn’t very interested in turning their back on Russia. Ukraine was a deeply divided and dysfunctional country before 2014 but all that seems to have been dismissed by the West as excuse-making."

    Yeah, it's strange how tearing off a chunk of another country and financing so called "independence" movements there (note that Strelkov/Girkin has openly admitted that his salary came from Moscow all that time he was pretending to a DOnbass freedom fighter) can solidify a formerly divided country on the notion that the Kremlin is not the brotherly group of well-wishers some of them once foolishly thought they were. And if that weren't enough, well, I guess an outright invasion is even better in that regard.

    Weird how THAT tends to get dismissed by all of Moscow's useful idiots and trolls.


    Russia’s invasion largely put an end to this pro-Russian sentiment: by May 2022, only 4 percent in Ukraine’s east and 1 percent in the south still had a positive view of Russia. Support for Ukraine joining NATO, on the other hand, had surged to record highs: 69 percent in the east and 81 percent in the south, up from 36 percent in the east and 48 percent in the south, according to a poll taken on February 16 and 17 of this year.
     

    Replies: @Peterike

    Hey HA, have you apologized yet for all the Covid bullcrap you peddled? You were wrong about everything.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @Peterike


    Hey HA, have you apologized yet for all the Covid bullcrap you peddled?
     
    Please don't encourage him to respond with another 5,000 words of gibberish, while calling people "fanboys".
  210. @Anonymous
    On the subject of Ukraine, this is a fascinating interview with a British volunteer in that war (Not least because it has some interesting tidbits about Ukrainian corruption):

    https://youtu.be/TCbD4WBqPg4

    .

    Replies: @anonymous, @22pp22

    Well, that was a first. Actual information from an informed source. More please!

  211. Anon[360] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave
    @Anon

    Anon[360] wrote to me:[


    Dave] “This has become an artillery war of attrition, and, according to Western media reports from the few reporters who have gone near the front, the kill ratio is horrifically against the Kievan forces.”

    [Anon] Sources for this? Must be reporters who’s provably gone to the front and also pro-Western according to your own standards.
     
    I have documented this again and again.

    Click on my name and look through my earlier posts.

    I am frankly sick and tired of playing silly games with guys like you on this.

    Check out my earlier posts and the links therein.

    Or don't. I don't care.

    Frankly, I just no longer give a damn about fools like you. I do care about the innocents who are dying.

    The Kiev regime is going to lose, at horrendous cost.

    I hate that: I would like to see an immediate, negotiated peace, as I have said again and again and again.

    But the US Deep State will not allow it.

    And so Ukrainians will die.

    Replies: @Anon

    Ah, you’re going the far leftist route, where you refuse to give any sources for alleged “ratios/data/facts” etc. It would be even easier for you to just post the sources but apparently you refuse to do so, curious.

    I’m taking this as a tacit admission that you’re just making shit completely up now lmfao.

  212. @Anonymous
    @Ron Unz

    Thanks for that, Ron. I read your article from which you drew your comment... and agree.

    The rulers of the USA (not the politicians, I mean the people who ultimately control Biden's teleprompter) seem to be overplaying their hand. This seems to be a general trend in the West, a general "unseriousness". Irrespective of the origins and explanations for WWII, amongst the population there seems to have been a practicality and seriousness about that time or growing up in that time, enforced by the conditions of war and war economy, that persisted for most of the lifetimes of the baby boomers.

    The Cold War prolonged and retained that sense of practicality until 1990.

    In the absence of that sort of existential threat with the relatively brief "unipolar world" (unipolar if the great equalizer of nukes was ignored) there seems to be a lack of strategic vision and practicality to the whole affair. It's a "let's do more of the same, but amplified (more so than the other courtiers)" rather than the result of asking questions like "What do we ultimately want? Why do we want it? How will that benefit us? What is that likely to achieve?"

    It seems that momentum from the Frankfurt School has persisted. One would think that after 100 years, a review of the strategic aims of the goals of the FS would be in order. The white goyim now less than 10% of the world's population... are they the "big bad" still? for example. Are the old tribal enmities the most important thing at stake now? e.g. Russia, Ukraine.

    I too have been watching Sachs, Douglas MacGregor, Mearsheimer, Gabbard, and Tucker on youtube. I am not sure what is true and what will ultimately come to be.

    However, I do believe that Russia has a 3:1 population advantage of Ukraine, a similar people. If it just came down to Russia and Ukraine in a vacuum, I think Russia would have won already. But the USA has decided that it wants to fight a proxy war.

    Due to the proximity and the fact that the ultimate backstop is nukes, I believe that Russia wants it more than NATO and are prepared to get it. I am not sure with the destruction of the Nordsteam pipeline, the USA will be able to repair the damage to its own credibility there. But ultimately in a battle of wills, this war is on Russia's borders, and a year ago none of us knew what a Kherson, Mariupol or a Bakhmut was. One would think that this was not the case for many Russians. (Steve would likely say that Ukraine wants it more because it is defending their own country... but did they really want the Eastern, Russian ethnic areas that were in their country when they were shelling them?)

    For the Russian, Ukraine potentially joining NATO crossed a red line. After decades of F(*&ing Around, the USA is finally going to "Find out".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6sbPCIEMyI

    More accurately...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mH9NzJwldok

    The original police action style operation was enough to work if Ukraine was willing/allowed to negotiate. It's a bit like discussing actions with your children. "Do you want to do this the easy way, or do you want to do this the hard way?" Sometimes they choose the hard way. And that's ok, the hard way works also. The easy way would have been a negotiated peace with minimal Ukrainian territory loss (just the ethnic Russian areas), no NATO ever for the rump Ukraine state.

    What this means is that now Russia will ask the question, what do we have to do in order to secure our strategic aims? Now that we are going to conduct a proper war, what is the best bang per buck achievable militarily? Might that be the entire coastal access of Ukraine, of course the Russian areas... maybe some other key things.

    The time span will be years, potentially. Even decades. It might mean making winters very uncomfortable for the Ukrainian populace. It can mean holding the existing lines while training and building the force required to accomplish the goals of a proper war. You can take time though. Eventually the USA forgets why it fights a war in a far-flung state. Good, fast, cheap, pick any two. So in a war where Russia can potentially take its time, they would take longer and do it more inexpensively. Every Russian war is not WWII, a meat grinder of existential threat.

    In fact, if I was looking at this strategically from the Russian perspective, we see that:
    1) US lacks multi-decadal patience for long, intractable proxy wars far from home.
    2) A key driver of US foreign policy is defense spending. They love a conflict that is going to consume a lot of materiel. But eventually the US tires of it, see 1.

    So you fight this in a way that is going to consume the US coffers in a way that doesn't cause strategic harm to your own side, minimizes your own casualties and economic losses, and be prepared to do that for a decade or two if you can't achieve shorter term victory. Eventually there is goint to be some other squirrel that diverts the US attention.

    I am also not sure why there is this focus on air power, why it should be used. Ukraine does not have appreciable air power. There is no compelling reason for Russia to use its air assets if it can accomplish its goals with ground forces.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuXwOM-2yq8

    I often agree with Steve (even on COVID) but don't always agree, and it seems I differ on the current war in Ukraine. We'll see what happens I guess.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Bill Jones

    “There is no compelling reason for Russia to use its air assets if it can accomplish its goals with ground forces.”

    So Russia could use its mighty air power to win this war more easily, but instead they’re mostly letting the air force sit it out to make the war more of a fair fight for the poor Ukrainians.

    Right.

  213. @Hapalong Cassidy
    @Steve Sailer

    So I take it Steve, that you support Ukraine taking back Crimea and Donbas as well? Because that is what Zelenskyy and Biden have stated they will do. In your worldview, those were part of Ukraine in 1994, and should go back to them now, correct? If so, then what has changed now that was different in 2014?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I’ve written several times about how the US needs to make sure it doesn’t wind up being the dog being wagged by the Ukrainian over Ukrainian war aims. Ukraine’s stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @Steve Sailer


    Ukraine’s stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.
     
    Victory must be total! Nothing less will be satisfactory than Putin's head on a pike, the Rainbow Flag flying over the Kremlin, Russia broken up into small principalities under local Boyars, and Tchaikovsky's 2nd Symphony renamed "Ukrainian"!

    So how much is Vlad paying you, Steve? You sound like a traitor and a Russian spy.

    Or at least you now would to every single Democrat (and not a few Republicans) on Twitter.

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Hapalong Cassidy


    Ukraine’s stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.
     
    Yeah.

    The best Ukraine has any hope of getting is that the four Donbass provinces and Crimea stay in Russia and Ukraine is Finlandized.

    That minimalist result would be in everyone's interest, including, I think, Russia's.

    But Putin has amassed a massive force that has the potential to conquer all of Ukraine.

    And that is not in everyone's interest.

    If Russia takes large casualties conquering Ukraine, Putin is going to be under political pressure to take more than the Donbass oblasts and Crimea.

    Odessa, almost certainly, and probably Kharkov. Quite possibly all of East Ukraine up to the Dnieper, as well as all of the territory west of the Dnieper that is part of "Novorossiya."

    That will lead to future conflict.

    It would be in everyone's interest to end this now. Not to mention the interests of the hundreds of thousands of Eastern Slav families who will lose sons, brothers, and fathers if this goes on.

    But the US Deep State does not want it to end.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Alyosha

    , @Mike Tre
    @Steve Sailer

    Still deleting comments I see. I guess certain patterns aren't supposed to be recognized. So, where were those guys for the first 180 or so comments?

    Replies: @Greta Handel

  214. Russia and US defense contractors are winning.

    Ukraine and Europe are losing.

    That’s the “balance”

  215. @Steve Sailer
    @Batman

    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts? Or do you have some complicated theory about how losing Kherson wasn't a humiliating defeat for Russia, it is all part of a brilliant strategy to lure Ukraine into a cauldron?

    Replies: @Curle, @BB753, @Observator, @PhysicistDave, @Batman, @AndrewR, @God of Emptiness, @Dnought

    Steve,

    You are great, I really respect your work, and I really love reading your stuff.
    I agree that there seems to be some setbacks-but I would like to point out a couple things (I am also not a Putin lover-but I do admire his abilities).

    1. Every President we have had for the last 23 years has said they have Putin figured out, contained, and are beating him. None of them has actually done this. Most of them were, I would say, not high-level thinkers, and Biden is essentially senile.

    2. Putin -like it or not-has gotten just about every single thing he has ever wanted. Whatever area he wanted to annex or whatever you want to call it-he got it. Yeah-he can’t win them all-and who knows what we haven’t been told-but in his area of the world-he’s gotten a lot. He consolidated Chechnya, Georgia or whatever it is called, and Crimea. So curious what make everyone think he won’t pull this off.

    3. I have been told that Putin is finish, it is over for Russia, and Ukraine is victorious-every day since the war started. Yes-there are set backs for Russia-some I suspect may be Putin’s health. I am not saying they are winning-but Ukraine seems to keep needing funds-so I am not sure where all the money is going. If it is for weaponry-you know heavy ordinance-doesn’t that stuff last longer then bullets or a few weeks/months? I don’t know-but seems like either they are lying about the funds or they keeping getting their weapons destroyed, or something.

    4. I agree with you that they have not made any advances (that we know of) in awhile-but that is the one thing about Mr. Putin that I think really pisses everyone off-he’s hard to figure out. Hard to say if that really means anything at all. Like Yogi said-it ain’t over till it’s over.

    5. I don’t want Russia to win and I don’t want Ukraine to lose. I also don’t want Ukraine to win and I don’t want Russia to lose. My personal belief is that no one ever truly “wins” a war. I think the killing needs to stop-immediately-and a diplomatic civilized solution should happen. In my experience, the ones who want wars the most, are the least willing to fight in them.

    Now, I could be completely wrong and Washington DC and the MSM could be telling us the truth-after all they have never lied to us before-have they?

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @God of Emptiness

    Putin -like it or not-has gotten just about every single thing he has ever wanted. Whatever area he wanted to annex or whatever you want to call it-he got it.

    He consolidated Chechnya, Georgia or whatever it is called, and Crimea. So curious what make everyone think he won’t pull this off.

    Hitler went down the same path.

    He scored a bunch of victories which made him arrogant and then he blew it all by invading the USSR.

    Ukraine is not Georgia or Chechnya. Even before NATO assistance they had a military larger than France. We don't even know how many ATGMs they stockpiled. At least 10 thousand. Where did Putin think those ATGMs would go? He may be good at maintaining power but he is in over his head. That was clear when he thought it was a good idea to send a 40 mile column of armor and supply trucks at Kiev.

    I have been told that Putin is finish, it is over for Russia, and Ukraine is victorious-every day since the war started.

    Where were you told this? Most military analysts believed that Ukraine would collapse within a month. Ukraine has surprised the world by lasting this long.

  216. @J.Ross
    @Kim

    Right now things are pretty universally and unprecedentedly bad, but chanting "Russia bad" lets some people pretend it's still an earlier, better time.

    Replies: @Loyalty Over IQ Worship, @Mark G.

    Right now things are pretty universally and unprecedentedly bad, but chanting “Russia bad” lets some people pretend it’s still an earlier, better time.

    Yes, I think that is pretty much it. People don’t want to accept how bad things are becoming in this country, so they are pretending it is still the eighties. The government ran a 250-billion-dollar deficit in November, the highest for any November in history. The national debt was thirty percent of GDP in the eighties and just passed a hundred percent. Volcker could raise interest rates back then but doing that now would lead to high interest payments on the huge debt which the country couldn’t afford. The Boomers were entering the work force then. They are all retiring now. The dysgenic effects of our welfare and immigration policies have left a younger generation ill prepared to take their place. Real incomes adjusted for inflation have dropped for 19 months in a row. Life expectancy has dropped five of the last seven years and is on track to drop again for 2022. The CBO estimates by 2032 the cost of Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, government and military pensions will equal 100% of tax receipts.

    I was working for the Department of Defense in 1982 and still am forty years later. The difference in the workforce between then and now is the difference between night and day. Out of control affirmative action has put many incompetents in high positions. The DoD has failed an audit six years in a row. The military is having recruiting problems. Talented people don’t want to join a military where promotions are based on skin color, you are subjected to woke propaganda, and you are forced to get unsafe and ineffective vaccines because big pharma donated a lot to the Biden campaign in 2020. People like me wanted to join back then to defend the country and its traditional values of freedom and individual rights but how many people can love a woke American empire with Biden at the top?

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Thanks: PhysicistDave, bomag
  217. @BB753
    @Intelligent Dasein

    "There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. "

    For me, the fact that a boatload of old geezers in a packed cruise ship had had such low mortality rate even poorly treated closed the case. Ioannidis concurred. But then, contrary to evidence, both Steve and Greg Cochran went on full-panic mode and fell for the totalitarian technocratic scam.

    Replies: @Axxuary

    But then, contrary to evidence, both Steve and Greg Cochran went on full-panic mode and fell for the totalitarian technocratic scam.

    I’m glad BB753 noticed this anomaly in the otherwise sensible Sailer and Cochran. I was surprised at Cochran’s reaction to Ioannidis and wondered if he weren’t irrational about age-normed fatality rates. Many older misanthropes get this way when they yield to their fears and loathings.

    • Thanks: BB753
  218. @Mr. Anon
    @AnotherDad


    When all was said and done, I think it was clear, the Soviets while a nuclear equal, were not really equal in terms of the actual operation of conventional forces. In part due to leadership, organization and training, but mostly Western technological–mostly electronic–superiority.
     
    What you say is all true, but it would be foolish to extrapolate from this war to any potential future war, especially one fought on Russian soil. Russia has always been militarily inferior to the West. And they have always gotten shellacked in the opening of most any war they fight. But they often come back in the second act to impose a lot of hardship on their adversaries - against the French in the Napoleonic Wars, against the Austrians in WWI, against the Germans in WWII.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    What you say is all true, but it would be foolish to extrapolate from this war to any potential future war, especially one fought on Russian soil.

    Agreed. Furthermore, Russia has 6000 nukes, more than anyone else. So no one can attack Russia. If Russia actually feels threatened their adversary is going to feel some serious radioactive heat.

    The actual threat to Russia is not that. Neither of the two plausible adversaries–the US and China–are that nuts.

    No the threat to Russia is the same as in the West: Immigration and low native/core population fertility. Russia will be around, but–if it doesn’t get a leader seriously tuned in on the stuff that matters who cracks down on immigration from the ‘stans and gets to work on “affordable family formation”–it is going to increasingly less and less Russian and more and more Muslim.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @AnotherDad

    Bloody hell, AD - I like your comments (on every subject but this one), but how many more times do I have to chuck this stuff at you before it sinks in? Read this comment (addressed to you) again - Russia is concerned about demography. But as the Japanese (also concerned) have discovered, making people have kids isn't too easy.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/washington-supreme-court-makes-kendis-butterknife-the-law-of-the-land/#comment-5685912

    The UK in the 1970s had affordable family formation - housing was 4x median male wages and a working man could afford kids and a mother at home caring for them. Fertility still fell off a cliff as the pill went mainstream and magazines aimed at girls* promoted everything except motherhood.

    You also wondered why Russia wanted to keep Chechnya and the Stans - again, let me repeat Zbigniew Brzezinski :


    "it is imperative that no Eurasian challenger should emerge capable of dominating Eurasia and thus also of challenging America’s global pre-eminence... support for the new post-Soviet states—for geopolitical pluralism in the space of the former Soviet empire—has to be an integral part of a policy designed to induce Russia to exercise unambiguously its European option (i.e. become part of the Global American Empire). Among these states, three are geopolitically especially important: Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, and Ukraine…most important, however, is Ukraine”

     

    https://www.pdfdrive.com/the-grand-chessboard-american-primacy-and-its-geostrategic-imperatives-d175987890.html



    PhysicistDave - why bother debating HA, Jack etc? They are where they are and nothing will shift them - for all I know it's baked in the genes. It's like trying to reason with a cat as to why it shouldn't poo in your freshly raked flowerbeds.


    * I wonder what Israeli magazines aimed at teenage girls are like? Israel is the only place which seems to have a handle on demography. Perhaps the messages are different there...whereas Western media on Ukraine leads to tragedies like this:

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/sage-odonnell-australian-man-dies-fighting-for-freedom-in-ukraine/04d0dfd4-4867-4e68-bd7b-5985da7c73b2
  219. @Mike Tre
    @Mr. Anon

    A Palantir was a communication device similar to a crystal ball found in Tolkien's works. The problem being that several were acquired by Sauran and used against the realms of men.

    That doesn't give me a warm fuzzy.


    "Can the Department of the Interior run “gentleman’s clubs”?"

    I'm pretty sure the Clinton era Secret Service were found to have this entrepreneurial spirit.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    A Palantir was a communication device similar to a crystal ball found in Tolkien’s works. The problem being that several were acquired by Sauran and used against the realms of men.

    Yeah. Their use of the term is……………..interesting. The Palantir was the means by which Sauron corrupted the mind of Saruman and made a pawn of him.

    Is that the team that the CIA identifies with? Team Sauron?

    I’m pretty sure the Clinton era Secret Service were found to have this entrepreneurial spirit.

    During the 1970s sometime, the US Government acquired a topless bar (in D.C., I think) after some kind of prosecution and asset seizure. For a period of time, it was actually run by the GSA. I couldn’t find a link to it, but I remember hearing about it somewhere (I think it was on Louis Rukeyser’s Wall Street Week in Review).

    • Thanks: Mike Tre
  220. @Steve Sailer
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    I've written several times about how the US needs to make sure it doesn't wind up being the dog being wagged by the Ukrainian over Ukrainian war aims. Ukraine's stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @PhysicistDave, @Mike Tre

    Ukraine’s stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.

    Victory must be total! Nothing less will be satisfactory than Putin’s head on a pike, the Rainbow Flag flying over the Kremlin, Russia broken up into small principalities under local Boyars, and Tchaikovsky’s 2nd Symphony renamed “Ukrainian”!

    So how much is Vlad paying you, Steve? You sound like a traitor and a Russian spy.

    Or at least you now would to every single Democrat (and not a few Republicans) on Twitter.

  221. @Cagey Beast
    @AndrewR

    It's worth remembering that none of us have any power to change things so yelling at Steve Sailer makes little sense. In any case, the position he's taking on this is far from unusual. Douglas Murray is a fellow-traveller of Mr. Sailer but Glenn Greenwald is not. Greenwald and Murray are homosexuals but Sailer is not. Further proof that being gay and being a faggot are two different things.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    I like Greenwald a lot and wouldn’t call him that

  222. What I don’t understand is why Russia doesn’t assassinate US elites like Thiel, Musk, politicians, etc. and their families since they’re de facto combatants against Russia at this point and enabling strikes into Russia itself:

  223. @RadicalTomato
    @PhysicistDave

    The North did also have considerable logistic advantages, and the South's economic base of slaves and cotton was not convertable to any military value.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    RadicalTomato wrote to me:

    The North did also have considerable logistic advantages, and the South’s economic base of slaves and cotton was not convertable to any military value.

    Yeah, that is precisely my point: The Russian economy by all accounts I have seen is in great shape — the sanctions seem not to be biting at all.

    But the Ukrainian economy no longer exists: they certainly no longer have the ability to manufacture weapons and ammo.

    Indeed, as they keep oh-so-loudly insisting, they are completely dependent on supplies and handouts from the West.

    Until Russia cuts off those supply lines. Which should be relatively easy with the forces Putin has now built up.

    “Amateurs talk strategy; professionals talk logistics.”

    And that, combined with the obvious population and resource imbalance between Russia and Ukraine is why Ukraine has no hope of militarily defeating Russia.

    Unless, that is, Russia just gives up or the West goes in full force and we get WW III.

    The first is, I think, unlikely. And I very much doubt the West has the stomach for the second.

  224. @Johann Ricke
    @PhysicistDave


    Whereas, the US military-industrial complex would never, ever over-price by a factor of ten or a hundred, right, Jack?

    I worked for the US MIC for a number of years. I know the truth.

    You don’t?
     
    If you look at their financial reports, it's not apparent that they're all that profitable. Lockheed Martin makes the only production model stealth aircraft in the world. Its profit margins hover in the 10% range. That's another way of saying its costs, one way or another, are 90% of the selling price, i.e. it is not overpricing by a factor of 10.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Bill Jones, @Mr. Anon

    Johann Ricke wrote to me:

    If you look at their financial reports, it’s not apparent that they’re all that profitable. Lockheed Martin makes the only production model stealth aircraft in the world. Its profit margins hover in the 10% range. That’s another way of saying its costs, one way or another, are 90% of the selling price, i.e. it is not overpricing by a factor of 10.

    No, they are indeed quite dramatically over-pricing.

    It’s just that much of it never reaches the stockholders. It’s just wasted.

    In my first job out of school, I worked for a commercial tech firm that was a sister division of a defense contractor. It happened that my department was working on a project that was very similar to a project that our sister division was working on. We had only a fraction of the manpower and a tiny fraction of the funding.

    Yet, they were amazed at how fast we moved and how successful we were. We were way ahead of them, despite their dramatically greater resources.

    For my next job, I actually worked at a defense contractor and saw the process from the inside.

    It was stunning. Almost nothing got done.

    The difference between market-oriented firms and government-oriented firms is dramatically greater than one would expect from a straightforward economic analysis of incentives. The defense contractors have a culture that is anti-productive.

    Being someone who almost became an economist rather than a physicist, I found it quite an education in applied economic analysis.

  225. @Steve Sailer
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    I've written several times about how the US needs to make sure it doesn't wind up being the dog being wagged by the Ukrainian over Ukrainian war aims. Ukraine's stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @PhysicistDave, @Mike Tre

    Steve Sailer wrote to Hapalong Cassidy

    Ukraine’s stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.

    Yeah.

    The best Ukraine has any hope of getting is that the four Donbass provinces and Crimea stay in Russia and Ukraine is Finlandized.

    That minimalist result would be in everyone’s interest, including, I think, Russia’s.

    But Putin has amassed a massive force that has the potential to conquer all of Ukraine.

    And that is not in everyone’s interest.

    If Russia takes large casualties conquering Ukraine, Putin is going to be under political pressure to take more than the Donbass oblasts and Crimea.

    Odessa, almost certainly, and probably Kharkov. Quite possibly all of East Ukraine up to the Dnieper, as well as all of the territory west of the Dnieper that is part of “Novorossiya.”

    That will lead to future conflict.

    It would be in everyone’s interest to end this now. Not to mention the interests of the hundreds of thousands of Eastern Slav families who will lose sons, brothers, and fathers if this goes on.

    But the US Deep State does not want it to end.

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @PhysicistDave

    The best Ukraine has any hope of getting is that the four Donbass provinces and Crimea stay in Russia and Ukraine is Finlandized.

    There are not four Donbas provinces.

    They're called Oblasts and only two are part of Donbas which further undermines his "protecting Donbas" excuse. The other two Oblasts are heavily pro-Ukrainian.

    If Russia takes large casualties conquering Ukraine, Putin is going to be under political pressure to take more than the Donbass oblasts and Crimea.

    He is currently under pressure to score any type of win and they still haven't taken Bakhmut.

    His 4 star general/former chef doesn't know what he is doing as seen by him sending out small waves of conscripts. Mostly squads without any type of air or armor support.

    Not even WW1 level tactics. Heck even Napolean wouldn't send out small waves of men against entrenched positions.

    See for yourself:
    https://funker530.com/video/ukrainian-artillery-brackets-and-destroys-russian-platoon/

    They're bunching up and running around like chickens.

    Russia is being managed by a dictator that skipped Modern Warfare 101. His main general was a chef in 2008 and his minster of defense is a former governor with zero military experience. All strange but true.

    Replies: @michael droy, @PhysicistDave

    , @Alyosha
    @PhysicistDave

    There are only two Donbass oblasts, not four "provinces" as you said. You're being quite sloppy as usual, and in this case you're just wrong as well.

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave

  226. I desperately want Russia to win this, but wishing does not make it so.

    According to those lists popular in the Western media, Norway is the freest country in the world.

    A Norwegian actress is looking at a three-year jail sentence for saying, “Men cannot be lesbians.”

    That is not the kind of freedom I want.

    Слава России.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @22pp22


    A Norwegian actress is looking at a three-year jail sentence for saying, “Men cannot be lesbians.”
     
    And rightly so.

    She hurt feelings of another woman, thereby insulting the whole female gender.

    https://nypost.com/2022/12/15/tonje-gjevjon-faces-up-to-3-years-in-prison-for-saying-men-cannot-be-lesbians/

    Norwegian actress Tonje Gjevjon faces up to 3 years in prison for saying men cannot be lesbians
    ..................

    The post on Gjevjon’s Facebook page under investigation read, “It’s just as impossible for men to become a lesbian as it is for men to become pregnant. Men are men regardless of their sexual fetishes.”

    ..................................

    This deserves punishment.

    , @AKAHorace
    @22pp22

    I desperately want Russia to win this, but wishing does not make it so.

    I disagree with you on the first statement, I hope for some kind of compromise where Russia hold some regions of Ukraine but does not crush it.

    But thank you for the second statement. wishing does not make it so.

    Everyone else that posts here either says Russia is winning and is right or that the Ukraine is winning and is right. No one seems to be able to separate what they want from how things are turning out. If you cannot do this it is difficult to have an intelligent conversation. In real life, sometimes the bad guys win.

  227. One thing this Palantir article reminds me of is the reports on the U.S. Army’s 3rd Infantry Division at the beginning of the Iraq War: how the commander had a screen where all his vehicles were blue dots or something and then the Iraqis were a different color. I don’t know how effective that was or how effective this is. It just seems like a lot of people are getting killed recently without the lines changing much.

  228. @22pp22
    I desperately want Russia to win this, but wishing does not make it so.

    According to those lists popular in the Western media, Norway is the freest country in the world.

    A Norwegian actress is looking at a three-year jail sentence for saying, "Men cannot be lesbians."

    That is not the kind of freedom I want.

    Слава России.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @AKAHorace

    A Norwegian actress is looking at a three-year jail sentence for saying, “Men cannot be lesbians.”

    And rightly so.

    She hurt feelings of another woman, thereby insulting the whole female gender.

    https://nypost.com/2022/12/15/tonje-gjevjon-faces-up-to-3-years-in-prison-for-saying-men-cannot-be-lesbians/

    Norwegian actress Tonje Gjevjon faces up to 3 years in prison for saying men cannot be lesbians
    ………………

    The post on Gjevjon’s Facebook page under investigation read, “It’s just as impossible for men to become a lesbian as it is for men to become pregnant. Men are men regardless of their sexual fetishes.”

    …………………………….

    This deserves punishment.

  229. @AnotherDad
    @Mr. Anon


    What you say is all true, but it would be foolish to extrapolate from this war to any potential future war, especially one fought on Russian soil.
     
    Agreed. Furthermore, Russia has 6000 nukes, more than anyone else. So no one can attack Russia. If Russia actually feels threatened their adversary is going to feel some serious radioactive heat.

    The actual threat to Russia is not that. Neither of the two plausible adversaries--the US and China--are that nuts.

    No the threat to Russia is the same as in the West: Immigration and low native/core population fertility. Russia will be around, but--if it doesn't get a leader seriously tuned in on the stuff that matters who cracks down on immigration from the 'stans and gets to work on "affordable family formation"--it is going to increasingly less and less Russian and more and more Muslim.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Bloody hell, AD – I like your comments (on every subject but this one), but how many more times do I have to chuck this stuff at you before it sinks in? Read this comment (addressed to you) again – Russia is concerned about demography. But as the Japanese (also concerned) have discovered, making people have kids isn’t too easy.

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/washington-supreme-court-makes-kendis-butterknife-the-law-of-the-land/#comment-5685912

    The UK in the 1970s had affordable family formation – housing was 4x median male wages and a working man could afford kids and a mother at home caring for them. Fertility still fell off a cliff as the pill went mainstream and magazines aimed at girls* promoted everything except motherhood.

    You also wondered why Russia wanted to keep Chechnya and the Stans – again, let me repeat Zbigniew Brzezinski :

    “it is imperative that no Eurasian challenger should emerge capable of dominating Eurasia and thus also of challenging America’s global pre-eminence… support for the new post-Soviet states—for geopolitical pluralism in the space of the former Soviet empire—has to be an integral part of a policy designed to induce Russia to exercise unambiguously its European option (i.e. become part of the Global American Empire). Among these states, three are geopolitically especially important: Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, and Ukraine…most important, however, is Ukraine”

    https://www.pdfdrive.com/the-grand-chessboard-american-primacy-and-its-geostrategic-imperatives-d175987890.html

    PhysicistDave – why bother debating HA, Jack etc? They are where they are and nothing will shift them – for all I know it’s baked in the genes. It’s like trying to reason with a cat as to why it shouldn’t poo in your freshly raked flowerbeds.

    * I wonder what Israeli magazines aimed at teenage girls are like? Israel is the only place which seems to have a handle on demography. Perhaps the messages are different there…whereas Western media on Ukraine leads to tragedies like this:

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/sage-odonnell-australian-man-dies-fighting-for-freedom-in-ukraine/04d0dfd4-4867-4e68-bd7b-5985da7c73b2

  230. @Hibernian
    @anonymous

    The usual suspects are working hard to prevent the cops fram using Shot Spotter.

    Replies: @bomag

    This.

    Seems that crime is an institution that must be maintained; benefits accrue to some groups.

  231. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Anonymo

    No, Steve's position isn't that it's wrong to invade other countries. It's that it's wrong to invade other countries now.

    For some reason, Steve thinks the current world borders are perfect and should never be changed. Steve obviously doesn't believe that the US should give back California to Mexico.

    The civil war that split up Yugoslavia was horribly brutal, but you could argue that the various peoples of that region are better off with their own countries. Sometimes, the borders of a region need to be shaken up to represent the reality on the ground.

    Maybe Steve is worried that the US is heading that way.

    Replies: @bomag

    Or maybe he sees that Russian influence is often not a particularly positive experience for a country?

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @bomag

    The same can be said for US or Israeli influence for other countries, but Steve doesn't go into a hissy fit when talking about those countries.

  232. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Anonymo:


    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians — ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians?
     
    There are very, very few "Putin fanboys" here, Steve.

    Most of us just want the killing to stop.

    I'd be happy if there were simply a peace along the current front lines.

    But the US Deep State will not allow that to happen.

    As to "why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians," which of us, "by [our] own testimony" have claimed that?

    If this is anything at all like almost all wars, some Kievan soldiers are fighting bravely, some Russians are fighting bravely, and an awful lot of soldiers on both sides are merely trying not to die. And there are surely a lot of out-and-out cowards on both sides.

    Do you have any actual evidence showing quantitatively more bravery on the Kievan side than on the side of the Russian Allies? And more than that, has anyone here who is attacking the US Deep State and its puppet regime in Kiev, claimed "by [our] own testimony" to have such evidence, as you asserted?

    As far as I can tell from the very limited information we have from Ukraine, an awful lot of Ukrainian men are quite desperate to avoid fighting for the illegal puppet regime in Kiev (and wisely so). And there have been reports of Ukrainian forces refusing to fight.

    Do you have actual evidence to the contrary? Not just propaganda?

    Replies: @For what it's worth

    “There are very, very few “Putin fanboys” here, Steve.

    Most of us just want the killing to stop.”

    Now *that’s* gaslighting.

    • Agree: Yngvar
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @For what it's worth

    For what it's worth wrote to me:


    [Dave] “There are very, very few “Putin fanboys” here, Steve.

    Most of us just want the killing to stop.”

    [FWIW] Now *that’s* gaslighting.
     
    Now, *that* is what is known technically as a "pathological lie" by a "pathological liar."
  233. The point of the anti-Russia crusade is to help Jews and homosexuals work out their grudges against modern-day Russia.

    They were all energized long before the Ukraine situation. They are wickedly encouraging the poor Ukrainians to be cannon fodder.

  234. @Steve Sailer
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    I've written several times about how the US needs to make sure it doesn't wind up being the dog being wagged by the Ukrainian over Ukrainian war aims. Ukraine's stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.

    Replies: @Mr. Anon, @PhysicistDave, @Mike Tre

    Still deleting comments I see. I guess certain patterns aren’t supposed to be recognized. So, where were those guys for the first 180 or so comments?

    • Replies: @Greta Handel
    @Mike Tre

    Deleting, or just Whimming? Mine on Mr. Sailer’s threads have always come through eventually, albeit as upthread blueberries.

    Mr. Unz, however, has recently been deleting my comments under his articles, including a refutation in a reply to his disparagement of my contributions here.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

  235. The Goddamn Russians don’t get it. We need to send our beautiful Admiral Levine to seduce them with her beauty.

    This transexual represents the best of the USA’s ruling class.

    By the way, why don’t we augment the Statue of Liberty? It needs to have some phallic appendage so that young men will know what they are fighting for. Long live Uncle Samantha!

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    "By the way, why don’t we augment the Statue of Liberty? "

    Easy, change the torch to a big flaming penis. the Huddled Masses will dig it.

  236. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Batman:


    The last important Russian advance was around the 4th of July. For nearly the last 6 months, Russian acquisitions of land might be measured in, what, hundreds of acres? Russian losses have probably been two orders of magnitude greater.

    Are you simply ignorant of these facts?
     
    Steve, we all love you, man, but are you completely ignorant of the military history of the last two centuries?

    Look just at the two World Wars:

    At the end of WW I, Germany still occupied a significant amount of Allied territory: the Allies did not control one square inch of German territory.

    But Germany lost.

    In WW II, Germany for a time occupied an enormous amount of Russian territory. But Germany still lost.

    You do not, you cannot, win a war simply and only by seizing territory.


    You win a war, you only can win a war, by creating a situation in which the other side is either unable or unwilling to continue fighting.

    You occupy territory, you cede territory, you advance, you retreat -- solely with the purpose of advancing towards that one single goal.

    And if you achieve that goal, even if the enemy occupies a huge amount of your territory, you win, and then you take whatever the hell you want.

    As WW I proved so nicely.

    This basic fact of warfare may be confusing to people who prefer to pore over maps and follow the ebb and flow of battle lines.

    But this is not Stratego or Risk. This is a real war fought in the real world.

    And this is the reality of warfare in the real world for more than two centuries.

    Replies: @michael droy, @James J. O'Meara, @Buzz Mohawk, @Unladen Swallow

    Germany didn’t occupy a huge amount of territory at the end of WW2, quite the contrary. WW1 was a different case altogether, due to the British naval embargo that essentially starved the civilian population of Germany, combined with an American lead offensive against German positions in France. I don’t think those historical analogies you brought up in this debate work here.

  237. @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer


    Seriously, Russia has a huge moral problem with corruption that helps explain its embarrassing military performance since mid-July.
     
    The Ukraine, which never had a Putin figure to rein in its oligarchs, is far more corrupt than Russia, and that didn't seem to impede the Ukraine's advances this fall. A bigger issue for Russia has probably been its paucity of military spending in recent years:

    https://specials-images.forbesimg.com/imageserve/60890da04d91e45a7160b853/960x0.jpg?fit=scale

    Not really what you'd expect to see from a dictator determined to reconstitute the USSR, as some American pundits tell us.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @michael droy

    100% right – anyone who claims now not to know that this is a slow artillery war that Ukraine has been consistently losing since the start is a deliberate liar.
    Strip out the “Ukraine is winning” comments in western media and all the rest is about artillery war, russian firing 3 or 10x the shells, Zelensky and co demanding more artillery weaponry, Western promises of more and the next wunder weapon that will out gun Russia.

    That is all the “news” we get amongst the obvious bs.

    • Replies: @HA
    @michael droy

    "100% right – anyone who claims now not to know that this is a slow artillery war that Ukraine has been consistently losing since the start is a deliberate liar."

    Did you not even read the graphic accompanying that post, or were you confused by the word "paucity"? Look again -- Russia is actually way BEHIND the US when it comes to military spending, and barely ahead of France and Germany. Good luck winning a "slow artillery war" (whatever nether region of your anatomy you pulled that phrase from) with numbers like that, not to mention a GDP the size of California or Canada.

    And consistently losing? That heroic Russian "withdrawal" (or whatever sugar-coated phrase you want to substitute for giving up a city they had controlled since March and poured enormous amounts of artillery into) doesn't count as a loss at all? And how much artillery was on the Moskva? What about all those tanks they left behind in Kupyansk and all their other "strategic withdrawals", to the extent that Russia has become Ukraine's main heavy weapons supplier? How is that the "3x or 10x" artillery differential is proving insufficient to hold even Bakhmut, a city the Russians were crowing about having taken since August or earlier?

    "Hmm – if you see some of the videos on Telegram showing how Russia takes out Ukrainians,..."

    Ah, and there we have it. Michael Droy evidently gets his info on Ukraine by way of Telegram videos, and feels no need to broaden his sources (apart from whatever troll blog told him that "slow artillery war" is a good thing.) I mean, there's your problem right there.

    Then again, go ahead and keep on doing what you're doing. I dearly hope the Kremlin stooges planning this debacle of an operation have the same "trust the plan" naïveté that you so desperately cling to.


    The Wall Street Journal: Captured Russian weapons make up the largest supply of heavy weaponry for Ukraine

    According to open-source intelligence analysts interviewed by the Wall Street Journal, Ukraine’s rapid breakthrough in Kharkiv Oblast last month helped putting hundreds of pieces of Russian armor into Ukraine's hands. This, combined with weapons taken during Russia's retreat from Kyiv and other parts of northern Ukraine in April, has turned Russia into by far the largest supplier of heavy weapons to Ukraine. In sheer numbers, it put Moscow well ahead of the U.S. or other allies.
     

  238. @22pp22
    I desperately want Russia to win this, but wishing does not make it so.

    According to those lists popular in the Western media, Norway is the freest country in the world.

    A Norwegian actress is looking at a three-year jail sentence for saying, "Men cannot be lesbians."

    That is not the kind of freedom I want.

    Слава России.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian, @AKAHorace

    I desperately want Russia to win this, but wishing does not make it so.

    I disagree with you on the first statement, I hope for some kind of compromise where Russia hold some regions of Ukraine but does not crush it.

    But thank you for the second statement. wishing does not make it so.

    Everyone else that posts here either says Russia is winning and is right or that the Ukraine is winning and is right. No one seems to be able to separate what they want from how things are turning out. If you cannot do this it is difficult to have an intelligent conversation. In real life, sometimes the bad guys win.

  239. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Kim

    Yep, I'll let this war play out and see what happens. I have no idea why Steve has gone crazy about all of this.

    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It's bizarre.

    Maybe Russia really is losing the war, maybe not. What I do know is that our media lies constantly and is the PR wing for the establishment.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein, @michael droy

    I think it is difficult. It is really hard to understand the world honestly with current media, and extremely easy to assume that because they can be shown to be lying about 75% of the news, they are probably lying about all of it.
    It is even harder if you have a full time job or a full time interest in a particular field.

    Steve it seems has a very full time interest in about 50 fields (and I know all I know about 45 of them from reading Steve).

    Certainly I am surprised he isn’t more sceptical of media reports on Ukraine.

    The alternative media and the permo-sceptics do get stuff wrong.
    3 years in we know that lockdowns were wrong but covid vaccinations were right – but the sceptics have made no more effort to correct their views than the mass media.

    And what really surprises me is that Steve hasn’t talked about the Twitter Files yet, just his recent difficult experience with Twitter. I’m really interested in what he thinks about the Twitter files and the implied Facebook and Google Search files, never mind never to be mentioned NYT/WaPo files.

    Mind not a single “real life” person I have asked here in UK knows what the Twitter files are.

  240. @Alyosha
    @michael droy

    "If you are talking Kherson, they withdrew from Kherson city – the only part of Kherson Oblast that is the Ukrainian side."

    Wildly inaccurate on your part. There are many parts of Kherson Oblast that is on the Ukranian side apart from Kherson City. Here, I'll list all the parts of Kherson Oblast on the Ukranian side that aren't Kherson City: Bilozerka Raion which has 64,790 people, Beryslav Raion which has 95,967 people, old Velyka Oleksandrivka Raion, Stanislav, Ivanivka, Mylove, Dudchavny, etc.

    There are literally hundreds of villages and cities in Kherson Oblast complete seperate from Kherson City that Ukraine has retaken from Russia. Clearly you know almost nothing at all about this war, Kherson Oblast, or Ukraine.

    Replies: @michael droy

    Sure but only the City was held by Russia for any length of time or defended.
    And even the city was not forcibly taken from Russia by Ukraine despite at least 10k Ukrainian dead.

    So in reference to Steve’s claim of taking large amounts of land forcibly from Russia, NOT TRUE.
    As in deed you probably know because you are nitpicking my statement rather than backing up his.

  241. @bomag
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Or maybe he sees that Russian influence is often not a particularly positive experience for a country?

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country

    The same can be said for US or Israeli influence for other countries, but Steve doesn’t go into a hissy fit when talking about those countries.

  242. @John Johnson
    @Corvinus


    “You are being facetious but he is correct and it’s not a simple matter of intelligence“

     

    No, I’m being serious. It’s an absolutely anti-white statement on his part. He makes up an arbitrary percentage and proceeds to denigrate the critical thinking ability of whites. And you come to his defense. It’s sickening.

    How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.

    Where are these critical thinkers? Democrats cheered a stroke victim over a doctor and the Republicans tried putting in a football player with zero experience into the Senate. They didn't even bother to do any background checks on him.

    Do tell which televised political program caters to critical thinkers.


    “Interestingly the CIA determined that only around 1% of the population has the potential to become political leaders.”
     
    Lol, now you’re citing the Deep State? How do you know that’s accurate? What makes you trust this information? Do you even have a citation?

    The KGB reached the same conclusion. It's in the Yuri Bezmenov interviews.

    Most people are not interested in politics and of those that are only a very small percentage are capable of independent thought and taking a leadership role.

    Yuri in fact outlined how they would exploit "useful idiots" (educated idealists) while looking for the real potential leaders to eliminate. I can probably dig up the interview if you want.

    Romans and Greeks reached similar conclusions. Plato believed that Western society should be governed by a small elite that lies to everyone else about the reality of unequal ability. If you want a source you can read The Republic.

    I'm not saying I agree with them. But Whites as a group are not inclined towards critical thinking. They are only better than other groups when pressed. Most Whites would rather be told what is the correct view rather than seek it. I saw this in college and it was quite depressing. The prof would present a political view as the truth and anyone that asked questions would be viewed by most students as being anti-social or needlessly disruptive.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.”

    You’re just digging yourself a bigger hole. You’re offering a clear opinion and dressing it up as an absolute fact. That would be one of the most monumental discoveries in human history—the near universal inability of people to critically think for themselves when it comes to vetting news.

    It’s an untenable position. But go ahead, cite your sources.

    Pray tell, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    “Where are these critical thinkers? Democrats cheered a stroke victim over a doctor and the Republicans tried putting in a football player with zero experience into the Senate. They didn’t even bother to do any background checks on him.”

    Fetterman had a well documented political career on Pennsylvania. Regarding Walker, he was Trump’s candidate. Yes, he was an awful candidate, and why he came close to winning I don’t know.

    Regardless, in thousands of elections, people across our great land had made their decision based on scrutinizing the candidates by way of print and electronic media. It’s YOUR opinion, NOT objective truth, that the supermajority of American whites lack the intellectual chops to disseminate information. They don’t need an anti-white elitist like yourself haranguing that they are sheep.

    “But Whites as a group are not inclined towards critical thinking. They are only better than other groups when pressed. Most Whites would rather be told what is the correct view rather than seek it.“

    If you want to get murdered on this hill, that’s your choice. It’s ultimately an opinion on your part.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    @Corvinus

    Last time, I cheered for Jack D against you. Now I cheer for you, against John Johnson. What a world!

    , @John Johnson
    @Corvinus


    “How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.”
     
    You’re just digging yourself a bigger hole. You’re offering a clear opinion and dressing it up as an absolute fact.

    I'm not digging anything. I clearly said it is my opinion from experience around Whites.

    Most White people are incapable of critical thinking unless pressed.

    You ignored my question about which political show caters to critical thinking. So you acknowledge there isn't one? 200 channels and not one is serious about encouraging critical thinking in politics.

    Fetterman had a well documented political career on Pennsylvania. Regarding Walker, he was Trump’s candidate. Yes, he was an awful candidate, and why he came close to winning I don’t know.

    Fetterman was an embarrassment in the debate and Walker humiliated Hannity by making him draw up excuses for all his abortions and ex-girlfriends. Are critical thinkers not in charge of these parties? Why not if they are everywhere?

    Regardless, in thousands of elections, people across our great land had made their decision based on scrutinizing the candidates by way of print and electronic media. It’s YOUR opinion, NOT objective truth, that the supermajority of American whites lack the intellectual chops to disseminate information.

    Wow you actually believe a supermajority of American Whites can critically analyze what they see in the media? That is extremely generous and also wishful thinking.

    Most Whites either believe that:

    1. Noah's Ark was a real event and we are all descendants of a small tribe of Israelis who got on a boat with two animals of every type. God killed off just about everyone and if racial inequality exists it is from Big Government and soulless Democrats morally corrupting racial minorities.

    2. Evolution doesn't apply to human differences beyond the superficial because (unexplained) and racist White men are the real cause of modern racial inequalities not just in America but around the world. Billions are needed to fix these inequalities even if billions have already been spent. Anyone who questions this belief should be socially maligned as an evil racist or ignorant.

    Do tell which belief is evidence that Whites are natural critical thinkers given the mounds upon mounds of evidence that both are simply indefensible when held to scrutiny.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  243. @Corvinus
    @John Johnson

    “How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.”

    You’re just digging yourself a bigger hole. You’re offering a clear opinion and dressing it up as an absolute fact. That would be one of the most monumental discoveries in human history—the near universal inability of people to critically think for themselves when it comes to vetting news.

    It’s an untenable position. But go ahead, cite your sources.

    Pray tell, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    “Where are these critical thinkers? Democrats cheered a stroke victim over a doctor and the Republicans tried putting in a football player with zero experience into the Senate. They didn’t even bother to do any background checks on him.”

    Fetterman had a well documented political career on Pennsylvania. Regarding Walker, he was Trump’s candidate. Yes, he was an awful candidate, and why he came close to winning I don’t know.

    Regardless, in thousands of elections, people across our great land had made their decision based on scrutinizing the candidates by way of print and electronic media. It’s YOUR opinion, NOT objective truth, that the supermajority of American whites lack the intellectual chops to disseminate information. They don’t need an anti-white elitist like yourself haranguing that they are sheep.

    “But Whites as a group are not inclined towards critical thinking. They are only better than other groups when pressed. Most Whites would rather be told what is the correct view rather than seek it.“

    If you want to get murdered on this hill, that’s your choice. It’s ultimately an opinion on your part.

    Replies: @Hunsdon, @John Johnson

    Last time, I cheered for Jack D against you. Now I cheer for you, against John Johnson. What a world!

  244. @God of Emptiness
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve,

    You are great, I really respect your work, and I really love reading your stuff.
    I agree that there seems to be some setbacks-but I would like to point out a couple things (I am also not a Putin lover-but I do admire his abilities).

    1. Every President we have had for the last 23 years has said they have Putin figured out, contained, and are beating him. None of them has actually done this. Most of them were, I would say, not high-level thinkers, and Biden is essentially senile.

    2. Putin -like it or not-has gotten just about every single thing he has ever wanted. Whatever area he wanted to annex or whatever you want to call it-he got it. Yeah-he can't win them all-and who knows what we haven't been told-but in his area of the world-he's gotten a lot. He consolidated Chechnya, Georgia or whatever it is called, and Crimea. So curious what make everyone think he won't pull this off.

    3. I have been told that Putin is finish, it is over for Russia, and Ukraine is victorious-every day since the war started. Yes-there are set backs for Russia-some I suspect may be Putin's health. I am not saying they are winning-but Ukraine seems to keep needing funds-so I am not sure where all the money is going. If it is for weaponry-you know heavy ordinance-doesn't that stuff last longer then bullets or a few weeks/months? I don't know-but seems like either they are lying about the funds or they keeping getting their weapons destroyed, or something.

    4. I agree with you that they have not made any advances (that we know of) in awhile-but that is the one thing about Mr. Putin that I think really pisses everyone off-he's hard to figure out. Hard to say if that really means anything at all. Like Yogi said-it ain't over till it's over.

    5. I don't want Russia to win and I don't want Ukraine to lose. I also don't want Ukraine to win and I don't want Russia to lose. My personal belief is that no one ever truly "wins" a war. I think the killing needs to stop-immediately-and a diplomatic civilized solution should happen. In my experience, the ones who want wars the most, are the least willing to fight in them.

    Now, I could be completely wrong and Washington DC and the MSM could be telling us the truth-after all they have never lied to us before-have they?

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Putin -like it or not-has gotten just about every single thing he has ever wanted. Whatever area he wanted to annex or whatever you want to call it-he got it.

    He consolidated Chechnya, Georgia or whatever it is called, and Crimea. So curious what make everyone think he won’t pull this off.

    Hitler went down the same path.

    He scored a bunch of victories which made him arrogant and then he blew it all by invading the USSR.

    Ukraine is not Georgia or Chechnya. Even before NATO assistance they had a military larger than France. We don’t even know how many ATGMs they stockpiled. At least 10 thousand. Where did Putin think those ATGMs would go? He may be good at maintaining power but he is in over his head. That was clear when he thought it was a good idea to send a 40 mile column of armor and supply trucks at Kiev.

    I have been told that Putin is finish, it is over for Russia, and Ukraine is victorious-every day since the war started.

    Where were you told this? Most military analysts believed that Ukraine would collapse within a month. Ukraine has surprised the world by lasting this long.

  245. @Hypnotoad666
    @Corvinus


    The fact of the matter is that you and others HAVE to perpetuate the lie that all or most media content is Fake News.
     
    No one is saying that every single fact reported in the MSM is false and that the truth is always exactly 180 degrees to the opposite. Rather, everything the MSM reports that impacts one of their sacred Narratives is propaganda to support that narrative. Propaganda is obviously not always factually false. Instead, propaganda consists of: (a) emphasizing any true facts that arguably support your narrative; (b) covering up and avoiding the true facts that contradict your narrative; (c) reporting some false facts that support your narrative (easily attributed to anonymous sources); and, finally (and most importantly), (d) spin, arguments, assumptions, and assertions that reinforce your narrative.

    For example, it's a true fact that the Ukrainians went on the offensive in September and took over some land in Kharkov oblast. The Narrative is: Russians are evil and incompetent and Ukraine is always winning the war and will therefore eventually prevail. So the propaganda machine reports this true fact of a map change. But it omits the true fact that Ukraine's main offensive effort in Kherson was a debacle in which they lost all the material and troops they put together with western help over six months. It also ignores the true fact that the Russians deliberately withdrew tactically because they didn't have enough troops deployed (now remedied by their mobilization), and that occupying cow country does nothing to help Ukraine win the war.

    But most importantly the MSM is lockstep in spinning this change in the front lines as a self-evidently game-changing victory for Ukraine that proves the Narrative. And just endlessly repeating that non-sequitur conclusion as if it's an established fact is more than enough to mislead both low-information, trusting normies as well as slightly more sophisticated people who are already primed to believe the Narrative. So the specific facts aren't inaccurate per se. But it's still a false propaganda narrative that is 180 degrees from the reality on the battlefield.

    The identical propaganda process applies to all of the MSM's sacred Narratives: e.g., Covid is a deadly threat to everyone, who all need 100% safe and effective vaxx shots and infinite boosters; Election fraud is impossible; Global Warming is an imminent crisis that justifies any cost to remedy; Systemic Racism is responsible for all black people problems; etc., etc.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Again, what make you part of this elite one percent that enables you to have the energy to critically think about news stories?

    “No one is saying that every single fact reported in the MSM is false and that the truth is always exactly 180 degrees to the opposite.”

    That’s EXACTLY the narrative here on this fine opinion webzine.

    “Propaganda is obviously not always factually false. Instead, propaganda consists of: (a) emphasizing any true facts that arguably support your narrative; (b) covering up and avoiding the true facts that contradict your narrative; (c) reporting some false facts that support your narrative (easily attributed to anonymous sources); and, finally (and most importantly), (d) spin, arguments, assumptions, and assertions that reinforce your narrative.”

    You mean what you’re doing right now?

    “The Narrative is: Russians are evil and incompetent and Ukraine is always winning the war and will therefore eventually prevail.”

    Lol, you created a false premise and a strawman and argue from that position. You know it’s much more complicated and nuanced than what you are making it out to be.

    “It also ignores the true fact that the Russians deliberately withdrew tactically because they didn’t have enough troops deployed (now remedied by their mobilization), and that occupying cow country does nothing to help Ukraine win the war.”

    That’s called a position, not a fact. One that can be challenged. So you simply disagree with the other side’s counter arguments. Nothing more, nothing less.

    “And just endlessly repeating that non-sequitur conclusion as if it’s an established fact is more than enough to mislead both low-information, trusting normies as well as slightly more sophisticated people who are already primed to believe the Narrative. “

    In your opinion. But at least we bear witness to your anti-white rhetoric.

    “So the specific facts aren’t inaccurate per se. But it’s still a false propaganda narrative that is 180 degrees from the reality on the battlefield.”

    What is this reality on the battlefield? What are your sources? How are you certain this information is reliable? Should we not be wary of Russian propaganda?

    “The identical propaganda process applies to all of the MSM’s sacred Narratives: e.g., Covid is a deadly threat to everyone, who all need 100% safe and effective vaxx shots and infinite boosters; Election fraud is impossible; Global Warming is an imminent crisis that justifies any cost to remedy; Systemic Racism is responsible for all black people problems; etc., etc.”

    Basically, it’s your opinion.

    Again, what make you part of this elite one percent that enables you to have the energy to critically think about news stories?

  246. @Anon7
    @michael droy

    The alternate-view estimate of Ukrainian battlefield deaths, deaths of Ukrainian soldiers, is that about 150,000 men have been killed, along with perhaps 250,000 casualties. That's why Hero of the West Zelenskyy is reportedly conscripting young boys and old men to go fight in Bakhmut.

    If this alternate view is correct, the Ukrainians have pretty much used up their best troops fighting Russia's worst trained soldiers using the oldest equipment in Russia's armory. I'm not saying this was a Putin master plan, but I did think of it at the very outset of the war, that the effects of new technology like cheap little drones versus tanks was not known (I hadn't thought about Palantir), and that Putin might want to find things out before he sent in his best stuff.

    The slaughter and destruction in Ukraine, on a scale not seen in Europe since WWII, are due entirely to Western machinations, forcing Russia into a war of decision. The real goals? Depose Putin? Destabilize Russia? Test Palantir and our other technology? Launder American tax dollars into political contributions from defense contractors?

    Well, Putin is still standing, and more popular than ever. Russia's economy is doing better than that of many European countries, and we've provided them with new allies willing to buy gas with rubles, like China and India (one-third of the world's population). Palantir seems to work really well - but our main enemy has now learned all about it, and is working out how to circumvent it.

    And using the suffering of people around the world to fund your political party - that's just too odious to even comment on.

    Replies: @michael droy

    Yes I pretty much concur with this alternate view.
    Maybe 25% lower deaths and casualties but the right ball park.

    And using the suffering of people around the world to fund your political party – that’s just too odious to even comment on.

    This or variants on this.
    The completely unnecessary Deaths and casualties of hundreds of thousands of enlisted Ukrainians to fight a war which was lost (short of US nuclear intervention) back in March is probably the most immoral act since Vietnam/Laos/Cambodia.
    And to do it all by Proxy is worse – my Brits are equally complicit as your Americans and the media could have stopped it.

  247. @Corvinus
    @John Johnson

    “How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.”

    You’re just digging yourself a bigger hole. You’re offering a clear opinion and dressing it up as an absolute fact. That would be one of the most monumental discoveries in human history—the near universal inability of people to critically think for themselves when it comes to vetting news.

    It’s an untenable position. But go ahead, cite your sources.

    Pray tell, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    “Where are these critical thinkers? Democrats cheered a stroke victim over a doctor and the Republicans tried putting in a football player with zero experience into the Senate. They didn’t even bother to do any background checks on him.”

    Fetterman had a well documented political career on Pennsylvania. Regarding Walker, he was Trump’s candidate. Yes, he was an awful candidate, and why he came close to winning I don’t know.

    Regardless, in thousands of elections, people across our great land had made their decision based on scrutinizing the candidates by way of print and electronic media. It’s YOUR opinion, NOT objective truth, that the supermajority of American whites lack the intellectual chops to disseminate information. They don’t need an anti-white elitist like yourself haranguing that they are sheep.

    “But Whites as a group are not inclined towards critical thinking. They are only better than other groups when pressed. Most Whites would rather be told what is the correct view rather than seek it.“

    If you want to get murdered on this hill, that’s your choice. It’s ultimately an opinion on your part.

    Replies: @Hunsdon, @John Johnson

    “How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.”

    You’re just digging yourself a bigger hole. You’re offering a clear opinion and dressing it up as an absolute fact.

    I’m not digging anything. I clearly said it is my opinion from experience around Whites.

    Most White people are incapable of critical thinking unless pressed.

    You ignored my question about which political show caters to critical thinking. So you acknowledge there isn’t one? 200 channels and not one is serious about encouraging critical thinking in politics.

    Fetterman had a well documented political career on Pennsylvania. Regarding Walker, he was Trump’s candidate. Yes, he was an awful candidate, and why he came close to winning I don’t know.

    Fetterman was an embarrassment in the debate and Walker humiliated Hannity by making him draw up excuses for all his abortions and ex-girlfriends. Are critical thinkers not in charge of these parties? Why not if they are everywhere?

    Regardless, in thousands of elections, people across our great land had made their decision based on scrutinizing the candidates by way of print and electronic media. It’s YOUR opinion, NOT objective truth, that the supermajority of American whites lack the intellectual chops to disseminate information.

    Wow you actually believe a supermajority of American Whites can critically analyze what they see in the media? That is extremely generous and also wishful thinking.

    Most Whites either believe that:

    1. Noah’s Ark was a real event and we are all descendants of a small tribe of Israelis who got on a boat with two animals of every type. God killed off just about everyone and if racial inequality exists it is from Big Government and soulless Democrats morally corrupting racial minorities.

    2. Evolution doesn’t apply to human differences beyond the superficial because (unexplained) and racist White men are the real cause of modern racial inequalities not just in America but around the world. Billions are needed to fix these inequalities even if billions have already been spent. Anyone who questions this belief should be socially maligned as an evil racist or ignorant.

    Do tell which belief is evidence that Whites are natural critical thinkers given the mounds upon mounds of evidence that both are simply indefensible when held to scrutiny.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @John Johnson

    “I’m not digging anything. I clearly said it is my opinion from experience around Whites.”

    Exactly, YOUR opinion. Which is NOT absolute truth. Is it not likely that your own experiences can be subjected to recency bias and confirmation bias?

    Again, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    “Most White people are incapable of critical thinking unless pressed.”

    Yes, in your own individual experiences. That doesn’t mean it applies universally.

    “You ignored my question about which political show caters to critical thinking.”

    There’s not just one show or one publication. From bloggers to substacks, from Sunday news shows to CSPAN debates, white Americans locate and vet information. That’s reality.

    “Fetterman was an embarrassment in the debate”

    According to Who/Whom?

    “and Walker humiliated Hannity by making him draw up excuses for all his abortions and ex-girlfriends.”

    That’s all on Hannity, right?

    “Are critical thinkers not in charge of these parties? Why not if they are everywhere?”

    Trump is in charge of the GOP. 74 million people, most of them white, believe he is a critical thinker. Do you want to tell each one personally that it is YOUR opinion that they have a limited capacity to critically think?

    Go right ahead. Document it on social media. Tell them your anti white views.

    The fact is that tens of millions of Americans engage in critical thinking everyday, especially when it comes to the issues. You personally disagree, which is your liberty to do so.

    Are you done here?

    Replies: @John Johnson

  248. @Peterike
    @HA

    Hey HA, have you apologized yet for all the Covid bullcrap you peddled? You were wrong about everything.

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    Hey HA, have you apologized yet for all the Covid bullcrap you peddled?

    Please don’t encourage him to respond with another 5,000 words of gibberish, while calling people “fanboys”.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast, Mr. Anon
  249. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Hapalong Cassidy


    Ukraine’s stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.
     
    Yeah.

    The best Ukraine has any hope of getting is that the four Donbass provinces and Crimea stay in Russia and Ukraine is Finlandized.

    That minimalist result would be in everyone's interest, including, I think, Russia's.

    But Putin has amassed a massive force that has the potential to conquer all of Ukraine.

    And that is not in everyone's interest.

    If Russia takes large casualties conquering Ukraine, Putin is going to be under political pressure to take more than the Donbass oblasts and Crimea.

    Odessa, almost certainly, and probably Kharkov. Quite possibly all of East Ukraine up to the Dnieper, as well as all of the territory west of the Dnieper that is part of "Novorossiya."

    That will lead to future conflict.

    It would be in everyone's interest to end this now. Not to mention the interests of the hundreds of thousands of Eastern Slav families who will lose sons, brothers, and fathers if this goes on.

    But the US Deep State does not want it to end.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Alyosha

    The best Ukraine has any hope of getting is that the four Donbass provinces and Crimea stay in Russia and Ukraine is Finlandized.

    There are not four Donbas provinces.

    They’re called Oblasts and only two are part of Donbas which further undermines his “protecting Donbas” excuse. The other two Oblasts are heavily pro-Ukrainian.

    If Russia takes large casualties conquering Ukraine, Putin is going to be under political pressure to take more than the Donbass oblasts and Crimea.

    He is currently under pressure to score any type of win and they still haven’t taken Bakhmut.

    His 4 star general/former chef doesn’t know what he is doing as seen by him sending out small waves of conscripts. Mostly squads without any type of air or armor support.

    Not even WW1 level tactics. Heck even Napolean wouldn’t send out small waves of men against entrenched positions.

    See for yourself:
    https://funker530.com/video/ukrainian-artillery-brackets-and-destroys-russian-platoon/

    They’re bunching up and running around like chickens.

    Russia is being managed by a dictator that skipped Modern Warfare 101. His main general was a chef in 2008 and his minster of defense is a former governor with zero military experience. All strange but true.

    • Replies: @michael droy
    @John Johnson


    They’re called Oblasts and only two are part of Donbas which further undermines his “protecting Donbas” excuse. The other two Oblasts are heavily pro-Ukrainian.
     
    They really are not pro-Ukrainian. This has been standard propaganda, but the queues of vehicles trying to cross from one side to the other have all been going away from Kiev.
    You may have seen Zelensky's arrival at Kherson city (surely the most pro-Ukrainian part of the Kherson Oblast) and the tepid support he got by 50 or so supporters.

    There used to be 24 Ukrainian oblasts (plus 2 special status cities and the Autonomous Republic of Crimea).

    Map: https://cdn.mappr.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/image-226.jpeg?w=2048&h=1449&scale.option=fill&cw=2048&ch=1449&cx=center&cy=center

    Pro-Russian parties won the last proper elections in 2008 (since when pro-Russian parties have been banned). Ukrainian elections was always a matter of narrow margins between pro-Russian and pro-Ukraine parties with the side that made most concessions to the other winning.

    Look at the map - the very idea that Zaporhizhzhya or Kherson were Pro-Kiev is laughable in a country split roughly 50/50. Even Kharkov and Dnipropetrovs'k are pro-Russian on balance.

    Indeed I suspect the reason Russia hung on to Kherson city (completely strategically unnecessarily) for so long was because it was such a red rag to the nazi bullish bullshit that claimed Kherson was pro-Kiev. That is why tens of thousands of poor blooden conscripts ended up dead or casualties attacking Kherson city for so long with out actually defeating Russia in battle.

    He is currently under pressure to score any type of win and they still haven’t taken Bakhmut.

     

    Still missing the point. Russia is not fighting for land it is fighting to kill large numbers of Ukrainian military (especially Nazis) for minimal Russian cost. Bakhmut like Kherson serve the same purpose.
    Whatever anecdotal videos you put out it is quite clear that when you commit 10 times the men against 10 times the shells in an artillery battle you lose.

    The smart thing for Ukraine to do is withdraw deeply and just keep shelling civilians from long distance (as they did to Donbas from 2015-2022 and still do. Make Russia take real risks in chasing Nazis across neutral or even pro-Kiev territory while actually giving the conscripts more than 5 weeks training. It is curious why they daren't do this. (TV pictures of queues of Ukrainians trying to get into Russian controlled Oblasts being the major downside).

    Replies: @HA

    , @PhysicistDave
    @John Johnson

    My favorite Fed John Johnson wrote to me:


    They’re bunching up and running around like chickens.
     
    One of the things I find funny about you hasbara operatives is that you seem to really feel that arguing that Russia is failing will somehow make all your dreams come true.

    For eight months now, you guys have been dreaming that Russia was running out of missiles. But they just keep shooting their non-existent missiles at the Kievan targets.

    There is a material reality that goes beyond the words you spew out.

    And I am content to watch how that material reality plays out.

    It is not going to result in a Kievan military victory.

    I only regret that the killing continues to go on, because thugs like you have succeeded in preventing a negotiated peace.
  250. @Mike Tre
    @Steve Sailer

    Still deleting comments I see. I guess certain patterns aren't supposed to be recognized. So, where were those guys for the first 180 or so comments?

    Replies: @Greta Handel

    Deleting, or just Whimming? Mine on Mr. Sailer’s threads have always come through eventually, albeit as upthread blueberries.

    Mr. Unz, however, has recently been deleting my comments under his articles, including a refutation in a reply to his disparagement of my contributions here.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Greta Handel

    Unz has been deleting my comments that stand in opposition to his claims about the kovid since the bs started 2 1/2 years ago. He also limited my previous handle to one comment a day with no actions.

    Sailer whims occasionally, but I can see those comments with the "waiting to be moderated" message under them. The deleted ones are just gone.

    There were 4-5 commenters who are typically ubiquitous throughout every single post Sailer makes, and all were curiously absent from the first 180 comments or so, which is bizarre. I mentioned it. Comment deleted.

  251. @Johann Ricke
    @PhysicistDave


    Whereas, the US military-industrial complex would never, ever over-price by a factor of ten or a hundred, right, Jack?

    I worked for the US MIC for a number of years. I know the truth.

    You don’t?
     
    If you look at their financial reports, it's not apparent that they're all that profitable. Lockheed Martin makes the only production model stealth aircraft in the world. Its profit margins hover in the 10% range. That's another way of saying its costs, one way or another, are 90% of the selling price, i.e. it is not overpricing by a factor of 10.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Bill Jones, @Mr. Anon

    Thanks for the laugh.

    It’s been a while since I’ve seen anyone believe that the “expenses” of the MIC were in any way related to producing a product.

  252. Another piece on the importance of a complex system being used to gain big war time advantages.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidaxe/2022/12/24/russia-electronic-warfare-troops-knocked-out-90-percent-of-ukraines-drones/?sh=7fcf9ff5575c
    (found at the very wonderful and like Steve, mostly accurate, Moonofalabama site.)

    The author makes it quite clear that the high tech highly complex systems part of warfare in Ukraine is being dominated by Russia. This is despite writing in Forbes (though he does include a few pro-Ukraine myths like the supposed early huge Ukrainian victories as a handful of Russians invaded half of Ukraine and then had to retreat – swallowed as a price for publication I guess).
    This is is hardly surprising given that Russia is fighting at the front line while Nato is mostly fighting and advising from Poland and it is known that around Syria Russia EW has been scaring teh US.

    Next up – a single Billion dollar Patriots system, which at best could protect part of Kiev with missiles each costing $1m (or up to $6m) defending against $10k drones (Russian made, but having borrowed from Iran ideas).

  253. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymo

    "Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?"

    I met a Ukrainian "defense expert" who owned the single nicest piece of land I've seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else's country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians -- ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else's country?

    Replies: @Anonymo, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Colin Wright, @TWS, @PhysicistDave, @YetAnotherAnon, @Redman

    “the Putin fan boys”

    Christopher Caldwell, Putin fanboy.

    https://imprimis.hillsdale.edu/how-to-think-about-vladimir-putin/

    Vladimir Vladimirovich is not the president of a feminist NGO. He is not a transgender-rights activist. He is not an ombudsman appointed by the United Nations to make and deliver slide shows about green energy. He is the elected leader of Russia—a rugged, relatively poor, militarily powerful country that in recent years has been frequently humiliated, robbed, and misled. His job has been to protect his country’s prerogatives and its sovereignty in an international system that seeks to erode sovereignty in general and views Russia’s sovereignty in particular as a threat.

    By American standards, Putin’s respect for the democratic process has been fitful at best. He has cracked down on peaceful demonstrations. Political opponents have been arrested and jailed throughout his rule. Some have even been murdered—Anna Politkovskaya, the crusading Chechnya correspondent shot in her apartment building in Moscow in 2006; Alexander Litvinenko, the spy poisoned with polonium-210 in London months later; the activist Boris Nemtsov, shot on a bridge in Moscow in early 2015. While the evidence connecting Putin’s own circle to the killings is circumstantial, it merits scrutiny.

    Yet if we were to use traditional measures for understanding leaders, which involve the defense of borders and national flourishing, Putin would count as the pre-eminent statesman of our time. On the world stage, who can vie with him? Only perhaps Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey.

    When Putin took power in the winter of 1999-2000, his country was defenseless. It was bankrupt. It was being carved up by its new kleptocratic elites, in collusion with its old imperial rivals, the Americans. Putin changed that. In the first decade of this century, he did what Kemal Atatürk had done in Turkey in the 1920s. Out of a crumbling empire, he rescued a nation-state, and gave it coherence and purpose. He disciplined his country’s plutocrats. He restored its military strength. And he refused, with ever blunter rhetoric, to accept for Russia a subservient role in an American-run world system drawn up by foreign politicians and business leaders. His voters credit him with having saved his country.

    Given how much economic power, which correlates pretty well with political power, had fallen into the hands of the oligarch/nomenklatura class by the end of the 1990s, it’s a miracle Putin survived to become leader. He could easily have been a lost leader, a Stolypin, and if the US have their way he might become one yet. In those days people who crossed the oligarchs came to nasty ends, and oligarch quarrels were bloody.

    It’s only because the oligarchs thought that he was their front man, as described by Masha Gessen, no Putin fangirl, quoting Boris Berozofsky.

    https://theintercept.com/2015/06/11/russian-oligarch-wanted-turn-joke-reality/

    When Putin became president, I was for a long time in a state of profound naiveté. Well, I went to him … I told him: “Listen, Volodya, what happened: we destroyed the entire political space. Devoured, not destroyed, but devoured it. We absolutely dominated … Look, I’ll suggest that we can not have effective political system, if there’s a tough competition. So I suggest we create an artificial two-party system. So, let’s say, the left and right. A Socially Oriented party and neo-conservatives liberal party. Choose any. And I’ll make another party. At the same time, my own heart is closer to neoconservatives, and I think so, you [Putin] are socially oriented.

    It’s odd that Steve, who so presciently predicted that destroying Saddam would not turn Iraq into Denmark or Norway, seems to have a blind spot about a country where democracy has extremely shallow roots and where the bulk of the population were effectively slaves, bought and sold with the land they worked on, until 1861.

    IMHO Putin is to Russia as Ghaddaffi was to Libya (until US/UK killed him), the best possible leader given the country they are leading.

    • Thanks: Cagey Beast
  254. @John Johnson
    @PhysicistDave

    The best Ukraine has any hope of getting is that the four Donbass provinces and Crimea stay in Russia and Ukraine is Finlandized.

    There are not four Donbas provinces.

    They're called Oblasts and only two are part of Donbas which further undermines his "protecting Donbas" excuse. The other two Oblasts are heavily pro-Ukrainian.

    If Russia takes large casualties conquering Ukraine, Putin is going to be under political pressure to take more than the Donbass oblasts and Crimea.

    He is currently under pressure to score any type of win and they still haven't taken Bakhmut.

    His 4 star general/former chef doesn't know what he is doing as seen by him sending out small waves of conscripts. Mostly squads without any type of air or armor support.

    Not even WW1 level tactics. Heck even Napolean wouldn't send out small waves of men against entrenched positions.

    See for yourself:
    https://funker530.com/video/ukrainian-artillery-brackets-and-destroys-russian-platoon/

    They're bunching up and running around like chickens.

    Russia is being managed by a dictator that skipped Modern Warfare 101. His main general was a chef in 2008 and his minster of defense is a former governor with zero military experience. All strange but true.

    Replies: @michael droy, @PhysicistDave

    They’re called Oblasts and only two are part of Donbas which further undermines his “protecting Donbas” excuse. The other two Oblasts are heavily pro-Ukrainian.

    They really are not pro-Ukrainian. This has been standard propaganda, but the queues of vehicles trying to cross from one side to the other have all been going away from Kiev.
    You may have seen Zelensky’s arrival at Kherson city (surely the most pro-Ukrainian part of the Kherson Oblast) and the tepid support he got by 50 or so supporters.

    There used to be 24 Ukrainian oblasts (plus 2 special status cities and the Autonomous Republic of Crimea).

    Map: https://cdn.mappr.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/image-226.jpeg?w=2048&h=1449&scale.option=fill&cw=2048&ch=1449&cx=center&cy=center

    Pro-Russian parties won the last proper elections in 2008 (since when pro-Russian parties have been banned). Ukrainian elections was always a matter of narrow margins between pro-Russian and pro-Ukraine parties with the side that made most concessions to the other winning.

    Look at the map – the very idea that Zaporhizhzhya or Kherson were Pro-Kiev is laughable in a country split roughly 50/50. Even Kharkov and Dnipropetrovs’k are pro-Russian on balance.

    Indeed I suspect the reason Russia hung on to Kherson city (completely strategically unnecessarily) for so long was because it was such a red rag to the nazi bullish bullshit that claimed Kherson was pro-Kiev. That is why tens of thousands of poor blooden conscripts ended up dead or casualties attacking Kherson city for so long with out actually defeating Russia in battle.

    He is currently under pressure to score any type of win and they still haven’t taken Bakhmut.

    Still missing the point. Russia is not fighting for land it is fighting to kill large numbers of Ukrainian military (especially Nazis) for minimal Russian cost. Bakhmut like Kherson serve the same purpose.
    Whatever anecdotal videos you put out it is quite clear that when you commit 10 times the men against 10 times the shells in an artillery battle you lose.

    The smart thing for Ukraine to do is withdraw deeply and just keep shelling civilians from long distance (as they did to Donbas from 2015-2022 and still do. Make Russia take real risks in chasing Nazis across neutral or even pro-Kiev territory while actually giving the conscripts more than 5 weeks training. It is curious why they daren’t do this. (TV pictures of queues of Ukrainians trying to get into Russian controlled Oblasts being the major downside).

    • Replies: @HA
    @michael droy

    "They really are not pro-Ukrainian. This has been standard propaganda, but the queues of vehicles trying to cross from one side to the other have all been going away from Kiev."

    Yeah, the colonists and other people that Russia imported to replace the Ukrainians that lived there before are not going to be heading for Kyiv, i.e. the capital of the country they betrayed. So what? The ones that were left behind who didn't openly collaborate with the Russians didn't need to bother with fleeing -- at least not until Russia subsequently showed them what their brotherly love really amounts to once they decided to flatten what they couldn't conquer.

    "Pro-Russian parties won the last proper elections in 2008..."

    2008 was a long ago. Since then, Russia has swiped Crimea, installed mafia statelets in Donbass, and invaded the rest of the country. As noted earlier, that tends to put a crimp in the whole "Russians are our brothers" meme. Yes, the Kremlin invested heavily in their efforts to bribe the local government officials, given the importance of Kherson in ensuring Crimea's water supply, and were successful enough to allow the city to fall quickly, but that explains why, when the Ukrainians took their city back, there were quite a number of collaborators people who thought it wise to heroically withdraw, tails between their legs. The fact that you find that indicative of anything just shows how desperate you are.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

  255. @Johann Ricke
    @PhysicistDave


    Whereas, the US military-industrial complex would never, ever over-price by a factor of ten or a hundred, right, Jack?

    I worked for the US MIC for a number of years. I know the truth.

    You don’t?
     
    If you look at their financial reports, it's not apparent that they're all that profitable. Lockheed Martin makes the only production model stealth aircraft in the world. Its profit margins hover in the 10% range. That's another way of saying its costs, one way or another, are 90% of the selling price, i.e. it is not overpricing by a factor of 10.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave, @Bill Jones, @Mr. Anon

    Lockheed Martin is not even primarily an aircraft company anymore. They are knee-deep in all sorts of intelligence and other deep-state activities:

    https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/lockheed-martin-shadowing-you/

    Those are much more profitable than airplanes.

    Its profit margins hover in the 10% range. That’s another way of saying its costs, one way or another, are 90% of the selling price, i.e. it is not overpricing by a factor of 10.

    Its costs, as with almost every company, are mostly payroll. That’s money going into the pockets of workers and also executives. That’s money that builds a huge constituency for what LM does. And how do you know that a lot of those costs aren’t excessive? One huge cost for companies doing business with the government is compliance – the swarms of people they hire to make sure that they comply with the ever expanding array of federal regulations. You think those companies object to that? Hell no – they get paid for it – they price it in to their inflated contracts. It’s all gravy for them.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  256. @Zero Philosopher
    Steve Sailer;

    "Similarly, Thiel’s strategy for modern data-based warfare doesn’t sound that esoteric, but it does seem like it must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century."

    Steve Sailer, Russia's accomplishments are outstanding for what they have to work with. The Russian economy is around 7 X smaller than that of the U.S, but they still have the technical wherewithal to not only match but in many cases surpass the best that the American Industrial-military Complex can come up with - atter stealing trillions of Dollars from American taxpayers.

    Might I remind you that Russia(technically the U.S.S.R, I know) beat America at putting a man in space. If this is not impressive to you, consider the following: Russia was the country that suffered the most infra-structure and economic destruction from WW2. They also were a country that had been industrialized for only about 50 years at that point, compared to 150 years for U.S.A. On top of that, the cream of the crop of the German rocket scientists were brought to America under Project Paperclip. Russia got only the second-tier German rocket scientists. And yet, despite all thyese handicaps, *Russia beat America at putting a man in space* .Americans will say that they "won" the space race by putting a man on the Moon, but Russia never had the economic and industrial resources to undergo such a massive project.

    Russians do these things out of a heroic sense of being David Vs Golliath. During WW2, they took on arguably the best militsry that the World has ever seen and, even though they were a borderline Third World country, beat them. It's hard to estimate the numer of total Russian casualties during that war. Some put it as "little" as 11 million and others as high as 40 million. The most accurate fiigure is around 27 million between civilians and military. That is almost two oders of magnitude more people than America lost at that same war.

    When they see themselves as superpower, Russians become apathetic. Their attitude towards Ukraine is that it is a much smaller and weaker country, so the Ukranians should be reasonable and surrender. After all, the Russians have made it clear to the Ukranians that they see them as more-or-less the same people, and have no desire to do them harm. This is unlike the situation in WW2, where Germans made it clear that they saw slavs like Russians as an inferior race only good enough to be ethnically clensed. So the Russians don't understand why the Ukranians are not reasonable and surrender. Russia has not even used 1% of it's military might in this war. They still treat it as a "special military operation".

    The biggest danger of this war is that the Russians will finally see that they are the underdogs, because they are not fighting just the Ukraine, but the combined might of 30 countries in the form of NATO.

    The moment that the Russians realize that losing this war will mean being reduced to a sattellite state of the U.S in the form of NATO, they will actually declare war not only to Ukraine but to all the countries aiding the Ukraine.

    What will Americans do when Russians actually bomb a NATO base killing thousands of American boys? What will America do when Russia uses it's legendary long-range heavy artillary, the mightiest that the World has ever seen, to shell eastern European nations that joined NATO and bomb American bases as well?

    Nukes are out of the question for obvious reasons....you don't want to pull a Nagasaki or Hiroshima against the country that has the World's largest stockpile of I.C.B.Ms armed with multi-megaton nukes.

    So Amerrica will be forced into a ground war against Russia. There is a joke that military men throughout the World say:

    "The first rule of war is: whatever you do, don't get into a land war with Russia."

    America cannot even pacify a few barbarics in Afghanistan. How exactly will America win a land war against the mightiest nation that the World has ever seen when it comes to land warfare? How will an army of trannies and feminists beat the terrifying will of enraged Russian men?

    Your gloating about Russia's "defeat" in this war is not only premature, but also reveals a completely idiotic level of hubris. You do not want to coner Russians. Ask Napoleon or Hitler what Russians will do to you when they finally decide that play time is over.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    Ask Napoleon or Hitler what Russians will do to you when they finally decide that play time is over.

    Then again, you may want to consult with Admiral Togo or Katsura Tarō.

  257. @John Johnson
    @Corvinus


    “How is it anti-White? Other races are even worse at it.”
     
    You’re just digging yourself a bigger hole. You’re offering a clear opinion and dressing it up as an absolute fact.

    I'm not digging anything. I clearly said it is my opinion from experience around Whites.

    Most White people are incapable of critical thinking unless pressed.

    You ignored my question about which political show caters to critical thinking. So you acknowledge there isn't one? 200 channels and not one is serious about encouraging critical thinking in politics.

    Fetterman had a well documented political career on Pennsylvania. Regarding Walker, he was Trump’s candidate. Yes, he was an awful candidate, and why he came close to winning I don’t know.

    Fetterman was an embarrassment in the debate and Walker humiliated Hannity by making him draw up excuses for all his abortions and ex-girlfriends. Are critical thinkers not in charge of these parties? Why not if they are everywhere?

    Regardless, in thousands of elections, people across our great land had made their decision based on scrutinizing the candidates by way of print and electronic media. It’s YOUR opinion, NOT objective truth, that the supermajority of American whites lack the intellectual chops to disseminate information.

    Wow you actually believe a supermajority of American Whites can critically analyze what they see in the media? That is extremely generous and also wishful thinking.

    Most Whites either believe that:

    1. Noah's Ark was a real event and we are all descendants of a small tribe of Israelis who got on a boat with two animals of every type. God killed off just about everyone and if racial inequality exists it is from Big Government and soulless Democrats morally corrupting racial minorities.

    2. Evolution doesn't apply to human differences beyond the superficial because (unexplained) and racist White men are the real cause of modern racial inequalities not just in America but around the world. Billions are needed to fix these inequalities even if billions have already been spent. Anyone who questions this belief should be socially maligned as an evil racist or ignorant.

    Do tell which belief is evidence that Whites are natural critical thinkers given the mounds upon mounds of evidence that both are simply indefensible when held to scrutiny.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “I’m not digging anything. I clearly said it is my opinion from experience around Whites.”

    Exactly, YOUR opinion. Which is NOT absolute truth. Is it not likely that your own experiences can be subjected to recency bias and confirmation bias?

    Again, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    “Most White people are incapable of critical thinking unless pressed.”

    Yes, in your own individual experiences. That doesn’t mean it applies universally.

    “You ignored my question about which political show caters to critical thinking.”

    There’s not just one show or one publication. From bloggers to substacks, from Sunday news shows to CSPAN debates, white Americans locate and vet information. That’s reality.

    “Fetterman was an embarrassment in the debate”

    According to Who/Whom?

    “and Walker humiliated Hannity by making him draw up excuses for all his abortions and ex-girlfriends.”

    That’s all on Hannity, right?

    “Are critical thinkers not in charge of these parties? Why not if they are everywhere?”

    Trump is in charge of the GOP. 74 million people, most of them white, believe he is a critical thinker. Do you want to tell each one personally that it is YOUR opinion that they have a limited capacity to critically think?

    Go right ahead. Document it on social media. Tell them your anti white views.

    The fact is that tens of millions of Americans engage in critical thinking everyday, especially when it comes to the issues. You personally disagree, which is your liberty to do so.

    Are you done here?

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Corvinus

    Exactly, YOUR opinion. Which is NOT absolute truth. Is it not likely that your own experiences can be subjected to recency bias and confirmation bias?

    This is a forum where we share our opinions. Feel free to disagree and try to not get so emotionally riled.

    Again, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    I've never said I am part of any elite. I'm fine with open debate and would have no problem with being introduced as the most un-elite person in the room. Let the audience decide who is actually engaging in critical thinking.

    I am an anti-leftist and I have no fear of open debate with them. In fact I had left-wing professors go after me early on in college for asking basic questions. I've had leftists go after me on a personal level. They are terrified of open debate and so are libertarians and establishment conservatives. Doesn't matter if they call themselves elite or if they refer to me as some prole. I don't really care about the labels they give me as long as I have an audience. Their ideologies are weak and I can expose them as such.


    Fetterman was an embarrassment in the debate
     
    According to Who/Whom?

    PA voters
    https://ellington.eldoradonews.com/news/2022/nov/04/the-painful-story-of-john-fettermans-embarrassing/

    Trump is in charge of the GOP. 74 million people, most of them white, believe he is a critical thinker.

    Trump is not in charge of the GOP. He holds no position of authority within the organization and will have to run in the primary like everyone else. DeSantis currently holds him in a lead:
    https://nypost.com/2022/12/14/desantis-leads-trump-among-gop-primary-voters-poll/

    Most Republicans were convinced he would win in the last election even though polling was showing that he was losing independents. His support with independents has fallen off a cliff so no I don't see anything you are suggesting is evidence of widespread critical thinking. The popularity of Fox shows that most conservatives are not interested in thinking critically about our issues.

    Tell them your anti white views.

    I'm not anti-White. I'm a realist and I don't engage in wishful thinking. US media has become refined in its ability to discourage independent thought. I don't view most White people as idiots if that is what you are inferring. Most aren't interested in politics and the minority that are trust Fox and CNN as valid news sources.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  258. @PhysicistDave
    @Steve Sailer

    Steve Sailer wrote to Hapalong Cassidy


    Ukraine’s stated war aims of returning to 2013 borders make good domestic politics in Ukraine considering how much Ukraininians hate Russians at present for invading. But 2021 borders seem more sensible war aims to me.
     
    Yeah.

    The best Ukraine has any hope of getting is that the four Donbass provinces and Crimea stay in Russia and Ukraine is Finlandized.

    That minimalist result would be in everyone's interest, including, I think, Russia's.

    But Putin has amassed a massive force that has the potential to conquer all of Ukraine.

    And that is not in everyone's interest.

    If Russia takes large casualties conquering Ukraine, Putin is going to be under political pressure to take more than the Donbass oblasts and Crimea.

    Odessa, almost certainly, and probably Kharkov. Quite possibly all of East Ukraine up to the Dnieper, as well as all of the territory west of the Dnieper that is part of "Novorossiya."

    That will lead to future conflict.

    It would be in everyone's interest to end this now. Not to mention the interests of the hundreds of thousands of Eastern Slav families who will lose sons, brothers, and fathers if this goes on.

    But the US Deep State does not want it to end.

    Replies: @John Johnson, @Alyosha

    There are only two Donbass oblasts, not four “provinces” as you said. You’re being quite sloppy as usual, and in this case you’re just wrong as well.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Alyosha

    He's not being sloppy - he's trying to gloss over that Russia has announced the annexation of FOUR oblasts (Donetsk, Kherson, Luhansk and Zaporizhzhia) even though at the start of the war only Donetsk and Luhansk were ostensible war aims.

    "Peace Advocate" Dave wants to do some sleight of hand and say, "how about Russia gets to keep FOUR oblasts (parts of which it doesn't actually occupy)? This deal good for one day only!"

    Sorry Dave, no one is going to fall for this. The Ukrainians are not naïve and know the value of "deals" with Russia (worthless) , not that they would take this deal anyway.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

    , @PhysicistDave
    @Alyosha

    Alyosha wrote to me:


    There are only two Donbass oblasts, not four “provinces” as you said.
     
    Well, I guess now there are four Donbass provinces.

    And now they are part of the Russian Federation.

    And forever more.

    As Dylan said, "The times they are a changin'."

    The world is no longer the world you grew up in, old lady.

    Live with it.

    Or don't.
  259. @Corvinus
    @John Johnson

    “I’m not digging anything. I clearly said it is my opinion from experience around Whites.”

    Exactly, YOUR opinion. Which is NOT absolute truth. Is it not likely that your own experiences can be subjected to recency bias and confirmation bias?

    Again, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    “Most White people are incapable of critical thinking unless pressed.”

    Yes, in your own individual experiences. That doesn’t mean it applies universally.

    “You ignored my question about which political show caters to critical thinking.”

    There’s not just one show or one publication. From bloggers to substacks, from Sunday news shows to CSPAN debates, white Americans locate and vet information. That’s reality.

    “Fetterman was an embarrassment in the debate”

    According to Who/Whom?

    “and Walker humiliated Hannity by making him draw up excuses for all his abortions and ex-girlfriends.”

    That’s all on Hannity, right?

    “Are critical thinkers not in charge of these parties? Why not if they are everywhere?”

    Trump is in charge of the GOP. 74 million people, most of them white, believe he is a critical thinker. Do you want to tell each one personally that it is YOUR opinion that they have a limited capacity to critically think?

    Go right ahead. Document it on social media. Tell them your anti white views.

    The fact is that tens of millions of Americans engage in critical thinking everyday, especially when it comes to the issues. You personally disagree, which is your liberty to do so.

    Are you done here?

    Replies: @John Johnson

    Exactly, YOUR opinion. Which is NOT absolute truth. Is it not likely that your own experiences can be subjected to recency bias and confirmation bias?

    This is a forum where we share our opinions. Feel free to disagree and try to not get so emotionally riled.

    Again, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    I’ve never said I am part of any elite. I’m fine with open debate and would have no problem with being introduced as the most un-elite person in the room. Let the audience decide who is actually engaging in critical thinking.

    I am an anti-leftist and I have no fear of open debate with them. In fact I had left-wing professors go after me early on in college for asking basic questions. I’ve had leftists go after me on a personal level. They are terrified of open debate and so are libertarians and establishment conservatives. Doesn’t matter if they call themselves elite or if they refer to me as some prole. I don’t really care about the labels they give me as long as I have an audience. Their ideologies are weak and I can expose them as such.

    Fetterman was an embarrassment in the debate

    According to Who/Whom?

    PA voters
    https://ellington.eldoradonews.com/news/2022/nov/04/the-painful-story-of-john-fettermans-embarrassing/

    Trump is in charge of the GOP. 74 million people, most of them white, believe he is a critical thinker.

    Trump is not in charge of the GOP. He holds no position of authority within the organization and will have to run in the primary like everyone else. DeSantis currently holds him in a lead:
    https://nypost.com/2022/12/14/desantis-leads-trump-among-gop-primary-voters-poll/

    Most Republicans were convinced he would win in the last election even though polling was showing that he was losing independents. His support with independents has fallen off a cliff so no I don’t see anything you are suggesting is evidence of widespread critical thinking. The popularity of Fox shows that most conservatives are not interested in thinking critically about our issues.

    Tell them your anti white views.

    I’m not anti-White. I’m a realist and I don’t engage in wishful thinking. US media has become refined in its ability to discourage independent thought. I don’t view most White people as idiots if that is what you are inferring. Most aren’t interested in politics and the minority that are trust Fox and CNN as valid news sources.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @John Johnson

    “Let the audience decide who is actually engaging in critical thinking.“

    But they can’t. You just stated 99 percent of whites lack the capacity. What makes you part of this one percent who can? Try not get so emotionally riled when you respond.

    “They are terrified of open debate…”

    Again, how can the supermajority of whites engage in this process if they need things essentially spooners to them?

    “Trump is not in charge of the GOP. He holds no position of authority within the organization…”

    Keep telling yourself that. He’s an ex-President who played kingmaker in the GOP primaries and who is running for re-election. Until he is defeated in the GOP primaries in 2024, he is its leader.

    “The popularity of Fox shows that most conservatives are not interested in thinking critically about our issues.”

    In your opinion, not objective truth.

    “Most aren’t interested in politics“

    In your opinion, not objective truth.

    “I’m a realist…”

    More like anti-white elitist. What makes you believe you know for certain that most whites cannot think for themselves? Can’t your own experiences be prone to recency and confirmation bias?

    Replies: @John Johnson

  260. @John Johnson
    @Corvinus

    Exactly, YOUR opinion. Which is NOT absolute truth. Is it not likely that your own experiences can be subjected to recency bias and confirmation bias?

    This is a forum where we share our opinions. Feel free to disagree and try to not get so emotionally riled.

    Again, are you part of this one percent elite who “have the energy or ability to do that (critically think)? Why?

    I've never said I am part of any elite. I'm fine with open debate and would have no problem with being introduced as the most un-elite person in the room. Let the audience decide who is actually engaging in critical thinking.

    I am an anti-leftist and I have no fear of open debate with them. In fact I had left-wing professors go after me early on in college for asking basic questions. I've had leftists go after me on a personal level. They are terrified of open debate and so are libertarians and establishment conservatives. Doesn't matter if they call themselves elite or if they refer to me as some prole. I don't really care about the labels they give me as long as I have an audience. Their ideologies are weak and I can expose them as such.


    Fetterman was an embarrassment in the debate
     
    According to Who/Whom?

    PA voters
    https://ellington.eldoradonews.com/news/2022/nov/04/the-painful-story-of-john-fettermans-embarrassing/

    Trump is in charge of the GOP. 74 million people, most of them white, believe he is a critical thinker.

    Trump is not in charge of the GOP. He holds no position of authority within the organization and will have to run in the primary like everyone else. DeSantis currently holds him in a lead:
    https://nypost.com/2022/12/14/desantis-leads-trump-among-gop-primary-voters-poll/

    Most Republicans were convinced he would win in the last election even though polling was showing that he was losing independents. His support with independents has fallen off a cliff so no I don't see anything you are suggesting is evidence of widespread critical thinking. The popularity of Fox shows that most conservatives are not interested in thinking critically about our issues.

    Tell them your anti white views.

    I'm not anti-White. I'm a realist and I don't engage in wishful thinking. US media has become refined in its ability to discourage independent thought. I don't view most White people as idiots if that is what you are inferring. Most aren't interested in politics and the minority that are trust Fox and CNN as valid news sources.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “Let the audience decide who is actually engaging in critical thinking.“

    But they can’t. You just stated 99 percent of whites lack the capacity. What makes you part of this one percent who can? Try not get so emotionally riled when you respond.

    “They are terrified of open debate…”

    Again, how can the supermajority of whites engage in this process if they need things essentially spooners to them?

    “Trump is not in charge of the GOP. He holds no position of authority within the organization…”

    Keep telling yourself that. He’s an ex-President who played kingmaker in the GOP primaries and who is running for re-election. Until he is defeated in the GOP primaries in 2024, he is its leader.

    “The popularity of Fox shows that most conservatives are not interested in thinking critically about our issues.”

    In your opinion, not objective truth.

    “Most aren’t interested in politics“

    In your opinion, not objective truth.

    “I’m a realist…”

    More like anti-white elitist. What makes you believe you know for certain that most whites cannot think for themselves? Can’t your own experiences be prone to recency and confirmation bias?

    • Replies: @John Johnson
    @Corvinus


    “Let the audience decide who is actually engaging in critical thinking.“
     
    But they can’t. You just stated 99 percent of whites lack the capacity. What makes you part of this one percent who can? Try not get so emotionally riled when you respond.

    I said they are unable to decipher modern media unless pressed. They aren't going to do it naturally and mainstream media programs do not encourage critical thinking.

    An open debate would not be modern media. All of their debates are scripted. They use controlled opposition and they don't bring in outsiders that could undermine the establishment. All the MSM outlets do it and that includes Fox.


    The popularity of Fox shows that most conservatives are not interested in thinking critically about our issues.
     
    In your opinion, not objective truth.

    So you can believe Fox can be trusted to provide all relevant points of view in a debate? What about race? Will they have a full debate when they promote charter schools as a solution to Black areas? Will they invite Steve for his opinion?


    Most aren’t interested in politics
     
    In your opinion, not objective truth.

    It's a data backed assertion. See: TV ratings for political shows and voting rates. 30% of Whites didn't vote in the last election:
    https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/561886-whos-not-voting-in-america/

    Do I need to really show the ratings of mainstream pop shows vs any political show?


    “I’m a realist…”
     
    More like anti-white elitist. What makes you believe you know for certain that most whites cannot think for themselves?

    I've been around over 1000 college educated Whites and have spent time in numerous political groups.

    I wouldn't trust more than 5% to watch a program from Tucker or Maddow and think critically about what is presented and possibly Google any remaining questions. Most people don't work that way and that includes most White people. Most White people find those shows to be torture and the fans tend to not ask questions. It doesn't matter how many degrees they have.

    It isn't an anti-White position. Our best hope to end clown world is in that 5%. Probably our only hope.

    The KGB and CIA reached a similar conclusion in leadership potential. I'm honestly surprised you are so offended by this. Most people go with the flow and it has been that way for thousands of years. White people are better than other races at questioning authority but it's really difficult for them in a modern world where the mainstream media has perfected its ability to promote conformity over criticism. That includes conservative media.

    Replies: @Corvinus

  261. @michael droy
    @Dave Pinsen

    100% right - anyone who claims now not to know that this is a slow artillery war that Ukraine has been consistently losing since the start is a deliberate liar.
    Strip out the "Ukraine is winning" comments in western media and all the rest is about artillery war, russian firing 3 or 10x the shells, Zelensky and co demanding more artillery weaponry, Western promises of more and the next wunder weapon that will out gun Russia.

    That is all the "news" we get amongst the obvious bs.

    Replies: @HA

    “100% right – anyone who claims now not to know that this is a slow artillery war that Ukraine has been consistently losing since the start is a deliberate liar.”

    Did you not even read the graphic accompanying that post, or were you confused by the word “paucity”? Look again — Russia is actually way BEHIND the US when it comes to military spending, and barely ahead of France and Germany. Good luck winning a “slow artillery war” (whatever nether region of your anatomy you pulled that phrase from) with numbers like that, not to mention a GDP the size of California or Canada.

    And consistently losing? That heroic Russian “withdrawal” (or whatever sugar-coated phrase you want to substitute for giving up a city they had controlled since March and poured enormous amounts of artillery into) doesn’t count as a loss at all? And how much artillery was on the Moskva? What about all those tanks they left behind in Kupyansk and all their other “strategic withdrawals”, to the extent that Russia has become Ukraine’s main heavy weapons supplier? How is that the “3x or 10x” artillery differential is proving insufficient to hold even Bakhmut, a city the Russians were crowing about having taken since August or earlier?

    “Hmm – if you see some of the videos on Telegram showing how Russia takes out Ukrainians,…”

    Ah, and there we have it. Michael Droy evidently gets his info on Ukraine by way of Telegram videos, and feels no need to broaden his sources (apart from whatever troll blog told him that “slow artillery war” is a good thing.) I mean, there’s your problem right there.

    Then again, go ahead and keep on doing what you’re doing. I dearly hope the Kremlin stooges planning this debacle of an operation have the same “trust the plan” naïveté that you so desperately cling to.

    The Wall Street Journal: Captured Russian weapons make up the largest supply of heavy weaponry for Ukraine

    According to open-source intelligence analysts interviewed by the Wall Street Journal, Ukraine’s rapid breakthrough in Kharkiv Oblast last month helped putting hundreds of pieces of Russian armor into Ukraine’s hands. This, combined with weapons taken during Russia’s retreat from Kyiv and other parts of northern Ukraine in April, has turned Russia into by far the largest supplier of heavy weapons to Ukraine. In sheer numbers, it put Moscow well ahead of the U.S. or other allies.

  262. Putin -like it or not-has gotten just about every single thing he has ever wanted. Whatever area he wanted to annex or whatever you want to call it-he got it

    Sure, if you announce vague goals and shift the goal posts at will, you are sure to achieve your goals.

    But even by that standard, you are wrong. Putin annexed Kharkiv and Kherson and no sooner had he annexed them but the Russian Army was forced to retreat from most of those provinces. So no, he don’t got it.

    And his hold on remaining territory is tenuous. He has been forced to relocate his command centers and aircraft well away from Ukrainian territory. If Rushists dare to approach to close inside of allegedly annexed territory, they might get their manhood blown off as just happened to the former head of the Russian space program, Rogozin. Rogozin is a sad case because he is an educated man who has lived in the West and who should have known better than to support the ultra-nationalist line. He is not a common criminal like Prigozhin, but he was blinded by his lust for money and power.

    Notice that Zelensky visited Bakhmut just last week, right on the front line, but Putin has not dared set foot anywhere near Ukraine.

    Anyway, whether Putin gets to keep even his temporary gains remains to be seen. As someone pointed out, Hitler had “achieved everything he wanted” by 1942 but then he proceeded to lost it all. If he had stayed in his 1939 borders he probably could have ruled for the rest of his miserable life but he overreached.

    Even if Putin gets to keep his territorial gains, he has made Russia a pariah state, he has lost his European markets for oil and gas, he has gotten 100,000 young Russian men killed and many more permanently disabled, he has caused hundreds of thousands more to flee. He has caused Finland and Sweden to join NATO. And for this he has control of a bunch of rubble when the one thing Russia is not short on to begin with was land.

    What Putin REALLY wanted was for the Kyiv regime to fall in a matter of days and for a Russia friendly puppet regime to be installed. The West would make a lot of speeches at the UN but in the end the Germans would still want their Russian gas. Everything has gone unimaginably worse than what he actually wanted and ever since then he has been improvising, largely ineffectually, to keep it all from going even further south. This is what actually happened and no amount of copium will change that reality.

    • Replies: @HA
    @Jack D

    "What Putin REALLY wanted was for the Kyiv regime to fall in a matter of days..."


    https://twitter.com/DarthPutinKGB/status/1608043793424457729

    , @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    LOL, f**k Europe. (To paraphrase the Cookie Monster)

    Modi, the Indian leader, made this point at the start of this whole crisis: Europe isn't important. Europeans need to get over the idea that the world revolves around them and their problems. India, China - the whole rest of the world - stands with Russia. Moscow "losing" Europe is of no account. Zero. Zip. Nada.

    Replies: @Jack D

  263. @Alyosha
    @PhysicistDave

    There are only two Donbass oblasts, not four "provinces" as you said. You're being quite sloppy as usual, and in this case you're just wrong as well.

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave

    He’s not being sloppy – he’s trying to gloss over that Russia has announced the annexation of FOUR oblasts (Donetsk, Kherson, Luhansk and Zaporizhzhia) even though at the start of the war only Donetsk and Luhansk were ostensible war aims.

    “Peace Advocate” Dave wants to do some sleight of hand and say, “how about Russia gets to keep FOUR oblasts (parts of which it doesn’t actually occupy)? This deal good for one day only!”

    Sorry Dave, no one is going to fall for this. The Ukrainians are not naïve and know the value of “deals” with Russia (worthless) , not that they would take this deal anyway.

    • LOL: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Jack D

    Jack D wrote to me:


    “Peace Advocate” Dave wants to do some sleight of hand and say, “how about Russia gets to keep FOUR oblasts (parts of which it doesn’t actually occupy)? This deal good for one day only!”

    Sorry Dave, no one is going to fall for this. The Ukrainians are not naïve and know the value of “deals” with Russia (worthless) , not that they would take this deal anyway.
     
    Unfortunately, Jack, I do not think Putin is any longer willing to offer any "deal" of any sort to the puppet regime in Kiev.

    Putin has massed over half a million troops for some purpose.

    I do not know any better than you exactly what he has planned -- a sweep westward from the Donbass, a sweep southeastward from Belorussia to encircle the remaining neo-Nazi forces in the Donbass, a sweep south to cut off supply lines from the West? All of the above? Something else?

    I don't know, but Kiev is losing men at a hellish rate.

    You Deep Staters had a chance to make a deal a few months ago.

    Not, I fear, any longer.

    And, so, tragically, a lot more people are going to die.

    Because of deeply evil monsters like you who refuse to apply the principle of self-determination of peoples to the different regions that made up the fake little country once and briefly known as Ukraine.

    Because you love seeing Eastern Slavs killing Eastern Slavs because of your family history.

    Because you are an enemy of the United States of America and of the human race.

    Because you are truly a monster.

    If there is a God, I hope he metes out to you the justice you so richly deserve.

    Replies: @Jack D, @John Johnson, @YetAnotherAnon

  264. @Dave Pinsen
    @Steve Sailer


    Where’s the Russian Air Force?
     
    It’s there.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1578239014028529664?s=46&t=xz4qv6SFq3ZlzYZMZ-T3oA

    Why hasn’t it achieved air supremacy?
     
    Two reasons, I suspect:

    1) Too many effective anti-aircraft weapons, most of them Russian-built, plus Western MANPADS.

    2) Fear of Russian pilots getting tortured to death if they survive getting shot down.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Fear of Russian pilots getting tortured to death if they survive getting shot down.

    Russia would prefer that pilots (and other troops) NOT be captured. They have circulated all sorts of propaganda about how if the Ukrainians take you prisoner they are going to cut your balls off, so you should kill yourself rather than be taken alive. They do this for two reasons: 1. to reinforce the idea that the Ukrainians are a bunch of Nazis and #2 because a captured Russian is a problem – Russia needs to give the Ukrainians something valuable (a Ukrainian prisoner) in exchange for a captive Russian. If you are dead, then no exchange is necessary (well maybe they can exchange your corpse). The famous Russian maxim, “no person, no problem” applies.

    The Ukrainians OTOH WANT to take prisoners for the exact opposite reasons – it gives them currency that they can use to get their own men back. And Ukraine allows its POW camps to be inspected by the Red Cross because it wants to be seen by its Western partners as abiding by the Geneva Conventions. Russia has not.

    Ukraine has exchanged hundreds of POWs (including many pilots) . It’s impossible to prove a negative (“Ukraine is not torturing any pilots to death”) but for sure they ain’t torturing them all because many have come back in one piece.

    For example, here is an interview by a Ukrainian journalist with a captured Russian pilot:

    He was later reported exchanged:

    https://euroweeklynews.com/2022/10/01/russian-pilot-aleksandr-krasnoyartsev-bombed-chernihiv-exchanged-prisoners-of-war/

    Zolkin has interviewed hundreds of Russian prisoners on his channel. A few report having been beaten after they are captured but most say that nothing happened to them and they were treated well. Many were wounded and received medical care in Ukraine (Russia tends to leave the wounded and dead behind.)

    Of course when they return to Russia they are pressured to say otherwise. One of the Wagner captives said a little bit too much in his interview and when he got back, Prigozhin had him executed on camera with a sledge hammer, so the smarter captives are cautious in what they say.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    Jack, you were the one who thought the murder of Dugin’s daughter by Ukrainian forces was no big deal.

    Replies: @Jack D

    , @James B. Shearer
    @Jack D

    The Ukrainians OTOH WANT to take prisoners for the exact opposite reasons .."

    They should want to take prisoners but that doesn't mean everyone has gotten the word (or is willing to listen).

  265. @Reg Cæsar
    @Anonymous


    Peter Thiel, a homo siding with Globohomo. Go figure.
     
    How very white of him.

    There are currently 32 countries where same-sex marriage is legal: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and Uruguay.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/FT_19.10.22_SSMsnapshot_featured.png?w=1200&h=628&crop=1


     

    The US should show the same color as Mexico-- Indian reservations are still free to set their own standards.


    More than two dozen countries have marriage equality, and more than half of these are in Western Europe...


    The expansion of LGBTQ+ rights around the globe has been uneven, with bans on same-sex relationships still in place in many countries.

    Marriage Equality: Global Comparisons (--CFR... remember them?)
     

    Taiwan is captive to Western markets, and in South Africa, as in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Austria, the US, and eight Canadian provinces, it was imposed by a high court ruling authored by a white judge. (Oh, and a court imposed it in Taiwan, too, though one assumes the judge wasn't white.)


    What you need to know about LGBT rights in 11 maps

    White people are sick. Civilization itself is built on marriage; it wouldn't exist otherwise. We've trivialized a critical pillar.

    Replies: @Richard B

    honest effort, something the Russians don’t seem to have an abundance of in this century.

    Like much of Steve’s cringe-corny fanboy comment section. Case in point:

    White people are sick.

    Oh brother. Or should I say, Oy vey!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Richard B

    One can imagine what Teddy Roosevelt would have to say about any society with "marriage equality". Or Winston Churchill. Or Rudyard Kipling. Or Francis Galton or Charles Darwin.

    Had any existed in their day, that is.

    Replies: @Jack D

  266. @Jack D
    @Dave Pinsen


    Fear of Russian pilots getting tortured to death if they survive getting shot down.
     
    Russia would prefer that pilots (and other troops) NOT be captured. They have circulated all sorts of propaganda about how if the Ukrainians take you prisoner they are going to cut your balls off, so you should kill yourself rather than be taken alive. They do this for two reasons: 1. to reinforce the idea that the Ukrainians are a bunch of Nazis and #2 because a captured Russian is a problem - Russia needs to give the Ukrainians something valuable (a Ukrainian prisoner) in exchange for a captive Russian. If you are dead, then no exchange is necessary (well maybe they can exchange your corpse). The famous Russian maxim, "no person, no problem" applies.

    The Ukrainians OTOH WANT to take prisoners for the exact opposite reasons - it gives them currency that they can use to get their own men back. And Ukraine allows its POW camps to be inspected by the Red Cross because it wants to be seen by its Western partners as abiding by the Geneva Conventions. Russia has not.

    Ukraine has exchanged hundreds of POWs (including many pilots) . It's impossible to prove a negative ("Ukraine is not torturing any pilots to death") but for sure they ain't torturing them all because many have come back in one piece.

    For example, here is an interview by a Ukrainian journalist with a captured Russian pilot:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QQJhtLcW2I

    He was later reported exchanged:

    https://euroweeklynews.com/2022/10/01/russian-pilot-aleksandr-krasnoyartsev-bombed-chernihiv-exchanged-prisoners-of-war/

    Zolkin has interviewed hundreds of Russian prisoners on his channel. A few report having been beaten after they are captured but most say that nothing happened to them and they were treated well. Many were wounded and received medical care in Ukraine (Russia tends to leave the wounded and dead behind.)

    Of course when they return to Russia they are pressured to say otherwise. One of the Wagner captives said a little bit too much in his interview and when he got back, Prigozhin had him executed on camera with a sledge hammer, so the smarter captives are cautious in what they say.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @James B. Shearer

    Jack, you were the one who thought the murder of Dugin’s daughter by Ukrainian forces was no big deal.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    How do we know that it was Ukrainian forces? If I had to guess, in light of all the people falling out of windows in Russia, I would have to guess that it was some internal dispute. If you think of the rulers of Russia as being a Mob like the Mafia or the Sinaloa Cartel, except that instead of capturing the lucrative drug trade, they have captured the even more lucrative hydrocarbon trade, you won't be far off. Once you look at them that way, a lot of the things in Russia begin to make a lot of sense.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  267. @Steve Sailer
    @Cagey Beast

    Putin fans can never admit that Russia has a moral problem with corruption, which is a huge part of why Putin's spies and his air force have failed so badly in this misbegotten war.

    Replies: @michael droy, @Sean, @Anonymo, @Corvinus, @rebel yell, @AndrewR, @Old Prude, @Chrisnonymous

    I don’t read every comment, but I don’t see much evidence of Putin fanboys in the comments. There is a larger component of contrarians like ID and US DOS/CIA skeptics like Physicist Dave. Your references to Putin fans definitely create the impression that you have a sportsball attitude to the war that actually mirrors what you incorrectly attribute to your critics.

    Your comments about corruption undermining Russian military preparedness and soft power projection are interesting. Would like to see actual reportage about that instead of the schoolyard level stuff.

    In general, I’d say your portrayal of conscripted Ukrainians being killed in large numbers as “bravely fighting for Ukraine” is cope to deal with the fact that the US is cynically using the Ukrainian people as cannon fodder in a war to support its own hegemony. But if your sportsball fantasy let’s you sleep at night, great.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    Both Putin and the CIA thought the Ukrainians would fold within days.

    In the most impressive display of nationalism of this century, they didn't.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Redman

    , @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    @Chrisnonymous

    It's amazing to see Steve Sailer do so much Fake Narrative.

    Putin resisting our Fake Elites is infuriating to him. Guys like him have a petulant, jealous reaction.


    Maybe he senses that a lot of Americans would rather have Putin as a co-citizen than our Fake Elites. Cowboys and Cossacks have a lot in common and should be brothers. Honestly, would you rather have Lavrov or Sailer as a co-citizen?

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  268. @Alyosha
    @PhysicistDave

    There are only two Donbass oblasts, not four "provinces" as you said. You're being quite sloppy as usual, and in this case you're just wrong as well.

    Replies: @Jack D, @PhysicistDave

    Alyosha wrote to me:

    There are only two Donbass oblasts, not four “provinces” as you said.

    Well, I guess now there are four Donbass provinces.

    And now they are part of the Russian Federation.

    And forever more.

    As Dylan said, “The times they are a changin’.”

    The world is no longer the world you grew up in, old lady.

    Live with it.

    Or don’t.

  269. @John Johnson
    @PhysicistDave

    The best Ukraine has any hope of getting is that the four Donbass provinces and Crimea stay in Russia and Ukraine is Finlandized.

    There are not four Donbas provinces.

    They're called Oblasts and only two are part of Donbas which further undermines his "protecting Donbas" excuse. The other two Oblasts are heavily pro-Ukrainian.

    If Russia takes large casualties conquering Ukraine, Putin is going to be under political pressure to take more than the Donbass oblasts and Crimea.

    He is currently under pressure to score any type of win and they still haven't taken Bakhmut.

    His 4 star general/former chef doesn't know what he is doing as seen by him sending out small waves of conscripts. Mostly squads without any type of air or armor support.

    Not even WW1 level tactics. Heck even Napolean wouldn't send out small waves of men against entrenched positions.

    See for yourself:
    https://funker530.com/video/ukrainian-artillery-brackets-and-destroys-russian-platoon/

    They're bunching up and running around like chickens.

    Russia is being managed by a dictator that skipped Modern Warfare 101. His main general was a chef in 2008 and his minster of defense is a former governor with zero military experience. All strange but true.

    Replies: @michael droy, @PhysicistDave

    My favorite Fed John Johnson wrote to me:

    They’re bunching up and running around like chickens.

    One of the things I find funny about you hasbara operatives is that you seem to really feel that arguing that Russia is failing will somehow make all your dreams come true.

    For eight months now, you guys have been dreaming that Russia was running out of missiles. But they just keep shooting their non-existent missiles at the Kievan targets.

    There is a material reality that goes beyond the words you spew out.

    And I am content to watch how that material reality plays out.

    It is not going to result in a Kievan military victory.

    I only regret that the killing continues to go on, because thugs like you have succeeded in preventing a negotiated peace.

    • Agree: Redman
  270. @Steve Sailer
    @Anonymo

    "Shouldn’t the same corruption problems be true of the Ukraine?"

    I met a Ukrainian "defense expert" who owned the single nicest piece of land I've seen in the Hollywood Hills.

    But, in this case, the obvious difference is that the Ukrainians are defending their country and the Russians are just screwing around in somebody else's country.

    So the Ukrainians are trying harder.

    All the Putin fan boys who keep claiming that Ukrainians are dying vastly more than Russians -- ask yourself why, by your own testimony, the Ukrainians are fighting more bravely than the Russians? Could it be because they are defending their country while the Russians are sent to conquer somebody else's country?

    Replies: @Anonymo, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Colin Wright, @TWS, @PhysicistDave, @YetAnotherAnon, @Redman

    I don’t understand the refusal to accept the obvious: this is a “civil war” that’s been going on for a while within Ukraine between nationalist Ukrainians and ethnic Russian Ukrainians. The latter had been seeking autonomy since 2014. This was never a planned “war of annexation.”

    No matter how much of this history is explained to many Americans (and Brits) I meet, they never change their view.

    You should read Mike Whitney on the UR. He was good on Covid too.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Redman

    This was never a planned “war of annexation.”

    So you are saying that Putin's announcement of his annexation of four Ukrainian provinces wasn't planned, that he's just winging it as his earlier plans fail?

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Redman

    , @Jack D
    @Redman


    I don’t understand the refusal to accept the obvious: this is a “civil war” that’s been going on for a while within Ukraine between nationalist Ukrainians and ethnic Russian Ukrainians. The latter had been seeking autonomy since 2014. This was never a planned “war of annexation.”
     
    Because it's not true. If it was a civil war, what are Russian Federation troops doing in Ukraine? When there was a Civil War in the US, there were no British or Mexican troops involved. If they were "seeking autonomy", why has Putin now annexed the breakaway territories into Russia (plus a bit more)? When there was a Civil War in the US, Mexico did not annex the Confederacy.

    The LPR and DPR were never autonomous in any meaningful sense, not for one day. They were never internationally recognized, even by Russia's "allies" such as China. They were armed and funded by Russia, their leaders took their orders from Moscow. They would not have lasted a week without Russian support. The idea that they were " autonomous" is pure Russian window dressing and I can't believe that anyone in the West would fall for it (unless they WANTED to fall for it).

    Replies: @Hibernian

  271. @Greta Handel
    @Mike Tre

    Deleting, or just Whimming? Mine on Mr. Sailer’s threads have always come through eventually, albeit as upthread blueberries.

    Mr. Unz, however, has recently been deleting my comments under his articles, including a refutation in a reply to his disparagement of my contributions here.

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    Unz has been deleting my comments that stand in opposition to his claims about the kovid since the bs started 2 1/2 years ago. He also limited my previous handle to one comment a day with no actions.

    Sailer whims occasionally, but I can see those comments with the “waiting to be moderated” message under them. The deleted ones are just gone.

    There were 4-5 commenters who are typically ubiquitous throughout every single post Sailer makes, and all were curiously absent from the first 180 comments or so, which is bizarre. I mentioned it. Comment deleted.

    • Thanks: Greta Handel
  272. @Loyalty Over IQ Worship
    The Goddamn Russians don't get it. We need to send our beautiful Admiral Levine to seduce them with her beauty.

    This transexual represents the best of the USA's ruling class.

    By the way, why don't we augment the Statue of Liberty? It needs to have some phallic appendage so that young men will know what they are fighting for. Long live Uncle Samantha!

    https://twitter.com/libsoftiktok/status/1607374539960336384

    Replies: @Mike Tre

    “By the way, why don’t we augment the Statue of Liberty? ”

    Easy, change the torch to a big flaming penis. the Huddled Masses will dig it.

  273. @michael droy
    @John Johnson


    They’re called Oblasts and only two are part of Donbas which further undermines his “protecting Donbas” excuse. The other two Oblasts are heavily pro-Ukrainian.
     
    They really are not pro-Ukrainian. This has been standard propaganda, but the queues of vehicles trying to cross from one side to the other have all been going away from Kiev.
    You may have seen Zelensky's arrival at Kherson city (surely the most pro-Ukrainian part of the Kherson Oblast) and the tepid support he got by 50 or so supporters.

    There used to be 24 Ukrainian oblasts (plus 2 special status cities and the Autonomous Republic of Crimea).

    Map: https://cdn.mappr.co/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/image-226.jpeg?w=2048&h=1449&scale.option=fill&cw=2048&ch=1449&cx=center&cy=center

    Pro-Russian parties won the last proper elections in 2008 (since when pro-Russian parties have been banned). Ukrainian elections was always a matter of narrow margins between pro-Russian and pro-Ukraine parties with the side that made most concessions to the other winning.

    Look at the map - the very idea that Zaporhizhzhya or Kherson were Pro-Kiev is laughable in a country split roughly 50/50. Even Kharkov and Dnipropetrovs'k are pro-Russian on balance.

    Indeed I suspect the reason Russia hung on to Kherson city (completely strategically unnecessarily) for so long was because it was such a red rag to the nazi bullish bullshit that claimed Kherson was pro-Kiev. That is why tens of thousands of poor blooden conscripts ended up dead or casualties attacking Kherson city for so long with out actually defeating Russia in battle.

    He is currently under pressure to score any type of win and they still haven’t taken Bakhmut.

     

    Still missing the point. Russia is not fighting for land it is fighting to kill large numbers of Ukrainian military (especially Nazis) for minimal Russian cost. Bakhmut like Kherson serve the same purpose.
    Whatever anecdotal videos you put out it is quite clear that when you commit 10 times the men against 10 times the shells in an artillery battle you lose.

    The smart thing for Ukraine to do is withdraw deeply and just keep shelling civilians from long distance (as they did to Donbas from 2015-2022 and still do. Make Russia take real risks in chasing Nazis across neutral or even pro-Kiev territory while actually giving the conscripts more than 5 weeks training. It is curious why they daren't do this. (TV pictures of queues of Ukrainians trying to get into Russian controlled Oblasts being the major downside).

    Replies: @HA

    “They really are not pro-Ukrainian. This has been standard propaganda, but the queues of vehicles trying to cross from one side to the other have all been going away from Kiev.”

    Yeah, the colonists and other people that Russia imported to replace the Ukrainians that lived there before are not going to be heading for Kyiv, i.e. the capital of the country they betrayed. So what? The ones that were left behind who didn’t openly collaborate with the Russians didn’t need to bother with fleeing — at least not until Russia subsequently showed them what their brotherly love really amounts to once they decided to flatten what they couldn’t conquer.

    “Pro-Russian parties won the last proper elections in 2008…”

    2008 was a long ago. Since then, Russia has swiped Crimea, installed mafia statelets in Donbass, and invaded the rest of the country. As noted earlier, that tends to put a crimp in the whole “Russians are our brothers” meme. Yes, the Kremlin invested heavily in their efforts to bribe the local government officials, given the importance of Kherson in ensuring Crimea’s water supply, and were successful enough to allow the city to fall quickly, but that explains why, when the Ukrainians took their city back, there were quite a number of collaborators people who thought it wise to heroically withdraw, tails between their legs. The fact that you find that indicative of anything just shows how desperate you are.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @HA


    Yeah, the colonists and other people that Russia imported to replace the Ukrainians that lived there before are not going to be heading for Kyiv [...]
     
    This is the sort of claim someone makes when he's got a dog in the fight. What's your ethnic background?

    Replies: @HA

  274. @Jack D

    Putin -like it or not-has gotten just about every single thing he has ever wanted. Whatever area he wanted to annex or whatever you want to call it-he got it
     
    Sure, if you announce vague goals and shift the goal posts at will, you are sure to achieve your goals.

    But even by that standard, you are wrong. Putin annexed Kharkiv and Kherson and no sooner had he annexed them but the Russian Army was forced to retreat from most of those provinces. So no, he don't got it.

    And his hold on remaining territory is tenuous. He has been forced to relocate his command centers and aircraft well away from Ukrainian territory. If Rushists dare to approach to close inside of allegedly annexed territory, they might get their manhood blown off as just happened to the former head of the Russian space program, Rogozin. Rogozin is a sad case because he is an educated man who has lived in the West and who should have known better than to support the ultra-nationalist line. He is not a common criminal like Prigozhin, but he was blinded by his lust for money and power.

    Notice that Zelensky visited Bakhmut just last week, right on the front line, but Putin has not dared set foot anywhere near Ukraine.

    Anyway, whether Putin gets to keep even his temporary gains remains to be seen. As someone pointed out, Hitler had "achieved everything he wanted" by 1942 but then he proceeded to lost it all. If he had stayed in his 1939 borders he probably could have ruled for the rest of his miserable life but he overreached.

    Even if Putin gets to keep his territorial gains, he has made Russia a pariah state, he has lost his European markets for oil and gas, he has gotten 100,000 young Russian men killed and many more permanently disabled, he has caused hundreds of thousands more to flee. He has caused Finland and Sweden to join NATO. And for this he has control of a bunch of rubble when the one thing Russia is not short on to begin with was land.

    What Putin REALLY wanted was for the Kyiv regime to fall in a matter of days and for a Russia friendly puppet regime to be installed. The West would make a lot of speeches at the UN but in the end the Germans would still want their Russian gas. Everything has gone unimaginably worse than what he actually wanted and ever since then he has been improvising, largely ineffectually, to keep it all from going even further south. This is what actually happened and no amount of copium will change that reality.

    Replies: @HA, @Anonymous

    “What Putin REALLY wanted was for the Kyiv regime to fall in a matter of days…”

  275. @HA
    @michael droy

    "They really are not pro-Ukrainian. This has been standard propaganda, but the queues of vehicles trying to cross from one side to the other have all been going away from Kiev."

    Yeah, the colonists and other people that Russia imported to replace the Ukrainians that lived there before are not going to be heading for Kyiv, i.e. the capital of the country they betrayed. So what? The ones that were left behind who didn't openly collaborate with the Russians didn't need to bother with fleeing -- at least not until Russia subsequently showed them what their brotherly love really amounts to once they decided to flatten what they couldn't conquer.

    "Pro-Russian parties won the last proper elections in 2008..."

    2008 was a long ago. Since then, Russia has swiped Crimea, installed mafia statelets in Donbass, and invaded the rest of the country. As noted earlier, that tends to put a crimp in the whole "Russians are our brothers" meme. Yes, the Kremlin invested heavily in their efforts to bribe the local government officials, given the importance of Kherson in ensuring Crimea's water supply, and were successful enough to allow the city to fall quickly, but that explains why, when the Ukrainians took their city back, there were quite a number of collaborators people who thought it wise to heroically withdraw, tails between their legs. The fact that you find that indicative of anything just shows how desperate you are.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    Yeah, the colonists and other people that Russia imported to replace the Ukrainians that lived there before are not going to be heading for Kyiv […]

    This is the sort of claim someone makes when he’s got a dog in the fight. What’s your ethnic background?

    • Replies: @HA
    @Cagey Beast

    "This is the sort of claim someone makes when he’s got a dog in the fight. What’s your ethnic background?"

    Whatever ethnic background is implied by the steadfast insistence -- going as far back as when Crimea was first swiped -- that if Putin had just done what his predecessors had done with Belarus or what Nuland allegedly did with Ukraine, he could have won over the entire country, and everyone would have simply had to admit that he had stolen it fair and square. But he didn't do that. Instead, he violated the Budapest Memorandum and thereby forced the US to pay attention to a part of the world they couldn't care less about (though they had no trouble caring back when the Budapest Memorandum was signed, and they were haranguing and arm-twisting everyone to try and avoid a "Yugoslavia with nukes" dissolution of the USSR).

    So THAT is my dog in the fight -- consistently telling every fanboy who would listen that Putin could have played it the way he usually did -- some combo of bribes, blackmail, polonium, etc. -- and kept it all on the down low, and thereby gotten the whole country wrapped up in a pastry basket, and no one but an actual Ukrainian (or maybe a Pole) would have even cared. You really have a problem with that?

    So you tell us, genius -- what ethnicity does that make me, given that I don't care what Putin does to Ukraine so long as he does it without flagrantly violating agreements which the US midwifed? PhysicistDave ran the numbers and said I'm... wait for it... Croatian! Or else, given the frequent hasbara indication, he thinks I'm a rhymes-with-you-know-who. Earlier, he has come up with self-hating Russian, a Five Eyes ex-pat, and who knows what else. Regardless, if this is how the two of you try and make sense of the world, it's no wonder you make almost no sense at all.

    Replies: @PhysicistDave

  276. @Redman
    @Steve Sailer

    I don’t understand the refusal to accept the obvious: this is a “civil war” that’s been going on for a while within Ukraine between nationalist Ukrainians and ethnic Russian Ukrainians. The latter had been seeking autonomy since 2014. This was never a planned “war of annexation.”

    No matter how much of this history is explained to many Americans (and Brits) I meet, they never change their view.

    You should read Mike Whitney on the UR. He was good on Covid too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jack D

    This was never a planned “war of annexation.”

    So you are saying that Putin’s announcement of his annexation of four Ukrainian provinces wasn’t planned, that he’s just winging it as his earlier plans fail?

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @Steve Sailer

    It's clear from his comment that he's saying this war started in 2014 and was not planned as a war of annexation. It now is one and Putin himself has laid out how Russia got here.

    , @Redman
    @Steve Sailer

    Putin clearly started the SMO with the intent (and hope since nothing was guaranteed) to neuter the Ukraine military to protect the security of the new autonomous Donbas states. But when Ukraine didn’t fall in the first month he went to plan B.

    The people in Luhansk and Donetsk didn’t initially want to become part of Russia but preferred to remain autonomous Russian speaking Ukrainians. When facts interfered with that (i.e. the West decided this was the hill they preferred to die defending with much of its collective armory) the ethnic Russian Ukrainians decided to vote to become part of Russia with Putin’s blessing.

    Wars are fluid so it’s hard to say what Putin’s plans C and D might entail. But giving up the Donbas is definitely not part of them now.

  277. @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't read every comment, but I don't see much evidence of Putin fanboys in the comments. There is a larger component of contrarians like ID and US DOS/CIA skeptics like Physicist Dave. Your references to Putin fans definitely create the impression that you have a sportsball attitude to the war that actually mirrors what you incorrectly attribute to your critics.

    Your comments about corruption undermining Russian military preparedness and soft power projection are interesting. Would like to see actual reportage about that instead of the schoolyard level stuff.

    In general, I'd say your portrayal of conscripted Ukrainians being killed in large numbers as "bravely fighting for Ukraine" is cope to deal with the fact that the US is cynically using the Ukrainian people as cannon fodder in a war to support its own hegemony. But if your sportsball fantasy let's you sleep at night, great.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    Both Putin and the CIA thought the Ukrainians would fold within days.

    In the most impressive display of nationalism of this century, they didn’t.

    • Thanks: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @Steve Sailer

    As far as Washington is concerned Ukrainian nationalists are just fuel for the fire. The US/EU/NATO have as much sympathy for Ukrainian nationalism as they did for the Islamic State back when they were all insisting "Assad must go!".

    , @Redman
    @Steve Sailer

    One could argue that the Afghans exhibited the most impressive display of nationalism this century. They withstood US occupation for most of it and now have billions of dollars worth of US arms left behind for their effort.

    Ukraine still might be reduced to rubble before the anniversary of the SMO. We shall see fairly soon it appears. At least according to Ritter and MacGregor.

    Replies: @Hunsdon, @Colin Wright

  278. @Steve Sailer
    @Redman

    This was never a planned “war of annexation.”

    So you are saying that Putin's announcement of his annexation of four Ukrainian provinces wasn't planned, that he's just winging it as his earlier plans fail?

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Redman

    It’s clear from his comment that he’s saying this war started in 2014 and was not planned as a war of annexation. It now is one and Putin himself has laid out how Russia got here.

  279. @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    Both Putin and the CIA thought the Ukrainians would fold within days.

    In the most impressive display of nationalism of this century, they didn't.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @Redman

    As far as Washington is concerned Ukrainian nationalists are just fuel for the fire. The US/EU/NATO have as much sympathy for Ukrainian nationalism as they did for the Islamic State back when they were all insisting “Assad must go!”.

  280. @Chrisnonymous
    @Steve Sailer

    I don't read every comment, but I don't see much evidence of Putin fanboys in the comments. There is a larger component of contrarians like ID and US DOS/CIA skeptics like Physicist Dave. Your references to Putin fans definitely create the impression that you have a sportsball attitude to the war that actually mirrors what you incorrectly attribute to your critics.

    Your comments about corruption undermining Russian military preparedness and soft power projection are interesting. Would like to see actual reportage about that instead of the schoolyard level stuff.

    In general, I'd say your portrayal of conscripted Ukrainians being killed in large numbers as "bravely fighting for Ukraine" is cope to deal with the fact that the US is cynically using the Ukrainian people as cannon fodder in a war to support its own hegemony. But if your sportsball fantasy let's you sleep at night, great.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    It’s amazing to see Steve Sailer do so much Fake Narrative.

    Putin resisting our Fake Elites is infuriating to him. Guys like him have a petulant, jealous reaction.

    Maybe he senses that a lot of Americans would rather have Putin as a co-citizen than our Fake Elites. Cowboys and Cossacks have a lot in common and should be brothers. Honestly, would you rather have Lavrov or Sailer as a co-citizen?

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

    I don't understand Sailer's take on Ukraine, but if he were dictator of the USA, our country would be way better off than it is now. So, I want a geopolitical situation where Sailer and Lavrov can be on the same side.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Loyalty Over IQ Worship

  281. @Redman
    @Steve Sailer

    I don’t understand the refusal to accept the obvious: this is a “civil war” that’s been going on for a while within Ukraine between nationalist Ukrainians and ethnic Russian Ukrainians. The latter had been seeking autonomy since 2014. This was never a planned “war of annexation.”

    No matter how much of this history is explained to many Americans (and Brits) I meet, they never change their view.

    You should read Mike Whitney on the UR. He was good on Covid too.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Jack D

    I don’t understand the refusal to accept the obvious: this is a “civil war” that’s been going on for a while within Ukraine between nationalist Ukrainians and ethnic Russian Ukrainians. The latter had been seeking autonomy since 2014. This was never a planned “war of annexation.”

    Because it’s not true. If it was a civil war, what are Russian Federation troops doing in Ukraine? When there was a Civil War in the US, there were no British or Mexican troops involved. If they were “seeking autonomy”, why has Putin now annexed the breakaway territories into Russia (plus a bit more)? When there was a Civil War in the US, Mexico did not annex the Confederacy.

    The LPR and DPR were never autonomous in any meaningful sense, not for one day. They were never internationally recognized, even by Russia’s “allies” such as China. They were armed and funded by Russia, their leaders took their orders from Moscow. They would not have lasted a week without Russian support. The idea that they were ” autonomous” is pure Russian window dressing and I can’t believe that anyone in the West would fall for it (unless they WANTED to fall for it).

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Jack D


    When there was a Civil War in the US, there were no British or Mexican troops involved.
     
    The UK intervened in various ways and had military liasions to the Confederacy including field observers. The UK eventually paid at least in part the Alabama claims for construction of a Confederate commerce raider in a British shipyard.

    The French took over Mexico during the War except for pockets of resistance. This regime collapsed soon after the final victory of the Union.
  282. @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    Jack, you were the one who thought the murder of Dugin’s daughter by Ukrainian forces was no big deal.

    Replies: @Jack D

    How do we know that it was Ukrainian forces? If I had to guess, in light of all the people falling out of windows in Russia, I would have to guess that it was some internal dispute. If you think of the rulers of Russia as being a Mob like the Mafia or the Sinaloa Cartel, except that instead of capturing the lucrative drug trade, they have captured the even more lucrative hydrocarbon trade, you won’t be far off. Once you look at them that way, a lot of the things in Russia begin to make a lot of sense.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jack D

    Jack, that’s a bunch of baloney. Dugan is just a writer. He and his daughter were not part of a power structure.

    Russia is not just one big mafia operation either. The extreme anti-Russian bigotry you guys have is shocking. They’re is corruption in Ukraine and Russia and the United States for that matter. But this isn’t real analysis, this is just you demonizing a people you want to destroy.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @John Johnson

  283. @Kim

    It must have taken a lot of honest effort, something the Russians don't seem to have an abundance of in this century
     
    Well, I recognize that this is an attempt at slander, the format tells me that, but what is the basis of the claim?

    Meanwhile, it might be a good thing the Russians haven't been trying:

    Russia launches 7000mph Zircon hypersonic nuke missile

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YZW8oMo8Irk

    Replies: @meh, @Bill Jones, @YetAnotherAnon, @Hypnotoad666, @Jack D, @GAnon

    SM-3 operationally intercepted a projectile traveling ~17,000 MPH almost 20 years ago. The maximum (take Russian cope factor into account) velocity of a Zircon, yet to be operationally deployed in the current year, is ~6,000 mph. Keep in mind to achieve these speeds, it must make the projectile utterly reliant on cueing data from a third party, and has limited to no maneuverability in the terminal phase.

    Do with that information what you will. Maybe there is a reason Kiev isn’t in Russian hands yet.

  284. Anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    @Anonymous

    How do we know that it was Ukrainian forces? If I had to guess, in light of all the people falling out of windows in Russia, I would have to guess that it was some internal dispute. If you think of the rulers of Russia as being a Mob like the Mafia or the Sinaloa Cartel, except that instead of capturing the lucrative drug trade, they have captured the even more lucrative hydrocarbon trade, you won't be far off. Once you look at them that way, a lot of the things in Russia begin to make a lot of sense.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Jack, that’s a bunch of baloney. Dugan is just a writer. He and his daughter were not part of a power structure.

    Russia is not just one big mafia operation either. The extreme anti-Russian bigotry you guys have is shocking. They’re is corruption in Ukraine and Russia and the United States for that matter. But this isn’t real analysis, this is just you demonizing a people you want to destroy.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Anonymous

    Agree but out of [agree]s.

    , @John Johnson
    @Anonymous

    Russia is not just one big mafia operation either. The extreme anti-Russian bigotry you guys have is shocking. They’re is corruption in Ukraine and Russia and the United States for that matter. But this isn’t real analysis, this is just you demonizing a people you want to destroy.

    Russia is not one big mafia operation? How would a Jewish chef become a 4 star general in less than 10 years? Do you realize that a chef with zero military experience is in charge of the main front?

    Putin's chef turned military contractor
    https://news.yahoo.com/meet-yevgeny-prigozhin-putins-chef-232047687.html

    The minister of defense also has zero military experience and was a governor up until 2012:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Shoigu

    That is madness.

    You are really going to tell me this isn't a mafia government? Do you realize how many former allies of Putin have fallen down stairs or out of windows?

    Full list of Russians who fell to their deaths in 2022
    https://www.newsweek.com/every-russians-who-fell-death-ukraine-war-started-this-year-2022-pavel-antov-1769951

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @BB753, @Anonymous, @Dnought

  285. @Steve Sailer
    @michael droy

    Putin's military genius cannot be impugned.

    Replies: @Cagey Beast, @BB753, @Redman

    This was actually Surovikin’s tactics, not Putin. When Putin put him in charge to consolidate the various militias (with different generals) who’d been fighting the SMO independently, and decided this was a real war, he turned tactics over to the most experienced general in the RF.

    Surovikin saw no military advantage in keeping Kherson City on the other side of the Dnieper.

    The RF needed to build up its forces to fight a real war against NATO (which this now is). Keeping a city like Kherson with weak logistical support on the other side of the river provided no military advantage.

  286. @Jack D
    @Redman


    I don’t understand the refusal to accept the obvious: this is a “civil war” that’s been going on for a while within Ukraine between nationalist Ukrainians and ethnic Russian Ukrainians. The latter had been seeking autonomy since 2014. This was never a planned “war of annexation.”
     
    Because it's not true. If it was a civil war, what are Russian Federation troops doing in Ukraine? When there was a Civil War in the US, there were no British or Mexican troops involved. If they were "seeking autonomy", why has Putin now annexed the breakaway territories into Russia (plus a bit more)? When there was a Civil War in the US, Mexico did not annex the Confederacy.

    The LPR and DPR were never autonomous in any meaningful sense, not for one day. They were never internationally recognized, even by Russia's "allies" such as China. They were armed and funded by Russia, their leaders took their orders from Moscow. They would not have lasted a week without Russian support. The idea that they were " autonomous" is pure Russian window dressing and I can't believe that anyone in the West would fall for it (unless they WANTED to fall for it).

    Replies: @Hibernian

    When there was a Civil War in the US, there were no British or Mexican troops involved.

    The UK intervened in various ways and had military liasions to the Confederacy including field observers. The UK eventually paid at least in part the Alabama claims for construction of a Confederate commerce raider in a British shipyard.

    The French took over Mexico during the War except for pockets of resistance. This regime collapsed soon after the final victory of the Union.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
  287. @Cagey Beast
    @HA


    Yeah, the colonists and other people that Russia imported to replace the Ukrainians that lived there before are not going to be heading for Kyiv [...]
     
    This is the sort of claim someone makes when he's got a dog in the fight. What's your ethnic background?

    Replies: @HA

    “This is the sort of claim someone makes when he’s got a dog in the fight. What’s your ethnic background?”

    Whatever ethnic background is implied by the steadfast insistence — going as far back as when Crimea was first swiped — that if Putin had just done what his predecessors had done with Belarus or what Nuland allegedly did with Ukraine, he could have won over the entire country, and everyone would have simply had to admit that he had stolen it fair and square. But he didn’t do that. Instead, he violated the Budapest Memorandum and thereby forced the US to pay attention to a part of the world they couldn’t care less about (though they had no trouble caring back when the Budapest Memorandum was signed, and they were haranguing and arm-twisting everyone to try and avoid a “Yugoslavia with nukes” dissolution of the USSR).

    So THAT is my dog in the fight — consistently telling every fanboy who would listen that Putin could have played it the way he usually did — some combo of bribes, blackmail, polonium, etc. — and kept it all on the down low, and thereby gotten the whole country wrapped up in a pastry basket, and no one but an actual Ukrainian (or maybe a Pole) would have even cared. You really have a problem with that?

    So you tell us, genius — what ethnicity does that make me, given that I don’t care what Putin does to Ukraine so long as he does it without flagrantly violating agreements which the US midwifed? PhysicistDave ran the numbers and said I’m… wait for it… Croatian! Or else, given the frequent hasbara indication, he thinks I’m a rhymes-with-you-know-who. Earlier, he has come up with self-hating Russian, a Five Eyes ex-pat, and who knows what else. Regardless, if this is how the two of you try and make sense of the world, it’s no wonder you make almost no sense at all.

    • Troll: Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @HA

    My little buddy HAsbara wrote to Cagey Beast:


    [CB] “This is the sort of claim someone makes when he’s got a dog in the fight. What’s your ethnic background?”

    [HAsbara] Whatever ethnic background is implied by the steadfast insistence...
     
    Why are you so afraid to tell us what country you live in, what country you were born in, to which country you owe allegiance, etc.?

    It won't blow your cover -- no one would know what street you live on or where your house is.

    But it might sort of wreck the hasbara game, eh?

    I have had no qualms about saying, for many, many years, that my name is Dave Miller and that I live in Sacramento. I have given out details about what schools I went to (from high school through grad school), about places I have worked and patents that I am co-inventor on, etc. Anyone who wants to confirm that could easily do so.

    And my allegiance is to the American Republic. And I am an inveterate enemy of the unconstitutional US Deep State.

    Bizarrely, you once threatened me that if Ron gave info about me to the Feds then I would be in a lot of trouble. What makes this so bizarre is that I worked for many years for the US Intel Community -- I assure you, they know how to get in touch! They're good at that sort of thing.

    But what are you afraid of, HAsbara?

    Except, of course, diminishing your hasbara value?

    There must be a negotiated peace that respects the right of self-determination of peoples, laid out in Article 1 of the Charter of the United Nations, and applied to the people of the Donbass and Novorossiya.


    So that the killing will stop.
  288. @Intelligent Dasein
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    All of the sudden, he completely believes the MSM that he mocks for a living. It’s bizarre.
     
    That's not the correct way to approach this subject.

    Whenever Steve goes off the rails about something, which he routinely does about Covid and Ukraine, there arises a vocal minority in the comments section that accuses him of "believing the mainstream media," as if that was a capital sin to be avoided at all costs. It isn't that simple. You can't find a shortcut to the truth just by inverting whatever the mainstream media says. And in any case, when you start speculating about what Steve believes about what the mainstream media says, you've prescinded very far from the topic at hand.

    Let's look at Steve's reaction to Covid as a case a point. From the very beginning of the pandemic, there was more than enough information in the mainstream media for people to draw the correct conclusions. There was, notably, the Diamond Princess data, which should have demonstrated to all and sundry that Covid 19 was not a dangerous disease and did not warrant any special containment protocols. The quite influenza-like (and safely low) Total Case Fatality Rate of 0.23% was early calculated from data readily available in the mainstream media, and that figure was itself recycled many times through the mainstream media. The lack of clinical data regarding vaccine efficacy, the dangers of vaccine side effects, the risk of myocarditis, various European governments cancelling their vaccine recommendations for young people---all of this was published in close to real time in the mainstream media.

    None of it mattered. The Kovid Karens, which happen to include Steve Sailer, were determined to have their pandemic party come hell or high water. They did this not because they innocently believed a pack of lies told them by the Evil MSM, but because the mood had already descended upon them for other reasons. We can talk about what those reasons were later, but the point at present is to dispel the notion that it all originated with the media.

    Now, this is not to say that people like Steve didn't selectively use MSM reports to support their fantastical version of events. This is not to say that chief pandemicists like Fauci did not actively try to shape the message through their media appearances and their influence over media outlets. This is not to say that most people working in the MSM were not Kovid Karens themselves who put out deliberately misleading information. All of this did happen, but the truth still leaked out, as it always does. The truth was never really that hard to find. Steve was not misled; he believes what he believes because he wants to.

    When it comes to Ukraine, there is likewise plenty of mainstream information out there from which truth can be inferred. Russia clearly cannot be "running out of weapons" when she still hasn't even finished burning through her backlog of 40-year-old artillery shells yet. The Russian military cannot be "embarrassing itself in Ukraine" when, by and large, the Russian military hasn't even entered Ukraine yet. All the fighting has been done by the Donbass militias and Wagner group, which have so far successfully destroyed more than 50% of the Ukrainian military. Once again, Steve believes what he believes because he wants to.

    And as we can see from the peevish tone of his replies in this thread, those beliefs are both very personal and very much under assault from the facts.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Corvinus, @BB753, @Hypnotoad666, @Redman

    Very astute post.

    These are the same “beliefs” I find with a massive number of conservative (even very pro-Trump) friends and acquaintances. They’ll talk about almost any topic that goes against the MSM grain. But when I bring up the Ukraine war they become hostile towards me. All logic shuts down. It’s like they believe “we” are at war and their lives depended upon supporting the Joe Biden-controlled military or we will all be speaking Russian soon.

    • Thanks: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    @Redman

    Redman wrote to Intelligent Dasein :


    But when I bring up the Ukraine war they become hostile towards me. All logic shuts down. It’s like they believe “we” are at war and their lives depended upon supporting the Joe Biden-controlled military or we will all be speaking Russian soon.
     
    Yeah.

    Humans have this rather intense tribalist instinct. It's why almost none of us have any reservations about rooting for the "home-town team."

    It's not all bad: it is good to care more about your neighbors than the people across town and more about the people across town than the people half-way around the world. Indeed, the people who pretend to care more about people half-way around the world than about their own neighbors are always lying hypocrites who want to virtue signal rather than actually help their fellow human beings.

    But the ruling elite know how to manipulate this basically healthy instinct and use it to control and dominate ordinary people and distract ordinary people from the real enemy -- the ruling elite. A number of the commenters here -- "John Johnson," HA, Jack D, etc. know how to manipulate people in that way.

    By the way, a lot of critics of the ruling elite claim that the elite lack this normal human ability to identify with your own group. That's not true at all: the members of the ruling elite have an extraordinarily strong sense of group identity.

    It's just that the group they identify with is not their fellow citizens. It's the other members of the ruling elite.
  289. @Corvinus
    @John Johnson

    “Let the audience decide who is actually engaging in critical thinking.“

    But they can’t. You just stated 99 percent of whites lack the capacity. What makes you part of this one percent who can? Try not get so emotionally riled when you respond.

    “They are terrified of open debate…”

    Again, how can the supermajority of whites engage in this process if they need things essentially spooners to them?

    “Trump is not in charge of the GOP. He holds no position of authority within the organization…”

    Keep telling yourself that. He’s an ex-President who played kingmaker in the GOP primaries and who is running for re-election. Until he is defeated in the GOP primaries in 2024, he is its leader.

    “The popularity of Fox shows that most conservatives are not interested in thinking critically about our issues.”

    In your opinion, not objective truth.

    “Most aren’t interested in politics“

    In your opinion, not objective truth.

    “I’m a realist…”

    More like anti-white elitist. What makes you believe you know for certain that most whites cannot think for themselves? Can’t your own experiences be prone to recency and confirmation bias?

    Replies: @John Johnson

    “Let the audience decide who is actually engaging in critical think