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From the Washington Post news section:

How Bubba Wallace ended up assigned to a garage stall containing a noose

By Liz Clarke
June 24, 2020 at 5:23 p.m. PDT

The tumultuous sequence of events that followed Sunday’s discovery of a rope tied into a noose and used as a garage door pull at Talladega Superspeedway appears to have resulted primarily from one assumption and one massive coincidence.

Nobody has released a close-up photo of the “noose” for knot experts to evaluate, but nobody who knows much about knots imagines it would be an actual noose, which is a type of slip knot that would be sub-optimal for a loop to tug on at the end of the rope for pulling the garage door down. Guys who work on race car crews tend to be pretty competent at things like tying knots.

The assumption was that the noose was deliberately placed in the garage stall assigned to the team of NASCAR’s only African American driver in its Cup series, Bubba Wallace, and intended as a threat of racial violence.

The coincidence, one that to many strains credulity, is that Wallace’s team ended up being assigned the only stall among the 44 in Talladega’s infield garage that had a noose that served as a door pull.

In reality, The Last Refuge came up with lots of video of the Talladega garage in recent years showing that many stalls had their garage door pull ropes fashioned into loops that the ignorant and delusional might imagine were nooses.

On Tuesday, 48 hours after the noose was discovered, the FBI announced that no hate crime had been committed because its investigation, which involved 15 agents, concluded that the rope, which the FBI referred to as “a noose” four times in its statement, had been in that particular garage stall since at least October 2019, when the Cup Series last raced at the 2.66-mile Alabama track.

For that reason, the FBI concluded it couldn’t have been a hate crime because no one could have known that Wallace’s No. 43 Chevrolet would have been assigned that stall. It was a coincidence, in other words, and enough to consider the case closed.

NASCAR officials, however, remain sufficiently troubled to continue their internal investigation into why the rope-pull in one of its garages was tied in a noose. Was it simply to lower the garage door via the only knot someone knew how to tie? Or was it to send a racist message that was easily deniable, given the noose’s role as a door pull?

The former is benign. The latter is cause for concern for NASCAR and for any company attempting to project the value of inclusion, even it [sic] doesn’t rise to the level of a hate crime.

As NASCAR’s investigation goes on, the multiple unanswered questions, as well as the intricacies of the sport’s garage stall assignment policy, have sowed broad confusion, deepened skepticism among many and hardened the positions of conspiracists who either reject the FBI’s findings or are convinced Wallace staged the scene.

As many fans struggle to make sense of the sequence of events, several facts are not in dispute, at least in the view of the FBI and NASCAR:

There was a noose in Talladega’s No. 4 stall, which Wallace’s team was assigned. The FBI referred to it as a noose four times; NASCAR President Steve Phelps referred to it as a noose several times as well.

Show us a close-up photo.

It had been there for at least eight months, confirmed by grainy background footage of a video interview shot in the walkway in front of the stall in October 2019, when the Wood brothers team occupied the spot.

No other Talladega stall had a rope-pull fashioned like a noose.

Lots of them have had them, as can be seen in video.

Wallace, 26, whose call for NASCAR to ban displays of the Confederate flag at its tracks this month was instrumental in Phelps announcing that long-discussed step June 10, issued a statement Wednesday saying he was “relieved” that investigators concluded that what had been feared wasn’t the case. And he vowed that the controversy would not detract from the show of unity by drivers and crew members at the start of Monday’s rain-postponed race or the progress stock-car racing has made to be more welcoming.

Racial tensions already were high when NASCAR’s Cup series turned to Talladega, one hour east of Birmingham, for Sunday’s scheduled race. NASCAR’s biggest and fastest track, Talladega is also the most muscular symbol of stock-car racing’s following in the Deep South, built on land donated to NASCAR founder Bill France in 1968 by his good friend and Alabama’s then-governor, George C. Wallace.

It’s also the track where the Confederate flag is most prevalent in the infield, flown by fans who view it as a symbol of a proud, defiant heritage and love NASCAR for much the same reason.

Although 5,000 spectators were admitted Sunday for what was NASCAR’s second race since the Confederate flag ban was announced, several protesters gathered outside the track to display their flags, and a plane flew overhead toting a Confederate flag banner proclaiming “DEFUND NASCAR.”

Wallace says noose incident ‘makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up’

Before each race, NASCAR assigns garage stalls based on the current season point standings, with the leader getting the most desirable — typically the one closest to the track entrance, for easy access on and off during frenzied practice sessions, the number of which varies from track to track. The second-place team gets the next stall, the third-place team gets the next stall and so on.

Wallace was 20th in the standings entering the race at Talladega, so normally he would have been assigned the stall 19 spots down from points leader Kevin Harvick.

But under novel coronavirus protocols, NASCAR groups multicar teams together to limit social interaction in the garage.

So Sunday at Talladega, the preferred stall went to Harvick as the points leader, and his three Stewart-Haas teammates (Clint Bowyer, Aric Amirola and Cole Custer) were assigned the next stalls in order beside him before Joey Logano, who is second in the standings, and his Team Penske teammates were slotted in.

The domino effect pushed Wallace’s Richard Petty team further back in the pecking order, all the way to Stall No. 4. (At Talladega, the No. 1 stall is near the back of the garage, and thus not desirable.)

In other words, your conspiracy theory from near the top of the article — “The coincidence, one that to many strains credulity, is that Wallace’s team ended up being assigned the only stall among the 44 in Talladega’s infield garage that had a noose that served as a door pull” — is ridiculous.

Basically, this fiasco was driven by bigoted stereotyping of white Southerners.

 
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  1. wren says:

    This reminds me — have we seen the full bodycam footage from the George Floyd death?

    Didn’t the police at one point say it would somehow demonstrate a lack of culpability or something?

    Or am I thinking of something else?

  2. Not Raul says:

    Fake Noose!

    This is so stupid.

    A cub scout could have explained to Hoover’s boys that the loop ain’t no noose. But I guess the fellas thought that it was NooseCAR, so . . . close enough for government work.

    Our country’s knot knowledge is falling behind.

    Maybe the boys on the hate crime beat need to earn a knot badge.

    https://scoutingmagazine.org/2017/04/tie-essential-scouting-knots/

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
  3. Mr. Anon says:

    And here’s another:

  4. BenKenobi says:

    They’ll say anything. It doesn’t matter how ridiculous. Hubris invites nemesis.

    I wonder how many journalists (sic) once said “je suis charlie.”

    Indeed.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  5. Ano says:

    Democrats: We’re putting to a vote a law which makes garage door pull ropes a federal hate crime.

    Republicans: Aye, aye, aye, aye….

    • LOL: Gordo
  6. Anon[186] • Disclaimer says:

    If the door pull had been a real noose, it would have tightened around your fingers and squeezed them painfully tight if you had put them inside the loop to pull the door down. It was a static knot, which isn’t a noose. A noose slides shut because it’s made to do that.

    I’m tired of female libtard liars in the NYT and Post like Liz Clarke. Most of the asinine propaganda articles are by young female Iagos deliberately trying to stir the trouble pot to boiling. They are a pack of malicious witches, and they should not get a pussy pass for their chronic lying. Men need to stop saying to themselves, “Oh, of course she couldn’t tell the difference between the knots because she’s just a stupid young chick.”

    If you adopt a position of authority like these female columnists, you ARE supposed to know better. If an authority is ignorant about something and is asked for their opinion, they should immediately go out and educate themselves about it so they don’t sound like an idiot.

    If you don’t recognize a door pull by its form and position in the garage, it’s because you’re dumber than pig manure.

    Clarke is just a vile, stupid, evil, self-satisfied piece of filth upset that she can’t get a wave of arson and looting going.

    • Replies: @Kyle
  7. Meanwhile, the Spectator is having fun with Hannah Jones..

    https://spectator.us/1619-project-nikole-hannah-jones-products/

    Why do so many of our new cultural leaders resemble Bozo the clown?

  8. vhrm says:

    The article also displays selective ignorance: They spend paragraphs explaining what the normal garage assignment would have been and what the coronavirus modified assignment was and why.

    So they are clearly capable of at least moderately detailed and complex thinking and writing. They are also willing to subject the reader to this level of arguably boring detail.

    But they still don’t provide detail on the knot or the ropes and loops on the other garage doors.

    • Replies: @Forbes
  9. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @BenKenobi

    Gotta love how the demographic responsible for most of the violent crime in this country–every single year for several decades now–somehow cowers in its safe spaces whenever confronted with a potential micro-agression. Never mind that most of these micro-aggresions are fake, and that all of them are (at best) symbolic. Being shot, or raped, or having your head bashed in is nothing compared to the thought that someone, somewhere, may be contemplating using a cotton ball right now.

    • Thanks: Charon, kikz
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
  10. OT: When the COVID vaccine becomes available, which group is going to get first gibs, er I mean first dibs.

    • Replies: @Gordo
  11. In the space of one single day (today) I have been exposed to;
    – this article about Nascar’ s “concern” about the noose hoax and how they are committed to inclusion.
    – at work, an announcement about the corporate drag queen/tranny club or something.
    – learned that NASA HQ is being named for an obscure black female.
    – at work, there are posters commemorating Womens History month, showing a black female.
    – received an email from Kaiser Permanente saying they are committed to equality and inclusion, and giving helpful advice on staying safe if you go out to riot and vandalize (oops I mean “protest”).

    All in one day. Good god the propaganda is relentless. Is this what living under Maoism or Castroism was like?

  12. Basically, this fiasco was driven by bigoted stereotyping of white Southerners.

    East coast Jewish media/intelligentsia derive their understanding of the South from watching movies like Mississippi Burning.

    If you watch the trailer below, you’ll have a pretty good understanding of how Jews view the South. For the last 25-30 years, this is the lens through which the South has been portrayed

    If you watch the opening of the Andy Griffith show, you’ll have pretty good understanding of how Southerners view themselves. Up through the late 80s/early 90s, this is the lens through which the South was portrayed.

    This too.

    If someone built a time machine and traveled back to the 70s/80s era South to inform the inhabitants what the future would be like, I wonder what they’d say.

    • Replies: @william munny
    , @Mr. Anon
  13. Bubba’s fake hate hoax was likely born one of two ways:

    1. Like Kapernick, Bubba might have been close to being dropped by his team/sponsor and went hard-white-hating-paranoia to save his job. Kapernick’s white-hating gf also played a role, so maybe, like Kapernick, someone new in his circle got his ear about black “oppression”. The current hysteria didn’t hurt the timing.

    2. Or, alternatively, Bubba was trying to bang up his Q rating like Jussie Smollett tried. Bubba could’ve been securing himself a reality show or commenting deal afterwards by getting just enough fame from being the victim to get him a regular gig in front of the cameras.

    I’m leaning towards #1. Bubba doesn’t seem that good a racer, but I don’t watch NASCAR or any driving sports.

    P.S. how funny is it this black dude’s name is Bubba? Are we living in an alternate script for Forrest Gump?

  14. Watashi ga kita!

    I have always said that the American Right is absolutely useless. Recent events bear me out. Seriously, why can’t you people gaslight him for sharing a name with noted racist George Wallace! Jeez.

    • Thanks: Redneck farmer
  15. Bill B. says:

    the intricacies of the sport’s garage stall assignment policy

    How can any sane journalist write these words.

    Why doesn’t Wapo just go the full Der Stürmer and pump out anti-white caricatures and anti-white-cockroach propaganda?

    • Replies: @U. Ranus
    , @Jim Don Bob
  16. (Something, something about women should only write about food or weddings.)

  17. AKAHorace says:

    Unrelated (but who knows these days) but of interest:

    My Little Pony Fans Are Ready to Admit They Have a Nazi Problem

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2020/06/my-little-pony-nazi-4chan-black-lives-matter/613348/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  18. @Anonymous

    Black athletes have feminine tendencies.

  19. U. Ranus says:
    @Bill B.

    Why doesn’t Wapo just go the full Der Stürmer and pump out anti-white caricatures and anti-white-cockroach propaganda?

    Bezos wants Whitey to shut up and work hard at low low wages, not make him scared enough to flee from the plantation.

  20. Bottom line is that no noose is good news.

  21. @Not Raul

    “A cub scout could have explained to Hoover’s boys that the loop ain’t no noose. ”

    I wouldn’t be too sure about that. My bet is that today’s typical Cub Scout would come closer to being able to explain the meaning of each stripe in the Rainbow Flag than being able to intelligently discuss various types of knots.

  22. Kyle says:
    @Anon

    I don’t want to nitpick, but how could you possibly expect a woman to understand the finer points of Eagle Scout level knot tying? We all realize that If you only had access to one end of the rope and the other end of the rope was attached to the garage door 15 feet in the air, this would be an effective way of making a hand loop. Knot the rope once at a point about where the loop is going to be, then fashion a sort of slip knot or hangman’s noose. Coiling the end of the rope around a few times would be a great way to take up extra slack in the rope. The original knot that you put in it would keep the slipping coil element of the knot from constricting around your hand, making it functional as a garage door pull. The entire package is cheap, simple, elegant, nice and neat looking, and effective. That’s generally what guys who work on race cars are good at doing. You have to realize that by mansplaing the finer points of nooses and slip knots to a female Washington post reporter, she’s gonna look at you like you have two heads. And wonder why you know how to tie a noose. And file that in the “everything and everyone is racist” part of her brain. You can’t blame her for doing her job to the best of her ability. The real villains in this story are the NASCAR brass. I’m starting to suspect that the guys in the garage working on the race cars may have higher IQs than the liberal arts major HR personnel populating NASCAR corporate offices. Just a hunch. The corporate guys literally don’t know how to open a garage door.

    • Agree: Gordo
  23. Art Deco says:

    My supposition is that as the economy of the news business has decayed, they’re increasingly unable to attract new entrants who have the intelligence to do other things with their life while the character of people currently in journalism repels people with a modicum of integrity; at some point in the last several generations a feedback loop emerged wherein the moral character of each successive cohort of journalists was worse than the preceding cohort. Another problem you’ve seen is that succeeding cohorts are more and more politically homogeneous. James Jackson Kilpatrick and Jesse Helms, both born around 1920, built careers in the news business before making careers in topical commentary and electoral politics. In 1955, the most prominent reporter in the United States was Dorothy Kilgallen, whose politics were decidedly non-liberal. With all the feedback loops in effect, your body of reporters and editors is increasingly composed of dopey and dishonest leftoids.

    • Replies: @black sea
  24. Anonymous[301] • Disclaimer says:

    Basically, this fiasco was driven by bigoted stereotyping of white Southerners.

    Good line. But the deeper motivation may be even worse: malice toward White Americans.

  25. @JohnnyWalker123

    Exactly right.

    I never met a southerner until I joined the Marines. While I tended to imagine Bo and Luke, people I knew absolutely believed the Mississippi Burning stuff. Most of the joking in the military is based on regional and racial differences, and I came to like the southern culture so much that I would have moved there if not for family. I also admired them for being far better military men than me.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  26. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Why do so many of our new cultural leaders resemble Bozo the clown?

    In brains, as well as in looks.

  27. @Mike_from_SGV

    Is this what living under Maoism or Castroism was like?

    Not quite. We don’t have loud speakers on every corner.

    Yet.

  28. @Mike_from_SGV

    learned that NASA HQ is being named for an obscure black female.

    That was a good one.

    Good god the propaganda is relentless. Is this what living under Maoism or Castroism was like?

    Under Mao and Castro you got sent to a nice camp in the countryside with fresh air, food, and lots of exercise. Lots of exercise.

    That’s next.

  29. @Bill B.

    Why doesn’t Wapo just go the full Der Stürmer and pump out anti-white caricatures and anti-white-cockroach propaganda?

    WaPo is already there when dealing with BadWhites. But even some of their staff think they went too far in doxxing the woman who wore blackface to Toles’ party:

    https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2020/06/why-did-the-washington-post-get-this-woman-fired.html

    PS. I turns out that the paler bitch in the photo, one Lexie Gruber, is the one who instigated the whole thing and who is Puerto Rican to boot.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Ea0dzBuWkAgEdp8?format=jpg

  30. Call it what it probably is (since no photos) — “a rope with a knot in it” not “a noose”.

    As pointed out, a ‘noose’ is a slip-knot that would wrap around your hand and be more hassle than help as a garage door pull.

    Are there any former boy scouts who can supply us with the name of the knot used?

    We should ban the knot used and any variation of loop-knots that confuse the PC klan and their white saviors.

    If it calms the nerves of just one snowflake, it will be worth the sacrifice to the well-adjusted. Oh, and get rid of spiders too!

  31. Anon[150] • Disclaimer says:

    She’s a late-40-something sportswriter whose beat is the local college basketball scene and NASCAR. So she has only progressed a little beyond the high school newspaper level in career prestige. For the forseeable future sports, especially college sports, may not be the most active news niche. As budgets fall, her job is at the top of the list to be chopped.

    So time to reinvent one’s career. And silence is violence.

    The article is kind of brilliant, actually: a precision torpedo aimed directly at a major cognitive weakness in the black brain, the tendancy to cook up and believe all manner of unlikely conspiracy theories about whitey.

    • Agree: Gabe Ruth
  32. Anonymous[601] • Disclaimer says:
    @william munny

    I also admired them for being far better military men than me.

    What exactly makes for a better military man?

  33. black sea says:
    @Art Deco

    For most journalists, journalism isn’t really a career or even a job; it’s a hobby, like surfing or rock climbing. It is well suited to the young, and particularly those unencumbered by adult responsibilities.

    The main difference is that journalism isn’t nearly as exciting, and courage is generally a liability.

  34. Gordo says:
    @James Speaks

    I believe the UK team has insisted that first shots should be to third world countries because of their disadvantage etcetera, BoJo of course agreed, what’s a few more deaths after the f*ck up he already made.

  35. George says:

    “Guys who work on race car crews tend to be pretty competent at things like tying knots.”

    So how is it that a pro racecar driver has never seen a knot used as a door pull?

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
  36. re: “noose”, over and over…
    If you didn’t know any better you might think someone was trying to stir up a race war.

  37. Jack D says:

    Here is a photo of the noose, from the WSJ (WSJ captured it from an old video):

    https://images.wsj.net/im-202446

    It’s impossible to tell but it does indeed look like a noose.

    The problem is not just whether it was or was not a noose, but what is the meaning of “noose”? When I was a kid, a noose was a hangman’s rope. It wasn’t associated primarily with lynching, nor was lynching associated only with black people. In old cowboy movies, anyone could get lynched. We used to play the word game “hangman” and draw a little gallows and no one associated it with black people in any way. At Halloween, nooses were often part of the decorations.

    But, fast forward to 2020. The WSJ tell us that “a noose [is] one of the country’s starkest symbols of hatred and racism.” When and how did the noose become a “racist symbol” akin to a Swastika ?

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/bubba-wallace-a-noose-and-how-a-racist-symbol-hung-at-talladega-for-months-11593082800?mod=hp_lead_pos12

    “Racism experts say nooses, even when they’re purportedly tied to serve another purpose, are still racist symbols of intimidation to African-Americans who encounter them. ”

    Wow, racism expert is a job now? What are the qualifications? Where do I apply?

    • Replies: @black sea
    , @HEL
    , @Anonymous
  38. Suppose someone hangs up a real noose (not just a rope with a loop at the end) and does it to provoke black people. That would be a federal crime worthy of investigation by the FBI and something for which a person could be sent to prison? Because blacks are supposed to be so emotionally fragile that they have to be federally protected from the trauma of seeing a rope arranged in a certain way?

    This is just a power thing, like with the n-word, where anti-whites find joy in tormenting white people with ridiculous rules.

  39. I recently watch Outlander. The British hung three colonist “traitors.” Nary a one was black. Then there is the Eastwood classic of Hang’em High. Time to end this travesty of noose cultural appropriation. Blacks can have the extremely dull NASCAR. Left turns only with corporate sponsorship is right up the BLM’s alley.

    • LOL: West reanimator
  40. Pericles says:

    Nobody has released a close-up photo of the “noose” for knot experts to evaluate, but nobody who knows much about knots imagines it would be an actual noose, which is a type of slip knot that would be sub-optimal for a loop to tug on at the end of the rope for pulling the garage door down.

    On the bright side, I take it this means the best and brightest of Columbia Journalism are not forced to crew when the editors go yachting for the weekend.

  41. Barnard says:

    The video proves this is a common way for a rope to be tied. It is a certainty NASCAR is lying when they said no other garages had loops tied into the end of them at the Talladega garages. Do you think they bothered to go around to every garage on Sunday and untie all of the other ropes? It is surprising that whatever low levels employees were involved in the hoax haven’t been leaking the details online. There is no way all these guys want to keep bowing down to Bubba Wallace.

  42. black sea says:
    @Jack D

    The noose phenomenon is directly related to the deficit-of-racist-incidents phenomenon.

    Like you, I can remember when nooses were a common accessory in the haunted houses we would put together as kids. Nooses, like bloody axes, were related to execution, and execution was related to death, and thus considered suitable for facilitating Halloween thrills.

    Nooses have now been culturally appropriated by racism experts as tools of anti-black terror, and can’t conceivably be used for any non-terroristic purpose, such as closing a garage door. Only black people can tie nooses, and even then only for the purpose of reminding white people of their guilt.

    You really have to struggle these days to portray America as a hate-saturated society, rather than just a society of different peoples, some of whom don’t have share that much in common with others, and mostly prefer being among their own.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Gabe Ruth
  43. Pericles says:

    From the press conference: I suppose now that the noose turned out to be libel from an unstable, foolish person, that Nascar can permit Confederate flags again? No? What do you mean? Nascar was and is obviously, ludicrously wrong in their new policies. Still no, without even an excuse? Hey, take your hands off me!

    • Replies: @Jack D
  44. Jack D says:
    @Pericles

    Let me ask you this: when you tighten a noose around an object and then let go, does the noose spring back to its former position?

  45. scott h says:

    Don’t buy from Amazon… If you do you’re subsidizing this kind of B.S.

  46. Jack D says:
    @black sea

    This is also related to the phenomenon of “triggering”. According to the “racism experts”, even if an object is made to serve a functional purpose and is not made with racist motives, such an object can be “triggering” to certain people and is therefore verboten. The WSJ article makes this explicitly clear.

    It then follows that organization (NASCAR) who has created or permitted such an object is guilty of a crime. If not an actual felony then at least a thought crime that requires an apology and corrective action (renaming your organization in honor of a black person, perhaps) and if he can be located, the firing of the person who did this.

    This is entirely opposite to the former Western concept of criminal law, which was (logically) focused on the thoughts and action of the alleged criminal. Under our (former) system of criminal law, in order to be guilty of a crime, you had to BOTH do a criminal act AND do so with criminal intent. How others might perceive your act had nothing to do with it – your act and intentions had to be objectively criminal. Under our new, topsy-turvy system, your criminality is not judged by your own thoughts and actions but by what is in the head of third parties – black people, women, etc. over whom you have no control. This is nuts.

  47. HEL says:
    @Jack D

    When and how did the noose become a “racist symbol” akin to a Swastika ?

    Steve pointed to the Jena 6 case from like 2006 as the potential starting point. Seems plausible. There some people put up nooses as a dig at a rival school that had a western themed mascot. Even imitated the school colors. Nevertheless this was combined with the fact that the kids at this school primarily hung out with kids of the same race i.e. behaved the way kids do in absolutely every multiracial school, to suggest this place was some sort of Jim Crow throwback. Thereby justifying the football player thugs stomping another kid unconscious, somehow . . . I don’t recall all the details and it’s too stupid to look up. But nooses were definitely a substantial part of that phony controversy.

    Black solipsism is absolutely overwhelming, and when combined with a media that supports it, can apparently consume the entire world. Official black opinion has deemed that any sort of a loop in a rope is a hate crime against blacks, and therefore any other connotations this object may have are now irrelevant.

  48. Guys who work on race car crews tend to be pretty competent at things like tying knots.

    My guess is that the “noose” is a bowline knot. But this raises troubling questions as to whether the bowline mnemonic is racist signalling, e.g., “the rabbit comes out of its hole, the rabbit goes around a tree, the rabbit goes back down its hole”. This sounds like some kind of racist threat against “rabbits”, i.e. POCs, to me.

  49. @wren

    This reminds me — have we seen the full bodycam footage from the George Floyd death?

    Didn’t the police at one point say it would somehow demonstrate a lack of culpability or something?

    Or am I thinking of something else?

    I think the attorney for one of the Officers charged (not Chauvin) said that the bodycam footage was exculpatory – at least for his client. That may have been the genesis of your notion.

    FWIW, I and others have noticed that since the original call for cops to wear bodycams from the pro-criminal lobby, and the adoption of bodycams in response by some but not all departments, there has been little call for bodycams since. Additionally, as you notice in this instance, there has been little demand for the release of bodycam footage in these high profile cases. It seems that the bodycam footage usually winds up showing what you would have expected it would show – the supposed victims of police brutality doing stupid, violent, and dangerous stuff right before things go really bad.

    • Thanks: wren
    • Replies: @Redman
  50. Anon[233] • Disclaimer says:

    I follow NASCAR, and I suspect Mr. Wallace will never win a race. He’s not treated unfairly in race traffic, but IMHO he is not on the same level as the genuinely top racers. Odd things happen in racing, and he could luck into a win…look at the records and you’ll find plenty of one-time winners.

    In NASCAR, if you have the skills you can get noticed. I cannot think of a more competency-ruled hierarchy than NASCAR race drivers. They get to the top one way, and that is by impressing team owners with their racing skills. But that’s history. Things can change.

    It’s easily possible that this is an effort by Mr. Wallace to get a sympathy ride in a top-rated race car. He might have a slight chance to win a race on a first-rank team. (I still have my doubts.)

    In a similar situation female driver Danica Patrick, was always mid-pack, very often wrecked, and never came close to winning a race. She often had potentially race-winning race cars. Ms Patrick was just not at the same level as the top drivers in NASCAR. But she sure sold a lot of advertising.

  51. This article is actually remarkable in how much stupidity it assumes in its readers.

    It bruits the idea that it was no coincidence that Bubba was assigned to a stall with a pre-existing “noose”, but then in its description makes it clear that there’s almost no possible way that that assignment could have been planned for such a purpose.

    How low must your IQ be to read through the entire article and not realize how absurd is its conspiracy angle?

    Does credibility, even with their own otherwise like-minded readers, mean nothing to WaPo these days?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  52. Jack D says:
    @candid_observer

    It’s a matter of saving face. I see people on the right doing it as well. Cops and prosecutors do this all the time, which is how innocent people end up being convicted. When you have established a position and then the facts turn out not to favor your position, it’s a natural human thing not to just admit that you were wrong. You’ve psychologically invested in your position and to admit that you were wrong might make you seem foolish to other people.

    So instead, you invent conspiracies, you insist that what happened was a false flag operation, etc. This is just how our brains work. If the facts don’t fit our pre-conceived notions, then the facts must be wrong, not our notions. It takes a brutal amount of fact finding to dislodge those notions.

  53. Mr. Anon says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    As you point out, southern/country culture achieved some mainstream exposure in the 1970s in movies and on the pop-charts. Already by the 80s, this was beginning to turn into the, by now, near ubiquitous identification of southern and rural America with bigotry, ignorance, and backwardness.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  54. @Jack D

    When you have established a position and then the facts turn out not to favor your position, it’s a natural human thing not to just admit that you were wrong. You’ve psychologically invested in your position and to admit that you were wrong might make you seem foolish to other people.

    Happens constantly in science and engineering as well.

    You’d be amazed how many supposedly, “data-driven,” people aren’t.

  55. Anonymous[183] • Disclaimer says:

  56. Mr. Blank says:

    bigoted stereotyping of white Southerners.

    We’re used to it by now.

  57. @Jack D

    Hear that goyim your guilds are just as guilty as our guilds of this. Your guilds-like (glances at list) …prosecutors which is a guild not lucrative enough for our gifted brains.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  58. “this fiasco was driven by bigoted stereotyping of white Southerners.”

    It wasn’t a “fiasco” for the likes of Liz Clarke, Juliet Macur and Alan Blinder. Stereotyping of white Southerners is what they do. It’s who they are, you might say. Hate has a home at WaPo and NYT.

  59. huisache says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    the Bozos have taken over the bus, as the Firesign Theater guys might say

  60. Gamecock says:

    ‘NASCAR officials, however, remain sufficiently troubled to continue their internal investigation’

    NASCAR figures it doesn’t need an audience.

  61. Big Dog says:

    I have watched my last nastycar. They can call the dogs and piss on the fire as far as I’m concern. I wonder how it will be before nascar fixes a race so he can win it, I know it will happen, just hang on.

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @Gordo
  62. Anonymous[224] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Here is a photo of the noose, from the WSJ (WSJ captured it from an old video):

    We don’t know that is “the” noose. That is an old image.

    It’s impossible to tell but it does indeed look like a noose.

    A noose has a running knot in it. You couldn’t tell from looking at it if it was a noose. And the supposed fact that it has been around for a year, with ample loop still intact (not pulled tight), suggests it is not in fact a noose.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  63. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Forbes
    , @wren
    , @duncsbaby
  64. Gabe Ruth says:

    I thought of the this-goes-straight-to-the-top! gambit, mad I didn’t beat them to publish. That Putin crony on Twitter definitely doing grade A work holding stuff in reserve to let the MSM beclown itself further. Yes these loops are quite common, better luck next time.

    It’s also nice to learn white people can’t be hung from the neck until dead, and so have no reason to fear nooses. Obviously it must be a survival technique we are taught, because if it were an evolved racial difference, well, that’s a little close to the head to be kosher. Maybe it’s because we can’t jump and get strung up by accident?

  65. Jack D says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Actually lots of Jewish prosecutors. Law is a heavily Jewish business. You should have picked cops. Not that many Jewish cops. A few in NYC which had, at one time, a Jewish proletariat (I haven’t see a Jewish cabbie in NY for 30 years, but they used to exist) , but otherwise fairly rare.

  66. Jack D says:
    @MEH 0910

    See, that’s the problem with “show us the noose!” They showed you the noose and it really is a noose. The correct answer is, “So what if it is a noose? A noose is not associated exclusively with black people any more than fried chicken and watermelons are exclusively associated with black people. This association is in your own sick heads. Even Freud said that sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @wren
  67. Forbes says:
    @vhrm

    Facts inconvenient to The Narrative will always be ignored. First rule of media.

  68. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    Whether a noose will close on itself depends on how many turns there are on the rope, how tightly they are wound, how much weight is applied, the thickness of the rope and what material it has been made from, whether it has been lubricated or not, etc. Back in the old days when hangman was a profession they knew all about these factors and a skilled hangman could judge them just right (and judge the drop so it would break the neck of the condemned prisoner so that he would die a swift death). It’s not as simple as it looks in a comic book and most people today get all their knowledge from comic books (or from the NY Times which is a glorified comic book). Once you break the chain of personally handed down knowledge, from father to son, from master to apprentice, it’s difficult to get it back and we’ve lost so much.

    Probably this noose required more weight on it than the weight of a counterbalanced garage door so it never tightened on itself or if it did, people just readjusted back to an open loop. Also if you pull only on the through-rope side of the noose it will never tighten.

  69. Anonymous[224] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    See, that’s the problem with “show us the noose!” They showed you the noose and it really is a noose. The correct answer is, “So what if it is a noose? A noose is not associated exclusively with black people any more than fried chicken and watermelons are exclusively associated with black people. This association is in your own sick heads. Even Freud said that sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.”

    What was its purpose, if not to intimidate black people?

  70. peterike says:
    @Jack D

    (I haven’t see a Jewish cabbie in NY for 30 years, but they used to exist)

    The last time I met a native New Yorker driving a cab was in Tel Aviv.

    Lots of hot women in Tel Aviv.

  71. res says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    What did Bozo ever do to you to make you insult him like that?

    • Agree: The Alarmist
    • Replies: @Forbes
    , @Jim Don Bob
  72. @George

    Could it be that he isn’t very “professional” ? To be a professional, you have to make a living at some skilled activity. All evidence is that this bozo hasn’t produced any income for his team from winning races, placing in races or assisting team mates on the track in the same.

  73. Forbes says:
    @MEH 0910

    Meanwhile, this is the knotted loop that the FBI said was not a noose. Go figure.

  74. Forbes says:
    @res

    What did Bozo ever do to make Hannah insult him like that…

  75. @res

    My younger brother cried when Howdy Doody went off the air.

  76. wren says:
    @MEH 0910

    It does look like a noose!

    But a mini-noose!

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  77. @Anonymous

    In general, they were more cheerful in their suffering, more willing to shoulder others’ loads, and had more stamina.

    • Replies: @Adam B Coleman
  78. Redman says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    A while back (I can’t recall whether it was a from a poster here) there was video footage of the initial part of Floyd’s arrest which clearly shows 2 small white bags (possibly Fentanyl or another drug?) fall out of his pocket. I haven’t heard any discussion about that video since.

    First drop: 3:31
    Second drop: 3:38

    https://www.investmentwatchblog.com/watch-bags-of-drugs-fall-from-george-floyd-while-in-custody/

    This raises 2 issues : (1) was Floyd possibly dealing drugs to the others in his car?; and (2) did he possibly try to swallow the drugs to avoid detection leading to the ultimate overdose show by the serology tests?

    The first question is somewhat irrelevant, although it may be why so many cops eventually were called to the scene. The second question (if the cops verify this theory) could potentially lead to an acquittal.

  79. Gabe Ruth says:
    @black sea

    Back when I used to leave the house for work, I used to walk by the window of what took to be a day care or kindergarten classroom. For some reason I still don’t understand, the are always about a dozen ropes with loops in the end hanging from ceiling, about 4 or 5 feet from the ground. They always brought nooses to my mind, and in that setting they were unsettling. I know it makes me literally Hitler, but my gut reaction has never been concern for how they look to black people.

  80. Muggles says:

    No noose is good noose.

  81. wren says:
    @Jack D

    I can’t find the noose clips from Gilliam’s Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus (which were well done, iirc), but they are certainly equal opportunity devices.

    First time?

  82. Gordo says:
    @Big Dog

    I wonder how it will be before nascar fixes a race so he can win it, I know it will happen, just hang on.

    Could well happen, might be worth a small wager.

  83. Art Deco says:
    @Mr. Anon

    I don’t remember it in that order. I seem to recall in popular music and television films ca. 1973 places in the South (and sometimes rural areas generally) were commonly portrayed as sinister and violent places. See, for example Vicky Lawrence’s “The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia” (which had been pitched to Sonny Bono for Cher to sing, but which he thought would ruin them with their Southern audience), a feature film like Macon County Line, or a telemovie like Nightmare in Badham County. You had a counter-current running parallel to that before and after with figures like Johnny Cash and Charlie Daniels and bits of mass entertainment like Hee Haw and The Dukes of Hazzard. I’m remembering the latter displacing the former by about 1980.

  84. gregor says:

    Check out this intentionally obtuse “Fact Check” article.

    “Posts Falsely Claim Wallace Mistook ‘Automotive Belt for a Noose’”
    https://www.factcheck.org/2020/06/posts-falsely-claim-wallace-mistook-automotive-belt-for-a-noose/

    Fact Check: Totally False, Bigots!

    They strawman some FB post that did not correctly identify the details of the hoax. But they don’t tell you what actually happened. They just say the FB story is wrong, implicitly defending Bubba’s lame story. Joke’s on them since the real story about the garage door rope ended up being way funnier anyway.

    Liberal Fact Check Methodology: If something serves the narrative but is false, say the story is “true” in terms of “the big picture” even if not “technically” correct in every detail. If it undermines the narrative, argue that it is wrong either for some technical reason or barring that argue that while it is “technically true” it’s “misleading” because blah, blah, blah.

    Stories like UVA frat rape and NASCAR noose might not be true in the sense that, you know, they actually happened. But they are still “true” in principle.

  85. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.2466/17.49.CP.3.8

    Law is a heavily Jewish business.

    Around New York City 50 years ago. Nowadays about 7% of lawyers are Jewish; about 1/4 of all law professors are Jewish.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  86. tyrone says:
    @Ron Mexico

    I thought that was called peacocking.(boy ,do I miss Roissey)

  87. How are those FBI agents supposed to overthrow a duly elected president and push the Great Leap Forward Fundamental Transformation along if they are playing footsie with a garage pull?

  88. @Jack D

    (I haven’t see a Jewish cabbie in NY for 30 years, but they used to exist)

    I caught a ride with a Jewish cabbie in NYC 2-3 years ago.He was in his seventies. He told me he knows of two other Jewish cabbies in the city .

  89. @Jack D

    Once you break the chain of personally handed down knowledge, from father to son, from master to apprentice, it’s difficult to get it back and we’ve lost so much.

    That’s why they made such a bloody mess of Sadam Hussein’s hanging. The drop was too long for his body weight and they wound up ripping his head off. What was intended to be a hanging wound up as a gruesome decapitation.

  90. @Art Deco

    Around New York City 50 years ago. Nowadays about 7% of lawyers are Jewish; about 1/4 of all law professors are Jewish.

    I think in the Northeast it’s much more than 7%. In Big Law probably more like 20-25%. As you say,still nothing like it was 50 years ago, though. According to this article

    https://digitalcommons.du.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1030&context=law_facpub

    60% of all lawyers in NYC in 1960 were Jewish.

  91. Anon[209] • Disclaimer says:

    A fear of nooses is ridiculous. Back in the day, every criminal, both black and white, got hung to death by a noose because hanging was the preferred method of execution. Yet you don’t see whites quaking at the sight of a noose.

    The whole thing is just another scam criminal blacks are using against neurotic, hypersensitive whites.

    If you try to scam someone, yes, you’re a criminal. You’re committing a crime. Every black who tries to do this is a criminal.

  92. @Jim Don Bob

    In Racist Screed, NYT’s 1619 Project Founder Calls ‘White Race’ ‘Barbaric Devils,’ ‘Bloodsuckers,’ Columbus ‘No Different Than Hitler’


    JUNE 25, 2020 By Jordan Davidson
    In an indication of what was to come, the founder of the New York Times’ 1619 Project penned a lengthy racist screed attacking all white people…

    https://thefederalist.com/2020/06/25/in-racist-screed-nyts-1619-project-founder-calls-white-race-barbaric-devils-bloodsuckers-no-different-than-hitler/

    …………………..
    It’s a good thing Twitter, Facebook and Google cancelled The Federalist. I might never have learned about them otherwise.

    • Replies: @bruce county
    , @Art Deco
    , @anon
  93. @Jack D

    Or this isn’t actually the garage door pull in question. How many people actually know? And of that number, how many would be willing to risk everything they have by telling the truth? And of that number, how many would get a sympathetic hearing in the MSM?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Jack D
  94. @Jim Don Bob

    We do much better than that. We have an omnipresent MSM, Google and Social Media, and a monstrous Big Brother with his tentacles everywhere.

  95. @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Does she look in the mirror every day and say “I am beautiful”?
    In reality she should be asking that question, but it’s something narcissist’s never ask.
    They don’t like the truth.

  96. Pontius says:

    Best comment on all of this was from somone on the CBC website:

    Tyler Brown

    7 hours ago

    “Bubba is the best race card driver of all time.”

  97. Anonymous[224] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Or this isn’t actually the garage door pull in question. How many people actually know? And of that number, how many would be willing to risk everything they have by telling the truth? And of that number, how many would get a sympathetic hearing in the MSM?

    And why is the released photo looking out, rather than into the garage, which would be more easily identifiable and would also give a better sense of its proportion?

  98. wren says:
    @Peterike

    So it actually was a conspiracy this whole time.

  99. I found this gem…..

    Look what else they found in Bubba’s garage.. Oh look ….It’s a white hood.

  100. Did not the ignorant Wallace in fact never bother to verify what was claimed to be a noose and if it ever existed? Or was he simply too lazy and too stupid to be bothered?

  101. Dube says:
    @Jack D

    I don’t know know that slippage and tightening are essential for a hangman’s knot, as it is called. Hanging is not choking. Hanging is a breaking of the neck. That is why the heavy coiling is wound above the loop. The hangman carefully places the coiling beside the head and behind the ear; that bulk snaps the head to the side and breaks the neck.

    If choking were of the essence, then a simple garrote would do do job, without need of a scaffold.

    • Agree: vhrm
  102. duncsbaby says:
    @MEH 0910

    That pic above is another good representation of photographers doing a long shot to make things look bigger than they really are. That noose almost looks like it could fit over a human head but seen from other pics it looks like a small piece of rope that was just big enough to fit in a hand to pull down the garage (which of course is what it was used for.)

  103. @wren

    It does look like a noose!

    But a mini-noose!

    These were secret Klan nooses, used to hang black males by their johnsons.

  104. Jack D says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    I believe that the photo IS of the actual door pull – they wouldn’t go so far as to completely falsify the thing. BUT they don’t have to – they can lie while telling the truth. Note that the photo does not contain anything that gives you a clue as to the scale of the noose. It looks like a perfectly formed hangman’s noose. What they DON’T show you is that the entire noose is only a few inches across – it’s a MINIATURE noose, a toy-size noose, just big enough to fit your hand. You could use it to maybe hang a squirrel but not a human. Making it look like it is a full sized noose with a close up photo with no clue as to scale makes it seem much more threatening than the toy sized noose that it actually is.

  105. Art Deco says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    What’s interesting about this is that her maternal-side grandparents were perfectly ordinary people who were apparently forgiving about their daughter getting pregnant twice before she was married, something quite atypical among ordinary people in 1975.

    https://www.papich-kubafs.com/obituary/2100862

    https://www.papich-kubafs.com/obituary/2041858

  106. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Wait, isn’t that one of RuPaul’s friends from “Drag Race”?

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