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The Unfairness of It All
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Let’s say you are an ear, nose & throat specialist doctor. After years of paying your dues, in early 2020 you made the big leap: you quit your well-paid job, took out a big loan, signed a lengthy lease, hired a half dozen employees, and on February 1, you opened your own practice. Sure, times might be a little tough for the first few years as you build a reputation, but you are living the American Dream.

Now three month later you are wondering if you will go bankrupt because most patients would rather not see an ENT doc if they can avoid it. Meanwhile, your brother-in-law, who owns a proctology clinic, is getting by and figures he’ll be doing well again by the end of summer. Patients keep calling him up for appointments. They don’t seem too worried. He just asked if he could offer a job to your best nurse because, clearly, you won’t be needing her for awhile.

Maybe you should kick yourself for your moral failing in choosing to specialize in ENT instead of in proctology, as your brother-in-law keeps implying, but … how were you supposed to know?

The extreme randomness of this disaster is striking. It’s not like AIDS where the main victims were needle junkies and bathhouse patrons. This one tends to strike hardest at warm Italian families in which children visit their parents and grandparents, at people who sing enthusiastically in church, at Germans who like doing their people’s traditional dances, at vigorous skiers, and so forth.

Nor are the economic effects like 2008 where people with a higher risk-reward preference tended to get burned worse. This one just seems random. Almost nobody had a plan ahead of time for what to do if everybody stays home for a few months. It’s reassuring to think that some nefarious set of insiders must have had an evil master plan, but in truth nobody seems to have had a clue. For example, here is the 2016 National Security Council’s Playbook for Early Response to High-Consequence Emerging Infectious Disease Threats and Biological Incidents.

I haven’t read the whole thing, but I don’t see much in the way of thinking about the economic aspects. If I search for terms like “shut” or “close” or “jobs” or “rent,” I don’t find much.

Nor have I even heard of many science fiction tales relevant to our current predicament. There are some memorable depictions of an apocalyptic pandemic like Andromeda Strain and Twelve Monkeys, but I’ve never heard of a sci-fi story or movie about an only moderately disastrous pandemic like this one where it’s unclear whether the disease or the economic cure will be worse.

A few organizations prudently planned ahead. For example, the All England Lawn Tennis Club has been paying $2 million per year to insure against their Wimbledon tournament being canceled due to a pandemic. They expect to collect $141 million (assuming their insurance companies survive). But the vast majority of organizations and individuals did not to do this, so they have turned to their governments for help.

The various gigantic bailouts passed abruptly by Congress with little deliberation will benefit some people and organizations, especially those who had particularly persuasive and fast-moving lobbyists, and fail to help others. Some survivor firms will happen to have the resources to buy up roadkill enterprises at fire sale prices and emerge even richer.

One thing we can predict is that the eventual distribution of wealth that shakes out of these sudden events will strike many as lacking in legitimacy. After all, who goes broke and who gets rich out of 2020 doesn’t seem to have much to do with moral behavior. This does not bode well for future political stability.

 
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  1. Anonymous[130] • Disclaimer says:

    Nothing disrupted the UK economy than World War 1, not even the long drawn out Napoleonic wars, the American war or even World War 2. In fact, Britain’s history is a long, long litany of wars which exhausted the national treasury. Famously, Henry VIII debased the national coinage and brought in hyper inflation, to pay for his particular campaigning.

    Anyhow, the damage wrought by WW1 on the British economy – which will never be matched – *did* lead to massive unemployment, the abolition of sterling/gold compatibility, *but* the 1920s and 30s saw the longest, most sustained period of industrial expansion the UK has ever seen. Most of Britain’s housing was built in that period.

    No. The *REAL* economic catastrophe of the times is the EU euro currency vanity project, disaster zone.
    In the final analysis, *ALL* that matters is economic growth. Everything else is mere bullshit. The euro currency is the most fiendishly devised scheme yet authored by the The Economist magazine to perpetuate and institutionalize zero economic growth. Over *DECADES*.

    If this crisis prompts the very welcome and overdue destruction of the (evil) EU, it would be well worth it. Worth it a thousand times over.

    • Agree: fish
  2. Mike Tre says:

    The Kovid Kult Klan are the last ones who get to complain about the unfairness of it all.

  3. One thing we can predict is that the eventual distribution of wealth that shakes out of these sudden events will strike many as lacking in legitimacy. This does not bode well for future political stability.

    If you don’t already live in the castle or manor house, you’re just another one of the serfs. As it was in the “Dark” ages, the Criminal Elite have bought-up enough hard assets and bought-off enough people to protect them from the little people long enough to reduce the little people to debt slavery by destroying any savings they have in financial assets by making everything a person needs to live more costly or simply unobtainable at a fair price, and further by debasing the value of money in general. The joke on the Street is that physical gold is now known as Unobtainium.

    I don’t know if this pandemic was man-made, but the crisis certainly was, and if it was unintentional (which seems a big ‘if’ as each day goes by), it certainly hasn’t gone wasted.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  4. ATate says:

    I see no reason for optimism at all.

    I’m not sure what to teach my children anymore. Life sucks and then you die? I have to leave a legacy of some bored teenagers t-shirt slogan?

    I have to unplug somehow.

  5. Slightly OT, but are Craigslist “landlords” in the US taking advantage of the crisis by offering “free” rooms to female tenants in exchange for sex? I was surprised how many there were on the UK site. Maybe they have always been there.

    By contrast there were only a few ads from (presumably) “sex workers” looking for clients without making it explicit.

    Buying a second hand car is a pain at the moment, you can’t attend the auction, and you have to pay for the car to be delivered.

    • Replies: @unit472
    , @Lot
    , @Neuday
  6. Unfairness always comes out of heavy-handed government and the nanny-state. Does anyone remember Kindergarten, when “we’re all going to have to stay inside during recess because one of you broke the rules! That’ll teach you.”?

    The unfairness came in as this hysterical response to the Kung Flu was dictated to us by our Governors and other public officials, who, for the most part, believed the full narrative from the Lyin’ Press and Feral Gov’t with its “expert” know-it-alls, like Fauci. Fairness happens when people are free to make their own decisions.

    Also, what Mike Tre (above) said.

    .

    PS: As you wrote before, Steve, anesthesiologists are getting knocked out hard too (pun intended). The wife of a co-worker has $5,500 4-times-yearly liability insurance payments. Her insurance company will not accept “but, I’m not working right now.”

    • LOL: Kyle
  7. Bill P says:

    Friend of mine had just opened a painting business when this thing hit. He had a nice contract lined up that would have kept him busy through summer. Poof, gone with one executive order from the governor. And the worst thing is that he could have kept it without endangering anyone. How does painting buildings spread this thing?

    People are being thrown out of work, and eventually their homes in all likelihood, for no good reason.

    The economic situation is akin to what’s going on at slaughterhouses across the nation: livelihoods are being culled like so many excess stock animals.

    Was it contrived? Not entirely, but in part for sure. People with access to power have had a “seat at the table” from the beginning. I don’t think anyone believes they’ve acted out of purely altruistic motives.

    So, yes, political stability and goodwill will suffer. Politicians are burning political capital like rocket fuel. Just wait until they start cutting budgets and raising taxes. I wonder how many governors are extending emergency orders not to protect their subjects, but to keep the prodigious powers they have in states of emergency.

  8. theMann says:

    Yea, real bummer that behavior has consequences. A couple of the consequences:

    1. The collapse of food supply chains is happening across the entire Northern Hemisphere. When people get hungry enough, all bets are off for everybody.

    2. The mathematics of CoronaFraud can be simply expressed:

    10, 000 Satanic Traitors directed
    1,000,000 Willing liars the Media, who effortlessly bamboozled
    1,000,000,000 Sniveling Cowards All of you who bowed down, the Catholic Church being
    lowest and most degraded.

    Do we even have a Pandemic?

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/04/jon-rappoport/covid-two-vital-experiments-that-have-never-been-done-2/

    If we do, it is a truly remarkable Pandemic that kills very sick, very old people to the exclusion of everybody else. But definitely worth destroying the Economy and the Rule of Law, both.

    But given the facts we can glean from a systematic lying Media Machine everybody should hide in a closet and keep shitting their pants.

    Because your Government loves you and will change your diaper and feed you and pay your bills.

    Because your Government loves you and always tells you the truth, and always has told the truth.

    So it seems the most interesting consequence of all is the Revelation that 99% of the people on the planet are tied for first in the Galactic Fucktard Contest. This will be remembered going forward.

  9. Jake says:

    “The extreme randomness of this disaster is striking. It’s not like AIDS where the main victims were needle junkies and bathhouse patrons. This one tends to strike hardest at warm Italian families in which children visit their parents and grandparents, at people who sing enthusiastically in church, at Germans who like doing their people’s traditional dances, at vigorous skiers, and so forth.”

    That’s exactly why the Left, and Neocons, love this Covid-19 . It seems to hit the people they despise most the hardest. It is not ruining the lives of delightful gays woking in theatre. It is ruining the lives the kin of whites who are Deplorable and probably voted for Trump..

    The Left never really wanted to ‘lift up’ blacks in behaviour. The Left wanted to have blacks influence larger and large swaths of non-rich whites so that those whites would begun to act more and more like blacks.

    The Elites of the Anglo-Zionist Empire have as their top priority not the endless support for Israel but the use of blacks and, to a lesser degree, other non-whites as weapons and tools with which to browbeat non-Elite whites, with which to pervert non-Elite whites.

    It is about both class and ethnicity. It is kulturkampf against almost all whites by a group of Elite whites and their natural Jewish ally. It is a culture war that has been waging since at least the early 17th century

  10. “This one just seems random. Almost nobody had a plan ahead of time for what to do”

    Funny I was just pondering the question of what the most analogous forerunner of the Coronavirus was.

    The best prior example I came up with was the 1976 Swine Flu outbreak. It appeared out of the blue to great fanfare and not a little panic. A vaccine was rushed into production. Ultimately, the disease the turned out to be less harmful than feared while the remedy (the rushed vaccine) turned out to be more harmful than promised. Everyone involved in pushing either half of the mistaken narrative (deadly virus/safe vaccine) looked sheepish for a few moments and then moved on, hoping, usually successfully, that their error would not be held against them.

    This was pretty much the same trajectory as the present WuFlu, but now multiplied by globalism and the more intensive comms interconnectedness of digital media. Our present “remedy” is blanket economic seizure rather than a rushed vaccine, but certain people are still determined to jam janky fluids and microchips into us ASAP anyway. It looks like the error-will-not-be-penalized aspect is holding true again too.

  11. Bill B. says:

    OT

    (Thank God.)

    I’ve noticed that Saint Greta Thunberg has ‘only’ 4.1 million followers yet Elon Musk has 33.4 million followers to his (to my eye) not particularly interesting Twitter feed.

    I find this surprising given the global orgasms over her pronouncements and appearances, as reported by the MSM.

    Bill Gates has 50.1 million followers as appropriate for a man with more money than God.

    Leonardo DiCaprio handily beats Greta with 15.3 million but they may be his girlfriends.

    • Replies: @adreadline
    , @vinny
  12. Michigan’s Democrat governor is insisting that the taxpayers provide free college tuition to all healthcare and grocery store workers as a “front line workers GI bill”

  13. @Mike Tre

    They are also the first who should have their assets seized and redistributed to all those thrown out of work by this hysterical nonsense.

    • Agree: Federalist
    • Replies: @Peter Frost
  14. Here’s a contrarian note: plenty of people are starting to come around to the idea of running their own business/job independence. The idea of a small family farm is also occurring to many folks now. Perhaps it will continue, and once we’re out of quarantine folks start their own home-based businesses and start raising some backyard chickens.

    How did this go back in The Great Depression? I mean, by the 1950s the idea of the Company Man was back in full swing, thanks to a roaring economy and a massive industrial base, but I’d love to know the stats about the number/percentage of small business started after the Crash of 1929 to the late 1940s, and also how many farms/backyard gardens were started (I’d include WW2 Victory Gardens in that).

    Having been laid off before thanks to the economy in 2008, and having had that lay off last more than a year, I’m far less stressed than most people right now about the job downturn. I know they aren’t going to be foreclosing like gangbusters, and I know how long it takes collections folks to get to you and how slow the courts are on eviction processes and how bankruptcy works. I try to tell family and friends about this, but they are just feeling the stress of it for the first time and can’t really process it. I feel bad, but you can’t know how weak bill collecting is it till you’ve gone through it.

    We will have cash in our pockets, the government will keep printing money to keep unrest down. Use that to stock up

    As it stands, I’m far more worried about (1) the rebound of the disease in the fall; (2) the supply chain interruptions. My advice: use the summer to stock up on a year’s worth of food, medicine, masks, gloves, get a firearm and train with it, while starting a garden, learning how to store food, and getting a bug out plan in place. It’s not that expensive, and its worth going into debt to get that set up quickly if you have credit cards or loans.

    This fall’s flu season might be terrifying, and by winter we might see legitimate starvation conditions in certain cities if a bad blizzard hits and we’re in quarantine hits. If you can move to a more rural location and have all your food with you, do it by Labor Day if you can.

    • Agree: V. Hickel
    • Replies: @Carol
    , @Anon
  15. @Almost Missouri

    There was only Cronkite, Brinkley, and Reynolds to report on Swine Flu in the 70s. No cable. No internet. You had to go to a lot of trouble to get other information.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  16. John C. says:

    Random indeed: I was laid of from a company where had I worked for 17 years when it was sold last December.

    Had the good fortune to immediately pick up work from former clients and was booked through October, looking to net slightly more than I made in my old job.

    My profession? Television producer for live sporting events.

    • Replies: @Dano
    , @Known Fact
  17. @Bill B.

    Bill Gates has 50.1 million followers as appropriate for a man with more money than God.

    Which must mean that Jeff Bezos, whose wealth is even greater than Gates’, is very much inappropriate with his puny 1.4 million followers, at least in your view. Plus, it’s not like Musk is wealthier than Thurnberg or anything.

    Barack Obama, of course, beats all of them, including the current President of the United States, but I’m sure that’s appropriate, as he’s also much wealthier than the latter. I guess.

    And regarding the new order being unstable because of people perceiving it to be unfair, it’s also most obvious. No one, back in the dark ages, thought things were unfair, and in any case it all lasted just a few years.

  18. Steve, The Unfairness of it All doesn’t apply just to Corona. It applies to life in general.

    In my half century on this planet, the most important thing I’ve learned is: sh!t happens. And more often than not, the worse the sh!t, the less likely you are to expect it. All we can do about this is two things:

    1. Prepare: try to get your finances in order to be able to survive with no income for a few months. Make sure you have non perishable food and water in the house.

    2. Live life to the fullest: never assume anything about tomorrow, or that you’ll even have a tomorrow. Never take any for granted and enjoy every day as best you can.

  19. Darlings, if I had that kind of money, I’d see all the specialists this year. Covid isn’t what’s holding me back.

    As to the unfairness issue, I’d say “incompetence” is the operative word wrt to our pandemic response. Trump’s coasting by triangulation. In other words he’s grabbing a little advice from Dr. Fauci blended with some from his political base along with some wild speculation about medical techniques not necessarily relevant to the current covid epidemic. Then there’s the designated technocrat, Dr. Fauci, who scares us all into derailing the economy. Is this deliberate political sabotage or a doctor getting his way no matter what the cost, a sort of last hurrah? Then there’s our manufacturing base’s complete inability to ramp up production of PPE while the CDC can’t even construct a reliable test kit that can then be sent out for mass production. Maybe we’re really waiting on Germany and South Korea to sell us whatever they have left after they’re done testing their respective peoples. If these bozos keep getting richer it will be because they hired competent financial advisors who invest in German and South Korean companies for said bozos.

    For many weeks it’s been obvious that the elderly and others in managed care facilities were the people truly in danger from covid. The money and the quarantine should’ve been focused on such facilities along with some support for those with compromised immune systems in the general population. Of course, Congress had already shot out checks to everyone and their dog by then.

    • Agree: utu, Polynikes
  20. SFG says:
    @Jake

    The coronavirus is killing lots of New Yorkers (and to a lesser extent people in big cities), and black and brown people are in fact being hit harder (due to preexisting conditions, which the elites like to mention, which are in turn due to bad behavior, which they don’t). The Jewish community in and around New York was hit hard due to their many connections (though the Orthodox and Hasidim were hit particularly hard, and the elites aren’t so fond of them).

    Rural white ‘deplorables’ haven’t been hit hard by the virus itself, as you’d expect from any communicable disease–they socially distance as a part of life, because they live far apart. But it does kill old people, who skew more left.

    The shutdown hurts poor people more than rich people, because they tend to have jobs that can’t be done from home. (Exceptions, like doctors in New York, abound.) This hurts both ‘deplorables’ who aren’t affected and poor people in cities (heavily nonwhite) who have to go to work at grocery stores, etc. and expose themselves to the virus.

    The elites are less affected, as always. They are elite. Though, as you see, they can still die from the virus–it killed the head of the Bank of Portugal a little while ago.


    Now if you wanted to argue that the West has been characterized by a fight between clerical and anticlerical forces, and that Jews (predominantly) sided with the anticlerical forces, yes, I would agree with that.

  21. mousey says:

    “Nightfall”, by Isaac Asimov. Not about a pandemic but about how people react to something unexpected and frightening.
    The story is about a planet that never experiences nighttime due to multiple nearby stars until that fated period when the suns rays are blocked out. People do what people do when they encounter the unexpected. They panic. The city is destroyed along with all technology and the people with the technical knowledge. Life begins all over again from scratch and the cycle continues until that smart guy figures out what happened in the past and that it will happen again….

  22. @ATate

    Since your kids are here on earth, teach them how to survive outside of the system.

  23. SFG says:

    I’ll channel Lewis a little and say many traditions have known about this:

    Proverbs 16:9: A man’s heart plans his way, But the Lord directs his steps.

    Proverbs 19:21 There are many devices in a man’s heart; nevertheless the counsel of the LORD, that shall stand.

    Deem no man happy, until he passes the end of his life without suffering grief. –Herodotus, attributed to Solon.

    Count no man happy until he dies, free from pain at last. –Sophocles, Oedipus Rex.

    And here’s a Chinese folktale:
    Sāi Wēng lived on the border and he raised horses for a living. One day, he lost one of his prized horses. After hearing of the misfortune, his neighbor felt sorry for him and came to comfort him. But Sāi Wēng simply asked, “How could we know it is not a good thing for me?”
    After a while, the lost horse returned and with another beautiful horse. The neighbor came over again and congratulated Sāi Wēng on his good fortune. But Sāi Wēng simply asked, “How could we know it is not a bad thing for me?”
    One day, his son went out for a ride with the new horse. He was violently thrown from the horse and broke his leg. The neighbors once again expressed their condolences to Sāi Wēng, but Sāi Wēng simply said, “How could we know it is not a good thing for me?” One year later, the Emperor’s army arrived at the village to recruit all able-bodied men to fight in the war. Because of his injury, Sāi Wēng’s son could not go off to war, and was spared from certain death.

    Our ancestors were much more aware of the random nature of life and death than we are. Until now, perhaps.

    • Replies: @Kim
    , @Jack D
    , @SunBakedSuburb
  24. @Achmed E. Newman

    In fact the entire parasitic element of the healthcare infrastructure is feasting right now at the expense of the productive workforce. Insurance companies are clamoring for federal handouts even as their profit margins soar thanks to a reduction in medical services rendered but a constant inflow of premiums. At the same time, frontline physicians are getting huge paycuts even as their risk of workplace death or injury has gone up a hundredfold or more thanks to the virus.

  25. Hodag says:

    For the iSteve ers in the insurance business.

    My understanding of the giant policies written for things like Wimbledon.

    1. You go to your insurance company (Travelers, Zurich et al) and say you want to buy this insurance. Their actuaries get busy and come up with a price, there is a meeting of the minds and insurance company is paid the premium.

    2. Insurance company really isn’t in the business of insuring anything, but marketing, collecting premiums and reselling the risk and keeping a percentage of the premium. So they put the coverage out to auction among various re-insurers. The re-insurers cover the risk for the premium without having to beat the bushes for sales.

    3. Nothing happens everybody is happy.

    4. Re-insurers are pretty heavily regulated. They own assets – like commercial real estate and farmland.

    5. What happens when the re-insurer’s assets are worth 1/3 less? Do they sit tight or do they start upping risk to chase returns?

    Long story short – how are the re-insurers?

    • Replies: @Jokah Macpherson
    , @David
    , @Dano
  26. vinny says:
    @Bill B.

    If Greta had been living in my head for this long, I’d start charging her rent.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  27. Anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:

    I’m pretty sure that the economic distress and stunting of lives and ambitions attributable to this current crisis is a damned sight less than that which occurred after the 1973 OPEC oil embargo, which knocked the stuffing out of the west and permanently deflated late 20th century economic and scientific optimism.

  28. unit472 says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I would expect the “Sugar Daddy” trade to be suffering. While there maybe a lot of younger women who might need a ‘Sugar Daddy’ there could well be a shortage of older men willing ( and able) to make the trade. Job and investment losses would be bad enough but risking hospitalization or even death from such a ‘trade’ might cool the male libido.

  29. utu says:
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    Yes, “sh!t happens” but not all of it must. Look at 2008 Bush and 2009 Obama bailouts. What if the money went to people who were unable to pay the mortgage instead of the banks who ended up with both the money and the collateral?

  30. bomag says:
    @Anonymous

    In the final analysis, *ALL* that matters is economic growth

    I’d put in a word for demographic growth. Or at least the ability to project one’s demographics into the future.

    • Replies: @Redman
  31. anon[196] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The unfairness came in as this hysterical response to the Kung Flu was dictated to us by our Governors and other public officials,

    Honest question. Why do you people continue repeating this nonsense? You’ve been debunked on essentially every claim, but yet you won’t stop it. You’ve promoted miracle medicines that didn’t work, you’ve misinterpreted antibody studies you know nothing about, you’ve thrown around “herd immunity” when you don’t even know what it is or how it works, you’ve falsely compared the virus to the flu (the flu NEVER does this), you’ve insulted people who wear face masks in public when there is evidence that they have a positive effect …

    Is it rank ignorance or blind libertarian (conservative liberalism) ideology?

    Probably the greatest piece of evidence that this country is finished is all these old people rushing to invoke “big gubmint” and “Ronald Reagan” in the face of a catastrophic pandemic easily provable to be worse than the worst flu season in American history since 1918 — and it’s just getting started! It’s so bad Florida is now hiding the numbers. Notice how these people rush to blame “nanny state” for what has happened here. It’s a defense mechanism meant to shield their egos from the obvious disconfirmation provided by current events.

    Reality: America has a decentralized, inefficient federal system that has woefully underperformed compared to actual nanny states in essentially all metrics — South Korea, China, Singapore, New Zealand. Logic would suggest that perhaps it’s your ideology which contributed. Actual nanny states have a functional national healthcare systems. Actual nanny states have avoided economic collapse through intelligent government. Real nanny states like New Zealand and Taiwan have crushed this virus; Taiwan has already reopened and New Zealand is just a few days away from completely eradicating all traces of the virus. Compare that to America’s pathetic response.

    Do you want to know why this country failed? It’s guys like this poster. I know that sounds harsh, but it’s true. Libertarian selfishness and greed did this. Because if you’re willing to make the argument that 2.2 million people have to die for muh economy, then there is logically no argument you could ever make against mass immigration … or liberalism in general or even big gubmint if it’s proved it can increase the size of your pocket book. Obvious contradictions like this never seem to phase you guys though. Your entire worldview is built on a house of cards — platitudes meant to shield you of responsibility for your actions or requirements that you contribute to the greater good. Trump is going down hard in 2020 and taking you guys with him. Part of me is glad. When boomers are out of the way, we can concentrate on rebuilding because it is obvious no amount of evidence will ever change your minds.

  32. Anon[788] • Disclaimer says:
    @ATate

    I quit the security of a good-paying government job to follow my dream. I have worthless degrees in the humanities and no useful skills or knowledge. But being relatively young, healthy, and everything clicking for me I decided I should strike out on my own.

    Five years ago I moved to another part of the country and started a business. I entered March with good self-employment making ~$3k-4k/week with ~50-60 hrs/week work. By mid March 2020 it was 100% gone, never to return.

    I struck out on my own indeed. Fortunately I didn’t have a highly-leveraged business. I get sick thinking about those who do.

    Luckily I recently found a $14/hour job for a major retailer. So life is good.

    And to think, all the employees at the government agency I left are sitting on their asses collecting their paychecks and just a received a $1200 bonus for their troubles.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  33. bomag says:
    @ATate

    I have to leave a legacy of some bored teenagers t-shirt slogan?

    I’m offering the teenagers a combo of Lenin and Orwell:

    “The future is who gets to apply the boot to whom’s face.”

    • Replies: @Sparkon
  34. International Jew [AKA "Hebrew National"] says:

    I was hoping for a proctology joke.

  35. @Jake

    That’s exactly why the Left, and Neocons, love this Covid-19

    In Europe it is the opposite. Maybe partly because the European Left still identifies with workers. The European Right loves any excuse to control the masses.

    On the positive side, the lockdown has put an end to immigration, and probably moved that debate permanently to the right. Another reason the Left wants to fight it.

    You also see a lot of grumbling in Europe about kids not being in schools. The Left hates homeschooling over here and has been fighting it for decades. The idea of parents teaching their kids their own personal beliefs is anathema to the Left.

    The Far Right here seems to take their cues from Russia and/or the Koch brothers/Federalist think tanks rather than being an organic European conservative movement. It is comical to watch them parroting US right-wing talking points that end up allying them with the far Left.

  36. Kim says:
    @SFG

    Our ancestors were much more aware of the random nature of life and death than we are. Until now, perhaps.

    There is nothing random about life. On the contrary, it is utterly determined.

    • Replies: @SFG
  37. @Hodag

    Cochran and Miller talked about this in one of their coronavirus podcasts; may have even been the very first one. Cochran seems to think that reinsurance is complete bullshit, which was always my gut feeling as well (you can’t magic away the non-independence of events causing claims) and since he is right so often I have no reason to doubt him now.

  38. If we learn nothing else from this disaster it is that we need TERM LIMITS. How long can we go on being lorded over by the likes of Pelosi, Schumer, McConnell, Cuomo, Newsom et al ? In the long run they have done more harm than good in their careers.

  39. MLK says:

    Twelve Monkeys hasn’t gotten the attention it deserves in this pandemic. It hits a little too close to home in that it’s about quarantining the uninfected.

    This is a historical first, as far as I know.

    Here’s some rather odd revisionism about Cuba’s draconian response to HIV/AIDS, published in November right as the whole Wuhan Virus thingie was about to get going:

    https://www.tampabay.com/opinion/2019/11/29/are-public-health-quarantines-in-our-future-column/

    Cuba’s entire population was already in a form of lockdown and under comprehensive surveillance. Its response to AIDs merely added a layer of additional control of the infected.

    China was similarly positioned vis-à-vis the population, and dealt with the infected in roughly the same way. But the outbreak started in China so it set a governmental response precedent for the countries that followed.

  40. Jack D says:
    @Bill P

    It’s easy to go mad with power. Woody Allen figured out a long time ago – in Bananas when the Castro like dictator takes over he commands everyone to change their underwear twice a day. “And you must wear it on the outside, so we can check!”.

    In Philly they just announced the new rules for permitted construction. It can take place Monday to Friday only. Coronavirus is more contagious on weekends, I guess. And you can build if you already have a permit but forget about applying for zoning variances. Oh, also no demolition, no foundation work and you have to have a “hand washing station” on your site (never mind that construction workers always wear gloves anyway). And so on, endlessly.

    Coronavirus is now the all purpose excuse for the government doing that which they were inclined to do anyway, which is to turn us into a Permit Raj and interfere in everyone’s lives while making most forms of economic activity illegal or at least so burdened by regulation that they were impractical. The natural mode of government (and part of the reason that most of the world was so poor forever) is that everything that is not expressly permitted is forbidden. You can’t do anything unless you have permission from us and we will grant our permission sparingly and reluctantly, according to our whim. The quarantine is the perfect excuse for putting this regime in place in the US. The government figures that if they are lucky, CV will be around forever and so will these regulations.

    There is a reason why our manufacturing moved to China and it wasn’t just labor costs. Having an ever increasing # of “inspectors” coming to visit your business and fine you for all sorts of “violations” was a big part of it too. Not to mention harassment from unions, “community activists”, lawsuits, etc. Who needs this headache?

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Philly guy
    , @Redman
    , @Dtbb
  41. Nathan says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    “Does anyone remember Kindergarten, when “we’re all going to have to stay inside during recess because one of you broke the rules! That’ll teach you.”?”

    Yeah, I remember that. They’ve been conditioning this sort of response into people for generations. Some people have the kind of personality that just naturally takes to it- the natural born hall monitor. Others don’t, but the hall monitors have been able to get on top. They go into politics and stick around schools for so long they end up with PhDs- a degree system so broken it locks them into $40k/ a year indentured servitude and leaves them with little better to do than meddle in other people’s business.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  42. Bill Gates-pushed covid-19 lockdown and the massive ‘WFH’ Work from Home pivot, have resulted in huge profits for Bill Gates’ Microsoft, as companies massively adopt Microsoft’s corporate cloud computing services

    Adding greatly to the net worth of Gates himself and his billionaire friends

    Microsoft Corp. announced the following results for the quarter ended March 31, 2020, as compared to the corresponding period of last fiscal year:

    Revenue was $35.0 billion and increased 15%
    Operating income was $13.0 billion and increased 25%
    Net income was $10.8 billion and increased 22%
    Diluted earnings per share was $1.40 and increased 23%

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/microsoft-earnings-sales-beat-company-reports-minimal-impact-covid-19

    FWIW – There was a discussion on Gab re why the very smart Steve Sailer seems so bowled over by coronavirus panic as something extremely real, versus the huge dissident community including Unz’s Shamir and Atzmon, many whistle-blowing, lockdown-denouncing physicians and epidemiologists etc, who mostly see a giant political manipulation from what statistically resembles a bad-flu-season temporary surge in deaths of elderly and sick and weak and obese

    The thought was that Steve, being both a boomer and someone who fought off cancer in his late 30s, is just too emotional about this

    Unlike ‘It’s just a flu, bro!’ US Vice President Mike Pence, cheerfully the only person refusing a mask at the Mayo Clinic amidst doctors and infected patients … and given that Pence personally receives the world’s highest-level intelligence briefing every morning, maybe Pence knows something?

    • Replies: @Redman
    , @keypusher
  43. @Jack D

    I like the idea that Philly, a city where just about every week a house collapses because of shoddy slapdash demolition work, needs less License and Inspection personnel.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  44. B36 says:

    Things could be worse. The Big One could hit about now.

  45. Hockamaw says:

    I feel like a lot of people on the Right haven’t come to terms with the fact that Biden, and VP running mate Kamala, are going to win in November. So we’re going to be looking at a situation where we’re in an economic malaise with a president who has advanced senile dementia and his odious WOC Vice President presiding over the smoldering ashes of the American system.

  46. Travis says:

    The Spanish flu was extremely unfair, as it killed mostly younger healthy Americans while the Wahu Flu kills mostly the old , obese , sick and frail.

    The Spanish Flu killed 33,512 Americans under the age of 40 in New York City alone
    The Wahu Flu has killed 300 people under the age of 40 in all of NY
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4082668/table/tbl1/?report=objectonly

    The vast majority of deaths from the Wahu Flu are over the age of 75, The majority of those killed by the Spanish Flu were under the age of 40. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid19/index.htm

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @obwandiyag
  47. Ben H says:

    yeah I’ve noticed a lot of the characters who usually put themselves out there as the saviors of humanity are reaaaaaalllly quiet right now. Waiting to buy up what remains of main street America at bargain prices, possibly. Otherwise holding their fire as the crisis – at this point caused by the lockdown more than the virus itself – ripens to the point of disaster for them to strike. Would be interesting to see the funding for the “don’t open up” lobby.

  48. J.Ross says:

    The Trump economy was the most tangible and widely appreciated effect of the Trump presidency. The Democrat response to this flu variant was to crash the Trump economy. They’re following up on this by pushing vote-by-mail. No plan my alveoli. “Never let a crisis go to waste” doesn’t mean you cause the crisis (or want it), it simply means you think quickly and exploit the hand you’re dealt.

    • Agree: Dtbb, Neuday
    • Replies: @Barnard
    , @obwandiyag
  49. Nathan says:

    The problem is the left and right are no longer operating with the same moral compass. The “essential” employees, the people that can work from home, and even the OnlyFans thots are ipso facto the moral superiors to the people that the lockdown is affecting. You can here it in the way these people seethe and sneer at anyone who wants to go back to work. It’s gross. God forbid you stray from the orthodoxy. Stay the fuck home (*losers*)!

    There’s a twisted puritanical streak to the left these days, and I’m afraid that the pandemic is only going to exacerbate their nasty, censorious behavior toward anyone who deviates from the progressive moral code. It’s likely that they will use this to gin up hatred for the current administration, succeed in gaining the Senate and white house, and then set about the final destruction of their moral enemies. Remember, this could resolve in the actualization of the Cloward-Piven strategy, at least for the healthcare system. As much as I’ve heard right-wing pundits blather about Cloward-Piven, no one seems to remember it now. If the left nationalizes the healthcare industry, your hypothetical ENT and proctologist are about to have much bigger problems. We will ALL have much bigger problems.

  50. Jack D says:
    @SFG

    At the end of Charlie Wilson’s War, the character of Gus Avrakotos tells this same “folk tale” (a lot of folk tales (and folk songs) are actually modern inventions) because everyone is celebrating that the Soviets have been defeated by the Afghan mujaheddin (in other words, the Taliban and Bin Laden) thanks to American assistance but the wise Gus wonders whether putting these guys in power will turn out well for the Americans in the long run (hint – it won’t).

    • Replies: @Polynikes
    , @utu
    , @tomv
  51. @Buffalo Joe

    Buffalo Joe,
    Term limits? Ain’t gonna happen, as this would disrupt The System. Here is an email I sent to a friend prefaced with a explanation from Sundance of the operations of The System from a recent post at the Conservative Tree House, and followed by my own thoughts on this topic…

    A longish, but illuminating breakout of The Grifter’s Paradise that is D.C.:

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2020/04/28/oh-dear-kentucky-representative-thomas-massie-touches-the-third-rail-reveals-dcs-biggest-secret/#more-190326

    A couple of further thoughts:

    1) Political “campaign donations” (with some few exceptions) can be kept by the politician. There is quite an industry in “foundations” capitalized by these “donations”. Funny how the heads of these “foundations” are so often, if not the politicians themselves, they are family members, and they draw salaries in so doing. Long-form graft; don’t have to figure where to squirrel away the vig out of sight of any authorities, instead you hide it in plain sight all legal like.

    2) Sundance mentions how many politicians chose to retire when their income stream was cut off. Now consider this; why would it be that term limit proposals all die the death? Probably because, just when the politicians would be better positioned through laddering up through seniority (another weaponized form of corruption), they would get their snouts yanked out of the trough. I mean, how fair is that, eh?

    Congress would seem to be a perfect target for RICO (Racketeering-Influenced and Corrupt Organization) Act enforcement. Fits the whole rotten bunch to a “T”. But they probably made themselves exempt in the enabling legislation…

  52. @ATate

    Go into the Prepper industry. I guarantee you it’s going to be a growth sector.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  53. @Bill P

    The moral legitimacy of government is also being undermined by the extraordinary stupidity of some of the nation’s governors. The babe in Maine said the state will be shut down indefinitely even though they have had < 50 cases in a population of almost 2 million. And Newsom in California just closed all the state's parks and beaches. Because science, or something.

    Eventually people are going to say screw this and defy authority, especially as the weather improves.

    • Replies: @Brian Reilly
  54. Dano says:
    @John C.

    Dang….sorry, hope it turns around for you soon.

  55. David says:
    @Hodag

    A deal like that is usually written within Lloyds. Some syndicate will structure the terms and put down a line, then the broker will shop it around to other syndicates to fill it out. Usually the “lead” underwriter will condition his line on the broker being able to place most if not all the rest of the program with others. That way, the lead gets a skin-in-the-game peer review. If the price needs to go up to place the program, the lead gets the benefit of that, too.

    Since the syndicates buy reinsurance on their own lines, the typical reinsurer’s payout is a small share of the total loss.

    There’s a lot of glamour (relatively speaking) in programs like this and the pricing assumptions usually take a back seat to underwriters’ desire to be in the game. And $141mm is just 0.24% of Wills Re’s estimate of reinsurance “industry” capital.

    • Replies: @David
  56. Dano says:
    @Hodag

    Good question. My guess is they are whispering in the lobbyists ears…

  57. Carol says:
    @R.G. Camara

    “The idea of a small family farm is also occurring to many folks now. ”

    Oh really? That’s hard work you know. Nothing you want to be doing into your 50s.

    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
  58. @Lawyer Guy

    Michigan’s Democrat governor is insisting that the taxpayers provide free college tuition to all healthcare and grocery store workers as a “front line workers GI bill”

    That’s still better than paying them bonus money to not work.

  59. @John C.

    Don’t lose hope — check out Steve’s post on women’s pro hockey!

  60. @Buffalo Joe

    If we learn nothing else from this disaster it is that we need TERM LIMITS.

    SCOTUS outlawed term limits in the 90s by a 5-4 decision after some states had passed term limit laws. The decision would have been different had Robert Bork been confirmed to the court.

    • Replies: @Marty
  61. With five votes scheduled for 2020 I figured my part-time office job with our board of elections would be especially juicy this year. Even brutal dictatorships hold phony elections, right? Well not NY — Cuomo’s already canceled two and the local school-tax vote in May looks dead in the water as well.

  62. Polynikes says:

    The various gigantic bailouts passed abruptly by Congress with little deliberation will benefit some people and organizations, especially those who had particularly persuasive and fast-moving lobbyists, and fail to help others.

    This was mainly caused by the panic and the need to “do something,” and the insiders always win in this scenario.

    But where did the panic come from? The media fuels it, sure. Government bureaucrats and moron academics who never have to be accountable to anyone share some blame. As do self-righteous politicians. Bloggers, “influencers” and the like can take a little, too. But we must look internal if we want the true answer.

    We’ve become a me-first society that is soft and cares more about ourselves and instant gratification than more profound long-term concepts like liberty and the future of our children and their children. It wasn’t caused by this panic, but this panic laid it bare. It does not bode well for the future of this Republic (or if you look worldwide, possibly at the future of western democracy).

  63. Polynikes says:
    @Jack D

    The Zen Master says, “we’ll see…”

  64. Anon7 says:

    “…and on February 1, you opened your own practice. Sure, times might be a little tough for the first few years as you build a reputation, but you are living the American Dream.”

    My grandfather opened his medical practice in a small farming community in … 1929. Things were a bit rough after everything crashed, but it all worked out over the next few decades. Of course, he and my grandma needed to be a bit flexible when it came to accepting payment in the form of a plucked chicken or perhaps an apple pie during those early years.

    Nor have I even heard of many science fiction tales relevant to our current predicament. There are some memorable depictions of an apocalyptic pandemic like Andromeda Strain and Twelve Monkeys, but I’ve never heard of a sci-fi story or movie about an only moderately disastrous pandemic like this one where it’s unclear whether the disease or the economic cure will be worse.

    Neither have I and I’ve read a lot of sf (and stf!). Thanks to men like Jonas Salk and Alexander Fleming (vaccines and antibiotics), we strode the earth like colossi – what in the natural world could hold us back from the stars? Ourselves, maybe. Bacteria and viruses? not so much.

    In the last decade, there were a few boutique collections on a specific topic, like antibiotic resistance. But they’re all written in the Woke style, which succeeded the Cyberpunk style, and I just won’t read literature that is correct, politically.

    You might look at women authors like Margaret Atwood, who has written some things I like. She’s resistant to the triumphalism of most male fiction, because she is a reflexive feminist, but it doesn’t seem to make her better at predicting or imagining what actually happens.

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @HA
  65. fish says:
    @Anonymous

    If this crisis prompts the very welcome and overdue destruction of the (evil) EU, it would be well worth it. Worth it a thousand times over.

    Let Europe show us the way…….

  66. fish says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Unfairness always comes out of heavy-handed government and the nanny-state. Does anyone remember Kindergarten, when “we’re all going to have to stay inside during recess because one of you broke the rules! That’ll teach you.”?

    ….ah yes…..Gretchen Whitmer Syndrome!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  67. Redman says:
    @Jack D

    This is a point I was hoping someone would make. Thanks.

    I agree with the poster who emphasized the importance of economic growth. While a truly prosperous nation requires much more than just economic wealth, it creates fertile ground for everything else. And what most stands in the way of such growth? A bloated bureaucracy of managerial elites who pass all kinds of regulations, often pointless, to justify their positions and power.

    I agree with Woody’s satirical observations on the corruption of power. Although I’m oddly starting to see the wisdom in the Bananas dictator’s other insane impromptu diktat: Maybe we should consider making the official language Swedish, at least Sweden’s leaders respected its citizens enough to treat them like adults.

  68. @utu

    They would have used it to go to Disney and buy some more jewelry and a bug screen TV

    • Replies: @utu
  69. @Peter Akuleyev

    In Europe it is the opposite. Maybe partly because the European Left still identifies with workers.

    So that’s why they are in favor of unlimited immigration, because “they identify with the workers”. OK!

  70. utu says:
    @Jack D

    Charlie Wilson’s War was a great job in covering up the fact that the Islamist and all kinds of mujahideen elements were supported long time before Soviet invasions with the explicit objective to lure the Soviets into their Vietnam.

    https://dgibbs.faculty.arizona.edu/brzezinski_interview
    Q: Despite this risk, you were an advocate of this covert action. But perhaps you yourself desired this Soviet entry into the war and looked for a way to provoke it?

    Brzezinski: It wasn’t quite like that. We didn’t push the Russians to intervene, but we knowingly increased the probability that they would.

    Q : When the Soviets justified their intervention by asserting that they intended to fight against secret US involvement in Afghanistan , nobody believed them . However, there was an element of truth in this. You don’t regret any of this today?

    Brzezinski: Regret what? That secret operation was an excellent idea. It had the effect of drawing the Russians into the Afghan trap and you want me to regret it? The day that the Soviets officially crossed the border, I wrote to President Carter, essentially: “We now have the opportunity of giving to the USSR its Vietnam war.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Anonymous
  71. @utu

    Just before the last crash I had some clients who were involved in a Bush program where the US government paid them to purchase small machine shops and ship the equipment to Muslim countries because the new jobs would solve the extremist problem.

    The government paid for everything, gave a huge subsidy payment, and a big plus was the feds paid for 7 years of AIG all risk coverage on the venture.

    The crash happened, the clients were sweating the AIG coverage because AIG was also one of the biggest entities holding the bag on the end of the swaps chain.

    Bush Jr shoveled the money to AIG to make them whole, then Obama shoveled even more to them because they were just like a bank, kind of, sort of.

    I heard, and believe, the real reason was that the euro billionaires had some exposure if AIG went down.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  72. There are some memorable depictions of an apocalyptic pandemic like Andromeda Strain and Twelve Monkeys, but I’ve never heard of a sci-fi story or movie about an only moderately disastrous pandemic like this one where it’s unclear whether the disease or the economic cure will be worse.

    Film doesn’t know how to present the likely arcs of crises for two reasons, the first being that there aren’t usually enough explosions, but the other is that the the more plausable is more frightening.

    Gaslighting about “conspiracy theories” operates under a similar principle. We’re bad at using conspiracy in its more general, legalistic sense of it being simply a group planning the nafarious.
    Now it’s only meant for something like “Chem trails gave me autism” moonbatness.

    Disastors are like 4G warfare- slow, grinding, fits and starts, shifting concerns and alliances, varying locales, times, and degrees of state of nature descent, weird curveballs that can be considered significant in hindsight or not.

    We’ve had prosperity so long, we are unable to accurately describe what is happening or recognize simple conflict patterns that may or may not spiral out of control. One blogger pointed out that we’ve also outsourced violence to such a degree we don’t even have an honest discourse on what violence actually is.
    You have to go back to over half a century to find writers who can dispassionately describe events and frame them in any kind of reasonable interpretation.

  73. Gordo says:

    A few organizations prudently planned ahead. For example, the All England Lawn Tennis Club has been paying $2 million per year to insure against their Wimbledon tournament being canceled due to a pandemic.

    I propose that the board of the All England Lawn Tennis Club be placed in charge of the United Kingdom, nay the entire Western World.

  74. Peter Frost says: • Website
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    They are also the first who should have their assets seized and redistributed to all those thrown out of work by this hysterical nonsense.

    Perhaps they should be placed on a rack and forced to say “COVID-19 is no worse than a bad flu.”

    • Replies: @Polynikes
  75. utu says:

    “…doesn’t seem to have much to do with moral behavior.” – What if smokers are indeed much less susceptible to the virus? They will be hated even more.

    • Replies: @Sean
  76. Anonymous[161] • Disclaimer says:

    One question that intrigues me is this:

    If this crisis engenders a new age of harshness, rationality and cold analysis, due to ‘luxury’ being abolished, will dipshits like Bryan Caplan – who peddles stark staring *obvious* falsehoods and wooly thinking – still be entertained by cushy lifed professional guilt tripping fooldom out there? Or will the fools wake up and actually smell the fecal matter?

  77. SFG says:
    @Anon7

    Cyberpunk was political–it was an attack on Reagan/Thatcher deregulation. That’s why there are big corporations owning everything.

    Of course, even if you’re a conservative, if you’re a young guy the idea of stalking through a high-tech city of the future with robotic arms that lift ten times the normal amount and shoot bullets is kind of appealing. The Woke stuff is anti-male, which is the natural audience for sci-fi, which is why it gets the genre a ‘strange new respect’ but gets outcompeted for nerds’ money by stuff from Japan. Japan, being homogeneous, doesn’t have to worry about racial conflict and can worry about story and plot (and, this being sci-fi, giant robots). Plus, being from another culture, it’s weird, always a plus with sci-fi fans.

    Paper costs killed the pulps. Every genre has its time in the sun.

  78. Anonymous[135] • Disclaimer says:

    The incoherent jackass in the white house is not helping. He is morphing into the POTUS from hell.

    His approval #s crashed when he went along with the insane mass quarantine shutdown and he has been trumpeting the bogus merits of shutdown policy ever since —- which effectively puts his own head in the political noose.

    This clown is now tweeting about Sweden’s supposed bad example where actually the data picture is more complex than meets the eye. He doesn’t place any value on the fact that Sweden’s entire population hasn’t been traumatized and economically devastated as we have been. Sweden’s death toll is actually small per capita (like almost every other country) compared to actual contagion calamities of history.

    Trump is playing right into the hands of Cuomo Newsom et al. Idiot Trump is now married to shutdown policy effectiveness so he will be powerless to oppose future shutdowns.

    Trump should’ve been pounding the nature of the corona disease itself (it preys on weaklings) and the assorted logistical and therapeutic countermeasures we have developed as the reason for progress in controlling the outbreak.

    INSTEAD THIS FUCKING ASSHOLE IS TRUMPETING ECONOMIC SHUTDOWN AS OUR SAVIOR. This weak approval seeking bitch president is going to wreck us all.

  79. Anonymous[930] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ozymandias

    The prepper industry has always been cyclical. The last big boom was Y2K, a big drop, 9/11 then a tapering off.

  80. utu says:
    @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    “They would have used it to go to Disney and buy some more jewelry and a bug screen TV”– Are you with Goldman Sachs? They paid themselves $20 billion in bonuses in 2009.

  81. @Peter Akuleyev

    “The European Right loves any excuse to control the masses. ”

    I guess that means that Angela Merkel is hard right control freak.

  82. Lot says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    They were around in 2003 in every major city. Anyone else who looked can confirm, as the best “deals” you saw when you sorted by price were always Nigerian scammers asking for paypaling to them security deposits and pervs with “seeking young single women to share my 1-bedroom” ads.

  83. guest007 says:

    A couple of nitpicks.

    1. The term proctologist is no longer used. They are gastroenterologist and they have been hurt due to the slow down in medicine because no one is getting their endoscopy at the moment. A better example would have been OB/GYN because labor and delivery departments at hospitals are still open because babies just do not wait that long.

    However, when things have recovered enough, all of these physicians will be overwhelmed with business. The same as with dentist or optometrist.

    It seems that the most long term harm will be tourism and spectator sports. Those two industries have specialized into squeezing people into small spaces (think of the bus or tram at Disneyworld).

    There is also limited ways to offset the risk.

  84. Lot says:

    “ the eventual distribution of wealth that shakes out of these sudden events will strike many as lacking in legitimacy”

    So it won’t change things?

    A Bernie Revolution but with closed borders sounds great to me.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  85. Dtbb says:
    @Jack D

    They learned it in law school.

  86. JMcG says:

    Deserve got nothing to do with it.

  87. Jim Beam says:

    My wife has a distant ancestor, a Northerner, who became enamored of the South. Took his entire inheritance, bought a dozen slaves, and moved to Georgia. In 1858.

  88. @Jim Don Bob

    Jim Don, If there was going to be a lot of people defying authority, actually re-engaging in commerce, recreation, and such, it would already have happened. Nope, we will stay mostly in the bounds our betters have put us in, hoping that they don’t go to hard on us.

  89. Daniel H says:

    Almost nobody had a plan ahead of time ….

    Most of us have some sort of plan to muddle through life, it’s just that it isn’t really any good, or well thought out.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  90. @SFG

    “Our ancestors were much more aware of the random nature of life and death than we are.”

    But we have 24/7 porn and shopping at our fingertips.

  91. Neuday says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Slightly OT, but are Craigslist “landlords” in the US taking advantage of the crisis by offering “free” rooms to female tenants in exchange for sex? I was surprised how many there were on the UK site. Maybe they have always been there.

    By contrast there were only a few ads from (presumably) “sex workers” looking for clients without making it explicit.

    Buying a second hand car is a pain at the moment, you can’t attend the auction, and you have to pay for the car to be delivered.

    Maybe you should place an ad offering a free room to a female tenant but you want access to her second-hand. . . car.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  92. Jack D says:
    @utu

    There was nothing wrong (IMHO) in provoking the Russians into a Vietnam-like trap. That was certainly fair enough under the rules of the Great Game/Cold War. The US (usually) does OK in wars – it’s the peace that follows that we screw up.

  93. Anonymous[369] • Disclaimer says:
    @utu

    Yeah, the U.S./West had the goal of weakening the Soviet influence in Central Asia by turning it into a hornet’s nest through Salafism. Good long term strategy… not. Our CIA and State Department needs more hard science majors and fewer poli sci, law, and area studies majors.

  94. Sean says:
    @utu

    Smoker’s cough will be like going about spitting on folk now. Exhaled smoke or vape also makes it obvious smoker’s respiratory aerosol is literally up innocent bystanders’ noses. Runners are another lot who are going to be firmly told to take their habit away. Distance running in urban areas seems unlikely to be healthy anyway Half of all marathon runners develop fluid in their lungs after a race.
    —-

    Nor are the economic effects like 2008 where people with a higher risk-reward preference tended to get burned worse.

    Don’t you mean ‘bailed out by the government better’?

    After all, who goes broke and who gets rich out of 2020 doesn’t seem to have much to do with moral behavior.

    Michael Hudson on Trump’s Coronavirus bill

    [A] n enormous giveaway that makes real estate tax exempt for the next 30 years. Obviously the lobbyists have written these laws. Real estate will not make a profit for the next 30 or 50 years. But it’ll make enormous cash flow. They’ll call it depreciation. The depreciation schedule pretends that buildings are losing their value even when they’re going way up. It’s an accounting system, including the national income accounts that have little to do with the real economy. […] Now, when you say we have to give the banks more money to lend more to get the economy moving, it means we have to have families and businesses take on more debt. All the classical economists warned against the landlord class, banks and the monopolists continuing to run society into the ground.

    The money is being made in Finance, Insurance and Real Estate, it making things like screws and fasteners , which the US has simply ceased to manufacture, also F-35 circuit boards are manufactured by Huawei. Smart money has long been going long going to China now https://www.stripes.com/news/veterans/the-federal-retirement-fund-is-about-to-invest-in-china-some-former-us-military-leaders-object-1.627524 Also
    https://www.breitbart.com/radio/2019/07/20/ret-general-robert-spalding-moon-landing-couldnt-happen-todays-deindustrialized-america-weve-lost-all-china/s

    I think there may be a trend where firms that go bust are bought for a song because because the customer data is being acquired. But no one will be keeping their jobs. And it does not have to be US firms that take them over.

  95. @Nathan

    “There’s a twisted puritanical streak to the left these days”

    The new Puritans have a Covenant with vile drag queens eager to read to kids in libraries. They can desecrate the innocence of children and the sanctity of libraries in one fell swoop.

  96. AP says:

    One thing we can predict is that the eventual distribution of wealth that shakes out of these sudden events will strike many as lacking in legitimacy. After all, who goes broke and who gets rich out of 2020 doesn’t seem to have much to do with moral behavior. This does not bode well for future political stability.

    An excellent point. Still, a positive contrast with the former Commie countries, where those who got rich did not do so due to random circumstances but due to very deliberate criminality.

  97. Anon[269] • Disclaimer says:

    I think there’s a lot of glass half full in the pandemic.

    The presidential campaign was raptured out of existence. How refreshing.

    I think there’ll be a lot of deregulation because a lot of bullshit has been shown to not be necessary after all…

    … Including maybe a college education. Going into massive debt and postponing life for four or five years for the equivalent of Khan Academy with 100 diversity administrators and a bias response team? When hiring begins anew we might see companies hiring Covid dropouts on the basis of their SAT and an interview.

    The whole illegal alien fueled food industrial complex: farms and meat processors may automate and pay decent rates to citizens (out of work university humanities adjuncts who can’t learn to code?) to produce more expensive food, and half of restaurants may find themselves permanently closed after many of the locked down learn to cook. And might tipping die?

    Illegal alien housekeepers may be unemployable and decide to repatriate.

    There will be people putting off medical visits to their detriment, but there will be many more realizing that most medical visits and drugs are unnecessary. And why can’t phone and Zoom consultations, drugs by mail, and credit card payments continue after Covid settles down, many will ask. ENT was not the best lede, since it’s one of the scamier specialities, 90 percent BS.

  98. J.Ross says:
    @Lawyer Guy

    The easy dismissal of wiping out student debt misses the fact that our universities are an unconfronted, let alone unpunished, enemy, and if debt dropping is handled properly it can serve a vital political and societal purpose. If this new GI bill goes through it will not only be a disaster, it will be the same disaster that the easy dismissal warned against.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
  99. anon[399] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mike Tre

    The Kovid Kult Klan are the last ones who get to complain about the unfairness of it all.

    It’s so unfair that I can’t go outside my house to buy McDonald’s for a whole month (maybe two!). What else am I supposed to spend all this 401k money on? The humanity of it all. I’m so lonely now. Even the illegals I employ to cut my lawn don’t come around anymore. I used to pretend I know all about their holidays – cinco de mayonnaise or whatever they call it — and sermonize about work ethnic and Ronald Reagan, America’s greatest president. They seemed to like it just fine. But I have to tell you, these guys have a nasty habit of forgetting to take their nails out of the driveway. Anyway, good times. My daughter sure does like them, too. They always ask for her when she’s around. She speaks Spanish just like them. Learned it in Spain. She’s teaching it to my Spanish grandson. He’s not so quick in the head. I think there’s something wrong with him. BTW, is it usual for Spaniards to be so dark? That may be part of his condition, but I don’t know because they don’t have health insurance, and I don’t want to pay for them to be on my plan. Since the doctors won’t do anything for him at the emergency room, I figure it can’t be all that bad.

    But as I was saying, this is terrible. I may even have to call — reluctantly — one of my other kids I don’t talk to anymore. They said they didn’t want anything to do with me after I watched Bill O’reilly once and told them I wasn’t going to give them any money for college. Pull yourselves up by the bootstraps, I said. Get a job and pay for it yourselves. I’m sure you can work a low wage job and completely support yourself through college. That’s what I did back in the day. Hell, I graduated without debt, got a job making bank right after, and paid off my first house before I was 40. You guys can’t just do that? Too many videogames. Kids these days. No work ethic. Cruise ship vacations don’t just pay for themselves. The fourth wife needs some love, too. All I want to do is “live my life” and these meanies are stopping me. If you get sick and die, fine. Stay indoors if you want. But I have a constitutional right to do whatever I want! And I want to go to the park and grill! Hopefully, president Trump gets reelected so I don’t have to tolerate these socialists anymore.

    • Replies: @Manfred Arcane
  100. Daniel H says:
    @Jack D

    Sure, setting up white people, who had done no harm to you or your family, to get slaughtered is a good thing. Nothing wrong. Just a game.

    And leave aside the 100s of thousands of innocent Afghans who were slaughtered in that conflict. Just a game. Just a game.

    Cucks and American leftists. You are the same wretched people.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Johann Ricke
  101. @Jack D

    There was nothing wrong (IMHO) in provoking the Russians into a Vietnam-like trap.

    No provocation necessary. What exactly did Russia do in Afghanistan that it hadn’t already done in its other Muslim provinces? The only reason Afghanistan never became part of the Russian Empire prior to the Soviet invasion was British involvement. In fact, if Russia had done in Afghanistan what it did in its other Muslim conquests, it would have won. But millions of Afghans would have been killed.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basmachi_movement
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Asian_revolt_of_1916
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deportation_of_the_Chechens_and_Ingush
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circassian_genocide

  102. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    COVID-19 gives greater support to the Rawlsian “veil of ignorance” ethical framework than the traditional “birth lottery” concept does.

  103. Thoughts says:

    Stop right there Steve, I made it to ‘Vigorous skiers and so forth’

    NO ONE ‘VIGOROUS’ IS DYING FROM THIS DISEASE!!!!

    THE DISEASE IS NOT HARMING ANYONE MORE THAN A COLD OR FLU!

    The government aka people are hurting other people and destroying the economy.

    And we all know NYC is killing people via neglect or bad healthcare to boost stats for political purposes.

    2 weeks ago the worldwide governments should have been like *clap clap* everyone back to normal…those who die die.

    The End.

    So no…this suffering, is no longer RANDOM.

    I will go back to normal, as though Covid doesn’t exist.

    Because guess what…It doesn’t really exist. It’s just the same old cold/flu we get every f-ing year. The end. Drink a tonic water, take your zinc, your quercetin, take your D…same thing you did the prevent the flu and overcome that ridiculous fear you have of dying.

    Read the Bible. Have some faith.

  104. anon[225] • Disclaimer says:

    In the middle of all this negativity, look at some positives:

    1. Immigration will be down. With a high unemployment for a long time, there will great intolerance among generally indifferent public to bring new workers. Air lines have shutdown, when they start operating, there will be few and far between flights. Especially international ones. And they will not be cheap. With the 6 foot etc., spacing, most airplanes have to operate in first class/business class mode.

    2. With a deficit in multiple trillions for as long as the eye can see, there won’t be any money for “invade the world” project. In fact, fear of Covid will greatly reduce military activity. The coming stagflation will eat away real military budgets and the hardware will slowly rot away and become less useful over time.

    3. The cacophony of global warming will go away. With transport of all kinds greatly reduced, there won’t be any need for the Swedish girl to go and cry around. Already, the air is very clean all around the world and wild life is recovering. The reduced economic growth may also lead to less pollution (not much to throw away when not much to buy because not much money in pocket – poverty can be a good anti-polluter). The reduced population growth (and even early die off of older people) will also reduce pressure on ecosystem.

    4. Early die off of older people may make the average age younger leading to better worker/retiree ratio. This is especially helpful in older countries of Europe.

  105. Whiskey says: • Website

    Unfairness is the whole point Steve. The deepest desire in our rulers is to degrade and destroy the Dirt People– anyone not from Harvard or Yale.

    So that only special people have anything nice. How can they be happy if we are? Misery and pain for the Dirt people is the whole point.

    We are rapidly approaching hit civil war. President Abrams a slam dunk will get us there.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  106. J.Ross says:
    @SFG

    I recently took in Michael Crichton’s Rifftrax-ready Looker, which suffers from very basic problems in writing, pacing, action sequences (they use that comically bad thing where the “flying man” is attached to the camera and tracked), character logic (the police do whatever the plot needs at the moment and not what police should do, etc), and so on. What it does well, besides the girls (and a New Wave synthpop soundtrack from Barry DeVorzon worth a check from any Cars or Blondie fans), is that Max Headroom early eighties thing about evil megacorps and mind-controlling commercials. They’re so (rightly) proud of the satirical commercials that they replay them over the closing credits.

  107. @Jack D

    “The US (usually) does OK in wars”

    The wars post WW2 were supposedly about the containment of commies. American elites grew rich from the imperial expansion of the military and intelligence budgets during the Cold War. American elites grew rich when Chinese commies became capitalists without having to abandon their domestic tyranny. American elites grew envious of the Chinese model — a market system thriving in a police state. Closely connected American and Chinese elites agree that an insidious virus, combined with ruthless politicians and totalitarian Big Tech, will bring about the acceptance of the Chinese model in America.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  108. prosa123 says:

    Just in: for the first time ever, since it opened 116 years ago, the New York subway will be at least temporarily ending 24/7 service. Trains won’t run from 1am to 5am starting next week. This is ostensibly to allow thorough cleaning of the cars, but it’s certainly no coincidence that the decision came just a couple days after the big media expose of skells infesting the trains.

  109. MEH 0910 says:

    The Andromeda Strain – Original Trailer (Robert Wise, 1971)

    [MORE]

    Gil Mellé – The Andromeda Strain (1971) (Full Album)

  110. @utu

    The bailouts were immoral , should have let the banks fail and allowed housing prices to fall. Then the millennials would have been buying low cost homes and forming families. The Americans who stopped paying their mortgages got to live rent free for an average of 18 months before they lost their homes. My aunt was able to live in her home for 24 months after she stopped paying her mortgage. Like many others, she had re-mortgaged her home and spent the proceeds going on vacations and buying a new car…most of the people who lost their homes had lied about their income and could have been prosecuted for fraud , like Paul Manafort. He may have been the only American charged with lying to obtain a mortgage.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  111. Barnard says:
    @J.Ross

    One of the big unknowns here is how many Americans adults are content to be paid to sit at home staring at screens. It is insane for any small business owner to vote against Trump, but how many of their employees care more about having a job than getting handouts from the government. It is a test of intelligence of the American voter to see how many of them understand paying out unemployment at a higher rate than people’s wages is an unsustainable bad idea. A majority don’t seem to understand it now.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Buffalo Joe
  112. After all, who goes broke and who gets rich out of 2020 doesn’t seem to have much to do with moral behavior. This does not bode well for future political stability.

    Once upon a time when I was teaching ethics to Realtors – let that sink in – in order to provide meaningful content to a roomful of motivated adults, I explored the works of Lawrence Kohlberg, Ph. D. Psychology, U. Chicago. From that experience I have two takeaways that might be relevant here, but first a short course on his theory of moral development.

    As children grow and mature physically, their moral reasoning ability devlops through six stages, from completely self-centered toddlers to worldy sages.
    Level I Pre-conventionalo
    Stage 1 obedience and punishment driven
    Stage 2 self-interest driven
    Level II Conventional
    Stage 3 good intentions as determined by social consensus
    Stage 4 authority and social order obedience driven
    Level III Post-conventional
    Stage 5 social contract driven
    Stage 6 universal ethical principles driven

    Most adults are either stage 3 or 4. I, and most iuStave commentors are, of course, stage six.

    My takeaways applied to the present corona-chan situation:
    1.) When the rest of the world is ating out of fear or desperation, their moiral reasoning regresses to Stage 2. It is unsafe to depend on a social contract if no one else is doing that.

    2) Peole who never develop to a stage 3 or above cannot communicate with someone at stage 4, 5, or 6. The words have differenbt meanings to them.

    • Replies: @vinteuil
  113. Mr. Anon says:

    Nor are the economic effects like 2008 where people with a higher risk-reward preference tended to get burned worse. This one just seems random. Almost nobody had a plan ahead of time for what to do if everybody stays home for a few months. It’s reassuring to think that some nefarious set of insiders must have had an evil master plan, but in truth nobody seems to have had a clue. For example, here is the 2016 National Security Council’s Playbook for Early Response to High-Consequence Emerging Infectious Disease Threats and Biological Incidents.

    I haven’t read the whole thing, but I don’t see much in the way of thinking about the economic aspects. If I search for terms like “shut” or “close” or “jobs” or “rent,” I don’t find much.

    Do you find anything? When I search this Playbook for the word “playbook” I find nothing. Maybe my pdf reader is lame, but it appears to be a non-searchable pdf. Anyway, the government often inserts weird characters, spaces, etc. into documents, and otherwise formats and parses them strangely in order to defeat FOIA requests.

    The speed with which governments around the World, and States within the US, rolled out intrusive, authoritarian stay-at-home orders indicated that somebody somewhere had done some planning. Sort of like the way the first draft of the Patriot Act was introduced in Congress just one week after 911. The way to not let a crisis go to waste is to be prepared to exploit a crisis when it comes up.

    • Replies: @res
  114. …most patients would rather not see an ENT doc if they can avoid it.

    They’re obviously confusing ENTs and Orcs.

    Meanwhile, your brother-in-law, who owns a proctology clinic, is getting by…

    As long as he’s not getting bi! (Sorry…)

    In crosswordese, the ENT works at the adit. The proctologist, at the exit, or egress. (Any miners here? Do you exit by the adit as well? And do the pasty crusts pile up down there over time?)

    It’s not like AIDS where the main victims were needle junkies and bathhouse patrons. This one tends to strike hardest at warm Italian families in which children visit their parents and grandparents, at people who sing enthusiastically in church, at Germans who like doing their people’s traditional dances, at vigorous skiers, and so forth.

    Steve’ll be hearing from his neighbors at GLAAD.

    If I search for terms like “shut” or “close” or “jobs” or “rent,” I don’t find much.

    Jobs might lead to the ENT, rent (boys) to the proctologist. In West Hollywood, at least.

  115. Thoughts says:

    One more thing….

    There was a reality start who died of Ovarian Cancer and a bunch of IVF’er C list celebs who got breast cancer…

    I always had a sick feeling…especially with Ovarian Cancer girl….that her New York Doctors were giving her cancer because it was such a great storyline

    Yeah I said it. I think certain C List and Reality Stars were given cancer to boost ratings.

    I feel the exact same way about this Nick Cordero guy…

    He’s the Sacrificial Covid Celebrity Lamb.

    The NYDoctors got together and said ‘Who shall be the sacrifice?…Ahhh Nick! Tis u!’

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  116. Redman says:
    @bomag

    Nice clarification.

    I was going to mention demographic growth along with deregulation as essential for economic growth. But it should be the right demographic.

  117. @The Alarmist

    I don’t know if this pandemic was man-made, but the crisis certainly was, and if it was unintentional (which seems a big ‘if’ as each day goes by), it certainly hasn’t gone wasted.

    It turns out that a virus is the perfect vehicle to destroy individual liberty and impose collectivism overnight. The foundation of a free society is that people are free to make choices for themselves by accepting individual risks that they believe are necessary for their own lives. This is the inalienable right to the “pursuit of happiness.”

    But the virus turns that equation upside down. Now, your pursuit of happiness is no longer your own affair. By merely existing in society you are supposedly harming others. Thus, your choices become everybody else’s business and you must be controlled and regulated for the alleged good of the collective.

    George Carlin once said that if fascism comes to America it will be wearing a smiley face t-shirt instead of jack-boots. But perhaps it will be wearing a doctor’s mask.

    • Agree: Redman, Polynikes
    • Replies: @Redman
    , @Alexander Turok
  118. @anon

    OK, Doomer. Are you on Bill Gates’ payroll, the DNC’s, the CCP’s, or just non-aligned hysterical?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  119. Daniel H says:
    @anon

    Immigration will be down. With a high unemployment for a long time, there will great intolerance among generally indifferent public to bring new workers.

    You are wrong about that. Immigration numbers are already baked into the law, and to continue importing H1Bs the employer only needs to clear the small hurdle of getting some government bureaucrat to sign off on visas that are already allocated, a small hurdle indeed. The immigration fanatics will NEVER yield, not ever, not for one minute. The likes of Schumer stay awake at night imagining myriad ways they can turn this coronavirus into a call for more and more and ever more immigration. You do not have an appreciation of the enemy we are up against. Immigration will never just wither away, it must be killed, with avowed, direct action, and excepting Stephen Miller there is not a single man in the Trump administration who is motivated to do this.

  120. @Anonymous

    In the final analysis, *ALL* that matters is economic growth. Everything else is mere bullshit.

    What an utterly asinine statement.

    *ALL* that matters” is at root protecting your people from invasion and replacement.
    If you do that you’ll have a future, and if your people are at all competent, you’ll have a pretty nice future.

    My parents grew up in a depression because of the bumbling of the Hoover and Roosevelt administrations, and yet when i was born in the 50s, life was … pretty damn good with a great future ahead. Now … not so much.

    Germany in ruins in 1945 was still Germany. But after tremendous economic growth, but now a failure to protect itself from invasion … does not look to be Germany much longer.

    The Euro was a stupid idea. (It was always politically, not economically driven.) But the real failure of “Europe” is that it did not enforce a European border and protect the future for Europeans.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  121. @anon

    “You people!” What do you mean, “you people?!”

  122. HA says:
    @Anon7

    “I’ve never heard of a sci-fi story or movie about an only moderately disastrous pandemic like this one…”

    You might try the Bible. In the story of Jonah, his encounter with the whale is actually more of a side episode. The main plot consists of him reluctantly dealing with the task of prognosticating/prophesying a calamitous chastisement for the wicked city of Nineveh. But much to Jonah’s amazement, his predictions are heeded and the city’s residents embark on a vast project of crisis mitigation (though, not having access to N95 propylene mesh, they had to make to with sackcloth and ashes), whereupon God’s wrath dissipated, so that the foretold catastrophe never materialized.

    Whereupon Jonah became angry and bitter with God for making him look like a fool (and presumably an object of ridicule by those subsequently his prophesy was never anything more than an empty hoax, though that part is left to the imagination of the reader).

    There’s plenty of other currently topical sections earlier in the Bible, including detailed quarantine and social distancing regulations with regard to leprosy.

    Despite their understanding that “The race is not to the swift or the battle to the strong…but time and chance happen to them all”, our ancestors were not as passive towards plagues and epidemics and the pitfalls of crisis management as some would now have us believe.

  123. Anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:

    Now three month later you are wondering if you will go bankrupt because most patients would rather not see an ENT doc if they can avoid it.

    Why are people against seeing an ear, nose, and throat doctor?

  124. @Lawyer Guy

    There is understandably a lot of confusion about “The Bailout” in 2009. It actually had several distinct pieces.

    Some of these were smart and fair — such as injecting liquidity by forcing banks to take loans in the form of preferred stock, which the Fed recovered completely and at a substantial profit.

    But the worst piece was covering the obligations of AIG to Goldman Sachs and its ilk. These hyper-sophisticated players made a boatload of money by purchasing under-priced “default insurance” from AIG that obviously couldn’t cover in the case of an economy-wide financial panic. When their bet turned bad they should have been forced to eat at least some of the cost of their own miscalculation. Instead, that piece of the bailout was a pure gift to the oligarchs.

  125. Jack D says:
    @Daniel H

    What harm had the American boys sent to Vietnam done to the people of Russia? None, but the Russians had no problem setting up Ho Chi Minh with Soviet armaments and “technical advisers”. If fellow white people never made war against each other, there would be a lot fewer wars, but that has never been the case.

  126. @ATate

    I see no reason for optimism at all.

    I’m not sure what to teach my children anymore. Life sucks and then you die? I have to leave a legacy of some bored teenagers t-shirt slogan?

    Geez bro dial it down a notch. It’s a sharp recession, not the end of the world.

    Tell your daughters to find a good man, your sons to find a good woman–a spouse of good genes and good character. Tell them that what ultimately matters and will give them life long happiness is … family–watching your children develop, blossom, grow up; passing on the best of your race, culture and civilization and seeing it live on into the future. Tell them life is precious.

    I have to unplug somehow.

    Indeed.

  127. @Jack D

    What harm had the American boys sent to Vietnam done to the people of Russia? None, but the Russians had no problem setting up Ho Chi Minh with Soviet armaments and “technical advisers”.

    The Russians also supplied the Viet Minh against the French. And the Chinese and the North Koreans against the US. Not to mention just about every communist movement on the planet against incumbent governments.

  128. rexl says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, I see where New Zealand has stopped all immigration, including students.

  129. Daniel H says:
    @Jack D

    What harm had the American boys sent to Vietnam done to the people of Russia? None, but the Russians had no problem setting up Ho Chi Minh with Soviet armaments and “technical advisers”. If fellow white people never made war against each other, there would be a lot fewer wars, but that has never been the case.

    1) We went into Vietnam in order to make Vietnam into our own image. We could have ended the carnage at any moment by announcing our intent to withdraw.

    2) If the Soviet Union didn’t exist, the Vietnamese would have resisted just as forcefully, and they still would have won in the end.

    3) In your reckoning, payback justifies itself.

  130. @Daniel H

    Sure, setting up white people, who had done no harm to you or your family, to get slaughtered is a good thing. Nothing wrong. Just a game.

    And leave aside the 100s of thousands of innocent Afghans who were slaughtered in that conflict. Just a game. Just a game.

    Cucks and American leftists. You are the same wretched people.

    So where would the Russians, who supplied the Viet Minh against the French and the North Koreans and North Vietnamese against the US, fall in your taxonomy?

  131. @Almost Missouri

    It looks like the error-will-not-be-penalized aspect is holding true again too.

    We have elections. The opportunity to run against aggressively stupid lockdown policies is definitely there. Motivated candidates just have to take it and be able to clearly and effectively make their case.

  132. Anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    PS: As you wrote before, Steve, anesthesiologists are getting knocked out hard too (pun intended). The wife of a co-worker has $5,500 4-times-yearly liability insurance payments. Her insurance company will not accept “but, I’m not working right now.”

    The typical anesthesiologist has MILLIONS of dollars socked away in savings and other assets, and MILLIONS in future earnings to look forward to. Having to make good on a $5,500 quarterly payment during a work slowdown, while your husband remains employed? World’s smallest violin.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  133. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Should of specialized in fingers….

    – J. Biden

  134. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Dont send American boys to do jobs Asian boys should be doing.

    – L. Johnson

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    , @danand
  135. keypusher says:
    @Jake

    It is not ruining the lives of delightful gays woking in theatre.

    It’s the worst thing to happen to delightful gays woking [blunder intended?] in theater since AIDS. Every theater in America is shut down. What were you thinking?

  136. @SFG

    Interesting take on cyberpunk. As a libertarian, I liked the anarchist variants like Stephenson’s Snow Crash. That world didn’t seem at all dystopian to me. Years later, I became a fan of steampunk and was shocked when the genre suddenly withered after 2012. Lately in reading some steampunk collections of the times, I see the editors repeating leftist talking points and bemoaning the “non-political” successors to the movement who are “glorifying racism, sexism and imperialism.” Due to the ease of self-publishing, they couldn’t really kill the genre, but it disappeared from mainstream outlets. For example, the only steampunk in Tor’s new releases list was written by blacks — as one of them dubbed it, “steamfunk.”

    BTW, I recall reading an informal survey done by a dissident right SF writer in which he identified the most _popular_ SF sub-genre was military sci-fi.

    • Replies: @SFG
  137. Anonymous[161] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Sorry, buddy.

    The people who actually matter and run the world, (hint, The Economist magazine), *absolutely* could not give a shit about whether the ‘workers’ like immigration or not.

    It will, without a doubt, ramp up as soon as the crisis passes – as will the push toward globalisation. Anyone who doubts this has a hugely inflated opinion of themselves.

    Remember how Muslim immigration ramped up after the dust (literally) settled from 9/11, before the last gobbets of atomised human flesh were picked out of Manhattan drainpipes and guttering?
    What’s that statistic again?, Vastly more Muslims entered the USA in the years after 9/11 than in *all* the years previous?

    • Agree: JMcG
  138. keypusher says:
    @anon

    Incidentally, has anyone posted this?

    https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/comparing-covid-19-deaths-to-flu-deaths-is-like-comparing-apples-to-oranges/

    It’s arguing that the reason people think covid is much worse than the flu is because it is much worse. The CDC estimates of annual flu deaths wildly overestimate how many people actually die from the flu.

    When reports about the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 began circulating earlier this year and questions were being raised about how the illness it causes, COVID-19, compared to the flu, it occurred to me that, in four years of emergency medicine residency and over three and a half years as an attending physician, I had almost never seen anyone die of the flu. I could only remember one tragic pediatric case.

    Based on the CDC numbers though, I should have seen many, many more. In 2018, over 46,000 Americans died from opioid overdoses. Over 36,500 died in traffic accidents. Nearly 40,000 died from gun violence. I see those deaths all the time. Was I alone in noticing this discrepancy?

    I decided to call colleagues around the country who work in other emergency departments and in intensive care units to ask a simple question: how many patients could they remember dying from the flu? Most of the physicians I surveyed couldn’t remember a single one over their careers. Some said they recalled a few. All of them seemed to be having the same light bulb moment I had already experienced: For too long, we have blindly accepted a statistic that does not match our clinical experience.

    • Thanks: danand, Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @HA
  139. @Neuday

    “Maybe you should place an ad offering a free room to a female tenant but you want access to her second-hand. . . car.”

    Excellent idea!

    “Spacious accommodation offered rent-free to broadminded, flexible female with car in return for certain domestic duties. Please reply with photo of car.”

    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
  140. Anonymous[161] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    Look.

    The difference between Singapore on one hand and Nigeria on the other is ‘economic growth’.

    Yes yes yes – no one is more aware than me that that bald statement hides a lot, namely the sublime truth that ‘genetics’ is the real factor here, but taken in the round compounded economic growth year after year is crudely the difference between eating chicken salad – or being forced to eat chicken shit.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @AnotherDad
  141. @SunBakedSuburb

    “American and Chinese elites agree that an insidious virus, combined with ruthless politicians and totalitarian Big Tech, will bring about the acceptance of the Chinese model in America”

    This is exactly as predicted by Eamonn Fingleton in his last book In The Jaws Of The Dragon, although I don’t think even he could see The Atlantic calling for the Chinese model to be implemented in the Land Of The Free.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eamonn_Fingleton

    “The evidence is in: the Confucian values by which China is ruled are not only incompatible with those of the West, they prove strikingly more robust. Far from China changing, Westerners who do business in China are modifying their behavior–often quite troublingly–under Beijing’s influence. Picture a phalanx of chocolate soldiers marching into a blowtorch.

    Top American Internet companies have already reneged on Western values in pursuit of lucrative business in their Chinese subsidiaries. How long before they prove similarly malleable in their domestic operations? Writing for the New York Times on a conference in Shanghai in 2005, Tina Rosenberg recounted how top American business leaders fawned on Chinese Communist Party officials. She added: “Let’s not pretend that foreign investment will make China a democracy. That argument was born out of desperation and self-interest. Because China is too lucrative a market to resist, American and European businessmen have ended up endorsing the party line through their silence–or worse. They are not molding China; China is molding them.””

  142. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:

    There are some memorable depictions of an apocalyptic pandemic like Andromeda Strain

    I’m not convinced it’s accurate to say that The Andromeda Strain depicts an apocalyptic pandemic.

    The only people who died in the book/movie were the residents of a small town (Piedmont, AZ) with a population of less than a hundred along with three military personnel (the two guys who went looking for the satellite that originally brought the AS to earth and a Phantom jet pilot who has key components of his jet dissolved by the fast-mutating lifeform).

    Hardly apocalyptic.

    I suppose you could say The Andromeda Strain depicts an imminent apocalyptic pandemic, but that’s not really the same thing, is it?

  143. Anon[305] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: De Blasio gets into hot water for breaking up a Jewish funeral, and makes threats to arrest Jews in the future if they gather. It sounds like he felt okay for going after Hasidic Jews, the one group that tends to vote Republican. Unfortunately for Da Mayor, he didn’t realize that one attack on Jews means they all feel attacked. Judging from the large number of replies on this thread, it sounds like every Jew in New York with a twitter account went after him, including all the liberals.

    It’s bemusing that De Blasio is trying to keep Jews from killing each other with Covid-19, and the Jewish community reacts like he’s Hitler.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Buffalo Joe
    , @Lugash
  144. Sparkon says:
    @bomag

    “The future is who gets to apply the boot to whom’s face.”

    Nice try but the possessive of who is whose, not whom’s.

    The general rule will serve you well: Possessive pronouns never use or require an apostrophe.

    yours mine his hers ours theirs its whose

    The bell was ringing for him whose number was up.

    But your slogan has other problems as the future is not a person. You could say

    The questions are who gets to apply the boot to whose face.

    Of course, when talking about face kicking, it’s important to be grammatically correct, which is more a combination of Strunk & White.

    • Thanks: Carol
    • Replies: @bomag
    , @res
  145. keypusher says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Swine flu killed one person. Covid has killed 63 thousand people in the United States so far. You might have been able to come up with a more idiotic “forerunner” but I’m not sure how.

    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2009-apr-27-sci-swine-history27-story.html

    https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  146. @anon

    • Retard: Achmed E. Newman

    • Agree: Johnny Smoggins
    • LOL: BenKenobi
  147. @Lawyer Guy

    Lawyer Guy, makes sense to me, I mean the first GI Bill was for those who really put their lives on the line and many of whom came home mained, not to mention those who never came home, except in a pine box.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
  148. @AnotherDad

    It’s a sharp recession, not the end of the world.

    Agreed, but it has been extremely difficult to ignore/tune out the total information war being waged by the Establishment that has consistently tried to portray the WuFlu as an ELE.

  149. @Anon

    788, well, you know that is why they say hindsight is 20/20. You can start over again, as your dream seemed to be obtainable or you can stew about leaving a government job. But in the end there are few things worse than going to work at a job you don’t like.

  150. @Travis

    Travis, the Spanish Flu was 1918 and NYC was still cold water tenements with the air choked with coal smoke. My mother was born in 1917, with three siblings who were born in 1915,1913 and 1911. Old Italian women spaced their kids out by nursing them to age two. My late father was born in 1918, with three older siblings born in 1916,1914 and 1912. They never spoke of the Spanish Flu. The Great Depression and WWII were the life changing events in their lives.

  151. Marty says:

    Don’t know which thread this goes to, but I’m sitting in my car drinking a chocolate milk shake across the street from Stanford, and here comes a white woman , about 30, with four black kids, 10, 7, 5, 3.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  152. your brother-in-law, who owns a proctology clinic

    Well he always was an asshole, and it takes one to know one.

  153. Anon[342] • Disclaimer says:
    @R.G. Camara

    IMHO guys who are successful in the bond business are exceptionally intelligent and savvy. Jeffrey Gundlach, who is the founder of the highly regarded DoubleLine Capital, said a few days ago “ People don’t understand the magnitude of … the social unease at least that’s going to happen when … 26 million-plus people have lost their job.”

    It makes sense to be prepared as well as you can for worst-case scenarios. For most people, that probably won’t be much.

  154. Jack D says:
    @Philly guy

    The problem is that L&I is not really focused on health and safety. Most of its work is devoted to enforcing the zoning code, whose main function is to provide work for lawyers and drive up the cost of construction. Also enforcing construction codes that are geared toward maximizing trade costs, especially UNIONIZED trades. For example, until recently any building with more than 4 units had to be plumbed with copper and cast iron, decades after most of the country shifted to plastic. Most of these rules add NOTHING to safety. If they got rid of those worthless rules they could REALLY spend their time focusing on safety.

    Did you know that Houston has NO zoning code? Did you know that from 1950 to the present the population of Houston quadrupled? Did you know that from 1950 to the present Philly lost 1/4 of its population (and an even higher % of its white population)? Coincidence?

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  155. tomv says:
    @Jack D

    Your scare quote around “folk tale” is uncalled for, O Wise One. This one actually dates back from 139 BC and is so famous that it’s become a Chinese proverb: 塞翁失馬,焉知非福.

    • Thanks: Rosie
  156. And now here come the “contact tracers” to your door. Has there ever been a better job for a budding Karen?

  157. Redman says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    And let’s not forget: “We’re all in this together.” To me, nothing highlights the absurdity of this fiasco more than that insipid slogan.

    The quarantines have shined a light on how we’re not in this together at all. How you come through this completely depends on your social and job status. The guys in finance are mostly teleworking and think this is a vacation. While 30 million people just entered the unemployment line. We’re not all feeling this the same at all.

  158. Muggles says:

    If words of cynicism, anger, hate, smugness and Know-It-All cancer were worth a buck a word, we’d all get rich today here reading these comments.

    Nothing like a little house arrest and unpaid vacation (for some) to bring out the canned knowledge about Who Is Behind every unexpected event. And blame, We can’t have some minor inconvenience without blaming a long list of different people. Trump of course. Or Trump haters. Both maybe.

    What? No one is paying $1/word? I can’t collect?

    Man! I’ve wasted a lot of time here today. Better move on…

  159. Bruno says:

    It’s not corona specific :

    In France every high school graduate can start medical school. There is a competition after 1 year where 10% succeeds. All those happy ones will end up 9 years later being MD. After the sixth year, there is also a competition very similar to usmle step 1 in the USA, and based only on rank, the 3 000 to 8 000 students (depending on how mqny positions were offered by the government 5 years earlier, it controls each university number of spots for the end year exam), choose their specialty and place of residency.

    15 years ago, biology was one of the top specialty, just a bit higher than radiology, because the revenue was the highest. But with the industry changes, it has fallen sharply and many have been broken or work as employee for the bigger lab while the people who chose radiology are making a fortune.

    I know someone who was hesitating and he chose by rolling a dice. He asked a barmaid. He is now a very wealthy radiologist thanks to this lady …

  160. vhrm says:
    @Joe Stalin

    That video about “War Loan” history is interesting. I never knew about it. And such a straightforward and honest name.

    That wars or government programs in general need to be financed somehow seems quaint.

  161. See?! This proves that capitalism–what you bozos so risible-euphemistically call “The Free Market”–is a bunch of hokum.

    In that silly fairy tale, prices are supposed to find their level, the world is supposed to beat a path to the builder of a better mousetrap, expertise and thrift are rewarded, incompetence and profligacy are punished, and luck has nothing to do with it.

    Hardehardeharhar. That’s a long horse laugh. Against you bozo true believers in a god who does not exist.

    In the real world, prices are gouged, the worst mousetrap is the only one on the shelves, expertise and thrift are irrelevant, and the incompetent and profligate get lucky.

    Bozos.

    • Replies: @bomag
  162. Polynikes says:
    @Peter Frost

    The liquidation of assets seems more productive, but I like your suggestion. It has a nice blend of justice and comedy. Hell…why not both?

  163. @Travis

    Cooking the books again. Yeah, anybody can massage any statistics into any conclusion they want.

    Here’s the true conclusion: more people have died in NYC of the coronavirus than died in NYC from the Spanish flu.

    You people are such liars. You even lie with the truth. And you are killers. You want people to die. Same to you.

    • Troll: Manfred Arcane
    • Replies: @anon
    , @duncsbaby
    , @Travis
  164. @J.Ross

    Vote by mail, if it helps anybody, will help the Republicans. The only people who have the organization and attention span to do what it takes to vote by mail are conservative old people. It’s the same as with off-year elections.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  165. JMcG says:
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    I’m with you, I really am. But doesn’t your second recommendation contradict your first?

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
  166. @Bill P

    The only reason to close painting aisles, stores, contractors would be the use of masks. I will be airless spraying the inside of a school next week without any decent masks.

  167. SFG says:
    @Kim

    Well, random from our point of view. I mean, if you had perfect knowledge of the position of every atom on the planet, the entire structure of society and everyone’s genetic code (which would technically derive from the first one) I guess you could predict everything…but practically speaking, life is much less predictable than we imagine or would like.

  168. @Buffalo Joe

    Most hospitals in Michigan are petitioning Adolf Whitmer to allow for some elective procedures, as many are looking at bankruptcy. 3 counties in Michigan make up 75% of C19 cases and deaths. Guess which metro area that is? If a GI Bill for those workers is available, I can stomach it, but most hospitals here are basically closed, except for regular emergencies.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  169. JMcG says:
    @Daniel H

    Thank God for Sam Colt.

  170. Kim says:
    @AnotherDad

    Tell your daughters to find a good man, your sons to find a good woman–a spouse of good genes and good character.

    My greatest guilty pleasure is true crime documentaries. One true crime series I have enjoyed is called “Snapped” and is about women (in the USA, and mostly confined to white women) who have murdered their spouses in a planned way.

    I am surprised there have been so many such murders as most of the cases are post-2000 and the series is now in I think its 17th season of say, 12 episodes a season. So plenty of women have killed their husbands in this conscienceless way.

    As I have said, these cases are all first degree, planned murders. Poison, shotguns, faked car crashes, and so on. The number one motive is money (think carefully before you get a life insurance policy), but romance/sex/desire for male attention/desire to be “free” is up there, custody of children too.

    How is this relevant to your comment I have quoted? Well, the show always gives a lot of the killer’s background. They try to emphasize things like “she had a disturbed upbringing” but what in fact I notice is how often (always?) the fruit doesn’t fall far from the tree. The mother was a wild and uncontrollable teenager who got pregnant to four different men by the age of 21? The daugher grows up and has similar behavior.

    I just mean to say, it is important to look at the parents and grandparents. It isn’t guaranteed of course, but the father was a career criminal who abandoned the mother and child? Then it was not the abandonment that made her a feckless, reckless, untrustworthy and selfish killer. It was her father’s genes.

  171. cthulhu says:

    Pierre Ouellette wrote a book back in the late ‘90s called The Third Pandemic, about a worldwide breakout of a seriously drug-resistant and easily spread pneumonia. Pretty good yarn; his ideas on the breakdown of society seem pretty plausible. Sort of like a breezier Niven/Pournelle potboiler. It’s out of print but you can probably find it used on Amazon.

  172. Hibernian says:
    @Anonymous

    Famously, Henry VIII debased the national coinage and brought in hyper inflation, to pay for his particular campaigning.

    Not to mention seizing monastic land and selling it at fire sale prices.

  173. In 1933, in the midst of the Great Depression, private industry got together and created in Chicago the Century of Progress, now represented by one of the stars on the Chicago flag. You can see how western civilization considered itself in relation to other civilizations just by looking at this film. The Exposition paid for itself.

  174. @Hypnotoad666

    To me, that shows a problem with liberty: absolute liberty is not appropriate in a pandemic situation.

    One could write a similar paragraph about how STDs undermined “free love.” Most would see that as showing a problem with “free love,” not as evidence STDs are not real.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  175. Uncle Dan says:

    After all, who goes broke and who gets rich out of 2020 doesn’t seem to have much to do with moral behavior.

    It never has.

  176. Anon[303] • Disclaimer says:

    @ the extreme randomness of it all..

    Thus spake entitled modern man, who holds no truth as coming from above himself to tell him how then to live.

    @ who goes broke and who gets rich out of 2020 doesn’t seem to have much to do with moral behavior.

    Decent people will come out of this wiser and poorer.

  177. Valdem says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    The homeschooling for sure but unorganic conservatism? There is nothing in the US that comes close to what is in Europe for openly nationalistic and racialist rhetoric. You had openly fascist sympathizing political parties like Golden Dawn in Greece pulling seats in parliament and genuine youth groups across Europe that are firmly rooted in ethno-nationalism.

    I would say the UK is more “conservative” in that way where every policy decision is funneled through a host of NGOs and special interest groups that put their country last.

  178. @theMann

    So it seems the most interesting consequence of all is the Revelation that 99% of the people on the planet are tied for first in the Galactic Fucktard Contest

    Indeed, everyone else but you is wrong, just as they all fail to see the massive Round Earth conspiracy.

  179. @utu

    Neither Goldman Sachs nor the irresponsible homebuyers should have been bailed out.

  180. @Nathan

    Nathan, I’ve seen an example of this conditioning in the lines at the TSA at airports many a time. After registering my disgust with the whole unconstitutional piece of security theater, others will tell me things like “well, if it hadn’t been for those few bad guys, we wouldn’t have to do this.” They are very much resigned to it, also seeing it as a necessary thing, you know, to “save our freedoms”.

    You can’t keep a free country with people like that, who are a big majority of Americans.

    Thanks for the good reply.

  181. Uncle Dan says:
    @Lawyer Guy

    To funnel gummint money to colleges, which, silver lining, the virus has shown to be obsolete.

  182. @fish

    I had to look up that name, Fish, as (luckily) it didn’t ring a bell. I do know about the higher level of Police State tactics going on in Michigan. What happened to her in elementary school? Did too many girls pull her hair or make fun of her shoes? Some of these problems start early, maybe in the womb. Perhaps her Mom listened to the Internationale too loudly while fetal Gretchen was trying to nap in there after getting a quick snack from the placenta.

  183. @Anonymous

    No, they don’t have MILLIONS in savings. They’ve got to buy real estate here and there and do all kinds of deals or the IRS will take more than 1/2 of their money. I have a lot of respect for the amount of work doctors have done in medical school and residency. It is a long road to get to the point where you can make the big bucks.

    Nobody likes to throw away money for absolutely nothing at a burn rate of $22,000 yearly. That money could have been used to buy a real nice Harley or maybe one of those rare miniature violins that you mentioned … Just sayin …

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Adam Smith
  184. @Alexander Turok

    One could write a similar paragraph about how STDs undermined “free love.”

    Nope. That’s a false analogy. If you want to have unprotected sex with a Haitian intravenous drug addict, or whatever, you have the freedom to run that risk. It may be a bad decision but nobody else needs to regulate your decision.

    Not being allowed to leave the house because it could theoretically harm someone you’ve never met is pretty different. And the fact they can do all this for a bad version of the common cold sets a bad precedent.

  185. anon[129] • Disclaimer says:
    @obwandiyag

    Here’s the true conclusion: more people have died in NYC of the coronavirus than died in NYC from the Spanish flu.

    I just googled a NYT’s article that says the spanish flu killed 20,000 people in New York City (that’s city, not state).

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/02/nyregion/spanish-flu-nyc-virus.html

    The Corona virus has killed 4,585 people in New York City as of April 29.

    You people are such liars. You even lie with the truth. And you are killers. You want people to die. Same to you.

    No rebuttal needed for this part of your comment. Embarrassing.

    • Replies: @keypusher
  186. Marty says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    But the ruling only applies to limits originating at the state level. Still available under through an Article V convention.

  187. @Lot

    They don’t call him ‘Colonel’ Sanders because he likes fried chicken – they call him that because he is a typical military-procurement whore who has the MIC so far embedded in his colon that it gives him a lump in his throat.

    Counterpunch has had Sanders’ number since the mid-00s. Alexander Cockburn obviously hated Sanders’ guts, and for good reason, it seems.

    • Replies: @Lot
  188. Anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @Barnard

    It is insane for any small business owner to vote against Trump, but how many of their employees care more about having a job than getting handouts from the government.

    Small business owners like foreign labor.

  189. HA says:
    @keypusher

    “Incidentally, has anyone posted this?”

    He stated as much in a recent interview. I think I saw the link on Cochran’s blog:

    According to him, the CDC (and this is on top of their no-don’t-bother/yes-you-obviously-should-duh double-take with regard to masks) has been consistently inflating the annual flu deaths (which are not “counted” but rather, “estimated”, so that they’re easier to fudge) in order to encourage more people to get the flu shot.

    Which means that now, when doctors are dealing with something that actually is much nastier than the flu, it is that much more difficult to convince people what is really happening. Who could have possibly predicted that crying wolf over and over again would eventually lead to such trouble? If we only had some high-powered genius model that could have warned us of that in advance…aw, who am I kidding? That’s obviously asking for far too much.

    This is presumably another reason why some people prefer to look at excess death comparisons. There’s less of an opportunity for the CDC to cook the numbers, but I’m sure they’re hard at work trying to find some way to lie to us about those, too.

    Anyway, it’s good that he’s gotten that into print.

  190. @Anonymous

    In the final analysis, *ALL* that matters is economic growth

    …to a materialist.

    The rest of us have souls.

    • Replies: @adreadline
  191. @Hockamaw

    I feel like a lot of people on the Right haven’t come to terms with the fact that Biden, and VP running mate Kamala, are going to win in November.

    No one cares about your feelings.

  192. @JMcG

    It’s an ant/grasshopper hybrid. A granthopper.

    • LOL: JMcG
  193. anon[958] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    The funniest thing is that Hasidic Jews are the super spreaders who are responsible for the bulk of cases in New York, and hence, a large portion of cases in the US overall. It’s funny to watch supposedly data-driven individuals bend over backward to avoid this fact.

    Steve & Boomer Co will talk about ghetto house parties on Chicago’s South Side or spring breakers in Florida, but they won’t touch this one.

    • Replies: @HA
    , @Anonymous
  194. Anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    No, they don’t have MILLIONS in savings. They’ve got to buy real estate here and there and do all kinds of deals or the IRS will take more than 1/2 of their money. I have a lot of respect for the amount of work doctors have done in medical school and residency. It is a long road to get to the point where you can make the big bucks.

    And she is making big bucks and is surely a millionaire.

    Nobody likes to throw away money for absolutely nothing at a burn rate of $22,000 yearly. That money could have been used to buy a real nice Harley

    Oh, is this just about her “preferences” and her leisure consumption? Pardon me, I thought you were making out a case of hardship or injustice.

    She is a sophisticated individual living well into the 99th percentile of wealth and income in this country. She can easily afford to pay a $5000 insurance premium under a contract that she signed.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  195. @Anonymous

    “Caplan” means never having to say you’re sorry.

    • Replies: @SFG
  196. @Anonymous

    Dont send American boys to do jobs Asian boys should be doing.

    – L. Johnson

    The Russians could have spared themselves a lot of tears if they had heeded LBJ’s advice. Only they were merely adding yet another Muslim province to their empire, just like they had added so many others. Except the rules had changed, and they could not resort to the measures they had deployed very effectively against so many other Muslim lands.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basmachi_movement
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Asian_revolt_of_1916
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deportation_of_the_Chechens_and_Ingush
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circassian_genocide

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  197. Fairness and unfairness are trivial notions to consider when good stuff or bad stuff happens. We’ve no special right to expect good stuff/outcomes. We’ve got to suck it up and deal with it. And if some leaders can’t deal with it, they should step aside.

  198. @Hockamaw

    I feel like a lot of people on the Right haven’t come to terms with the fact that Biden, and VP running mate Kamala, are going to win in November.

    The most Biden-like (if less corrupt) candidates in the last 100 or so years have been George McGovern and Walter Mondale, who also challenged controversial incumbents.

    How did they, and “running mate Geraldine”, do?

  199. keypusher says:
    @anon

    The Corona virus has killed 4,585 people in New York City as of April 29.

    Where did you get such a ridiculous number? As of the 26th, there were 16,673 deaths in New York City attributed to coronavirus, but the true number was probably above 20,000. Since people have continued to die of coronavirus since Sunday, but the Spanish flu death count has remained the same, looks like obwandiyag was right and you were wrong.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/04/27/upshot/coronavirus-deaths-new-york-city.html

  200. @Nathan

    Excellent comment, Nathan! You are very right about “single-payer”, euphemism for Government health care.

  201. keypusher says:
    @brabantian

    Bill Gates-pushed covid-19 lockdown and the massive ‘WFH’ Work from Home pivot, have resulted in huge profits for Bill Gates’ Microsoft, as companies massively adopt Microsoft’s corporate cloud computing services

    The wackjobs are coming up with really shitty conspiracy theories these days.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  202. HA says:
    @anon

    “It’s funny to watch supposedly data-driven individuals bend over backward to avoid this fact.”

    They’re not avoiding the facts. After all, how are white people going to be denounced for their racist, Islamophobic and anti-semitic COVID policies if no one bothers to properly count up all the victims?

    For example, according to this article, Swedish Somalis are 40% of the Stockholm covid cases despite being roughly 1% of the population, and Orthodox Jews are 60% of the Israeli cases, though only 12% of the population. I’m not aware of the article having been denounced as extremist hate literature (though it wouldn’t be surprising if that were the case).

    Extremist Muslim religious leaders around the world have also advised their followers to continue going on religious pilgrimages and to ignore health warnings from the authorities, stating that COVID-19 is a punishment for the unbelievers and will not touch Muslims…“Bring any infected person to me and let me kiss them and I’m quite sure that I won’t contract the virus, if he is a true follower of Imam Hussein”…Samawi announced in one of his sermons. …

    Somali Swedish Mustaf Salah answers,…”Many people said that this disease is only meant to kill for non-Muslims thus, it cannot affect Muslims….”

    • Replies: @Anon7
  203. utu says:
    @Jack D

    “There was nothing wrong ” – No, it was very wrong to use instrumentally Afghans and draw them into a war that millions would eventually die. It comes straight from Kant’s 2nd Categorical Imperative. Every Machiavellian like yourself will resort to moral arguments when his ass is on the line. For people like you appeal to higher ideals like morality and truth is only a rhetorical device. If it works, why not I can use it, right?

  204. @anon

    Except for the airline thing, these ideas all make good sense #225. That has nothing to do with whether they will happen or not, which will be NOT.

    #1) Not happening, Trump’s worthless tweet notwithstanding.
    #2) No, no, no! We can just BORROW the money, as we always do.
    #3) Global Climate Disruption(TM) is a crock anyway. It is necessary for control of the people, though, so it’s very important.
    #4) I doubt it’ll make much difference. Have the various bad flu seasons in the past made a difference? SS runs in the red, just like all government operations. See #2 though – luckily we can borrow money. Thank you, Federal Reserve Board!

  205. SFG says:
    @Jack D

    I might have agreed with you 20 years ago, but now I just figure our Middle Eastern policy just gets us into lots of wars and gets lots of people killed and wastes huge amounts of money.

    Maybe give the Israelis Long Island or something.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @JMcG
    , @Johann Ricke
  206. @Anonymous

    I wasn’t making a case really that the woman couldn’t pay this. It is definitely no hardship like a sit-down restaurant owner is experiencing. It’s $5,500 every quarter for NOTHING, due to the whim of government officials. Got it?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Rob
  207. SFG says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Didn’t help Harvey Weinstein, Woody Allen, or Donald Sterling.

  208. Testing12 says:

    “This one tends to strike hardest…”

    Jesus Christ, we’re still playing along with this fake news narrative?

    Pro tip: if you find yourself on the same side of advocacy as Fredo Cuomo and Don Lemon then you need your head examined

  209. Anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    The funniest thing is that Hasidic Jews are the super spreaders who are responsible for the bulk of cases in New York, and hence, a large portion of cases in the US overall.

    Citation needed.

  210. Anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG

    Maybe give the Israelis Long Island or something.

    This.

  211. @Manfred Arcane

    LOL!, especially at “OK, Doomer”. Nice one. I also like “non-aligned hysterical”. Good stuff, Manfred.

  212. @Anon

    305, he should have said “you people.”

  213. @Reg Cæsar

    The rest of us have souls.

    Y’know… I’ve seen some pictures of what they claim is this “virus” thing going around. Never saw one of ’em close up myself, so I can’t be sure it’s the real thing. A few days ago, the bigwigs even said a couple o’ photos n’ videos of some flying saucers were legit, though I’ve never seen one of those face to face either. So I dunno. Maybe they’re bamboozling me, could be.

    But ‘scuse me, mister, I mean no offense, but I’ll say… that “soul” thing, now that I’ve never even seen a picture of, not even a damn fake one!

  214. Lot says:
    @Kratoklastes

    “ MIC so far embedded in his colon”

    No so far to stop him from being one of 25% of members of Congress to vote against the Iraq War.

    Not only did he get the single biggest vote in Congress of the past 30 years correct, he did a better job than 95% of opponents at identifying the correct reasons. Watch for yourself:

    In particular at the end he warned of a long and costly occupation, Iraq falling into civil war, lack of a plan for a new government, and Iraq spreading instability into its neighbors. He also did not mention or focus on the bad arguments against Iraq that were a top point for others: it’s a conspiracy to get their oil and there’d be mass American casualties associated with the invasion.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Shmendrix
  215. Anon7 says:
    @HA

    After all, how are white people going to be denounced for their racist, Islamophobic and anti-semitic COVID policies if no one bothers to properly count up all the victims?

    No kidding. This is all Michigan politicians can talk about. Covid19 deaths in Detroit’s black community are disproportionate: rather than looking at medical data, they skip immediately to centuries of white oppression and they’re adding up the bill right now. I expect that they will be looking at our retirement savings; as Willie Sutton said, that’s where the money is.

  216. @Barnard

    Barnard, if you continue to pay people lots of money not to work they will spend lots of money because they don’t have to work and they have plenty of time to do “things.” The worst thing would be to extend credit to the well off unemployed.

  217. @Anonymous

    Yes yes yes – no one is more aware than me that that bald statement hides a lot, namely the sublime truth that ‘genetics’ is the real factor here, but taken in the round compounded economic growth year after year is crudely the difference between eating chicken salad – or being forced to eat chicken shit.

    But what good does it do you that some entity called the USA will be eating chicken salad if the people eating the chicken salad bear no relation to you and yours? As the saying goes “the future belongs to those who show up for it”. If you don’t have children or let others supplant them they won’t have a future , though I suppose you can console your self with the thought that Hassan, Pedro & Patel will be enjoying chicken salad.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  218. @Thoughts

    Thoughts, sad to say but breast cancer is big business. A month devoted to all things pink and billions raised for research for a “we are almost there” cure. Don’t want to kill the golden goose.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  219. Lugash says:
    @Anon

    It’s like the early years of the AIDS crisis when health officials were trying to close the bath houses.

    We’ve seen the bug-denialists, are we going to start seeing the bug-chasers?

  220. Anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I wasn’t making a case really that the woman couldn’t pay this. It is definitely no hardship like a sit-down restaurant owner is experiencing. It’s $5,500 every quarter for NOTHING, due to the whim of government officials. Got it?

    It’s hardly mere “whim”. There is an epidemic afoot in the country. Large numbers of Americans support the shut down.

    It’s one quarter at most of “nothing”, and she agreed to the contract written in such and such a way.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  221. Anonymous[229] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    In particular at the end he warned of a long and costly occupation, Iraq falling into civil war, lack of a plan for a new government, and Iraq spreading instability into its neighbors.

    So he omitted the most important reasons.

  222. Anonymous[175] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve: do you think short-illness Boris Johnson’s corona-thon help his public image? Why didn’t Trudeau admit to having it while he had the chance? Also why don’t the African big-man coteries take this opportunity to convert to the “Veep”-style endless motorcade brand of public excursion; dancing pallbearers are so March 2020, now we want to be in the antimicrobial box instead

  223. bomag says:
    @anon

    And I’m sure when this is all done there will be cries to open our borders to even more people from the nanny states, so they can escape move here and spread the gospel.

  224. Anonymous[294] • Disclaimer says:
    @Whiskey

    Where did this phrase “dirt people” come from? It’s funny because it’s similar to “mud people,” but “mud people” is supposed to be an insult. Why anyone would use “dirt” as if it’s supposed to be a good thing is beyond me.

    And much like liberals preach diversity and go home to mostly-white neighborhoods, I’ll betcha people who go on about dirt people would very much not want to live among them. The trailer park is much less violent than the ghetto, but you still wouldn’t want to raise your kids anywhere near it.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
  225. Anon7 says:
    @SFG

    “Cyberpunk was political–it was an attack on Reagan/Thatcher deregulation.”

    I was reading what came to be called “cyberpunk science fiction” at the same time that I was doing it – using microcomputers and modems (which had just come out) to do all sorts of fun stuff. That was the gist of the stories, too. Never saw any of the great stories as being particularly political.

    “The Woke stuff is anti-male, which is the natural audience for sci-fi…”

    Science fiction is not anti-male, or at least it wasn’t from the late 19th century until the early twenty-first century. That’s the whole argument of the current Woke science fiction crowd, that it was a white male literary form. That’s why, for example, the last set of writer candidates for the prestigious Hugo awards contained almost no males and no white males at all, as far as I know. Lots of women of color. Very correct.

    “Every genre has its time in the sun.”

    True dat.

    • Replies: @SFG
  226. @keypusher

    How is this wacky? Gates is surely profiting off of this and smirking he is during interviews as he discusses the need for harder and longer lockdowns.

    Everyone is using Office 365 for remote work. As well as “teams” which is a zoom-like conference call/planner app connected to 365.

    He resigned from the Microsoft board to focus on his Foundation just weeks before the outbreak got bad in the U.S.

    He’s investing in ID2020, and in research for coronavirus vaccines- and if they do make a viable one, that will probably be the first and most important piece of your “health data” stored on your biometric ID (no it’s not a chip, it’s some infrared tattoo- the ID2020 website explains it all with some very empowering language. Visa and MasterCard are partners)

    Bill Gates is making a lot of money off of this.

    • Replies: @keypusher
    , @Jack D
  227. JMcG says:
    @SFG

    The Israelis prefer owning capital hill. Misspelling intentional.

  228. @adreadline

    Soul is shorthand for Love for the Divine. You can’t take a Polaroid of love.

  229. Anonymous[910] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Some unfair happenings:

    What are the basic facts about cremation? How much time does it require? How much fuel does it consume?

  230. Anonymous[137] • Disclaimer says:
    @kaganovitch

    I’ve been posting here an awful long time, always under the moniker ‘Anonymous’.

    One of the big points I incessantly try to hammer home is that the notion of any wealthy adopting Economist style massive uncontrolled third world immigration is the *antithesis* of a rapid wealth growing program, due, purely and simply to the productivity factor, which, basically, is the heart of wealth creation.
    The anger – which is evident in most of my posts – is directed at the god damned bare face liars, (The Economist magazine, Caplan, NYT, WSJ, Bloomberg, Tony Blair, the EU, etc etc), who try to lie and lie and lie about this and talk around it, conning the gullible, if not self conning themselves.

    I DON’T LIKE LIARS.

    I must admit to say, that being raised by family where morality and honesty were scrupulously observed, the advent of the Internet in the mid to late ’90s of the last century really opened up my eyes to just how many damned liars there are out there – and the perfect positive correlation there is between dishonesty and wealth and power – and political influence.
    This realisation made me despair. Hence my anger.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @kaganovitch
  231. Anonymous[137] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    As an aside, I know that ex President Jimmy Carter gets a lot of stick for various reasons from the right, but to me he seems like a man who had/has an almost sacred mission to be honest and truthful to the electorate.

  232. Whiskey says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Zman st his blog uses it. It’s his.

  233. “It’s not like AIDS where the main victims were needle junkies and bathhouse patrons.”

    The examples Steve gave were from Europe, but so many American victims or carriers have been blacks who had spent their lives ignoring common sense about health, and/or who have flagrantly flouted pandemic public health rules.

    However, I see some parallels to the 2008 MMM, where blacks and Hispanics who never paid their mortgages, and got them with no down payments got off scot-free.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  234. @Nicholas Stix

    Southwest Georgia has a big outbreak that traces to a black funeral for a janitor from a big family on February 29.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  235. danand says:
    @Anonymous

    “Dont send American boys to do jobs Asian boys should be doing.

    – L. Johnson”

    #337, is this the forked tongue man of which you speak?

    President Lyndon B. Johnson campaigned in the 1964 election with the promise not to escalate the war. “We are not about to send American boys 9 or 10,000 miles away from home to do what Asian boys ought to be doing for themselves,” he said.

    Johnson sent the first U.S. ground combat troops to Vietnam.

    “We did not choose to be the guardians at the gate, but there is no one else,” Johnson said. He ordered 210,000 American ground troops to Vietnam.

    By April 1967, we had a force of 470,000 men in Vietnam. We were learning that there was no light at the end of the tunnel.

    Despite the presence of 549,000 American troops, the United States had failed to cut supply lines from the North along the so-called Ho Chi Minh Trail, which ran along the border through Laos and Cambodia.

    By 1967, the U.S. goal was less about saving South Vietnam and more about avoiding a humiliating defeat.

    Former Secretary of State Dean Rusk, who had assured Johnson in 1965 that he was “entirely right” on Vietnam, now stated, “I do not think we can do what we wish to do in Vietnam.”

    As a result of the Tet Offensive, Lyndon Johnson lost it all. Senator Eugene McCarthy, who picked up more than 40 percent of the vote, challenged Johnson in the Democratic presidential primary.

    The next primary was in Wisconsin, and polls showed the president getting no more than 30 percent of the vote. Johnson knew he was beaten and withdrew from the race.

    Johnson was not invited to attend either the 1968 or 1972 Democratic presidential conventions.

  236. @Steve Sailer

    A fitting tribute to the importation of cheap labor.

  237. @Anonymous

    Lots of the stupidity done in the name of the Kung Flu was done on whims. Beaches? Boat ramps? Bicycle paths?

    Large numbers of Americans support the shut down.

    Large numbers of Russians supported the Bolsheviks.

    • Replies: @Kyle
  238. @Johann Ricke

    Only they were merely adding yet another Muslim province to their empire, just like they had added so many others.

    There is only one fate worse than losing a war against the Afghans. And that is winning it.

    Hell, look at us and Puerto Rico. The pinoys left a lifetime ago.

  239. Shmendrix says:
    @Lot

    Iraq may have been costly to the US taxpayers and the soldiers who gave their lives, but it was extremely profitable for the Haliburtons of the world.

  240. Anonymous[354] • Disclaimer says:

    Let’s say…
    you are a blogger who is recognized by a significant percentage of those who even know your name as one of the most astute minds out there today.
    I suspect you’ll do better than those who tried to play the game.
    RESPEK.

  241. bomag says:
    @Sparkon

    The general rule will serve you well: Possessive pronouns never use or require an apostrophe.

    Nice.

    I do miss some finer points of grammatical construction, but I was purposeful here in an effort to be pithy with “who, whom”. I considered adding “sic” or “*poetic license”, but thought it distracting.

    I could have worked harder at being grammatically correct, e.g. modifying Lenin’s phrase: “who will overtake and apply a boot to the face of whom”.

  242. bomag says:
    @obwandiyag

    …the incompetent and profligate get lucky

    IOW, Africa wins again.

  243. Kyle says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Somehow I have a feeling that a large number of Russians support the American shut down as well. And they’re probably doing all they can to enforce the shut down on social media.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  244. David says:
    @David

    I feel bound to say that it’s 0.024%, not what I said earlier. That mistake haunted me. Derb said not to use decimal points and percents but I thought I could handle it.

  245. anon[146] • Disclaimer says:

    The Far Right here seems to take their cues from Russia and/or the Koch brothers/Federalist think tanks rather than being an organic European conservative movement.

    *Koch, corporate “think tanks”, moron grifters like Charlie Kook, boomer internet crackpots, corporate websites like Breitbarf, conspiracy websites like Info&”doomsdayseed”wares, Donald Trump’s crazy twitter account, and Faux News. If they actually took their cues from Russia, we’d all be better off. Russia isn’t being flooded with 1 million+ illegals per year.

    There is a reason why our manufacturing moved to China and it wasn’t just labor costs. Having an ever increasing # of “inspectors” coming to visit your business and fine you for all sorts of “violations” was a big part of it too. Not to mention harassment from unions, “community activists”, lawsuits, etc. Who needs this headache?

    That’s mostly a libertarian fantasy. The main reasons why manufacturing relocated to China are the following: 1) they have far more intelligent, educated people in complex engineering fields than the US does. There are also economy of scale considerations. 2) boomers educated Chinese in our schools in exchange for their generous tuition dollars (paid for by our trade deficit, an extraction of wealth from future generations — gee, thanks boomers), and they went back to China. What, you guys really thought you could educate all those smart Chinese in our schools for decades without consequence? Another failing of liberaltarianism. Selfish old people didn’t care to plan for the future as long as their pockets were lined in the present. Muh economy guys.

    Chinese manufacturing workers are highly skilled in their own right, just not in things that will be found in any American college curriculum. Apple CEO Tim Cook made this point well in a 2017 interview at the Fortune Global Forum in China:

    The popular conception is that companies come to China because of low labor cost. I’m not sure what part of China they go to, but the truth is China stopped being the low labor cost country many years ago. And that is not the reason to come to China from a supply point of view. The reason is because of the skill, and the quantity of skill in one location, and the type of skill it is. The products we do require really advanced tooling…and the tooling skill is very deep here. In the U.S. you could have a meeting of tooling engineers, and I’m not sure we could fill the room. In China you could fill multiple football fields.

    https://nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-china-shock-doctrine

    I feel like a lot of people on the Right haven’t come to terms with the fact that Biden, and VP running mate Kamala, are going to win in November.

    Agreed. Just look how delusional these guys are. Conspiracies, complaining they can’t leave their house for a whole month, black helicopter conspiracies with Bill Gates … That completely sane comment of yours was downvoted. I can see it now. These guys are going into full meltdown on election night when Biden destroys Trump. Lots of rage posts and conspiracies incoming. Truth: there is simply no path for Donald Trump to win at this point absent some huge scandal for Biden. Saying otherwise is akin to praying for a miracle. The miracle was 2016, and he squandered it. Trump’s deluded cult following is about to get a rude awakening this November.

    [MORE]

    The Spanish flu was extremely unfair, as it killed mostly younger healthy Americans while the Wahu Flu kills mostly the old , obese , sick and frail.

    Eff grandma. I just wanna go to Micky D’s. That’s a winning election strategy if I ever heard one. Conservative Inc: “Why do we lose elections?”

    The Trump economy was the most tangible and widely appreciated effect of the Trump presidency. The Democrat response to this flu variant was to crash the Trump economy.

    The “Trump Economy” was a sham created by the Federal Reserve and corporate stock buybacks. The stock market did well but consumers weren’t any better off. “Muh lowest unemployment” was really just a bunch of low wage gig jobs. And it was Trump’s pathetic performance which resulted in this mess in the first place. He ignored it until it blew up in his face. No conspiracy theory is required. Place blame where it belongs. South Korea just defeated Covid-19. So did New Zealand. Both did exactly that which you oppose. They’ll be opening soon, back to business as usual as the US rushes to cover up deaths and pretend it isn’t happening.

    That’s essentially the angle the boomer conservative right is taking now – it’s not happening! (but it is). It’s a hysterical reaction coming from having to face your own mortality. You can’t because you’re the most selfish generation in American history (given essentially everything you didn’t earn for free), so you dismiss the threat. This generation was told their whole lives the good times would never stop – the free drugs, the free love, the free and easy multiculturalism would end in rainbows. They’d either go to heaven or upload their brains into androids and live forever. The most selfish generation enters an end-of-life crisis and everyone else has to pay for it.

    New Zealand Imposes National Lockdown

    “On 23 March New Zealand committed to an elimination strategy. Both countries had relatively low case numbers at that time: New Zealand had reported 102 cases and no deaths and Australia had reported 1396 cases and 10 deaths. On that day the prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, announced that New Zealand was going to rapidly escalate levels of physical distancing and travel restrictions, reaching the level of a full national lockdown on 26 March (level four on the alert scale). …”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/10/elimination-what-new-zealands-coronavirus-response-can-teach-the-world#maincontent

    New Zealand health official claims ‘elimination’ of coronavirus as new cases hit single digits

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2020/04/28/coronavirus-new-zealand-health-official-claims-elimination-virus/3038321001/

    Trump allegedly asked Fauci if officials could let coronavirus ‘wash over’ US

    https://thehill.com/homenews/administration/492390-wapo-trump-allegedly-asked-fauci-if-officials-could-let-coronavirus

    Pakistan screened us for coronavirus. Nobody checked us when we got back to JFK.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2020/03/25/coronavirus-quarantine-new-york-pakistan-airport/

    The decision would have been different had Robert Bork been confirmed to the court.

    Without term limits and congress would be controlled by AOC acolytes by now. Do you older guys know anything about younger generations and their political leanings? You should. You guys trained this Red Guard in the first place.

    BTW:

    Robert Bork Was the Judicial Activist He Warned Us About

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/robert-bork-was-the-judicial-activist-he-warned-us-about/

    We’ve become a me-first society that is soft and cares more about ourselves and instant gratification than more profound long-term concepts like liberty and the future of our children and their children. It wasn’t caused by this panic, but this panic laid it bare.

    We’re a society that rejects science in favor of hollow exhortations like “freedum” and “liberty” over public safety and common decency. Your freedoms are still here and safe from the black helicopters as evidenced by those red states foolishly reopening. The only panic here originates from all the old guys temporarily inconvenienced by concern for their fellow citizen. Their hysterical projection of “muh economy” and disingenuous “muh freedom” drumbeat has been near constant since the beginning. You guys don’t deserve to win the future. I have no sympathy.

    ….ah yes…..Gretchen Whitmer Syndrome!

    Lol. Lay off the Tucker Carlson bro. Her approval rating is 15 points higher than Trump’s in a critical swing state. “Gretchen Whitmer Syndrome” = winning elections while liberaltarian tears flow. Remember that when she’s put on the VP ticket and crushes Donald Trump in a landslide this year. You can make fun of her (without basis) but she’s still gonna wallop you.

    I agree with the poster who emphasized the importance of economic growth. While a truly prosperous nation requires much more than just economic wealth, it creates fertile ground for everything else.

    Economics is downstream of fundamentals like biology and culture, which should always be prioritized first. Market fetishists have inverted that, worshiping a market that primarily does not benefit them to the detriment of the rest. This has resulted in a degradation of biology (mass immigration) and culture (progressive SJWism). The end result will be a loss of the economy as you’re booted out the door of power. You’ll be left thinking how it could have happened. “But muh lowest unemployment” you’ll say. Yeah, padre don’t care about that bud. You’ve got the goods, and they don’t. Gimmie gimmie gimmie. That’s what Trump’s “record levels of legal immigration” got you.

    My previous point: “Because if you’re willing to make the argument that 2.2 million people have to die for muh economy, then there is logically no argument you could ever make against mass immigration … or liberalism in general or even big gubmint if it’s proved it can increase the size of your pocket book.

    Aaaannnnnd that’s how we ended up in this mess folks. Oppose illegal mass immigration? “Hey, they cut my grass, and I save money – more for me. Yay.” Oppose legal mass immigration? “Hey, some dumb study says we’ll get a half a point of GDP growth out of it. Yay.” … oh sure, it’s gnarly for you guys (gals! I mean gals! … sorry … don’t send me off to one of your educational gulags you erected during the cold war).

    “Anyways, we new democrats are now voting you all out of office and imposing free healthcare for illegals, raising taxes through the roof, banning immigration and customs enforcement, and prohibiting what we now call hatespeech (basically, anything we don’t like … websites, social media accounts, books) + erecting a draconian surveillance state targeted directly at you and your children. Don’t say any naughty words or it’s the gulag for you alt-right heretics. Gnarly.”

    Conservatives: “But how?!”

    Any ideology that prioritizes the self over the group leads to both being destroyed eventually. This explains is why group-oriented Asia is the future and why Europe and (especially) North America is lost. Both will be third world before the end of this century while China will still be chugging along, completely dominating. There is a lesson in that.

    So that’s why they are in favor of unlimited immigration, because “they identify with the workers”. OK!

    They aren’t in favor of unlimited immigration. That’s what their leaders want. Regardless, Europe takes in fewer people than the United States under liberaltarianism. There have been protests all across Europe against immigration. And lots of anti-immigration candidates and political parties have been elected and won influence. Where are American boomers on that subject? Oh, yeah. They support Trump’s “record levels of legal immigration.”

    Perhaps they should be placed on a rack and forced to say “COVID-19 is no worse than a bad flu.”

    But that would be perjury. Only Trump’s friends are allowed to do that.

    How accurate is the US coronavirus death count? Some experts say it’s off by ‘tens of thousands’

    https://abcnews.go.com/Health/accurate-us-coronavirus-death-count-experts-off-tens/story?id=70385359

    COVID-19 Is Not the Flu

    There is still much we don’t know about the coronavirus, but we know enough to say that it is far more dangerous than the flu. It took twelve months and 61 million infections for the H1N1 swine flu to kill 12,500 Americans in 2009–10. The Centers for Disease Control estimated that the seasonal flu killed 34,200 Americans during the 2018–19 flu season. In 2019, car crashes killed 38,800 Americans. [Me: 62, 000 Covid deaths since late February.]

    So the infection-fatality rate could be anywhere from three to 27 times greater than the flu’s, according to initial studies.

    “This is worse than the flu. There’s no question about it,” Dr. Jay Bhattacharya of Stanford Medical School tells National Review.

    The numbers indicate a fatality rate in the city of at least 0.55 percent but likely closer to 1 percent.

    There are other signs of the unusual lethality of the coronavirus. It has killed 100 Italian doctors. That doesn’t happen during a bad flu season. It has killed 30 employees of the New York City Police Department. That doesn’t happen during a bad flu season.

    https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2020/05/18/covid-19-is-not-the-flu/

    N.Y.C. Deaths Reach 6 Times the Normal Level, Far More Than Coronavirus Count Suggests

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/04/27/upshot/coronavirus-deaths-new-york-city.html

    I have dozens of other stories like that. They all debunk essentially every talking point recited on this blog. It doesn’t take a black helicopter conspiracy to damage Donald Trump because it’s totally not like Mr. Lysol for Brains hasn’t done plenty of that himself lately.

    Mail in ballots

    Lemme get this straight. You guys hitched your wagon to a fringe libertarian cult that made it logically impossible to oppose mass immigration / progressive liberalism / political correctness, and now that you have to deal with the inevitable consequences of your beliefs, you want to just basically voter suppress your way to power? Some combination of your best of all worlds beliefs – cheap labor, low taxes, a middle-class, market economics, immigration, social services, and political power – are not compatible. Ironic, isn’t it? Guys on the right have repeatedly mocked women in the past, telling them that they couldn’t have it all at the same time while believing the same fallacy for themselves. They can dish it out, but they can’t take it.

    It all boils down to this:

    Do you want cheap Wal-Mart junk or do you want a healthy middle class that makes stuff here at slightly higher prices? Do you want to pay for government services like the post office or do you want private monopolies that ban books (Amazon) delivering your stuff very slightly cheaper (in select areas only). Do you want to cut your own grass or have a functioning country? Decisions, decisions.

  246. @Anonymous

    One of the big points I incessantly try to hammer home is that the notion of any wealthy adopting Economist style massive uncontrolled third world immigration is the *antithesis* of a rapid wealth growing program, due, purely and simply to the productivity factor, which, basically, is the heart of wealth creation.

    I can’t disagree with this, but even if it were otherwise, i.e. that immigration was a fiscal boon to the USA, would you be okay with your civilization being supplanted by a different civilization? Doesn’t this amount to selling your children’s birthright for a mess of pottage?

  247. Rosie says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    You also see a lot of grumbling in Europe about kids not being in schools.

    I don’t know if anyone who doesn’t follow this issue has seen or heard this, but the MSM is making it a point to tell everyone how awful homeschooling is.

    But of course, homeschooling and quarantine are two very different things. In fact, it’s not really even homeschooling. In ordinary times, it’s more like out-and-about-schooling. Plus, public schools can’t just leave kids and parents alone during the time. They’re sending them things to so, so it’s really the worst of both. They decide what you are going to teach, and then you do all the work. All of the responsibility, none of the freedom. Fortunately, parents are able to drop out of this.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @anon
  248. Travis says:
    @obwandiyag

    The Spanish flu epidemic killed 41,000 New York City Residents…The Wahu flu has killed just 20,000 New Yorkers so far. Time will tell if it ends up killing 41,000…but it is quite evident that the Wahu flu will not kill 33,000 people under the age of 40

    While the Spanish Flu killed 33,000 people under the age of 40 while the Wahu flu has killed just 300 people under the age of 40. It seems that the elderly had some immunity to the 1918 Spanish Flu , while today children to the Wahu Flu and it is not fatal to young adults.

    • Replies: @res
    , @Buffalo Joe
  249. @Anonymous

    The difference between Singapore on one hand and Nigeria on the other is ‘economic growth’.

    Yes yes yes – no one is more aware than me that that bald statement hides a lot, namely the sublime truth that ‘genetics’ is the real factor here, but taken in the round compounded economic growth year after year is crudely the difference between eating chicken salad – or being forced to eat chicken shit.

    Anonymous, it’s ok to just say, “Ok, yeah, you were right, i was wrong.”

  250. keypusher says:
    @S. Anonyia

    First of all, your shitty theory is different from the last whackjob’s shitty theory, which was that coronavirus was promoting cloud computing. But let’s talk about how stupid your theory is.

    For starters, everybody already has some flavor of Office. As for “teams” — I’ve been video- and teleconferencing frequently since this started. I’m going to be hosting a webex later this morning. And I’ve never even heard of “teams.” Sounds like the Bing of videoconferencing.

    Next, resigning from Microsoft’s board and investing in multiple vaccines, most or all of which will fail, sound like extremely lousy ways to make money from this. And if one of them turns out to work — well, first of all, thank God. And second, do you think he’ll make lots of money from it? How? Do you think governments will pay Bill Gates a buck per shot? They won’t.

    ID2020 — yeah, maybe he’ll make money from that. So what? There is no evidence that Bill Gates is particularly motivated money at this stage of his life. His big focus has been his foundation for years.

    The fact is, for whackjobs, there is literally no course of action Bill Gates could take that couldn’t support some stupid conspiracy theory or other. It’s the law of psychology : Small heads see small heads everywhere.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @S. Anonyia
  251. @Hockamaw

    It should be a scandal that the (likely) next president is obviously senile.

  252. J.Ross says:
    @obwandiyag

    That’s as may be but the Democrats aren’t pushing for vote by mail for reasons of health or to support their opponents.

  253. @Ron Mexico

    Ron, My father and five uncles served in WWII. Most were drafted, a couple enlisted, but their lives were altered dramatically. Barely out of HS, they served and returned. The GI Bill gave them a chance to further their education. Medical personnel already are trained and educated, why would they need a GI Bill. Nurses becoming doctors? Don’t see the need.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Hibernian
  254. @Rosie

    Right, Rosie. That is fortunate. We are lucky that the school is giving about 1 hour’s worth of work a day, at least after I point out what is a waste of time that we will not bother with. There is no real requirement we know of to turn in this or that by any deadline. I personally like it this way, but with undisciplined kids AND parents, this may not work out for everyone.

    I’ve been worried since they are meeting more regularly on Zoom now, that the teachers may be adding more assignments, but it doesn’t look like it so far.

    1 hour of the book from the school, then reading assignments of ours (some on the web), then some geometry, other math, and geography, then a long recess, and music and more reading in the afternoon.

    That’s one of the silver linings.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  255. @keypusher

    If we didn’t have a test for COVID-19, we would conclude (correctly) we are having a somewhat worse than average flu season.

    And half of all flu seasons are worse than average.

    • Replies: @HA
    , @res
    , @keypusher
  256. Anonymous[198] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    Medical personnel already are trained and educated, why would they need a GI Bill. Nurses becoming doctors? Don’t see the need.

    And I don’t see the justification.

    Programs to help any American go into health care, coupled with a ban on foreigners in that workforce? To that I say: Yes, absolutely.

  257. Jack D says:
    @S. Anonyia

    Everyone is using Office 365 for remote work.

    As opposed to beforehand, when everyone already used Office 365 (or some other version of Office) for office work.

    As well as “teams” which is a zoom-like conference call/planner app connected to 365.

    “Everyone” is using Zoom. Teams is just another Microsoft also-ran app like the Edge browser, Windows Phone, etc. Microsoft has an inferior copycat app for every conceivable use.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  258. HA says:
    @Almost Missouri

    “If we didn’t have a test for COVID-19, we would conclude…we are having a somewhat worse than average flu season.”

    FoxNews: Coronavirus outbreak in US could be deadlier than any flu season since 1967

    Already, the coronavirus death toll is inching closer to that of the 2017-2018 flu season, which killed more than 61,000 Americans, the worst flu season in recent years.

    But according to a recent Reuters tally, the coronavirus outbreak could be deadlier than the 1967 flu season, which claimed roughly 100,000 lives in the U.S. Only deadlier was the flu season of 1957, which killed about 116,000 people, according to the outlet, and the 1918 Spanish flu epidemic, which claimed some 675,000 lives across the country.

    So, despite the delayed start and the unprecedented prevention/social-distancing/lockdown measures (which seem to be having an effect, given that groups that flout the rules — Somali Swedes, Orthodox Jews, AirBnB party-goers — are especially hard hit) this thing already looks to be within the top 3 worst flu seasons of the last century.

    So it’s “somewhat” worse than average in the sense that the kid who gets the lowest scores in, say, a class of thirty or so is testing “somewhat” poorly. You’re looking an awful lot like that kid right about now.

    I’m not disputing that tallies can be retallied, and the final revisions could go either way, but unless you’re the queen of England, it’s clear that the “we” who are making these conclusions you speak of are solely you and your fellow coronatruthers, for whom ideology is far more important than trivial matters such as what 2+2 really amounts to.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  259. vinteuil says:
    @James Speaks

    “Psychologists” should be forbidden by law to talk or write about ethics. They simply cannot help treating ethical positions they disagree with as pathologies or developmental shortcomings.

    “Universal ethical principles” as the highest stage of moral development, indeed! Few people have caused more trouble in the world than the promoters of “universal ethical principles.”

    I spit on the grave of Lawrence Kohlberg, Ph.D.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
  260. res says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Good point. It does not appear to be searchable (as far as I can tell it was scans with no OCR done). Does anyone here have good OCR software they could run on it? The file is 21MB so too big for the free internet services I see.

    The bottom of page 45 has a bullet list of “Community mitigation measures,” but no real discussion of them that I see. Notably missing from the list is any mention of the more severe grades of shutdown we are having. In particular, the involuntary kind. They do mention school closings and cancelling large gatherings.

  261. res says:
    @Sparkon

    You are right, but there is a somewhat interesting discussion of why there is no “whomse” at
    https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/343880/why-is-whomse-not-a-word

    P.S. Worth considering that “whom’s” may have been meant as a joke. It’s kind of funny in the context of that statement (boot applied to face) and the iSteve “Who, Whom?”

    • Replies: @Sparkon
  262. Hibernian says:
    @anon

    …absent some huge scandal for Biden.

    I’ll give you three: His senility, Tara Reade, and the photographic proof of his tendency to publicly paw quite young women and girls.

  263. Hibernian says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    It’s a typical advance bribe for voting for her.

  264. res says:
    @Travis

    Excellent points. Also worth mentioning that NYC has 50% more people now.
    1920 5,620,048
    2016 8,550,405

    I think that is apples to apples (some quote a much larger metro area number). This page gives a fairly consistent number for 2012:
    https://www.infoplease.com/us/us-cities/population-20-largest-us-cities-1900-2012

  265. @Hernan Pizzaro del Blanco

    The bailouts were immoral , should have let the banks fail and allowed housing prices to fall. Then the millennials would have been buying low cost homes and forming families. The Americans who stopped paying their mortgages got to live rent free for an average of 18 months before they lost their homes. My aunt was able to live in her home for 24 months after she stopped paying her mortgage. Like many others, she had re-mortgaged her home and spent the proceeds going on vacations and buying a new car…most of the people who lost their homes had lied about their income and could have been prosecuted for fraud , like Paul Manafort. He may have been the only American charged with lying to obtain a mortgage.

    Absolutely agree.

    Bailouts drive a truck through moral hazard and “incentives” generally.

    The Feds job is to not let the money supply fall and not let credit for business/consumers dry up.

    But there’s no need to bail any specific people out. Businesses/people who screw up should go bankrupt–lose their C-suite jobs, be turfed out of their homes, etc. etc. To be replaced by other people and businesses making better decisions.

    ~~

    Generally we need a smaller and more robust–less speculative–financial system.

    Obvious example, home finance is by its very nature a long term investment. It should be done by highly capitalized–low debt, equity–publicly held companies making decisions based on the long term success/return of the company; with it’s managers/employees compensated based on the long term return of the loans they generate.

    Let the market reward sound, long term decision making … and punish screw ups and speculators.

  266. res says:
    @Almost Missouri

    we would conclude (correctly) we are having a somewhat worse than average flu season.

    Leaving aside the small matter of the level of countermeasures needed to make that so.

    • Agree: utu
  267. @anon

    Why so brief? Is that all you have to say?

  268. @vinteuil

    “Psychologists” should be forbidden by law to talk or write about ethics. They simply cannot help treating ethical positions they disagree with as pathologies or developmental shortcomings.

    I have a problem with many of them as they have less intelligence than I do and thus do not understand enough of the implicatins of what I say to make a call. Still, to say that psychologists should be forbidden is to lump all as though they were all the same. They are not.

    “Universal ethical principles” as the highest stage of moral development, indeed! Few people have caused more trouble in the world than the promoters of “universal ethical principles.”

    As with the problem with less well developed psychologists making calls above their pay grade, there is a problem with ethicists doing the same. The problem is with incompetents, not with the idea itself.

    I spit on the grave of Lawrence Kohlberg, Ph.D.

    I had no idea you were in Cambridge.

    Seriously, application of his principles by someone who can’t reason well enough to understand them is no more or less harmful than criticism of them by similarly hobbled ethicists.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  269. Anonymous[198] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    “Everyone” is using Zoom. Teams is just another Microsoft also-ran app like the Edge browser, Windows Phone, etc. Microsoft has an inferior copycat app for every conceivable use.

    Why do you consider them to be inferior?

  270. @anon

    Richard Spencer, is that you? Or is it Hunter Wallace?

  271. @Kyle

    I suppose, Kyle, but how many are Bolsheviks these days versus simple peasant Viagra(TM) comment-spammers who reckon, with people staying in their walk-in closets now, the time is ripe to sell Americans on Viagra(TM) via unreadable blocks of un-paragraphed text in Russian?

  272. ” it’s unclear whether the disease or the economic cure will be worse.”

    To whom is it unclear?

    The disease has been vastly overstated as a beard for the upcoming Greatest Depression that has been inevitable since the 2008 multi-trillion dollar blessing to the Banks to enable the continuance of their looting and destruction of the economy.

  273. @res

    Which assumes the countermeasures were actually substantially effective and they don’t deserve to be left aside.

    They might have been in some places, but all over the place, they have been ridiculous, random, arbitrary and stupid.

    We will I think still kind of find out. Because at some point we will all have to be exposed to this still anyway. And while no country at all performed a proper control, not even Sweden, a lot of places have implemented vastly different levels and kinds of intervention. In a year or two, I bet the data nerds can back out whether any of it made a statistically significant difference. Once they have all the final data and plenty of time to study it.

    I would guess the western approach in this has been close to completely useless anyway.

    What did China actually do? I am aware they did geographic regional isolation. Did they try to quarantine healthy people in areas not even exposed to the virus? Try to prevent people from socializing with their neighbors? Tell healthy people to stay inside their home and shut down local economies? Start ruling podiatrists unessential and furniture stores essential? I have no idea.

    Regional isolation is actually a completely normative quarantine strategy. Universal random senseless lockdown is not. What we have done seems like the true completely ‘novel’ and ‘unprecedented’ event going on here. They have invented a whole new stupid modern way of doing health quarantine. And they probably did it too late anyway, but it probably wouldn’t have worked if they had done it sooner anyway.

    My hope is that by the time this is done we can all admit it was an insane hysterical disaster so we don’t do it again next time there is a pandemic disease event. I don’t think one required any kind of heavy intervention but even if you are going to do it anyway out of precaution, we can at least do things that make sense and have been applied throughout history. Lock down the sick and lock down regional travel to prevent spread. You don’t just lock down society. South Dakota apparently never even locked down or mandated any precautions at all. It’s South Dakota, good that they didn’t. But they also never did anything to restrict travel into the state either. Also good, because this doesn’t warrant it. But that would at least work. As an example:

    Keeping people out of SD could prevent the spread of disease to SD, and then with isolated cases that get through you could lock down towns within the state and isolate the sick within the town. But what would keeping essential interstate shipping open but telling people in small South Dakota towns to isolate from each other accomplish? Or telling them not to go outdoors? Or not to do their day jobs?

  274. anon[608] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    Here’s how the Government version of home schooling works:
    The program for the week is posted out, the child completes the program with assistance where needed from the parent and posts it back postage free to the Government for assessment.
    It’s been happening that way for children who live in remote areas [or have some unstated reason for not attending] in Australia for a century.
    A child of reasonable intelligence will have completed the weeks work by Tuesday lunchtime.
    There is still a teacher who can be consulted remotely when needed.
    Had a step child who used it for a while, worked well, far less stressed.

  275. anon[608] • Disclaimer says:
    @keypusher

    And if one of them turns out to work —

    Depends how you define work. Destroy or limit the receiver’s health? All vaccines do that.

    And second, do you think he’ll make lots of money from it?

    Someone will.
    7 billion mandatory shots every year @ 1 cent a shot back in good ole Bill’s pocket still adds up to something, then there are chickens, hogs, cattle, sheep, dogs, cats, pet rats who’re needin’ pertecting too.
    I do agree that money isn’t Bill Gates main motivation though.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  276. @Travis

    Travis, NYC in 1918, a mere 102 years ago, was cold water flat tenement housing with shared toilets. The air thick with coal smoke and many immigrants having no idea of where to access medical aid.

    • Replies: @Travis
  277. @Achmed E. Newman

    Ach, my grand daughter in Bucks County,Pa. has two hours of online, Monday through Thursday. No school on Friday. Also no soccer or volleyball or horse back riding, so nothing to look forward to. This is very bad for the kids.

  278. @James Speaks

    Kohlberg was a great moral psychologist, and his work, in my opinion, remains the cornerstone of modern moral thought, as far as this endeavor is possible at all.

    I don’t see how could it have been done better.

    His chief weakness is that his “summit” is, basically, the world-view appropriate to saints of all major religions (except for their “ideological” squabbles), reminiscent of Albert Schweitzer. But, he should have left space for other world-views, which define self not just in terms of ego, in our classical Western sense.

    The summit of his moral development somehow collapses in the possible encounter with transmoral values. Apart from this, “metaphysical” objection, I would put forward a quasi-Darwinian one: what could universal humanism mean if you are confronted with sheer struggle for survival of your kin?

  279. @Adam Smith

    Nice, but it’s out of my league now, Adam. I can’t even afford a paint job for my Maserati right now, what with this COVID-one-niner recession and all…

    … can you play it for me?

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
  280. @Buffalo Joe

    The curtailment of the group activities is a shame, Joe, especially as the outside ones you mention are not a threat at all – what BS! However, if this goes on into the fall, there’s no earthly reason the Moms and some Dads can’t organize this away from the school. Where I’m at, some of the (often pretty MILFy) Moms are always organizing something, for the PTO, this, that and the other.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  281. I would put forward a quasi-Darwinian one: what could universal humanism mean if you are confronted with sheer struggle for survival of your kin?

    It has been recognized that it is unsafe to be operating at, for example, stage four reasoning if you were imprisoned with sociopaths operating at stage one.

    This, BTW, is why I sometimes emit racist utterances; they be in response to a mindset that a) refuses to wash their hands or b) practice social distancing or c) change diet to treat obesity/diabetes and yet d) blames structural racism for disparate health outcomes vis a vis covid 19. It is structural racism, but it is their own racism to blame me for their failures.

    Stage four reasoning requires a stage three environment to be safe; stage one reasoning deserves stage two management.

  282. @keypusher

    Okay, so you really admire the guy, for whatever reason. That is one hilariously passionate defense over some speculation.

    I, for one, do not like smirking billionaires with a messiah complex.

    And not all workplaces used Office 365 or teams before. The few hold-outs are now getting on board with it…

    • Replies: @keypusher
  283. @anon

    It’s his messiah complex and megalomania that motivates him. He’s really an obnoxious character.

  284. @Buffalo Joe

    Bad for kids, but worse for young adults just getting their careers and lives in order.

    The kids just get time off school and more time to be creative and play. And as for college students, they’ll benefit from even more grade inflation than usual.

    People aged 25-40 will be set back the most by this mess.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  285. SFG says:
    @Anon7

    Gibson’s talked about it. These stories are dystopias with huge gaps between rich and poor and corporations running rampant. Of course, lots of young, tech-savvy guys thought being a hacker cowboy in a decrepit city of the future sounded edgy and cool. And…that’s OK, IMHO. The audience often takes a different view than the artist.

    I should have said, “the woke stuff is anti-male, and males are the natural audience for sci-fi, so they’re attacking what would be their natural constituency and helping kill the genre.” We actually agree. 😉

    • Replies: @Anon7
  286. SFG says:
    @Fidelios Automata

    Well…it’s a dissident right person doing the poll, so of course you have sample bias.

    Baen is still making mil-sf and isn’t too PC. I’ve tried to support them where I can.

    Cyberpunk sounds fun to a 13-year-old boy (there’s that joke about the golden age of sf being 13, ie when the person giving the opinion was 13 years old) who can imagine being 25 years old and roaming the infinite data space of the net and being ten times as strong as a normal man with cybernetic augmentations. Imagine trying to raise a family with organleggers trying to chop you or your kids up for parts, or having to dodge cybernetically augmented gangsters on your way to work.

    Not that I’m picking on you at all, I inhaled Star Trek: TNG (Durocher has a nice bit here on Unz about this being an example of intelligent, progressive but male authority a few weeks back), Mage: the Ascension (magic derived from paradigms! as if derived from a different set of principles than science) and Dungeons & Dragons (not only can any monster be slain, you know exactly how much punishment it can take) at a similar age.

    But tell me, who are these non-political successors to the movement of which you speak? 😉

  287. @adreadline

    But ‘scuse me, mister, I mean no offense, but I’ll say… that “soul” thing, now that I’ve never even seen a picture of, not even a damn fake one!

    As we cannot see into your mind, we can assume you are quite out of it?

  288. @Achmed E. Newman

    Ach, Two elements of school are education and socialization and right now the education part is sketchy and the social part non existant. Stay safe.

  289. @S. Anonyia

    S.Anonyia, kids are not being allowed to be kids and play. Otherwise nice comment. Thank you. Stay safe.

  290. Rob says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    What if, God forbid, she made an egregious error, and left someone a vegetable and was sued for millions, and lost. Would she accept the insurance company saying that the market was down, way below where they thought it would be when they signed the contract. Besides, they had just paid big bonuses for all the executives, so they wouldn’t be paying the settlement. Or would she expect them to abide by the terms they agreed to?

    I expect lots of contracts are going to have contingencies for infectious disease shutdowns in place going forward. As it is, she should pay or try to weasel out of the contract somehow. Probably the lawyers’ billing would be more than $5,500.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  291. Fenster says:

    What about a Special Extraordinary Tax?

  292. Sparkon says:
    @res

    Yes, but who whom? has much deeper roots than iSteve. From that font of knowledge Wikipedia:

    Who, whom? (Russian: кто кого?, Kto kovo?) is a Bolshevist principle or slogan which was formulated by Lenin in 1921.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who,_whom%3F

    It’s also one of the early lessons for anyone who studies Russian, which is highly inflected, so it’s not just Кто, Кого, but a whole bunch of additional case work…

    Nominative Case – Кто
    Accusative Case – Кого
    Genitive Case – Кого
    Dative Case – Кому
    Instrumental Case – Кем
    Prepositional Case – Ком

    In English we have just three cases:
    Nominative, Objective, and Possessive –

    I, me, and mine
    you, you, and yours
    they, them, and theirs
    we, us, and ours
    she, her, and hers
    he, him, and his
    it, it, and its
    who, whom, and whose

    When encountering grammatical tangles, such as occurs when who appears in a subordinate clause, a good plan is to rewrite the sentence. Start over.

    Which would be correct?

    I was waiting for whoever walked through the door.

    or

    I was waiting for whomever walked through the door.

    In this case, changing the word order not only avoids the problem, but also provides the correct solution.

    Whoever walked through the door, I was waiting.

    Or a rewrite:

    If somebody walked through the door, I was waiting.

    Or, for humor, switch to Lurid Histrionic Word Salad Malaprop Mode:

    Psst. If any slimy stumblebum spewing specious slogans staggered through my front door way up on Wolverton mountain, I was prepared to decimate him unmercifully with a robust counterattack by existential dingbats and fortuitous wingnuts.

  293. @Rob

    I get it about the contract, Rob (and anonymous). It wasn’t SHE that decided she didn’t want to work. (I think you get that, Rob, but not anonymous).

  294. MEH 0910 says:

  295. @Buffalo Joe

    Thoughts, sad to say but breast cancer is big business.

    Right. And prostate cancer kills more men than breast cancer does women.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  296. @Achmed E. Newman

    Sorry to learn of your economic misfortune… Damn that Covid straight to heck…

    A couple years ago, when my Mercedes needed some paint work, I opted for rattle cans. Looks great even from 5 feet away. Maybe you can find some rustoleum or krylon that’s blendable on your Maserati.

    For example, Rustoleum Sunrise Red is damn close to BMW Brilliantrot.

    They’ll never fetch that asking price. They’re shootin’ for the moon.

    I found my tiny violin at a garage sale across the street for $10.

    Yes, I can play the hell out of it…

    Would you like to hear “Cry Me A River” “Red Barchetta”?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  297. nebulafox says:
    @Jack D

    Tactical ass-kickings mean absolutely nothing without a favorable strategic result in the end. This has been a lesson we have should have absorbed with Vietnam, where we won every battle but lost the war, yet didn’t.

    War is too painful, too serious a business to pursue halfheartedly: go in determined to prevail at all costs using all methods, with a defined, coherent, realistic strategic/political ending in mind… or don’t go in at all. That’s the lesson I’ve learned.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  298. keypusher says:
    @S. Anonyia

    Actually, I don’t. Like most people, I don’t like Office, I hate Word, and I don’t particularly care for Microsoft.

    I just dislike whackjobs who project their petty hateful greed onto everyone else.

  299. Anon7 says:
    @SFG

    “decrepit city of the future”

    I.e., Japan, in Gibson’s case. Yup, I’ve heard the phrase “low life and high-tech” which is pretty descriptive.

    “…helping kill the genre.”

    Ugh. Destroying everything men like is actually the goal of feminists. My starry-eyed view of sf was solidified at age 8, when I read 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea when vacationing in Florida with my grandparents. They rented a small house that was right on the Gulf, and I’d read it next to the ocean. Oh, and my uncle was a submarine commander who was also visiting with his family; he would send me all kinds of cool stuff, like declassified Trident missile photos. So I don’t really have an objective view.

    We actually agree.

    Think you’re right.

  300. @SFG

    Maybe give the Israelis Long Island or something.

    Just give them the border region with Mexico. I expect the flow of border jumpers across our new southern border with the transplanted Israel would suddenly cease. Because they’d do everything necessary to keep Mexicans on their side of the border – including shooting them.

  301. Travis says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    there was no treatment for the Flu in 1918. Medical aid was useless for the flu in 1918. Even today we have no effective treatments for the flu, no cure for the flu has been developed.

    and we have no cure for the current coronavirus….few treatment options are available, thankfully 98% of those infected with CV do not need medical care today. Without hospitals we the wahu flu would probably be killing .9% of New Yorkers instead of killing .6% of New Yorkers

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  302. @Jim Don Bob

    Jim Bob, I used to represent a food company at the Susan G. Komen “Race for the Cure” across the country. I set up from Boston to Sacramento, Little Rock to Madison, probably 25 cities. Huge turn outs, almost no overhead to Komen, with donations and sponsors. That was 25 years ago, more events, more people, more fund raising, same results. An actual cure would end the BILLIONS raised. My son holds a charity sports event and over the past few years he has raised $250K plus. God bless him, he is a great son, but where does the money go?

  303. @Travis

    Travis, no cure yet, but we have flu vaccines. Don’t have to cure what you don’t have. Stay Safe and thank you for the reply.

  304. @Adam Smith

    Haha, $32! Man, she’s working in a hurry. Do people steal those things? Is it to take off the muffler and act like it’s a muscle car?

    Thank you very much for the full orchestration Red Barchetta, Adam. I was prepared to hate it, but that was damn good. Of course without frets you can’t do (I don’t think?) that harmonic plucking that Alex Lifeson does as a memorable part of the song, there’s no ROCKIN’ guitar solo, and no screamin’ Geddy Lee, the latter possibly a plus for some people. I like his singing, but I can see why some people don’t.

    Is that true about the violin? Is yours the world’s smallest? Well, all this time, I thought it was just an expression.

    See you on PS.

    • Replies: @Adam Smith
  305. @res

    Leaving aside that places not locking down (Sweden, the Dakotas) are not worse off than places that did (UK, NJ). And even in places that did lock down, the rate of increase of new cases had already flattened before the lockdown.

  306. @HA

    But according to a recent Reuters tally, the coronavirus outbreak could be deadlier than the 1967 flu season, which claimed roughly 100,000 lives in the U.S. Only deadlier was the flu season of 1957, which killed about 116,000 people, according to the outlet, and the 1918 Spanish flu epidemic, which claimed some 675,000 lives across the country.

    Don’t count absolute numbers on a per capita phenomenon. The US population in the 1950s and 1960s was about half the current population, so the equivalent flu season today would be 200,000, which happens to be a recent projection for the coronavirus toll. And that ignores the fact that the Feds are openly bribing hospitals to code as many corona deaths as possible, something which did not happen in any prior flu season.

    The 1918 population was one third of today’s, so that would be about 2 million lives lost today. And that ignores years of life lost. The 1918 pandemic disproportionately affected the age cohort whose loss causes the most social damage: young adults in whom society has already invested their upbringing and education but who have not yet led their productive lives. By contrast, coronavirus overwhelmingly affects the old and infirm, those whose productive days are behind them. Not denying the personal tragedy in either case, just pointing out that all deaths are not equal from a social dislocation point of view, which is the point of view relevant for government authorities.

  307. @keypusher

    I read that the fist time you posted it. It’s an interesting hypothesis, but the reason it is in the blog section of Scientific American is that it is just a hypothesis. A young doctor called a few of his young doctor friends and they agreed that after Trump quoted some conventional medical statistics, those statistics must be wrong.

    If this ever becomes settled science, I’m sure you’ll let us know.

  308. @Achmed E. Newman

    Top of the morning to you, Achmed,

    When you paint a car you have to work kinda fast. You don’t want to allow the paint time to flash before you lay more wet paint over it. 70% overlap on your wet edge. The video’s below explain better than I can.

    Here’s a proper video on how to mix Rustoleum with reducer and catalyst with a pretty good tutorial on how to spray paint…

    This video here, this guy really knows what he’s doing. This video has helped me take my painting up a notch or two. It’s quite a bit longer at 80 minutes. He packs a whole lot of info in there. You might want to watch it before you paint your Maserati…

    Thank you very much for the full orchestration Red Barchetta, Adam. I was prepared to hate it, but that was damn good. Of course without frets you can’t do (I don’t think?) that harmonic plucking that Alex Lifeson does as a memorable part of the song, there’s no ROCKIN’ guitar solo, and no screamin’ Geddy Lee, the latter possibly a plus for some people. I like his singing, but I can see why some people don’t.

    Glad you liked it, it’s pretty good, but not nearly as good as the original, in my opinion. I like Geddy’s voice too, but I too understand why some people don’t.

    Alex is one of the best guitarists ever.

    Full disclosure: I’m a guitarist… And a bass player… It seems only fair that I should tell you now that I know you’re an engineer. You can play harmonics on any sort of string. Violins are just a bit different, as would be any string played with a bow. Frets have nothing to do with harmonics. Essentially you place your finger lightly upon a string, without pressing it into the fretboard. At the 12th fret you will find a harmonic the same as the fretted note at the 12th fret. One octave up from the open string. 12th fret is the halfway point between the bridge and the nut. You will find the same harmonics at the same interval in either direction from the halfway point…

    Is that true about the violin? Is yours the world’s smallest? Well, all this time, I thought it was just an expression.

    Not the world’s smallest, but still pretty small. Tiny violins come in all kinds of sizes…

    Some rather large…

    And some very small…

    See you at PS

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