The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
The Umpteenth Telephoto Lens Shot of a "Packed Beach" That Is Also "Not at All Packed"
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

And yet, the Virginian-Pilot article accompanying this telephoto lens shot says the “sprawling beach nearby was not at all packed:”

While the sprawling beach nearby was not at all packed, and groups were keeping their distance, there was no lack of beach blankets, towels, tents and umbrellas set up near the water.

Here are some overhead shots (if broadcast live, at 1 hour and 42 minutes later in the afternoon):

I know everybody in America wants to fight over imposing two extreme policies of Shut All Beaches Down Forever or I Should Be Able to Drive My Mobile Tongue-Piercing Parlor Truck on the Beach with Government Endorsement, but why not devote a little thought to some constructive compromises?

For example, beaches naturally are divisible into two main sections: the dry sand, which is good for sunbathing and the like, and the wet sand, which is good for walking and playing in the waves. If you look at the photo in the tweet above carefully, you can see that the inland half or so of the dry sand isn’t being much used, which is common on broad beaches like this. Most people who want to sit on the dry sand set up their towels quite close to the wet sand.

But this means the densest crowding is found right at the edge of dry sand and wet sand. In normal times, that’s great. The ideal place to put your towel is where the dry sand is sloping down to the wet sand, so you can prop yourself up comfortably on your elbows and watch the waves and the parade of pedestrians go by below you.

But if you want to distance people out more during this epidemic, the beach officials could put stakes in the sand, say, 50 feet inland from the high water mark for the day or at the point where the dry sand begins to slope down to the wet sand and not allow people to sit close to the wet sand. Instead, they can use for sunbathing all the immense amount of flat dry sand further inland.

I realize of course that nobody is interested in reasonable constructive compromises. The really important thing is not to learn and come up with smarter ways to do things, but to prove the other guy was wrong.

 
Hide 98 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. anon[217] • Disclaimer says:

    All the social distancing on the beach is gone as soon as a journo-list deploys her long focal length lens, set for maximum depth of field. Because the picture is totally the same as the beach, just as the map is totally the territory and the symbol is the refererant. If anyone caught the bug it was the fault of that journo-lists’s camera, because voodoo juju power! Stop the photography before the collapsed social distance infects someone else!

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  2. Let My Mobile Tongue-Piercing Parlor Operate on the Beach,

    How come you never told us what your problem with this is, Steve? I know you are not in a hurry to get your tongue pierced. Could you let the young freaks who want their tongues pierced GET their tongues pierced now, and hold out for “the duration” for yours?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @AnotherDad
  3. Inverness says:

    But the people in that photo are negroes! I thought telephoto lenses weren’t racist. Anyway everyone needs their Vitamin D, I read it right here.

  4. Americans aren’t used to making responsible decisions because they haven’t had any power over their own lives for decades.

    • Agree: TomSchmidt
  5. Barnard says:

    Why are so many people falling for this? Most Americans have been to the beach and have their own pictures from those visits that should enable them to remember people are not packed on top of each other. We have such a stupid society of sheep who want to consider themselves heroes for sitting at home staring at screens.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @Kyle
  6. I know everybody in America wants to fight over imposing two extreme policies of Shut All Beaches Down Forever or I Should Be Able to Drive My Mobile Tongue-Piercing Parlor Truck on the Beach with Government Endorsement, but why not devote a little thought to some constructive compromises?

    I realize of course that nobody is interested in reasonable constructive compromises.

    You might be being sarcastic, Sailer, but I think that sums it up. My opinion (so that the uninterested can promptly stop reading) is that when people as individualistic as the Americans of today are left to their own devices, they often do not cooperate and settle for a compromise. Each side, sometimes each individual, instead tries to prevail at the cost of the other(s), through subjugation or even destruction, though the latter is unlikely to happen in the developed world.

    To avoid that, one possibility, which I’m sure has many opponents, is having the government take control and make them, or compel them depending on one’s view, to settle for a compromise. It might not be the American way, it might be judged unacceptable, dictatorial, and it might well be, yet there’s evidence that, when it comes to stopping the pandemic, it works. But it’s moot: the United States does not have such a government today, something that is not solely President Trump’s or the state governors’ doing, as he, and them, are much more of a consequence of how American society was when they were elected, and it has not changed much in the last three and a half years. It’s possible that with another president, another government, this WuFlu emergency would have played out very differently. But a government like that would not represent the country’s people. Again, they do not want to compromise.

    Other nations face similar problems. And we are suffering, and will likely suffer some more, due to it, including after the pandemic is over, if it ends. (Personally, I’m rather optimistic about the whole thing)

    Regarding whether going to the beach furthers the spread significantly, it doesn’t obviously seem to do so, there is some tentative evidence against it, but there is one way to find out. In a few weeks, we will know. There will be no turning back whatever the result, but we will get to know.

  7. Thoughts says:

    Why is your example of the right so batshit

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Desiderius
  8. The eternal reprobate Atlantic magazine:

    How Well-Intentioned White Families Can Perpetuate Racism
    The sociologist Margaret Hagerman spent two years embedded in upper-middle-class white households, listening in on conversations about race.
    The Atlantic / Joe Pinsker

    The first sentence of the article:

    When Margaret Hagerman was trying to recruit white affluent families as subjects for the research she was doing on race, one prospective interviewee told her, “I can try to connect you with my colleague at work who is black. She might be more helpful.”

    Anyone want to lay odds?

    [MORE]

    “Racism is not a problem,” one girl tells Hagerman, adding that it “was a problem when all those slaves were around and that, like, bus thing and the water fountain.” Meanwhile, the girl’s mother nods along.

    Reading the MSM with an even slightly critical cast of mind is like shooting fish in a barrel.

    Pinsker: Some of the parents in your book may see the problems with choosing mostly white neighborhoods or schools, but the explanation they usually provide for those choices is that they just want what’s best for their children. This rationale is generally considered understandable, even honorable, but can you talk about its dark side?

    LOL

    Pinsker: What would it look like for a white affluent parent to make a choice not to give their children “the best”? Is it a matter of not calling the school to get the best math teacher? Or is there a more proactive thing a parent might be able to do?

    Pinsker: So far we’ve talked about how white parents shape their children’s views on race. But a big theme of the book is that kids themselves actively contribute to the formation of racist beliefs. How does that work?

    Hagerman: One of the things I was really struck by was how frequently some of these children used the phrase That’s racist or You’re racist. They were using this word in contexts that had nothing to do with race: They were playing chess, and they would talk about what color chess pieces they wanted to have, and then one of them would say, “Oh, that’s racist”—so things that had to do with colors, but also sometimes just out of the blue, instead of saying, “That’s stupid.” These kids have taken this phrase, That’s racist, and inverted it in a way such that it’s become meaningless.

  9. syonredux says:

    Interesting stuff……

    the AJC’s surveys also show that Jews who describe being Jewish as very important to them identify as Democrats rather than Republicans by larger margins than do Jews who describe being Jewish as fairly important or not very important to them

    Similarly, data from ACJ’s surveys shows that when Jews are asked what is the single most important aspect of their Jewish identity they are most likely to say ancestry followed by a commitment to social justice. Contrary to the perceptions of some gentiles, less than one in five Jews say that religion is the most important determinant of their own Jewish identity.

    It’s worth noting that Jews are not always left-leaning. For instance, Pew Polling finds that a mere 8% of Israeli Jews describe themselves as being on the left while 55% describe themselves as centrist and 37% as being on the right. This is radically different from Jewish opinion in any other nation. Of course, the Jews who are in Israel are not the same people as the Jews who are in America. Still, this difference is obviously consistent with the view that American Jews lean left, in part, because it is in their perceived group interest because they are a minority

    And Pew (2013) finds that “More than nine-in-ten Jews (94%) agree they are proud to be Jewish. Three-quarters (75%) say they have a strong sense of belonging to the Jewish people, and about six-in-ten (63%) say they have a special responsibility to care for Jews in need around the world.”

    https://ideasanddata.wordpress.com/2020/05/17/jewish-influence-on-american-politics/

  10. Anonymous[413] • Disclaimer says:

    I realize of course that nobody is interested in reasonable constructive compromises. The really important thing is not to learn and come up with smarter ways to do things, but to prove the other guy was wrong.

    A risk-based approach seems sensible, but the right to be a douche-bag shall not be infringed. Give me liberty and give my retiree neighbor death and some other guy down the road permanent lung injury.

    And yet over in the East they have methods that work. It’s kind of odd how in WW2 there were greater sacrifices made collectively for about 3 years by our people, but it’s too much to ask now for minor sacrifices for a shorter period of time. Yes, collectively cooperating on rice farming as a village has been bred into Orientals but we do have a history also of cooperation when push comes to shove.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  11. prosa123 says:

    Officials on Long Island are concerned about massive beach overcrowding on Memorial Day weekend because the NYC beaches won’t be open.

  12. Ran out of edit time. Here’s just a bit more of Maggie Haberman:

    This idea that your own child is the most important thing—that’s something we could try to rethink.

    I don’t have any children, but I care very deeply about other people’s kids.

    I think when we look across time and history and geography, we can see that the way that we’re doing it—prioritizing your own child over everyone else—is one way, but I don’t think that has to be the only way.

    Examples?

    One of several ironies here is that a classic Semitic critique of Anglo parenting is that Anglos neglect their children and don’t really care about them. They send them off to boarding school!

    https://snltranscripts.jt.org/78/78hupdate.phtml

  13. @syonredux

    Still, this difference is obviously consistent with the view that American Jews lean left, in part, because it is in their perceived group interest because they are a minority

    However , by far the most visibly Jewish, the Orthodox wing of Jewry, lean right by a substantial margin.

  14. @syonredux

    It’s worth noting that Jews are not always left-leaning. For instance, Pew Polling finds that a mere 8% of Israeli Jews…

    Classic misdirection. Emphases added.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  15. If it misleads, it leads.

  16. Spud Boy says:

    Have these people worried about beaches ever actually been to one? It would be extremely unusual and creepy to set up closer than 6’ from a stranger, virus or no virus.

  17. @Barnard

    Barnard, most Americans are law abiding, so they think that government rules are usually just, the MSM on the other hand answers to no one. Right now they want you to believe that there are those people who flaunt the rules, read Trump followers, and those people who agree with what the government is doing. Anytime some questions the MSM, they claim it is an attempt to muzzle them.And the MSM answers to no one.

  18. Marty says:

    Pacifica, right now, 6:00 p.m., more surfers in the water than people on the beach.

  19. Sam Patch says:

    Funny that Steve posted this. My wife and I took our three kids to Virginia Beach Oceanfront yesterday afternoon. The built-up resort area was remarkably crowded. Also, just a few days ago they allowed businesses to start seating people outdoors, so restaurants and bars in the area also seemed pretty crowded. Still, it’s important to keep in mind that the research seems to be showing that you’re not going to get COVID-19 at the beach anyhow.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  20. But if you want to distance people out more during this epidemic, the beach officials could put stakes in the sand, say, 50 feet inland from the high water mark for the day or at the point where the dry sand begins to slope down to the wet sand and not allow people to sit close to the wet sand. Instead, they can use for sunbathing all the immense amount of flat dry sand further inland.

    Or you could follow Wonderhussy’s example, and find yourself a nice deserted endorheic lake laced with military-industrial waste where even the loons won’t go anymore. (Literal loons.)

    During her quarantine escape, she visited our very own Aral Sea, Walker Lake in Nevada:

  21. syonredux says:
    @Mr McKenna

    It’s worth noting that Jews are not always left-leaning. For instance, Pew Polling finds that a mere 8% of Israeli Jews…

    Classic misdirection. Emphases added.

    Is it? I thought that it was more a case of the author wanting to demonstrate that Jewish Leftism is a Diasporic phenomenon:

    It’s worth noting that Jews are not always left-leaning. For instance, Pew Polling finds that a mere 8% of Israeli Jews describe themselves as being on the left while 55% describe themselves as centrist and 37% as being on the right. This is radically different from Jewish opinion in any other nation. Of course, the Jews who are in Israel are not the same people as the Jews who are in America. Still, this difference is obviously consistent with the view that American Jews lean left, in part, because it is in their perceived group interest because they are a minority

    It seems to me that he’s indicating that Jews stop being Leftist when they are in the majority…..

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    , @kaganovitch
  22. Anonymous[279] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thoughts

    Because he’s obviously not talking about “the right?” Most rank and file conservatives support the lockdown overall, even if they are critical of the implementation.

  23. Another possible reason for the press using telephoto lens shots of beaches so often is that no individual can be easily identified in them.

  24. Whiskey says: • Website

    Steve you are again missing the point. This is not about the virus. Not about Corona Chan.

    This is about upper class elites making Dirt People miserable. It’s on the par with global warming means beans and bugs to eat only. Meat, chicken and fish are only for elites. As are private homes, private cars, flying,barbeques and haircuts.

    Corona Chan is just the opportunity for elites to control, degrade, and abuse Dirt People.

    Super genius Newsom is now telling state employees to take a 10% pay cut. Furloughs may also happen.

  25. Anonymous[356] • Disclaimer says:

    Again! Team Fauci will not discuss a critical issue:

    The huge difference between indoor and outdoor transmission rates.

    Add this to the critical issue of viral strains. Apparently them word “strain” was/is forbidden at CDC NIH FDA etc.

    There’s a long list of taboo critical issue covid topics —- according to our authorities.

    At least Birx has a conscience. She keeps sabotaging the liars at CDC.

    But you know who is ultimately responsible for this bogus information stream coming from Team Fauci?

    That’s right. King Asshole Trump.

  26. anon[394] • Disclaimer says:

    Her bio at the Viginia Pilot describes Kaitlin Mckeown as a “visual journalist” Steve,

    Gotta call’em by their preferred whatever right? Photographer is now “visual journalist” folks.

    She is also being very deceptive unless her photos were edited in any way.

    Note: I wonder what it is about the beach that upsets the covid cheerleaders so much. Perhaps all that vitamin D and sunlight might help people’s immune systems with the virus, but not yet showing syptoms, get over the hump somehow and more quickly develop antibodies to kill it? Perhaps those beachgoers with all that vitamin D wont be as susceptible for several days the following week. Im already past the point to where I believe lefties are hoping for the highest death tolls possible in order to beat the Bad Orange Man and all.

    BTW…..The Denver Medical authorities declared a guy who died with a .55 blood alcohol content, almost 6 times the legal limit actually died of, what else, covid.

  27. @syonredux

    Interesting. Though, Borough Park Jews are right-wing and Tel Aviv Jews trend left.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @prosa123
  28. newrouter says:

    >I realize of course that nobody is interested in reasonable constructive compromises. <

    This is all so stupid. Why "reason" with it?

  29. My general impression about people who are at the beach in their swimsuits is that they tend to space themselves automatically, staying with friends or family and keeping a considerable distance from other groups of people. It is natural for women, especially, to choose not to sit close to strangers, as they put down their beach blankets and settle down.

  30. @syonredux

    It seems to me that he’s indicating that Jews stop being Leftist when they are in the majority…

    Had this poll been taken in Israel in 1955 ,when Jews were a much greater majority of the population,the majority would have identified as Left. Leaning right or left is more complicated than one variable.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  31. The media is trying to instigate resentment towards white people because it’s largely white people who go to the beach. I know this first-hand because it’s always white kids who are hopping over my “No Trespassing Sign” to laugh and frolic on my private, half-mile stretch of La Jolla beachfront.

    The government should embrace the free market and auction off America’s coastline to people like myself. Problem solved: no more overcrowding.

    But I will still want the subsidized flood insurance.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @anon
  32. syonredux says:
    @kaganovitch

    It seems to me that he’s indicating that Jews stop being Leftist when they are in the majority…

    Had this poll been taken in Israel in 1955 ,when Jews were a much greater majority of the population,the majority would have identified as Left. Leaning right or left is more complicated than one variable.

    Indeed. For example, many of those “Leftist” Israeli Jews in 1955 were Blood-and-Soil nationalists…..

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  33. Art Deco says:
    @syonredux

    1. British Jews are religious, more often than not, and favor the Conservative Party nowadays.

    2. NB, Israeli Jews are usually Sephardic or Mizrahi, North American Jews very seldom. Also, a large slice of the Ashkenazic Jews in Israel are post-Soviet emigres.

    3. Israeli Jews are found in large numbers in every social stratum in Israel, whereas North American Jews are seldom wage earners and in professional-managerial employments as often as not.

    4. Reality intrudes on a daily basis in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem in a way it does not on the Upper West Side.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  34. @Mr McKenna

    Interesting. Though, Borough Park Jews are right-wing and Tel Aviv Jews trend left.

    Tel Aviv Jews are the very same demographic mutatis mutandis as the American Jewish Left. Urban, credentialed ,militantly secular, artsy etc. In Israel they are a smaller percentage of the population so they don’t prevail.

  35. International Jew [AKA "Hebrew National"] says:

    None of these telephoto shots would be possible, if our air pollution just came out of quarantine.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  36. International Jew [AKA "Hebrew National"] says:
    @Mr McKenna

    They were playing chess, and they would talk about what color chess pieces they wanted to have, and then one of them would say, “Oh, that’s racist”

    Humor-challenged reporter.

    • Replies: @vhrm
  37. syonredux says:
    @Art Deco

    1. British Jews are religious, more often than not, and favor the Conservative Party nowadays.

    Doesn’t that have a lot to do with anti-Israel sentiment in the Labour Party?

  38. @syonredux

    Indeed. For example, many of those “Leftist” Israeli Jews in 1955 were Blood-and-Soil nationalists

    True

  39. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Back in the old days, every newspaper had one “Big Bertha”, an old Graflex large format single lens reflex camera with a really long lens. It had to be mounted on a surveyor’s tripod and was mostly used at high school football games. Now with image stabilization, the deceit-minded journos go out there with very long lenses and can casually do what took a lot of work in the old days, but is still thought of as impressive.

    The readers are often utterly uninformed and do not understand the concept, and are thus manipulatable.

    They call the MSM “the megaphone” for a reason. Unless a person knows exactly what they are misrepresenting, how they are misrepresenting it, and why they would want to misrepresent it it is almost impossible to contradict “the narrative”. Certain people are drawn to the media who can and do generate this narrative as moths to a flame, and people of similar inclinations promote them , enable them, encourage them. People of a different mindset, outlook, perspective are discouraged at every turn from this career.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  40. anon[270] • Disclaimer says:

    This long depth of field gaming with photos is just gaslighting as far as I’m concerned. Because I know what those beaches look like on a full day and a semi full day. Plus I cannot be the only person looking at these pix who has been to both Newport beach, CA and Virginia beach VA.

    Lying little liars of the imaginary journo-listic profession should be pushing a broom in the parking lot of a fast food restaurant for the next 5 years. Perhaps they’d learn from it.

  41. prosa123 says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Though, Borough Park Jews are right-wing and Tel Aviv Jews trend left.

    Most of the Borough Park Jews are Hasidic.

  42. M_Young says:

    Schrodinger’s beach.

  43. I’m declaring all beaches sanctuary beaches. Undocumented swimmers welcome. It’s the inclusive thing to do.

  44. vhrm says:
    @International Jew

    …would say, “Oh, that’s racist”—so things that had to do with colors, but also sometimes just out of the blue, instead of saying, “That’s stupid.” These kids have taken this phrase, That’s racist, and inverted it in a way such that it’s become meaningless.

    Not just humor-impaired but willfully oblivious that it’s not the kids who made the label meaningless, but the Critical Race Theory people and SJWs who applied it to anything and everything.

    Cities? racist concentration of blacks.
    Suburbs? racist exclusion of blacks
    Rural? racist reminder of plantations.
    Wilderness? racist. (apparently because Yellowstone was set up by eugenecists 100 some years ago…)

    basketball? racist: too many white owners. “plantation economy”
    football? racist: not enough black QBs
    hockey? hahaha.
    100m ? racist because you people think it’s genetic instead of 100% pure heart and hard work.

    Is there anything that isn’t racially problematic today because it either has too few or too many blacks or is imposed on blacks or appropriated from them?

    Thin women: racist. oppressive imposition of unrealistic white norms on black bodies.
    Fat women: racist! appropriating black culture (and men)

  45. tofl says:

    Mr Sailer makes a very good point here. I believe myself to be moderate in my views on most subjects, but I am finding it hard not to have strong feelings on this one. Let me offer my perspective, from the UK. The government has passed the Coronavirus Act 2020, without opposition in parliament, which for the next two years gives it unprecedented powers to regulate the public, commercial and private lives of citizens, including the closing of educational establishments, offices, factories, retail and sports and leisure establishments, suspension of elections, weddings, religious services, has made it illegal for citizens to meet more than one other person outside their household outdoors, making any public gathering including any gathering for the purposes of protest illegal, and it is illegal to visit friends or family in their private dwellings. The 77th Brigade of the Army are working with the Home Office Rapid Response Unit “helping to quash rumours from misinformation, but also to counter disinformation”. The goverment is on record as having deliberately employed fear to produce compliance in the population. There has been no meaningful political opposition to this – all the parties in parliament and all the devolved governments and regional authorities have accepted this without much question, as have state and other media – almost all the debate has been about delivery of the strategy rather than the appriach itself. These powers are subject to renewal every 6 months in Parliament. There is also an economic aspect to this, which I believe is also important but I won’t touch on it further at this point in order not to distract from my greatest concerns. The government roadmap (Google “Our plan to rebuild: The UK Government’s COVID-19 recovery strategy”) makes clear that Phase 2, which involves unspecified measures to suppress/contain spread, will go on until an effective vaccine or treatment is found, and they freely admit this may be never. The sinister phrase “new normal” has become accepted, and it is clear that enforced “social distancing” of TWO METRES (including in schools and workplaces) and track and trace (based on an NHS app feeding into a centralised database) are central to the Phase 2 strategy. Some snippets to give a flavour of the prevailing mood: Home secretary Priti Patel on a small, peaceful protest against “lockdown” this weekend, which saw the police arrest a few of the participants for breaking the Coronavirus Act: “These protestors are putting the safety of themselves and others at risk, placing pressure on the NHS and risking lives. The police officers monitoring them and breaking them up in order to protect the public have my full backing.” (NOTE that the NHS is no longer in any danger of being overwhelmed as the government have themselves admitted, and stood down unused extra hospitals, and the slogan “Protect the NHS” has been dropped). The PM in a recent meeting: “I’ve learned that it’s much easier to take people’s freedoms away than give them back,” the Prime Minister joked to laughter from his team.’”. And in a recent newspaper article: “If we all stick at it, then we’ll be able, gradually, to get rid of the complexities and the restrictions and make it easier and simpler for families to meet again. But we must move slowly, and at the right time.”. The government are relishing this, I have no doubt.
    I believe the situation we are in as a free country is extremely unhealthy, and am pessimistic for the future. The beach idea is a good one, and personally I quite like keeping away from other people, but from where I stand at the moment, anything that cements a “new normal” in this country’s thinking should be resisted. I am worried that even conceding small modifications to general life (as opposed to specific ones like shielding the vulnerable, which the government spectacularly failed to do) will give succour to a much more far reaching change to our way of life for the foreseeable future, a change which I believe to be very wrong indeed. Maybe I should be more open to constructive compromises, but I feel pushed into a corner by a tide of sinister madness. I look forward to others view on this.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  46. Anonymous[265] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    A mobile surgical suite operated on a beach from a truck and involving the tongue would is probably intended as hyperbole/metaphor for a way sure to spread COVID-1. If it is so intended, it’s successful.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  47. I liked the 1969 response to the Hong Kong flu, which I survived. It killed more than 100k Americans and a million world-wide, and it occasionally made the front pages and the six o’clock news, but we shrugged it off and kept on keeping on. Heck, we even put people men on the moon. This is what you could do in a world not dominated and cowed by feminism and DIE.

  48. Kyle says:
    @Barnard

    Have you ever been to the beach in Atlantic City on Memorial Day? I used to be a lifeguard there. It really is that packed. People really are laying on top of each other. Memorial Day is coming up soon & beaches will be packed like nothing we’ve yet seen in these photos. My 93 year old grandfather is slowly recovering from sars-2. He has become my personal litmus year. If he survives this I all I can conclude is that a quarter of a million Americans will die simply due to Darwinism.

  49. @Anonymous

    In WW2, we were “fighting for the American way of life”. The payoff would be more stuff after the war.
    And Americans tried to minimize the sacrifices they did make.

  50. @Anonymous

    Right. However, if you’re a young person (the only ones dumb enough to have their tongues pierced in the first place), you likely have nothing to fear from the virus. As I wrote before, the tongue-piercing bit is probably just a hazardous, especially in the long run, to one’s health as the Kung Flu, at that age, maybe ANY age.

    So what’t the point? Is it that these people, possibly infected now, will spread it? That’s back to the same question. Could we not expect them to have a little bit of concern for those very susceptible to real injury or death from the Kung Flu, and if they don’t, could those susceptible people be careful on their own? (i.e., perhaps not hanging out in any places with loads of people around of the kind that get their tongues pierced?)

  51. Hodag says:

    I have booked the family hodag’s annual Michigan beach week. Private beach that is never crowded. There are a lot of business that truly depend on summer weekenders and I hope they make it.

    • Agree: AnotherDad
  52. @Achmed E. Newman

    Could you let the young freaks who want their tongues pierced GET their tongues pierced now, and hold out for “the duration” for yours?

    C’mom, Achmed the Wuhan Special is an end-to-end debacle. (We aren’t even going to get the most obvious good that should come of it–an immigration moratorium).

    Let’s at least get one positive thing out of it–the tattoo and piercing parlors closed permanently … let’s preserve a bit more beauty in this world as it all goes to hell.

    • Agree: kaganovitch
  53. @tofl

    Tofl, you might have written a high quality comment … but i didn’t read it because you didn’t bother using paragraphs–ok you used two paragraphs and didn’t bother separating them. It’s just a solid thick visually impenetrable blob of text.

    Paragraphs do at least a couple things:

    — Logical separation, organization.
    A single idea. Or a single argument. Or a particular case. Or one example or anecdote. Etc. That grouping helps you write more effectively focusing on the issue at hand and closing it before moving on. And makes what you are saying logically digestible to slow limited minds like mine. “Ok, he’s saying A” (hum, whirr) “Ok, he’s saying B” (hum whirr).

    — Visual separation, clarity.
    Our eyes can work through it more easily. Keep track of our spot. Pause. Glance back if necessary. All of which aids in the logical processing issue noted previously.

    • Agree: Bernard
    • Replies: @tofl
  54. Sparkon says:

    Well, I’d say the photo at the top of Steve’s article here definitely was not taken with a telephoto lens.

    The wide view and substantial depth of field in this photo coupled with its complete lack of compression and foreshortening are signature characteristics of a wide angle lens, not a telephoto.

    Note the apparently tiny people in the far distance.

  55. tofl says:
    @AnotherDad

    @AnotherDad

    Thanks for your comments. You are of course right. I was in a hurry when I wrote it – trying to fit it in before work. Here’s an updated version; hope it is worth reading:

    Mr Sailer makes a very good point here.

    I believe myself to be moderate in my views on most subjects, but I am finding it hard not to have strong feelings on this one. Let me offer my perspective, from the UK.

    The government has passed the Coronavirus Act 2020, without opposition in parliament, which for the next two years gives it unprecedented powers to regulate the public, commercial and private lives of citizens, including the closing of educational establishments, offices, factories, retail and sports and leisure establishments, suspension of elections, weddings and religious services. The act has made it illegal for citizens to meet more than one other person outside their household outdoors, making any public gathering including any gathering for the purposes of protest illegal, and it is illegal to visit friends or family in their private dwellings.

    The 77th Brigade of the Army are working with the Home Office Rapid Response Unit “helping to quash rumours from misinformation, but also to counter disinformation”. The goverment is on record as having deliberately employed fear to produce compliance in the population.

    There has been no meaningful political opposition to this – all the parties in parliament and all the devolved governments and regional authorities have accepted this without much question, as have state and other media – almost all the debate has been about delivery of the strategy rather than the appriach itself. These powers are subject to renewal every 6 months in Parliament.

    There is also an economic aspect to this, which I believe is also important but I won’t touch on it further at this point in order not to distract from my greatest concerns.

    The government roadmap (Google “Our plan to rebuild: The UK Government’s COVID-19 recovery strategy”) makes clear that Phase 2, which we are starting now, involving unspecified measures to suppress/contain spread, will go on until an effective vaccine or treatment is found, and they freely admit this may be never.

    The sinister phrase “new normal” has become accepted, and it is clear that enforced “social distancing” of TWO METRES (including in schools and workplaces) and track and trace (based on an NHS app feeding into a centralised database) are central to the Phase 2 strategy.

    Some snippets to give a flavour of the prevailing mood:

    Home secretary Priti Patel on a small, peaceful protest against “lockdown” this weekend, which saw the police arrest a few of the participants for breaking the Coronavirus Act: “These protestors are putting the safety of themselves and others at risk, placing pressure on the NHS and risking lives. The police officers monitoring them and breaking them up in order to protect the public have my full backing.” (NOTE that the NHS is no longer in any danger of being overwhelmed as the government have themselves admitted, and stood down unused extra hospitals, and the slogan “Protect the NHS” has been dropped).

    The PM in a recent meeting: “I’ve learned that it’s much easier to take people’s freedoms away than give them back,” the Prime Minister joked to laughter from his team.’”.

    And the PM in a recent newspaper article: “If we all stick at it, then we’ll be able, gradually, to get rid of the complexities and the restrictions and make it easier and simpler for families to meet again. But we must move slowly, and at the right time.”. The government are relishing this, I have no doubt.

    I believe the situation we are in as a free country is extremely unhealthy, and am pessimistic for the future. The beach idea is a good one, and personally I quite like keeping away from other people, but from where I stand at the moment, anything that cements a “new normal” in this country’s thinking should be resisted. I am worried that even conceding small modifications to general life (as opposed to specific ones like shielding the vulnerable, which the government spectacularly failed to do) will give succour to a much more far reaching change to our way of life for the foreseeable future, a change which I believe to be very wrong indeed. Maybe I should be more open to constructive compromises, but I feel pushed into a corner by a tide of sinister madness. I look forward to others view on this.

    • Thanks: AKAHorace
  56. @anon

    The “tell” in all these photo journo-frauds is the foreground.

    You can always look at the foreground and even though there is still compression of depth, it’s more accurate than the whole scene. And you can sanity check depth against the horizontal.

    What it pretty much always reveals is … the beach is not packed at all. It’s got some people, but there is plenty of space. And more than plenty of space in terms of setting up your group’s camp suitably separated from others.

    ~~~

    BTW, isn’t journalism like this–denigrating all these Virginia blacks for flocking to the beach to boost their vitamin D–racism!

    Racism of the worst sort! Blacks require something like 3x the sun exposure of whites to produce adequate vitamin D. And vitamin D deficiency seems to be a factor in high black Wuhan-virus death rates.

    This “journalist” by denigrating blacks going to the beach and trying to induce the authorities to close or limit access is murdering black bodies! Why does she even have a job? Why isn’t she in prison?

    • Agree: Ron Mexico
  57. Mr. Anon says:

    I realize of course that nobody is interested in reasonable constructive compromises. The really important thing is not to learn and come up with smarter ways to do things, but to prove the other guy was wrong.

    No, Steve, we are not interested in reasonable compromises between between being a free person in a free country and being on lockdown orders by the warden. Just as we are not interested in a reasonable compromise between being left unmolested with our own wallet and getting shot dead by a stickup man – the reasonable compromise in that case being handing over our wallet.

    The reasonable public health compromise is for people like you, who are worried about the disease, to stay home and take such means as you deem appropriate, for the rest of us to understand your actions, and for all of us to take the necessary precautions for the safety of the elderly and infirm – precautions like not sending SARS-COV-2 infected patients to recover in nursing homes.

    Putting the World on lockdown was never reasonable in the first place – not from day one.

  58. If you’re lucky one day you’ll be allowed on the beach — just sign in first and leave your contact info puhleeze

  59. res says:
    @tofl

    Thanks for being open to AnotherDad’s suggestion. And for this interesting first comment of yours at the Unz Review. Hope you stick around and make more good comments.

  60. JMcG says:
    @tofl

    I don’t live in an area of the US that’s been particularly hard hit by Corona. Restaurants and bars are closed, of course. My kids are attending school online, with mixed results from what I’ve been seeing. I’m in an essential occupation, so continue to work as normal.
    I don’t really pay any attention to American mass media any longer, but I do sometimes check the British papers, whose reporting on events in the US is often much better than that of the press here. I listen to Irish radio, both national and local.
    The thing that strikes me is the almost hushed awe with which government pronouncements seem to received over there. I have elderly relatives who live in remote areas of Ireland who literally did not go out their front doors for 60 days! They were told to “cocoon” and by God, they did as they were bid.

    That kind of control is, I believe, inconceivable here. There’s a lot of “go f**k yourself “ left in us for now. The police, most of them anyway, don’t really have the appetite for that nannying, finger wagging crap that the Met Police and the Gardai seem to live for. Plus, we’re armed to the teeth, and that really does matter a lot.

    I find the public service announcements on Irish radio to be sinister. They have a woman with a posh Dublin accent instructing the public to accept information ONLY from official government sources. To say that it’s all very Orwellian is trite, but true.

    • Replies: @tofl
  61. AKAHorace says:
    @tofl

    Thank you for changing this tofl, it is much better now.

    You mention the 77th Brigade, a new British Army Unit. It seems to be for cyberwar or propaganda.
    Seriously weird.

    from Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/77th_Brigade_(United_Kingdom)

    Current structure
    The current structure is as follows:[16]

    Defence Cultural Specialist Unit – Planning support on behavioural analysis
    Task Group – Provides highly deployable specialists to other parts of the Armed Forces and Government organisations
    Outreach Group – Provides professional specialists in Security Capacity Building in Defence
    Digital. Operations Group – Delivers influencing activity and products across a range of communication types and platforms
    Operational Media Communications Group – Media Operations and Civil Affairs
    Staff Corps– A specialist Army Reserve unit providing strategic level consultancy to the MOD and wider government. The Staff Corps consists of two elements – the General Service Corps and the Engineer and Logistic Staff Corps.
    On 11 October 2018, it was announced that a ‘Cultural Property Protection Unit’ would also be set up as part of the 77th Brigade.[17] A Human Security cell has also been set up.[18]

    • Replies: @tofl
  62. Corvinus says:

    It is a true statement that the crowds were large. The photos lend support to that conclusion, as did eyewitness testimony. The article also did say that the beach was not “packed”. There seems to be a disconnect here. However, an area can have many people in (i.e. a large crowd) but also not be “packed” (as in that crowd almost elbow to elbow or being wedged tightly together).

    We also know that public officials use different photos from a wide range of perspectives, arial footage from local news agencies, and police surveillance when making their decisions to close off or shut down public places. For now, it would seem that people there are generally following social distancing protocols. But we do NOT know from the article was the extent that people there 1) were NOT practicing social distancing/wearing a mask -and- 2) were in “mixed company”** (see bel0w) which poses health risks for the “non-mixed company” (which could be minimized through social distancing and/or wearing a mask).

    “But if you want to distance people out more during this epidemic, the beach officials could put stakes in the sand, say, 50 feet inland from the high water mark for the day or at the point where the dry sand begins to slope down to the wet sand and not allow people to sit close to the wet sand. Instead, they can use for sunbathing all the immense amount of flat dry sand further inland.”

    First, I think Mr. Sailer needs to contact those officials and offer consultation (for a fee, of course). It’s a civic duty, cash in on those pattern recognition skills! Second, what happened to that “license plate” proposal from a few weeks back?”

    Hat Tip –> Anon[506] • Disclaimer

    I fear that the license plate scheme would lead to the “New York Rent a Dog” problem: People would lend out their cars to others. Also, why wouldn’t people just swarm in via Uber, or is Uber outlawed? **Finally, beach openings would most end up as household mixings, which is what lockdown is supposed to prevent. The unit of quarantine is the household, not the family, not the social friend group, not the romantic partner pair. Individual quarantine would be ideal, but the realities of living spaces prevent it. But a lot of people will end up meeting friends at the beach, or picking them up in their last-digit legal cars (observing social distancing … not)**. So the license plate attempt to create rational, enforceable rules would end up creating end-runs around lock down.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  63. Corvinus says:
    @Sam Patch

    “Still, it’s important to keep in mind that the research seems to be showing that you’re not going to get COVID-19 at the beach anyhow.”

    Not until possibly 2 or 3 weeks from now. It will be interesting to see if a spike results there and other places where restrictions have been relaxed.

  64. Anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Hello 427!
    I think you may be thinking of the Speed Graphic press camera. I have one of those that one of my relatives, who was a newspaperman for 40 years, gave to me. When he began his career in the early 1970s, it had long been superseded by the 35mm format, but at one time was ubiquitous.
    You can see them in use in old movies and newsreels. The photos they took were amazing for the quality of detail. They were not specifically used for telephoto shots but for typical news photos. However, because of the high-quality, large-format film, it was easy to crop in on a photo while retaining detail, so you had a close-up without lens distortion.
    You can see in this photo why the 35mm (or miniature camera as it was originally called) won out for news photography.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  65. @Corvinus

    I’m generally a moderate. I was against the hysterics at the beginning and against the “just the flu bro” boys. The Diamond Princess data has held up well. The antibody test samples all come up in the same general ballpark. 10-50x “the flu”, something around 0.5% IFR–skewing quite heavily old/sick–with modern medicine and a US style population structure.

    I think a good policy looks like
    — hard quarantine on anyone sick
    — quarantine/protect the vulnerable
    — close super-spreader activities
    — mandatory masks in necessary indoor venues–transit, air travel, public buildings (courthouse, library), grocery stores, medical buildings
    then
    — other private businesses operate as they see fit–as their customer base desires; with perhaps some public health guidelines (separation, etc.) for things like restaurants

    But honestly whenever i read one of these tedious Corny comments … i’d rather roll the dice on a 1 in 10 shot of dying myself, than live in his world of endless schoolmarming.

  66. Bernard says:
    @AnotherDad

    To AnotherDad,

    Absent a method to privately message one another, I suppose I’m left with a post as a way to express my admiration of your eloquence and clarity. Though at times our thoughts diverge, I’m always interested in reading your ideas. Thanks for your contributions.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  67. c matt says:
    @Mr McKenna

    It’s possible, but the reason is more likely they were trying to find a polite way to not get involved in her bullshit.

  68. tofl says:
    @AnotherDad

    I think I prefer your remedy to that of the UK government, though I would be interested in what you mean by “close super-spreader activities”. What are these activities, and for how long would you propose closing them?

    I’m not keen on masks as I feel they perpetuate an atmosphere of fear. But maybe they are prudent. Again for how long?

    Separation in restaurants, well that’s possibly tough in crowded cities like London. Separation in clubs, pubs and bars, even more difficult. Isn’t it natural for humans to want to get up close and personal, often with relative strangers? Do we think we can do without that, until we find a vaccine? Which may be a long time.

  69. c matt says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Pinsker: So far we’ve talked about how white parents shape their children’s views on race. But a big theme of the book is that kids themselves actively contribute to the formation of racist beliefs. How does that work?

    Observation.

  70. tofl says:
    @JMcG

    I have been quite astonished at how easily what I thought was a freedom-loving population of contrarians, who voted for Brexit against the odds, have accepted so easily the suspension of basic freedoms.

    Friends and colleagues who are very much of the liberal left are now ardent supporters of the government and the police. The same people who applauded Extinction Rebellion trying to shut down central London think that a few hundred people in Hyde Park peacefully protesting against “lockdown” are “covidiots” who deserve everything they get from the police and are endagering public health and the sacred NHS (our basically secular country’s new religion).

    It’s a shame to say it, but it seems like we’re basically finished.

  71. @Whiskey

    I used to think like you. Thought eating vegetables was only something done to punish people. Then I turned eight.

    Super genius Newsom is now telling state employees to take a 10% pay cut. Furloughs may also happen.

    Are California public employees “dirt people” now?

  72. I agree that ideology has often overtaken what actually works.

    I don’t know how many people read both iSteve and Kevin Drum’s blog. I know Steve sometimes likes to make fun of Drum’s weirder posts. However, both SS and KD are in a number crunchy “let’s see what actually WORKS!” mode these days.

    Example. In this post, Drum says that school closings are counter-productive.

    https://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2020/05/school-closure-vs-restaurant-closure-which-is-most-effective/

    I agree. Some of my kids can handle on-line learning, others cannot. One of my kids is a HS senior now. The school says that this semester will be Pass/Fail. The school says anyone passing a class at the time the schools closed will pass the class, and the grade will have NO effect on their GPA. Meaning, halfway through the last semester of senior year, my kid was told she could effectively blow off the rest of the semester will absolutely no effect whatsoever on her GPA. So, of course she is blowing off the rest of the semester. Why not?

    I will have 2 kids in college this coming fall. Their college says they are planning to open up in the fall. Good. I love my kids, but I want them the h3!! out of my house by September!!!!!

    https://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2020/05/school-closure-vs-restaurant-closure-which-is-most-effective/

    • Replies: @res
  73. @Bernard

    I would add Jack D. and Art Deco to that list.

    It must be depressing dealing with all “the Joos did it” crap, but Jack does it quite patiently. And I wouldn’t argue lightly with AD.

    • Agree: Bernard
  74. res says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Thanks for that link. Here is the paper.
    https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2020.00608

    It is interesting that they got such different results than what the Kinsa data seemed to show. I am not sure what to make of that. Anyone have any thoughts?

    Most of the details are in the Supplemental Materials. I thought this graphic on page 22 was useful for getting a sense of the overall timing of the countermeasures:
    SUPPLEMENTAL EXHIBIT 1
    Fraction of US Population Covered by Social Distancing Measures

  75. @Whiskey

    Super genius Newsom is now telling state employees to take a 10% pay cut. Furloughs may also happen.

    Wake me when you see any report that any guvmint employee is getting less than full pay.

  76. Anonymous[366] • Disclaimer says:

    If you want to see a photograph of a crowded beach not taken with a telephoto lens, how about Coney Island on Labor Day, 1939. Camera used, a Speed Graphic.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Bernard
  77. @Anonymous

    That looks crowded.

    Also, most people who would go to Coney Island Beach would go via the Subway of Doom, so there are good reasons to keep NYC beaches closed.

  78. @tofl

    I’m not keen on masks as I feel they perpetuate an atmosphere of fear. But maybe they are prudent. Again for how long?

    Separation in restaurants, well that’s possibly tough in crowded cities like London. Separation in clubs, pubs and bars, even more difficult.

    Thanks for your comments, tofl, and for making the effort of reposting your first comment.

    I live in Hong Kong, where we’ve been engaged in anti-corona social distancing and masking since January. HK is even more crowded than London, and our restaurants and pubs are, in normal times, especially cramped because floor space here is so outrageously expensive.

    The past few months here show that reasonable public health measures can be implemented and sustained without businesses having to shut down. Even restaurants here have never closed, although they’ve obviously gone through some tough times. Bars and pubs had to close for a few weeks, but are back open again.

    I know what you mean about masks promoting a sense of fear, but that perception can be changed by mass adoption of masking, and a bit of time. When enough people wear them, this in fact is reassuring; you know that nobody’s virus-laden coughs are spreading droplets around the space you’re in. In this sense, and somewhat paradoxically, it’s actually freeing, as you feel more confident riding on a crowded MTR train, or going shopping in a packed mall. Masking is almost universal here in public, even though there have been only three locally-spread cases in the past month. Most HK people now are quite confident in going out more or less as normal.

    Masking therefore can be a transitional stage leading to the resumption of ordinary life. Nobody wants to wear one forever, but if it means you can go back to work, go out to eat, go to the pub (which I’ve done the past couple of Friday evenings), and go shopping in an almost-normal way, I think it’s worth it for a while.

    • Replies: @tofl
  79. @AnotherDad

    What do you think about schools and mandatory masks? I have been a teacher for 25 years, some of those in real rundown buildings and neighborhoods. Kids/students have really poor hygiene habits, picking boogers and eating them, etc., yet I have never had anything worse than the 24 hr flu. Don’t recall any students terribly ill. I was really bothered when, one year, two Muslim girls wore the full head covering with only the eyes opening. I want to see my students mouths / expressions when in a teaching setting. This whole Covid reaction has been so bizarre in my opinion.

  80. Bernard says:
    @Anonymous

    Not a tattoo on the bunch. A pleasure to behold.

  81. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Same company, but no.

    The Speed Graphic and Crown Graphic were large format “press” cameras, view cameras with or without a focal plane shutter, made in several sizes but the 4×5 or “quarter plate” being the far and away most common. The Graflex was a large format SLR , a big bulky awkward affair, that took the same backs and lenses but offered through the lens viewing without looking at the back of the ground glass and removing the film back. It was usually used for technical photography, and most “Big Bertha” setups involved surplus long lenses and a bit of local fabrication.

    Press photography, as exemplified by Weegee and the hundreds who emulated him, used large format cameras (in the US Graflex , both the name of the company and its SLR camera, had most of the market) pretty exclusively until the very late 50s or early 60s. Which is why you see photos of the then Jackie Bouvier with her Graphic camera. after a short dalliance with medium format cameras the 35mm SLR Nikon F utterly dominated the scene transitioning in about 1962. You still saw a few large format guys in scenes of pressmen surrounding the JFK assassination events, but very rarely any in photos of them around Vietnam issues, the RFK or MLK assassinations, et al.

    The large format press camera was capable of extraordinarily fine results but in practice press photography actually improved in the 35mm era. Darkroom practice was sloppy, there was always a lot of dust and dirt everywhere in the camera, and basically they always used the flashgun with its huge bulbs in all situations. In fact, and this leads to my next point, in use the camera shutter was usually tripped by a solenoid connected to the flashgun and using a Press camera hand held can be quite awkward without one. They just got in the subject’s face and fired the flash, and the outside lighting mattered little since the maximum aperture for most of those lenses was f;8 or somewhere in that region. 35mm film had to be handled cleanly and the exposure settings were much more in play by then, since they couldn’t just tray develop the negative to “that looks about right” and stick it in the stop bath as in the sheet film days.

    The old press cameras are still not rare or valuable, but many have been abused or butchered (it’s common to find focal plane ones with the FP shutter ripped out). The rare game piece is the flashgun. Unfortunately, the prop department for Star Wars decided that the classic flash gun made a pretty good light saber, and Star Wars cunts have butchered them into fake lightsabers en masse, often buying a whole Graphic outfit and dumpstering everything else. Toward the end of the Graphic era, electronic strobes were coming into use, and they are more practical now since they haven’t made flashbulbs in 25 years, but they need a bulky remote satchel or purse thing with a 510 volt battery and capacitors for the HV. Modern switch mode substitutes can be fabricated, but being an authentic press photographer circa 1955 or before is now a difficult thing to setup.

    The cameras had, usually, a Graflok back and would take sheet film holders, a rollfilm adapter, or a Polaroid back. I don’t think you can get the Polaroid film for these anymore, sadly. Sheet film is still available, or you can cut down surplus wide roll aerial materials. I like to use single weight uncoated photo paper and reverse process it, or negative process it and use it as a paper negative for cool 1940s Bernard of Hollywood effects. The whole setup is awkward, but so is a Hasselblad or a RB/RZ Mamiya.

    This photo is a fine one and I hope the man in the picture, who is probably long since passed unless this was a retro modern shoot, had a lot of fun with it.

    Here we see the incoming Nikon F…

    • Thanks: JMcG
  82. bjondo says:

    How crowded beaches will be not important.
    Won’t be too many 80 year olds with lung disease.
    Get a cough. Big Deal. Everybody’s a sissy now. Get over it.

    Pale faces worry about burns and swimmers worry about jellyfish, Man O’ Wars – high winds.

    If possible on beach, no one likes to be close
    unless neighboring gal is topless.

    5 dancing shlomos

  83. anon[645] • Disclaimer says:
    @Red Blooded American Boomer

    Do the kids bring surfboards or boogie boards with them?

    But I will still want the subsidized flood insurance.

    What about the earthquake insurance?

  84. Harold says:

    So American beach air is not as smoggy as I have been tricked into thinking all these years.

  85. tofl says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    As an alternative to indefinite shutdown and house arrest, it may be preferable. I presume when you get to the bar and you’re in your group, you take your masks off?

  86. @tofl

    I presume when you get to the bar and you’re in your group, you take your masks off?

    Yes, definitely.

    For a while there was a recommendation that in restaurants you would keep your mask on until your food arrived, and then put it back on again as soon as you were done eating. Some people followed this; some didn’t. Now most people take off their masks when they sit down at their tables, and put them on again when they leave.

    There were also some extra-spacing requirements for restaurants, which have been relaxed only recently, and many have put up makeshift temporary barriers between tables, although I doubt those make much difference. There is still a limit of eight people per table, but I suspect that’ll be coming down soon as well.

  87. @Achmed E. Newman

    Show me a woman with a pierced tongue and stud and I’ll show you a walking Petri dish of disease. It isn’t the piercing, it’s why she would want it. If you don’t know the attraction, I can’t help you.

    My employer hired a woman who looked very professional in her business skirt suit, but had a tongue stud. She started off very professional. Had a degree from a better state university, good class standing, interviewed very well.

    A couple of weeks later, I saw her in a minimal swim suit at a public pool. Tats all over her back, belly, buttocks, upper legs. I was a little nonplussed, but acted blase. Well, when company picnic time rolls around, maybe half a year later,she shows up with her fiance’, a mulatto-mestizo, and his mixafewofem kids. And sporting the beginnings of a baby bump. She was probably four months along, but hadn’t said a word to HR yet, as it turns out. Well, she finally announces and her maternity leave is set up, and by this time her work numbers start coming in. Her department is a shambles.

    As it turned out she had twins-a boy and a girl, both hideous. She had a difficult late pregnancy and delivery and her leave stretched out. Finally, it was obvious we didn’t want her back, and despite being with the company a little less than a year, she was offered a specially good severance package, which fortunately she took. Whatever we paid her was worth it.

    Last I saw of her was about a year ago, with her twins about four now. Hideous, squabbling brats. I asked her how things were going. Guess what-I know some will find it difficult to believe, but she’s a single mom now. She put on about 25 pounds and was working as a service adviser at a car dealership. Probably making way less than what we were paying her.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  88. @tofl

    You are not in ANY KIND of free country, per your paragraph 14 (and thanks for taking Dad’s suggestion!) From what you just wrote, Tofl, England sounds farther gone than the Oceania of Orwell’s 1984. I say that with no exaggeration whatsoever.

    Mr. McG is right. There is a lot of “go fuck yourself” left in America. It’s something we should be proud of rather than deride, as Mr. Sailer and others here often do. I can only hope to be a leader of a part of the “go fuck yourself” crowd.

    • Replies: @tofl
    , @Corvinus
  89. @AnotherDad

    I did not wear any mask on the airliner, even after they said it’s mandatory. Screw that. They have ~ 5-7 % of normal passenger business from my pretty-good estimates, so they are not gonna argue with me.

    However, after my wife had about gone hysterical (mostly it’s lack of sleep from her job, but during the lack of sleep she would go look at the phone to keep up with the numbers), I promised her I’d wear it. So I do.

    It was one of:

    a) Lie about it, and she’d calm down – just not gonna
    b) Try to explain that she was being somewhat hysterical – didn’t work
    c) Have her continue to get very upset about it – it was going to be real trouble for us soon.
    d) Wear the stupid mouth-diaper (part of the time), on trips and at the store.

    There is no coming back from a reply to Coronavinus. The argument will just keep going, and going, and going…

  90. @CarlosHathitachiTheSecond

    Haha, cool story, bro, and I don’t mean that in the stupid sarcastic fashion that guys with tongue-piercings would!

    I’d keep this advice from you in mind, but I’m not in that same world of yours, CH-II

  91. tofl says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yes, things are pretty far gone, and it happened very quickly.

    To take the 1984 analogy a bit further, my main hope is in the “proles”. The so-called intellectual classes here are mainly supportive of the (Conservative) Government, and do not in general seem open to argument. This subject has been very polarising here, and there are very few forums where I have seen any kind of civil, constructive debate between people who have different views. This forum is an exception.

    I am hoping that those people with so-called baser instincts, such as the urge to get together with members of the opposite (or same) sex , in private, with whom they don’t currently live, bring a different perspective. Yes, the government has effectively made it illegal to have sex outside your current household, unless public indecency is your thing.

  92. @tofl

    Yes, the government has effectively made it illegal to have sex outside your current household,…

    Haha! “Incest is best, forget the rest.” is, I believe, the funny line you hear, but honestly, I think I’ve forgotten the rest (of that quip).

    Thanks for the reply, Sir. I wish the remaining good people of your land the best of luck. You will need all of it.

  93. @tofl

    When the UK trusted their own people with firearms in the face of war.

    Gone.for.ever.

    • Replies: @tofl
  94. Corvinus says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    “You are not in ANY KIND of free country…”

    LOL, of course he (tofl) and you are in a free country, it’s just easier to make that pronouncement when you prefer that matters be done differently. It’s really a silly argument you make.

    • Replies: @tofl
  95. tofl says:
    @AKAHorace

    Yes, it’s pretty sinister.

    I don’t know if it is connected but certain video clips featuring in some cases quite mainstream, moderate commentators such as Professor Karol Sikora have been disappearing from YouTube for violating their terms of service.

    Perhaps he is considered dangerous precisely because is mainstream and moderate yet departs somewhat from WHO doctrine. They’ll tell you that what they are trying to do is combat “misinformation” and “fake news”, but I suspect the real weird stuff gets left because few believe it.

    Very few mainstread figures here are departing from the accepted wisdom that we need to distance forever, or until a vaccine is found, whichever comes sooner.

    • Thanks: AKAHorace
  96. tofl says:
    @Joe Stalin

    We had the right to bear arms until 1920.

  97. tofl says:
    @Corvinus

    It depends how you define free I suppose.

    We’re freer than many, even now. But much less free than we were.

    By government order, during the Emergency Period:

    – All educational establishments are closed
    – All bars, restaurants, pubs, cafes are closed save for takeaway business
    – All retail establishments are closed save for food and household items
    – All sports, entertainment and leisure establishments are closed
    – All religious establishments are closed
    – Elections are suspended
    – Weddings are banned
    – Sporting events are banned
    – Leaving your home is only permitted for enumerated reasons:
    Exercise
    Work, but only if you are unable to work from home (so most offices are closed)
    Medical reasons
    Shopping
    “Recreation”
    A few other minor reasons
    – Gatherings of more than two people from different households are illegal, including gatherings for political protest

    It is illegal to visit others in their homes, including friends and close family, even in their gardens.

    It is illegal to spend the night outside your own home.

    [MORE]

    From 8th June any UK citizens returning from foreign travel will be forced to quarantine at home for 14 days.

    Police have powers to enforce these measures, which they are using. People have been turned back from stations and in their cars.

    Neighbours report people to the police (though to be fair this seems to happen more with celebrities and major political figures, a number of whom have been caught breaking the law).

    Re-opening of many of the establishments and businesses closed by the these orders will be dependent on compliance with “social distancing” requirements whereby people need to be kept TWO METRES apart. This is double the WHO guideline and there is no science behind this – it’s on record that the govt didn’t think people could be trusted to stay 1 metre apart so they doubled it.

    The Act which brings about the above prohibitions was passed in Parliament without a vote. It is time limited to two years, with a requirement to review every 6 months in Parliament, though such period can be extended by ministerial order.

    The government roadmap for dealing with this “crisis” describes a “Phase 2” (which we are in now) which will last until a vaccine or treatment can be found, and also recognises this might be NEVER.

    Key parts of the roadmap, as well as “social distancing”, include use of an app which sends information to a central NHS database, and “track and trace” whereby you may be contacted by a government “tracer”, told you have been in contact with someone who has had a positive test (but you won’t be told who) and told to self isolate for 14 days.

    The government have said there will be no austerity measures to pay the bill for the closure of society and the economy, so it’s clear taxes will need to rise. Several national newspapers have featured stories about a “wealth tax” – no doubt leaked to test the water.

    There is no UK political party or or TV news outlet or major national newspaper or devolved national, regional or local government that opposes these laws and policies. The opposition parties and media have been critical of the execution of policy, not of the policy itself. The opposition are more pro-“lockdown” than the government.

    The original intention as presented to the public was to “flatten the curve” to protect the NHS. This has now been achieved; extra hospitals (not used) are being stood down, the “protect the NHS” slogan has been dropped. The new logic is to prevent a “second wave”, stop anyone from dying on the government’s watch ever again, save face, perpetuate the NHS worship that has become the new national religion – heretics are shunned – who knows?

    The government set their own criteria for when the “emergency period” ends. They are being advised by a committee of “experts” who meet, but most of the minutes of these meetings are being withheld from publication, ostensibly to prevent “confusing” the public and sending “mixed messages”.

    So draw your own conclusions as to how free we are.

    One aspect that I have not seen debated on this excellent forum much is the moral/ethical dimension of imposing restrictions on individual and collective freedom of action for the greater good.

    One could for example arguably justify a short term set of restrictions if it could be reasonably demonstrated that those restrictions would protect a National Health Service from being overhwelmed. But can one justify on moral grounds the kind of restrictions I have described continuing indefinitely, in order to ostensibly protect the vulnerable?

    The vulnerable were in town where I live in full force this morning. Good for them.

    Surely unless this virus poses an existential threat to us, we have to learn to live with it, take sensible, targeted precautions where practical, but carry on with normal life and allow people to choose their own level of risk.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments have been licensed to The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
Talk TV sensationalists and axe-grinding ideologues have fallen for a myth of immigrant lawlessness.
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
How a Young Syndicate Lawyer from Chicago Earned a Fortune Looting the Property of the Japanese-Americans, then Lived...
Becker update V1.3.2