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From the NYT:

Back at It Again: German Leaders Try to Form a Government
By MELISSA EDDY JAN. 6, 2018

BERLIN — Six days of meetings, three parties and a news blackout: If all goes well in meetings that start this weekend, that’s the combination that could give Germany a new government by March.

That’s the best-case situation, as leaders of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservative Christian Democrats, their Bavaria-only sister party, the Christian Social Union, and their previous partners, the Social Democrats, sit down on Sunday for a new round of talks intended to hammer out the basis of a new government. …

Immigration and Refugees

The huge influx of migrants has emerged as a polarizing issue in Germany and contributed to the drop of 14 percentage points in support overall for the negotiating parties. Many of those voters switched to the far-right Alternative for Germany, which campaigned on an anti-immigrant platform.

Immigration remains one of the biggest sticking points in the talks. Conservatives and Social Democrats are split over the number of people who should be allowed to enter the country and to apply for protection on humanitarian grounds. Ms. Merkel and the Bavarians are holding to a limit of 200,000 applications, but the Social Democrats are opposed to any restrictions.

The Social Democrats support legislation that would allow Germany to admit qualified immigrants to fill thousands of openings in companies and factories. The official in charge of Germany’s national labor agency has said the country will need 300,000 qualified immigrants annually to fill the gaps, because record employment has made it difficult to find enough workers.

After all, “Social Democracy” has always stood for Open Borders and Lower Wages. Social Democrats have always stood in solidarity, arm-in-arm, with Global Capital. How can the capitalist class upgrade their private jets if they have to pay German workers more money?

 
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  1. Ms. Merkel and the Bavarians are holding to a limit of 200,000 applications,

    It’s news to me that Merkel has accepted this demand by the CSU, her position has always been that there can’t be an upper limit on asylum seekers. And the demand by the CSU isn’t to be taken seriously anyway, it’s merely the usual “good cop, bad cop” routine to keep at least a few right-wing voters voting for CDU/CSU (200 000 “refugees” a year is still national suicide anyway, only a bit slower).
    One issue of contention though is “family reunification” for “refugees” that have been denied asylum in the narrow sense, but can stay in Germany under subsidiary protection (iirc that is because of general insecurity in their countries of origin or something of the sort). It has been suspended until March 2018, and the SPD demands that after that date they’ll be allowed to bring their relatives to Germany.
    Anyway, both Social and Christian Democrats can go to hell as far as I’m concerned.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    Can the CSU insist? Do they alway just follow Merkel?
    , @Diversity Heretic
    I always value your comments, especially on Germany. What do you make of the estimate by the German Labor Minister that Germany "needs" 300,000 "qualified" immigrants a year to fill gaps in the labor market. I readily admit that I am no expert on the German economy but, in light of robotization, automation and computerization, my first reaction is that they must have made LSD legal for members of the German cabinet. Is there any truth whatsoever to the view that Germany has a labor shortage?

    I also recall that very few of the "migrants" that have arrived have any useful skills and that unemployment remains very high.

    What's your opinion?
    , @Old Palo Altan
    To Hell? No, the place might not actually exist.
    I want them to go to the wall, every last one of them.
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  2. The official in charge of Germany’s national labor agency has said the country will need 300,000 qualified immigrants annually to fill the gaps, because record employment has made it difficult to find enough workers.

    What proof do they have that the German economy is adding 300,000 jobs a year and what qualifications do the migrants have to fill these jobs? These are questions that don’t need to be asked because Diversity is our Strength!

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Yeah, walk around Frankfurt Airport, and see how many actual German workers you can find. Take note of the quality of work and service you get from the imported workers.

    Germans, like so many others in the West, are kidding themselves. If they are lucky, the foreigners they import to clean their bedpans and change their adult diapers will merely smother them in their sleep in the nursing home, rather than torturing them and mocking them, all the while taking selfies for their homies, as has been recently been seen in the UK.

    , @bomag

    ...because record employment has made it difficult to find enough workers
     
    IOW, to improve the successful village, we have to burn it.

    In this and other areas, specious economic arguments are pushed to justify dysfunctional policy. We need a Reformation where the worship of GDP is challenged and replaced.
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  3. Now, now. Attacking the banks won’t end heteronormative patriarchy, now, will it? On the contrary, the plutocrats are the friends of the #Resistance. How convenient…

    The amount of propaganda damage Trump could have wreaked on the Democratic Party if he opted to quote Chavez and Gompers (or even 2015 Sanders) on uncontrolled immigration’s effects on socioeconomic power dynamics rather than embracing McConnellism and the Gospel of Wealth is pretty hard to understate. Trump might be too much of a preening moron to tap into this political potential of further underlying how united the two parties have become on our essentially pro-oligarchic socioeconomic outlook, but that doesn’t mean the next right-wing insurgency figure has to be.

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    And on top of the impact on our nation, it's not even smart politics: rather than creating a new, alternate network of startup founders to breakup monopolies in Silicon Valley that push much of the nonsense we see on open borders and anti-nationalism, he's giving tax cuts to Zuckerberg, who might even freaking run for the Democrats some day.

    A right-wing movement with the common sense to advocate finding ways to make the market work for ordinary Americans (how can we make angel investment into a "regular middle class thing to do" in the 21st Century?), as opposed to stupidly fetishizing it and treating it like religious dogma at the expense of basic common sense, can do a lot. Of course, they'd also throw the neocons overboard in favor of old-school realism, too, but that's another story.

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  4. Read More
    • Replies: @IHTG
    https://memegenerator.net/img/images/600x600/14419512/two-buttons-and-stuff.jpg
    , @AndrewR
    Presumably, however, German politicians are united in their tolerance (if not preference) for migrants with anti-Germanic views.
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    I think that Germany has done sufficient penance for its sins during WWII, and now that the jihadis have fulfilled their purpose, they can go home and torture each other, per tradition.
    , @Pericles
    Deporting everyone except the Jews from Germany is certainly a bold strategy.
    , @Perspective
    This is good, the west can now reject "refugees" from muslim countries on the basis they're anti-Semitic. This should be enshrined in immigration policy.
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  5. @nebulafox
    Now, now. Attacking the banks won't end heteronormative patriarchy, now, will it? On the contrary, the plutocrats are the friends of the #Resistance. How convenient...

    The amount of propaganda damage Trump could have wreaked on the Democratic Party if he opted to quote Chavez and Gompers (or even 2015 Sanders) on uncontrolled immigration's effects on socioeconomic power dynamics rather than embracing McConnellism and the Gospel of Wealth is pretty hard to understate. Trump might be too much of a preening moron to tap into this political potential of further underlying how united the two parties have become on our essentially pro-oligarchic socioeconomic outlook, but that doesn't mean the next right-wing insurgency figure has to be.

    And on top of the impact on our nation, it’s not even smart politics: rather than creating a new, alternate network of startup founders to breakup monopolies in Silicon Valley that push much of the nonsense we see on open borders and anti-nationalism, he’s giving tax cuts to Zuckerberg, who might even freaking run for the Democrats some day.

    A right-wing movement with the common sense to advocate finding ways to make the market work for ordinary Americans (how can we make angel investment into a “regular middle class thing to do” in the 21st Century?), as opposed to stupidly fetishizing it and treating it like religious dogma at the expense of basic common sense, can do a lot. Of course, they’d also throw the neocons overboard in favor of old-school realism, too, but that’s another story.

    Read More
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  6. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Trump won’t stop hyping it! Another crazy own-goal tweet today.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/949498795074736129

    So maybe a single day of rage gives the book an extra push. But it looks like Trump is pumping this thing for the foreseeable future!

    “Michael Wolff is a total loser who made up stories in order to sell this really boring and untruthful book.”

    Come on! This is not sharp Trump! Is it Ivanka? This sentence is such a dumb backfire that I have to assume it’s the daughter (revenge for being called dumb in the book).

    Read More
    • Troll: IHTG
    • Replies: @Anon

    Come on! This is not sharp Trump!
     
    If you believe that Trump goes to bed at 6.30pm to eat cheeseburgers and watch TV on three screens, well, you're retarded sir.
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  7. International solidarity and economic needs combined are the rationalisation for the Social Democrats and the Christian Democrats as well, to keep the borders open. The will not to regulate the immigration, but rather tolerate and/or heartfully welcome whoever wants to come in, makes all other thoughts and actions unnecessary.

    In the German radical left, there’s still the thought prevalent, that everybody on earth is entiteld to go wherever he or she or – you know- whatever they are: That everybody is free to go wherever they want to go.
    At the Goethe (sigh) University in Frankfurt/Main is an elite project at work, to secure the juridical foundations to keep the borders as open as possible.

    The tensions in society are being noticed – and countered by a) state-supervised censoring measures concerning the media and by b) seductive talk (in the media, too, who collaborate) which neglects by and large all experiences of mankind with societal tensions and lots of scientific knowledge about these things (cf. Koopmans, Collier, R. Putnam, Hans-Werner Sinn, Bernd Raffelhüschen, Bernhard Schlink, Necla Kelek, Thilo Sarrazin etc. pp.).

    If the Social/Christian -Democrats coalition would work as the NYT assumes, this coalition will act like the optimist who allows the passengers in a plane on it’s way to a fatal crash, to losen their seat belts: Just relax – and take it easy, everybody.

    Ah – Porsche has a special program running for young – ehem – refugees. Problem was: None of those who applied was able to qualify. Not even one.

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    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome


    everybody is free to go wherever they want to go

     

    Literally any country on Earth, no exceptions?
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  8. Oregon is about the size of Germany. Oregon has a population of approximately 4 million, so in 15 years the Social Democrats are intent on importing into their already quite crowded country numbers equal to that of a state that is similar in size. Nobody ever says that Oregon is an underpopulated wasteland. I think that the people of Oregon are quite comfortable with the size of their population as it is.

    Keep it up, in a few decades Germans will have legitimate cause to talk about Lebensraum. We know where that talk got us the last time.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Oregon population is concentrated west of the mountains, chiefly in the Willamette Valley and around Medford. Most of eastern Oregon is federal land, either Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management, and is either forest or high desert and lacking in water sources. Much of the eastern area is best seen in a rear view mirror, not fit for much population growth.
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  9. @anony-mouse
    https://www.politico.eu/article/german-conservatives-propose-deporting-anti-semitic-migrants/

    I think they're doing this just to drive Unz.com crazy.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance

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  10. Wikipedia says that Social Democrats have been in decline for some time. Basically when Tony Blair and others redefined themselves as ‘Third Way’. Third Way stressed social justice over socialism. So there was a clean break.

    When he was a British Labour Party MP, Third Way supporter and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair wrote in a Fabian pamphlet in 1994 about the existence of two prominent variants of socialism: one is based on a Marxist economic determinist and collectivist tradition that he rejected and the other is an “ethical socialism” that he supported which was based on values of “social justice, the equal worth of each citizen, equality of opportunity, community”.[129]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_democracy#Third_Way_(1990s%E2%80%932010s)

    Read More
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    Blair forgot to mention that "Invade The World, Invite The World" was an integral part of this vision.
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  11. After all, “Social Democracy” has always stood for Open Borders and Lower Wages. Social Democrats have always stood in solidarity, arm-in-arm, with Global Capital.

    All the centre-left parties in Europe have seen their politicians change from being of working class backgrounds to people whose parents or even grandparents had working class backgrounds. This with near total university education for anyone involved in politics led to the shift from class politics to humanities-educated middle-class concerns about identity politics. People forget that Jeremy Corbyn was of the old left and clearly lukewarm on the result of Brexit, with him being criticised for his indifferent campaigning for a no vote. Most of the opposition to the UK joining in the 70s was from trade unions concerned with foreign labour competition. The explosion of immigrants after the 2004 enlargement was their vindication.

    By the time the Soviet Union fell and the triumph of neo-liberalism, post-modern was ready, appealing to a schoolmarmish politics of ‘empathy’, (Read, being too middle-class to see low wage immigrants as a threat but as socio-economic inferiors to be protected) turning into the pathological altruism we see which sees it’s proper manifestation in politics by harming ones own people at the expense of outgroups. The total ease with which they all now speak with corporate propaganda and buzzwords acting to scare off anyone with dignity in trying in political parties.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dieter Kief
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Actually, most of the opposition to the UK's EU Accession, back in 1973, was purely on constitutional grounds - the ancient dogma of Westminster supremacy.
    Thus, such strange bedfellows as Tony Benn, Michael Foot and Enoch Powell sat on the same table.
    The British left objected to the then EEC because they saw it as a 'capitalist's club' - favouring capital over labour with laws that could not be altered by Westminster.
    , @Logan
    pathological altruism we see which sees it’s proper manifestation in politics by harming ones own people at the expense of outgroups.

    Ahh, but these types don't see members of their racial/ethnic groups as "their people." In a very real sense "their people" are the other members of the global elite from whatever ethnicity.
    , @Beckow

    pathological altruism we see which sees it’s proper manifestation in politics by harming ones own people at the expense of outgroups. The total ease with which they all now speak with corporate propaganda and buzzwords
     
    One domestic group that is not harmed are the employers and the so called 'enterpreneurs'. (The enterpreneurs went by a few different terms in the past, but let's not go there today.)

    There is no question that the 'social democrats' know this. They get paid and rewarded to know it. One can see it as a standard technique that is always used to disable any opposition: infiltrate over time your own people into it, and then turn it into your own surveillance and political tool. People with money have always had this method available to them - people want money above all, even 'working class' people, so buying them is relatively easy. So they are using it.

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  12. @anony-mouse
    https://www.politico.eu/article/german-conservatives-propose-deporting-anti-semitic-migrants/

    I think they're doing this just to drive Unz.com crazy.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance

    Presumably, however, German politicians are united in their tolerance (if not preference) for migrants with anti-Germanic views.

    Read More
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  13. @anony-mouse
    https://www.politico.eu/article/german-conservatives-propose-deporting-anti-semitic-migrants/

    I think they're doing this just to drive Unz.com crazy.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance

    I think that Germany has done sufficient penance for its sins during WWII, and now that the jihadis have fulfilled their purpose, they can go home and torture each other, per tradition.

    Read More
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  14. @anony-mouse
    https://www.politico.eu/article/german-conservatives-propose-deporting-anti-semitic-migrants/

    I think they're doing this just to drive Unz.com crazy.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance

    Deporting everyone except the Jews from Germany is certainly a bold strategy.

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  15. I enjoy Germany tremendously and can speak the language, but I’ve necer entertained the idea of living there. They’re a strange, gruff, persnickety bunch who often act very strangely. There are lots of unemployed people in other EU countries but these people don’t find the prospect of life in Hermany appealing. What makes these Germans think that Syrians or whoever will flourish there. They’re going to drop out, not assimilate and cause trouble.

    Read More
    • Replies: @megabar
    Germans presumably are no different than any other Western nation w.r.t. believing that all peoples of the Earth are fundamentally the same in ability. If that were true, it'd be quite rational to think that the immigrants will assimilate.

    The fundamental problem is that the Western elite truly believe that there are no differences in IQ between the races. There is currently no reason to believe that this will change any time soon.
    , @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    One sees much, much, much projecting on sites like this about attributes of Germans and Germany. Like you I like the place and find much to admire but wouldn't want to live out my days there. Various semi-rhetorical questions come to mind:

    How many altrighters entirely collude German people and culture with Scandinavian people and culture?
    Why is Germany a market economy when a writer needs to talk about its dynamism and a socialist object lesson when a writer needs to talk about moribund European economies?
    Why doesn't the American left do more to trump up (no pun intended) the example of Germany, let alone model policy after it?
    Why not more clamoring, on both sides, for American immigration to Germany? Wouldn't that be 2 birds 1 stone? If not, why?
    Why doesn't just one altrighter, just one, shut up and stop worrying about his "whiteness" and burn the same calories instead improving his own lot in life by dipping into copious online resources and, say, learn to speak German?
    How many people here know how much current German economic success has to do with holding down wages in the 1980s and 90s, a seat for organized labor on corporate boards since WWII, excellent public (egads, "socialist") healthcare, education and commensurate high taxes, alongside a high savings rate and a public that has, at least until recently, been hellbent against debt?

    Americans look at Germany and can't clear their ideological filters to realize they need to get humble and learn what's really there. German labor and debt laws are too ambitious for our left and its public programs and their role in market success is a repudiation of neoliberal /conservative economic dogma.
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  16. This population calculator doesn’t seem to work:

    http://ilkkah.com/population-calculator/

    https://github.com/ile/population-calculator

    But a working online calculator for computing and attractively graphing population trends could be a nice piece of linkbait for Unz.com.

    For instance, what does 200,000 migrants per year actually mean 30 years down the line?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon

    For instance, what does 200,000 migrants per year actually mean 30 years down the line?
     
    Ask the Australians @ 245,000 a year. Sydney and Melbourne are now Pajeet and Wong central. Where do the heritage European Aussies go?
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  17. @anony-mouse
    https://www.politico.eu/article/german-conservatives-propose-deporting-anti-semitic-migrants/

    I think they're doing this just to drive Unz.com crazy.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance

    This is good, the west can now reject “refugees” from muslim countries on the basis they’re anti-Semitic. This should be enshrined in immigration policy.

    Read More
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  18. @Horseball
    I enjoy Germany tremendously and can speak the language, but I've necer entertained the idea of living there. They're a strange, gruff, persnickety bunch who often act very strangely. There are lots of unemployed people in other EU countries but these people don't find the prospect of life in Hermany appealing. What makes these Germans think that Syrians or whoever will flourish there. They're going to drop out, not assimilate and cause trouble.

    Germans presumably are no different than any other Western nation w.r.t. believing that all peoples of the Earth are fundamentally the same in ability. If that were true, it’d be quite rational to think that the immigrants will assimilate.

    The fundamental problem is that the Western elite truly believe that there are no differences in IQ between the races. There is currently no reason to believe that this will change any time soon.

    Read More
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  19. @German_reader

    Ms. Merkel and the Bavarians are holding to a limit of 200,000 applications,
     
    It's news to me that Merkel has accepted this demand by the CSU, her position has always been that there can't be an upper limit on asylum seekers. And the demand by the CSU isn't to be taken seriously anyway, it's merely the usual "good cop, bad cop" routine to keep at least a few right-wing voters voting for CDU/CSU (200 000 "refugees" a year is still national suicide anyway, only a bit slower).
    One issue of contention though is "family reunification" for "refugees" that have been denied asylum in the narrow sense, but can stay in Germany under subsidiary protection (iirc that is because of general insecurity in their countries of origin or something of the sort). It has been suspended until March 2018, and the SPD demands that after that date they'll be allowed to bring their relatives to Germany.
    Anyway, both Social and Christian Democrats can go to hell as far as I'm concerned.

    Can the CSU insist? Do they alway just follow Merkel?

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    • Replies: @German_reader
    The CSU is a fraud, they make some noise, but in the end they'll go along with everything, their "conservative" profile is totally fake and limited to handing out benefits to pensioners and the like, they're useless on the issues that matter. After the coalition talks with the liberal FDP and the Greens had failed, Seehofer's (the CSU leader) first reaction was blaming the FDP and more or less saying how well he and other Christian Democrats had gotten on with the Greens...given that the Greens are total mass immigration fanatics, that tells you everything. Christian democracy in Germany is utterly irredeemable imo, it needs to die as a political force.
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  20. What would make this really fun would be if Germany consulted Israel on wall-building.

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    I bring this idea up at times in German debates. Usual reaction: A strange silence.
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  21. @jimmyriddle
    Can the CSU insist? Do they alway just follow Merkel?

    The CSU is a fraud, they make some noise, but in the end they’ll go along with everything, their “conservative” profile is totally fake and limited to handing out benefits to pensioners and the like, they’re useless on the issues that matter. After the coalition talks with the liberal FDP and the Greens had failed, Seehofer’s (the CSU leader) first reaction was blaming the FDP and more or less saying how well he and other Christian Democrats had gotten on with the Greens…given that the Greens are total mass immigration fanatics, that tells you everything. Christian democracy in Germany is utterly irredeemable imo, it needs to die as a political force.

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    • Agree: eah
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  22. What are the latest stats on what percentage of invaders erm I mean migrants to Germany are productively employed?

    I recall last year the number was just a few percent. And most of those were in gubment makework jobs, not machinists or engineers. The rest are living off generous German welfare.

    Yet, German politicians maintain they need more migrants to “help the economy.” Um, yeah.

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    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    If Germany really needs more workers, there is no shortage of unemployed youth in the Mediterranean countries. They also have the option of Ukranians, Belarusians and (gasp) Russians.

    And...maybe they could abolish feminism and restore a fertility rate of 3+
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  23. @Daniel H
    Oregon is about the size of Germany. Oregon has a population of approximately 4 million, so in 15 years the Social Democrats are intent on importing into their already quite crowded country numbers equal to that of a state that is similar in size. Nobody ever says that Oregon is an underpopulated wasteland. I think that the people of Oregon are quite comfortable with the size of their population as it is.

    Keep it up, in a few decades Germans will have legitimate cause to talk about Lebensraum. We know where that talk got us the last time.

    Oregon population is concentrated west of the mountains, chiefly in the Willamette Valley and around Medford. Most of eastern Oregon is federal land, either Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management, and is either forest or high desert and lacking in water sources. Much of the eastern area is best seen in a rear view mirror, not fit for much population growth.

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  24. After all, “Social Democracy” has always stood for Open Borders and Lower Wages.

    Well, they’re supposed to represent the poor. So stocking the labor pool with even more poor, like so much trout, is to their advantage.

    But not to the common people’s. That’s why they almost invariably turn to the right. Blood and soil are all they have!

    Social Democrats have always stood in solidarity, arm-in-arm, with Global Capital.

    The Birchers were saying that when you were in kneepants.

    (Oh, wait… Californians spend their entire lives in kneepants. Scratch that metaphor.)

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    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    No, there's still a few remnants of the old Birchers lingering here in CA.
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  25. I’d love to work in Germany. Repatriate German-Americans!

    Read More
    • Replies: @eah
    I’d love to work in Germany.

    Why?
    , @The Alarmist
    If you don't mind the paycut, the way of life is ... or at least the chocolates, cheeses, and beers are better
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  26. @Horseball
    I enjoy Germany tremendously and can speak the language, but I've necer entertained the idea of living there. They're a strange, gruff, persnickety bunch who often act very strangely. There are lots of unemployed people in other EU countries but these people don't find the prospect of life in Hermany appealing. What makes these Germans think that Syrians or whoever will flourish there. They're going to drop out, not assimilate and cause trouble.

    One sees much, much, much projecting on sites like this about attributes of Germans and Germany. Like you I like the place and find much to admire but wouldn’t want to live out my days there. Various semi-rhetorical questions come to mind:

    How many altrighters entirely collude German people and culture with Scandinavian people and culture?
    Why is Germany a market economy when a writer needs to talk about its dynamism and a socialist object lesson when a writer needs to talk about moribund European economies?
    Why doesn’t the American left do more to trump up (no pun intended) the example of Germany, let alone model policy after it?
    Why not more clamoring, on both sides, for American immigration to Germany? Wouldn’t that be 2 birds 1 stone? If not, why?
    Why doesn’t just one altrighter, just one, shut up and stop worrying about his “whiteness” and burn the same calories instead improving his own lot in life by dipping into copious online resources and, say, learn to speak German?
    How many people here know how much current German economic success has to do with holding down wages in the 1980s and 90s, a seat for organized labor on corporate boards since WWII, excellent public (egads, “socialist”) healthcare, education and commensurate high taxes, alongside a high savings rate and a public that has, at least until recently, been hellbent against debt?

    Americans look at Germany and can’t clear their ideological filters to realize they need to get humble and learn what’s really there. German labor and debt laws are too ambitious for our left and its public programs and their role in market success is a repudiation of neoliberal /conservative economic dogma.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Why doesn’t the American left do more to trump up (no pun intended) the example of Germany, let alone model policy after it?

    Chicago labor lawyer Thomas Geohagen's "Were You Born on the Wrong Continent?" has a lot on Germany. Here's my review:

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/the-new-synthesis-and-our-posterity

    Germany has different labor laws than the U.S. and it seems to make for better automobile companies. But it's a real technical issue and I don't pretend to understand why Germany>US>pre-Thatcher Britain.

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  27. Read More
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  28. OT

    Kandel is where the 15 y/o girl was brutally stabbed to death in a drug store with a long kitchen knife by an Afghan asylum seeker — afterward the mayor almost immediately made a ‘frontlashy’ statement.

    My respect for the courageous woman! She stands again at the door of the windy mayor in #Kandel! On her sign: “A mayor is more concerned about alleged xenophobia than about our children being slaughtered by strangers.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @eah
    A decently sized 1 BR apartment would be 40qm -- 4 minderjährig (!) asylum seekers, including the one who killed the girl (who claims to be 15 y/o), lived in a nice single family home with 190qm.

    Here the Afghan resided on 190 square meters (with three other unaccompanied youth refugees) in #Kandel, who killed the 15-year-old German girl with several stab wounds. Sponsored by the stupid German taxpayer.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DS2-AlcWsAAj44N.jpg

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DS2-CWKXUAAUhzU.jpg
    , @stillCARealist
    I love those German verbs. There always seems to be a lone "werden" hanging out on the end of sentences.

    To the person who said they'd like to live and work in Germany, I say viel Gluck. All the Germans I've met over the years honestly look down on Americans.
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  29. @eah
    OT

    Kandel is where the 15 y/o girl was brutally stabbed to death in a drug store with a long kitchen knife by an Afghan asylum seeker -- afterward the mayor almost immediately made a 'frontlashy' statement.

    My respect for the courageous woman! She stands again at the door of the windy mayor in #Kandel! On her sign: "A mayor is more concerned about alleged xenophobia than about our children being slaughtered by strangers."

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DS2uui-VoAAPL1o.jpg

    A decently sized 1 BR apartment would be 40qm — 4 minderjährig (!) asylum seekers, including the one who killed the girl (who claims to be 15 y/o), lived in a nice single family home with 190qm.

    Here the Afghan resided on 190 square meters (with three other unaccompanied youth refugees) in #Kandel, who killed the 15-year-old German girl with several stab wounds. Sponsored by the stupid German taxpayer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bossel
    "A decently sized 1 BR apartment would be 40qm — 4 minderjährig (!) asylum seekers [...]lived in a nice single family home with 190qm."

    Wow! 47,5 instead of 40sqm! That's insaaaaane! The luxury! The excess!
    & btw, the house is not the one they actually lived in. It's a stock picture.


    47.5 is more than necessary, but they were in the care of some kind of public charity for youths. & I doubt that they built or bought the house with migrants in mind.
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  30. @Antlitz Grollheim
    I'd love to work in Germany. Repatriate German-Americans!

    I’d love to work in Germany.

    Why?

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  31. @Moses
    What are the latest stats on what percentage of invaders erm I mean migrants to Germany are productively employed?

    I recall last year the number was just a few percent. And most of those were in gubment makework jobs, not machinists or engineers. The rest are living off generous German welfare.

    Yet, German politicians maintain they need more migrants to "help the economy." Um, yeah.

    If Germany really needs more workers, there is no shortage of unemployed youth in the Mediterranean countries. They also have the option of Ukranians, Belarusians and (gasp) Russians.

    And…maybe they could abolish feminism and restore a fertility rate of 3+

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  32. @Barnard

    The official in charge of Germany’s national labor agency has said the country will need 300,000 qualified immigrants annually to fill the gaps, because record employment has made it difficult to find enough workers.
     
    What proof do they have that the German economy is adding 300,000 jobs a year and what qualifications do the migrants have to fill these jobs? These are questions that don't need to be asked because Diversity is our Strength!

    Yeah, walk around Frankfurt Airport, and see how many actual German workers you can find. Take note of the quality of work and service you get from the imported workers.

    Germans, like so many others in the West, are kidding themselves. If they are lucky, the foreigners they import to clean their bedpans and change their adult diapers will merely smother them in their sleep in the nursing home, rather than torturing them and mocking them, all the while taking selfies for their homies, as has been recently been seen in the UK.

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  33. @Antlitz Grollheim
    I'd love to work in Germany. Repatriate German-Americans!

    If you don’t mind the paycut, the way of life is … or at least the chocolates, cheeses, and beers are better

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  34. @German_reader

    Ms. Merkel and the Bavarians are holding to a limit of 200,000 applications,
     
    It's news to me that Merkel has accepted this demand by the CSU, her position has always been that there can't be an upper limit on asylum seekers. And the demand by the CSU isn't to be taken seriously anyway, it's merely the usual "good cop, bad cop" routine to keep at least a few right-wing voters voting for CDU/CSU (200 000 "refugees" a year is still national suicide anyway, only a bit slower).
    One issue of contention though is "family reunification" for "refugees" that have been denied asylum in the narrow sense, but can stay in Germany under subsidiary protection (iirc that is because of general insecurity in their countries of origin or something of the sort). It has been suspended until March 2018, and the SPD demands that after that date they'll be allowed to bring their relatives to Germany.
    Anyway, both Social and Christian Democrats can go to hell as far as I'm concerned.

    I always value your comments, especially on Germany. What do you make of the estimate by the German Labor Minister that Germany “needs” 300,000 “qualified” immigrants a year to fill gaps in the labor market. I readily admit that I am no expert on the German economy but, in light of robotization, automation and computerization, my first reaction is that they must have made LSD legal for members of the German cabinet. Is there any truth whatsoever to the view that Germany has a labor shortage?

    I also recall that very few of the “migrants” that have arrived have any useful skills and that unemployment remains very high.

    What’s your opinion?

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    My fifty cent: I usually hint at Japan and New Zealand.
    , @Anonymous
    Eastern and central Europe, never mind southern Europe, could fill those vacancies with ease. As the EU is a 'free labour movement area', this should happen as a matter of course.

    Don't believe those damned rationalizing lies.
    , @German_reader

    Is there any truth whatsoever to the view that Germany has a labor shortage?
     
    They always claim that, but I'm unconvinced. Admittedly my opinion on economics may not be worth much, but there's significant emigration of skilled Germans to other countries, and Germany doesn't seem that attractive for all the young unemployed in southern Europe either. Frankly, it's not that great here, with high taxes, wages that have pretty much stagnated for decades, and a political and cultural atmosphere that is just suffocating. If they really cared about keeping/attracting skilled labor, wouldn't it make more sense to try changing that?
    Anyway, how likely do you think it is Syrians, Afghans and Somalis will provide the skilled workers Germany needs? Excessively unlikely I'd say. Instead you'll get many of them permanently on welfare (there already are hundreds of thousands of them receiving just the same welfare benefits as natives), engaged in petty and not so petty crime, or at best in low-skilled labor. It will be a giant burden on Germany and eat up all the resources that could otherwise be used for dealing with the demographic problems Germany faces. It's pure madness.
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  35. @Anonymous
    OT: Trump won't stop hyping it! Another crazy own-goal tweet today.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/949498795074736129

    So maybe a single day of rage gives the book an extra push. But it looks like Trump is pumping this thing for the foreseeable future!

    "Michael Wolff is a total loser who made up stories in order to sell this really boring and untruthful book."

    Come on! This is not sharp Trump! Is it Ivanka? This sentence is such a dumb backfire that I have to assume it's the daughter (revenge for being called dumb in the book).

    Come on! This is not sharp Trump!

    If you believe that Trump goes to bed at 6.30pm to eat cheeseburgers and watch TV on three screens, well, you’re retarded sir.

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  36. @Stephen Marle II
    This population calculator doesn't seem to work:

    http://ilkkah.com/population-calculator/

    https://github.com/ile/population-calculator

    But a working online calculator for computing and attractively graphing population trends could be a nice piece of linkbait for Unz.com.

    For instance, what does 200,000 migrants per year actually mean 30 years down the line?

    For instance, what does 200,000 migrants per year actually mean 30 years down the line?

    Ask the Australians @ 245,000 a year. Sydney and Melbourne are now Pajeet and Wong central. Where do the heritage European Aussies go?

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  37. @Rosamond Vincy
    What would make this really fun would be if Germany consulted Israel on wall-building.

    I bring this idea up at times in German debates. Usual reaction: A strange silence.

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    The enemy of my enemy is my friend.
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  38. @Diversity Heretic
    I always value your comments, especially on Germany. What do you make of the estimate by the German Labor Minister that Germany "needs" 300,000 "qualified" immigrants a year to fill gaps in the labor market. I readily admit that I am no expert on the German economy but, in light of robotization, automation and computerization, my first reaction is that they must have made LSD legal for members of the German cabinet. Is there any truth whatsoever to the view that Germany has a labor shortage?

    I also recall that very few of the "migrants" that have arrived have any useful skills and that unemployment remains very high.

    What's your opinion?

    My fifty cent: I usually hint at Japan and New Zealand.

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  39. @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    One sees much, much, much projecting on sites like this about attributes of Germans and Germany. Like you I like the place and find much to admire but wouldn't want to live out my days there. Various semi-rhetorical questions come to mind:

    How many altrighters entirely collude German people and culture with Scandinavian people and culture?
    Why is Germany a market economy when a writer needs to talk about its dynamism and a socialist object lesson when a writer needs to talk about moribund European economies?
    Why doesn't the American left do more to trump up (no pun intended) the example of Germany, let alone model policy after it?
    Why not more clamoring, on both sides, for American immigration to Germany? Wouldn't that be 2 birds 1 stone? If not, why?
    Why doesn't just one altrighter, just one, shut up and stop worrying about his "whiteness" and burn the same calories instead improving his own lot in life by dipping into copious online resources and, say, learn to speak German?
    How many people here know how much current German economic success has to do with holding down wages in the 1980s and 90s, a seat for organized labor on corporate boards since WWII, excellent public (egads, "socialist") healthcare, education and commensurate high taxes, alongside a high savings rate and a public that has, at least until recently, been hellbent against debt?

    Americans look at Germany and can't clear their ideological filters to realize they need to get humble and learn what's really there. German labor and debt laws are too ambitious for our left and its public programs and their role in market success is a repudiation of neoliberal /conservative economic dogma.

    Why doesn’t the American left do more to trump up (no pun intended) the example of Germany, let alone model policy after it?

    Chicago labor lawyer Thomas Geohagen’s “Were You Born on the Wrong Continent?” has a lot on Germany. Here’s my review:

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/the-new-synthesis-and-our-posterity

    Germany has different labor laws than the U.S. and it seems to make for better automobile companies. But it’s a real technical issue and I don’t pretend to understand why Germany>US>pre-Thatcher Britain.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    German products tend to be well made but overpriced and difficult/expensive to service.

    Certainly, the German car is not as reliable as a Japanese made Honda or Toyota any more. It does have a better road feel and feeling of tightness, but as a transportation device it doesn't work quite as well. German electronics in particular are troublesome.

    It is routine in the US for BMWs and Mercedes to be driven to the junkyard under their own power, their mechanicals still basically ok but with numerous systems issues which cost more to fix than the car is worth. The Japanese car is hauled off dead having given its all and crushed, having gone 3-600k as opposed to the German car's 150k.

    This means if you are a good scrounger a BMW or Benz makes a great LeMons car.
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  40. I thought the Million Men March to Germany was required to fill these very jobs. Or they are expected to remain on welfare and we need more migrants to work in order to provide more taxes?

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  41. Of course, the rational and logical choice for Germany is for the CDU to ditch Merkel and form a coalition government with the AfD and CSU.

    The eminently logical, rational and democratic choice for Germany – so, of course, it won’t happen.

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    • Replies: @rogue-one
    The elites will prefer destruction of Europe to making a deal with AfD. It is not political, it's religion.s AfD agenda is a direct attack on the "multi-cultural, white-guilt" values of the elites (and a large portion of German population.)

    AfD will stand and die alone.

    , @Maj. Kong
    The CDU/CSU can't form a majority coalition with the AfD, they would also need the FDP.

    The likeliest scenario for the AfD to ever influence policy is to support a minority government, in the way that the Dansk Folkpartiet does in Denmark. The AfD has internal squabbling, and faces the unlimited wrath of the media and deep state.

    West Germany doesn't like minority governments, as a result of unstable Weimar coalitions (for some reason, Weimar degneracy doesn't attract the same opposition). The only minority governments have formed in East German lander.

    As long as Merkel is party leader, the AfD is not going to be joining a coalition. The SPD is a much liklier future coalition partner. SPD parties in the East have formed coalitions with Die Linke. If the SPD joins another grand coalition, the party faces a drop in support if not an outright collapse. A Sarrazin style leader might then emerge.

    Bavaria is holding elections this year, if the AfD gets above 15% of the vote, the CSU might be forced to go into coalition with them. That would be an earthquake. I can't imagine the CSU ever agreeing to a coalition with the SPD, they haven't been together since the immidiate postwar era. (German readers can indicate where I am wrong)
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  42. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Whilst on the subject, yes it is ludicrous for a ‘workers’ party such as the SPD to undermine labor by flooding Germany with cut-price labour – that is if the fraudsters will actually work.

    But surely, it’s even more ludicrous for a political party which calls itself the *CHRISTIAN* Democratic Party to flood Germany with Muslims?

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  43. @Diversity Heretic
    I always value your comments, especially on Germany. What do you make of the estimate by the German Labor Minister that Germany "needs" 300,000 "qualified" immigrants a year to fill gaps in the labor market. I readily admit that I am no expert on the German economy but, in light of robotization, automation and computerization, my first reaction is that they must have made LSD legal for members of the German cabinet. Is there any truth whatsoever to the view that Germany has a labor shortage?

    I also recall that very few of the "migrants" that have arrived have any useful skills and that unemployment remains very high.

    What's your opinion?

    Eastern and central Europe, never mind southern Europe, could fill those vacancies with ease. As the EU is a ‘free labour movement area’, this should happen as a matter of course.

    Don’t believe those damned rationalizing lies.

    Read More
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  44. @Anonymous
    Of course, the rational and logical choice for Germany is for the CDU to ditch Merkel and form a coalition government with the AfD and CSU.

    The eminently logical, rational and democratic choice for Germany - so, of course, it won't happen.

    The elites will prefer destruction of Europe to making a deal with AfD. It is not political, it’s religion.s AfD agenda is a direct attack on the “multi-cultural, white-guilt” values of the elites (and a large portion of German population.)

    AfD will stand and die alone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    the “multi-cultural, white-guilt” values of the elites (and a large portion of German population.)
     
    It's not guilt and they're not elite. They're the usual master class that one sees most often in history. The large portion of the population goes along the get along.
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  45. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The truly odious Martin Schulz has demanded the ‘price’ of a German commitment to a filly federal ‘United States of Europe’ superstate, by 2025, as the cost of SPD support for a CDU coalition.

    Well, at least you can’t accuse Schulz of dishonesty. He conveniently proved that everything Nigel Farage said about the EU is true – right in the middle of the incessant moan-fest from the ‘remain’ EU-enthusiast fanatics in the UK.

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  46. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Altai

    After all, “Social Democracy” has always stood for Open Borders and Lower Wages. Social Democrats have always stood in solidarity, arm-in-arm, with Global Capital.
     
    All the centre-left parties in Europe have seen their politicians change from being of working class backgrounds to people whose parents or even grandparents had working class backgrounds. This with near total university education for anyone involved in politics led to the shift from class politics to humanities-educated middle-class concerns about identity politics. People forget that Jeremy Corbyn was of the old left and clearly lukewarm on the result of Brexit, with him being criticised for his indifferent campaigning for a no vote. Most of the opposition to the UK joining in the 70s was from trade unions concerned with foreign labour competition. The explosion of immigrants after the 2004 enlargement was their vindication.

    By the time the Soviet Union fell and the triumph of neo-liberalism, post-modern was ready, appealing to a schoolmarmish politics of 'empathy', (Read, being too middle-class to see low wage immigrants as a threat but as socio-economic inferiors to be protected) turning into the pathological altruism we see which sees it's proper manifestation in politics by harming ones own people at the expense of outgroups. The total ease with which they all now speak with corporate propaganda and buzzwords acting to scare off anyone with dignity in trying in political parties.

    Actually, most of the opposition to the UK’s EU Accession, back in 1973, was purely on constitutional grounds – the ancient dogma of Westminster supremacy.
    Thus, such strange bedfellows as Tony Benn, Michael Foot and Enoch Powell sat on the same table.
    The British left objected to the then EEC because they saw it as a ‘capitalist’s club’ – favouring capital over labour with laws that could not be altered by Westminster.

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    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    "The British left objected to the then EEC because they saw it as a ‘capitalist’s club’ – favouring capital over labour with laws that could not be altered by Westminster."


    And they were 100% correct. But when Blair's "New Labour" took over, the Labour Party shook off any pretence of being anything other than a capitalist party.
    , @Anonymous
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYBskAcSopU#t=43m9s
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  47. @Anonymous
    Of course, the rational and logical choice for Germany is for the CDU to ditch Merkel and form a coalition government with the AfD and CSU.

    The eminently logical, rational and democratic choice for Germany - so, of course, it won't happen.

    The CDU/CSU can’t form a majority coalition with the AfD, they would also need the FDP.

    The likeliest scenario for the AfD to ever influence policy is to support a minority government, in the way that the Dansk Folkpartiet does in Denmark. The AfD has internal squabbling, and faces the unlimited wrath of the media and deep state.

    West Germany doesn’t like minority governments, as a result of unstable Weimar coalitions (for some reason, Weimar degneracy doesn’t attract the same opposition). The only minority governments have formed in East German lander.

    As long as Merkel is party leader, the AfD is not going to be joining a coalition. The SPD is a much liklier future coalition partner. SPD parties in the East have formed coalitions with Die Linke. If the SPD joins another grand coalition, the party faces a drop in support if not an outright collapse. A Sarrazin style leader might then emerge.

    Bavaria is holding elections this year, if the AfD gets above 15% of the vote, the CSU might be forced to go into coalition with them. That would be an earthquake. I can’t imagine the CSU ever agreeing to a coalition with the SPD, they haven’t been together since the immidiate postwar era. (German readers can indicate where I am wrong)

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    • Replies: @jeppo
    Good comment.

    The obvious solution, to me anyway, would be for the Union to dump Merkel* as leader for, say, CSU chief Horst Seehofer (or anyone else really), then form a minority government with the FDP.

    That would give them 326 seats in the 709 seat Bundestag, enough for them to align themselves with any one of the other 4 parties on a case-by-case basis.

    And, one would think, a post-Merkel CDU/CSU-FDP government would be ideologically much more inclined to cooperate with the AfD than with any of the other 3 leftist parties. One can dream...

    *Even the establishment stooges at Deutsche Welle now want to see Merkel gone. Why the supposedly "conservative" backbenchers in the Union still put up with her is beyond me.

    http://www.dw.com/en/opinion-the-era-of-angela-merkel-is-coming-to-an-end/a-42045351
    , @Nico
    The CSU and SPD will almost certainly form a Grand Coalition this time, but it’s anyone’s guess as to how long the coalition lasts. If the SPD holds fast until the next prescribed election date, the party is not likely to survive: the energies of the left will be split, with the hard-left elements being absorbed into the more ideological Die Linke and the liberal/modernist/globalist elements probably starting a new centrist party. Indeed, this is exactly what happened in France after the last socialist government demonstrated the inability of the old Workers’ International apparatus to deal even superficially with the issues facing Europe in the 21st century. Stateside, of course, for all the buzz about the 2016 Democratic platform being the “most progressive in history,” there is no question of returning to the pre-1976 regulatory structure, regardless of what happens this fall or in 2020. It is not true, as some claim, that “left/right” no longer matters in politics, but the principal battlefield can no longer be thought of in terms of fiscality qua fiscality.
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  48. @Dieter Kief
    International solidarity and economic needs combined are the rationalisation for the Social Democrats and the Christian Democrats as well, to keep the borders open. The will not to regulate the immigration, but rather tolerate and/or heartfully welcome whoever wants to come in, makes all other thoughts and actions unnecessary.

    In the German radical left, there's still the thought prevalent, that everybody on earth is entiteld to go wherever he or she or - you know- whatever they are: That everybody is free to go wherever they want to go.
    At the Goethe (sigh) University in Frankfurt/Main is an elite project at work, to secure the juridical foundations to keep the borders as open as possible.

    The tensions in society are being noticed - and countered by a) state-supervised censoring measures concerning the media and by b) seductive talk (in the media, too, who collaborate) which neglects by and large all experiences of mankind with societal tensions and lots of scientific knowledge about these things (cf. Koopmans, Collier, R. Putnam, Hans-Werner Sinn, Bernd Raffelhüschen, Bernhard Schlink, Necla Kelek, Thilo Sarrazin etc. pp.).

    If the Social/Christian -Democrats coalition would work as the NYT assumes, this coalition will act like the optimist who allows the passengers in a plane on it's way to a fatal crash, to losen their seat belts: Just relax - and take it easy, everybody.

    Ah - Porsche has a special program running for young - ehem - refugees. Problem was: None of those who applied was able to qualify. Not even one.

    everybody is free to go wherever they want to go

    Literally any country on Earth, no exceptions?

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Everybody is free to go wherever they want to go

    Literally any country on Earth, no exceptions?
     

    That’s what I hear and read in debates, day in day out from people in the Green Party, the Left party from Social and even from Christian Democarts and from Liberals, too, and of course: From the more radical ones. The logic behind their argument is: Neoliberal Capitalism means worldwide injustice and oppression and migration is one of the effective antidotes.

    And that’s what Martin Seel’s expert-group of jurists and philosophers at Frankfurt's Goethe-University claims: Taht it’s a natural right of everybody on earth to move to any country he might want to. Seel proposed this mxime at a public Neue Züricher Zeitung Conference talk in Berlin last year, too.

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  49. I got news for ya’ll.

    All political movements turn out to be at war with the working classes despite the rhetoric and even if they don’t begin that way.

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  50. @rogue-one
    The elites will prefer destruction of Europe to making a deal with AfD. It is not political, it's religion.s AfD agenda is a direct attack on the "multi-cultural, white-guilt" values of the elites (and a large portion of German population.)

    AfD will stand and die alone.

    the “multi-cultural, white-guilt” values of the elites (and a large portion of German population.)

    It’s not guilt and they’re not elite. They’re the usual master class that one sees most often in history. The large portion of the population goes along the get along.

    Read More
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  51. @Dieter Kief
    I bring this idea up at times in German debates. Usual reaction: A strange silence.

    The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    The enemy of my enemy is my friend.
     
    - This could be a tad more complicated. I'm not quite sure, but the logic behind this strange German taboo concerning Irael's border-protection might best be undertsood as follows: What Israel does is not to be compared to what Germany does or wants to do or should do, because Jews were once killed in large number by Germans. Thus: It'd be frivolous to make comparisons between German and Israeli politics. The past changed everything, and thus: If a German doesn't act (or talk, or think) accordingly, he must be a Hitlerite.

    Ok that's No. 1.

    And No. 2 : Lots of East Germans are very shameful, because they were stuck behind a wall. Their conclusion: Walls need to be bad alltogether. And just in case, there'd be one which wouldn't right away qualify as oppressive, you'd still be supposed to act as No. 1 suggests: What Israel does is not to be compared to what Germany does, or wants to do, or should do ..a t .. a l l !

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  52. @George
    Wikipedia says that Social Democrats have been in decline for some time. Basically when Tony Blair and others redefined themselves as 'Third Way'. Third Way stressed social justice over socialism. So there was a clean break.

    When he was a British Labour Party MP, Third Way supporter and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair wrote in a Fabian pamphlet in 1994 about the existence of two prominent variants of socialism: one is based on a Marxist economic determinist and collectivist tradition that he rejected and the other is an "ethical socialism" that he supported which was based on values of "social justice, the equal worth of each citizen, equality of opportunity, community".[129]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_democracy#Third_Way_(1990s%E2%80%932010s)

    Blair forgot to mention that “Invade The World, Invite The World” was an integral part of this vision.

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  53. @Barnard

    The official in charge of Germany’s national labor agency has said the country will need 300,000 qualified immigrants annually to fill the gaps, because record employment has made it difficult to find enough workers.
     
    What proof do they have that the German economy is adding 300,000 jobs a year and what qualifications do the migrants have to fill these jobs? These are questions that don't need to be asked because Diversity is our Strength!

    …because record employment has made it difficult to find enough workers

    IOW, to improve the successful village, we have to burn it.

    In this and other areas, specious economic arguments are pushed to justify dysfunctional policy. We need a Reformation where the worship of GDP is challenged and replaced.

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  54. @Altai

    After all, “Social Democracy” has always stood for Open Borders and Lower Wages. Social Democrats have always stood in solidarity, arm-in-arm, with Global Capital.
     
    All the centre-left parties in Europe have seen their politicians change from being of working class backgrounds to people whose parents or even grandparents had working class backgrounds. This with near total university education for anyone involved in politics led to the shift from class politics to humanities-educated middle-class concerns about identity politics. People forget that Jeremy Corbyn was of the old left and clearly lukewarm on the result of Brexit, with him being criticised for his indifferent campaigning for a no vote. Most of the opposition to the UK joining in the 70s was from trade unions concerned with foreign labour competition. The explosion of immigrants after the 2004 enlargement was their vindication.

    By the time the Soviet Union fell and the triumph of neo-liberalism, post-modern was ready, appealing to a schoolmarmish politics of 'empathy', (Read, being too middle-class to see low wage immigrants as a threat but as socio-economic inferiors to be protected) turning into the pathological altruism we see which sees it's proper manifestation in politics by harming ones own people at the expense of outgroups. The total ease with which they all now speak with corporate propaganda and buzzwords acting to scare off anyone with dignity in trying in political parties.

    pathological altruism we see which sees it’s proper manifestation in politics by harming ones own people at the expense of outgroups.

    Ahh, but these types don’t see members of their racial/ethnic groups as “their people.” In a very real sense “their people” are the other members of the global elite from whatever ethnicity.

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    • Agree: dfordoom
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  55. @Anonymous
    Actually, most of the opposition to the UK's EU Accession, back in 1973, was purely on constitutional grounds - the ancient dogma of Westminster supremacy.
    Thus, such strange bedfellows as Tony Benn, Michael Foot and Enoch Powell sat on the same table.
    The British left objected to the then EEC because they saw it as a 'capitalist's club' - favouring capital over labour with laws that could not be altered by Westminster.

    “The British left objected to the then EEC because they saw it as a ‘capitalist’s club’ – favouring capital over labour with laws that could not be altered by Westminster.”

    And they were 100% correct. But when Blair’s “New Labour” took over, the Labour Party shook off any pretence of being anything other than a capitalist party.

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  56. @Hippopotamusdrome


    everybody is free to go wherever they want to go

     

    Literally any country on Earth, no exceptions?

    Everybody is free to go wherever they want to go

    Literally any country on Earth, no exceptions?

    That’s what I hear and read in debates, day in day out from people in the Green Party, the Left party from Social and even from Christian Democarts and from Liberals, too, and of course: From the more radical ones. The logic behind their argument is: Neoliberal Capitalism means worldwide injustice and oppression and migration is one of the effective antidotes.

    And that’s what Martin Seel’s expert-group of jurists and philosophers at Frankfurt’s Goethe-University claims: Taht it’s a natural right of everybody on earth to move to any country he might want to. Seel proposed this mxime at a public Neue Züricher Zeitung Conference talk in Berlin last year, too.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    And that’s what Martin Seel’s expert-group of jurists and philosophers at Frankfurt’s Goethe-University claims
     
    Schools are evidently not Frankfurt's strong suit.
    , @bomag

    ...it’s a natural right of everybody on earth to move to any country he might want to.
     
    Such absurdity. Is there a shred of reasonableness on that side?

    I imagine that Syrian refugees would want to live in Syria; the Green party should enforce those rights.

    This is one of those "rights" that its advocates should pay for. The Green party can house and support immigrants, and be reimbursed by all the wonderful economic activity they will allegedly generate.

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  57. @Rosamond Vincy
    The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

    The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

    - This could be a tad more complicated. I’m not quite sure, but the logic behind this strange German taboo concerning Irael’s border-protection might best be undertsood as follows: What Israel does is not to be compared to what Germany does or wants to do or should do, because Jews were once killed in large number by Germans. Thus: It’d be frivolous to make comparisons between German and Israeli politics. The past changed everything, and thus: If a German doesn’t act (or talk, or think) accordingly, he must be a Hitlerite.

    Ok that’s No. 1.

    And No. 2 : Lots of East Germans are very shameful, because they were stuck behind a wall. Their conclusion: Walls need to be bad alltogether. And just in case, there’d be one which wouldn’t right away qualify as oppressive, you’d still be supposed to act as No. 1 suggests: What Israel does is not to be compared to what Germany does, or wants to do, or should do ..a t .. a l l !

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    1. That generation is dying off. I do not believe in Ancestral Guilt, except of course Original Sin, which means we're all equally screwed.

    In addition, the Germans are now wise enough to recognize that Jewish businesses add to the economy, while Rapefugees on benefits do not. One hopes Jews outside of the NY media-stocracy recognize that Germans are far less dangerous than Jihadists.
    They do not have to like each other

    2. The Berlin Wall, as you note, kept people IN, specifically in an undesirable government system (Communism). This would keep people OUT of a government system (Western non-Sharia law), in the interest of KEEPING it desirable.

    I am not so tactless that I would put on the gates, instead of the infamous "Arbeit Macht Frei," a sign reading, "Go Get a Job Somewhere Else."
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  58. @Diversity Heretic
    I always value your comments, especially on Germany. What do you make of the estimate by the German Labor Minister that Germany "needs" 300,000 "qualified" immigrants a year to fill gaps in the labor market. I readily admit that I am no expert on the German economy but, in light of robotization, automation and computerization, my first reaction is that they must have made LSD legal for members of the German cabinet. Is there any truth whatsoever to the view that Germany has a labor shortage?

    I also recall that very few of the "migrants" that have arrived have any useful skills and that unemployment remains very high.

    What's your opinion?

    Is there any truth whatsoever to the view that Germany has a labor shortage?

    They always claim that, but I’m unconvinced. Admittedly my opinion on economics may not be worth much, but there’s significant emigration of skilled Germans to other countries, and Germany doesn’t seem that attractive for all the young unemployed in southern Europe either. Frankly, it’s not that great here, with high taxes, wages that have pretty much stagnated for decades, and a political and cultural atmosphere that is just suffocating. If they really cared about keeping/attracting skilled labor, wouldn’t it make more sense to try changing that?
    Anyway, how likely do you think it is Syrians, Afghans and Somalis will provide the skilled workers Germany needs? Excessively unlikely I’d say. Instead you’ll get many of them permanently on welfare (there already are hundreds of thousands of them receiving just the same welfare benefits as natives), engaged in petty and not so petty crime, or at best in low-skilled labor. It will be a giant burden on Germany and eat up all the resources that could otherwise be used for dealing with the demographic problems Germany faces. It’s pure madness.

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    • Replies: @bossel
    "Frankly, it’s not that great here"
    No one keeps you there. Lots of countries don't have as restrictive migration laws as you want to have them in Germany. Free choice...

    "wages that have pretty much stagnated for decades"
    Bleh...
    The growth may not be exorbitant, but that's only expected in an already high income economy.

    https://data.oecd.org/lprdty/labour-compensation-per-hour-worked.htm
    Only 1 year (2006) since 1992 with negative growth, else it's roughly around 2 % per year on average.

    https://data.oecd.org/hha/household-disposable-income.htm
    Similar picture, a bit lower, since 1995 roughly 1% growth per year on average.

    "It will be a giant burden on Germany"
    Actually, at the moment the burden should be highest & it probably gets less over time as some migrants return to their home countries & others will start paying taxes.


    "Admittedly my opinion on economics may not be worth much"
    Agreed.
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  59. @Maj. Kong
    The CDU/CSU can't form a majority coalition with the AfD, they would also need the FDP.

    The likeliest scenario for the AfD to ever influence policy is to support a minority government, in the way that the Dansk Folkpartiet does in Denmark. The AfD has internal squabbling, and faces the unlimited wrath of the media and deep state.

    West Germany doesn't like minority governments, as a result of unstable Weimar coalitions (for some reason, Weimar degneracy doesn't attract the same opposition). The only minority governments have formed in East German lander.

    As long as Merkel is party leader, the AfD is not going to be joining a coalition. The SPD is a much liklier future coalition partner. SPD parties in the East have formed coalitions with Die Linke. If the SPD joins another grand coalition, the party faces a drop in support if not an outright collapse. A Sarrazin style leader might then emerge.

    Bavaria is holding elections this year, if the AfD gets above 15% of the vote, the CSU might be forced to go into coalition with them. That would be an earthquake. I can't imagine the CSU ever agreeing to a coalition with the SPD, they haven't been together since the immidiate postwar era. (German readers can indicate where I am wrong)

    Good comment.

    The obvious solution, to me anyway, would be for the Union to dump Merkel* as leader for, say, CSU chief Horst Seehofer (or anyone else really), then form a minority government with the FDP.

    That would give them 326 seats in the 709 seat Bundestag, enough for them to align themselves with any one of the other 4 parties on a case-by-case basis.

    And, one would think, a post-Merkel CDU/CSU-FDP government would be ideologically much more inclined to cooperate with the AfD than with any of the other 3 leftist parties. One can dream…

    *Even the establishment stooges at Deutsche Welle now want to see Merkel gone. Why the supposedly “conservative” backbenchers in the Union still put up with her is beyond me.

    http://www.dw.com/en/opinion-the-era-of-angela-merkel-is-coming-to-an-end/a-42045351

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  60. @Dieter Kief

    Everybody is free to go wherever they want to go

    Literally any country on Earth, no exceptions?
     

    That’s what I hear and read in debates, day in day out from people in the Green Party, the Left party from Social and even from Christian Democarts and from Liberals, too, and of course: From the more radical ones. The logic behind their argument is: Neoliberal Capitalism means worldwide injustice and oppression and migration is one of the effective antidotes.

    And that’s what Martin Seel’s expert-group of jurists and philosophers at Frankfurt's Goethe-University claims: Taht it’s a natural right of everybody on earth to move to any country he might want to. Seel proposed this mxime at a public Neue Züricher Zeitung Conference talk in Berlin last year, too.

    And that’s what Martin Seel’s expert-group of jurists and philosophers at Frankfurt’s Goethe-University claims

    Schools are evidently not Frankfurt’s strong suit.

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    "Schools are evidently not Frankfurt’s strong suit."

    I've learned a lot from Erich Fromm's work and from Habermas' too (much less from Adorno/Horkheimer). And Seel has written a good book about virtues and a pretty good one about aesthetics and a good one with very consice and precise little essays about recent Philosophy. And yes - Seel is part of the Franfurter Schule. But here, on juridical turf, as the head of this interdisciplinary group of scientists, he just misses out, unfortunately. (He knows how to drive a tractor - and how to use a fork (to work, actually, with a hay-fork and such stuff). Up until a few years ago, I would have thought, he's ok. I still think he's ok, basically. Sigh).

    The systematically most important point comes from the kantian Nürnberg philosopher (who wrote a very readable and highly interesting book called Apology of the Devil) Johan Benjamin Erhard, a contemporary of Goethe. He held, that rights don't sustain themselves - they are a function of societal well-being (=friendliness, faith, productiveness...); rights depend on presuppositions, which they can't grant - and rights should always be applied (and written down) in such a way, that they don't disturb what they are made to protect: A good life.
    Erhard concludes: If the state and the law does not protect the citizen, this citizen is free to rebel against his state - it might even be his duty then. Universal are only the basic defensive rights which secure one's life and dignity. - And this is quite different from granting everybody on earth the right to migrate into any welfare state he chooses, and therefor I state: Seel et. al. are wrong, Johann Benjamin Erhard is right.

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  61. @Dieter Kief

    The enemy of my enemy is my friend.
     
    - This could be a tad more complicated. I'm not quite sure, but the logic behind this strange German taboo concerning Irael's border-protection might best be undertsood as follows: What Israel does is not to be compared to what Germany does or wants to do or should do, because Jews were once killed in large number by Germans. Thus: It'd be frivolous to make comparisons between German and Israeli politics. The past changed everything, and thus: If a German doesn't act (or talk, or think) accordingly, he must be a Hitlerite.

    Ok that's No. 1.

    And No. 2 : Lots of East Germans are very shameful, because they were stuck behind a wall. Their conclusion: Walls need to be bad alltogether. And just in case, there'd be one which wouldn't right away qualify as oppressive, you'd still be supposed to act as No. 1 suggests: What Israel does is not to be compared to what Germany does, or wants to do, or should do ..a t .. a l l !

    1. That generation is dying off. I do not believe in Ancestral Guilt, except of course Original Sin, which means we’re all equally screwed.

    In addition, the Germans are now wise enough to recognize that Jewish businesses add to the economy, while Rapefugees on benefits do not. One hopes Jews outside of the NY media-stocracy recognize that Germans are far less dangerous than Jihadists.
    They do not have to like each other

    2. The Berlin Wall, as you note, kept people IN, specifically in an undesirable government system (Communism). This would keep people OUT of a government system (Western non-Sharia law), in the interest of KEEPING it desirable.

    I am not so tactless that I would put on the gates, instead of the infamous “Arbeit Macht Frei,” a sign reading, “Go Get a Job Somewhere Else.”

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    “Go Get a Job Somewhere Else.”
     
    As I woke up last friday morning - these two little sentence - slowly, but firmly - - slipped into my mind: Many migrants don't come here to do things. They'd rather snatch them.


    (What you write about Germany and the jews might happen - and might be happening already. What I wrote was an attempt to come to grips with what this part of our national history has done so far with our mentality (especially the mentality of our functional elites (the (Berlin-)wall-thoughts of mine served the same purpose)).
    So - these things - if we are lucky enough,- could indeed change.

    (The last big sign on this way were two books by Rolf-Peter Sieferle: "Finis Germania" - and - : "Das Migrationsproblem" - about the tension between mass migration and the welfare state.

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  62. @Dieter Kief

    Everybody is free to go wherever they want to go

    Literally any country on Earth, no exceptions?
     

    That’s what I hear and read in debates, day in day out from people in the Green Party, the Left party from Social and even from Christian Democarts and from Liberals, too, and of course: From the more radical ones. The logic behind their argument is: Neoliberal Capitalism means worldwide injustice and oppression and migration is one of the effective antidotes.

    And that’s what Martin Seel’s expert-group of jurists and philosophers at Frankfurt's Goethe-University claims: Taht it’s a natural right of everybody on earth to move to any country he might want to. Seel proposed this mxime at a public Neue Züricher Zeitung Conference talk in Berlin last year, too.

    …it’s a natural right of everybody on earth to move to any country he might want to.

    Such absurdity. Is there a shred of reasonableness on that side?

    I imagine that Syrian refugees would want to live in Syria; the Green party should enforce those rights.

    This is one of those “rights” that its advocates should pay for. The Green party can house and support immigrants, and be reimbursed by all the wonderful economic activity they will allegedly generate.

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  63. @Desiderius

    And that’s what Martin Seel’s expert-group of jurists and philosophers at Frankfurt’s Goethe-University claims
     
    Schools are evidently not Frankfurt's strong suit.

    “Schools are evidently not Frankfurt’s strong suit.”

    I’ve learned a lot from Erich Fromm’s work and from Habermas’ too (much less from Adorno/Horkheimer). And Seel has written a good book about virtues and a pretty good one about aesthetics and a good one with very consice and precise little essays about recent Philosophy. And yes – Seel is part of the Franfurter Schule. But here, on juridical turf, as the head of this interdisciplinary group of scientists, he just misses out, unfortunately. (He knows how to drive a tractor – and how to use a fork (to work, actually, with a hay-fork and such stuff). Up until a few years ago, I would have thought, he’s ok. I still think he’s ok, basically. Sigh).

    The systematically most important point comes from the kantian Nürnberg philosopher (who wrote a very readable and highly interesting book called Apology of the Devil) Johan Benjamin Erhard, a contemporary of Goethe. He held, that rights don’t sustain themselves – they are a function of societal well-being (=friendliness, faith, productiveness…); rights depend on presuppositions, which they can’t grant – and rights should always be applied (and written down) in such a way, that they don’t disturb what they are made to protect: A good life.
    Erhard concludes: If the state and the law does not protect the citizen, this citizen is free to rebel against his state – it might even be his duty then. Universal are only the basic defensive rights which secure one’s life and dignity. – And this is quite different from granting everybody on earth the right to migrate into any welfare state he chooses, and therefor I state: Seel et. al. are wrong, Johann Benjamin Erhard is right.

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  64. @eah
    A decently sized 1 BR apartment would be 40qm -- 4 minderjährig (!) asylum seekers, including the one who killed the girl (who claims to be 15 y/o), lived in a nice single family home with 190qm.

    Here the Afghan resided on 190 square meters (with three other unaccompanied youth refugees) in #Kandel, who killed the 15-year-old German girl with several stab wounds. Sponsored by the stupid German taxpayer.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DS2-AlcWsAAj44N.jpg

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DS2-CWKXUAAUhzU.jpg

    “A decently sized 1 BR apartment would be 40qm — 4 minderjährig (!) asylum seekers [...]lived in a nice single family home with 190qm.”

    Wow! 47,5 instead of 40sqm! That’s insaaaaane! The luxury! The excess!
    & btw, the house is not the one they actually lived in. It’s a stock picture.

    47.5 is more than necessary, but they were in the care of some kind of public charity for youths. & I doubt that they built or bought the house with migrants in mind.

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    • Replies: @eah
    It’s a stock picture.

    You are correct, and I should have caught that.

    public charity

    What in your mind is a "public charity"? -- if it's "public", then maybe it gets most if not all of its money from the government -- so how is it a "charity"?

    47.5 is more than necessary, but they were in the care of some kind of public charity for youths. & I doubt that they built or bought the house with migrants in mind.

    Kandel is in Rheinland-Pfalz -- per current rental prices in R-P, average Miete for a Wohnung up to 40qm is approx 12€/qm -- a bunk bed in a Flüchtlingsheim would suffice, and be a lot cheaper -- the fact that some "public charities" (whatever those are) make money off taxpayers by providing overpriced flats and houses where Flüchtlinge live as good as many and better than some Germans is part of the problem, not something to put forth as a counterpoint.

    I doubt that they built or bought the house with migrants in mind

    Maybe not the particular house where the girl's killer lived -- but this is actually common -- also renting out entire hotels -- as expected there is a lot of corruption.

    80 Flüchtlinge eingepfercht – 2800 Euro Miete pro Tag
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  65. @Altai

    After all, “Social Democracy” has always stood for Open Borders and Lower Wages. Social Democrats have always stood in solidarity, arm-in-arm, with Global Capital.
     
    All the centre-left parties in Europe have seen their politicians change from being of working class backgrounds to people whose parents or even grandparents had working class backgrounds. This with near total university education for anyone involved in politics led to the shift from class politics to humanities-educated middle-class concerns about identity politics. People forget that Jeremy Corbyn was of the old left and clearly lukewarm on the result of Brexit, with him being criticised for his indifferent campaigning for a no vote. Most of the opposition to the UK joining in the 70s was from trade unions concerned with foreign labour competition. The explosion of immigrants after the 2004 enlargement was their vindication.

    By the time the Soviet Union fell and the triumph of neo-liberalism, post-modern was ready, appealing to a schoolmarmish politics of 'empathy', (Read, being too middle-class to see low wage immigrants as a threat but as socio-economic inferiors to be protected) turning into the pathological altruism we see which sees it's proper manifestation in politics by harming ones own people at the expense of outgroups. The total ease with which they all now speak with corporate propaganda and buzzwords acting to scare off anyone with dignity in trying in political parties.

    pathological altruism we see which sees it’s proper manifestation in politics by harming ones own people at the expense of outgroups. The total ease with which they all now speak with corporate propaganda and buzzwords

    One domestic group that is not harmed are the employers and the so called ‘enterpreneurs’. (The enterpreneurs went by a few different terms in the past, but let’s not go there today.)

    There is no question that the ‘social democrats’ know this. They get paid and rewarded to know it. One can see it as a standard technique that is always used to disable any opposition: infiltrate over time your own people into it, and then turn it into your own surveillance and political tool. People with money have always had this method available to them – people want money above all, even ‘working class’ people, so buying them is relatively easy. So they are using it.

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  66. @German_reader

    Is there any truth whatsoever to the view that Germany has a labor shortage?
     
    They always claim that, but I'm unconvinced. Admittedly my opinion on economics may not be worth much, but there's significant emigration of skilled Germans to other countries, and Germany doesn't seem that attractive for all the young unemployed in southern Europe either. Frankly, it's not that great here, with high taxes, wages that have pretty much stagnated for decades, and a political and cultural atmosphere that is just suffocating. If they really cared about keeping/attracting skilled labor, wouldn't it make more sense to try changing that?
    Anyway, how likely do you think it is Syrians, Afghans and Somalis will provide the skilled workers Germany needs? Excessively unlikely I'd say. Instead you'll get many of them permanently on welfare (there already are hundreds of thousands of them receiving just the same welfare benefits as natives), engaged in petty and not so petty crime, or at best in low-skilled labor. It will be a giant burden on Germany and eat up all the resources that could otherwise be used for dealing with the demographic problems Germany faces. It's pure madness.

    “Frankly, it’s not that great here”
    No one keeps you there. Lots of countries don’t have as restrictive migration laws as you want to have them in Germany. Free choice…

    “wages that have pretty much stagnated for decades”
    Bleh…
    The growth may not be exorbitant, but that’s only expected in an already high income economy.

    https://data.oecd.org/lprdty/labour-compensation-per-hour-worked.htm

    Only 1 year (2006) since 1992 with negative growth, else it’s roughly around 2 % per year on average.

    https://data.oecd.org/hha/household-disposable-income.htm

    Similar picture, a bit lower, since 1995 roughly 1% growth per year on average.

    “It will be a giant burden on Germany”
    Actually, at the moment the burden should be highest & it probably gets less over time as some migrants return to their home countries & others will start paying taxes.

    “Admittedly my opinion on economics may not be worth much”
    Agreed.

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  67. It’s kind of funny to see them pathetically debase themselves so long after the actual election was held, after everybody said they had nothing more to talk about. They’re so desperate to do anything rather than call new elections, since, German voters having realized the sky didn’t fall last time, would probably give AfD 20% the next time.

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  68. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/apr/17/germans-right-upset-poverty-lie

    For about 15 years German governments have been following a strict policy of very low wage increases, thus holding inflation below that of other EMU countries, and even below the inflation target of the ECB. By doing so, Germany has kept the prices of its exports low, creating an enormous advantage for its exporters within the EMU.

    Peripheral enterprises have thus found it difficult to compete against German enterprises, and eurozone markets have become dominated by German industry. However, in the domestic German economy it has been another story. Since wage increases have been low, demand has been weak, incomes have been rising slowly, and inequality has increased greatly. Most German people have been counting the pennies and, as we know, have not accumulated substantial wealth. Their main benefit has been relatively low unemployment on the back of strong exports.

    Meanwhile, the German export juggernaut has caused mayhem in the rest of the EMU. Peripheral countries, unable to compete, have accumulated huge public and private debts. Indebtedness masked their inherent weakness for a while by boosting domestic consumption and, in some countries, leading to a housing bubble. But then the global crisis arrived and the essential failure of peripheral Europe became evident. The southerners have found themselves sitting on overvalued houses while holding large debts that they can hardly service.

    https://www.newstatesman.com/economics/2013/04/germany-really-poorest-eurozone-country
    Germany is roughly middling when it comes to mean household wealth, suggesting a massive inequality of household wealth in the country. Indeed, of all the counties de Grauwe and Ji look at, Germany has the largest discrepancy between mean and median household wealth – the latter is almost a quarter the former.

    They write:

    Put differently, there is a lot of household wealth in Germany but this is to be found mostly in the top of the wealth distribution

    .

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  69. Alternative for Deutschland political party in Germany makes claim that regular Christian churches in Germany have very little to do with European Christianity. Christianity must either be a fighting faith or it must be allowed to die. Pope Tango and the Protestants are killing Christianity in Germany, France, Britain, Australia and all other European Christian nations.

    A Christian church that fights for the faith would oppose mass immigration.

    https://translate.googleusercontent.com/AfDBerlin/status/949578621366267904

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  70. @Reg Cæsar

    After all, “Social Democracy” has always stood for Open Borders and Lower Wages.
     
    Well, they're supposed to represent the poor. So stocking the labor pool with even more poor, like so much trout, is to their advantage.

    But not to the common people's. That's why they almost invariably turn to the right. Blood and soil are all they have!


    Social Democrats have always stood in solidarity, arm-in-arm, with Global Capital.
     
    The Birchers were saying that when you were in kneepants.

    (Oh, wait... Californians spend their entire lives in kneepants. Scratch that metaphor.)

    No, there’s still a few remnants of the old Birchers lingering here in CA.

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  71. @Maj. Kong
    The CDU/CSU can't form a majority coalition with the AfD, they would also need the FDP.

    The likeliest scenario for the AfD to ever influence policy is to support a minority government, in the way that the Dansk Folkpartiet does in Denmark. The AfD has internal squabbling, and faces the unlimited wrath of the media and deep state.

    West Germany doesn't like minority governments, as a result of unstable Weimar coalitions (for some reason, Weimar degneracy doesn't attract the same opposition). The only minority governments have formed in East German lander.

    As long as Merkel is party leader, the AfD is not going to be joining a coalition. The SPD is a much liklier future coalition partner. SPD parties in the East have formed coalitions with Die Linke. If the SPD joins another grand coalition, the party faces a drop in support if not an outright collapse. A Sarrazin style leader might then emerge.

    Bavaria is holding elections this year, if the AfD gets above 15% of the vote, the CSU might be forced to go into coalition with them. That would be an earthquake. I can't imagine the CSU ever agreeing to a coalition with the SPD, they haven't been together since the immidiate postwar era. (German readers can indicate where I am wrong)

    The CSU and SPD will almost certainly form a Grand Coalition this time, but it’s anyone’s guess as to how long the coalition lasts. If the SPD holds fast until the next prescribed election date, the party is not likely to survive: the energies of the left will be split, with the hard-left elements being absorbed into the more ideological Die Linke and the liberal/modernist/globalist elements probably starting a new centrist party. Indeed, this is exactly what happened in France after the last socialist government demonstrated the inability of the old Workers’ International apparatus to deal even superficially with the issues facing Europe in the 21st century. Stateside, of course, for all the buzz about the 2016 Democratic platform being the “most progressive in history,” there is no question of returning to the pre-1976 regulatory structure, regardless of what happens this fall or in 2020. It is not true, as some claim, that “left/right” no longer matters in politics, but the principal battlefield can no longer be thought of in terms of fiscality qua fiscality.

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  72. @eah
    OT

    Kandel is where the 15 y/o girl was brutally stabbed to death in a drug store with a long kitchen knife by an Afghan asylum seeker -- afterward the mayor almost immediately made a 'frontlashy' statement.

    My respect for the courageous woman! She stands again at the door of the windy mayor in #Kandel! On her sign: "A mayor is more concerned about alleged xenophobia than about our children being slaughtered by strangers."

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DS2uui-VoAAPL1o.jpg

    I love those German verbs. There always seems to be a lone “werden” hanging out on the end of sentences.

    To the person who said they’d like to live and work in Germany, I say viel Gluck. All the Germans I’ve met over the years honestly look down on Americans.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    I lived in Cologne from 1993 to 1997, and never met anyone who looked down on me as an American.
    However, ALL Europeans, and probably the French most of all, look down on Americans because, as they see it, we are rich, loud, vulgar, ignorant, and spoiled. All of this happened after World War II and the advent of mass tourism. Before that Americans in Europe were few and far between, and were therefore objects of a curiosity which was always venal (they being rich), but otherwise fairly benign (they being childlike and naive).
    Once they got to know the denizens of fly-over country though, all that changed.
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  73. @Anonymous
    Actually, most of the opposition to the UK's EU Accession, back in 1973, was purely on constitutional grounds - the ancient dogma of Westminster supremacy.
    Thus, such strange bedfellows as Tony Benn, Michael Foot and Enoch Powell sat on the same table.
    The British left objected to the then EEC because they saw it as a 'capitalist's club' - favouring capital over labour with laws that could not be altered by Westminster.
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  74. @Rosamond Vincy
    1. That generation is dying off. I do not believe in Ancestral Guilt, except of course Original Sin, which means we're all equally screwed.

    In addition, the Germans are now wise enough to recognize that Jewish businesses add to the economy, while Rapefugees on benefits do not. One hopes Jews outside of the NY media-stocracy recognize that Germans are far less dangerous than Jihadists.
    They do not have to like each other

    2. The Berlin Wall, as you note, kept people IN, specifically in an undesirable government system (Communism). This would keep people OUT of a government system (Western non-Sharia law), in the interest of KEEPING it desirable.

    I am not so tactless that I would put on the gates, instead of the infamous "Arbeit Macht Frei," a sign reading, "Go Get a Job Somewhere Else."

    “Go Get a Job Somewhere Else.”

    As I woke up last friday morning – these two little sentence – slowly, but firmly – – slipped into my mind: Many migrants don’t come here to do things. They’d rather snatch them.

    (What you write about Germany and the jews might happen – and might be happening already. What I wrote was an attempt to come to grips with what this part of our national history has done so far with our mentality (especially the mentality of our functional elites (the (Berlin-)wall-thoughts of mine served the same purpose)).
    So – these things – if we are lucky enough,- could indeed change.

    (The last big sign on this way were two books by Rolf-Peter Sieferle: “Finis Germania” – and – : “Das Migrationsproblem” – about the tension between mass migration and the welfare state.

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  75. @German_reader

    Ms. Merkel and the Bavarians are holding to a limit of 200,000 applications,
     
    It's news to me that Merkel has accepted this demand by the CSU, her position has always been that there can't be an upper limit on asylum seekers. And the demand by the CSU isn't to be taken seriously anyway, it's merely the usual "good cop, bad cop" routine to keep at least a few right-wing voters voting for CDU/CSU (200 000 "refugees" a year is still national suicide anyway, only a bit slower).
    One issue of contention though is "family reunification" for "refugees" that have been denied asylum in the narrow sense, but can stay in Germany under subsidiary protection (iirc that is because of general insecurity in their countries of origin or something of the sort). It has been suspended until March 2018, and the SPD demands that after that date they'll be allowed to bring their relatives to Germany.
    Anyway, both Social and Christian Democrats can go to hell as far as I'm concerned.

    To Hell? No, the place might not actually exist.
    I want them to go to the wall, every last one of them.

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  76. @bossel
    "A decently sized 1 BR apartment would be 40qm — 4 minderjährig (!) asylum seekers [...]lived in a nice single family home with 190qm."

    Wow! 47,5 instead of 40sqm! That's insaaaaane! The luxury! The excess!
    & btw, the house is not the one they actually lived in. It's a stock picture.


    47.5 is more than necessary, but they were in the care of some kind of public charity for youths. & I doubt that they built or bought the house with migrants in mind.

    It’s a stock picture.

    You are correct, and I should have caught that.

    public charity

    What in your mind is a “public charity”? — if it’s “public”, then maybe it gets most if not all of its money from the government — so how is it a “charity”?

    47.5 is more than necessary, but they were in the care of some kind of public charity for youths. & I doubt that they built or bought the house with migrants in mind.

    Kandel is in Rheinland-Pfalz — per current rental prices in R-P, average Miete for a Wohnung up to 40qm is approx 12€/qm — a bunk bed in a Flüchtlingsheim would suffice, and be a lot cheaper — the fact that some “public charities” (whatever those are) make money off taxpayers by providing overpriced flats and houses where Flüchtlinge live as good as many and better than some Germans is part of the problem, not something to put forth as a counterpoint.

    I doubt that they built or bought the house with migrants in mind

    Maybe not the particular house where the girl’s killer lived — but this is actually common — also renting out entire hotels — as expected there is a lot of corruption.

    80 Flüchtlinge eingepfercht – 2800 Euro Miete pro Tag

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    • Replies: @German_reader
    Don't bother arguing with bossel, he's a Merkel troll whose contributions here are limited to sniping at Sailer or other commenters. Anybody who hasn't gotten by now that a lot of those "minors" aren't minors at all and that the system is deeply dysfunctional (maybe deliberately so) is living in cloud cuckoo land anyway.
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  77. @stillCARealist
    I love those German verbs. There always seems to be a lone "werden" hanging out on the end of sentences.

    To the person who said they'd like to live and work in Germany, I say viel Gluck. All the Germans I've met over the years honestly look down on Americans.

    I lived in Cologne from 1993 to 1997, and never met anyone who looked down on me as an American.
    However, ALL Europeans, and probably the French most of all, look down on Americans because, as they see it, we are rich, loud, vulgar, ignorant, and spoiled. All of this happened after World War II and the advent of mass tourism. Before that Americans in Europe were few and far between, and were therefore objects of a curiosity which was always venal (they being rich), but otherwise fairly benign (they being childlike and naive).
    Once they got to know the denizens of fly-over country though, all that changed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I am forced to listen to BBC radio as part of a carpool, Western Europeans are programmatically bombarded with lies and half-truths to the effect that USA=DPRK so that Euroweenies will be distracted from their own problems. This is the entirety of Louis Theroux's career, except that interlude where he stumbled through a non-explanation about Jimmy Saville. About a third of British posters at /pol/ honestly think that we hunt and eat black children and that USAPATRIOT placed us all under the kind of panopticon found in, y'know, London.
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  78. @eah
    It’s a stock picture.

    You are correct, and I should have caught that.

    public charity

    What in your mind is a "public charity"? -- if it's "public", then maybe it gets most if not all of its money from the government -- so how is it a "charity"?

    47.5 is more than necessary, but they were in the care of some kind of public charity for youths. & I doubt that they built or bought the house with migrants in mind.

    Kandel is in Rheinland-Pfalz -- per current rental prices in R-P, average Miete for a Wohnung up to 40qm is approx 12€/qm -- a bunk bed in a Flüchtlingsheim would suffice, and be a lot cheaper -- the fact that some "public charities" (whatever those are) make money off taxpayers by providing overpriced flats and houses where Flüchtlinge live as good as many and better than some Germans is part of the problem, not something to put forth as a counterpoint.

    I doubt that they built or bought the house with migrants in mind

    Maybe not the particular house where the girl's killer lived -- but this is actually common -- also renting out entire hotels -- as expected there is a lot of corruption.

    80 Flüchtlinge eingepfercht – 2800 Euro Miete pro Tag

    Don’t bother arguing with bossel, he’s a Merkel troll whose contributions here are limited to sniping at Sailer or other commenters. Anybody who hasn’t gotten by now that a lot of those “minors” aren’t minors at all and that the system is deeply dysfunctional (maybe deliberately so) is living in cloud cuckoo land anyway.

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  79. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Why doesn’t the American left do more to trump up (no pun intended) the example of Germany, let alone model policy after it?

    Chicago labor lawyer Thomas Geohagen's "Were You Born on the Wrong Continent?" has a lot on Germany. Here's my review:

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/the-new-synthesis-and-our-posterity

    Germany has different labor laws than the U.S. and it seems to make for better automobile companies. But it's a real technical issue and I don't pretend to understand why Germany>US>pre-Thatcher Britain.

    German products tend to be well made but overpriced and difficult/expensive to service.

    Certainly, the German car is not as reliable as a Japanese made Honda or Toyota any more. It does have a better road feel and feeling of tightness, but as a transportation device it doesn’t work quite as well. German electronics in particular are troublesome.

    It is routine in the US for BMWs and Mercedes to be driven to the junkyard under their own power, their mechanicals still basically ok but with numerous systems issues which cost more to fix than the car is worth. The Japanese car is hauled off dead having given its all and crushed, having gone 3-600k as opposed to the German car’s 150k.

    This means if you are a good scrounger a BMW or Benz makes a great LeMons car.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Agreed. The Germans over engineer things. I've been buying Hondas for 35+ years and they have never let me down. I have heard many stories from friends about expensive repairs on German cars.
    , @Austrian
    You are talking about luxury cars for export. They are status symbols. In Germany it is Turks and Arabs who buy the used luxury models for posing purposes. So the positional value quickly wears of.

    German proles fix and tune their cars and keep them running just fine. Taxi drivers use Mercedes E-class. Mercedes Sprinter Vans are workhorses.

    The conventional wisdom over here is that american cars are unreliable and expensive to maintain. That's because only a small subset of freaks who larp as americans buy US cars over here and they don't buy boring F-150 trucks.

    It comes down to parts availability, experience and which variants, engines and transmissions are known to be reliable.
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  80. @Anonymous
    German products tend to be well made but overpriced and difficult/expensive to service.

    Certainly, the German car is not as reliable as a Japanese made Honda or Toyota any more. It does have a better road feel and feeling of tightness, but as a transportation device it doesn't work quite as well. German electronics in particular are troublesome.

    It is routine in the US for BMWs and Mercedes to be driven to the junkyard under their own power, their mechanicals still basically ok but with numerous systems issues which cost more to fix than the car is worth. The Japanese car is hauled off dead having given its all and crushed, having gone 3-600k as opposed to the German car's 150k.

    This means if you are a good scrounger a BMW or Benz makes a great LeMons car.

    Agreed. The Germans over engineer things. I’ve been buying Hondas for 35+ years and they have never let me down. I have heard many stories from friends about expensive repairs on German cars.

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    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    Surely the Germans themselves have heard these stories by now. Why haven't they tackled it?

    A friend was driving her new Mercedes and it stopped dead in an intersection. This was a very expensive car and due to a small problem, boom, it won't move. She beseeched her husband and he got her a Lexus instead.
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  81. @Jim Don Bob
    Agreed. The Germans over engineer things. I've been buying Hondas for 35+ years and they have never let me down. I have heard many stories from friends about expensive repairs on German cars.

    Surely the Germans themselves have heard these stories by now. Why haven’t they tackled it?

    A friend was driving her new Mercedes and it stopped dead in an intersection. This was a very expensive car and due to a small problem, boom, it won’t move. She beseeched her husband and he got her a Lexus instead.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    If somebody gave me a Mercedes, I would drive it for about a month, and then trade it in for a Lexus.
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  82. @Old Palo Altan
    I lived in Cologne from 1993 to 1997, and never met anyone who looked down on me as an American.
    However, ALL Europeans, and probably the French most of all, look down on Americans because, as they see it, we are rich, loud, vulgar, ignorant, and spoiled. All of this happened after World War II and the advent of mass tourism. Before that Americans in Europe were few and far between, and were therefore objects of a curiosity which was always venal (they being rich), but otherwise fairly benign (they being childlike and naive).
    Once they got to know the denizens of fly-over country though, all that changed.

    I am forced to listen to BBC radio as part of a carpool, Western Europeans are programmatically bombarded with lies and half-truths to the effect that USA=DPRK so that Euroweenies will be distracted from their own problems. This is the entirety of Louis Theroux’s career, except that interlude where he stumbled through a non-explanation about Jimmy Saville. About a third of British posters at /pol/ honestly think that we hunt and eat black children and that USAPATRIOT placed us all under the kind of panopticon found in, y’know, London.

    Read More
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  83. These parties are no more ‘socially democratic’ than the ‘Christian democrats’ are Christian.

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  84. @Anonymous
    German products tend to be well made but overpriced and difficult/expensive to service.

    Certainly, the German car is not as reliable as a Japanese made Honda or Toyota any more. It does have a better road feel and feeling of tightness, but as a transportation device it doesn't work quite as well. German electronics in particular are troublesome.

    It is routine in the US for BMWs and Mercedes to be driven to the junkyard under their own power, their mechanicals still basically ok but with numerous systems issues which cost more to fix than the car is worth. The Japanese car is hauled off dead having given its all and crushed, having gone 3-600k as opposed to the German car's 150k.

    This means if you are a good scrounger a BMW or Benz makes a great LeMons car.

    You are talking about luxury cars for export. They are status symbols. In Germany it is Turks and Arabs who buy the used luxury models for posing purposes. So the positional value quickly wears of.

    German proles fix and tune their cars and keep them running just fine. Taxi drivers use Mercedes E-class. Mercedes Sprinter Vans are workhorses.

    The conventional wisdom over here is that american cars are unreliable and expensive to maintain. That’s because only a small subset of freaks who larp as americans buy US cars over here and they don’t buy boring F-150 trucks.

    It comes down to parts availability, experience and which variants, engines and transmissions are known to be reliable.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. @stillCARealist
    Surely the Germans themselves have heard these stories by now. Why haven't they tackled it?

    A friend was driving her new Mercedes and it stopped dead in an intersection. This was a very expensive car and due to a small problem, boom, it won't move. She beseeched her husband and he got her a Lexus instead.

    If somebody gave me a Mercedes, I would drive it for about a month, and then trade it in for a Lexus.

    Read More
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