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For my new column in Taki’s Magazine on how to answer questions about the trajectories of fame using Google’s Ngram, I read all your comments on preliminary posting and made up a dozen graphs inspired by your ideas.

The Dynamics of Repute
Steve Sailer

October 05, 2022

The rise and fall of fame—or at least of the number of times books mention the name of an artist or other historical figure—can be conveniently graphed using Google’s free Ngram Viewer.

Google has digitized the contents of 129 million books. Ngram lets you look up how relatively frequently a text string comes up out of all the words published in all the books in any year from 1800 to 2019.

To show you what you can do with Ngram to answer your own questions about trends in fame over the past 220 years, let’s start out by graphing the number of mentions in books of two really, really famous guys: Shakespeare and Napoleon:

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. You could probably get a AI to analyse this to determine future events. For instance, interest in Shakespeare seems to peak before major wars.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @TelfoedJohn

    Seems to go up *during* the wars, maybe because he's one of the few commonly known sources of martial-sounding verse in English. "Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the dogs of war..." "We few, we happy few, we band of brothers..."

    I hope you're wrong, as the curve is trending upward...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Wilkey
    @TelfoedJohn


    You could probably get a AI to analyse this to determine future events. For instance, interest in Shakespeare seems to peak before major wars.
     
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts. The graph I'm seeing shows interest in Shakespeare declining before major wars, then increasing during or shortly after them.

    I would guess that the increase since 1980 is a result of:

    1) The increasing popularity of Shakespeare festivals - every state now seems to have at least one, if not more.

    2) Books have gotten much better at defining the words and phrases that are unfamiliar to modern readers (eReaders make it even easier).

    3) With all the political debates over what should or should not be read in schools, Shakespeare is one author that most sides can uniformly agree on. His themes are more universal than most, and - let's face it - his language is quite possibly the most beautiful ever committed to paper, in English or possibly any other language.

    The decrease in his popularity over the last two years can probably be explained by theatres going dark during COVID (see point 1), and post-George Floyd insanity causing assaults on the Western canon (see point 3). I've heard of some "Shakespeare festivals" that now barely perform any Shakespeare at all.

    Of the 15 shows produced by the Alabama Shakespeare Festival in its last two seasons, 6 have dealt with race (7 if you count "Cabaret") and only two were Shakespeare plays. The Oregon Shakespeare Festival may sound slightly better, with two of six plays about race and two by Shakespeare, until you read that their production of "King John" features "a cast of female and non-gender-binary performers" and that 10 of the 13 cast members in "The Tempest" are racial or ethnic minorities. That's how it works in repertory theatre: if you decide to produce even a couple of race plays, then the cast of those plays will inevitably be cast in the non-race related shows.

    So if a decline in Shakespeare's popularity is linked to greater likelihood of warm then the recent decline may be ominous indeed.

  2. Just one thing, you looked for most strings in “English”, whereas for Johann Sebastian Bach and Antonio Vivaldi you looked in “English Fiction”. How often do composers get namechecked like that in fiction? Surely hardly ever.

    “Bond slipped off his hand-made Loake Oxfords,put Johann Sebastian Bach on the Mediterraneo turntable, poured a martini and put his feet up.”

    In Robert Harris’ book Enigma, our hero goes with a girl to hear St Matthew Passion, but the composer’s full name never gets mentioned. In our days “Bach” is sufficient, few listen to CPE Bach or JC Bach.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Thanks. Sorry, that's a mistake.

    , @Meretricious
    @YetAnotherAnon

    CPE Bach is considered a major composer, and ppl still listen to his music:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Philipp_Emanuel_Bach

    , @AceDeuce
    @YetAnotherAnon


    In Robert Harris’ book Enigma, our hero goes with a girl to hear St Matthew Passion, but the composer’s full name never gets mentioned. In our days “Bach” is sufficient, few listen to CPE Bach or JC Bach.
     
    Funny you should mention that.

    There is a trend among woke liberal asshats (there's a triply redundant appellation) that classical music's habit of just using famous composers' last names is racist and sexist, and that all composers must be "fullnamed".

    Think I'm joking?

    https://slate.com/culture/2020/10/fullname-famous-composers-racism-sexism.html

    FTA:

    The habitual, two-tiered way we talk about classical composers is ubiquitous. For instance, coverage of an early October livestream by the Louisville Orchestra praised the ensemble’s performance of a “Beethoven” symphony, and the debut of a composition memorializing Breonna Taylor by “Davóne Tines” and “Igee Dieudonné.” But ubiquity doesn’t make something right. It’s time we paid attention to the inequity inherent in how we talk about composers, and it’s time for the divided naming convention to change.

     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  3. Google has fucked up ngram, just like everything else they touch.
    The shape of their curves now is markedly different for a number of “controversial” topics than it was ten years ago.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Bill Jones


    The shape of their curves now is markedly different for a number of “controversial” topics than it was ten years ago.
     
    Can you elaborate?

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  4. A good game is: if in a mad world you were allowed only three, who would they be?

    For me, Painters: Rembrandt, Vermeer, Turner. (Commendation: Monet.)

    Classical music: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven. (Commendation: Papa Haydn.)

    Jazz: Armstrong, Beiderbecke, Bechet. (Commendation: Django.)

    Prose in English: Shakespeare and … actually, there’s nobody else even close. He’s the Don Bradman of writers. I’ll grant that Miss Austen is the finest of novelists in English. Scott must be her principal competitor. I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small. Afterthought: how about Gibbon? His Decline and Fall is full of wonderful writing.

    Poetry: I won’t double-count Mr W S so I’ll go for Burns. Who else (in English or near-English)? Sheets and Kelly I suppose. How about Chaucer? But he’s bloody hard work unless you use a translation (as we didn’t at school).

    Stuff in foreign: even at the risk of being assassinated by the CIA I plump for lots of Russkis.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @dearieme

    It's not a good game.


    I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small.
     
    Is He Dead? (1898), play
    The Battle Hymn of the Republic, Updated (1901), satirical lyric
    King Leopold's Soliloquy (1905), satire
    Little Bessie Would Assist Providence (1908), poem
    Slovenly Peter (1935, posthumous), children's book[N 2]
    Some Thoughts on the Science of Onanism (1879), a speech given to The Stomach Club

    The Innocents Abroad (1869), travel
    Roughing It (1872), travel
    Old Times on the Mississippi (1876), travel
    Some Rambling Notes of an Idle Excursion (1877), travel
    A Tramp Abroad (1880), travel
    Life on the Mississippi (1883), travel
    Following the Equator (sometimes titled "More Tramps Abroad") (1897), travel
    Is Shakespeare Dead? (1909)
    Moments with Mark Twain (1920, posthumous)
    Mark Twain's Notebook (1935, posthumous)
    Letters from Hawaii (letters written in 1866, published as a book in 1947)

    "Advice to Little Girls" (1865)
    "On the Decay of the Art of Lying" (1880)
    "The Awful German Language" (1880)
    "Advice to Youth" (1882)
    "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses" (1895)
    "English As She Is Taught" (1897)
    "Concerning the Jews" (1898)
    "My First Lie, and How I Got Out of It" (1899)[14]
    "A Salutation Speech From the Nineteenth Century to the Twentieth" (1900)
    "To the Person Sitting in Darkness" (1901)
    "To My Missionary Critics" (1901)
    "Edmund Burke on Croker and Tammany" (1901)
    "What Is Man?" (1906)
    "Christian Science" (1907)
    "Queen Victoria's Jubilee" (1910)
    "The United States of Lyncherdom" (1923, posthumous)

    "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" (1867)
    "General Washington's Negro Body-Servant" (1868)[4]
    "Cannibalism in the Cars" (1868)
    "A Medieval Romance" [1868] (unfinished)[5]
    "My Late Senatorial Secretaryship" (1868)[6]
    Mark Twain vs Blondin [1869 satire letter]][7]
    "A Ghost Story" (1870)[8]: 176–180 
    "A True Story, Repeated Word for Word As I Heard It" (1874)[8]: 70–73 
    "Some Learned Fables for Good Old Boys and Girls" (1875)[8]: 77–83 
    "The Story Of The Bad Little Boy" (1875)
    "The Story Of The Good Little Boy" (1875)
    "A Literary Nightmare" (1876)
    "A Murder, a Mystery, and a Marriage" (1876)
    "The Canvasser's Tale" (1876)
    "The Invalid's Story" (1877)[8]: 135–? 
    "The Great Revolution in Pitcairn" (1879)[9]
    "1601: Conversation, as it was by the Social Fireside, in the Time of the Tudors" (1880)
    "The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm" (1882)
    "The Stolen White Elephant" (1882)
    "Luck" (1891)
    "Those Extraordinary Twins" (1892)
    "Is He Living Or Is He Dead?" (1893)
    "The Esquimau Maiden's Romance" (1893)
    "The Million Pound Bank Note" (1893)[8]: 226–238 
    "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" (1900)
    "A Double Barrelled Detective Story" (1902)
    "A Dog's Tale" (1904)
    "The War Prayer" (1905)
    "Hunting the Deceitful Turkey" (1906)
    "A Fable" (1909)
    "Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven" (1909)
    "My Platonic Sweetheart" (1912, posthumous)
    "The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine"[10] (2017, posthumous)

    Et m'fing cetera.

    Replies: @Indiana Jack, @dearieme

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @dearieme

    "Prose in English: Shakespeare"

    Do plays count as prose? Shakespeare was a consortium. Most writers are jugheads who stick to one mode or genre. Very few polymaths within the jugheadian literary realm.

    "I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small."

    So was his penix (had to: it was floating up there like a lesbian slow-pitch softball). But seriously, if you're interested in stage version of Twain with a reanimator flavour send Art Deco a postcard with your po box info., he'll get it to me, and I'll send you two tickets to a wonderful solo stage performance of Mark Twain's ramblings by an interesting new actor. The only catch is you'll need to book passage on a Black Love Cruise ship to see the show.

    Replies: @I, Libertine

    , @Verymuchalive
    @dearieme

    I’ll grant that Miss Austen is the finest of novelists in English. Scott must be her principal competitor.

    Interesting that a ( fairly ) "wet" Englishman like yourself can regard Sir Walter so highly. Before you complain, males who admire Jane Austen are frankly an odd bunch. She leaves the vast majority of men, like myself, completely cold. ( No doubt you will try to refute this ! )

    Like many 19th Century authors, Scott went out of academic favour in the 1920s and has never returned to favour, outside Scotland. The difference between him and other 19th Century authors is that most of his books have never been out of print and his stories continue to be adapted for cinema and television. The general public appreciate his work, even if academia continues to largely ignore him. Who remembers ( 7 times Nobel Prize nominated ) George Meredith now ?

    So credit to your critical sensibilities re Scott. And also re Dickens. You don't mention him at all - a sure sign of sanity. Without the backing of the cultural establishment, Dickens would be largely forgotten. The public don't like him much and buy his works in diminishing numbers. The large number of realistic characters skilfully created by Scott ( second only to Shakespeare ) are much preferrable to Dickens' grotesques.

    Replies: @CCG, @dearieme

    , @james wilson
    @dearieme

    I started a Chaucer translation and quit after one page. It was of course advertized as the breakthough in contemporary Chaucer translations. No. Reading the first page of the original showed me Chaucer was infinitely better even when half understood.

  5. @YetAnotherAnon
    Just one thing, you looked for most strings in "English", whereas for Johann Sebastian Bach and Antonio Vivaldi you looked in "English Fiction". How often do composers get namechecked like that in fiction? Surely hardly ever.

    "Bond slipped off his hand-made Loake Oxfords,put Johann Sebastian Bach on the Mediterraneo turntable, poured a martini and put his feet up."


    In Robert Harris' book Enigma, our hero goes with a girl to hear St Matthew Passion, but the composer's full name never gets mentioned. In our days "Bach" is sufficient, few listen to CPE Bach or JC Bach.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Meretricious, @AceDeuce

    Thanks. Sorry, that’s a mistake.

  6. I do wonder if the Van Gogh upsurge circa 1983 is the delayed effect of Don MacLean’s 1971 song “Vincent”. People who write books might be the people who bought records, only 12 years older.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Sounds plausible.

    I've heard that Don MacLean's "Vincent" was almost as big in Europe as "American Pie" was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @FPD72, @Zoos, @Paleo Liberal, @Reg Cæsar, @Wilkey

    , @Veteran Aryan
    @YetAnotherAnon


    I do wonder if the Van Gogh upsurge circa 1983 is the delayed effect of Don MacLean’s 1971 song “Vincent”.
     
    There was a touring Van Gogh exhibit in the U.S. some time around the early 80s. It's difficult to find information about it because all of the search results are about the current "Immersive Experience" tour. But I know there was one because I have a poster of 'Undergrowth With Two Figures' that came from a museum in New Orleans during that time.
  7. A lot of Lovecraft references are now about what a horrible person he was, unfortunately.

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Redneck farmer

    That's more of a later thing, I think.

    Not that I disagree--c'mon, we're *all* equally irrelevant to Cthulhu!

    , @fredyetagain aka superhonky
    @Redneck farmer

    Lovecraft's views were entirely standard for intelligent White men of his day. The only horrible people in this picture are his woke critics.
    HPL forever.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @YetAnotherAnon

  8. Nobels go gay.

    Of the 3 Chemistry Nobels, one is for L woman. If we count Svante Umlaut as a semi-gay, then there are 1.5 LBGT Nobels this year.

    Also, Sharpless got his 2nd Nobel, so he’s now in the company of Curie, Bardeen,..

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Second Nobel? I'm impressed.

    Sharpless was blinded in one eye in a chemistry lab accident over 50 years ago. He always wears goggles since.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Hodag, @Jimbo

    , @Anonymous
    @Bardon Kaldian


    Of the 3 Chemistry Nobels, one is for L woman. If we count Svante Umlaut as a semi-gay, then there are 1.5 LBGT Nobels this year.

     

    Where is the "B" from LGBT ? So, it's two this year. BTW, Pääbo looks like John Maynard Keynes. From a uninhibited exclusive gay life in the first half of life to a conventional family life, in the second half.

    Also, Sharpless got his 2nd Nobel, so he’s now in the company of Curie, Bardeen,..

     

    It looks like there is an innate component in scientific geniuses. There are children of former Nobels (like Pääbo) and others who were able to win more than one prize, like Sharpless .
  9. @Bardon Kaldian
    Nobels go gay.

    Of the 3 Chemistry Nobels, one is for L woman. If we count Svante Umlaut as a semi-gay, then there are 1.5 LBGT Nobels this year.

    Also, Sharpless got his 2nd Nobel, so he's now in the company of Curie, Bardeen,..

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    Second Nobel? I’m impressed.

    Sharpless was blinded in one eye in a chemistry lab accident over 50 years ago. He always wears goggles since.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    The ophthalmic surgeon who performed radial keratotomy on my eyes in 1985 was blind in one of his. I didn't know that until I read his obituary. Some kind of childhood accident. I wonder if that is what got him interested in eyes or inspired him to help other people with theirs.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    , @Hodag
    @Steve Sailer

    If Paris is worth a Mass, are two Nobels worth an eye?

    , @Jimbo
    @Steve Sailer

    It's interesting - one of the Dads in the scout troop my son is in is a patent attorney. He got his Ph.D in biochemistry, but decided to go back to law school. His reasons? Partially the money, but also because he had spent a lot of time in the lab and felt himself getting careless. He has since had two of his old colleagues die from lab accidents, so I guess he was right...

  10. @YetAnotherAnon
    I do wonder if the Van Gogh upsurge circa 1983 is the delayed effect of Don MacLean's 1971 song "Vincent". People who write books might be the people who bought records, only 12 years older.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Veteran Aryan

    Sounds plausible.

    I’ve heard that Don MacLean’s “Vincent” was almost as big in Europe as “American Pie” was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @Steve Sailer

    "Vincent" was pretty huge in the UK, and seems to have lasted longer than "American Pie" despite the tasteless teen "comedy" series of the same name.

    Wiki:


    The song was a particular favorite of the rapper and actor Tupac Shakur, and was played to him in the University Medical Center of Southern Nevada, the hospital where Tupac was admitted just before he died of gunshot wounds from a drive-by shooting
     
    (We were in Amsterdam for two days, and 'er indoors insisted we see the van Goghs, despite my desire to see the Vermeers in the Rijksmuseum. I'm sure that record influenced her choice. But as a paid up philistine, I always find famous paintings "in the flesh" slightly disappointing - the place is crowded, you can't just sit and look as you can at a book of good reproductions.)
    , @FPD72
    @Steve Sailer

    There’s a new documentary, “The Day the Music Died: The Making of Don McClean’s American Pie” in which McClean explains the various sources of the lyrics from both culture and his life. It’s streaming on Paramount+. I saw it in August and thought it was worth the price of a month’s subscription (around $6.00). The director was Mark Moormann, who seems to specialize in music themed documentaries.

    The film also spends significant time on the plane crash death of Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, and Yhe Big Bopper.

    , @Zoos
    @Steve Sailer


    I’ve heard that Don MacLean’s “Vincent” was almost as big in Europe as “American Pie” was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?
     
    He had more hits. "And I Love Her So" was a fine, classic piece of songwriting. Probably still a karaoke favorite. "Castles in the Air" did well, and "Wonderful Baby" I heard quite a lot on FM on release, deservingly, as it was a clever piece of songwriting, and the lyrics are just as applicable now. I recall hearing "Dreidel" on the radio a lot. Again, fine craftsmanship, although it was produced in a way that dates it. You must have heard most of these at some point and forgot about it. They all charted. He did well for himself. The boy had some chops.

    https://youtu.be/EJJYVJ-Ae6M

    https://youtu.be/BdKW0ZDTmxE

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    , @Paleo Liberal
    @Steve Sailer

    I remember going to see Don McLean in the early 1980s with an Asian fan of his. Her favorite song was “Vincent”, but she was an artist as well, so that might have something to do with it.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    I’ve heard that Don MacLean’s “Vincent” was almost as big in Europe as “American Pie” was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody...
     
    I heard "Vincent" done live, in the atrium of what's now the Embassy Suites by MSP Airport, by an aging black jazz saxophonist. It was riveting. It's hard to imagine the same feeling engendered by a similar treatment of "American Pie". Some songs are just better than others.

    I saw McLean live in the '70s at a college gym, and was likely the only one who came just for the opening act, Loudon Wainwright III. At the time I was long sick of "American Pie", but "Vincent" hadn't quite sunk in as the classic it turned out to be. The one song of his that did stick with me was the ironically more Wainwrightesque "On the Amazon".

    Years later I learned that this song dates from 1927 and English music hall. Were it not for words like prophylactics, hypodermics, and menopause, it would have been ideally suited for a Muppets Show filler spot. (That show was three minutes longer in the UK, thus all the music hall interludes.)


    They'd played it in the McLean household when he was a boy, and it stuck with him.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SBsC8uQ-tgs

    Did you know that McLean majored in finance at Ramapo College? That's even weirder than Scott Adams at Hartwick or Ronald Reagan at Eureka, where both took degrees in economics.

    Replies: @hhsiii

    , @Wilkey
    @Steve Sailer


    An odd career being a two hit wonder...
     
    Don McLean is actually a three hit wonder. But his third hit, "Killing Me Softly With His Song," was written by three other people and recorded by Roberta Flack.

    While "Vincent" and "American Pie" may be his only genuine chart toppers, the album they are on is uniformly excellent. A rare album I can listen to in entirety without the urge to skip a song.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Polistra

  11. Byron wrote:

    What is the end of Fame? ’tis but to fill
    A certain portion of uncertain paper:
    Some liken it to climbing up a hill,,
    Whose summit, like all hills, is lost in vapour;
    For this men write, speak, preach, and heroes kill,
    And bards burn what they call their ‘midnight taper’,
    To have, when the original is dust,
    A name, a wretched picture and worse bust.

    What are the hopes of man? Old Egypt’s King
    Cheops erected the first Pyramid
    And largest, thinking it was just the thing
    To keep his memory whole, and mummy hid;
    But somebody or other rummaging,
    Burglariously broke his coffin’s lid:
    Let not a monument give you or me hopes,
    Since not a pinch of dust remains of Cheops.

  12. SFG says:

    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I’ll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn’t understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that’s how they start showing up elsewhere. You’ll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don’t seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated–he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course–the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of…)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I’d love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I’m genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he’s not invading anyone anymore so he’s a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley–quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so ‘The Jazz Singer’ gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra’s fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler’s criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken’s (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC–there’s an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I’d love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness (‘body positivity’ covers up the fact that people really don’t like being fat), but I’ll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you’re supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend–I’d say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don’t really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance–it’s just a steady upward trend. You don’t see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. 😉 George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it’s just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it’d also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @SFG

    Dude, is there a reason polygamy is not an option for you?

    , @Whitaboot
    @SFG

    Bore off.

    , @Liger
    @SFG

    Funny, I thought Dracula was based on Walt Whitman.

    , @prosa123
    @SFG

    Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you’re supposed to be #ownvoices.

    China doesn't get PC protection any more, being such a rich and powerful nation.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @SFG

    An unremarked meta-pattern in Steve's Ngrams is that except for megastars Shakespeare and Napoleon, everyone who isn't already bumping along their lower asymptote has gone into an often steep decline in the last decade or two if they weren't already declining. The only exceptions are William F. Buckley (likely—as Steve noted—because of lefties wishing aloud for a new Buckley to rid them of these turbulent [rightwing] priests), Edgar Allen Poe (maybe he's seen as a "safe" way to namecheck classic American authors), and possibly H.G. Wells (which I can't explain).

    The obvious explanation for this melancholy withdrawing roar is that since the last decade or two, a new and growing wedge of acultural garbage ("woke") [anti-]literature is being published. In other words, following faith, the culture that ultimately depended on it appears to be dying, leaving behind only the petrified landmarks of Shakespeare and Napoleon upon the naked shingle. And as Arnold foresaw, we are increasingly on a darkling plain swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, where ignorant armies clash by night.

    Well, possibly that is overly pessimistic. After all, Google's Ngram counts words published, not words sold or words read, so, for example, seventeen copies of Gender Unicorn for Roger published in 2019 would count, but 17 million readings of T.S. Eliot in 2019 do not. Also, as Google started the Ngram project in the 2000s, it captures works published since then, but relies on library collection for older works, which collections have doubtless had a slow winnowing effect on their archives: the older the work, the higher quality it had to be to survive the slow attrition. So possibly the trends since the Ngram project began are an artifact of recency bias. One can hope, but still it is hard to imagine that even the forgotten worst of the 19th century was as bad as the median published today.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    , @prosa123
    @SFG

    I get the impression that Elvis attracts new generations of fans and therefore remains a cultural icon even with many of his original fans gone

    Another enduring figure is Albert Einstein. Not so much because of his theories, which few understand, but in large part because of his bizarre appearance.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    , @Almost Missouri
    @SFG


    Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s.
     
    I have some familiarity with Dungeons and Dragons, though not with Appendix N. I did know a guy in high school who was really into D&D and Lovecraft. I think that his obsession with the former preceded the latter, which would confirm your theory. I just looked him up and found he is now a professor of comparative religion at a second-tier university where he publishes impenetrable gobbledygook, so whatever crazy stuff he spouted in high school was arguably less insane than what he does professionally today. (Delayed mid-rot from Shub-Niggurath?) ... ("Niggurath" ... hmmmm.)

    You’ll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious)
     
    Noted, but the coefficient looks large.

    The movies with Schwarzenegger don’t seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated–he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.
     
    I guess that outside of iSteve readers, attending John Milius movies doesn't translate to future publishing.

    Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections.
     
    This is an acute observation: all three of those leading contemporary male authors are pseudonymous ciphers for obvious reasons of self-defense. This is a hint as to why the Masculine Revival remains subterranean and may remain so. It is also a rebuke to those speak airily of America's "free press".

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Byss[h]e Shelley
     
    Tried it. Unsurprisingly, Byron's 19th century fame swamps everything else into insignificance. If you remove Byron and add John Keats, though, you see what you probably anticipated: John leads Percy by a hair until the late 19th century when Percy decays to a half-length behind John, as Mary simultaneously comes out of nowhere to take up John's slack (Shelley renown was apparently a zero-sum game at the time), then in the post-war world Mary begins an inexorable ascent up the chart, supercharged by feminist subsidy in the 1980s and 1990s to sit on a high plateau overlooking her misfortunately penised colleagues today.

    Presley and Sinatra’s fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.
     
    Is it so sad? I always thought they were overrated, though Mark Steyn and Benjamin Schwartz went some way to convincing me that there's more to those guys than just good voices.
    , @Almost Missouri
    @SFG


    Mencken’s (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC–there’s an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.)
     
    Can you blame them? Menken proffers snarky sniping at progressive pretensions, whereas Nolte confronts the contemporary taboos head on. Nolte may or may not be right, but he sees the target clearly.

    I’d love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness (‘body positivity’ covers up the fact that people really don’t like being fat), but I’ll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.
     
    It's curious, isn't it? The obese negress in designer spandex is America's new cultural icon, yet interest in a genuine and cultured flesh-lover simultaneously diminishes. What gives? The racial angle is one possibility, but I think the real answer is that word "genuine". The modern fat-normalizing campaign, is—like everything in this depraved age—fundamentally dishonest: it tries to ennoble fatties while simultaneously pretending they aren't fat or that "fat" even means anything. It's objective isn't so much fat acceptance as truth suppression; fat acceptance is just a means, not an end. Rubens was an authentic lover of flesh. His authenticity repels wokels as garlic repels vampires.

    Austen has a more upward trend–I’d say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don’t really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance–it’s just a steady upward trend. You don’t see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great.
     
    I had the same reaction.

    George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.
     
    Eliot got a bit of feminist subsidy, but I think the modern English professors are simply too dim to realize that "George" is actually a woman. Also, her writing tends to about Christian verities in quotidian garb, which is of course anathema today. Contempt for Christianity, verity, ... and garb ... are the only allowable attitudes now.

    At base, Austen was writing about hypergamy, even if at several octaves of sublimation, but it can still resonate.

    I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it’d also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.
     
    A major problem with Ngram and the initials guys is that Ngram reads each rendering of the initials separately. For Tolkien, this can be overcome by just using his relatively rare last name, but this won't work for Lewis or Howard. Still, Lewis seems to beat Tolkien rather handily through all time periods, to my surprise.
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @SFG

    Good comment.

    "You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together."

    It could be that both were primarily published by Weird Tales in the same time frame, that Howard contributed stories, at Lovecraft's urging, to the Mythos, and the voluminous correspondence between the two. Any Howard or Lovecraft enthusiast should read these letters. Two contrasting personalities, but with mutual respect. The thoughts and ideas expressed by these two dead guys provide a deep well of inspiration.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @SFG


    Presley and Sinatra’s fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.
     
    Huh? Sinatra was born in 1915, his fan base not much more than a decade or so thereafter. For some fun, look up Paul Harvey's Rest of the Story episode about the Forties pop idol named Francis who drove young ladies to screams. They would chase him onto train platforms carrying scissors in order to clip a lock of his hair. Of course, Harvey was referring to none other than...*

    Ngram validates my observation that the term "boomer" was not applied to people until the early 1980s, when it bled out of Steve's old industry of market research and poisoned pop "journalism". Look up boom, baby boom, boomer, and baby boomer.

    Generation labels are about as old as AIDS. Indeed, the "boomers" were the last "generation" to grow up without one.

    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.


    No Great White Defendant in sight!

    What we know: Purdue University student from Indianapolis killed inside residence hall

    *:



    https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1372179087l/18130160.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anonymous

  13. @Redneck farmer
    A lot of Lovecraft references are now about what a horrible person he was, unfortunately.

    Replies: @SFG, @fredyetagain aka superhonky

    That’s more of a later thing, I think.

    Not that I disagree–c’mon, we’re *all* equally irrelevant to Cthulhu!

    • LOL: fish, Redneck farmer
  14. This is interesting, but ….

    I won’t address popular culture figures, composers etc. Let’s just say something about Napoleon and Shakespeare.

    Frankly, these figures cannot be compared. You’ll find Napoleon only in general history surveys, French history, biographies etc. Essentially- that’s it.

    But with Shakespeare, you’ll find him everywhere. For instance, in books about modern English language novel, you’ll find him mentioned as a decisive influence on James Joyce, Virginia Woolf and William Faulkner. Since much more books are about other books, i.e. literature, it is inevitable Shakespeare will be mentioned very frequently, even when the topic is the 20th C novel.

    So I think these things are amusing, but not quantifiable.

  15. @TelfoedJohn
    You could probably get a AI to analyse this to determine future events. For instance, interest in Shakespeare seems to peak before major wars.

    Replies: @SFG, @Wilkey

    Seems to go up *during* the wars, maybe because he’s one of the few commonly known sources of martial-sounding verse in English. “Cry ‘Havoc!’, and let slip the dogs of war…” “We few, we happy few, we band of brothers…”

    I hope you’re wrong, as the curve is trending upward…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @SFG


    I hope you’re wrong, as the curve is trending upward…
     
    There are some shrewd contents in yon same paper...
    And I must freely have the half of anything
    That this same paper brings you.

    https://www.rct.uk/sites/default/files/styles/rctr-scale-1300-500/public/collection-online/0/3/503495-1421243183.jpg?itok=wVM5F6FV

  16. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Sounds plausible.

    I've heard that Don MacLean's "Vincent" was almost as big in Europe as "American Pie" was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @FPD72, @Zoos, @Paleo Liberal, @Reg Cæsar, @Wilkey

    “Vincent” was pretty huge in the UK, and seems to have lasted longer than “American Pie” despite the tasteless teen “comedy” series of the same name.

    Wiki:

    The song was a particular favorite of the rapper and actor Tupac Shakur, and was played to him in the University Medical Center of Southern Nevada, the hospital where Tupac was admitted just before he died of gunshot wounds from a drive-by shooting

    (We were in Amsterdam for two days, and ‘er indoors insisted we see the van Goghs, despite my desire to see the Vermeers in the Rijksmuseum. I’m sure that record influenced her choice. But as a paid up philistine, I always find famous paintings “in the flesh” slightly disappointing – the place is crowded, you can’t just sit and look as you can at a book of good reproductions.)

  17. OP:
    There is a suspected serial killer in Stockton. 7 shootings, 6 fatal. It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California. MO is just shooting them with a hand gun, (“Man on a mission” style similar to other murderers of homeless people) he seems to be carefully staking out places with no CCTV coverage.

    6 men killed and 1 woman who survived. 5 Hispanic, 1 white, 1 black. These kinds of figures look a lot like the racial and sex demographics of the Hoovervilles in California. Most of these people had jobs or were only just out of work. Here is a news report on the latest two killings including the black woman who survived, it makes no mention of no other blacks being the target before (It doesn’t mention the race of the other victims or that 1 of them was a blue-eyed white man) and tries to paint it as racial and neglects the homeless angle.

    The emergence of Hoovervilles were one of the defining characteristics of the Great Depression, the last great crisis and Fourth Turning in the US. Housing these days also doesn’t have a lot of ‘flop house’ style accommodation for isolated single men in crisis who just want to save and don’t care about anything but having a bed and an address. Exceptions are certain kinds of immigrants who’ll put a dozen or more shiftless men in a single house but that isn’t of use to natives since they lack the contacts and life scripts to make use of that strategy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. I laughed at the whole ‘Seattle is dying’ thing because some homeless are around the CBD now, yeah okay, everything else was fine and mass migration was fine but some homeless, oh my god…

    The assumption is the killer is a white man but there are probably as many Asians there now. And the assumption is his killings are racial despite one of the victims being a blue-eyed WASP.

    Another great example of “Everything the US media claims is about race is about class. Everything the US media claims is about class is about race.”

    • Thanks: Inquiring Mind, Bill Jones
    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Altai


    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with ... dehumanising them is real.
     
    Radicals (i.e., the opposite of conservatives) express these same behaviors - though radicals deplore persons who are superficially different from "the homeless."

    There's a lot of contempt in the NYT.
    , @stillCARealist
    @Altai

    I thought flophouses were banned in most cities for being filthy drug dens. In fact, that's part of why the homeless population soared. No longer could bums get a crummy room for next to nothing. Now they had to camp on the streets (or by the river here in Sacramento).

    I knew a guy who was often drunk, moderately crazy, rather unemployable and reduced to living in a cheap, illegal room in someone else's sublet apartment. The landlady made a modest living by renting cheap apartments, or sub-letting from others, and then re-renting them out to numerous guys, like my former friend, for cheap. Eventually she got in trouble, and all these semi-bums got turned out to the streets. That's the last I heard from him anyway.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Altai


    ...the Hoovervilles in California.
     
    The Gavinvilles. The Bidenburghs.
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    @Altai

    "A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real."

    I've noticed this as well. The conservo/upper middle class/white frat rat was the most casually cruel and clueless variant of the American hominid. They have since been bettered in this anti-social behaviour by their POColoured opposite numbers.

    The image and brief footage of the possible Stockton Shooter depicts a tallish slim man dressed, of course, in all black ensemble. Quite possibly a young white man. Steve has posted a few electronic entrail readings on the psychological state of young black males. Why? Blacks are consistently outta control whenever the leash grows slack, so no mystery. The real focus should be on young white men and their psychological state which, and admittedly I'm no entrail expert, appears to be dreadful.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @Altai

    Stockton is a good example of what has happened to the United States in my lifetime.

    I was born there in the mid-twentieth century. As far as I know, it was a good town then. My father was on the school board. He had an engineering company at the time. He was also the president of the local homeowners' association, and he organized and led the construction of a community swimming pool. One of my earliest memories is walking home from that pool with our family.

    Thank God we left in 1964.

    , @Mike Tre
    @Altai

    "A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. "

    By what measure and compared to who? (or whom?) How responsible are homeless people for dehumanizing themselves?

    How does one go about obsessively dehumanizing the supposed homeless? It seems to me most people prefer to merely avoid the homeless.

    , @tr
    @Altai


    It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California.
     
    Hoovervilles? Please, Bidenvilles!
    , @p38ace
    @Altai

    They should be called Bidenvilles.

  18. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Sounds plausible.

    I've heard that Don MacLean's "Vincent" was almost as big in Europe as "American Pie" was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @FPD72, @Zoos, @Paleo Liberal, @Reg Cæsar, @Wilkey

    There’s a new documentary, “The Day the Music Died: The Making of Don McClean’s American Pie” in which McClean explains the various sources of the lyrics from both culture and his life. It’s streaming on Paramount+. I saw it in August and thought it was worth the price of a month’s subscription (around $6.00). The director was Mark Moormann, who seems to specialize in music themed documentaries.

    The film also spends significant time on the plane crash death of Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, and Yhe Big Bopper.

  19. @Altai
    OP:
    There is a suspected serial killer in Stockton. 7 shootings, 6 fatal. It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California. MO is just shooting them with a hand gun, ("Man on a mission" style similar to other murderers of homeless people) he seems to be carefully staking out places with no CCTV coverage.

    6 men killed and 1 woman who survived. 5 Hispanic, 1 white, 1 black. These kinds of figures look a lot like the racial and sex demographics of the Hoovervilles in California. Most of these people had jobs or were only just out of work. Here is a news report on the latest two killings including the black woman who survived, it makes no mention of no other blacks being the target before (It doesn't mention the race of the other victims or that 1 of them was a blue-eyed white man) and tries to paint it as racial and neglects the homeless angle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs51eKLhhg

    The emergence of Hoovervilles were one of the defining characteristics of the Great Depression, the last great crisis and Fourth Turning in the US. Housing these days also doesn't have a lot of 'flop house' style accommodation for isolated single men in crisis who just want to save and don't care about anything but having a bed and an address. Exceptions are certain kinds of immigrants who'll put a dozen or more shiftless men in a single house but that isn't of use to natives since they lack the contacts and life scripts to make use of that strategy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. I laughed at the whole 'Seattle is dying' thing because some homeless are around the CBD now, yeah okay, everything else was fine and mass migration was fine but some homeless, oh my god...

    The assumption is the killer is a white man but there are probably as many Asians there now. And the assumption is his killings are racial despite one of the victims being a blue-eyed WASP.

    Another great example of "Everything the US media claims is about race is about class. Everything the US media claims is about class is about race."

    Replies: @Coemgen, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre, @tr, @p38ace

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with … dehumanising them is real.

    Radicals (i.e., the opposite of conservatives) express these same behaviors – though radicals deplore persons who are superficially different from “the homeless.”

    There’s a lot of contempt in the NYT.

  20. Interesting that Rubens collapsed at the same time as corsets.

    Prices in the art market skyrocketed (as inflation hedges) at the same time as Van Gogh’s fame.

  21. Fun stuff. I see from trying his name in Ngram that Steve Sailer has been enjoying a bit of a resurgence since 2014 but had his peak of fame from 2006 to 2008. So far…

    • Replies: @Gordo
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Fun stuff. I see from trying his name in Ngram that Steve Sailer has been enjoying a bit of a resurgence since 2014 but had his peak of fame from 2006 to 2008. So far…
     
    Bearing in mind the age profile of your politicians it’s not too late for Steve’s Presidential bid.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  22. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Second Nobel? I'm impressed.

    Sharpless was blinded in one eye in a chemistry lab accident over 50 years ago. He always wears goggles since.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Hodag, @Jimbo

    The ophthalmic surgeon who performed radial keratotomy on my eyes in 1985 was blind in one of his. I didn’t know that until I read his obituary. Some kind of childhood accident. I wonder if that is what got him interested in eyes or inspired him to help other people with theirs.

    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    @Buzz Mohawk

    A one-eyed person performed a micro-surgical procedure on your eyes?

    What is next, blind airline pilots?

    Not a problem, these pilots rely on instruments!

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  23. stillCARealist [AKA "ForeverCARealist"] says:
    @Altai
    OP:
    There is a suspected serial killer in Stockton. 7 shootings, 6 fatal. It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California. MO is just shooting them with a hand gun, ("Man on a mission" style similar to other murderers of homeless people) he seems to be carefully staking out places with no CCTV coverage.

    6 men killed and 1 woman who survived. 5 Hispanic, 1 white, 1 black. These kinds of figures look a lot like the racial and sex demographics of the Hoovervilles in California. Most of these people had jobs or were only just out of work. Here is a news report on the latest two killings including the black woman who survived, it makes no mention of no other blacks being the target before (It doesn't mention the race of the other victims or that 1 of them was a blue-eyed white man) and tries to paint it as racial and neglects the homeless angle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs51eKLhhg

    The emergence of Hoovervilles were one of the defining characteristics of the Great Depression, the last great crisis and Fourth Turning in the US. Housing these days also doesn't have a lot of 'flop house' style accommodation for isolated single men in crisis who just want to save and don't care about anything but having a bed and an address. Exceptions are certain kinds of immigrants who'll put a dozen or more shiftless men in a single house but that isn't of use to natives since they lack the contacts and life scripts to make use of that strategy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. I laughed at the whole 'Seattle is dying' thing because some homeless are around the CBD now, yeah okay, everything else was fine and mass migration was fine but some homeless, oh my god...

    The assumption is the killer is a white man but there are probably as many Asians there now. And the assumption is his killings are racial despite one of the victims being a blue-eyed WASP.

    Another great example of "Everything the US media claims is about race is about class. Everything the US media claims is about class is about race."

    Replies: @Coemgen, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre, @tr, @p38ace

    I thought flophouses were banned in most cities for being filthy drug dens. In fact, that’s part of why the homeless population soared. No longer could bums get a crummy room for next to nothing. Now they had to camp on the streets (or by the river here in Sacramento).

    I knew a guy who was often drunk, moderately crazy, rather unemployable and reduced to living in a cheap, illegal room in someone else’s sublet apartment. The landlady made a modest living by renting cheap apartments, or sub-letting from others, and then re-renting them out to numerous guys, like my former friend, for cheap. Eventually she got in trouble, and all these semi-bums got turned out to the streets. That’s the last I heard from him anyway.

  24. Steve, since hitting 50,000 followers on Twitter, you’ve rocketed to 50,700 in no time at all. Thoughts on that?

  25. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Steve Sailer

    The ophthalmic surgeon who performed radial keratotomy on my eyes in 1985 was blind in one of his. I didn't know that until I read his obituary. Some kind of childhood accident. I wonder if that is what got him interested in eyes or inspired him to help other people with theirs.

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind

    A one-eyed person performed a micro-surgical procedure on your eyes?

    What is next, blind airline pilots?

    Not a problem, these pilots rely on instruments!

    • LOL: The Anti-Gnostic
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Inquiring Mind

    He did a fine job. Read the obituary I linked to if you're interested. He was a very accomplished man.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  26. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    Dude, is there a reason polygamy is not an option for you?

  27. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    Bore off.

  28. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    Funny, I thought Dracula was based on Walt Whitman.

  29. I suspect the full name of Jane Austen is used to prevent confusion with fictional failed astronaut Steve Austin or NYTimes best selling author Stone Cold Steve Austin.

  30. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you’re supposed to be #ownvoices.

    China doesn’t get PC protection any more, being such a rich and powerful nation.

  31. Byron’s contemporary rock-star fame is strange today. It seems that he personally met a lot of movers and shakers and seemed to really enthrall them, and they subsequently wrote a lot of great things about him. But to later people who never met him, his accomplishments seem less dynamic and memorable, and his incest with his half-sister damaged him.

    Byron’s personality seems much like JFK or Bill Clinton: hypersexual, domineering, and center-of-attention when you personally experience it (hence all 3’s loyal followers, apologists, and sex partners), but ultimately more sizzle than steak when you look at it with the cold eye of historical accomplishment and soberness.

    Like JFK, it helped Byron that he died young and in heroic circumstances, issuing a shock to sensibilities of his contemporaries and leading them to lionize him out of bounds to his actual worth. Bill Clinton, having aged, has not been so lucky, as he’s faded and his scandals have semi-caught up with him (e.g. Epstein, Clinton Foundation bribes, Marc Rich pardon, etc.).

    • Replies: @Meretricious
    @R.G. Camara

    RGC, have you read any of Lord Byron's poems? Byron is one of the leading figures of the Romantic movement, and is regarded as one of the greatest English poets. He remains widely read and influential.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

  32. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Second Nobel? I'm impressed.

    Sharpless was blinded in one eye in a chemistry lab accident over 50 years ago. He always wears goggles since.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Hodag, @Jimbo

    If Paris is worth a Mass, are two Nobels worth an eye?

  33. One shortcoming of these Ngram graphs is the y-axis. The only common way to express proportions in English is with the word “percent” (the symbol %). But with Ngrams we need to express the proportion of occurrences of a given name or term among all words in published books by numbers (proportions) that are orders of magnitude less than a percent (1/100). It sure would be convenient if we had a simple way to express very small proportions. But we do! Just use the

    https://www.nist.gov/pml/owm/metric-si-prefixes

    milli 10^(-3)
    micro 10^(-6)
    nano 10^(-9)
    pico 1o^(-12)
    femto 10^(-15)
    atto 10^(-18)
    zepto 10^(-21)
    yocto 10^(-24)

    Thus, instead of writing “0.0000100%”, this proportion is equal to 10^(-5)*10^(-2) = 10^(-7) = 100*10^(-9) and can be expressed more briefly as “100 nano”.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    Don't let Max Planck know what you're up to.
    I couldn't decide if he's the worlds biggest egotist, where literally everything in time and space has something named after him, but then I reflect on what they are and I've decided he's the worlds biggest egotist in the smallest possible way.

    Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

  34. @Buzz Mohawk
    Fun stuff. I see from trying his name in Ngram that Steve Sailer has been enjoying a bit of a resurgence since 2014 but had his peak of fame from 2006 to 2008. So far...

    Replies: @Gordo

    Fun stuff. I see from trying his name in Ngram that Steve Sailer has been enjoying a bit of a resurgence since 2014 but had his peak of fame from 2006 to 2008. So far…

    Bearing in mind the age profile of your politicians it’s not too late for Steve’s Presidential bid.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Gordo

    Oh, he has plenty of time. He's a full 16 years younger than Joe Biden. He also has an IQ at least 2 SD higher. All he has to do is cynically start marketing* himself now to his Coalition of the Fringes, which he knows better than anyone else. It's too late to use the Sailer Strategy.

    *Right up his alley, plus on really big stuff like COVID-19 and The Ukraine's War, his writing surely has satisfied the powers that be, so they might not actually get in his way. Don't get me wrong: I am a big fan. Nobody is perfect, and he is smarter, more educated and more accomplished than I am. It is a privilege to comment here. The mere fact that he allows this shit speaks volumes about him.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

  35. When the libertarian economist Murray Rothbard passed away, William F. Buckley wrote a particularly nasty obituary in which he said the following in his usual verbose way: “In Murray’s case, much of what drove him was a contrarian spirit, the deranging scrupulosity that caused him to disdain such as Herbert Hoover, Ronald Reagan, Milton Friedman, and-yes-Newt Gingrich, while huffing and puffing in the little cloister whose walls he labored so strenuously to contract, leaving him, in the end, not as the father of a swelling movement that “rous [ed] the masses from their slumber,” as he once stated his ambition, but with about as many disciples as David Koresh had in his little redoubt in Waco. ”

    If you do an Ngram for both of them, Buckley has been dropping since the eighties while Rothbard has steadily risen. It turned out Rothbard actually was the father of a swelling movement and Buckley ended up with as many disciples as David Koresh. Buckley’s National Review style conservatism is now largely dead as a dodo bird. I can remember going to see Buckley speak one time here in Indianapolis and the audience looked like it was rounded up and bused in from all the local nursing homes. No one under 60, except me, appeared to be interested in him. He left almost no young disciples behind and is becoming increasingly forgotten.

    • Agree: Muggles
  36. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    An unremarked meta-pattern in Steve’s Ngrams is that except for megastars Shakespeare and Napoleon, everyone who isn’t already bumping along their lower asymptote has gone into an often steep decline in the last decade or two if they weren’t already declining. The only exceptions are William F. Buckley (likely—as Steve noted—because of lefties wishing aloud for a new Buckley to rid them of these turbulent [rightwing] priests), Edgar Allen Poe (maybe he’s seen as a “safe” way to namecheck classic American authors), and possibly H.G. Wells (which I can’t explain).

    The obvious explanation for this melancholy withdrawing roar is that since the last decade or two, a new and growing wedge of acultural garbage (“woke”) [anti-]literature is being published. In other words, following faith, the culture that ultimately depended on it appears to be dying, leaving behind only the petrified landmarks of Shakespeare and Napoleon upon the naked shingle. And as Arnold foresaw, we are increasingly on a darkling plain swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, where ignorant armies clash by night.

    Well, possibly that is overly pessimistic. After all, Google’s Ngram counts words published, not words sold or words read, so, for example, seventeen copies of Gender Unicorn for Roger published in 2019 would count, but 17 million readings of T.S. Eliot in 2019 do not. Also, as Google started the Ngram project in the 2000s, it captures works published since then, but relies on library collection for older works, which collections have doubtless had a slow winnowing effect on their archives: the older the work, the higher quality it had to be to survive the slow attrition. So possibly the trends since the Ngram project began are an artifact of recency bias. One can hope, but still it is hard to imagine that even the forgotten worst of the 19th century was as bad as the median published today.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    @Almost Missouri


    ...and possibly H.G. Wells (which I can’t explain).
     
    Most likely it's due to a continued stream of popular film and TV adaptions of his work.
  37. Entering the text “spanked all the cheerleaders” got zero results, as well as permutations of the phrase. Perhaps google has not yet digitized the many fine porn novels of my youth.

    However, teh word “cheerleader” returns a compellingly ascendant curve :

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=cheerleader&year_start=1800&year_end=2019&corpus=26&smoothing=6&direct_url=t1%3B%2Ccheerleader%3B%2Cc0#t1%3B%2Ccheerleader%3B%2Cc0

    • LOL: Sam Malone
  38. Anonymous[365] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bardon Kaldian
    Nobels go gay.

    Of the 3 Chemistry Nobels, one is for L woman. If we count Svante Umlaut as a semi-gay, then there are 1.5 LBGT Nobels this year.

    Also, Sharpless got his 2nd Nobel, so he's now in the company of Curie, Bardeen,..

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Anonymous

    Of the 3 Chemistry Nobels, one is for L woman. If we count Svante Umlaut as a semi-gay, then there are 1.5 LBGT Nobels this year.

    Where is the “B” from LGBT ? So, it’s two this year. BTW, Pääbo looks like John Maynard Keynes. From a uninhibited exclusive gay life in the first half of life to a conventional family life, in the second half.

    Also, Sharpless got his 2nd Nobel, so he’s now in the company of Curie, Bardeen,..

    It looks like there is an innate component in scientific geniuses. There are children of former Nobels (like Pääbo) and others who were able to win more than one prize, like Sharpless .

  39. Anon[251] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Michigan SAT results:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/monitoringbias/status/1577324012014796800

    Iteratively LaGriffing the numbers, if you set a 1200 score to an IQ of 113 (trial and error) and you assume the standard 85 and 100 IQ means for blacks and whites and a standard deviation of 15, you get rounded 3 percent and 19 percent clearing the 1200=113 level. It works out perfectly.

    However 47 percent of Asians would clear 1200 only with an average IQ of 112, about a third of a standard deviation higher than the average IQ usually given for them. Perhaps there is some self selection among Asians who moved to Michigan?

  40. Anonymous[213] • Disclaimer says:
    @dearieme
    A good game is: if in a mad world you were allowed only three, who would they be?

    For me, Painters: Rembrandt, Vermeer, Turner. (Commendation: Monet.)

    Classical music: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven. (Commendation: Papa Haydn.)

    Jazz: Armstrong, Beiderbecke, Bechet. (Commendation: Django.)

    Prose in English: Shakespeare and ... actually, there's nobody else even close. He's the Don Bradman of writers. I'll grant that Miss Austen is the finest of novelists in English. Scott must be her principal competitor. I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small. Afterthought: how about Gibbon? His Decline and Fall is full of wonderful writing.

    Poetry: I won't double-count Mr W S so I'll go for Burns. Who else (in English or near-English)? Sheets and Kelly I suppose. How about Chaucer? But he's bloody hard work unless you use a translation (as we didn't at school).

    Stuff in foreign: even at the risk of being assassinated by the CIA I plump for lots of Russkis.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SunBakedSuburb, @Verymuchalive, @james wilson

    It’s not a good game.

    I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small.

    Is He Dead? (1898), play
    The Battle Hymn of the Republic, Updated (1901), satirical lyric
    King Leopold’s Soliloquy (1905), satire
    Little Bessie Would Assist Providence (1908), poem
    Slovenly Peter (1935, posthumous), children’s book[N 2]
    Some Thoughts on the Science of Onanism (1879), a speech given to The Stomach Club

    The Innocents Abroad (1869), travel
    Roughing It (1872), travel
    Old Times on the Mississippi (1876), travel
    Some Rambling Notes of an Idle Excursion (1877), travel
    A Tramp Abroad (1880), travel
    Life on the Mississippi (1883), travel
    Following the Equator (sometimes titled “More Tramps Abroad”) (1897), travel
    Is Shakespeare Dead? (1909)
    Moments with Mark Twain (1920, posthumous)
    Mark Twain’s Notebook (1935, posthumous)
    Letters from Hawaii (letters written in 1866, published as a book in 1947)

    “Advice to Little Girls” (1865)
    “On the Decay of the Art of Lying” (1880)
    “The Awful German Language” (1880)
    “Advice to Youth” (1882)
    “Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offenses” (1895)
    “English As She Is Taught” (1897)
    “Concerning the Jews” (1898)
    “My First Lie, and How I Got Out of It” (1899)[14]
    “A Salutation Speech From the Nineteenth Century to the Twentieth” (1900)
    “To the Person Sitting in Darkness” (1901)
    “To My Missionary Critics” (1901)
    “Edmund Burke on Croker and Tammany” (1901)
    “What Is Man?” (1906)
    “Christian Science” (1907)
    “Queen Victoria’s Jubilee” (1910)
    “The United States of Lyncherdom” (1923, posthumous)

    “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” (1867)
    “General Washington’s Negro Body-Servant” (1868)[4]
    “Cannibalism in the Cars” (1868)
    “A Medieval Romance” [1868] (unfinished)[5]
    “My Late Senatorial Secretaryship” (1868)[6]
    Mark Twain vs Blondin [1869 satire letter]][7]
    “A Ghost Story” (1870)[8]: 176–180 
    “A True Story, Repeated Word for Word As I Heard It” (1874)[8]: 70–73 
    “Some Learned Fables for Good Old Boys and Girls” (1875)[8]: 77–83 
    “The Story Of The Bad Little Boy” (1875)
    “The Story Of The Good Little Boy” (1875)
    “A Literary Nightmare” (1876)
    “A Murder, a Mystery, and a Marriage” (1876)
    “The Canvasser’s Tale” (1876)
    “The Invalid’s Story” (1877)[8]: 135–? 
    “The Great Revolution in Pitcairn” (1879)[9]
    “1601: Conversation, as it was by the Social Fireside, in the Time of the Tudors” (1880)
    “The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm” (1882)
    “The Stolen White Elephant” (1882)
    “Luck” (1891)
    “Those Extraordinary Twins” (1892)
    “Is He Living Or Is He Dead?” (1893)
    “The Esquimau Maiden’s Romance” (1893)
    “The Million Pound Bank Note” (1893)[8]: 226–238 
    “The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg” (1900)
    “A Double Barrelled Detective Story” (1902)
    “A Dog’s Tale” (1904)
    “The War Prayer” (1905)
    “Hunting the Deceitful Turkey” (1906)
    “A Fable” (1909)
    “Captain Stormfield’s Visit to Heaven” (1909)
    “My Platonic Sweetheart” (1912, posthumous)
    “The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine”[10] (2017, posthumous)

    Et m’fing cetera.

    • Replies: @Indiana Jack
    @Anonymous

    A graphing of "Mark Twain" on Ngram shows some interesting results. His peak occurred in 1890, 20 years before his death, and then declined sharply (mirroring Twain's financial difficulties at the same time). His low point was about 1903, and then rose and fell several times afterwards, with the highest peaks around 1952 and 2003 (the latter coinciding with the release of the Ken Burns documentary). His popularity has been declining since the early 2000's, but remains fairly high - about as high as it stood in 1897.

    , @dearieme
    @Anonymous

    If I'd known his oeuvre was as large as that I'd have rejected him immediately. A gazillion publications and only two famous books. Third rater, I suppose.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  41. I really enjoyed this article on Ngram comparisons. Now I’m a little embarrassed by my enthusiasm for the topic. I’m not actually a nerd nor do I embrace statistical analysis as a basis for problem solving. Nevertheless, it seems I’m not quite myself today. Have I been reading too much Sailer? Are the changes permanent?

  42. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    I get the impression that Elvis attracts new generations of fans and therefore remains a cultural icon even with many of his original fans gone

    Another enduring figure is Albert Einstein. Not so much because of his theories, which few understand, but in large part because of his bizarre appearance.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    @prosa123

    Einstein set the mark for all future Mad Professors in fact and fiction.

    https://cdn.theatlantic.com/thumbor/Aa4bZNrxnPI5-woP2EVJf8fYJAw=/1x207:1496x1048/976x549/media/img/2018/03/lead_large-1/original.jpg

    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-54KOgQUC8UY/UHqbJRghEuI/AAAAAAAAEmM/TaK_WbCWuLM/s1600/Metropolis_091Pyxurz.jpg

    Rotwang in Metropolis

    https://www.bertelsmann.com/media/news-und-media/bilder-news-und-pms/das-cabinet-des-dr-caligari-standfoto-1920-quelle-deutsches-filminstitut-dif-frankfurt-am-main-1600x900_article_landscape_gt_1200_grid.jpg

    Dr Caligari

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OL1kT3-BPuo

    Dr Magnus Pyke

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JH9L6VonhQc

    Sir Patrick Moore

  43. Try Emmett Till and Christopher Newsom. Newsom of course flat lines, post 2007 no different than pre 2007. Is there any white victim that would create a blip?

    • Agree: Gordo
  44. It’s impressively connosieurlicht of you to include Poussin. He’s often said to be, and in my experience really is, a favorite of many art critics and historians and THE favorite painter of many or even most (real) artists, but not much known among the art-looking public.

  45. @Almost Missouri
    @SFG

    An unremarked meta-pattern in Steve's Ngrams is that except for megastars Shakespeare and Napoleon, everyone who isn't already bumping along their lower asymptote has gone into an often steep decline in the last decade or two if they weren't already declining. The only exceptions are William F. Buckley (likely—as Steve noted—because of lefties wishing aloud for a new Buckley to rid them of these turbulent [rightwing] priests), Edgar Allen Poe (maybe he's seen as a "safe" way to namecheck classic American authors), and possibly H.G. Wells (which I can't explain).

    The obvious explanation for this melancholy withdrawing roar is that since the last decade or two, a new and growing wedge of acultural garbage ("woke") [anti-]literature is being published. In other words, following faith, the culture that ultimately depended on it appears to be dying, leaving behind only the petrified landmarks of Shakespeare and Napoleon upon the naked shingle. And as Arnold foresaw, we are increasingly on a darkling plain swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, where ignorant armies clash by night.

    Well, possibly that is overly pessimistic. After all, Google's Ngram counts words published, not words sold or words read, so, for example, seventeen copies of Gender Unicorn for Roger published in 2019 would count, but 17 million readings of T.S. Eliot in 2019 do not. Also, as Google started the Ngram project in the 2000s, it captures works published since then, but relies on library collection for older works, which collections have doubtless had a slow winnowing effect on their archives: the older the work, the higher quality it had to be to survive the slow attrition. So possibly the trends since the Ngram project began are an artifact of recency bias. One can hope, but still it is hard to imagine that even the forgotten worst of the 19th century was as bad as the median published today.

    Replies: @Pincher Martin

    …and possibly H.G. Wells (which I can’t explain).

    Most likely it’s due to a continued stream of popular film and TV adaptions of his work.

    • Thanks: Almost Missouri
  46. The Murder of the Man who was Shakespeare Calvin Hoffman

    https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/13647014

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Gordo
    @Emil Nikola Richard

    Nonsense but entertaining nonsense, I must have read it half a dozen times.

    There are a few good books like that, not true but a rip roaring read, another example that springs to mind is ‘The River’ by Edward Hooper.

  47. Two showbiz fun-size items, regarding ‘fame’…

    John Garfield was a movie star in the ’40s and ’50s, big box-office draw and several Academy Award nominations. He was born in New York in a Jewish ghetto, named Julius Garfinkle. One day returning to the neighborhood, he ran into a woman who lived below his family when he was a small boy, and she greeted him with a great deal of warmth and enthusiasm. Garfield had a fun reminiscence with her, asked about her her kids which were his old playmates, when she smiled at him and asked, “so, Julie, what have you been doing?”

    And the five stages of show business fame:
    1) who is John Garfield?
    2) get me John Garfield.
    3) get me a John Garfield type.
    4) get me a young John Garfield.
    5)who is John Garfield?

  48. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s.

    I have some familiarity with Dungeons and Dragons, though not with Appendix N. I did know a guy in high school who was really into D&D and Lovecraft. I think that his obsession with the former preceded the latter, which would confirm your theory. I just looked him up and found he is now a professor of comparative religion at a second-tier university where he publishes impenetrable gobbledygook, so whatever crazy stuff he spouted in high school was arguably less insane than what he does professionally today. (Delayed mid-rot from Shub-Niggurath?) … (“Niggurath” … hmmmm.)

    You’ll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious)

    Noted, but the coefficient looks large.

    The movies with Schwarzenegger don’t seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated–he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    I guess that outside of iSteve readers, attending John Milius movies doesn’t translate to future publishing.

    Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections.

    This is an acute observation: all three of those leading contemporary male authors are pseudonymous ciphers for obvious reasons of self-defense. This is a hint as to why the Masculine Revival remains subterranean and may remain so. It is also a rebuke to those speak airily of America’s “free press”.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Byss[h]e Shelley

    Tried it. Unsurprisingly, Byron’s 19th century fame swamps everything else into insignificance. If you remove Byron and add John Keats, though, you see what you probably anticipated: John leads Percy by a hair until the late 19th century when Percy decays to a half-length behind John, as Mary simultaneously comes out of nowhere to take up John’s slack (Shelley renown was apparently a zero-sum game at the time), then in the post-war world Mary begins an inexorable ascent up the chart, supercharged by feminist subsidy in the 1980s and 1990s to sit on a high plateau overlooking her misfortunately penised colleagues today.

    Presley and Sinatra’s fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Is it so sad? I always thought they were overrated, though Mark Steyn and Benjamin Schwartz went some way to convincing me that there’s more to those guys than just good voices.

  49. Meanwhile in Ireland.

    • Thanks: Richard B
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Dream

    Blacks who act up in Ireland are going to discover why the Irish gave the English so many problems throughout the 20th century. The Irish get pretty mad when they start feeling oppressed. The Troubles were absolutely bloodthirsty, and the Irish observed the silence of omerta about what they did.

    Replies: @Polistra, @YetAnotherAnon, @Harry Baldwin

    , @Richard B
    @Dream

    That was beautiful to watch. Hopefully we'll see more of this. And not just in Ireland.

    Though, I have to say, that watching this helps confirm that the IRA has become a bought and paid for shill of the hostile elite (if it wasn't always). Just as BLM itself is. Obviously. Hence the orchestrated "alliance." But these boys know better.

    Any change is going to come from the cultural periphery. For example, the boys in this video. Sooner or later people simply start saying No! in response to things where anything other than Yes! would have been unimaginable.

  50. OT – Steve’s favourite Man With Gold Chain becomes most sanctioned man in the world, with 204 separate sanctions (he’s also been made a general).

    • LOL: Sam Malone
  51. @SFG
    @TelfoedJohn

    Seems to go up *during* the wars, maybe because he's one of the few commonly known sources of martial-sounding verse in English. "Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the dogs of war..." "We few, we happy few, we band of brothers..."

    I hope you're wrong, as the curve is trending upward...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I hope you’re wrong, as the curve is trending upward…

    There are some shrewd contents in yon same paper…
    And I must freely have the half of anything
    That this same paper brings you.

  52. FWIW, there are a bunch of Napoleons. Napoleon I (early 1800s), Napoleon IV(mid 1800s), Napoleon XIV (1966) among the most famous. There were multiple branches of the Bonaparte including at least two American branchs,
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jérôme_Napoléon_Bonaparte
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Bonaparte#Later_life_in_the_United_States_and_Europe

  53. @Altai
    OP:
    There is a suspected serial killer in Stockton. 7 shootings, 6 fatal. It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California. MO is just shooting them with a hand gun, ("Man on a mission" style similar to other murderers of homeless people) he seems to be carefully staking out places with no CCTV coverage.

    6 men killed and 1 woman who survived. 5 Hispanic, 1 white, 1 black. These kinds of figures look a lot like the racial and sex demographics of the Hoovervilles in California. Most of these people had jobs or were only just out of work. Here is a news report on the latest two killings including the black woman who survived, it makes no mention of no other blacks being the target before (It doesn't mention the race of the other victims or that 1 of them was a blue-eyed white man) and tries to paint it as racial and neglects the homeless angle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs51eKLhhg

    The emergence of Hoovervilles were one of the defining characteristics of the Great Depression, the last great crisis and Fourth Turning in the US. Housing these days also doesn't have a lot of 'flop house' style accommodation for isolated single men in crisis who just want to save and don't care about anything but having a bed and an address. Exceptions are certain kinds of immigrants who'll put a dozen or more shiftless men in a single house but that isn't of use to natives since they lack the contacts and life scripts to make use of that strategy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. I laughed at the whole 'Seattle is dying' thing because some homeless are around the CBD now, yeah okay, everything else was fine and mass migration was fine but some homeless, oh my god...

    The assumption is the killer is a white man but there are probably as many Asians there now. And the assumption is his killings are racial despite one of the victims being a blue-eyed WASP.

    Another great example of "Everything the US media claims is about race is about class. Everything the US media claims is about class is about race."

    Replies: @Coemgen, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre, @tr, @p38ace

    …the Hoovervilles in California.

    The Gavinvilles. The Bidenburghs.

  54. @YetAnotherAnon
    Just one thing, you looked for most strings in "English", whereas for Johann Sebastian Bach and Antonio Vivaldi you looked in "English Fiction". How often do composers get namechecked like that in fiction? Surely hardly ever.

    "Bond slipped off his hand-made Loake Oxfords,put Johann Sebastian Bach on the Mediterraneo turntable, poured a martini and put his feet up."


    In Robert Harris' book Enigma, our hero goes with a girl to hear St Matthew Passion, but the composer's full name never gets mentioned. In our days "Bach" is sufficient, few listen to CPE Bach or JC Bach.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Meretricious, @AceDeuce

    CPE Bach is considered a major composer, and ppl still listen to his music:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Philipp_Emanuel_Bach

  55. @prosa123
    @SFG

    I get the impression that Elvis attracts new generations of fans and therefore remains a cultural icon even with many of his original fans gone

    Another enduring figure is Albert Einstein. Not so much because of his theories, which few understand, but in large part because of his bizarre appearance.

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    Einstein set the mark for all future Mad Professors in fact and fiction.

    Rotwang in Metropolis

    Dr Caligari

    Dr Magnus Pyke

    Sir Patrick Moore

  56. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    Mencken’s (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC–there’s an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.)

    Can you blame them? Menken proffers snarky sniping at progressive pretensions, whereas Nolte confronts the contemporary taboos head on. Nolte may or may not be right, but he sees the target clearly.

    I’d love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness (‘body positivity’ covers up the fact that people really don’t like being fat), but I’ll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    It’s curious, isn’t it? The obese negress in designer spandex is America’s new cultural icon, yet interest in a genuine and cultured flesh-lover simultaneously diminishes. What gives? The racial angle is one possibility, but I think the real answer is that word “genuine”. The modern fat-normalizing campaign, is—like everything in this depraved age—fundamentally dishonest: it tries to ennoble fatties while simultaneously pretending they aren’t fat or that “fat” even means anything. It’s objective isn’t so much fat acceptance as truth suppression; fat acceptance is just a means, not an end. Rubens was an authentic lover of flesh. His authenticity repels wokels as garlic repels vampires.

    Austen has a more upward trend–I’d say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don’t really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance–it’s just a steady upward trend. You don’t see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great.

    I had the same reaction.

    George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Eliot got a bit of feminist subsidy, but I think the modern English professors are simply too dim to realize that “George” is actually a woman. Also, her writing tends to about Christian verities in quotidian garb, which is of course anathema today. Contempt for Christianity, verity, … and garb … are the only allowable attitudes now.

    At base, Austen was writing about hypergamy, even if at several octaves of sublimation, but it can still resonate.

    I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it’d also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.

    A major problem with Ngram and the initials guys is that Ngram reads each rendering of the initials separately. For Tolkien, this can be overcome by just using his relatively rare last name, but this won’t work for Lewis or Howard. Still, Lewis seems to beat Tolkien rather handily through all time periods, to my surprise.

  57. Anon[141] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    The Red Scare podcast ladies are continuing to reference Steve Sailer. One of them retweeted an old ugly architecture tweet of Steve’s this week, and on last week’s podcast they made various references to Steve, including that Matt Yglesias has become Steve’s “sim” and that “The moral arc of history is long, and it curves toward Steve Sailer.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Scare_(podcast)

  58. @Bill Jones
    Google has fucked up ngram, just like everything else they touch.
    The shape of their curves now is markedly different for a number of "controversial" topics than it was ten years ago.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    The shape of their curves now is markedly different for a number of “controversial” topics than it was ten years ago.

    Can you elaborate?

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Almost Missouri

    In 2012 they found the word holocaust was exceeding rare through the 1960's drifted up only slightly and only in the early 70's spiked to the levels we've enjoyed since.

    Today they find a very different history of their version of history.

    "He who controls the past..."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  59. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    There seems to have been a big jump for many famous people once the internet got going, and everybody who was even remotely curious about anyone thereupon looked up xyz, absorbed what they were interested in, and then stopped looking. Data collected in the years to come may be a more accurate reflection of what people are actually interested in long-term.

    However, I would be concerned about the effect of bots distorting search data, since there’s money to be made in faking that. I’d also be curious about what people from foreign countries search for among Western figures.

    Boy, the writers and musicians I’m most interested in don’t even show up on the Ngram. Figures.

  60. @dearieme
    A good game is: if in a mad world you were allowed only three, who would they be?

    For me, Painters: Rembrandt, Vermeer, Turner. (Commendation: Monet.)

    Classical music: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven. (Commendation: Papa Haydn.)

    Jazz: Armstrong, Beiderbecke, Bechet. (Commendation: Django.)

    Prose in English: Shakespeare and ... actually, there's nobody else even close. He's the Don Bradman of writers. I'll grant that Miss Austen is the finest of novelists in English. Scott must be her principal competitor. I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small. Afterthought: how about Gibbon? His Decline and Fall is full of wonderful writing.

    Poetry: I won't double-count Mr W S so I'll go for Burns. Who else (in English or near-English)? Sheets and Kelly I suppose. How about Chaucer? But he's bloody hard work unless you use a translation (as we didn't at school).

    Stuff in foreign: even at the risk of being assassinated by the CIA I plump for lots of Russkis.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SunBakedSuburb, @Verymuchalive, @james wilson

    “Prose in English: Shakespeare”

    Do plays count as prose? Shakespeare was a consortium. Most writers are jugheads who stick to one mode or genre. Very few polymaths within the jugheadian literary realm.

    “I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small.”

    So was his penix (had to: it was floating up there like a lesbian slow-pitch softball). But seriously, if you’re interested in stage version of Twain with a reanimator flavour send Art Deco a postcard with your po box info., he’ll get it to me, and I’ll send you two tickets to a wonderful solo stage performance of Mark Twain’s ramblings by an interesting new actor. The only catch is you’ll need to book passage on a Black Love Cruise ship to see the show.

    • Replies: @I, Libertine
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Shakespeare's plays are more or less half prose and half verse. He wrote in the late sixteenth century, a transitional time when playwriting was gradually changing from one form to the other.

    His poetry (to which he owes half his fame, IMHO) was, of course, in verse.

  61. @Almost Missouri
    @Bill Jones


    The shape of their curves now is markedly different for a number of “controversial” topics than it was ten years ago.
     
    Can you elaborate?

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    In 2012 they found the word holocaust was exceeding rare through the 1960’s drifted up only slightly and only in the early 70’s spiked to the levels we’ve enjoyed since.

    Today they find a very different history of their version of history.

    “He who controls the past…”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bill Jones


    In 2012 they found the word holocaust was exceeding rare through the 1960’s drifted up only slightly and only in the early 70’s spiked to the levels we’ve enjoyed since.
     
    It was usually prefaced with nuclear.

    It's also found multiple times in the Old Testament, at least in the English translations the Catholic Church uses.

    As suggested by its Greek origin (holos "whole", and kaustos "burnt") the word designates an offering entirely consumed by fire, in use among the Jews and some pagan nations of antiquity...

    Only animals could be offered in holocaust; for human victims, which were sacrificed by the Chanaanites and by other peoples, were positively excluded from the legitimate worship of Yahweh (cf. Leviticus 18:21; 20:2-5; Deuteronomy 12:31; etc...)


    The principle rites to be carried out in the offering of holocausts, were (1) on the part of the offerer, that he should bring the animal to the door of the tabernacle, impose his hands on its head, slay it to the north of the altar, flay and cut up its carcass, and wash its entrails and legs; (2) on the part of the priest, that he should receive the blood of the victim, sprinkle it about the altar, and burn the offering.

    https://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07396b.htm
     

    https://whoisisrael.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Burnt-Offering-768x512.jpg
  62. OT – it’s not just European industry that the US want to take down, it’s their marine insurance and tanker business too. But if the EU and City of London want to commit suicide, who’s going to stop them?

    https://www.nytimes.com/live/2022/10/05/world/russia-ukraine-war-news#russia-oil-price-cap

    Under the new rules, companies involved in the shipping of Russian oil — including shipowners, insurers and underwriters — would be on the hook for ensuring that the oil they are helping to transport is being sold at or below the price cap. If they are caught helping Russia sell at a higher price, they could face lawsuits in their home countries for violating sanctions.
    Russian crude will come under an embargo in most of the European Union on Dec. 5, and petroleum products will follow in February. The price cap on shipments to non-E.U. countries has been championed by U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen as a necessary complement to the European oil embargo.

    Under the E.U. deal, Greece, Malta and Cyprus will be permitted to continue shipping Russian oil. Had they not agreed to place their companies at the forefront of applying the price cap, they would have been forbidden from shipping or insuring Russian oil cargo outside the European Union, a huge hit for major industries.

    More than half of the tankers now shipping Russia’s oil are Greek-owned. And the financial services that underpin that trade — including insurance, reinsurance and letters of credit — are overwhelmingly based in the European Union and Britain.

    “This is of course an open invitation to other countries to enter the oil shipping and related financial services businesses at the cost of European companies.”

    China and India are going to love their financial services getting a global boost. I can see the Greek fleet becoming Chinese.

    The US Strategic Oil Reserve is nearly halved, and OPEC have cut production by 2m barrels a day.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @YetAnotherAnon

    NYT;
    More than half of the tankers now shipping Russia’s oil are Greek-owned.

    Like many such articles in the NYT and others, no references are produced for this claim. It is generally accepted that most Russian oil is shipped in Russian-owned tankers, although these may be constantly reflagged, as this article from Lloyds List makes plain.
    https://lloydslist.maritimeintelligence.informa.com/LL1141450/Russia-sanctions-to-push-subterfuge-tankers-above-400-ships-says-BRS

    You;

    “This is of course an open invitation to other countries to enter the oil shipping and related financial services businesses at the cost of European companies.”
    China and India are going to love their financial services getting a global boost. I can see the Greek fleet becoming Chinese.

    Unlikely. Russia already has a self-sufficient financial system and will do it themselves, as this hostile Wikipedia article ultimately has to admit.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovcomflot

    It came to light on 13 June that Ingosstrakh had insured the tankers of Sovcomflot.[10]
    On 10 June 2022 the Russian National Reinsurance Company announced it would reinsure Russian ships including Sovcomflot's when the Russian shipping industry was left high and dry by the 2022 sanctions.[11][10]
    On 23 June 2022 the Indian Register of Shipping announced that it would provide safety certification several dozen ships managed by Dubai-based SCF Management Services, a subsidiary of Sovcomflot.[12][13][14] The CEO said on 18 June that Sovcomflot had insured all its cargo vessels with Russian insurers.[12][15]

    Note the absurd and false claim that the Russian shipping industry was left high and dry by Western Sanctions. No they weren't ! Ingosstrakh, RNRC and other Russian insurers merely took over insurance.

    Conclusion.
    The Russian-owned oil and LNG tanker fleet will continue to grow, even if in the interim it has to use subterfuge tankers with multiple reflags. Nowadays, Russia has a sophisticated financial system and will undertake most of its marine insurance requirements.

    This is of course the beginning of the end of Lloyd's and the City of London. Other non-Western companies see the sanctions and will insure with Russian and other non-Western insurance and service providers. 10 years from now, Lloyd's will be a fraction of its present size. Turkeys and Christmas spring to mind.

    , @Bill Jones
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The Saudi oil production cut was the biggest FU to the West I can recall. They are clearly positioning themselves for the upcoming Multi-Polar International Law based World Order. The implications of this for US hegemony are dire.

  63. @Redneck farmer
    A lot of Lovecraft references are now about what a horrible person he was, unfortunately.

    Replies: @SFG, @fredyetagain aka superhonky

    Lovecraft’s views were entirely standard for intelligent White men of his day. The only horrible people in this picture are his woke critics.
    HPL forever.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @fredyetagain aka superhonky

    Lovecraft's foes are foul, noisome and pustulent monsters from beyond, shambling and slobbering as they spread their slimy trail of foetid poison

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @fredyetagain aka superhonky

    He was an equal opportunity hater - in The Dreams In The Witch-House the evil being kills the child of a "clod-like laundry worker" with a Polish name, and The Street definitely wasn't keen on left-wing "Eastern Europeans".

    In The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath the moon-beasts consume "the fat black men of Parg, who they bought by the pound".

  64. I got halfway through the column and decided to read an Organic Chemistry text instead.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @The Anti-Gnostic


    I got halfway through the column and decided to read an Organic Chemistry text instead.
     
    Why?
  65. @Altai
    OP:
    There is a suspected serial killer in Stockton. 7 shootings, 6 fatal. It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California. MO is just shooting them with a hand gun, ("Man on a mission" style similar to other murderers of homeless people) he seems to be carefully staking out places with no CCTV coverage.

    6 men killed and 1 woman who survived. 5 Hispanic, 1 white, 1 black. These kinds of figures look a lot like the racial and sex demographics of the Hoovervilles in California. Most of these people had jobs or were only just out of work. Here is a news report on the latest two killings including the black woman who survived, it makes no mention of no other blacks being the target before (It doesn't mention the race of the other victims or that 1 of them was a blue-eyed white man) and tries to paint it as racial and neglects the homeless angle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs51eKLhhg

    The emergence of Hoovervilles were one of the defining characteristics of the Great Depression, the last great crisis and Fourth Turning in the US. Housing these days also doesn't have a lot of 'flop house' style accommodation for isolated single men in crisis who just want to save and don't care about anything but having a bed and an address. Exceptions are certain kinds of immigrants who'll put a dozen or more shiftless men in a single house but that isn't of use to natives since they lack the contacts and life scripts to make use of that strategy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. I laughed at the whole 'Seattle is dying' thing because some homeless are around the CBD now, yeah okay, everything else was fine and mass migration was fine but some homeless, oh my god...

    The assumption is the killer is a white man but there are probably as many Asians there now. And the assumption is his killings are racial despite one of the victims being a blue-eyed WASP.

    Another great example of "Everything the US media claims is about race is about class. Everything the US media claims is about class is about race."

    Replies: @Coemgen, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre, @tr, @p38ace

    “A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real.”

    I’ve noticed this as well. The conservo/upper middle class/white frat rat was the most casually cruel and clueless variant of the American hominid. They have since been bettered in this anti-social behaviour by their POColoured opposite numbers.

    The image and brief footage of the possible Stockton Shooter depicts a tallish slim man dressed, of course, in all black ensemble. Quite possibly a young white man. Steve has posted a few electronic entrail readings on the psychological state of young black males. Why? Blacks are consistently outta control whenever the leash grows slack, so no mystery. The real focus should be on young white men and their psychological state which, and admittedly I’m no entrail expert, appears to be dreadful.

  66. Somewhat coincidentally with this ngram discussion, Bill O’Reilly’s latest book focuses on Presley, Ali and Lennon, and how fame contributed to their downfalls. Aside from the effects these three had on pop culture, his wider point is that being famous in today’s society is asking for big trouble. You are a target, sometimes literally.

    Just playing around with random names on ngram is fascinating and I suppose those three celebs are worth plugging in for a look

    • Replies: @Meretricious
    @Known Fact

    Muhammad Ali (RIP) was an idiot. Ppl influenced by idiot jocks with big mouths are also idiots

  67. @dearieme
    A good game is: if in a mad world you were allowed only three, who would they be?

    For me, Painters: Rembrandt, Vermeer, Turner. (Commendation: Monet.)

    Classical music: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven. (Commendation: Papa Haydn.)

    Jazz: Armstrong, Beiderbecke, Bechet. (Commendation: Django.)

    Prose in English: Shakespeare and ... actually, there's nobody else even close. He's the Don Bradman of writers. I'll grant that Miss Austen is the finest of novelists in English. Scott must be her principal competitor. I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small. Afterthought: how about Gibbon? His Decline and Fall is full of wonderful writing.

    Poetry: I won't double-count Mr W S so I'll go for Burns. Who else (in English or near-English)? Sheets and Kelly I suppose. How about Chaucer? But he's bloody hard work unless you use a translation (as we didn't at school).

    Stuff in foreign: even at the risk of being assassinated by the CIA I plump for lots of Russkis.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SunBakedSuburb, @Verymuchalive, @james wilson

    I’ll grant that Miss Austen is the finest of novelists in English. Scott must be her principal competitor.

    Interesting that a ( fairly ) “wet” Englishman like yourself can regard Sir Walter so highly. Before you complain, males who admire Jane Austen are frankly an odd bunch. She leaves the vast majority of men, like myself, completely cold. ( No doubt you will try to refute this ! )

    Like many 19th Century authors, Scott went out of academic favour in the 1920s and has never returned to favour, outside Scotland. The difference between him and other 19th Century authors is that most of his books have never been out of print and his stories continue to be adapted for cinema and television. The general public appreciate his work, even if academia continues to largely ignore him. Who remembers ( 7 times Nobel Prize nominated ) George Meredith now ?

    So credit to your critical sensibilities re Scott. And also re Dickens. You don’t mention him at all – a sure sign of sanity. Without the backing of the cultural establishment, Dickens would be largely forgotten. The public don’t like him much and buy his works in diminishing numbers. The large number of realistic characters skilfully created by Scott ( second only to Shakespeare ) are much preferrable to Dickens’ grotesques.

    • Replies: @CCG
    @Verymuchalive

    What about other British authors of the 1800s like Arthur Conan Doyle, Lewis Carroll, Rudyard Kipling and the Brontë sisters?

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    , @dearieme
    @Verymuchalive

    a ( fairly ) “wet” Englishman like yourself

    I'm neither wet nor English. I agree that Dickens is awful though, excepting only The Tale of Two Cities which is cracker.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

  68. @fredyetagain aka superhonky
    @Redneck farmer

    Lovecraft's views were entirely standard for intelligent White men of his day. The only horrible people in this picture are his woke critics.
    HPL forever.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @YetAnotherAnon

    Lovecraft’s foes are foul, noisome and pustulent monsters from beyond, shambling and slobbering as they spread their slimy trail of foetid poison

  69. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    Good comment.

    “You’ll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together.”

    It could be that both were primarily published by Weird Tales in the same time frame, that Howard contributed stories, at Lovecraft’s urging, to the Mythos, and the voluminous correspondence between the two. Any Howard or Lovecraft enthusiast should read these letters. Two contrasting personalities, but with mutual respect. The thoughts and ideas expressed by these two dead guys provide a deep well of inspiration.

  70. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT - it's not just European industry that the US want to take down, it's their marine insurance and tanker business too. But if the EU and City of London want to commit suicide, who's going to stop them?

    https://www.nytimes.com/live/2022/10/05/world/russia-ukraine-war-news#russia-oil-price-cap


    Under the new rules, companies involved in the shipping of Russian oil — including shipowners, insurers and underwriters — would be on the hook for ensuring that the oil they are helping to transport is being sold at or below the price cap. If they are caught helping Russia sell at a higher price, they could face lawsuits in their home countries for violating sanctions.
    Russian crude will come under an embargo in most of the European Union on Dec. 5, and petroleum products will follow in February. The price cap on shipments to non-E.U. countries has been championed by U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen as a necessary complement to the European oil embargo.

    Under the E.U. deal, Greece, Malta and Cyprus will be permitted to continue shipping Russian oil. Had they not agreed to place their companies at the forefront of applying the price cap, they would have been forbidden from shipping or insuring Russian oil cargo outside the European Union, a huge hit for major industries.

    More than half of the tankers now shipping Russia’s oil are Greek-owned. And the financial services that underpin that trade — including insurance, reinsurance and letters of credit — are overwhelmingly based in the European Union and Britain.
     

    "This is of course an open invitation to other countries to enter the oil shipping and related financial services businesses at the cost of European companies."

    China and India are going to love their financial services getting a global boost. I can see the Greek fleet becoming Chinese.

    The US Strategic Oil Reserve is nearly halved, and OPEC have cut production by 2m barrels a day.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @Bill Jones

    NYT;
    More than half of the tankers now shipping Russia’s oil are Greek-owned.

    Like many such articles in the NYT and others, no references are produced for this claim. It is generally accepted that most Russian oil is shipped in Russian-owned tankers, although these may be constantly reflagged, as this article from Lloyds List makes plain.
    https://lloydslist.maritimeintelligence.informa.com/LL1141450/Russia-sanctions-to-push-subterfuge-tankers-above-400-ships-says-BRS

    You;

    “This is of course an open invitation to other countries to enter the oil shipping and related financial services businesses at the cost of European companies.”
    China and India are going to love their financial services getting a global boost. I can see the Greek fleet becoming Chinese.

    Unlikely. Russia already has a self-sufficient financial system and will do it themselves, as this hostile Wikipedia article ultimately has to admit.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovcomflot

    It came to light on 13 June that Ingosstrakh had insured the tankers of Sovcomflot.[10]
    On 10 June 2022 the Russian National Reinsurance Company announced it would reinsure Russian ships including Sovcomflot’s when the Russian shipping industry was left high and dry by the 2022 sanctions.[11][10]
    On 23 June 2022 the Indian Register of Shipping announced that it would provide safety certification several dozen ships managed by Dubai-based SCF Management Services, a subsidiary of Sovcomflot.[12][13][14] The CEO said on 18 June that Sovcomflot had insured all its cargo vessels with Russian insurers.[12][15]

    Note the absurd and false claim that the Russian shipping industry was left high and dry by Western Sanctions. No they weren’t ! Ingosstrakh, RNRC and other Russian insurers merely took over insurance.

    Conclusion.
    The Russian-owned oil and LNG tanker fleet will continue to grow, even if in the interim it has to use subterfuge tankers with multiple reflags. Nowadays, Russia has a sophisticated financial system and will undertake most of its marine insurance requirements.

    This is of course the beginning of the end of Lloyd’s and the City of London. Other non-Western companies see the sanctions and will insure with Russian and other non-Western insurance and service providers. 10 years from now, Lloyd’s will be a fraction of its present size. Turkeys and Christmas spring to mind.

  71. Is it correct to say these ngrams are generated from a vast array of books but not from newspapers and periodicals? Doesn’t that miss entire latitudes and longitudes of more immediate or superficial fame?

  72. But while Lord Byron doesn’t come up all that much anymore in daily conversation or even in books, his name lives on in the countless sports heroes and popular performers whose given name descends from his surname.

    Not actually countless. In fact, I can’t find any famous “popular performers” with the given name Byron (I wouldn’t know about sports). Byron “Whizzer” White was famous, and there was a film director, Byron Haskin. The only other Byron I know of is conservative pundit Byron York, and only because he’s the son of a local celebrity (his father Tom York was the host of The Morning Show on WBRC-TV in Birmingham for many years).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @the one they call Desanex

    Byron Buxton of the Twins is one of the top baseball players in the rare moments when he's healthy.

  73. @Inquiring Mind
    @Buzz Mohawk

    A one-eyed person performed a micro-surgical procedure on your eyes?

    What is next, blind airline pilots?

    Not a problem, these pilots rely on instruments!

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    He did a fine job. Read the obituary I linked to if you’re interested. He was a very accomplished man.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I did a double take when I read the first post, but then thought that the willingness to not discriminate against the blind is probably easier if you don't know about it.

  74. @Altai
    OP:
    There is a suspected serial killer in Stockton. 7 shootings, 6 fatal. It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California. MO is just shooting them with a hand gun, ("Man on a mission" style similar to other murderers of homeless people) he seems to be carefully staking out places with no CCTV coverage.

    6 men killed and 1 woman who survived. 5 Hispanic, 1 white, 1 black. These kinds of figures look a lot like the racial and sex demographics of the Hoovervilles in California. Most of these people had jobs or were only just out of work. Here is a news report on the latest two killings including the black woman who survived, it makes no mention of no other blacks being the target before (It doesn't mention the race of the other victims or that 1 of them was a blue-eyed white man) and tries to paint it as racial and neglects the homeless angle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs51eKLhhg

    The emergence of Hoovervilles were one of the defining characteristics of the Great Depression, the last great crisis and Fourth Turning in the US. Housing these days also doesn't have a lot of 'flop house' style accommodation for isolated single men in crisis who just want to save and don't care about anything but having a bed and an address. Exceptions are certain kinds of immigrants who'll put a dozen or more shiftless men in a single house but that isn't of use to natives since they lack the contacts and life scripts to make use of that strategy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. I laughed at the whole 'Seattle is dying' thing because some homeless are around the CBD now, yeah okay, everything else was fine and mass migration was fine but some homeless, oh my god...

    The assumption is the killer is a white man but there are probably as many Asians there now. And the assumption is his killings are racial despite one of the victims being a blue-eyed WASP.

    Another great example of "Everything the US media claims is about race is about class. Everything the US media claims is about class is about race."

    Replies: @Coemgen, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre, @tr, @p38ace

    Stockton is a good example of what has happened to the United States in my lifetime.

    I was born there in the mid-twentieth century. As far as I know, it was a good town then. My father was on the school board. He had an engineering company at the time. He was also the president of the local homeowners’ association, and he organized and led the construction of a community swimming pool. One of my earliest memories is walking home from that pool with our family.

    Thank God we left in 1964.

  75. While I find the idea of Google’s “name checks” (mentions in books by name) a rather crude and primitive measure it does jog one thought in my day.

    “Thor.”

    Formerly a rather obscure Viking era “god” of a largely forgotten group of theological lightweights. Yes, the “hammer” was a pretty good gimmick. More exciting than being nailed to a large wooden cross (which for some odd reason became the primary symbol of a major religion.)

    So Thor is becoming more of a cultural icon than JC. Even Mel Gibson couldn’t prevent that.

    Of course Thor is supposed to be hunky and master of battles and fighting. Jesus was rather wimpish on the subject, though did inspire a lot of subsequent bloodshed.

    There are a lot of books about Jesus (mainly, one in various forms) but few films. No TV shows other than second hand yak by preachers asking for alms.

    But Thor has a number of movies out and is likely to be a trending first name for baby boys. Maybe not as popular as Jesus in Mexico, not yet anyway.

    Would some crude name counting suggest Thor is replacing Jesus? Hard to say.

    Mohammad (Muhammad, etc.) gets a lot of Middle Eastern name ID but actual references to what he supposedly said are pretty scarce. Like Jesus (and Moses) he didn’t actually write anything down that we can find. And the Islamist scholars are pretty touchy about his “teachings.” They will kill you if they disagree with you (or encourage others to do so).

    Christians are largely over that now.

    Thor isn’t thought to have had any disciples other than drunken ship-borne raiders, though tales were often told. So Hollywood can make Thor say and do anything.

    “Thor” is trending, but may be on his way out. Only so many flying hammer stories can be told.

    Don’t get me started on Lord Krishna…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Muggles

    Iceland's patron saint is one Thorlak Thorhallsson, or Þorlákur Þórhallsson if you prefer. (Most of us find Icelandic orthography rather [ahem] thorny.) So "Thor" appears twice, in his own name and in his patronymic.

    He's not the only patron saint with a pagan-derived name. Paris's St Denis ultimately got his from Dionysius.


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Thorlak

    Replies: @Liberty Mike

    , @SFG
    @Muggles

    Honestly, it’s probably all the movies about him from Marvel Comics.

    , @Anonymous
    @Muggles


    Mohammad (Muhammad, etc.) gets a lot of Middle Eastern name ID but actual references to what he supposedly said are pretty scarce.
     
    Wrong. You just failed my class. There's a hyoooge corpus of literature much of which refers to what The Profit (Piss be upon him) supposedly said. It's called the Ḥadīth or "Tradition".
    , @Liberty Mike
    @Muggles

    Jesus has not been unexplored on film. To wit:


    The Robe

    The Greatest Story Ever Told

    The Last Temptation of Christ

    Judas

    Killing Jesus

    Jesus Christ Superstar

    Godspell

    The Young Messiah

    Son of God

    Jesus

    The Passion of Christ

    Monty Python's Life of Brian

    King of Kings

    The Nativity Story

    The Gospel According to Mathhew


    IIRC, Jesus has also been featured in several episodes of Family Guy.

  76. @Emil Nikola Richard
    The Murder of the Man who was Shakespeare Calvin Hoffman

    https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/13647014

    Replies: @Gordo

    Nonsense but entertaining nonsense, I must have read it half a dozen times.

    There are a few good books like that, not true but a rip roaring read, another example that springs to mind is ‘The River’ by Edward Hooper.

  77. @fredyetagain aka superhonky
    @Redneck farmer

    Lovecraft's views were entirely standard for intelligent White men of his day. The only horrible people in this picture are his woke critics.
    HPL forever.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @YetAnotherAnon

    He was an equal opportunity hater – in The Dreams In The Witch-House the evil being kills the child of a “clod-like laundry worker” with a Polish name, and The Street definitely wasn’t keen on left-wing “Eastern Europeans”.

    In The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath the moon-beasts consume “the fat black men of Parg, who they bought by the pound”.

  78. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Inquiring Mind

    He did a fine job. Read the obituary I linked to if you're interested. He was a very accomplished man.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    I did a double take when I read the first post, but then thought that the willingness to not discriminate against the blind is probably easier if you don’t know about it.

  79. I tried eisenhower,nixon,reagan,obama. Nixon had a bump in 2012 (not sure why) and again in 2016 & 2017, presumably because of Trump.
    “Obama” will always benefit from liberal love for Michelle as well as Barack.

  80. And from the grifter that keeps on giving we learn that the ark of political fame may keep you afloat even after you’ve been buried twice.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/former-clinton-advisor-says-hillary-may-run-2024

  81. Anon[216] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dream
    Meanwhile in Ireland.

    https://twitter.com/Composite_Guy2/status/1577679273787269126?t=ZQUK4nI_HefA_T80NqMooA&s=19

    Replies: @Anon, @Richard B

    Blacks who act up in Ireland are going to discover why the Irish gave the English so many problems throughout the 20th century. The Irish get pretty mad when they start feeling oppressed. The Troubles were absolutely bloodthirsty, and the Irish observed the silence of omerta about what they did.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Anon

    Yeah, that makes sense while Ireland has only fifty thousand African migrants in residence. Wait til they have ten million, then they'll be facing the same ruin the rest of us are. Schoolyard scuffles will be the least of their worries.

    Replies: @Inverness

    , @YetAnotherAnon
    @Anon

    The changes which took 60-odd years in England have taken half that time in Ireland, which is at least as cucked as the UK.


    "The Irish get pretty mad when they start feeling oppressed."
     
    Yes, but Irish elites are united in thinking the phone thieves are the oppressed ones. Whereas most of their elites were united against the Brits, they are wholly on board with the GAE agenda. The cultural changes in Ireland over the last 30 years are YUGE. Now their elites - including Sinn Fein - are delighted with being "a modern, inclusive European country" (aka tax haven for Big Tech and Big Pharma).

    A great pity, but if England couldn't survive, what chance do Ireland or Poland have?

    Note the number of organisations signing on to the first ever Black History event in Ireland, back in 2010.

    https://blackhistorymonthireland.wordpress.com/2017/07/19/the-background-to-black-history-month-ireland/


    On 30th October 2010, Cork Africa Connect, established by Zeph, showcased the first Black History Month event, as a pilot project, at the prestigious Gresham Metropole Hotel in Cork City with a Symposium, Dinner and a speech on “Africa Empowerment– Working Towards African Unity”. Rev. Fr. James Good’s keynote address was attended by African envoys and high profile Irish personalities, and supported by Cork City Council, University College Cork (UCC), and local media such as Red FM and the Cork Independent. UCC’s History Department took a supportive interest in Zeph’s work, helping to organise events. Cork City Council supplied some funding.
    A talk on the travels and works of social reformer Fredrick Douglass [who met with Daniel O’Connell of Ireland’s Catholic Emancipation movement in 1845] took place in University College Cork, alongside lectures on African-American Slave Trade Emancipation. Zeph explained in 2014 how BHMI was moving to the capital: “This year there are official events in Dublin, Cork and Waterford throughout the month.”
     
    , @Harry Baldwin
    @Anon

    Did the African return the phone he stole? It isn't clear from the video that he did.

  82. @Altai
    OP:
    There is a suspected serial killer in Stockton. 7 shootings, 6 fatal. It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California. MO is just shooting them with a hand gun, ("Man on a mission" style similar to other murderers of homeless people) he seems to be carefully staking out places with no CCTV coverage.

    6 men killed and 1 woman who survived. 5 Hispanic, 1 white, 1 black. These kinds of figures look a lot like the racial and sex demographics of the Hoovervilles in California. Most of these people had jobs or were only just out of work. Here is a news report on the latest two killings including the black woman who survived, it makes no mention of no other blacks being the target before (It doesn't mention the race of the other victims or that 1 of them was a blue-eyed white man) and tries to paint it as racial and neglects the homeless angle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs51eKLhhg

    The emergence of Hoovervilles were one of the defining characteristics of the Great Depression, the last great crisis and Fourth Turning in the US. Housing these days also doesn't have a lot of 'flop house' style accommodation for isolated single men in crisis who just want to save and don't care about anything but having a bed and an address. Exceptions are certain kinds of immigrants who'll put a dozen or more shiftless men in a single house but that isn't of use to natives since they lack the contacts and life scripts to make use of that strategy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. I laughed at the whole 'Seattle is dying' thing because some homeless are around the CBD now, yeah okay, everything else was fine and mass migration was fine but some homeless, oh my god...

    The assumption is the killer is a white man but there are probably as many Asians there now. And the assumption is his killings are racial despite one of the victims being a blue-eyed WASP.

    Another great example of "Everything the US media claims is about race is about class. Everything the US media claims is about class is about race."

    Replies: @Coemgen, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre, @tr, @p38ace

    “A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. ”

    By what measure and compared to who? (or whom?) How responsible are homeless people for dehumanizing themselves?

    How does one go about obsessively dehumanizing the supposed homeless? It seems to me most people prefer to merely avoid the homeless.

  83. @SFG
    Fascinating stuff, and a lot more fun than polygamy. (At least for us average guys!)

    I'll start with the pulp writers, where I actually have some specialized knowledge. Lovecraft and Howard seem to have gotten a boost in the late 1970s, possibly due to their namechecking in the inspirational reading list (Appendix N) of the Dungeons and Dragons game published in 1975 that showed an upswing through the late 70s and early 80s. They then became part of nerd culture, which took off in the 2000s as a subject of scholarly study as nerds got rich. Lovecraft (well, his reputation) also benefited from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop roleplaying game published in the 80s, which standardized his purposely vague mythology (they were supposed to be ineffable monsters you couldn't understand and went nuts trying to) into a bunch of monsters and gods with clearly defined appearances that nerds could then learn and use as an in-group signaling method. The Dark Young of Shub-Niggurath are only mentioned in a litany in the original stories, but after Sandy Petersen and Lynn Willis described them as masses of tentacles shaped like trees with hooves in their game, that's how they start showing up elsewhere. You'll notice how Lovecraft and Howard tend to move together (you could probably export the data and calculate a correlation coefficient if you were really curious). The movies with Schwarzenegger don't seem to have had as much of an effect as I would have anticipated--he really seems popular among tabletop gamers interested in the literary antecedents of their hobby.

    Political trends also have to do with it, of course--the sort of macho writing Bukowski produced is out of favor with literary types, who are either gay or female these days. (Look at how unpopular Updike and Philip Roth are becoming.) Hammett and Chandler seem to be declining as well. Whether Delicious Tacos, Zero HP Lovecraft, and Bronze Age Pervert will be forgotten or be seen as prefiguring the Midcentury Masculine Revival of the 2100s depends on the 2022 and 2024 elections. (Just kidding! Kind of...)

    The rest, of course, is more speculative.

    I'd love to say your graphs show Shakespeare belongs to the ages, but I never underestimate the ability of wokesters to destroy culture. I could say having the Jewish Harold Bloom engaging him in Bardolatry protected him for a few decades, but I'm genuinely not sure. Napoleon, well, he's not invading anyone anymore so he's a lot less interesting.

    You could try comparing Byron to Mary Shelley and Percy Bysse Shelley--quite a bit of Gothic fiction tropes (and Universal Monsters responsible for Halloween decorations) come from them, Shelley writing Frankenstein and Byron being the model for the aristocratic vampire Dracula.

    Jolson also has the distinction of being the first person to talk in a movie, so 'The Jazz Singer' gets mentioned in histories of film technology. Presley and Sinatra's fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Pegler's criticism of the New Deal took him down, as you say. (There was also some later anti-Jewish stuff that made sure he got forgotten.) Mencken's (moderate, and decreasing after Hitler) criticism of Jews hurt him with the intelligentsia, though the decline was more gradual in his case. (He sort of has an afterlife among the moderately un-PC--there's an H.L.Mencken society but frogtwitter would rather translate Ernst Nolte.) Will never really got past the Reagan era, I think. A lot of these guys seem to have come out of that early-to-mid-20th century masculine bohemia you allude to sometimes, which is now declining because of that masculine nature.

    I'd love to say Rubens is falling because people feel increasingly self-conscious about liking his fat ladies in an age of increasing fatness ('body positivity' covers up the fact that people really don't like being fat), but I'll leave it to someone more psychologically astute than me to figure that one out.

    As you say, Faulkner, Lewis, Buck, and Tarkington show what seem to me to be clear exponentially declining curves. Buck is now un-PC for being a white lady writing about China. (Her intent was anti-racist by the standards of the day, but now you're supposed to be #ownvoices.) Faulkner seems to have gone up with the civil rights movement but is now declining as, well, who wants to hear what some white guy wants to say about the South.

    Austen has a more upward trend--I'd say with the rise of feminism they were looking for a woman to include in the canon, but you don't really see a huge jump in the 60s, for instance--it's just a steady upward trend. You don't see a bump in the 90s with the rise of Austenian chick lit, either. Maybe she really is that great. ;) George Eliot shows a little bit of a bump in the 60s, but not to her 19th-century heights. Some English major can chime in here.

    Brando and Bogart seem to have risen with the New Hollywood and started declining in the 90s as people realized how toxically masculine they were. Or, it's just the normal decline of fame. But I bet feminism is behind the interest rising in Marilyn Monroe.

    T.S. Eliot seems to have taken a drop in the 60s as people who like hard fiction became more averse to conservatives. Lewis bumped up in the 1990s, I bet, as he began to be seen as a Christian author who could help your kids fight rising secularism among evangelicals. Same with Chesterton to a lesser degree. If Chesterton makes a comeback in the next 20 years, I half-credit Scott Alexander for talking about his fence. Wells declines and then starts to rise a little in the 90s as scholarly interest in science fiction increases. (I would be curious to see Lewis plotted against his Inkling ex-buddy with initials in front, J.R.R. Tolkien, who also wrote famous fantasy novels; it'd also be interesting to see Tolkien mapped against Lovecraft or Howard.)

    Replies: @Inquiring Mind, @Whitaboot, @Liger, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @prosa123, @Almost Missouri, @Almost Missouri, @SunBakedSuburb, @Reg Cæsar

    Presley and Sinatra’s fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.

    Huh? Sinatra was born in 1915, his fan base not much more than a decade or so thereafter. For some fun, look up Paul Harvey’s Rest of the Story episode about the Forties pop idol named Francis who drove young ladies to screams. They would chase him onto train platforms carrying scissors in order to clip a lock of his hair. Of course, Harvey was referring to none other than…*

    Ngram validates my observation that the term “boomer” was not applied to people until the early 1980s, when it bled out of Steve’s old industry of market research and poisoned pop “journalism”. Look up boom, baby boom, boomer, and baby boomer.

    Generation labels are about as old as AIDS. Indeed, the “boomers” were the last “generation” to grow up without one.

    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.

    No Great White Defendant in sight!

    What we know: Purdue University student from Indianapolis killed inside residence hall

    *:

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Reg Cæsar

    Here's a graphic to help with that.

    https://i.ibb.co/RQ31NRK/Screenshot-20221005-163111-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    I had an Asian roommate like that in my freshman year. Not fun.

    Best-looking rendition of Franz that I've ever seen btw.

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Reg Cæsar

    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.

    Founding stock America, right there. Just typical Pi Kappas, up to their usual hijinks.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Anonymous
    @Reg Cæsar


    Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.
     
    American universities should be for educating American kids.
  84. @Muggles
    While I find the idea of Google's "name checks" (mentions in books by name) a rather crude and primitive measure it does jog one thought in my day.

    "Thor."

    Formerly a rather obscure Viking era "god" of a largely forgotten group of theological lightweights. Yes, the "hammer" was a pretty good gimmick. More exciting than being nailed to a large wooden cross (which for some odd reason became the primary symbol of a major religion.)

    So Thor is becoming more of a cultural icon than JC. Even Mel Gibson couldn't prevent that.

    Of course Thor is supposed to be hunky and master of battles and fighting. Jesus was rather wimpish on the subject, though did inspire a lot of subsequent bloodshed.

    There are a lot of books about Jesus (mainly, one in various forms) but few films. No TV shows other than second hand yak by preachers asking for alms.

    But Thor has a number of movies out and is likely to be a trending first name for baby boys. Maybe not as popular as Jesus in Mexico, not yet anyway.

    Would some crude name counting suggest Thor is replacing Jesus? Hard to say.

    Mohammad (Muhammad, etc.) gets a lot of Middle Eastern name ID but actual references to what he supposedly said are pretty scarce. Like Jesus (and Moses) he didn't actually write anything down that we can find. And the Islamist scholars are pretty touchy about his "teachings." They will kill you if they disagree with you (or encourage others to do so).

    Christians are largely over that now.

    Thor isn't thought to have had any disciples other than drunken ship-borne raiders, though tales were often told. So Hollywood can make Thor say and do anything.

    "Thor" is trending, but may be on his way out. Only so many flying hammer stories can be told.

    Don't get me started on Lord Krishna...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SFG, @Anonymous, @Liberty Mike

    Iceland’s patron saint is one Thorlak Thorhallsson, or Þorlákur Þórhallsson if you prefer. (Most of us find Icelandic orthography rather [ahem] thorny.) So “Thor” appears twice, in his own name and in his patronymic.

    He’s not the only patron saint with a pagan-derived name. Paris’s St Denis ultimately got his from Dionysius.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Thorlak

    • Replies: @Liberty Mike
    @Reg Cæsar

    Well, for a contemporary manifestation of "Thor" appearing twice: the one, the only, Vladimir Vladimirovich.

  85. @R.G. Camara
    Byron's contemporary rock-star fame is strange today. It seems that he personally met a lot of movers and shakers and seemed to really enthrall them, and they subsequently wrote a lot of great things about him. But to later people who never met him, his accomplishments seem less dynamic and memorable, and his incest with his half-sister damaged him.

    Byron's personality seems much like JFK or Bill Clinton: hypersexual, domineering, and center-of-attention when you personally experience it (hence all 3's loyal followers, apologists, and sex partners), but ultimately more sizzle than steak when you look at it with the cold eye of historical accomplishment and soberness.

    Like JFK, it helped Byron that he died young and in heroic circumstances, issuing a shock to sensibilities of his contemporaries and leading them to lionize him out of bounds to his actual worth. Bill Clinton, having aged, has not been so lucky, as he's faded and his scandals have semi-caught up with him (e.g. Epstein, Clinton Foundation bribes, Marc Rich pardon, etc.).

    Replies: @Meretricious

    RGC, have you read any of Lord Byron’s poems? Byron is one of the leading figures of the Romantic movement, and is regarded as one of the greatest English poets. He remains widely read and influential.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    @Meretricious

    I'm not speaking about Byron's place among poets for his skill. I'm talking about how his contemporaries raved and made big deals about him while he was alive beyond all sorts.

    Byron seemed to have a personal magnetism that made his contemporaries hang on his every word and action. It was Byron's presence that made them rave, not his poetry.

    By comparison, Shakespeare, Chaucer, and Milton are the three most influential English poets of all time (all more important than Byron), and their contemporaries recognized their genius and influence. However, their praise while living was not of the level of Byron. Shakespeare had his contemporaries both praise him and yet teased him (the famous "Shake-scene" gibe that kicked off his public notoriety), and his retirement was quiet. And it wasn't as if Milton or Chaucer appearing at a party was some kind of epoch-making event that people talked about. No foreign power called for Shakespeare, Chaucer, or Milton to show up in the middle of a war to rally the people to the cause merely by showing up (as Byron did for the Greek independence movement).

    I think Byron's personal magnetism and the excitement of his times are the key to this. Much like how men remember the prettiest girl in their high school class well after high school is over as some beauty beyond compare, but other age groups look at her pictures and think her unremarkable, the contemporary view of Byron is all out of joint.

  86. @Known Fact
    Somewhat coincidentally with this ngram discussion, Bill O'Reilly's latest book focuses on Presley, Ali and Lennon, and how fame contributed to their downfalls. Aside from the effects these three had on pop culture, his wider point is that being famous in today's society is asking for big trouble. You are a target, sometimes literally.

    Just playing around with random names on ngram is fascinating and I suppose those three celebs are worth plugging in for a look

    Replies: @Meretricious

    Muhammad Ali (RIP) was an idiot. Ppl influenced by idiot jocks with big mouths are also idiots

  87. @Reg Cæsar
    @SFG


    Presley and Sinatra’s fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.
     
    Huh? Sinatra was born in 1915, his fan base not much more than a decade or so thereafter. For some fun, look up Paul Harvey's Rest of the Story episode about the Forties pop idol named Francis who drove young ladies to screams. They would chase him onto train platforms carrying scissors in order to clip a lock of his hair. Of course, Harvey was referring to none other than...*

    Ngram validates my observation that the term "boomer" was not applied to people until the early 1980s, when it bled out of Steve's old industry of market research and poisoned pop "journalism". Look up boom, baby boom, boomer, and baby boomer.

    Generation labels are about as old as AIDS. Indeed, the "boomers" were the last "generation" to grow up without one.

    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.


    No Great White Defendant in sight!

    What we know: Purdue University student from Indianapolis killed inside residence hall

    *:



    https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1372179087l/18130160.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anonymous

    Here’s a graphic to help with that.

    I had an Asian roommate like that in my freshman year. Not fun.

    Best-looking rendition of Franz that I’ve ever seen btw.

  88. @The Anti-Gnostic
    I got halfway through the column and decided to read an Organic Chemistry text instead.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I got halfway through the column and decided to read an Organic Chemistry text instead.

    Why?

  89. OT… https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/vatican-museum-tourist-smashes-statues/index.html

    Tourist smashes two statues in the Vatican
    ……………………….
    The episode took place in the Museo Chiaramonti, part of the Vatican Museums, around lunchtime. The space holds around 1,000 works of ancient statuary, and describes itself as "one of the finest collections of Roman portraits" in the world.
    …………………………………………….
    The man, reported to be an American, had demanded to see the pope, according to newspaper Il Messaggero. When he was told he couldn't, he allegedly hurled one Roman bust to the floor.
    As he ran off, with staff in pursuit, he knocked down another.
    …………………………………………………………….

    Bizarre occurrences aside, I'd advise anyone to go see those portraits. They're magnificent. Even more that Greek busts, who are stylized & sometimes clumsy.

    With Romans, you got the pinnacle of realist portraiture in bronze and marble.

    A room for Basquiat?

  90. Also OT, the revolution continues to eat its own.

    Ths chosenite curator was woke as can be, but the black chick knew she could take her down with some magic words. Needless to add, they don’t have to be remotely credible to serve the purpose.

    TPTB recognize this as collateral damage. Yes, it happens, but even privileged people must sometimes be sacrificed for the Project.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Polistra

    From the picture, it appears LaBouvier is celebrating her triumph with a glass of wine. What a rush it must be to have that power to destroy.

    Replies: @Polistra

    , @hhsiii
    @Polistra

    An independent investigation by Kramer Levin.

    LaBouvier basically makes a career of hounding anyone else having anything to say about Basquiat.

    , @Meretricious
    @Polistra

    LaBouvier has been run out of the curating business. The Atlantic just published a devastating expose on just how stupid and incompetent this affirmative action lightweight was during her tenure at the Guggenheim.

  91. @Muggles
    While I find the idea of Google's "name checks" (mentions in books by name) a rather crude and primitive measure it does jog one thought in my day.

    "Thor."

    Formerly a rather obscure Viking era "god" of a largely forgotten group of theological lightweights. Yes, the "hammer" was a pretty good gimmick. More exciting than being nailed to a large wooden cross (which for some odd reason became the primary symbol of a major religion.)

    So Thor is becoming more of a cultural icon than JC. Even Mel Gibson couldn't prevent that.

    Of course Thor is supposed to be hunky and master of battles and fighting. Jesus was rather wimpish on the subject, though did inspire a lot of subsequent bloodshed.

    There are a lot of books about Jesus (mainly, one in various forms) but few films. No TV shows other than second hand yak by preachers asking for alms.

    But Thor has a number of movies out and is likely to be a trending first name for baby boys. Maybe not as popular as Jesus in Mexico, not yet anyway.

    Would some crude name counting suggest Thor is replacing Jesus? Hard to say.

    Mohammad (Muhammad, etc.) gets a lot of Middle Eastern name ID but actual references to what he supposedly said are pretty scarce. Like Jesus (and Moses) he didn't actually write anything down that we can find. And the Islamist scholars are pretty touchy about his "teachings." They will kill you if they disagree with you (or encourage others to do so).

    Christians are largely over that now.

    Thor isn't thought to have had any disciples other than drunken ship-borne raiders, though tales were often told. So Hollywood can make Thor say and do anything.

    "Thor" is trending, but may be on his way out. Only so many flying hammer stories can be told.

    Don't get me started on Lord Krishna...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SFG, @Anonymous, @Liberty Mike

    Honestly, it’s probably all the movies about him from Marvel Comics.

  92. Anonymous[213] • Disclaimer says:
    @Muggles
    While I find the idea of Google's "name checks" (mentions in books by name) a rather crude and primitive measure it does jog one thought in my day.

    "Thor."

    Formerly a rather obscure Viking era "god" of a largely forgotten group of theological lightweights. Yes, the "hammer" was a pretty good gimmick. More exciting than being nailed to a large wooden cross (which for some odd reason became the primary symbol of a major religion.)

    So Thor is becoming more of a cultural icon than JC. Even Mel Gibson couldn't prevent that.

    Of course Thor is supposed to be hunky and master of battles and fighting. Jesus was rather wimpish on the subject, though did inspire a lot of subsequent bloodshed.

    There are a lot of books about Jesus (mainly, one in various forms) but few films. No TV shows other than second hand yak by preachers asking for alms.

    But Thor has a number of movies out and is likely to be a trending first name for baby boys. Maybe not as popular as Jesus in Mexico, not yet anyway.

    Would some crude name counting suggest Thor is replacing Jesus? Hard to say.

    Mohammad (Muhammad, etc.) gets a lot of Middle Eastern name ID but actual references to what he supposedly said are pretty scarce. Like Jesus (and Moses) he didn't actually write anything down that we can find. And the Islamist scholars are pretty touchy about his "teachings." They will kill you if they disagree with you (or encourage others to do so).

    Christians are largely over that now.

    Thor isn't thought to have had any disciples other than drunken ship-borne raiders, though tales were often told. So Hollywood can make Thor say and do anything.

    "Thor" is trending, but may be on his way out. Only so many flying hammer stories can be told.

    Don't get me started on Lord Krishna...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SFG, @Anonymous, @Liberty Mike

    Mohammad (Muhammad, etc.) gets a lot of Middle Eastern name ID but actual references to what he supposedly said are pretty scarce.

    Wrong. You just failed my class. There’s a hyoooge corpus of literature much of which refers to what The Profit (Piss be upon him) supposedly said. It’s called the Ḥadīth or “Tradition”.

  93. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Sounds plausible.

    I've heard that Don MacLean's "Vincent" was almost as big in Europe as "American Pie" was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @FPD72, @Zoos, @Paleo Liberal, @Reg Cæsar, @Wilkey

    I’ve heard that Don MacLean’s “Vincent” was almost as big in Europe as “American Pie” was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?

    He had more hits. “And I Love Her So” was a fine, classic piece of songwriting. Probably still a karaoke favorite. “Castles in the Air” did well, and “Wonderful Baby” I heard quite a lot on FM on release, deservingly, as it was a clever piece of songwriting, and the lyrics are just as applicable now. I recall hearing “Dreidel” on the radio a lot. Again, fine craftsmanship, although it was produced in a way that dates it. You must have heard most of these at some point and forgot about it. They all charted. He did well for himself. The boy had some chops.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Zoos

    When Roy Orbison was asked what he thought of Don McLean's cover of his song "Crying," he said it was "Not bad for a guy with half a voice" (by which I guess he was referring to McLean's range compared to his own).

  94. @Reg Cæsar
    @Muggles

    Iceland's patron saint is one Thorlak Thorhallsson, or Þorlákur Þórhallsson if you prefer. (Most of us find Icelandic orthography rather [ahem] thorny.) So "Thor" appears twice, in his own name and in his patronymic.

    He's not the only patron saint with a pagan-derived name. Paris's St Denis ultimately got his from Dionysius.


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Thorlak

    Replies: @Liberty Mike

    Well, for a contemporary manifestation of “Thor” appearing twice: the one, the only, Vladimir Vladimirovich.

  95. @Altai
    OP:
    There is a suspected serial killer in Stockton. 7 shootings, 6 fatal. It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California. MO is just shooting them with a hand gun, ("Man on a mission" style similar to other murderers of homeless people) he seems to be carefully staking out places with no CCTV coverage.

    6 men killed and 1 woman who survived. 5 Hispanic, 1 white, 1 black. These kinds of figures look a lot like the racial and sex demographics of the Hoovervilles in California. Most of these people had jobs or were only just out of work. Here is a news report on the latest two killings including the black woman who survived, it makes no mention of no other blacks being the target before (It doesn't mention the race of the other victims or that 1 of them was a blue-eyed white man) and tries to paint it as racial and neglects the homeless angle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs51eKLhhg

    The emergence of Hoovervilles were one of the defining characteristics of the Great Depression, the last great crisis and Fourth Turning in the US. Housing these days also doesn't have a lot of 'flop house' style accommodation for isolated single men in crisis who just want to save and don't care about anything but having a bed and an address. Exceptions are certain kinds of immigrants who'll put a dozen or more shiftless men in a single house but that isn't of use to natives since they lack the contacts and life scripts to make use of that strategy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. I laughed at the whole 'Seattle is dying' thing because some homeless are around the CBD now, yeah okay, everything else was fine and mass migration was fine but some homeless, oh my god...

    The assumption is the killer is a white man but there are probably as many Asians there now. And the assumption is his killings are racial despite one of the victims being a blue-eyed WASP.

    Another great example of "Everything the US media claims is about race is about class. Everything the US media claims is about class is about race."

    Replies: @Coemgen, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre, @tr, @p38ace

    It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California.

    Hoovervilles? Please, Bidenvilles!

  96. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    One shortcoming of these Ngram graphs is the y-axis. The only common way to express proportions in English is with the word "percent" (the symbol %). But with Ngrams we need to express the proportion of occurrences of a given name or term among all words in published books by numbers (proportions) that are orders of magnitude less than a percent (1/100). It sure would be convenient if we had a simple way to express very small proportions. But we do! Just use the

    https://www.nist.gov/pml/owm/metric-si-prefixes

    milli 10^(-3)
    micro 10^(-6)
    nano 10^(-9)
    pico 1o^(-12)
    femto 10^(-15)
    atto 10^(-18)
    zepto 10^(-21)
    yocto 10^(-24)

    Thus, instead of writing "0.0000100%", this proportion is equal to 10^(-5)*10^(-2) = 10^(-7) = 100*10^(-9) and can be expressed more briefly as "100 nano".

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Don’t let Max Planck know what you’re up to.
    I couldn’t decide if he’s the worlds biggest egotist, where literally everything in time and space has something named after him, but then I reflect on what they are and I’ve decided he’s the worlds biggest egotist in the smallest possible way.

    • Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    @Bill Jones

    Hi, Bill Jones. I don't understand your remark. You write, "Don’t let Max Planck know what you’re up to." All I did was propose an extended usage for the numerical prefixes "milli, micro, nano, pico, femto, atto, zepto, yocto" to conveniently express very small percentages. How is this related to Max Planck (after whom is named Planck's constant, which is the ratio of a photon's energy to its frequency)? See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_constant
    Does this make him a bigger egotist than, say, Amedeo Avogadro (1776-1856), after whom a different constant is named?

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  97. @Reg Cæsar
    @SFG


    Presley and Sinatra’s fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.
     
    Huh? Sinatra was born in 1915, his fan base not much more than a decade or so thereafter. For some fun, look up Paul Harvey's Rest of the Story episode about the Forties pop idol named Francis who drove young ladies to screams. They would chase him onto train platforms carrying scissors in order to clip a lock of his hair. Of course, Harvey was referring to none other than...*

    Ngram validates my observation that the term "boomer" was not applied to people until the early 1980s, when it bled out of Steve's old industry of market research and poisoned pop "journalism". Look up boom, baby boom, boomer, and baby boomer.

    Generation labels are about as old as AIDS. Indeed, the "boomers" were the last "generation" to grow up without one.

    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.


    No Great White Defendant in sight!

    What we know: Purdue University student from Indianapolis killed inside residence hall

    *:



    https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1372179087l/18130160.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anonymous

    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.

    Founding stock America, right there. Just typical Pi Kappas, up to their usual hijinks.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic



    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.
     
    Founding stock America, right there. Just typical Pi Kappas, up to their usual hijinks.
     
    From the link:

    A suspect is in custody and there is no threat to the community, said Purdue’s director of media and public relations Tim Doty.
     
    The Doty surname came over on the Mayflower:

    http://mrgroetz.weebly.com/uploads/1/0/8/2/10823526/562285_orig.jpg


    Second-to-last.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  98. @Reg Cæsar
    @SFG


    Presley and Sinatra’s fame, sadly, is probably dying off with their boomers.
     
    Huh? Sinatra was born in 1915, his fan base not much more than a decade or so thereafter. For some fun, look up Paul Harvey's Rest of the Story episode about the Forties pop idol named Francis who drove young ladies to screams. They would chase him onto train platforms carrying scissors in order to clip a lock of his hair. Of course, Harvey was referring to none other than...*

    Ngram validates my observation that the term "boomer" was not applied to people until the early 1980s, when it bled out of Steve's old industry of market research and poisoned pop "journalism". Look up boom, baby boom, boomer, and baby boomer.

    Generation labels are about as old as AIDS. Indeed, the "boomers" were the last "generation" to grow up without one.

    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.


    No Great White Defendant in sight!

    What we know: Purdue University student from Indianapolis killed inside residence hall

    *:



    https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1372179087l/18130160.jpg

    Replies: @Polistra, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Anonymous

    Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.

    American universities should be for educating American kids.

  99. During the first season of MTV’s Real World in 1992, one of the housemates spends a night sleeping on the street with a homeless person to learn what their life is like. The area where homeless live is called “Reaganville.”

  100. @Muggles
    While I find the idea of Google's "name checks" (mentions in books by name) a rather crude and primitive measure it does jog one thought in my day.

    "Thor."

    Formerly a rather obscure Viking era "god" of a largely forgotten group of theological lightweights. Yes, the "hammer" was a pretty good gimmick. More exciting than being nailed to a large wooden cross (which for some odd reason became the primary symbol of a major religion.)

    So Thor is becoming more of a cultural icon than JC. Even Mel Gibson couldn't prevent that.

    Of course Thor is supposed to be hunky and master of battles and fighting. Jesus was rather wimpish on the subject, though did inspire a lot of subsequent bloodshed.

    There are a lot of books about Jesus (mainly, one in various forms) but few films. No TV shows other than second hand yak by preachers asking for alms.

    But Thor has a number of movies out and is likely to be a trending first name for baby boys. Maybe not as popular as Jesus in Mexico, not yet anyway.

    Would some crude name counting suggest Thor is replacing Jesus? Hard to say.

    Mohammad (Muhammad, etc.) gets a lot of Middle Eastern name ID but actual references to what he supposedly said are pretty scarce. Like Jesus (and Moses) he didn't actually write anything down that we can find. And the Islamist scholars are pretty touchy about his "teachings." They will kill you if they disagree with you (or encourage others to do so).

    Christians are largely over that now.

    Thor isn't thought to have had any disciples other than drunken ship-borne raiders, though tales were often told. So Hollywood can make Thor say and do anything.

    "Thor" is trending, but may be on his way out. Only so many flying hammer stories can be told.

    Don't get me started on Lord Krishna...

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @SFG, @Anonymous, @Liberty Mike

    Jesus has not been unexplored on film. To wit:

    The Robe

    The Greatest Story Ever Told

    The Last Temptation of Christ

    Judas

    Killing Jesus

    Jesus Christ Superstar

    Godspell

    The Young Messiah

    Son of God

    Jesus

    The Passion of Christ

    Monty Python’s Life of Brian

    King of Kings

    The Nativity Story

    The Gospel According to Mathhew

    IIRC, Jesus has also been featured in several episodes of Family Guy.

  101. @dearieme
    A good game is: if in a mad world you were allowed only three, who would they be?

    For me, Painters: Rembrandt, Vermeer, Turner. (Commendation: Monet.)

    Classical music: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven. (Commendation: Papa Haydn.)

    Jazz: Armstrong, Beiderbecke, Bechet. (Commendation: Django.)

    Prose in English: Shakespeare and ... actually, there's nobody else even close. He's the Don Bradman of writers. I'll grant that Miss Austen is the finest of novelists in English. Scott must be her principal competitor. I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small. Afterthought: how about Gibbon? His Decline and Fall is full of wonderful writing.

    Poetry: I won't double-count Mr W S so I'll go for Burns. Who else (in English or near-English)? Sheets and Kelly I suppose. How about Chaucer? But he's bloody hard work unless you use a translation (as we didn't at school).

    Stuff in foreign: even at the risk of being assassinated by the CIA I plump for lots of Russkis.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @SunBakedSuburb, @Verymuchalive, @james wilson

    I started a Chaucer translation and quit after one page. It was of course advertized as the breakthough in contemporary Chaucer translations. No. Reading the first page of the original showed me Chaucer was infinitely better even when half understood.

  102. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Sounds plausible.

    I've heard that Don MacLean's "Vincent" was almost as big in Europe as "American Pie" was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @FPD72, @Zoos, @Paleo Liberal, @Reg Cæsar, @Wilkey

    I remember going to see Don McLean in the early 1980s with an Asian fan of his. Her favorite song was “Vincent”, but she was an artist as well, so that might have something to do with it.

  103. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Sounds plausible.

    I've heard that Don MacLean's "Vincent" was almost as big in Europe as "American Pie" was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @FPD72, @Zoos, @Paleo Liberal, @Reg Cæsar, @Wilkey

    I’ve heard that Don MacLean’s “Vincent” was almost as big in Europe as “American Pie” was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody…

    I heard “Vincent” done live, in the atrium of what’s now the Embassy Suites by MSP Airport, by an aging black jazz saxophonist. It was riveting. It’s hard to imagine the same feeling engendered by a similar treatment of “American Pie”. Some songs are just better than others.

    I saw McLean live in the ’70s at a college gym, and was likely the only one who came just for the opening act, Loudon Wainwright III. At the time I was long sick of “American Pie”, but “Vincent” hadn’t quite sunk in as the classic it turned out to be. The one song of his that did stick with me was the ironically more Wainwrightesque “On the Amazon”.

    Years later I learned that this song dates from 1927 and English music hall. Were it not for words like prophylactics, hypodermics, and menopause, it would have been ideally suited for a Muppets Show filler spot. (That show was three minutes longer in the UK, thus all the music hall interludes.)

    They’d played it in the McLean household when he was a boy, and it stuck with him.

    Did you know that McLean majored in finance at Ramapo College? That’s even weirder than Scott Adams at Hartwick or Ronald Reagan at Eureka, where both took degrees in economics.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    @Reg Cæsar

    Did Loudon do Delaware? Or Rufus is a Tit Man? (Which he didn’t turn out to be).

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  104. At the pop cultural level, for a celebrity to cross over into “immortality”, they have to a number of factors that were non-existent in the time of Napoleon and Lord Byron.

    a. They have to impacted ordinary, everyday people, folks, in some way (e.g. fans).

    b. They have to have something going for them in the looks department

    c. They have to have built up a national/global brand.

    Aside from Marilyn Monroe, and also John Wayne (I’m a bit surprised that Steve excluded Wayne from the list of movie stars…numerous polls over the ’90’s, and 2000’s, the most popular movie star has been topped by John Wayne while Bogart, Brando, Monroe, etc aren’t even on the list).

    The only other 20th century iconic brand/logo, equally worthy to the names of Dickens, Austen, Napoleon, and Byron is…Elvis.

    Around the world, a single name, this dead icon is well known even in the far reaches of the earth.

    Elvis

    45 YEARS and counting after his death, his estate draws tens of thousands of fans to the candlelight Vigil. No other 20th century icon commands that amount of respect.

    Seriously, does anyone think that 20 or 30 yrs after his death, people will be crowding into Liverpool’s roughest section to honor Sir Paul? C’mon.

    Does NYC’s Dakota apts draw 50-100k fans every single year around December 8 to mourn John Lennon? Not even close.

    Which icon (who was also worldwide famous during his lifetime) is as nearly as viable in death? Which estate makes as nearly as much as he did while he walked the earth? One name and one name only.

    Elvis

    Celebrities come and go. For one to be considered an icon, they must have staying power, but also appeal directly to the heart, and not the head. It must be deeply felt on a personal level, almost a religious experience. That is the key to immortality. (no one’s feeling that old time religion reading Byron poetry, or the military campaigns of the little corporal.)

    Quite fitting that the Academy Award/Oscar Buzz time is fast approaching and the lead actor in the film honoring the global icon, two generations after his death. Only one name stands above the rest. In pop culture, in pop music, in founding of new genre Rock and Roll, in pop fashion etc. One name.

    Elvis

  105. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Reg Cæsar

    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.

    Founding stock America, right there. Just typical Pi Kappas, up to their usual hijinks.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.

    Founding stock America, right there. Just typical Pi Kappas, up to their usual hijinks.

    From the link:

    A suspect is in custody and there is no threat to the community, said Purdue’s director of media and public relations Tim Doty.

    The Doty surname came over on the Mayflower:

    Second-to-last.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    Purdue is the alma mater of Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, and of Gene Cernan, the last man on the Moon. Both earned their engineering degrees there.

    Armstrong family name origin: Scotland

    Cernan family name origin: Ireland

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

  106. @Gordo
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Fun stuff. I see from trying his name in Ngram that Steve Sailer has been enjoying a bit of a resurgence since 2014 but had his peak of fame from 2006 to 2008. So far…
     
    Bearing in mind the age profile of your politicians it’s not too late for Steve’s Presidential bid.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Oh, he has plenty of time. He’s a full 16 years younger than Joe Biden. He also has an IQ at least 2 SD higher. All he has to do is cynically start marketing* himself now to his Coalition of the Fringes, which he knows better than anyone else. It’s too late to use the Sailer Strategy.

    *Right up his alley, plus on really big stuff like COVID-19 and The Ukraine’s War, his writing surely has satisfied the powers that be, so they might not actually get in his way. Don’t get me wrong: I am a big fan. Nobody is perfect, and he is smarter, more educated and more accomplished than I am. It is a privilege to comment here. The mere fact that he allows this shit speaks volumes about him.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Buzz Mohawk

    [Steve] also has an IQ at least 2 SD higher

    Are you kidding? 4 SDs at least. At this point, I'd guess Biden's IQ at about 80, maybe lower. Whatever is necessary to be able to read off index cards and repeat slogans. In his heyday I doubt it exceeded 105. According to Mark Simone, Biden used to be referred to as the dumbest man in the senate by his colleagues.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  107. Russkies surrender an AFV with customary white flag.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Joe Stalin


    Russkies surrender an AFV with customary white flag.
     
    The timing of all this will be rather interesting.

    Getting Putin to finally admit defeat will be an undeniable and incredibly rare (only?) political victory for the Biden Administration - though one accomplished with much help from the rest of NATO, and thanks to armaments developed during earlier administrations.

    With all the other troubles looming, Americans probably wouldn't care much about it directly, except for the fact that economic prospects will improve dramatically when it's finally over.

    So if Putin concedes defeat before the election in less than five weeks then expect a big recovery in the stock market and commensurate increase in turnout for the Democratic Party.

    If Putin does plan to finally admit defeat he is probably waiting until after the election, in order to punish Biden.

    Either way, your investments should see a considerable bump when the war ends. If you've taken money out of the market now may not be a bad time to get back in.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  108. @Reg Cæsar
    @The Anti-Gnostic



    OT, à la recherche du temps Purdue, one Varun Manish Chheda was killed in his dorm room. Accused is roommate Ji Min Sha.
     
    Founding stock America, right there. Just typical Pi Kappas, up to their usual hijinks.
     
    From the link:

    A suspect is in custody and there is no threat to the community, said Purdue’s director of media and public relations Tim Doty.
     
    The Doty surname came over on the Mayflower:

    http://mrgroetz.weebly.com/uploads/1/0/8/2/10823526/562285_orig.jpg


    Second-to-last.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Purdue is the alma mater of Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, and of Gene Cernan, the last man on the Moon. Both earned their engineering degrees there.

    Armstrong family name origin: Scotland

    Cernan family name origin: Ireland

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, and of Gene Cernan, the last man on the Moon."

    More accurate term would be "the most recent" man on the moon. Never say never, or that earthlings won't ever visit the lunar satellite ever ever again.

    Irony: Neil Armstrong, while obviously world famous, isn't an icon. Did his event directly impact, touch ordinary people's daily lives? On a micro, basic level, the answer remains no, he didn't.

    If seeing is believing, and yet there still remain millions of peoples who doubt the first lunar landing ever happened. It's a shame, but sometimes people can't accept the truth regarding actual events.

    Armstrong died ten yrs ago. It would be interesting to see in twenty years, if his fame has survived to the levels that they were at the height of his popularity.

    Replies: @prosa123

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Cernan family name origin: Ireland
     
    Correct, if counterintuitive:

    The original Gaelic form of Cernan was Mac Thighearnain, which is derived from the word "tighearna," which means "lord."

    https://www.houseofnames.com/cernan-family-crest#:~:text=The%20original%20Gaelic%20form%20of,%22%20which%20means%20%22lord.%22
     

    One could be forgiven for thinking it Slavic:

    Čermák Czech
    Means "redstart (bird)" in Czech.
    Cermak Czech
    Anglicized form of Čermák.
    Černík Czech
    Variant of Černý.
    Černý Czech
    Means "black" in Czech.

    https://surnames.behindthename.com/names/letter/c
     

    There are families in our area named Chernak and Cherney. I wondered if they were related, as if the latter adapted to America. A Chernak told me they weren't (both families had been in the area for generations), so then I wondered if Cherney was Norman, like Cheney and Chaney.

    But no, it's Central European as well. Chernak is Slovak and was adapted from Černák. Cherney is kind of Austrian-Bohemian, and adapted from things like Czerney. I assume both have some connotation of "black", as in swarthy or dark-haired.

  109. anonymous[142] • Disclaimer says:

    Max Lerner, the newspaper columnist who died in 1992, was once called the most important man in America. It was also said that American foreign policy was formed in Minsk because Lerner was born there and only emigrated to the USA with his family at the age of five. It seems, according to Ngram, that his reputation rose with the Cold War and soared with the Vietnam war, declining rapidly as it wound down and today he is virtually forgotten.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @anonymous

    Evidencing your point, I had no idea or memory of ever hearing of Max Lerner until I read your comment. This does not mean that he -- and whatever cohort shared his concerns -- did not influence my thought.

    Those whose names drop into obscurity may still have great effect. Lerner's work had impact in his time, and that probably caused ripples...

  110. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    Purdue is the alma mater of Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, and of Gene Cernan, the last man on the Moon. Both earned their engineering degrees there.

    Armstrong family name origin: Scotland

    Cernan family name origin: Ireland

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

    “Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, and of Gene Cernan, the last man on the Moon.”

    More accurate term would be “the most recent” man on the moon. Never say never, or that earthlings won’t ever visit the lunar satellite ever ever again.

    Irony: Neil Armstrong, while obviously world famous, isn’t an icon. Did his event directly impact, touch ordinary people’s daily lives? On a micro, basic level, the answer remains no, he didn’t.

    If seeing is believing, and yet there still remain millions of peoples who doubt the first lunar landing ever happened. It’s a shame, but sometimes people can’t accept the truth regarding actual events.

    Armstrong died ten yrs ago. It would be interesting to see in twenty years, if his fame has survived to the levels that they were at the height of his popularity.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Neil Armstrong never sought much publicity.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  111. @anonymous
    Max Lerner, the newspaper columnist who died in 1992, was once called the most important man in America. It was also said that American foreign policy was formed in Minsk because Lerner was born there and only emigrated to the USA with his family at the age of five. It seems, according to Ngram, that his reputation rose with the Cold War and soared with the Vietnam war, declining rapidly as it wound down and today he is virtually forgotten.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Evidencing your point, I had no idea or memory of ever hearing of Max Lerner until I read your comment. This does not mean that he — and whatever cohort shared his concerns — did not influence my thought.

    Those whose names drop into obscurity may still have great effect. Lerner’s work had impact in his time, and that probably caused ripples…

  112. @SunBakedSuburb
    @dearieme

    "Prose in English: Shakespeare"

    Do plays count as prose? Shakespeare was a consortium. Most writers are jugheads who stick to one mode or genre. Very few polymaths within the jugheadian literary realm.

    "I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small."

    So was his penix (had to: it was floating up there like a lesbian slow-pitch softball). But seriously, if you're interested in stage version of Twain with a reanimator flavour send Art Deco a postcard with your po box info., he'll get it to me, and I'll send you two tickets to a wonderful solo stage performance of Mark Twain's ramblings by an interesting new actor. The only catch is you'll need to book passage on a Black Love Cruise ship to see the show.

    Replies: @I, Libertine

    Shakespeare’s plays are more or less half prose and half verse. He wrote in the late sixteenth century, a transitional time when playwriting was gradually changing from one form to the other.

    His poetry (to which he owes half his fame, IMHO) was, of course, in verse.

  113. Is it not curious that, asked to think of a really, really famous historical figure, the mind lands quickly on “William Shakespeare,” a man about whom little beyond the works attributed to him is known, and for whom much of that little has nothing to do with literature?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @I, Libertine

    Sounds a little like Jesus, or in the converse perhaps. I've long wondered at how much "civilization" and "culture" and "gravitas" are given to figures from long ago about whom truly, honestly, nobody knows very much at all. I mean entire fields of study. This is just further evidence of how stupid humans are, even the smartest ones. It also gives credence to those who claim that only STEM fields are truly worthy. They have a point.

    This also makes one wonder how much "civilization" is based on pure myth and all the assorted writings and pontifications that come down from it.

    Truly it seems that this is so.

  114. OT — State media censors academic who is critical of dying, corrupt, illegitimate autocracy regarding a special military operation.
    https://nypost.com/2022/10/04/jeffrey-sachs-yanked-off-air-after-accusing-us-of-sabotaging-nord-stream/

  115. @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    I’ve heard that Don MacLean’s “Vincent” was almost as big in Europe as “American Pie” was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody...
     
    I heard "Vincent" done live, in the atrium of what's now the Embassy Suites by MSP Airport, by an aging black jazz saxophonist. It was riveting. It's hard to imagine the same feeling engendered by a similar treatment of "American Pie". Some songs are just better than others.

    I saw McLean live in the '70s at a college gym, and was likely the only one who came just for the opening act, Loudon Wainwright III. At the time I was long sick of "American Pie", but "Vincent" hadn't quite sunk in as the classic it turned out to be. The one song of his that did stick with me was the ironically more Wainwrightesque "On the Amazon".

    Years later I learned that this song dates from 1927 and English music hall. Were it not for words like prophylactics, hypodermics, and menopause, it would have been ideally suited for a Muppets Show filler spot. (That show was three minutes longer in the UK, thus all the music hall interludes.)


    They'd played it in the McLean household when he was a boy, and it stuck with him.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SBsC8uQ-tgs

    Did you know that McLean majored in finance at Ramapo College? That's even weirder than Scott Adams at Hartwick or Ronald Reagan at Eureka, where both took degrees in economics.

    Replies: @hhsiii

    Did Loudon do Delaware? Or Rufus is a Tit Man? (Which he didn’t turn out to be).

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @hhsiii

    I don't remember the set list. I know he got his shirt at Sears-- because I was wearing an identical one that night.

    I don't know where he attended school, if at all. He should have gone to Stuyvesant-- Peter was his direct ancestor. Daughter Lucy has opened concerts for folkie Dar Williams, who shares the middle name Snowden with Loudon. How either are related to Edward might be worth looking into.

  116. @Polistra
    Also OT, the revolution continues to eat its own.

    https://i.ibb.co/xFrZWKb/Screenshot-20221005-162626-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Ths chosenite curator was woke as can be, but the black chick knew she could take her down with some magic words. Needless to add, they don't have to be remotely credible to serve the purpose.

    TPTB recognize this as collateral damage. Yes, it happens, but even privileged people must sometimes be sacrificed for the Project.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @hhsiii, @Meretricious

    From the picture, it appears LaBouvier is celebrating her triumph with a glass of wine. What a rush it must be to have that power to destroy.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @Harry Baldwin

    https://i.ibb.co/4gRMTWm/Screenshot-20221006-001443-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

  117. Pegler was defendant in Reynolds v Pegler, at one time biggest libel judgment. Pegler had trashed Heywoud Brown. Brown died. Quentin Reynolds said Pegler had driven Broun to death. Pegler trashed Reynolds and accused him of being a war profiteer, nudist, bigamist etc. Reynolds sued and won. Louis Nizer was his lawyer.

  118. @Polistra
    Also OT, the revolution continues to eat its own.

    https://i.ibb.co/xFrZWKb/Screenshot-20221005-162626-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Ths chosenite curator was woke as can be, but the black chick knew she could take her down with some magic words. Needless to add, they don't have to be remotely credible to serve the purpose.

    TPTB recognize this as collateral damage. Yes, it happens, but even privileged people must sometimes be sacrificed for the Project.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @hhsiii, @Meretricious

    An independent investigation by Kramer Levin.

    LaBouvier basically makes a career of hounding anyone else having anything to say about Basquiat.

  119. @Zoos
    @Steve Sailer


    I’ve heard that Don MacLean’s “Vincent” was almost as big in Europe as “American Pie” was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?
     
    He had more hits. "And I Love Her So" was a fine, classic piece of songwriting. Probably still a karaoke favorite. "Castles in the Air" did well, and "Wonderful Baby" I heard quite a lot on FM on release, deservingly, as it was a clever piece of songwriting, and the lyrics are just as applicable now. I recall hearing "Dreidel" on the radio a lot. Again, fine craftsmanship, although it was produced in a way that dates it. You must have heard most of these at some point and forgot about it. They all charted. He did well for himself. The boy had some chops.

    https://youtu.be/EJJYVJ-Ae6M

    https://youtu.be/BdKW0ZDTmxE

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    When Roy Orbison was asked what he thought of Don McLean’s cover of his song “Crying,” he said it was “Not bad for a guy with half a voice” (by which I guess he was referring to McLean’s range compared to his own).

  120. @TelfoedJohn
    You could probably get a AI to analyse this to determine future events. For instance, interest in Shakespeare seems to peak before major wars.

    Replies: @SFG, @Wilkey

    You could probably get a AI to analyse this to determine future events. For instance, interest in Shakespeare seems to peak before major wars.

    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts. The graph I’m seeing shows interest in Shakespeare declining before major wars, then increasing during or shortly after them.

    I would guess that the increase since 1980 is a result of:

    1) The increasing popularity of Shakespeare festivals – every state now seems to have at least one, if not more.

    2) Books have gotten much better at defining the words and phrases that are unfamiliar to modern readers (eReaders make it even easier).

    3) With all the political debates over what should or should not be read in schools, Shakespeare is one author that most sides can uniformly agree on. His themes are more universal than most, and – let’s face it – his language is quite possibly the most beautiful ever committed to paper, in English or possibly any other language.

    The decrease in his popularity over the last two years can probably be explained by theatres going dark during COVID (see point 1), and post-George Floyd insanity causing assaults on the Western canon (see point 3). I’ve heard of some “Shakespeare festivals” that now barely perform any Shakespeare at all.

    Of the 15 shows produced by the Alabama Shakespeare Festival in its last two seasons, 6 have dealt with race (7 if you count “Cabaret”) and only two were Shakespeare plays. The Oregon Shakespeare Festival may sound slightly better, with two of six plays about race and two by Shakespeare, until you read that their production of “King John” features “a cast of female and non-gender-binary performers” and that 10 of the 13 cast members in “The Tempest” are racial or ethnic minorities. That’s how it works in repertory theatre: if you decide to produce even a couple of race plays, then the cast of those plays will inevitably be cast in the non-race related shows.

    So if a decline in Shakespeare’s popularity is linked to greater likelihood of warm then the recent decline may be ominous indeed.

  121. @I, Libertine
    Is it not curious that, asked to think of a really, really famous historical figure, the mind lands quickly on "William Shakespeare," a man about whom little beyond the works attributed to him is known, and for whom much of that little has nothing to do with literature?

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Sounds a little like Jesus, or in the converse perhaps. I’ve long wondered at how much “civilization” and “culture” and “gravitas” are given to figures from long ago about whom truly, honestly, nobody knows very much at all. I mean entire fields of study. This is just further evidence of how stupid humans are, even the smartest ones. It also gives credence to those who claim that only STEM fields are truly worthy. They have a point.

    This also makes one wonder how much “civilization” is based on pure myth and all the assorted writings and pontifications that come down from it.

    Truly it seems that this is so.

  122. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    @Buzz Mohawk

    "Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, and of Gene Cernan, the last man on the Moon."

    More accurate term would be "the most recent" man on the moon. Never say never, or that earthlings won't ever visit the lunar satellite ever ever again.

    Irony: Neil Armstrong, while obviously world famous, isn't an icon. Did his event directly impact, touch ordinary people's daily lives? On a micro, basic level, the answer remains no, he didn't.

    If seeing is believing, and yet there still remain millions of peoples who doubt the first lunar landing ever happened. It's a shame, but sometimes people can't accept the truth regarding actual events.

    Armstrong died ten yrs ago. It would be interesting to see in twenty years, if his fame has survived to the levels that they were at the height of his popularity.

    Replies: @prosa123

    Neil Armstrong never sought much publicity.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @prosa123

    Armstrong was a humble, midwestern American. Had he been a publicity-seeker like his co-pilot "Buzz" Aldrin, his name would be even far more prevalent than it is anyway. Unlike Buzz, he rightly held that he had only been one man in a massive project comprising 400,000 American people.

    Gene Cernan was "the last man on the Moon" because nobody knows when anybody will go back. As of now, Americans fucking OWN the Moon, and Gene was there for three days with a geologist named Harrison Schmidt collecting rocks in 1972. It's a done deal.

    Oh, and yes, my reputation here as one obsessed with Apollo is well and truly cemented, so I don't GAF what this looks like now.

  123. @the one they call Desanex

    But while Lord Byron doesn’t come up all that much anymore in daily conversation or even in books, his name lives on in the countless sports heroes and popular performers whose given name descends from his surname.
     
    Not actually countless. In fact, I can’t find any famous “popular performers” with the given name Byron (I wouldn’t know about sports). Byron “Whizzer” White was famous, and there was a film director, Byron Haskin. The only other Byron I know of is conservative pundit Byron York, and only because he’s the son of a local celebrity (his father Tom York was the host of The Morning Show on WBRC-TV in Birmingham for many years).

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Byron Buxton of the Twins is one of the top baseball players in the rare moments when he’s healthy.

  124. @hhsiii
    @Reg Cæsar

    Did Loudon do Delaware? Or Rufus is a Tit Man? (Which he didn’t turn out to be).

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I don’t remember the set list. I know he got his shirt at Sears– because I was wearing an identical one that night.

    I don’t know where he attended school, if at all. He should have gone to Stuyvesant– Peter was his direct ancestor. Daughter Lucy has opened concerts for folkie Dar Williams, who shares the middle name Snowden with Loudon. How either are related to Edward might be worth looking into.

  125. @Altai
    OP:
    There is a suspected serial killer in Stockton. 7 shootings, 6 fatal. It seems the guy is targeting homeless people living in the Hoovervilles of modern overcrowded California. MO is just shooting them with a hand gun, ("Man on a mission" style similar to other murderers of homeless people) he seems to be carefully staking out places with no CCTV coverage.

    6 men killed and 1 woman who survived. 5 Hispanic, 1 white, 1 black. These kinds of figures look a lot like the racial and sex demographics of the Hoovervilles in California. Most of these people had jobs or were only just out of work. Here is a news report on the latest two killings including the black woman who survived, it makes no mention of no other blacks being the target before (It doesn't mention the race of the other victims or that 1 of them was a blue-eyed white man) and tries to paint it as racial and neglects the homeless angle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs51eKLhhg

    The emergence of Hoovervilles were one of the defining characteristics of the Great Depression, the last great crisis and Fourth Turning in the US. Housing these days also doesn't have a lot of 'flop house' style accommodation for isolated single men in crisis who just want to save and don't care about anything but having a bed and an address. Exceptions are certain kinds of immigrants who'll put a dozen or more shiftless men in a single house but that isn't of use to natives since they lack the contacts and life scripts to make use of that strategy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    A lot of conservatives are psychologically motivated by contempt for those they deem their social inferiors and the obsession many have with homeless and dehumanising them is real. I laughed at the whole 'Seattle is dying' thing because some homeless are around the CBD now, yeah okay, everything else was fine and mass migration was fine but some homeless, oh my god...

    The assumption is the killer is a white man but there are probably as many Asians there now. And the assumption is his killings are racial despite one of the victims being a blue-eyed WASP.

    Another great example of "Everything the US media claims is about race is about class. Everything the US media claims is about class is about race."

    Replies: @Coemgen, @stillCARealist, @Reg Cæsar, @SunBakedSuburb, @Buzz Mohawk, @Mike Tre, @tr, @p38ace

    They should be called Bidenvilles.

  126. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Gordo

    Oh, he has plenty of time. He's a full 16 years younger than Joe Biden. He also has an IQ at least 2 SD higher. All he has to do is cynically start marketing* himself now to his Coalition of the Fringes, which he knows better than anyone else. It's too late to use the Sailer Strategy.

    *Right up his alley, plus on really big stuff like COVID-19 and The Ukraine's War, his writing surely has satisfied the powers that be, so they might not actually get in his way. Don't get me wrong: I am a big fan. Nobody is perfect, and he is smarter, more educated and more accomplished than I am. It is a privilege to comment here. The mere fact that he allows this shit speaks volumes about him.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    [Steve] also has an IQ at least 2 SD higher

    Are you kidding? 4 SDs at least. At this point, I’d guess Biden’s IQ at about 80, maybe lower. Whatever is necessary to be able to read off index cards and repeat slogans. In his heyday I doubt it exceeded 105. According to Mark Simone, Biden used to be referred to as the dumbest man in the senate by his colleagues.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Harry Baldwin

    Let's not get carried away.

    I was trying to be conservative, and with no direct knowledge about either man. Two standard deviations are a lot, and I was treating Biden as whatever mediocrity he was before the onset of dementia.

    Remember too, Steve blamed his Jeopardy loss on his buzzer.


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/ad/cd/3c/adcd3c03a2dda298f768c7171a9938b5.jpg

    Replies: @Ralph L

  127. @prosa123
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Neil Armstrong never sought much publicity.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Armstrong was a humble, midwestern American. Had he been a publicity-seeker like his co-pilot “Buzz” Aldrin, his name would be even far more prevalent than it is anyway. Unlike Buzz, he rightly held that he had only been one man in a massive project comprising 400,000 American people.

    Gene Cernan was “the last man on the Moon” because nobody knows when anybody will go back. As of now, Americans fucking OWN the Moon, and Gene was there for three days with a geologist named Harrison Schmidt collecting rocks in 1972. It’s a done deal.

    Oh, and yes, my reputation here as one obsessed with Apollo is well and truly cemented, so I don’t GAF what this looks like now.

  128. @Joe Stalin
    Russkies surrender an AFV with customary white flag.

    https://twitter.com/Igor_from_Kyiv_/status/1577706301387325441

    Replies: @Wilkey

    Russkies surrender an AFV with customary white flag.

    The timing of all this will be rather interesting.

    Getting Putin to finally admit defeat will be an undeniable and incredibly rare (only?) political victory for the Biden Administration – though one accomplished with much help from the rest of NATO, and thanks to armaments developed during earlier administrations.

    With all the other troubles looming, Americans probably wouldn’t care much about it directly, except for the fact that economic prospects will improve dramatically when it’s finally over.

    So if Putin concedes defeat before the election in less than five weeks then expect a big recovery in the stock market and commensurate increase in turnout for the Democratic Party.

    If Putin does plan to finally admit defeat he is probably waiting until after the election, in order to punish Biden.

    Either way, your investments should see a considerable bump when the war ends. If you’ve taken money out of the market now may not be a bad time to get back in.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Wilkey


    If Putin does plan to finally admit defeat he is probably waiting until after the election, in order to punish Biden.
     
    Better yet, wait until Kamala is installed. Kind of like Iran releasing the hostages for well-timed humiliation.

    Should the GOP retake both houses, they should avoid impeachment to concentrate on the 25th Amendment. That way, Democrats get the blame for a Harris presidency.

    Comparisons of Dr Jill to puppeteer Edith Wilson would also be fitting.
  129. @Bill Jones
    @Almost Missouri

    In 2012 they found the word holocaust was exceeding rare through the 1960's drifted up only slightly and only in the early 70's spiked to the levels we've enjoyed since.

    Today they find a very different history of their version of history.

    "He who controls the past..."

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    In 2012 they found the word holocaust was exceeding rare through the 1960’s drifted up only slightly and only in the early 70’s spiked to the levels we’ve enjoyed since.

    It was usually prefaced with nuclear.

    It’s also found multiple times in the Old Testament, at least in the English translations the Catholic Church uses.

    As suggested by its Greek origin (holos “whole”, and kaustos “burnt”) the word designates an offering entirely consumed by fire, in use among the Jews and some pagan nations of antiquity…

    Only animals could be offered in holocaust; for human victims, which were sacrificed by the Chanaanites and by other peoples, were positively excluded from the legitimate worship of Yahweh (cf. Leviticus 18:21; 20:2-5; Deuteronomy 12:31; etc…)

    The principle rites to be carried out in the offering of holocausts, were (1) on the part of the offerer, that he should bring the animal to the door of the tabernacle, impose his hands on its head, slay it to the north of the altar, flay and cut up its carcass, and wash its entrails and legs; (2) on the part of the priest, that he should receive the blood of the victim, sprinkle it about the altar, and burn the offering.

    https://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07396b.htm

  130. @Steve Sailer
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Sounds plausible.

    I've heard that Don MacLean's "Vincent" was almost as big in Europe as "American Pie" was in the U.S. An odd career being a two hit wonder, but both hits have a big cultural impact on their home continents. Was he a good judge of when he came up with a hit melody and then really worked on the lyrics for a long time?

    Replies: @YetAnotherAnon, @FPD72, @Zoos, @Paleo Liberal, @Reg Cæsar, @Wilkey

    An odd career being a two hit wonder…

    Don McLean is actually a three hit wonder. But his third hit, “Killing Me Softly With His Song,” was written by three other people and recorded by Roberta Flack.

    While “Vincent” and “American Pie” may be his only genuine chart toppers, the album they are on is uniformly excellent. A rare album I can listen to in entirety without the urge to skip a song.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Wilkey


    But his third hit, “Killing Me Softly With His Song,” was written by three other people...
     
    Or two, depending on whom you believe. Charles Fox and Norman Gimbel based it on Lori Lieberman's diary entry after a McLean concert. Lori and the married Norm had an affair, but the two men denied her writing credit. McLean himself was threatened when he included the story in liner notes on a later album.

    The song sucks. Gimbel and Fox did much better by Jim Croce. "I Got a Name" is anthemic, and sounds like it could be one of Croce's own works.

    Gimbel was able to do English-language versions of bossa nova classics in the Sixties because he was with BMI, not ASCAP, as the best American lyricists were. "Tall and tan and young and lovely..." is his line. Tom Jobim was so frustrated by having to settle for the Gimbels rather than the Mercers that, fluent in English, he eventually took over the job himself. Cf. "Wave" and "Waters of March".
    , @Polistra
    @Wilkey

    "Vincent" wasn't even close to a chart topper—not even top ten.

    McLean's second biggest hit in the USA was 'Crying'.

    In the UK, meanwhile, "American Pie" didn't hit #1
    but the other two songs did.

  131. @Wilkey
    @Joe Stalin


    Russkies surrender an AFV with customary white flag.
     
    The timing of all this will be rather interesting.

    Getting Putin to finally admit defeat will be an undeniable and incredibly rare (only?) political victory for the Biden Administration - though one accomplished with much help from the rest of NATO, and thanks to armaments developed during earlier administrations.

    With all the other troubles looming, Americans probably wouldn't care much about it directly, except for the fact that economic prospects will improve dramatically when it's finally over.

    So if Putin concedes defeat before the election in less than five weeks then expect a big recovery in the stock market and commensurate increase in turnout for the Democratic Party.

    If Putin does plan to finally admit defeat he is probably waiting until after the election, in order to punish Biden.

    Either way, your investments should see a considerable bump when the war ends. If you've taken money out of the market now may not be a bad time to get back in.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    If Putin does plan to finally admit defeat he is probably waiting until after the election, in order to punish Biden.

    Better yet, wait until Kamala is installed. Kind of like Iran releasing the hostages for well-timed humiliation.

    Should the GOP retake both houses, they should avoid impeachment to concentrate on the 25th Amendment. That way, Democrats get the blame for a Harris presidency.

    Comparisons of Dr Jill to puppeteer Edith Wilson would also be fitting.

  132. @Harry Baldwin
    @Buzz Mohawk

    [Steve] also has an IQ at least 2 SD higher

    Are you kidding? 4 SDs at least. At this point, I'd guess Biden's IQ at about 80, maybe lower. Whatever is necessary to be able to read off index cards and repeat slogans. In his heyday I doubt it exceeded 105. According to Mark Simone, Biden used to be referred to as the dumbest man in the senate by his colleagues.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Let’s not get carried away.

    I was trying to be conservative, and with no direct knowledge about either man. Two standard deviations are a lot, and I was treating Biden as whatever mediocrity he was before the onset of dementia.

    [MORE]

    Remember too, Steve blamed his Jeopardy loss on his buzzer.

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @Buzz Mohawk

    To be fair, decades before Zelensky, he was trying to buzz in with his dick.

  133. anonymous[144] • Disclaimer says:

    Hey Steve: How about a blog post about this article?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/05/opinion/mortality-penalty-inequality-education.html

    The Republican Party has become crucially dependent on a segment of white voters suffering what analysts call a “mortality penalty.”

    This penalty encompasses not only disproportionately high levels of so-called deaths of despair — suicide, drug overdoses and alcohol abuse — but also across-the-board increases in several categories of disease, injury and emotional disorder.

    “Red states are now less healthy than blue states, a reversal of what was once the case,” Anne Case and Angus Deaton, economists at Princeton, argue in a paper they published in April, “The Great Divide: Education, Despair, and Death.”

    Case and Deaton write that the correlation between Republican voting and life expectancy “goes from plus 0.42 when Gerald Ford was the Republican candidate — healthier states voted for Ford and against Carter — to minus 0.69 in 2016 and minus 0.64 in 2020. States classified as the least healthy voted for Trump and against Biden.”

    Case and Deaton contend that the ballots cast for Donald Trump by members of the white working class “are surely not for a president who will dismantle safety nets but against a Democratic Party that represents an alliance between minorities — whom working-class whites see as displacing them and challenging their once solid if unperceived privilege — and an educated elite that has benefited from globalization and from a soaring stock market, which was fueled by the rising profitability of those same firms that were increasingly denying jobs to the working class.”

    [MORE]

    Carol Graham, a senior fellow at Brookings, described the erosion of economic and social status for whites without college degrees in a 2021 paper:

    From 2005 to 2019, an average of 70,000 Americans died annually from deaths of despair (suicide, drug overdose, and alcohol poisoning). These deaths are concentrated among less than college educated middle-aged whites, with those out of the labor force disproportionately represented. Low-income minorities are significantly more optimistic than whites and much less likely to die of these deaths. This despair reflects the decline of the white working class. Counties with more respondents reporting lost hope in the years before 2016 were more likely to vote for Trump.

    Lack of hope, in Graham’s view, “is a central issue. The American dream is in tatters and, ironically, it is worse for whites.” America’s high levels of reported pain, she writes, “are largely driven by middle-aged whites. As there is no objective reason that whites should have more pain than minorities, who typically have significantly worse working conditions and access to health care, this suggests psychological pain as well as physical pain.”

    There are, Graham argues,

    long-term reasons for this. As blue-collar jobs began to decline from the late 1970s on, those displaced workers — and their communities — lost their purpose and identity and lack a narrative for going forward. For decades whites had privileged access to these jobs and the stable communities that came with them. Primarily white manufacturing and mining communities — in the suburbs and rural areas and often in the heartland — have the highest rates of despair and deaths. In contrast, more diverse urban communities have higher levels of optimism, better health indicators, and significantly lower rates of these deaths.

    In contrast to non-college whites, Graham continued,

    minorities, who had unequal access to those jobs and worse objective conditions to begin with, developed coping skills and supportive community ties in the absence of coherent public safety nets. Belief in education and strong communities have served them well in overcoming much adversity. African Americans remain more likely to believe in the value of a college education than are low-income whites. Minority communities based in part on having empathy for those who fall behind, meanwhile, have emerged from battling persistent discrimination.

    Over the past three years, however, there has been a sharp increase in drug overdose deaths among Black men, Graham noted in an email:

    The “new” Black despair is less understood and perhaps more complex. A big factor is simply Fentanyl for urban Black men. Plain and simple. But other candidates are Covid and the hit the African American communities took; Trump and the increase of “acceptance” for blatant and open racism; and, for some, George Floyd and continued police violence against blacks. There is also a phenomenon among urban Black males that has to do with longer term despair: nothing to lose, weak problem-solving skills, drug gangs and more.

    The role of race and gender in deaths of despair, especially drug-related deaths, is complex. Case wrote in an email:

    Women have always been less likely to kill themselves with drugs or alcohol, or by suicide. However, from the mid-1990s into the 20-teens, for whites without a four-year college degree, death rates from all three causes rose in parallel between men and women. So the level has always been higher for men, but the trend (and so the increase) was very similar between less-educated white men and women. For Blacks and Hispanics the story is different. Deaths of Despair were falling for less educated Black and Hispanic men from the early 1990s to the 20-teens and were constant over that period (at a much lower rate) for Black and Hispanic women without a B.A. After the arrival of Fentanyl as a street drug in 2013, rates started rising for both Black and Hispanic men and women without a B.A., but at a much faster rate for men.

    In their October 2014 study, “Economic Strain and Children’s Behavior,” Lindsey Jeanne Leininger, a professor at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, and Ariel Kalil, a professor of public policy at the University of Chicago, found a striking difference in the pattern of behavioral problems among white and Black children from demographically similar families experiencing the financial strains of the 2008 Great Recession:

    Specifically, we found that economic strain exhibited a statistically significant and qualitatively large association with White children’s internalizing behavior problems and that this relationship was not due to potentially correlated influences of objective measures of adverse economic conditions or to mediating influences of psychosocial context. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that the relationship between economic strain and internalizing problems is meaningfully different across White and Black children. In marked contrast to the White sample, the regression-adjusted relationship between economic strain and internalizing behaviors among the Black sample was of small magnitude and was statistically insignificant.

    Kalil elaborated on this finding in an email: “The processes through which white and Black individuals experience stress from macroeconomic shocks are different,” she wrote, adding that the “white population, which is more resourced and less accustomed to being financially worried, is feeling threatened by economic shocks in a way that is not very much reflective of their actual economic circumstances. In our study, among Black parents, what we are seeing is basically that perceptions of economic strain are strongly correlated with actual income-to-needs.”

    This phenomenon has been in evidence for some time.

    A 2010 Pew Research Center study that examined the effects of the Great Recession on Black and white Americans reported that Black Americans consistently suffered more in terms of unemployment, work cutbacks and other measures, but remained far more optimistic about the future than whites. Twice as many Black as white Americans were forced during the 2008 recession to work fewer hours, to take unpaid leave or switch to part-time, and Black unemployment rose from 8.9 to 15.5 percent from April 2007 to April 2009, compared with an increase from 3.7 to 8 percent for whites.

    Despite experiencing more hardship, 81 percent of Black Americans agreed with the statement “America will always continue to be prosperous and make economic progress,” compared with 59 percent of whites; 45 percent of Black Americans said the country was still in recession compared with 57 percent of whites. Pew found that 81 percent of the Black Americans it surveyed responded yes when asked “Is America still a land of prosperity?” compared with 59 percent of whites. Asked “will your children’s future standard of living be better or worse than yours?” 69 percent of Black Americans said better, and 17 percent said worse, while 38 percent of whites said better and 29 percent said worse.

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    There are similar patterns for other measures of suffering.

    In “Trends in Extreme Distress in the United States, 1993-2019,” David G. Blanchflower and Andrew J. Oswald, economists at Dartmouth and the University of Warwick in Britain, note that “the proportion of the U.S. population in extreme distress rose from 3.6 percent in 1993 to 6.4 percent in 2019. Among low-education midlife white persons, the percentage more than doubled, from 4.8 percent to 11.5 percent.”

    Blanchflower and Oswald point out that “something fundamental appears to have occurred among white, low-education, middle-aged citizens.”

    Employment prospects play a key role among those in extreme distress, according to Blanchflower and Oswald. A disproportionately large share of those falling into this extreme category agreed with the statement “I am unable to find work.”

    In her 2020 paper, “Trends in U.S. Working-Age Non-Hispanic White Mortality: Rural-Urban and Within-Rural Differences,” Shannon M. Monnat, a professor of sociology at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School, explained that “between 1990-92 and 2016-18, the mortality rates among non-Hispanic whites increased by 9.6 deaths per 100,000 population among metro males and 30.5 among metro females but increased by 70.1 and 65.0 among nonmetro (rural and exurban) males and females, respectively.”

    Monnat described these differences as a “nonmetro mortality penalty.”

    For rural and exurban men 25 to 44 over the same 28 years, she continued, “the mortality rate increased by 70.1 deaths per 100,000 population compared to an increase of only 9.6 among metro males ages 25 to 44, and 81 percent of the nonmetro increase was due to increases in drugs, alcohol, suicide, and mental/behavioral disorders (the deaths of despair).”

    The divergence between urban and rural men pales, however, in comparison with women. “Mortality increases among nonmetro females have been startling. The mortality growth among nonmetro females was much larger than among nonmetro males,” especially for women 45 to 64, Monnat writes. Urban white men 45 to 64 saw death rate per 100,000 fall from 850 to 711.1 between 1990 and 2018, while death rates for rural white men of the same age barely changed, 894.8 to 896.6. In contrast, urban white women 45 to 64 saw their death rate decline from 490.4 to 437.6, while rural white women of that age saw their mortality rate grow from 492.6 to 571.9.

    In an email, Monnat emphasized the fact that Trump has benefited from a bifurcated coalition:

    The Trump electorate comprises groups that on the surface appear to have very different interests. On the one hand, a large share of Trump supporters are working-class, live in working-class communities, have borne the brunt of economic dislocation and decline due to economic restructuring. On the other hand, Trump has benefited from major corporate donors who have interests in maintaining large tax breaks for the wealthy, deregulation of environmental and labor laws, and from an economic environment that makes it easy to exploit workers. In 2016 at least, Trump’s victory relied not just on rural and small-city working-class voters, but also on more affluent voters. Exit polls suggested that a majority of people who earned more than $50,000 per year voted for Trump.

    In a separate 2017 paper, “More Than a Rural Revolt: Landscapes of Despair and the 2016 Presidential Election,” Monnat and David L. Brown, a sociologist at Cornell, argue:

    Work has historically been about more than a paycheck in the U.S. American identities are wrapped up in our jobs. But the U.S. working-class (people without a college degree, people who work in blue-collar jobs) regularly receive the message that their work is not important and that they are irrelevant and disposable. That message is delivered through stagnant wages, declining health and retirement benefits, government safety-net programs for which they do not qualify but for which they pay taxes, and the seemingly ubiquitous message (mostly from Democrats) that success means graduating from college.

    Three economists, David Autor, David Dorn and Gordon Hanson of M.I.T., the University of Zurich and Harvard, reported in their 2018 paper, “When Work Disappears: Manufacturing Decline and the Falling Marriage Market Value of Young Men,” on the debilitating consequences for working-class men of the “China shock” — that is, of sharp increases in manufacturing competition with China:

    Shocks to manufacturing labor demand, measured at the commuting-zone level, exert large negative impacts on men’s relative employment and earnings. Although losses are visible throughout the earnings distribution, the relative declines in male earnings are largest at the bottom of the distribution.

    Such shocks “curtail the availability and desirability of potentially marriageable young men along multiple dimensions: reducing the share of men among young adults and increasing the prevalence of idleness — the state of being neither employed nor in school — among young men who remain.”

    These adverse trends, Autor, Dorn and Hanson report, “induce a differential and economically large rise in male mortality from drug and alcohol poisoning, H.I.V./AIDS, and homicide” and simultaneously “raise the fraction of mothers who are unwed, the fraction of children in single-headed households, and the fraction of children living in poverty.”

    I asked Autor for his thoughts on the implications of these developments for the Trump electorate. He replied by email:

    Many among the majority of American workers who do not have a four-year college degree feel, justifiably, that the last three decades of rapid globalization and automation have made their jobs more precarious, scarcer, less prestigious, and lower paid. Neither party has been successful in restoring the economic security and standing of non-college workers (and yes, especially non-college white males). The roots of these economic grievances are authentic, so I don’t think these voters should be denigrated for seeking a change in policy direction. That said, I don’t think the Trump/MAGA brand has much in the way of substantive policy to address these issues, and I believe that Democrats do far more to protect and improve economic prospects for blue-collar workers.

    There is some evidence that partisanship correlates with mortality rates.

    In their June 2022 paper, “The Association Between Covid-19 Mortality and the County-Level Partisan Divide in the United States,” Neil Jay Sehgal, Dahai Yue, Elle Pope, Ren Hao Wang and Dylan H. Roby, public health experts at the University of Maryland, found in their study of county-level Covid-19 mortality data from Jan. 1, 2020, to Oct. 31, 2021, that “majority Republican counties experienced 72.9 additional deaths per 100,000 people.”

    The authors cites studies showing that “counties with a greater proportion of Trump voters were less likely to search for information about Covid-19 and engage in physical distancing despite state-level mandates. Differences in Covid-19 mortality grew during the pandemic to create substantial variation in death rates in counties with higher levels of Trump support.”

    Sehgal and his colleagues conclude from their analysis that “voting behavior acts as a proxy for compliance with and support for public health measures, vaccine uptake, and the likelihood of engaging in riskier behaviors (for example, unmasked social events and in-person dining) that could affect disease spread and mortality.”

    In addition, the authors write:

    Local leaders may be hesitant to implement evidence-based policies to combat the pandemic because of pressure or oversight from state or local elected officials or constituents in more conservative areas. Even if they did institute protective policies, they may face challenges with compliance because of pressure from conservative constituents.

    For the past two decades, white working-class Americans have faced a series of economic dislocations similar to those that had a devastating impact on Black neighborhoods starting in the 1960s, as the Harvard sociologist William Julius Wilson described them in his 1987 book, “The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy.”

    How easy would it be to apply Wilson’s description of “extraordinary rates of black joblessness,” disordered lives, family breakdown and substance abuse to the emergence of similar patterns of disorder in white exurban America? How easy to transpose Black with white or inner city and urban with rural and small town?

    It is very likely, as Anne Case wrote in her email, that the United States is fast approaching a point where

    Education divides everything, including connection to the labor market, marriage, connection to institutions (like organized religion), physical and mental health, and mortality. It does so for whites, Blacks and Hispanics. There has been a profound (not yet complete) convergence in life expectancy by education. There are two Americas now: one with a B.A. and one without.

  134. @Wilkey
    @Steve Sailer


    An odd career being a two hit wonder...
     
    Don McLean is actually a three hit wonder. But his third hit, "Killing Me Softly With His Song," was written by three other people and recorded by Roberta Flack.

    While "Vincent" and "American Pie" may be his only genuine chart toppers, the album they are on is uniformly excellent. A rare album I can listen to in entirety without the urge to skip a song.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Polistra

    But his third hit, “Killing Me Softly With His Song,” was written by three other people…

    Or two, depending on whom you believe. Charles Fox and Norman Gimbel based it on Lori Lieberman’s diary entry after a McLean concert. Lori and the married Norm had an affair, but the two men denied her writing credit. McLean himself was threatened when he included the story in liner notes on a later album.

    The song sucks. Gimbel and Fox did much better by Jim Croce. “I Got a Name” is anthemic, and sounds like it could be one of Croce’s own works.

    Gimbel was able to do English-language versions of bossa nova classics in the Sixties because he was with BMI, not ASCAP, as the best American lyricists were. “Tall and tan and young and lovely…” is his line. Tom Jobim was so frustrated by having to settle for the Gimbels rather than the Mercers that, fluent in English, he eventually took over the job himself. Cf. “Wave” and “Waters of March”.

  135. @YetAnotherAnon
    Just one thing, you looked for most strings in "English", whereas for Johann Sebastian Bach and Antonio Vivaldi you looked in "English Fiction". How often do composers get namechecked like that in fiction? Surely hardly ever.

    "Bond slipped off his hand-made Loake Oxfords,put Johann Sebastian Bach on the Mediterraneo turntable, poured a martini and put his feet up."


    In Robert Harris' book Enigma, our hero goes with a girl to hear St Matthew Passion, but the composer's full name never gets mentioned. In our days "Bach" is sufficient, few listen to CPE Bach or JC Bach.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Meretricious, @AceDeuce

    In Robert Harris’ book Enigma, our hero goes with a girl to hear St Matthew Passion, but the composer’s full name never gets mentioned. In our days “Bach” is sufficient, few listen to CPE Bach or JC Bach.

    Funny you should mention that.

    There is a trend among woke liberal asshats (there’s a triply redundant appellation) that classical music’s habit of just using famous composers’ last names is racist and sexist, and that all composers must be “fullnamed”.

    Think I’m joking?

    https://slate.com/culture/2020/10/fullname-famous-composers-racism-sexism.html

    FTA:

    The habitual, two-tiered way we talk about classical composers is ubiquitous. For instance, coverage of an early October livestream by the Louisville Orchestra praised the ensemble’s performance of a “Beethoven” symphony, and the debut of a composition memorializing Breonna Taylor by “Davóne Tines” and “Igee Dieudonné.” But ubiquity doesn’t make something right. It’s time we paid attention to the inequity inherent in how we talk about composers, and it’s time for the divided naming convention to change.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @AceDeuce

    Of course, full-naming famous composers like Ludwig van Beethoven or Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart just makes them sound more awesome.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Unintended Consequence

  136. @Verymuchalive
    @dearieme

    I’ll grant that Miss Austen is the finest of novelists in English. Scott must be her principal competitor.

    Interesting that a ( fairly ) "wet" Englishman like yourself can regard Sir Walter so highly. Before you complain, males who admire Jane Austen are frankly an odd bunch. She leaves the vast majority of men, like myself, completely cold. ( No doubt you will try to refute this ! )

    Like many 19th Century authors, Scott went out of academic favour in the 1920s and has never returned to favour, outside Scotland. The difference between him and other 19th Century authors is that most of his books have never been out of print and his stories continue to be adapted for cinema and television. The general public appreciate his work, even if academia continues to largely ignore him. Who remembers ( 7 times Nobel Prize nominated ) George Meredith now ?

    So credit to your critical sensibilities re Scott. And also re Dickens. You don't mention him at all - a sure sign of sanity. Without the backing of the cultural establishment, Dickens would be largely forgotten. The public don't like him much and buy his works in diminishing numbers. The large number of realistic characters skilfully created by Scott ( second only to Shakespeare ) are much preferrable to Dickens' grotesques.

    Replies: @CCG, @dearieme

    What about other British authors of the 1800s like Arthur Conan Doyle, Lewis Carroll, Rudyard Kipling and the Brontë sisters?

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @CCG

    I said many 19th Century writers, not all. Of the ones you mention, woke Academia would certainly want to get rid of Kipling but can't. Sometimes a great writer can undergo serious academic neglect and later return to favour. Robert Louis Stevenson springs to mind. In the 1920s he was disregarded by academia and his works reached their nadir in the 1970s, where he was dismissed as a minor writer. The last 30 years have seen him restored to the pantheon of great writers, so his reputation is back to where it was in 1900. Throughout all this, his works continued to be appreciated by the public. Nearly all his works have never been out of print. Indeed, he is the 24th most translated author of all time.

    If the West survives and returns to its traditional roots, Scott and other neglected great writers will be fully appreciated again.

  137. @Polistra
    Also OT, the revolution continues to eat its own.

    https://i.ibb.co/xFrZWKb/Screenshot-20221005-162626-Daily-Mail-Online.jpg

    Ths chosenite curator was woke as can be, but the black chick knew she could take her down with some magic words. Needless to add, they don't have to be remotely credible to serve the purpose.

    TPTB recognize this as collateral damage. Yes, it happens, but even privileged people must sometimes be sacrificed for the Project.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @hhsiii, @Meretricious

    LaBouvier has been run out of the curating business. The Atlantic just published a devastating expose on just how stupid and incompetent this affirmative action lightweight was during her tenure at the Guggenheim.

  138. @Anonymous
    @dearieme

    It's not a good game.


    I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small.
     
    Is He Dead? (1898), play
    The Battle Hymn of the Republic, Updated (1901), satirical lyric
    King Leopold's Soliloquy (1905), satire
    Little Bessie Would Assist Providence (1908), poem
    Slovenly Peter (1935, posthumous), children's book[N 2]
    Some Thoughts on the Science of Onanism (1879), a speech given to The Stomach Club

    The Innocents Abroad (1869), travel
    Roughing It (1872), travel
    Old Times on the Mississippi (1876), travel
    Some Rambling Notes of an Idle Excursion (1877), travel
    A Tramp Abroad (1880), travel
    Life on the Mississippi (1883), travel
    Following the Equator (sometimes titled "More Tramps Abroad") (1897), travel
    Is Shakespeare Dead? (1909)
    Moments with Mark Twain (1920, posthumous)
    Mark Twain's Notebook (1935, posthumous)
    Letters from Hawaii (letters written in 1866, published as a book in 1947)

    "Advice to Little Girls" (1865)
    "On the Decay of the Art of Lying" (1880)
    "The Awful German Language" (1880)
    "Advice to Youth" (1882)
    "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses" (1895)
    "English As She Is Taught" (1897)
    "Concerning the Jews" (1898)
    "My First Lie, and How I Got Out of It" (1899)[14]
    "A Salutation Speech From the Nineteenth Century to the Twentieth" (1900)
    "To the Person Sitting in Darkness" (1901)
    "To My Missionary Critics" (1901)
    "Edmund Burke on Croker and Tammany" (1901)
    "What Is Man?" (1906)
    "Christian Science" (1907)
    "Queen Victoria's Jubilee" (1910)
    "The United States of Lyncherdom" (1923, posthumous)

    "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" (1867)
    "General Washington's Negro Body-Servant" (1868)[4]
    "Cannibalism in the Cars" (1868)
    "A Medieval Romance" [1868] (unfinished)[5]
    "My Late Senatorial Secretaryship" (1868)[6]
    Mark Twain vs Blondin [1869 satire letter]][7]
    "A Ghost Story" (1870)[8]: 176–180 
    "A True Story, Repeated Word for Word As I Heard It" (1874)[8]: 70–73 
    "Some Learned Fables for Good Old Boys and Girls" (1875)[8]: 77–83 
    "The Story Of The Bad Little Boy" (1875)
    "The Story Of The Good Little Boy" (1875)
    "A Literary Nightmare" (1876)
    "A Murder, a Mystery, and a Marriage" (1876)
    "The Canvasser's Tale" (1876)
    "The Invalid's Story" (1877)[8]: 135–? 
    "The Great Revolution in Pitcairn" (1879)[9]
    "1601: Conversation, as it was by the Social Fireside, in the Time of the Tudors" (1880)
    "The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm" (1882)
    "The Stolen White Elephant" (1882)
    "Luck" (1891)
    "Those Extraordinary Twins" (1892)
    "Is He Living Or Is He Dead?" (1893)
    "The Esquimau Maiden's Romance" (1893)
    "The Million Pound Bank Note" (1893)[8]: 226–238 
    "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" (1900)
    "A Double Barrelled Detective Story" (1902)
    "A Dog's Tale" (1904)
    "The War Prayer" (1905)
    "Hunting the Deceitful Turkey" (1906)
    "A Fable" (1909)
    "Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven" (1909)
    "My Platonic Sweetheart" (1912, posthumous)
    "The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine"[10] (2017, posthumous)

    Et m'fing cetera.

    Replies: @Indiana Jack, @dearieme

    A graphing of “Mark Twain” on Ngram shows some interesting results. His peak occurred in 1890, 20 years before his death, and then declined sharply (mirroring Twain’s financial difficulties at the same time). His low point was about 1903, and then rose and fell several times afterwards, with the highest peaks around 1952 and 2003 (the latter coinciding with the release of the Ken Burns documentary). His popularity has been declining since the early 2000’s, but remains fairly high – about as high as it stood in 1897.

  139. @Harry Baldwin
    @Polistra

    From the picture, it appears LaBouvier is celebrating her triumph with a glass of wine. What a rush it must be to have that power to destroy.

    Replies: @Polistra

  140. @AceDeuce
    @YetAnotherAnon


    In Robert Harris’ book Enigma, our hero goes with a girl to hear St Matthew Passion, but the composer’s full name never gets mentioned. In our days “Bach” is sufficient, few listen to CPE Bach or JC Bach.
     
    Funny you should mention that.

    There is a trend among woke liberal asshats (there's a triply redundant appellation) that classical music's habit of just using famous composers' last names is racist and sexist, and that all composers must be "fullnamed".

    Think I'm joking?

    https://slate.com/culture/2020/10/fullname-famous-composers-racism-sexism.html

    FTA:

    The habitual, two-tiered way we talk about classical composers is ubiquitous. For instance, coverage of an early October livestream by the Louisville Orchestra praised the ensemble’s performance of a “Beethoven” symphony, and the debut of a composition memorializing Breonna Taylor by “Davóne Tines” and “Igee Dieudonné.” But ubiquity doesn’t make something right. It’s time we paid attention to the inequity inherent in how we talk about composers, and it’s time for the divided naming convention to change.

     

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Of course, full-naming famous composers like Ludwig van Beethoven or Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart just makes them sound more awesome.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Steve Sailer

    Reminds me of an old joke where a hack writer is pitching an idea to a Hollywood bigwig about financing a movie version of his crappy musical:

    HACK: It can't miss. I've lined up the best talent there is to make this film.

    BIGWIG: Who do you have to direct?

    Spielberg?

    Steven Spielberg?

    No, his cousin Irving, from Des Moines. He makes industrial films.

    Do you have a producer signed on?

    Yeah, Howard.

    Ron Howard?

    No, Howard Finsterman. He used to be my neighbor in Queens.

    Well how about the main thing--the musical talent. Who's the female lead?

    Streisand.

    Barbra Streisand?

    No, Wilma Streisand. The karaoke champion of Omaha.

    Gee, I dunno about this. Who's the male lead?

    Goulet.

    Robert Goulet?

    Yes.

    , @Unintended Consequence
    @Steve Sailer

    Ludwig van Beethoven

    That's not a reference to "A Clockwork Orange", is it?

    Replies: @AceDeuce

  141. @Wilkey
    @Steve Sailer


    An odd career being a two hit wonder...
     
    Don McLean is actually a three hit wonder. But his third hit, "Killing Me Softly With His Song," was written by three other people and recorded by Roberta Flack.

    While "Vincent" and "American Pie" may be his only genuine chart toppers, the album they are on is uniformly excellent. A rare album I can listen to in entirety without the urge to skip a song.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Polistra

    “Vincent” wasn’t even close to a chart topper—not even top ten.

    McLean’s second biggest hit in the USA was ‘Crying’.

    In the UK, meanwhile, “American Pie” didn’t hit #1
    but the other two songs did.

  142. @Dream
    Meanwhile in Ireland.

    https://twitter.com/Composite_Guy2/status/1577679273787269126?t=ZQUK4nI_HefA_T80NqMooA&s=19

    Replies: @Anon, @Richard B

    That was beautiful to watch. Hopefully we’ll see more of this. And not just in Ireland.

    Though, I have to say, that watching this helps confirm that the IRA has become a bought and paid for shill of the hostile elite (if it wasn’t always). Just as BLM itself is. Obviously. Hence the orchestrated “alliance.” But these boys know better.

    Any change is going to come from the cultural periphery. For example, the boys in this video. Sooner or later people simply start saying No! in response to things where anything other than Yes! would have been unimaginable.

  143. @Steve Sailer
    @AceDeuce

    Of course, full-naming famous composers like Ludwig van Beethoven or Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart just makes them sound more awesome.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Unintended Consequence

    Reminds me of an old joke where a hack writer is pitching an idea to a Hollywood bigwig about financing a movie version of his crappy musical:

    HACK: It can’t miss. I’ve lined up the best talent there is to make this film.

    BIGWIG: Who do you have to direct?

    Spielberg?

    Steven Spielberg?

    No, his cousin Irving, from Des Moines. He makes industrial films.

    Do you have a producer signed on?

    Yeah, Howard.

    Ron Howard?

    No, Howard Finsterman. He used to be my neighbor in Queens.

    Well how about the main thing–the musical talent. Who’s the female lead?

    Streisand.

    Barbra Streisand?

    No, Wilma Streisand. The karaoke champion of Omaha.

    Gee, I dunno about this. Who’s the male lead?

    Goulet.

    Robert Goulet?

    Yes.

  144. @Bill Jones
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    Don't let Max Planck know what you're up to.
    I couldn't decide if he's the worlds biggest egotist, where literally everything in time and space has something named after him, but then I reflect on what they are and I've decided he's the worlds biggest egotist in the smallest possible way.

    Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    Hi, Bill Jones. I don’t understand your remark. You write, “Don’t let Max Planck know what you’re up to.” All I did was propose an extended usage for the numerical prefixes “milli, micro, nano, pico, femto, atto, zepto, yocto” to conveniently express very small percentages. How is this related to Max Planck (after whom is named Planck’s constant, which is the ratio of a photon’s energy to its frequency)? See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_constant
    Does this make him a bigger egotist than, say, Amedeo Avogadro (1776-1856), after whom a different constant is named?

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    You were working toward the smallest possible unit of percentages, the one below which there is only nothing.
    That was Plancks deal: the smallest unit of everything.
    Wiki's got a one page summary.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_units

    Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

  145. @Steve Sailer
    @AceDeuce

    Of course, full-naming famous composers like Ludwig van Beethoven or Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart just makes them sound more awesome.

    Replies: @AceDeuce, @Unintended Consequence

    Ludwig van Beethoven

    That’s not a reference to “A Clockwork Orange”, is it?

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    @Unintended Consequence


    Ludwig van Beethoven

    That’s not a reference to “A Clockwork Orange”, is it?
     
    Beethoven wrote Singin' in the Rain?


    ; )
  146. @Anon
    @Dream

    Blacks who act up in Ireland are going to discover why the Irish gave the English so many problems throughout the 20th century. The Irish get pretty mad when they start feeling oppressed. The Troubles were absolutely bloodthirsty, and the Irish observed the silence of omerta about what they did.

    Replies: @Polistra, @YetAnotherAnon, @Harry Baldwin

    Yeah, that makes sense while Ireland has only fifty thousand African migrants in residence. Wait til they have ten million, then they’ll be facing the same ruin the rest of us are. Schoolyard scuffles will be the least of their worries.

    • Replies: @Inverness
    @Polistra

    I know the "official figures" are lower, but when you're in Dublin now it definitely seems as though there are 100,000 Africans already in residence in that one town alone.

  147. @CCG
    @Verymuchalive

    What about other British authors of the 1800s like Arthur Conan Doyle, Lewis Carroll, Rudyard Kipling and the Brontë sisters?

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    I said many 19th Century writers, not all. Of the ones you mention, woke Academia would certainly want to get rid of Kipling but can’t. Sometimes a great writer can undergo serious academic neglect and later return to favour. Robert Louis Stevenson springs to mind. In the 1920s he was disregarded by academia and his works reached their nadir in the 1970s, where he was dismissed as a minor writer. The last 30 years have seen him restored to the pantheon of great writers, so his reputation is back to where it was in 1900. Throughout all this, his works continued to be appreciated by the public. Nearly all his works have never been out of print. Indeed, he is the 24th most translated author of all time.

    If the West survives and returns to its traditional roots, Scott and other neglected great writers will be fully appreciated again.

  148. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT - it's not just European industry that the US want to take down, it's their marine insurance and tanker business too. But if the EU and City of London want to commit suicide, who's going to stop them?

    https://www.nytimes.com/live/2022/10/05/world/russia-ukraine-war-news#russia-oil-price-cap


    Under the new rules, companies involved in the shipping of Russian oil — including shipowners, insurers and underwriters — would be on the hook for ensuring that the oil they are helping to transport is being sold at or below the price cap. If they are caught helping Russia sell at a higher price, they could face lawsuits in their home countries for violating sanctions.
    Russian crude will come under an embargo in most of the European Union on Dec. 5, and petroleum products will follow in February. The price cap on shipments to non-E.U. countries has been championed by U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen as a necessary complement to the European oil embargo.

    Under the E.U. deal, Greece, Malta and Cyprus will be permitted to continue shipping Russian oil. Had they not agreed to place their companies at the forefront of applying the price cap, they would have been forbidden from shipping or insuring Russian oil cargo outside the European Union, a huge hit for major industries.

    More than half of the tankers now shipping Russia’s oil are Greek-owned. And the financial services that underpin that trade — including insurance, reinsurance and letters of credit — are overwhelmingly based in the European Union and Britain.
     

    "This is of course an open invitation to other countries to enter the oil shipping and related financial services businesses at the cost of European companies."

    China and India are going to love their financial services getting a global boost. I can see the Greek fleet becoming Chinese.

    The US Strategic Oil Reserve is nearly halved, and OPEC have cut production by 2m barrels a day.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive, @Bill Jones

    The Saudi oil production cut was the biggest FU to the West I can recall. They are clearly positioning themselves for the upcoming Multi-Polar International Law based World Order. The implications of this for US hegemony are dire.

  149. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    @Bill Jones

    Hi, Bill Jones. I don't understand your remark. You write, "Don’t let Max Planck know what you’re up to." All I did was propose an extended usage for the numerical prefixes "milli, micro, nano, pico, femto, atto, zepto, yocto" to conveniently express very small percentages. How is this related to Max Planck (after whom is named Planck's constant, which is the ratio of a photon's energy to its frequency)? See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_constant
    Does this make him a bigger egotist than, say, Amedeo Avogadro (1776-1856), after whom a different constant is named?

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    You were working toward the smallest possible unit of percentages, the one below which there is only nothing.
    That was Plancks deal: the smallest unit of everything.
    Wiki’s got a one page summary.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_units

    • Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    @Bill Jones

    Hi, Bill Jones. Ah, now I get it. My talk of units for very small proportions reminded you of Max Planck, the "Prince of Smallness". Thanks for the link to Planck units.

  150. @Polistra
    @Anon

    Yeah, that makes sense while Ireland has only fifty thousand African migrants in residence. Wait til they have ten million, then they'll be facing the same ruin the rest of us are. Schoolyard scuffles will be the least of their worries.

    Replies: @Inverness

    I know the “official figures” are lower, but when you’re in Dublin now it definitely seems as though there are 100,000 Africans already in residence in that one town alone.

  151. @Anon
    @Dream

    Blacks who act up in Ireland are going to discover why the Irish gave the English so many problems throughout the 20th century. The Irish get pretty mad when they start feeling oppressed. The Troubles were absolutely bloodthirsty, and the Irish observed the silence of omerta about what they did.

    Replies: @Polistra, @YetAnotherAnon, @Harry Baldwin

    The changes which took 60-odd years in England have taken half that time in Ireland, which is at least as cucked as the UK.

    “The Irish get pretty mad when they start feeling oppressed.”

    Yes, but Irish elites are united in thinking the phone thieves are the oppressed ones. Whereas most of their elites were united against the Brits, they are wholly on board with the GAE agenda. The cultural changes in Ireland over the last 30 years are YUGE. Now their elites – including Sinn Fein – are delighted with being “a modern, inclusive European country” (aka tax haven for Big Tech and Big Pharma).

    A great pity, but if England couldn’t survive, what chance do Ireland or Poland have?

    Note the number of organisations signing on to the first ever Black History event in Ireland, back in 2010.

    https://blackhistorymonthireland.wordpress.com/2017/07/19/the-background-to-black-history-month-ireland/

    On 30th October 2010, Cork Africa Connect, established by Zeph, showcased the first Black History Month event, as a pilot project, at the prestigious Gresham Metropole Hotel in Cork City with a Symposium, Dinner and a speech on “Africa Empowerment– Working Towards African Unity”. Rev. Fr. James Good’s keynote address was attended by African envoys and high profile Irish personalities, and supported by Cork City Council, University College Cork (UCC), and local media such as Red FM and the Cork Independent. UCC’s History Department took a supportive interest in Zeph’s work, helping to organise events. Cork City Council supplied some funding.
    A talk on the travels and works of social reformer Fredrick Douglass [who met with Daniel O’Connell of Ireland’s Catholic Emancipation movement in 1845] took place in University College Cork, alongside lectures on African-American Slave Trade Emancipation. Zeph explained in 2014 how BHMI was moving to the capital: “This year there are official events in Dublin, Cork and Waterford throughout the month.”

  152. @Anonymous
    @dearieme

    It's not a good game.


    I do like Mark Twain but his oeuvre is too small.
     
    Is He Dead? (1898), play
    The Battle Hymn of the Republic, Updated (1901), satirical lyric
    King Leopold's Soliloquy (1905), satire
    Little Bessie Would Assist Providence (1908), poem
    Slovenly Peter (1935, posthumous), children's book[N 2]
    Some Thoughts on the Science of Onanism (1879), a speech given to The Stomach Club

    The Innocents Abroad (1869), travel
    Roughing It (1872), travel
    Old Times on the Mississippi (1876), travel
    Some Rambling Notes of an Idle Excursion (1877), travel
    A Tramp Abroad (1880), travel
    Life on the Mississippi (1883), travel
    Following the Equator (sometimes titled "More Tramps Abroad") (1897), travel
    Is Shakespeare Dead? (1909)
    Moments with Mark Twain (1920, posthumous)
    Mark Twain's Notebook (1935, posthumous)
    Letters from Hawaii (letters written in 1866, published as a book in 1947)

    "Advice to Little Girls" (1865)
    "On the Decay of the Art of Lying" (1880)
    "The Awful German Language" (1880)
    "Advice to Youth" (1882)
    "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses" (1895)
    "English As She Is Taught" (1897)
    "Concerning the Jews" (1898)
    "My First Lie, and How I Got Out of It" (1899)[14]
    "A Salutation Speech From the Nineteenth Century to the Twentieth" (1900)
    "To the Person Sitting in Darkness" (1901)
    "To My Missionary Critics" (1901)
    "Edmund Burke on Croker and Tammany" (1901)
    "What Is Man?" (1906)
    "Christian Science" (1907)
    "Queen Victoria's Jubilee" (1910)
    "The United States of Lyncherdom" (1923, posthumous)

    "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" (1867)
    "General Washington's Negro Body-Servant" (1868)[4]
    "Cannibalism in the Cars" (1868)
    "A Medieval Romance" [1868] (unfinished)[5]
    "My Late Senatorial Secretaryship" (1868)[6]
    Mark Twain vs Blondin [1869 satire letter]][7]
    "A Ghost Story" (1870)[8]: 176–180 
    "A True Story, Repeated Word for Word As I Heard It" (1874)[8]: 70–73 
    "Some Learned Fables for Good Old Boys and Girls" (1875)[8]: 77–83 
    "The Story Of The Bad Little Boy" (1875)
    "The Story Of The Good Little Boy" (1875)
    "A Literary Nightmare" (1876)
    "A Murder, a Mystery, and a Marriage" (1876)
    "The Canvasser's Tale" (1876)
    "The Invalid's Story" (1877)[8]: 135–? 
    "The Great Revolution in Pitcairn" (1879)[9]
    "1601: Conversation, as it was by the Social Fireside, in the Time of the Tudors" (1880)
    "The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm" (1882)
    "The Stolen White Elephant" (1882)
    "Luck" (1891)
    "Those Extraordinary Twins" (1892)
    "Is He Living Or Is He Dead?" (1893)
    "The Esquimau Maiden's Romance" (1893)
    "The Million Pound Bank Note" (1893)[8]: 226–238 
    "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" (1900)
    "A Double Barrelled Detective Story" (1902)
    "A Dog's Tale" (1904)
    "The War Prayer" (1905)
    "Hunting the Deceitful Turkey" (1906)
    "A Fable" (1909)
    "Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven" (1909)
    "My Platonic Sweetheart" (1912, posthumous)
    "The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine"[10] (2017, posthumous)

    Et m'fing cetera.

    Replies: @Indiana Jack, @dearieme

    If I’d known his oeuvre was as large as that I’d have rejected him immediately. A gazillion publications and only two famous books. Third rater, I suppose.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @dearieme

    Mark Twain was really good about writing about male adolescence (Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer, and the first half of Life on the Mississippi), but not so good about everything else.

  153. @Verymuchalive
    @dearieme

    I’ll grant that Miss Austen is the finest of novelists in English. Scott must be her principal competitor.

    Interesting that a ( fairly ) "wet" Englishman like yourself can regard Sir Walter so highly. Before you complain, males who admire Jane Austen are frankly an odd bunch. She leaves the vast majority of men, like myself, completely cold. ( No doubt you will try to refute this ! )

    Like many 19th Century authors, Scott went out of academic favour in the 1920s and has never returned to favour, outside Scotland. The difference between him and other 19th Century authors is that most of his books have never been out of print and his stories continue to be adapted for cinema and television. The general public appreciate his work, even if academia continues to largely ignore him. Who remembers ( 7 times Nobel Prize nominated ) George Meredith now ?

    So credit to your critical sensibilities re Scott. And also re Dickens. You don't mention him at all - a sure sign of sanity. Without the backing of the cultural establishment, Dickens would be largely forgotten. The public don't like him much and buy his works in diminishing numbers. The large number of realistic characters skilfully created by Scott ( second only to Shakespeare ) are much preferrable to Dickens' grotesques.

    Replies: @CCG, @dearieme

    a ( fairly ) “wet” Englishman like yourself

    I’m neither wet nor English. I agree that Dickens is awful though, excepting only The Tale of Two Cities which is cracker.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    @dearieme

    Dearieme, you're not English. I apologise. I'm sorry if I've offended you by calling you wet. It's just there are times when you sound ( metaphorically speaking ) rather like Philip Owen , who is wet - and Welsh.

    As regards Dickens, even authors who are awful can produce the odd book or two of value. Quite often, their literary reputations are dependent on just these few works. Think J D Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye ( I personally think it's overrated ) Did he write anything else ? Yes. Was it any good ? Apparently not as few people mention it.

  154. @Unintended Consequence
    @Steve Sailer

    Ludwig van Beethoven

    That's not a reference to "A Clockwork Orange", is it?

    Replies: @AceDeuce

    Ludwig van Beethoven

    That’s not a reference to “A Clockwork Orange”, is it?

    Beethoven wrote Singin’ in the Rain?

    ; )

  155. @dearieme
    @Anonymous

    If I'd known his oeuvre was as large as that I'd have rejected him immediately. A gazillion publications and only two famous books. Third rater, I suppose.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Mark Twain was really good about writing about male adolescence (Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer, and the first half of Life on the Mississippi), but not so good about everything else.

  156. @Bill Jones
    @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    You were working toward the smallest possible unit of percentages, the one below which there is only nothing.
    That was Plancks deal: the smallest unit of everything.
    Wiki's got a one page summary.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_units

    Replies: @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    Hi, Bill Jones. Ah, now I get it. My talk of units for very small proportions reminded you of Max Planck, the “Prince of Smallness”. Thanks for the link to Planck units.

  157. @Anon
    @Dream

    Blacks who act up in Ireland are going to discover why the Irish gave the English so many problems throughout the 20th century. The Irish get pretty mad when they start feeling oppressed. The Troubles were absolutely bloodthirsty, and the Irish observed the silence of omerta about what they did.

    Replies: @Polistra, @YetAnotherAnon, @Harry Baldwin

    Did the African return the phone he stole? It isn’t clear from the video that he did.

  158. @Steve Sailer
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Second Nobel? I'm impressed.

    Sharpless was blinded in one eye in a chemistry lab accident over 50 years ago. He always wears goggles since.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Hodag, @Jimbo

    It’s interesting – one of the Dads in the scout troop my son is in is a patent attorney. He got his Ph.D in biochemistry, but decided to go back to law school. His reasons? Partially the money, but also because he had spent a lot of time in the lab and felt himself getting careless. He has since had two of his old colleagues die from lab accidents, so I guess he was right…

  159. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Harry Baldwin

    Let's not get carried away.

    I was trying to be conservative, and with no direct knowledge about either man. Two standard deviations are a lot, and I was treating Biden as whatever mediocrity he was before the onset of dementia.

    Remember too, Steve blamed his Jeopardy loss on his buzzer.


    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/ad/cd/3c/adcd3c03a2dda298f768c7171a9938b5.jpg

    Replies: @Ralph L

    To be fair, decades before Zelensky, he was trying to buzz in with his dick.

  160. @Buzz Mohawk
    @Reg Cæsar

    Purdue is the alma mater of Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, and of Gene Cernan, the last man on the Moon. Both earned their engineering degrees there.

    Armstrong family name origin: Scotland

    Cernan family name origin: Ireland

    Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi, @Reg Cæsar

    Cernan family name origin: Ireland

    Correct, if counterintuitive:

    The original Gaelic form of Cernan was Mac Thighearnain, which is derived from the word “tighearna,” which means “lord.”

    https://www.houseofnames.com/cernan-family-crest#:~:text=The%20original%20Gaelic%20form%20of,%22%20which%20means%20%22lord.%22

    One could be forgiven for thinking it Slavic:

    Čermák Czech
    Means “redstart (bird)” in Czech.
    Cermak Czech
    Anglicized form of Čermák.
    Černík Czech
    Variant of Černý.
    Černý Czech
    Means “black” in Czech.

    https://surnames.behindthename.com/names/letter/c

    There are families in our area named Chernak and Cherney. I wondered if they were related, as if the latter adapted to America. A Chernak told me they weren’t (both families had been in the area for generations), so then I wondered if Cherney was Norman, like Cheney and Chaney.

    But no, it’s Central European as well. Chernak is Slovak and was adapted from Černák. Cherney is kind of Austrian-Bohemian, and adapted from things like Czerney. I assume both have some connotation of “black”, as in swarthy or dark-haired.

  161. @dearieme
    @Verymuchalive

    a ( fairly ) “wet” Englishman like yourself

    I'm neither wet nor English. I agree that Dickens is awful though, excepting only The Tale of Two Cities which is cracker.

    Replies: @Verymuchalive

    Dearieme, you’re not English. I apologise. I’m sorry if I’ve offended you by calling you wet. It’s just there are times when you sound ( metaphorically speaking ) rather like Philip Owen , who is wet – and Welsh.

    As regards Dickens, even authors who are awful can produce the odd book or two of value. Quite often, their literary reputations are dependent on just these few works. Think J D Salinger. The Catcher in the Rye ( I personally think it’s overrated ) Did he write anything else ? Yes. Was it any good ? Apparently not as few people mention it.

  162. @YetAnotherAnon
    I do wonder if the Van Gogh upsurge circa 1983 is the delayed effect of Don MacLean's 1971 song "Vincent". People who write books might be the people who bought records, only 12 years older.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Veteran Aryan

    I do wonder if the Van Gogh upsurge circa 1983 is the delayed effect of Don MacLean’s 1971 song “Vincent”.

    There was a touring Van Gogh exhibit in the U.S. some time around the early 80s. It’s difficult to find information about it because all of the search results are about the current “Immersive Experience” tour. But I know there was one because I have a poster of ‘Undergrowth With Two Figures’ that came from a museum in New Orleans during that time.

  163. @Meretricious
    @R.G. Camara

    RGC, have you read any of Lord Byron's poems? Byron is one of the leading figures of the Romantic movement, and is regarded as one of the greatest English poets. He remains widely read and influential.

    Replies: @R.G. Camara

    I’m not speaking about Byron’s place among poets for his skill. I’m talking about how his contemporaries raved and made big deals about him while he was alive beyond all sorts.

    Byron seemed to have a personal magnetism that made his contemporaries hang on his every word and action. It was Byron’s presence that made them rave, not his poetry.

    By comparison, Shakespeare, Chaucer, and Milton are the three most influential English poets of all time (all more important than Byron), and their contemporaries recognized their genius and influence. However, their praise while living was not of the level of Byron. Shakespeare had his contemporaries both praise him and yet teased him (the famous “Shake-scene” gibe that kicked off his public notoriety), and his retirement was quiet. And it wasn’t as if Milton or Chaucer appearing at a party was some kind of epoch-making event that people talked about. No foreign power called for Shakespeare, Chaucer, or Milton to show up in the middle of a war to rally the people to the cause merely by showing up (as Byron did for the Greek independence movement).

    I think Byron’s personal magnetism and the excitement of his times are the key to this. Much like how men remember the prettiest girl in their high school class well after high school is over as some beauty beyond compare, but other age groups look at her pictures and think her unremarkable, the contemporary view of Byron is all out of joint.

  164. Anonymous[989] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, a tangent, I know you’re a fellow Waugh fan, his son Alexander Waugh (highly distinguished and unmistakably intelligent himself) has a YouTube channel presenting what seems to me overwhelming new evidence (which he has played a large part in unearthing the past ten years) for the earl of Oxford’s being Shakespeare. I’d be interested in your opinion, whether you buy it or not. Waugh’s erudition alone is worth the time perusing thru his many short videos. I’ve watched them all, some twice (and my time spent reading to time spent watching videos ratio is about as high as it gets)(that would be a cool metric actually, eg for tracking progress in kids, probably leading to more programs to encourage reading over watching, which, though money wasted of course with respect to its well-intentioned objective, would be nice.

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