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The Washington Post headlines:

States rushing to reopen are likely making a deadly error, coronavirus models and experts warn
Closing America was hard. Science suggests reopening amid coronavirus will be even harder.
Jacksonville, Fla., beaches reopened last week after a short period of restrictions brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. (Sam Thomas/Reuters)
(Sam Thomas/Reuters)
By
William Wan,
Carolyn Y. Johnson and
Joel Achenbach
April 22, 2020 at 5:35 p.m. PDT

And illustrates it with this photo with the caption “Jacksonville, Fla., beaches reopened last week after a short period of restrictions brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.”

As I’ve mentioned a million times before, the oldest trick in the newspaper photographer’s book is using a telephoto lens to make a beach look supercrowded. It’s fun! Perspective distortion depends upon how much magnification the lens does versus how wide-angle it is. With telephoto lenses:

Distant objects look approximately the same size – closer objects are abnormally small, and more distant objects are abnormally large, and hence the viewer cannot discern relative distances between distant objects – distances are compressed.

At the opposite extreme, a wide-angle lens makes close objects appear much closer than more distant ones. TV commercial director Joe Sedelmaier wound up influencing American political history in the 1980s with his wide-angle lens shots:

I also the suspect this video is shot with a telephoto lens:

I know this looks like a 1980s baseball team mascot, but this is a real bird, the shoebill bird of Africa. They stand up to 5 feet tall.

By the way, this Jacksonville Beach looks excellent for social distanced walking, at least at low tide, because the wet sand that is hard enough for easy walking or even bike riding, is so wide. At Los Angeles beaches, in contrast, the water’s edge tends to be steeper, so the area of wet sand is quite narrow, forcing walkers into a narrow place.

 
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  1. Sometimes airline pilots irresponsibly fly too close to the Moon. This guy probably lost his license:

    • Replies: @snorlax
    I'd like to see him try flying that close to the sun!
    , @The Alarmist
    I buzzed a few interesting things when I was in the war, but I never thought to buzz the moon.
    , @Cortes
    Father Ted providing a lesson to a trainee Irish sky pilot:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OXypyrutq_M
  2. @Buzz Mohawk
    Sometimes airline pilots irresponsibly fly too close to the Moon. This guy probably lost his license:

    https://radchickblog.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/moon-plane.jpg

    I’d like to see him try flying that close to the sun!

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    They do that too. Fools. The wings probably melted off this one, like Icarus':

    https://petapixel.com/assets/uploads/2013/09/9731792046_c2b5f0bc04_b.jpg
    , @Bill Jones
    The Irish solved that problem.
    Aer Lingus only flies to the sun at night.
  3. @snorlax
    I'd like to see him try flying that close to the sun!

    They do that too. Fools. The wings probably melted off this one, like Icarus’:

  4. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:

    As a photographer, one little trick I employ…

    Let’s say I need a landscape pic of a popular place, and want no people in the shot. I’ll set the camera on a tripod, and take a picture every 30 seconds for 10-15 minutes. Then I can take all those exposures, set them up as layers in photoshop, and erase the people by replacing them with the empty space of a later exposure. Using this trick, I’ve taken pictures of a crowded Griffith Park Observatory at night, and made it look deserted when people were all over the damned place.

    On the flip side, I could take a somewhat empty beach, and employing the same strategy, except I’d be adding instead of subtracting people, make it look packed with people. Because it’s a static shot on a tripod, using the same exposure settings for each shot makes it damned hard to call bullshit on the photo, since I’m simply filling in new people into the photo. I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    I’m not saying any professional photographer, or blogging photographer would ever, ever, ever do that. Even a little. I’m just saying… they could.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    That's clever.
    , @ScarletNumber

    I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.
     
    Or be like the University of Wisconsin, who Photoshopped a black student attending a football game who has never attended into their application booklet.
    , @South Texas Guy
    Anonymous is on to something here. 15 years ago when I began my stint in journalism, any photographer pulling a photoshop trick like that would have gotten their ass fired (if caught). Nowadays, all bets are off because journos (and media owners) decided they'd rather be full-time democrats than impartial observers getting a balanced story.

    BTW, the same trick used in the beach photo can also be used at protests (as well as other events). Say if 30 people line up in front of the courthouse for a protest, taking a long shot like that will confuse the casual views, but walking across the street and dialing your zoom down to 17 (or whatever you have) would clearly show a piss pore turnout.
    , @Anon
    Another way to depopulate photos is to put the camera on a really solid tripod, put a really dark neutral density filter on the lens, stop the lens down to minimum, then do a really long "bulb" or "time" exposure. As long as the people are moving through the frame, they will not be at any particular place long enough to register. On the other hand, if they move slowly, you might get mysterious ghosted images. And if one guy just stands there the whole time, he will show up, blurred at the edges. This is a good way to photograph at a museum, deliberately choosing the exposure time to get some ghosts in the shot. And this is a trick used by large format architectural photographers to clean up the environment of a building.

    Now that I'm thinking of weird photography techniques, here's another: Shoot a moving person or object while tracking it, with the sky as a background (works best at dusk), with a half second or so exposure. Use on-camera flash to illuminate the person. This requires a second-curtain shutter sync for the flash to work right, so the person will be flashed at the end of the exposure, not the beginning. The flash should be set a stop or two below normal, since you are in daylight and don't really need flash: You're just using it to bring out the person at the end of the exposure. The result is a really atmosphere with a trailing blur. This is sometimes called "solar sync." The math for the flash exposure and the camera settings is a pain, but with digital you can just experiment.

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.
    , @Jonathan Mason

    I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.
     
    I know what you mean. I have a rather attractive painting of a well-known impressionist scene of a crowded street near the Arc de Triomphe in Paris and the same man appears three times in the picture. Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose!
    , @Keypusher
    Thanks, I’ve seen a lot of pictures where I wondered how the photographer ever managed to find a time when there were no people there. Now I know...
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    https://allthatsinteresting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/photo-stalin.jpg
  5. @Anonymous
    As a photographer, one little trick I employ...

    Let’s say I need a landscape pic of a popular place, and want no people in the shot. I’ll set the camera on a tripod, and take a picture every 30 seconds for 10-15 minutes. Then I can take all those exposures, set them up as layers in photoshop, and erase the people by replacing them with the empty space of a later exposure. Using this trick, I’ve taken pictures of a crowded Griffith Park Observatory at night, and made it look deserted when people were all over the damned place.

    On the flip side, I could take a somewhat empty beach, and employing the same strategy, except I’d be adding instead of subtracting people, make it look packed with people. Because it’s a static shot on a tripod, using the same exposure settings for each shot makes it damned hard to call bullshit on the photo, since I’m simply filling in new people into the photo. I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    I’m not saying any professional photographer, or blogging photographer would ever, ever, ever do that. Even a little. I’m just saying... they could.

    That’s clever.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    That’s clever.
     
    Laziness is the mother of invention.
  6. Anon[335] • Disclaimer says:

    The media is showing photos of surfers at Japan’s famous Kanagawa beaches, prompting statements from the governor and a surfer organization. My first thought was that the photos looked seriously foreshortened, but then the helicopter or drone gained altitude, and the water and beach were shown to be genuinely packed. Not every long lens photo lies.

    But I think closing surfing beaches may be like banning the sale of alcohol (which various Central and South American countries have done, as well as Greenland and South Africa): addicts have to feed their addiction.

    The alcohol ban has various explanations, depending on the country and who’s talking:

    — Preventing domestic violence while dad is home with mom all day

    — Reaction to a rumor that booze prevents/cures the Wuflu

    — A belief that the poor should be saving money, since things are going to be bad for a while

    — Preventing public misbehavior and risky behavior

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The alcohol ban has various explanations, depending on the country and who’s talking:
     
    There is another possible explanation: making sure that people are really miserable.
    , @JMcG
    - The irresistible attraction of pushing people around.
  7. Horizontal stripes are unflattering on some body types.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Some people can't be helped by clothing, period.

    If they're that fat, they shouldn't be out anyway.

    Nothing to do with coronavirus, by the way.

  8. @Anonymous
    As a photographer, one little trick I employ...

    Let’s say I need a landscape pic of a popular place, and want no people in the shot. I’ll set the camera on a tripod, and take a picture every 30 seconds for 10-15 minutes. Then I can take all those exposures, set them up as layers in photoshop, and erase the people by replacing them with the empty space of a later exposure. Using this trick, I’ve taken pictures of a crowded Griffith Park Observatory at night, and made it look deserted when people were all over the damned place.

    On the flip side, I could take a somewhat empty beach, and employing the same strategy, except I’d be adding instead of subtracting people, make it look packed with people. Because it’s a static shot on a tripod, using the same exposure settings for each shot makes it damned hard to call bullshit on the photo, since I’m simply filling in new people into the photo. I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    I’m not saying any professional photographer, or blogging photographer would ever, ever, ever do that. Even a little. I’m just saying... they could.

    I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    Or be like the University of Wisconsin, who Photoshopped a black student attending a football game who has never attended into their application booklet.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Or be like the University of Wisconsin, who Photoshopped a black student attending a football game who has never attended into their application booklet.
     
    Well, the problem of photoshopping someone into a picture that was never there is myriad. Different lenses distort the subject differently, and the lighting of the imported element is a major bitch. Anyone who's well versed in photoshop can zoom in and identify the shenanigans on a pixel level.
    Since I’m using the same camera, lens, lighting, and even sensor, my adding someone who wasn’t there only a minute before is easy peasy. It may still be detectable, but it not nearly as easy as identifying an element that never existed in the shot.

    The only sure way to detect it would be obtaining the "original" exposure, I would think, since there wouldn’t be one, since it conceivably took 30 shots to come up with the one.
  9. Isn’t the UV radiation from sunshine really tough on viruses? All that salt sea sun and sand should keep people healthy, no?

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
    As well as the continuous transverse breeze blowing virus away from walkers and out into the ocean.

    However, the viruses might mutate in the sea, infect giant squids, and they would go mad and swarm attack a coastal city. We've got to be careful about that sort of thing.

    , @J.Ross
    Sunlight is supposed to help (there is some reason to believe exposure to sun was a factor during the Spanish flu) and so is heat: here in Michigan we have temperatures in the thirties with snow and ice, in late April. States that get sun should absolutely exploit it.
    , @Jack D
    To the extent that the beach goers are coughing on surfaces, the UV radiation in sunshine should kill the virus that lands on those surfaces in very short order. Corona viruses are surprisingly delicate little critters and it doesn't take much heat, radiation or chemical activity to damage them to the point where they are no longer infectious. Think of them like dandelion seed heads but on a microscopic scale - any significant amount of energy applied to them is going to damage them.

    However, if people are close together they may cough or breath directly on each other (in fact this is the main means of transmission of the virus - transmission from surfaces is considered to be fairly rare but not impossible, so wiping your groceries and such is largely a waste of time) and the few seconds of sunshine while the virus particles are traveling thru the air would not be enough to kill them.
    , @Lugash
    The sun and fresh air is probably good for people. Interacting with people you otherwise wouldn't be in contact with isn't.... "hey let me swing by your house and we'll drive down to the beach together" and "Man, I'm hungry after walking on the beach, let's stop at McDonalds" poses a risk.
    , @Joe Stalin
    The solar radiation and thus UV will vary a great deal upon your location and TOD, so your worry time will vary once the viruses alight upon the outdoor surfaces.

    Predicted Inactivation of Viruses of Relevance to Biodefense by Solar Radiation

    We compiled available data on virus inactivation as a function of wavelength and calculated a composite action spectrum that allowed extrapolation from the 254-nm data to solar UV. We combined our estimates of virus sensitivity with solar measurements at different geographical locations to predict virus inactivation. Our predictions agreed with the available experimental data. This work should be a useful step to understanding and eventually predicting the survival of viruses after their release in the environment.

    The method developed here for estimating the effective solar flux was relatively straightforward and depended on available and reliable solar radiometry. We predicted virus inactivation by combining viral UV254 sensitivity with effective solar flux at particular geographical sites and times of year. Due mainly to environmental factors which would decrease the available solar UVB (e.g., clouds, air pollution, dust, etc.), the accuracy of the predicted time required for virus inactivation by solar UV is expected to be within a factor of 2 of the actual value (Table ​(Table5).5). This methodology could also be extended to nonhuman viruses of agricultural impact, such as those that infect livestock and major crops.

    Ultimately, the survival of a few selected viruses, or more likely of adequate nonpathogenic viral simulants, should be determined under actual solar exposure at representative locations and times of the year.

    Lacking specific experimental data, our approach can be used to estimate survival of a wide variety of viruses after their release at any location and time of the year. Our approach and estimations of virus survival should be useful to develop more efficient countermeasures and to develop improved quarantine guidelines for cities and other areas contaminated after a viral release.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1280232/
     
    I suspect that a UV lamp will have to irradiate a virus impacted surface for awhile to be effective in sterilization.
    , @Dr. X
    The sun will increase your body's production of Vitamin D, making your immune system better able to fight viruses.
  10. @Anonymous
    As a photographer, one little trick I employ...

    Let’s say I need a landscape pic of a popular place, and want no people in the shot. I’ll set the camera on a tripod, and take a picture every 30 seconds for 10-15 minutes. Then I can take all those exposures, set them up as layers in photoshop, and erase the people by replacing them with the empty space of a later exposure. Using this trick, I’ve taken pictures of a crowded Griffith Park Observatory at night, and made it look deserted when people were all over the damned place.

    On the flip side, I could take a somewhat empty beach, and employing the same strategy, except I’d be adding instead of subtracting people, make it look packed with people. Because it’s a static shot on a tripod, using the same exposure settings for each shot makes it damned hard to call bullshit on the photo, since I’m simply filling in new people into the photo. I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    I’m not saying any professional photographer, or blogging photographer would ever, ever, ever do that. Even a little. I’m just saying... they could.

    Anonymous is on to something here. 15 years ago when I began my stint in journalism, any photographer pulling a photoshop trick like that would have gotten their ass fired (if caught). Nowadays, all bets are off because journos (and media owners) decided they’d rather be full-time democrats than impartial observers getting a balanced story.

    BTW, the same trick used in the beach photo can also be used at protests (as well as other events). Say if 30 people line up in front of the courthouse for a protest, taking a long shot like that will confuse the casual views, but walking across the street and dialing your zoom down to 17 (or whatever you have) would clearly show a piss pore turnout.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    Yeah, a photog might bring in a nice piece of work, but as a news editor I'd still have to ask, "Does this photo lie?" And since my family was in fashion and media, I had learned early on just how much they can and do distort reality.
    , @prosa123
    It's long been a truism that crowd estimates at any sort of unticketed outdoor events such as protests or open-air concerts are very rough guesses at best.
    , @Stan Adams
    Time magazine once got raked over the coals for darkening O.J.’s mugshot:
    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/555b576fe4b08f7cf526c752/1435171795477-5H13UT1B8D2D56L4E5AT/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kMA-RPZJ9__R8E1-YZP6_poUqsxRUqqbr1mOJYKfIPR7LoDQ9mXPOjoJoqy81S2I8N_N4V1vUb5AoIIIbLZhVYxCRW4BPu10St3TBAUQYVKcEezr4tPLoyQ2NxPpQHhzsj2Sie1_bcPrdHN7tlaAJX0Ql6fdcrJZWYnEtcjmTYrQ/oj_480x318.jpg

    Was that really over 25 years ago? It seems like only yesterday.
  11. @Anon
    The media is showing photos of surfers at Japan's famous Kanagawa beaches, prompting statements from the governor and a surfer organization. My first thought was that the photos looked seriously foreshortened, but then the helicopter or drone gained altitude, and the water and beach were shown to be genuinely packed. Not every long lens photo lies.

    But I think closing surfing beaches may be like banning the sale of alcohol (which various Central and South American countries have done, as well as Greenland and South Africa): addicts have to feed their addiction.

    The alcohol ban has various explanations, depending on the country and who's talking:

    -- Preventing domestic violence while dad is home with mom all day

    -- Reaction to a rumor that booze prevents/cures the Wuflu

    -- A belief that the poor should be saving money, since things are going to be bad for a while

    -- Preventing public misbehavior and risky behavior

    The alcohol ban has various explanations, depending on the country and who’s talking:

    There is another possible explanation: making sure that people are really miserable.

    • Agree: jim jones
  12. Closing America was hard. Science suggests reopening amid coronavirus will be even harder.

    It is notable how people who know little about science, and understand still less, now use the word “Science!” as some kind of mystical incantation.

    • Replies: @Eagle Eye

    ... people who know little about science, and understand still less, now use the word “Science!” as some kind of mystical incantation.
     
    PRO TIP: "¡Science!" has even more magic power than mere “Science!” Just ask ¡Jeb!
    , @Eagle Eye

    ... people who know little about science, and understand still less, now use the word “Science!” as some kind of mystical incantation.
     
    PRO TIP: "¡¡¡Science!!!" has triple the magic power of “Science!” Just ask ¡Jeb!
  13. anonymous[227] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber
    Horizontal stripes are unflattering on some body types.

    Some people can’t be helped by clothing, period.

    If they’re that fat, they shouldn’t be out anyway.

    Nothing to do with coronavirus, by the way.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    Some people can’t be helped by clothing, period.

    If they’re that fat, they shouldn’t be out anyway.

    Nothing to do with coronavirus, by the way.
     
    That's a lockdown i could get behind.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    Fat people should be out and getting exercise. They're just the people who need it.

    I'm always impressed when I see a red-faced fatty pounding the pavement or doing circuits in the park. Fair play to them, they obviously know at least one half of what's needed.

    (Eating and drinking less is often harder than forcing yourself to exercise.)
  14. OT: French researchers plan to give nicotine patches to coronavirus patients and frontline workers after lower rates of infection were found among smokers – but say it’s NOT a reason to take up cigarettes
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8246939/French-researchers-plan-nicotine-patches-coronavirus-patients-frontline-workers.html

    Pack of Marlboro beats five humidifiers?

    • Replies: @Inverness
    Who would have guessed that France would be the country to discover the miracle cigarette cure.
    , @jim jones
    So my diet of cigarettes and whiskey has now been validated by "Science"
    , @Black-hole creator
    Thanks for the link. So smokers have an 80% smaller probability of ending up in the hospital. This is completely off the hook, a truly magical fact. Imagine if there was a proven drug with that kind of effect, i.e. reducing hospitalizations by a factor of 5, people would be rioting and asking for that drug to be available to anybody pronto.

    But, the phony MSM is not going to touch this discovery. I guess, it will spread by word of mouth. Might be a good time to buy tobacco stocks. I think most MSM still mentions smoking as a big risk factor. I remember I even considered giving up on vaping when the virus hit - I smoked for about 20 years and switched to vaping about 4 years ago. I think, I'll hold off for now.

    Now, of course smokers do no live as long so perhaps there are fewer geriatric smokers and that would affect the results. Still a factor of 5 effect is too high to overlook. People who are really paranoid should take up smoking. Oh, and cigarettes should no longer be taxed at such draconian rates - so far this is the only proven cure.

    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    Substitute a pack of Gallois.
  15. can we not? Seriously?

  16. What? why are you forcing this info?

  17. @Jedi Night
    Isn't the UV radiation from sunshine really tough on viruses? All that salt sea sun and sand should keep people healthy, no?

    As well as the continuous transverse breeze blowing virus away from walkers and out into the ocean.

    However, the viruses might mutate in the sea, infect giant squids, and they would go mad and swarm attack a coastal city. We’ve got to be careful about that sort of thing.

    • Agree: Simon Tugmutton
    • Replies: @Inverness
    You may think you're just kidding around, but take a look at the featured articles on the unz.com home page. The wuhan virus was cooked up at fort detrick by an unholy alliance of anglo-zionists and china-haters and released by the cia etc etc etc. And only trolls who believe the holocaust hoax would deny this obvious truth.

    Giant mutated squids would be a relief after reading some of this tripe. Steve should look for a new home--the credibility of this one is approximately nil.

    , @The Alarmist

    However, the viruses might mutate in the sea, infect giant squids, and they would go mad and swarm attack a coastal city. We’ve got to be careful about that sort of thing.
     
    It will by NYC, and the MSM will chalk up four million resulting deaths to COVID-19.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Lock, as reported in SF Gate, a paddle boarder was forced out of the ocean by police officers. An Oceanographer was quoted as saying that the virus could wash of of him and come ashore as a hazardous spray. Whatever.
    , @Known Fact
    Squidnado!
  18. I see the US has the same climatic/political divide as Australia. Hot states want to reopen and cool states don’t. In Queensland its basically summer all year round, hence the limited number of cases and increasing calls for easing restrictions.

    Given the massive climatic differences between different parts of the US in spring, it seems silly not to let states decide there own restrictions and easing schedules.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    That's interesting.

    Any other countries with a big north-south distance?

    Italy, obviously, with the South being less hard hit than the wealthy North.

    What about Spain? Madrid in the middle is hard hit, but it's at 2200 feet elevation so about 8 degrees F cooler than sealevel at that latitude.

    Vietnam south of China is practically done with the damn thing.

    , @AnotherDad

    Given the massive climatic differences between different parts of the US in spring, it seems silly not to let states decide there own restrictions and easing schedules.
     
    I think the word is "federalism".

    We lost a hunk in 1865. More in the 30s. And with the rise of minoritarianism, we've had the outright stripping of ("dangerous", "populist", "racist!") republican governance in favor of centralized elite diktat from our super-state--through the courts or administratively.

    But according to our Constitution federalism is what we are supposed to have.

    And as far as i know, the China-virus lockdowns have come down from states. I don't believe Trump ordered anything other than that which is properly a federal (i.e. central) government matter--border control.
  19. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber

    I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.
     
    Or be like the University of Wisconsin, who Photoshopped a black student attending a football game who has never attended into their application booklet.

    Or be like the University of Wisconsin, who Photoshopped a black student attending a football game who has never attended into their application booklet.

    Well, the problem of photoshopping someone into a picture that was never there is myriad. Different lenses distort the subject differently, and the lighting of the imported element is a major bitch. Anyone who’s well versed in photoshop can zoom in and identify the shenanigans on a pixel level.
    Since I’m using the same camera, lens, lighting, and even sensor, my adding someone who wasn’t there only a minute before is easy peasy. It may still be detectable, but it not nearly as easy as identifying an element that never existed in the shot.

    The only sure way to detect it would be obtaining the “original” exposure, I would think, since there wouldn’t be one, since it conceivably took 30 shots to come up with the one.

  20. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    That's clever.

    That’s clever.

    Laziness is the mother of invention.

    • Agree: LondonBob
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    Laziness is the mother of invention.

    It worked for Mitch Hedberg...
    "I write jokes for a living, I sit at my hotel at night, I think of something that's funny, then I go get a pen and I write it down. Or if the pen is too far away, I have to convince myself that what I thought of ain't funny."
  21. It’s clear that, while this was a serious problem, the lyingpress did everything they could to misinform people, with the goal of spreading panic and wrecking the economy. They’re terrorists.

    • Agree: Dtbb
  22. @alt right moderate
    I see the US has the same climatic/political divide as Australia. Hot states want to reopen and cool states don't. In Queensland its basically summer all year round, hence the limited number of cases and increasing calls for easing restrictions.

    Given the massive climatic differences between different parts of the US in spring, it seems silly not to let states decide there own restrictions and easing schedules.

    That’s interesting.

    Any other countries with a big north-south distance?

    Italy, obviously, with the South being less hard hit than the wealthy North.

    What about Spain? Madrid in the middle is hard hit, but it’s at 2200 feet elevation so about 8 degrees F cooler than sealevel at that latitude.

    Vietnam south of China is practically done with the damn thing.

    • Replies: @gabriel alberton
    Brazil has one of the largest North-South distances. Maybe even the largest considering continuous territory. Not sure. Canada might have it larger, but almost no one lives far up north.

    We're about to enter our dry season, and in June we'll enter our ''winter''. From what I know, the last few weeks have been, temperature-wise, what is expected for this time of the year, though they've been rather dry. The virus has spread even more quickly here than it did in the US, anyway, and even more so in the states near the Equator, which are less packed than São Paulo (generally speaking; the northern cities have high population densities inside their limits and have larger shares of people living precariously). And that's with the almost certain undercounting of both cases and, to a smaller extent, deaths.
    , @Thatgirl
    There are US states with as large climate differences as certain European countries. I live in New Mexico. While all of New Mexico is very dry, there is a significant difference in altitude and climate between north and south (North is mountainous, with cold snowy winters; south is sea-level and hot for most of the year). I believe Arizona is similar.

    Cases in these two states don’t seem to follow any geographic pattern other than being located in the big cities.

    Except in both states, the biggest area hit has been the Navajo Nation.
    , @Thatgirl
    There are US states with as large climate differences as certain European countries. I live in New Mexico. While all of New Mexico is very dry, there is a significant difference in altitude and climate between north and south (North is mountainous, with cold snowy winters; south is sea-level and hot for most of the year). I believe Arizona is similar.

    Cases in these two states don’t seem to follow any geographic pattern other than being located in the big cities.

    Except in both states, the biggest area hit has been the Navajo Nation.
  23. @Jedi Night
    Isn't the UV radiation from sunshine really tough on viruses? All that salt sea sun and sand should keep people healthy, no?

    Sunlight is supposed to help (there is some reason to believe exposure to sun was a factor during the Spanish flu) and so is heat: here in Michigan we have temperatures in the thirties with snow and ice, in late April. States that get sun should absolutely exploit it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It is finally hot and sunny in L.A. after the gloomiest April in memory. I was out in the yard.
  24. @J.Ross
    Sunlight is supposed to help (there is some reason to believe exposure to sun was a factor during the Spanish flu) and so is heat: here in Michigan we have temperatures in the thirties with snow and ice, in late April. States that get sun should absolutely exploit it.

    It is finally hot and sunny in L.A. after the gloomiest April in memory. I was out in the yard.

    • Replies: @anon

    I was out in the yard.
     
    I have reported you to Gov Gruesome. Expect a visit from the ChiCovStazi at any time.
    You must go back in the closet - something awful may happen to you, citizen.
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    It is finally hot and sunny in L.A. after the gloomiest April in memory.
     
    Ahaaa! That explains a lot of the gloomy posting.
  25. It’s the classic shot to take along sidewalks, mall corridors, boardwalks, and beaches to signify “crowd”. This kind of shot is in countless news reports, especially about summer holiday weekends or winter holiday shopping.

    So in addition to it’s technical realization it’s got a cultural touchstone effect too.

    That said, _because_ it’s such a familiar shot it undermines the effect on this shot since we know what that shot with look like on a crowded weekend.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    TV news "B-Roll!" I especally like the telephoto shots where they just show people's stomachs jiggling along when doing a feature on obesity
  26. Anon[506] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    As a photographer, one little trick I employ...

    Let’s say I need a landscape pic of a popular place, and want no people in the shot. I’ll set the camera on a tripod, and take a picture every 30 seconds for 10-15 minutes. Then I can take all those exposures, set them up as layers in photoshop, and erase the people by replacing them with the empty space of a later exposure. Using this trick, I’ve taken pictures of a crowded Griffith Park Observatory at night, and made it look deserted when people were all over the damned place.

    On the flip side, I could take a somewhat empty beach, and employing the same strategy, except I’d be adding instead of subtracting people, make it look packed with people. Because it’s a static shot on a tripod, using the same exposure settings for each shot makes it damned hard to call bullshit on the photo, since I’m simply filling in new people into the photo. I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    I’m not saying any professional photographer, or blogging photographer would ever, ever, ever do that. Even a little. I’m just saying... they could.

    Another way to depopulate photos is to put the camera on a really solid tripod, put a really dark neutral density filter on the lens, stop the lens down to minimum, then do a really long “bulb” or “time” exposure. As long as the people are moving through the frame, they will not be at any particular place long enough to register. On the other hand, if they move slowly, you might get mysterious ghosted images. And if one guy just stands there the whole time, he will show up, blurred at the edges. This is a good way to photograph at a museum, deliberately choosing the exposure time to get some ghosts in the shot. And this is a trick used by large format architectural photographers to clean up the environment of a building.

    Now that I’m thinking of weird photography techniques, here’s another: Shoot a moving person or object while tracking it, with the sky as a background (works best at dusk), with a half second or so exposure. Use on-camera flash to illuminate the person. This requires a second-curtain shutter sync for the flash to work right, so the person will be flashed at the end of the exposure, not the beginning. The flash should be set a stop or two below normal, since you are in daylight and don’t really need flash: You’re just using it to bring out the person at the end of the exposure. The result is a really atmosphere with a trailing blur. This is sometimes called “solar sync.” The math for the flash exposure and the camera settings is a pain, but with digital you can just experiment.

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I paid a lot of attention to what you could do with photography technology in 1977-1979 and then, to a lesser extent, into the late 1980s, but I'm wholly ignorant about the Photoshop Era. It was a lot of fun, in part because there were strong limits to what you could do using lenses and darkroom developing, so achieving some unusual effect took some cleverness. This was pretty similar to what you could do in music with electric guitars at the same time.

    The Digital Era released a lot of the Analog Era restrictions, which inspired some people and depressed others.

    , @anonymous

    Another way to depopulate photos is to put the camera on a really solid tripod, put a really dark neutral density filter on the lens, stop the lens down to minimum, then do a really long “bulb” or “time” exposure. As long as the people are moving through the frame, they will not be at any particular place long enough to register. On the other hand, if they move slowly, you might get mysterious ghosted images. And if one guy just stands there the whole time, he will show up, blurred at the edges. This is a good way to photograph at a museum, deliberately choosing the exposure time to get some ghosts in the shot. And this is a trick used by large format architectural photographers to clean up the environment of a building.
     
    Ohhh, that's a great idea. I never use that kind of filter, so it didn't occur to me.
    That actually helps me be more lazy!

    iSteve has the best comments section. Such a wide range of people with interests in everything.

    The math for the flash exposure and the camera settings is a pain, but with digital you can just experiment.
     
    When I'm trying to do a night landscape, I always say it's like I'm doing a "quickie quiz" full of math problems on the fly. I'm not pleasant to be around. Don't want anyone talking to me, because I'm doing math in my head, but everybody does. Complete strangers walk up to me to ask what lens I'm using, what my f-stop is, as if that could possibly help them in ANY fucking way the rest of their lives. But they do. People live aimless lives, and want others to be a part of it.
    , @Anonymous

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.
     
    But it jacked up the chemistry so you usually had to trick them into it and then they would ban you after that. You could do it yourself but some of the chemicals had to be thrown out.

    There was also a film called 5247 which was a negative cinema stock that was processed in a similar but not identical process to C-41. IIRC running it through the C-41 machine didn't damage the chemicals but the resulting negs were difficult to print.

    In those days I shot a lot of double X and 4X monochrome cinema stock. Freestyle sold it on occasion very cheaply. I always wanted a Hasselblad or similar with the 70mm back because you could get all kind of 70mm cine stock cheap, but never could swing it. The Hassy was actually a clunky beast, the Bronica was smoother and the optics almost as good but getting them repaired was always a bugger. The early 6x6 Bronica was a great concept and would take some magnificent glass but they never got the mechanicals sorted, the later electronic ones were decent but when they did break you were off line a while. The Mamiya RB/RZ were great but bulky. Ed Romney was a friend of mine and got me into the mamiya Press cameras and the later Graflex stuff and I had a lot of fun with that. I lost interest in photography with digital pretty much. The EPA and Kodak-laziness/stupidity end of Kodachrome was the last nail in the coffin. You can still do black and white and get the films, some of them, and the basic chemistry but no one wants to bother much any more. Other than cheap retro junkers does anyone make film cameras any more?
    , @kimchilover
    I tried doing an Advanced Search with the term "solar sync" but came up with nothing. I *think* I have an idea of what the technique would look like but would certainly appreciate a link to an example.

    Btw, thanks for making these two posts.
  27. @Anon
    Another way to depopulate photos is to put the camera on a really solid tripod, put a really dark neutral density filter on the lens, stop the lens down to minimum, then do a really long "bulb" or "time" exposure. As long as the people are moving through the frame, they will not be at any particular place long enough to register. On the other hand, if they move slowly, you might get mysterious ghosted images. And if one guy just stands there the whole time, he will show up, blurred at the edges. This is a good way to photograph at a museum, deliberately choosing the exposure time to get some ghosts in the shot. And this is a trick used by large format architectural photographers to clean up the environment of a building.

    Now that I'm thinking of weird photography techniques, here's another: Shoot a moving person or object while tracking it, with the sky as a background (works best at dusk), with a half second or so exposure. Use on-camera flash to illuminate the person. This requires a second-curtain shutter sync for the flash to work right, so the person will be flashed at the end of the exposure, not the beginning. The flash should be set a stop or two below normal, since you are in daylight and don't really need flash: You're just using it to bring out the person at the end of the exposure. The result is a really atmosphere with a trailing blur. This is sometimes called "solar sync." The math for the flash exposure and the camera settings is a pain, but with digital you can just experiment.

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.

    I paid a lot of attention to what you could do with photography technology in 1977-1979 and then, to a lesser extent, into the late 1980s, but I’m wholly ignorant about the Photoshop Era. It was a lot of fun, in part because there were strong limits to what you could do using lenses and darkroom developing, so achieving some unusual effect took some cleverness. This was pretty similar to what you could do in music with electric guitars at the same time.

    The Digital Era released a lot of the Analog Era restrictions, which inspired some people and depressed others.

    • Replies: @Anon

    The Digital Era released a lot of the Analog Era restrictions, which inspired some people and depressed others.
     
    This article last summer at New York Magazine had a couple of really impactful portraits by Jeff Brown of Harvard Law professor Bruce Hay:

    https://www.thecut.com/2019/07/bruce-hay-paternity-trap-maria-pia-shuman-mischa-haider.html

    https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/fashion/daily/2019/07/18/magazine/harvard/LEDE-Harvard.w570.h712.jpg

    I was really impressed with the photography and put some thought into dissecting how it was done, perhaps with gels and flash and the like. I took a transparency photography class in the evenings at Santa Monica City College back in the day, and the teacher was a working architectural photographer who explained all kinds of tricks, such as the once-a-day perfect time at dusk to take a building photo to get saturated sky color, hosing down the surface around the building with water, having people inside the building to turn lights on and off to get the right exposure for everything, full-window gels, and so on.

    So I imagined that Jeff Brown had similarly engineered his photos of Bruce Hay. I tracked down his email, passed my theories by him, and asked if my reconstruction was correct. His response was quite detailed, but most of it was Photoshop. He used some red gels, but the yellow was 'shopped, as was the sky (taken earlier in the day), and some of the lighting. He apparently shot hundreds of frames and pancaked them together in layers, choosing bits and pieces of the ones he liked best.

    As he summarized, "It's not the same process as the guy you took a course from, I can assure you. I think that takes more of a dedicated mind where I would say my process is a little more sporadic and slightly whimsical."
    , @bruce county
    I ran a small photo processing lab in the late 70's early 80's. Next day service kinda thing. It was busy.
    Working and playing with theE-6 process was exciting.
    The owner of the lab also owned a photography store as well. I got into photography every paycheck.
    The Cokin Filter System was a big thing then. I was able to create alot of "impossible " shots. Nothing even close to what we can do with pixels today.
  28. @Steve Sailer
    That's interesting.

    Any other countries with a big north-south distance?

    Italy, obviously, with the South being less hard hit than the wealthy North.

    What about Spain? Madrid in the middle is hard hit, but it's at 2200 feet elevation so about 8 degrees F cooler than sealevel at that latitude.

    Vietnam south of China is practically done with the damn thing.

    Brazil has one of the largest North-South distances. Maybe even the largest considering continuous territory. Not sure. Canada might have it larger, but almost no one lives far up north.

    We’re about to enter our dry season, and in June we’ll enter our ”winter”. From what I know, the last few weeks have been, temperature-wise, what is expected for this time of the year, though they’ve been rather dry. The virus has spread even more quickly here than it did in the US, anyway, and even more so in the states near the Equator, which are less packed than São Paulo (generally speaking; the northern cities have high population densities inside their limits and have larger shares of people living precariously). And that’s with the almost certain undercounting of both cases and, to a smaller extent, deaths.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Curitiba is pretty far south in Brazil and at 3066 feet of altitude (900 meters). Plus, it's been a world leader in optimizing bus mass transit. So the weather/mass transit hypothesis would predict that Curitiba will be slammed pretty hard in a month or two.

    On the other hand, Curitiba has a track record of sensible adaptations, so given some time to get ready, I hope they'll come up with something the rest of us can learn from.

  29. There’s another trick used probably more often, that commenters on ZeroHedge pointed out wrt an article about the opening of the Jax beaches a couple of days back. Two words: file photos. It’s much easier than even the clever photography tricks.

    ZH had a picture of a crowded (I assumed) Jacksonville, beach. It just wasn’t from the day the ban was lifter, or afterwards at all. They stuck a picture taken a good while back at the top of the article. It said “file photo” in small print. You can “save image” or search in bing for an image that goes exactly with your story, if you look for a few minutes.

    In the ZeroHedge article the writer covered some opposition to the opening of the beaches from mayors of 2 south Florida cities, and others with a #FloridaMorons hash tag or something. Need just the right image to bolster your case? FILE PHOTO! In this case, it was out-and-out lying, as the picture was simply not of the proper time, which mattered for a story on re-opening beaches with this virus around and social distancing requested.

    The Peak Stupidity post “Beaches” noted this subterfuge on Zerohedge Monday (including a link to iSteve on that earlier post about telephoto trickery). ZH has gotten sensationalist over the last few years.

    (You can use file photos legitimately, of course, but you have to be careful to not end up lying with them.)

    • Replies: @Barnard
    According to Snopes, this photo manipulation was technically true, but labeled false.

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/jacksonville-beaches-photos/

    A local Jacksonville reporter claims on Facebook that they aren't lying and posted distorted images next aerial shots that clearly demonstrate how far apart people are on the beach. He seems shocked and can't imagine why people don't trust him.

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There’s another trick used probably more often, that commenters on ZeroHedge pointed out
     

    ZH had a picture of a crowded (I assumed) Jacksonville, beach. It just wasn’t from the day the ban was lifter, or afterwards at all. They stuck a picture taken a good while back at the top of the article.
     
    Achmed, those ZeroHedge commenters were spreading false rumors:

    Photos accurately show reopening of Jacksonville Beach

    False claim: The media is lying about crowds of people on Jacksonville Beach in Florida by using old photos

    You wrote in your cited Peak Stupidity post:

    Though ZH had small print saying “file photo”, the photo was put there to distort the news in the article itself. The guy's point was just that - this photo on the top of the ZH post was the fake news.
     

    The ZeroHedge picture showed this beach at a different time from this Kung Flu panic time, and well, not just yesterday, when the beaches re-opened. That's fake news. Shame on you, Tyler Durden!
     
    Unless ZeroHedge changed the original post, the in-photo tag doesn’t read “file photo”, it reads “ⓒ Icon Sportswire via Getty Images”, as does the pic’s Twitter cite as featured in the ZeroHedge article. The ZeroHedge tag underneath the picture reads : “Getty Images”. Did ZeroHedge change the tag?

    That same photo leading off your Peak Stupidy post is cropped and resized much smaller—you wouldn’t be engaging in internet trickery of your own, would you? Tsk tsk: The lower left Getty copyright is cropped away, along with some bottom-screen foreground.

    Image hotlink from Peak Stupidity:

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_1430A.jpg

    Image hotlink from ZeroHedge (note original material at screen bottom):

    https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/flbeaches.jpg

    (You can use file photos legitimately, of course, but you have to be careful to not end up lying with them.)
     

    ZH has gotten sensationalist over the last few years.
     
    Achmed, there’s a lot of that going around.

    Not to bust your balls, but you might want to update that post… :)
  30. Anon[389] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    There’s an entertaining dustup at UCLA Law School over the n-word. (UCLA is getting particularly woke because it has a D.I.E. czar named Jerry Kang whose salary was $444,000 in 2016.)

    UCLA Law publicly shames professors for politically incorrect comments on COVID, n-word
    https://www.thecollegefix.com/ucla-law-publicly-shames-professors-for-politically-incorrect-comments-on-covid-n-word/

    Prominent libertarian law professor Eugene Volokh, whose group law blog The Volokh Conspiracy is published at the Reason website (after many years at the Washington Post website), discussed a case that centered on the use of the word [that iSteve will not print]. And he said the word in class while describing the case. It took a few months, but finally the administration got involved. But Volokh has tripled down, explicitly using the word in a dozen or so of his blog posts at Reason, once in the title. I think he wants to provoke the administration to do something that can be made the basis of a lawsuit to demolish the taboo.

    Race-Based Speech Restrictions
    https://reason.com/2020/04/16/race-based-speech-restrictions/

    A Question About Unexpurgated Language and Lawyers or Law Students
    https://reason.com/2020/04/19/a-question-about-unexpurgated-language-and-lawyers-or-law-students/

    Additionally, he is writing about a number of other recent … in the law classroom” cases. It seems like one of these is bound to wind up in court, and if it’s not Volokh’s case, he’ll definitely submit an amicus curiae brief. I think it’s healthy to force campus orthodoxies into court to subject them to the cleansing light of real-world law.

    Volokh was born in the USSR, came to the U.S. at 7, and graduated from UCLA with a B.S. in math-computer science at 15. He worked for 12 years as a programmer. Then he went to law school and clerked for Sandra Day O’Connor. His law review articles are commonly cited up to the Supreme Court level. I think he’s a worthy opponent for the likes of Jerry Kang.

    • Replies: @Inverness
    The infamous "n-word" is a really stupid hill to die on. Only a foreigner would fail to understand that. Do you really need to say the n-word? Really?

    I'd much rather make an issue of the diversicrat's salary. Now that's obscene.

    , @fish

    There’s an entertaining dustup at UCLA Law School over the n-word. (UCLA is getting particularly woke because it has a D.I.E. czar named Jerry Kang whose salary was $444,000 in 2016.)

     

    I guess we really wuz Kangs!

    Volokh was born in the USSR, came to the U.S. at 7, and graduated from UCLA with a B.S. in math-computer science at 15. He worked for 12 years as a programmer. Then he went to law school and clerked for Sandra Day O’Connor. His law review articles are commonly cited up to the Supreme Court level. I think he’s a worthy opponent for the likes of Jerry Kang.
     
    If we have to import more can't we find a way to get a lot more of these? We can manufacture our own "Wretched Refuse" quite capably (see "Kangz" above)!
  31. @gabriel alberton
    Brazil has one of the largest North-South distances. Maybe even the largest considering continuous territory. Not sure. Canada might have it larger, but almost no one lives far up north.

    We're about to enter our dry season, and in June we'll enter our ''winter''. From what I know, the last few weeks have been, temperature-wise, what is expected for this time of the year, though they've been rather dry. The virus has spread even more quickly here than it did in the US, anyway, and even more so in the states near the Equator, which are less packed than São Paulo (generally speaking; the northern cities have high population densities inside their limits and have larger shares of people living precariously). And that's with the almost certain undercounting of both cases and, to a smaller extent, deaths.

    Curitiba is pretty far south in Brazil and at 3066 feet of altitude (900 meters). Plus, it’s been a world leader in optimizing bus mass transit. So the weather/mass transit hypothesis would predict that Curitiba will be slammed pretty hard in a month or two.

    On the other hand, Curitiba has a track record of sensible adaptations, so given some time to get ready, I hope they’ll come up with something the rest of us can learn from.

    • Replies: @gabriel alberton
    You could look at Curitiba. I don't know that city much, but I can say it is less packed than São Paulo and about as packed as my city, Guarulhos, which is home to an international airport and from where massive numbers of people, even upper-class people, commute daily by bus and subway to SP, including myself (though not at the moment). Buses are crammed full around 6 am, as always. Many, but not most people appear to wear masks in there.

    As of April 21, we had 221 confirmed cases and 37 confirmed deaths in the city. I get out to do groceries and again, many, but not most, people are wearing masks at the supermarket, which yesterday was far from empty. Same thing in the bank, in the local soup kitchen (which is now takeout-only), etc.

  32. Anon[389] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I paid a lot of attention to what you could do with photography technology in 1977-1979 and then, to a lesser extent, into the late 1980s, but I'm wholly ignorant about the Photoshop Era. It was a lot of fun, in part because there were strong limits to what you could do using lenses and darkroom developing, so achieving some unusual effect took some cleverness. This was pretty similar to what you could do in music with electric guitars at the same time.

    The Digital Era released a lot of the Analog Era restrictions, which inspired some people and depressed others.

    The Digital Era released a lot of the Analog Era restrictions, which inspired some people and depressed others.

    This article last summer at New York Magazine had a couple of really impactful portraits by Jeff Brown of Harvard Law professor Bruce Hay:

    https://www.thecut.com/2019/07/bruce-hay-paternity-trap-maria-pia-shuman-mischa-haider.html

    I was really impressed with the photography and put some thought into dissecting how it was done, perhaps with gels and flash and the like. I took a transparency photography class in the evenings at Santa Monica City College back in the day, and the teacher was a working architectural photographer who explained all kinds of tricks, such as the once-a-day perfect time at dusk to take a building photo to get saturated sky color, hosing down the surface around the building with water, having people inside the building to turn lights on and off to get the right exposure for everything, full-window gels, and so on.

    So I imagined that Jeff Brown had similarly engineered his photos of Bruce Hay. I tracked down his email, passed my theories by him, and asked if my reconstruction was correct. His response was quite detailed, but most of it was Photoshop. He used some red gels, but the yellow was ‘shopped, as was the sky (taken earlier in the day), and some of the lighting. He apparently shot hundreds of frames and pancaked them together in layers, choosing bits and pieces of the ones he liked best.

    As he summarized, “It’s not the same process as the guy you took a course from, I can assure you. I think that takes more of a dedicated mind where I would say my process is a little more sporadic and slightly whimsical.”

    • Thanks: ic1000
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    a couple of really impactful portraits by Jeff Brown of Harvard Law professor Bruce Hay
     
    So many windows to choose from in the red light district.

    https://www.holland.com/upload_mm/3/3/9/512_fullimage_amsterdam%20red%20light%20district%20gracht%20by%20night.jpg.jpg

    , @Sparkon
    Impactful? I'd say garish, and he chopped off the professor's feet, when he could have moved back a few feet of his own, and arrived at a more pleasing composition.

    The same intensity light splashing all over the guy and his house is a further drawback. For impact, you need contrast between foreground and background, and this photo doesn't have it.

    , @Anonymous
    Am I the only person who looked at that photo and thought, "Where's me washboard"?
  33. @Steve Sailer
    Curitiba is pretty far south in Brazil and at 3066 feet of altitude (900 meters). Plus, it's been a world leader in optimizing bus mass transit. So the weather/mass transit hypothesis would predict that Curitiba will be slammed pretty hard in a month or two.

    On the other hand, Curitiba has a track record of sensible adaptations, so given some time to get ready, I hope they'll come up with something the rest of us can learn from.

    You could look at Curitiba. I don’t know that city much, but I can say it is less packed than São Paulo and about as packed as my city, Guarulhos, which is home to an international airport and from where massive numbers of people, even upper-class people, commute daily by bus and subway to SP, including myself (though not at the moment). Buses are crammed full around 6 am, as always. Many, but not most people appear to wear masks in there.

    As of April 21, we had 221 confirmed cases and 37 confirmed deaths in the city. I get out to do groceries and again, many, but not most, people are wearing masks at the supermarket, which yesterday was far from empty. Same thing in the bank, in the local soup kitchen (which is now takeout-only), etc.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Good luck to you intelligent Brazilians. Let us know when you come up with good ideas.
    , @Steve Sailer
    Good luck to you intelligent Brazilians. Let us know when you come up with good ideas.
    , @Dmitry

    people are wearing masks at the supermarket,
     
    So Brazilians even are behaving better during the epidemic, than people in civilized North-Western Europe? Similarly people are behaving more responsibly to anti-epidemic measures in Ukraine, Russia, than in North-Western Europe.
    , @Stan Adams
    In Miami, the government made mask-wearing mandatory. Security guards won’t let you into the store unless you have some kind of face covering.

    Are the buses and subways still charging fares? They’re free in Miami right now, but (again) you have to wear a mask and board through the back door.
  34. From my interactions online and through social media, there seems to be a lot of confusion over social distancing and the mitigation strategy. People think it’s supposed to get rid of the virus, which they think “flattening the curve” means. They don’t seem to understand that mitigation is basically to allow a controlled outbreak.

    • Agree: Meretricious
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    That was the issue I discussed in my March 10 Taki's column:

    https://www.takimag.com/article/crushing-the-coronavirus-curve/

  35. @Steve Sailer
    It is finally hot and sunny in L.A. after the gloomiest April in memory. I was out in the yard.

    I was out in the yard.

    I have reported you to Gov Gruesome. Expect a visit from the ChiCovStazi at any time.
    You must go back in the closet – something awful may happen to you, citizen.

    • LOL: vhrm
  36. @J. Farmer
    From my interactions online and through social media, there seems to be a lot of confusion over social distancing and the mitigation strategy. People think it's supposed to get rid of the virus, which they think "flattening the curve" means. They don't seem to understand that mitigation is basically to allow a controlled outbreak.

    That was the issue I discussed in my March 10 Taki’s column:

    https://www.takimag.com/article/crushing-the-coronavirus-curve/

  37. @gabriel alberton
    You could look at Curitiba. I don't know that city much, but I can say it is less packed than São Paulo and about as packed as my city, Guarulhos, which is home to an international airport and from where massive numbers of people, even upper-class people, commute daily by bus and subway to SP, including myself (though not at the moment). Buses are crammed full around 6 am, as always. Many, but not most people appear to wear masks in there.

    As of April 21, we had 221 confirmed cases and 37 confirmed deaths in the city. I get out to do groceries and again, many, but not most, people are wearing masks at the supermarket, which yesterday was far from empty. Same thing in the bank, in the local soup kitchen (which is now takeout-only), etc.

    Good luck to you intelligent Brazilians. Let us know when you come up with good ideas.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    In North-Western Europe, in the one of the world's most civilized and bourgeois cities: I think I still see 80-90% of people without any kind of masks or gloves in the supermarket. (And the minority of people with masks often are some kind of lost Chinese students). The native people are walking close together in narrow supermarket corridors, disobeying guidelines for where they are supposed to walk, talking and laughing loudly, touching things they don't buy, etc.

    Although on the positive, beer shelves are now full again - after all these weeks, panic buying seems to have transferred from beer and toilet paper, to something more essential like flour and eggs.

  38. @gabriel alberton
    You could look at Curitiba. I don't know that city much, but I can say it is less packed than São Paulo and about as packed as my city, Guarulhos, which is home to an international airport and from where massive numbers of people, even upper-class people, commute daily by bus and subway to SP, including myself (though not at the moment). Buses are crammed full around 6 am, as always. Many, but not most people appear to wear masks in there.

    As of April 21, we had 221 confirmed cases and 37 confirmed deaths in the city. I get out to do groceries and again, many, but not most, people are wearing masks at the supermarket, which yesterday was far from empty. Same thing in the bank, in the local soup kitchen (which is now takeout-only), etc.

    Good luck to you intelligent Brazilians. Let us know when you come up with good ideas.

    • Thanks: gabriel alberton
  39. That beach photo looks fine as is – they’re all family groups with >6’ radius of space around them. I don’t get all the beach worry bullshit anyway. I’ve never been jammed blanket to blanket with anyone at a southern California beach. Alt Right Moderate is right, DC and NYC media hacks are just bitter their cold weather is still going and they’re not supposed to travel. I don’t care what the various governors say, I think once May 1 rolls around people in the healthier states are not going to put up with restrictions anymore, particularly with respect to outdoor recreation.

    • Replies: @Keypusher
    It’s been a very cool and damp spring (as has been typical for NYC for the last 10-15 years). I’m sure that hasn’t helped with CV.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    AA, yesterday we had about an inch of snow that covered the lawn and hung on the branches, so our beaches are empty. Today I saw a lone golfer and then a twosome, all carrying their clubs, when I drove past the nearby country club. It was a mix of snow and rain today, temp now 37 dedrees, but people need to get out. We have a ban on launching boats so that a fisherman can't get on the lake. Lake Erie and Lake Ontario are rather big so don't see the need to ban fishing from boats. Now I see people driving together in cars so will that stop soon? A conserted effort to drive people crazy. They have already cancelled just about every local festival into the Fall months.
  40. @Steve Sailer
    It is finally hot and sunny in L.A. after the gloomiest April in memory. I was out in the yard.

    It is finally hot and sunny in L.A. after the gloomiest April in memory.

    Ahaaa! That explains a lot of the gloomy posting.

  41. @Anon
    The media is showing photos of surfers at Japan's famous Kanagawa beaches, prompting statements from the governor and a surfer organization. My first thought was that the photos looked seriously foreshortened, but then the helicopter or drone gained altitude, and the water and beach were shown to be genuinely packed. Not every long lens photo lies.

    But I think closing surfing beaches may be like banning the sale of alcohol (which various Central and South American countries have done, as well as Greenland and South Africa): addicts have to feed their addiction.

    The alcohol ban has various explanations, depending on the country and who's talking:

    -- Preventing domestic violence while dad is home with mom all day

    -- Reaction to a rumor that booze prevents/cures the Wuflu

    -- A belief that the poor should be saving money, since things are going to be bad for a while

    -- Preventing public misbehavior and risky behavior

    – The irresistible attraction of pushing people around.

  42. @Lockean Proviso
    As well as the continuous transverse breeze blowing virus away from walkers and out into the ocean.

    However, the viruses might mutate in the sea, infect giant squids, and they would go mad and swarm attack a coastal city. We've got to be careful about that sort of thing.

    You may think you’re just kidding around, but take a look at the featured articles on the unz.com home page. The wuhan virus was cooked up at fort detrick by an unholy alliance of anglo-zionists and china-haters and released by the cia etc etc etc. And only trolls who believe the holocaust hoax would deny this obvious truth.

    Giant mutated squids would be a relief after reading some of this tripe. Steve should look for a new home–the credibility of this one is approximately nil.

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    Did all these con-theorists crowd out "Ask a Mexican" Arellano? I would rather read his juvenile takes about gringos than some of these featured writers.
    , @Alden
    I agree that since about March 5 UNZ has been filled with ; , American evil oligarchs concocted the new Black Plague at Fort Detrick, sent the military teams to sprinkle it around Wuhan , we’re all gonna diee, bizarro octuple exponent math, and endless comments clipping and pasting graphs and projections that never came true.

    As of today 49,900 deaths mostly 70 and over compared to 80,000 flu deaths 2 years ago. This is an average not too bad mild flue season.

    UNZ is as bad as NYSLIMES and Wapo on China flu.
    Maybe Godfree Roberts is the new editor who selects the articles.

    I’ve followed Steve around the internet since the late 1990s. In fact I followed Steve from a cadre post to the comments on UNZ
  43. @Anonymous
    As a photographer, one little trick I employ...

    Let’s say I need a landscape pic of a popular place, and want no people in the shot. I’ll set the camera on a tripod, and take a picture every 30 seconds for 10-15 minutes. Then I can take all those exposures, set them up as layers in photoshop, and erase the people by replacing them with the empty space of a later exposure. Using this trick, I’ve taken pictures of a crowded Griffith Park Observatory at night, and made it look deserted when people were all over the damned place.

    On the flip side, I could take a somewhat empty beach, and employing the same strategy, except I’d be adding instead of subtracting people, make it look packed with people. Because it’s a static shot on a tripod, using the same exposure settings for each shot makes it damned hard to call bullshit on the photo, since I’m simply filling in new people into the photo. I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    I’m not saying any professional photographer, or blogging photographer would ever, ever, ever do that. Even a little. I’m just saying... they could.

    I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    I know what you mean. I have a rather attractive painting of a well-known impressionist scene of a crowded street near the Arc de Triomphe in Paris and the same man appears three times in the picture. Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose!

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    It's like watching an old TV show that needed some busy street scenes on a cheesy budget -- the same three extras keep walking back and forth past the stars again and again.
  44. @utu
    OT: French researchers plan to give nicotine patches to coronavirus patients and frontline workers after lower rates of infection were found among smokers - but say it's NOT a reason to take up cigarettes
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8246939/French-researchers-plan-nicotine-patches-coronavirus-patients-frontline-workers.html

    Pack of Marlboro beats five humidifiers?

    Who would have guessed that France would be the country to discover the miracle cigarette cure.

  45. @Anon

    The Digital Era released a lot of the Analog Era restrictions, which inspired some people and depressed others.
     
    This article last summer at New York Magazine had a couple of really impactful portraits by Jeff Brown of Harvard Law professor Bruce Hay:

    https://www.thecut.com/2019/07/bruce-hay-paternity-trap-maria-pia-shuman-mischa-haider.html

    https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/fashion/daily/2019/07/18/magazine/harvard/LEDE-Harvard.w570.h712.jpg

    I was really impressed with the photography and put some thought into dissecting how it was done, perhaps with gels and flash and the like. I took a transparency photography class in the evenings at Santa Monica City College back in the day, and the teacher was a working architectural photographer who explained all kinds of tricks, such as the once-a-day perfect time at dusk to take a building photo to get saturated sky color, hosing down the surface around the building with water, having people inside the building to turn lights on and off to get the right exposure for everything, full-window gels, and so on.

    So I imagined that Jeff Brown had similarly engineered his photos of Bruce Hay. I tracked down his email, passed my theories by him, and asked if my reconstruction was correct. His response was quite detailed, but most of it was Photoshop. He used some red gels, but the yellow was 'shopped, as was the sky (taken earlier in the day), and some of the lighting. He apparently shot hundreds of frames and pancaked them together in layers, choosing bits and pieces of the ones he liked best.

    As he summarized, "It's not the same process as the guy you took a course from, I can assure you. I think that takes more of a dedicated mind where I would say my process is a little more sporadic and slightly whimsical."

    a couple of really impactful portraits by Jeff Brown of Harvard Law professor Bruce Hay

    So many windows to choose from in the red light district.

  46. @Anon
    OT

    There's an entertaining dustup at UCLA Law School over the n-word. (UCLA is getting particularly woke because it has a D.I.E. czar named Jerry Kang whose salary was $444,000 in 2016.)

    UCLA Law publicly shames professors for politically incorrect comments on COVID, n-word
    https://www.thecollegefix.com/ucla-law-publicly-shames-professors-for-politically-incorrect-comments-on-covid-n-word/

    Prominent libertarian law professor Eugene Volokh, whose group law blog The Volokh Conspiracy is published at the Reason website (after many years at the Washington Post website), discussed a case that centered on the use of the word [that iSteve will not print]. And he said the word in class while describing the case. It took a few months, but finally the administration got involved. But Volokh has tripled down, explicitly using the word in a dozen or so of his blog posts at Reason, once in the title. I think he wants to provoke the administration to do something that can be made the basis of a lawsuit to demolish the taboo.

    Race-Based Speech Restrictions
    https://reason.com/2020/04/16/race-based-speech-restrictions/

    A Question About Unexpurgated Language and Lawyers or Law Students
    https://reason.com/2020/04/19/a-question-about-unexpurgated-language-and-lawyers-or-law-students/

    Additionally, he is writing about a number of other recent ... in the law classroom" cases. It seems like one of these is bound to wind up in court, and if it's not Volokh's case, he'll definitely submit an amicus curiae brief. I think it's healthy to force campus orthodoxies into court to subject them to the cleansing light of real-world law.

    Volokh was born in the USSR, came to the U.S. at 7, and graduated from UCLA with a B.S. in math-computer science at 15. He worked for 12 years as a programmer. Then he went to law school and clerked for Sandra Day O'Connor. His law review articles are commonly cited up to the Supreme Court level. I think he's a worthy opponent for the likes of Jerry Kang.

    The infamous “n-word” is a really stupid hill to die on. Only a foreigner would fail to understand that. Do you really need to say the n-word? Really?

    I’d much rather make an issue of the diversicrat’s salary. Now that’s obscene.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome


    Do you really need to say the n-word? Really?

     

    https://www.musicismysanctuary.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/NWA_TV_Eazy_E_Dr_Dre_MC_Ren_dj_Yella_Home_Videos_In_The_Studio_Behind_The_Scenes.jpg
    , @utu
    Being a foreigner explains John Derbyshire?
  47. If I’m Chris Cuomo all I see is some jackass loser fat-tire biker.

  48. @Buzz Mohawk
    Sometimes airline pilots irresponsibly fly too close to the Moon. This guy probably lost his license:

    https://radchickblog.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/moon-plane.jpg

    I buzzed a few interesting things when I was in the war, but I never thought to buzz the moon.

  49. • Replies: @Alden
    All my long life I’ve read and been told that the winter flu bronchitis pneumonia season is caused by everyone crowded inside with windows and doors closed.

    The science and medical experts claim that the Spanish flu incubated and spread in Leavenworth and other Kansas army base barracks and buildings with the closed doors and windows in winter.

    Now the democrats media and science and medical experts claim the way to avoid the flu is to stay inside with windows closed.

    It’s been a hoax from the start. My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.
  50. @Lockean Proviso
    As well as the continuous transverse breeze blowing virus away from walkers and out into the ocean.

    However, the viruses might mutate in the sea, infect giant squids, and they would go mad and swarm attack a coastal city. We've got to be careful about that sort of thing.

    However, the viruses might mutate in the sea, infect giant squids, and they would go mad and swarm attack a coastal city. We’ve got to be careful about that sort of thing.

    It will by NYC, and the MSM will chalk up four million resulting deaths to COVID-19.

  51. @utu
    OT: French researchers plan to give nicotine patches to coronavirus patients and frontline workers after lower rates of infection were found among smokers - but say it's NOT a reason to take up cigarettes
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8246939/French-researchers-plan-nicotine-patches-coronavirus-patients-frontline-workers.html

    Pack of Marlboro beats five humidifiers?

    So my diet of cigarettes and whiskey has now been validated by “Science”

    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    "So my diet of cigarettes and whiskey has now been validated by “Science”"

    Keith Richards could have told them that.
  52. @anonymous
    Some people can't be helped by clothing, period.

    If they're that fat, they shouldn't be out anyway.

    Nothing to do with coronavirus, by the way.

    Some people can’t be helped by clothing, period.

    If they’re that fat, they shouldn’t be out anyway.

    Nothing to do with coronavirus, by the way.

    That’s a lockdown i could get behind.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Maybe, but Shat can't.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Be85ZsJCIAI
  53. @alt right moderate
    I see the US has the same climatic/political divide as Australia. Hot states want to reopen and cool states don't. In Queensland its basically summer all year round, hence the limited number of cases and increasing calls for easing restrictions.

    Given the massive climatic differences between different parts of the US in spring, it seems silly not to let states decide there own restrictions and easing schedules.

    Given the massive climatic differences between different parts of the US in spring, it seems silly not to let states decide there own restrictions and easing schedules.

    I think the word is “federalism”.

    We lost a hunk in 1865. More in the 30s. And with the rise of minoritarianism, we’ve had the outright stripping of (“dangerous”, “populist”, “racist!”) republican governance in favor of centralized elite diktat from our super-state–through the courts or administratively.

    But according to our Constitution federalism is what we are supposed to have.

    And as far as i know, the China-virus lockdowns have come down from states. I don’t believe Trump ordered anything other than that which is properly a federal (i.e. central) government matter–border control.

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    Yes, other than a few frustrated words from President Trump regarding actions by various states, he has adhered to federalism.

    But, as you observed, the longer term Democrat plan is to reduce the role of the federal states, to that of mere administrative districts under the command of the centralized national state. If they were to succeed in packing enough states with Democrat majorities, they would surely move to cancel the 9th and 10th amendments, then moving on to "rationalize" the varying state laws, but always toward the favored Democrat social policies.

    Seeing what I see in the way of media-induced pants-pissing fear leading to automatic compliance with diktats here in NJ, the decades of social conditioning are well on the way to accomplishing this if the CivNat cult continues its sway.

    Today's post in the ever-provocative Z-Man Blog is relevant to that concern:

    http://thezman.com/wordpress/?p=20300
    , @Alden
    You’re right. The lockdowns have all come from governors, mayors city councils and county boards of supervisors.
  54. Why would you wear sneakers/shoes on the beach? that is just weird.

    • Replies: @Mehen

    Why would you wear sneakers/shoes on the beach? that is just weird.
     
    Sometimes the sand is really fucking hot.
  55. OT.

    St George’s Day (holiday in England) seems like the ideal time to recall Colin Head’s impassioned defence of English culture:

    https://scarfolk.blogspot.com/2013/06/mr-nationalist.html

  56. That beach doesn’t look crowded even with telephoto compression.

    I will say that the (typical) wild verbiage here:

    States rushing to reopen are likely making a deadly error, coronavirus models and experts warn
    Closing America was hard. Science suggests reopening amid coronavirus will be even harder.

    Is poking at a real issue. You don’t want the epidemic to pick up any steam again. We were fortunate that China virus only got going–decent # of carriers–at a time when the “flu season” would normally be starting to wind down. The warmer, sunnier, more humid weather now should help–really hinder spread. But we still have something like (probably north of) 95% of the population un-infected.

    So i think the critical issue is to … stop lying! Stop the sort of silly–really vile–advice from the
    “public health authorities” that we’ve had so far–ex. “masks don’t help”, “close the beaches”, “don’t golf”.

    Instead tell people the truth:
    — if sick, stay home, quarantine yourself
    — old/health compromised people — stay locked up
    — uninfected … go outside! especially in the sunshine–go golfing, go hiking, go to the beach!
    — avoid crowded indoor open-mouth activities–i.e. don’t go clubbing
    — mask up for crowded indoor activities (in stores, etc.)
    — wash hands, use sanitizer when enter/leaving public venue

    That should pretty much suffice to get through the summer without any big restart to the epidemic. Then hopefully by fall, we’ll have some sort of vaccine.

    It’s the next flu season–if we don’t have a vaccine–that will be an issue. If we face that scenario we’re going to need much more intelligent leadership than we’ve seen so far.

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Unfortunately, it's highly unlikely that we will have an effective vaccine by fall. Even operating at an accelerated pace, most experts regard a year as the minimum time in which a vaccine could be deployed.

    The best that we can hope for by next winter is that the Mania will have subsided after the election. In addition to the good advice that you give, treatment protocols will be better understood. Ventilators will be understood to be largely unnecessary and perhaps even counterproductive. Without ventilators as a health care bottleneck and with the understanding that eventually everyone is going to get the disease anyway, there's no point in locking everyone up. (In other words, the original UK strategy of reaching herd immunity was the right one in the first place).

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8248023/Nearly-90-cent-COVID-19-patients-placed-ventilators-NYs-largest-health-DIED.html

    According to this article, 97% of patients over 65 who were ventilated died. They would have had better results applying leaches or casting spells.

    I saw the doctor who recommended pulse oximeters on one of the morning shows today. He said that people were coming in to the emergency room with 50% oxygen readings, which are equivalent to being on the top of Mt. Everest, but felt no shortness of breath. (Normal readings are 95%+ and generally you should receive supplemental oxygen if you are below 90%). They had been told "don't go to the hospital unless you feel short of breath." He couldn't believe that these folks were even standing with such low readings but they were. He thought what was happening was that people's bodies were gradually acclimating to the lack of oxygen so they didn't notice it. By the time they came in, their lungs were badly damaged and most of them died despite being ventilated.

    Hopefully by next winter most older people will have oximeters and will know to come in to the hospital (or be prescribed oxygen at home) long before they are down to unsustainable levels of blood oxygen. Or else there will be some quick and dirty method of guesstimating oxygen starvation even without an oximeter. Or else, for anyone who is over 65 or has risk factors, they will be prescribed oxygen as a standard treatment when they show symptoms of Wuhan Virus - there's no harm in getting a little extra oxygen for a few days until you feel better.

    Which leads me to believe that they are wasting their time furiously building respirators right now and should be building oxygen concentrators and lots of oxygen tanks. Of course when the next wave hits, these will be in short supply. If you are not familiar, an oxygen concentrator is a device that separates oxygen from the air (actually what it does is it removes nitrogen from the air so what is left over is mostly oxygen) . Most are about the size and shape of a dehumidifier - you just plug it in and it outputs enough oxygen for one person. If you want to travel, it can fill an oxygen bottle for portable use but when you're home you just hook your oxygen line directly to it. The advantage over bottled oxygen is that you never run out as long as you have power and you don't need to get constant deliveries. If you are a serious prepper you may want to get yours now because you won't be able to get one later.
    , @Erik L
    This is correct and all the measures we ever needed to slow this down enough. Media trying to scare everyone with assertions and opinions that have the word "science" somewhere in there, are being irresponsible.
    , @The Alarmist

    But we still have something like (probably north of) 95% of the population un-infected.
     
    All the more reason to let it rip. The lockdowns are doing nothing to actually stop the spread, but what they are very effectively doing is ensuring more and more people will die bleak and often premature deaths in a nasty, brutish world rather than a relatively few dying in a relatively functioning world.

    COVID-19 is not, nor will it ever be, the Black Death, and even if it is, we still have enough knowledge for the vast majority to muddle through. Famine, pestilence, looting, plunder and civil unrest on the other hand are unavoidable if the vast majority of people are cowering in their homes, especially if police are chasing lockdown violators while criminals roam at large and are even being freed from jails.

    , @Steve Sailer
    Part of the problem is that everybody responds to changes by going to the same place at once. E.g., when L.A. closed shopping malls and restaurants, huge numbers of Angelenos came up independently but simultaneously with the idea of going to the Griffith Park planetarium, which became enormously packed. It's a little like panic shopping, but in this case, what happened was that everybody got a good idea -- The whole family should go for a hike in the mountains -- but they weren't aware of any place to hike other than the Planetarium.

    This in turn led to crazier government shutdowns of most outdoor recreation.

    One thing that authorities can do to get back to normal is to apply license plate even-odd restrictions to parking lots: E.g., "you can park at the beach parking lots today, April 23rd (and odd number) if your license plate ends in an odd number. Tomorrow, the 24th, only even numbered license plates can park there." This would probably reduce crowds by, I dunno, 30%?

    This kind of thing can then be dropped pretty quickly as people get used to going to the beach or whatever again and demand drops off.

  57. Are there any Slim Fast photography tricks?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jim, Oprah Winfrey is always on the cover of her magazine,I see it when in line at the grocery store. She is always posed in a way to make her seem, for lack of a better term, narrower, A slight twist, an object obscuring a hefty hip. Seems to work. Someone can find an example.
  58. @Jedi Night
    Isn't the UV radiation from sunshine really tough on viruses? All that salt sea sun and sand should keep people healthy, no?

    To the extent that the beach goers are coughing on surfaces, the UV radiation in sunshine should kill the virus that lands on those surfaces in very short order. Corona viruses are surprisingly delicate little critters and it doesn’t take much heat, radiation or chemical activity to damage them to the point where they are no longer infectious. Think of them like dandelion seed heads but on a microscopic scale – any significant amount of energy applied to them is going to damage them.

    However, if people are close together they may cough or breath directly on each other (in fact this is the main means of transmission of the virus – transmission from surfaces is considered to be fairly rare but not impossible, so wiping your groceries and such is largely a waste of time) and the few seconds of sunshine while the virus particles are traveling thru the air would not be enough to kill them.

  59. @South Texas Guy
    Anonymous is on to something here. 15 years ago when I began my stint in journalism, any photographer pulling a photoshop trick like that would have gotten their ass fired (if caught). Nowadays, all bets are off because journos (and media owners) decided they'd rather be full-time democrats than impartial observers getting a balanced story.

    BTW, the same trick used in the beach photo can also be used at protests (as well as other events). Say if 30 people line up in front of the courthouse for a protest, taking a long shot like that will confuse the casual views, but walking across the street and dialing your zoom down to 17 (or whatever you have) would clearly show a piss pore turnout.

    Yeah, a photog might bring in a nice piece of work, but as a news editor I’d still have to ask, “Does this photo lie?” And since my family was in fashion and media, I had learned early on just how much they can and do distort reality.

  60. @vhrm
    It's the classic shot to take along sidewalks, mall corridors, boardwalks, and beaches to signify "crowd". This kind of shot is in countless news reports, especially about summer holiday weekends or winter holiday shopping.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgUC_IY7rMw

    So in addition to it's technical realization it's got a cultural touchstone effect too.

    That said, _because_ it's such a familiar shot it undermines the effect on this shot since we know what that shot with look like on a crowded weekend.

    TV news “B-Roll!” I especally like the telephoto shots where they just show people’s stomachs jiggling along when doing a feature on obesity

  61. @Jonathan Mason

    I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.
     
    I know what you mean. I have a rather attractive painting of a well-known impressionist scene of a crowded street near the Arc de Triomphe in Paris and the same man appears three times in the picture. Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose!

    It’s like watching an old TV show that needed some busy street scenes on a cheesy budget — the same three extras keep walking back and forth past the stars again and again.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    In the famous chase scene in Bullet, McQueen passes the same VW bug at least twice, I think three times.
  62. @AnotherDad
    That beach doesn't look crowded even with telephoto compression.

    I will say that the (typical) wild verbiage here:


    States rushing to reopen are likely making a deadly error, coronavirus models and experts warn
    Closing America was hard. Science suggests reopening amid coronavirus will be even harder.
     
    Is poking at a real issue. You don't want the epidemic to pick up any steam again. We were fortunate that China virus only got going--decent # of carriers--at a time when the "flu season" would normally be starting to wind down. The warmer, sunnier, more humid weather now should help--really hinder spread. But we still have something like (probably north of) 95% of the population un-infected.

    So i think the critical issue is to ... stop lying! Stop the sort of silly--really vile--advice from the
    "public health authorities" that we've had so far--ex. "masks don't help", "close the beaches", "don't golf".

    Instead tell people the truth:
    -- if sick, stay home, quarantine yourself
    -- old/health compromised people -- stay locked up
    -- uninfected ... go outside! especially in the sunshine--go golfing, go hiking, go to the beach!
    -- avoid crowded indoor open-mouth activities--i.e. don't go clubbing
    -- mask up for crowded indoor activities (in stores, etc.)
    -- wash hands, use sanitizer when enter/leaving public venue

    That should pretty much suffice to get through the summer without any big restart to the epidemic. Then hopefully by fall, we'll have some sort of vaccine.

    It's the next flu season--if we don't have a vaccine--that will be an issue. If we face that scenario we're going to need much more intelligent leadership than we've seen so far.

    Unfortunately, it’s highly unlikely that we will have an effective vaccine by fall. Even operating at an accelerated pace, most experts regard a year as the minimum time in which a vaccine could be deployed.

    The best that we can hope for by next winter is that the Mania will have subsided after the election. In addition to the good advice that you give, treatment protocols will be better understood. Ventilators will be understood to be largely unnecessary and perhaps even counterproductive. Without ventilators as a health care bottleneck and with the understanding that eventually everyone is going to get the disease anyway, there’s no point in locking everyone up. (In other words, the original UK strategy of reaching herd immunity was the right one in the first place).

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8248023/Nearly-90-cent-COVID-19-patients-placed-ventilators-NYs-largest-health-DIED.html

    According to this article, 97% of patients over 65 who were ventilated died. They would have had better results applying leaches or casting spells.

    I saw the doctor who recommended pulse oximeters on one of the morning shows today. He said that people were coming in to the emergency room with 50% oxygen readings, which are equivalent to being on the top of Mt. Everest, but felt no shortness of breath. (Normal readings are 95%+ and generally you should receive supplemental oxygen if you are below 90%). They had been told “don’t go to the hospital unless you feel short of breath.” He couldn’t believe that these folks were even standing with such low readings but they were. He thought what was happening was that people’s bodies were gradually acclimating to the lack of oxygen so they didn’t notice it. By the time they came in, their lungs were badly damaged and most of them died despite being ventilated.

    Hopefully by next winter most older people will have oximeters and will know to come in to the hospital (or be prescribed oxygen at home) long before they are down to unsustainable levels of blood oxygen. Or else there will be some quick and dirty method of guesstimating oxygen starvation even without an oximeter. Or else, for anyone who is over 65 or has risk factors, they will be prescribed oxygen as a standard treatment when they show symptoms of Wuhan Virus – there’s no harm in getting a little extra oxygen for a few days until you feel better.

    Which leads me to believe that they are wasting their time furiously building respirators right now and should be building oxygen concentrators and lots of oxygen tanks. Of course when the next wave hits, these will be in short supply. If you are not familiar, an oxygen concentrator is a device that separates oxygen from the air (actually what it does is it removes nitrogen from the air so what is left over is mostly oxygen) . Most are about the size and shape of a dehumidifier – you just plug it in and it outputs enough oxygen for one person. If you want to travel, it can fill an oxygen bottle for portable use but when you’re home you just hook your oxygen line directly to it. The advantage over bottled oxygen is that you never run out as long as you have power and you don’t need to get constant deliveries. If you are a serious prepper you may want to get yours now because you won’t be able to get one later.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    Jack D's comment and the prior AnotherDad comment he was replying to contain good advice.

    Dissent on vaccine being available a year from now. Ironically, perhaps, Covid-19 isn't sufficiently terrible for most people, to justify large risks. Rush a vaccine to market and you might discover that the cure is worse than the disease.

    There is a literature on coronavirus vaccines dating back to around 2005, as the aftermath of the first SARS emergence in 2002-03. Multiple approaches looked promising. But there were two unexpected side effects (both did not come up with every approach):

    * Antibody enhancement of infection -- some of the antibodies that the vaccination provoked had the paradoxical effect of promoting SARS-CoV infection, when animals were challenged with live virus.

    * Cytokine storms -- vaccinated animals successfully fought off infection, but exposure to the live virus precipitated illness akin to a severe systemic allergic reaction.

    This isn't to say that a Covid-19 vaccine will cause either problem. Just that there are risks. When there are known risks, drug development proceeds slowly for both ethical reasons (do no harm) and practical ones (lawsuits, "60 Minutes" exposes).

    If, as a society, we view this as "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" territory, public intellectuals ought to be tackling this and other aspects of rapid vaccine development (ha). And so should bioethicists (ha ha).

    For all the chatter about Covid-19 being the new redlining, all I hear about real issues like these, is crickets.
  63. @South Texas Guy
    Anonymous is on to something here. 15 years ago when I began my stint in journalism, any photographer pulling a photoshop trick like that would have gotten their ass fired (if caught). Nowadays, all bets are off because journos (and media owners) decided they'd rather be full-time democrats than impartial observers getting a balanced story.

    BTW, the same trick used in the beach photo can also be used at protests (as well as other events). Say if 30 people line up in front of the courthouse for a protest, taking a long shot like that will confuse the casual views, but walking across the street and dialing your zoom down to 17 (or whatever you have) would clearly show a piss pore turnout.

    It’s long been a truism that crowd estimates at any sort of unticketed outdoor events such as protests or open-air concerts are very rough guesses at best.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Actually there are fairly accurate ways of determining crowd size by analyzing aerial photos, etc. but what happens is that people lie in both directions depending on whether it is in their interest to maximize or minimize the size of the crowd. Since no one is getting paid or making any legal determination (crowd size is mostly bragging rights) the estimates just hang out there with no one to make an unbiased determination.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    It’s long been a truism that crowd estimates at any sort of unticketed outdoor events such as protests or open-air concerts are very rough guesses at best.
     
    The National Park Service stopped giving such estimates for the Mall years ago. They had no need for them, and one side or both always gave them grief about it.
  64. Was telephoto movie compression first used in “Man of Aran” or did Flaherty lift it from someone else?

  65. @Jedi Night
    Isn't the UV radiation from sunshine really tough on viruses? All that salt sea sun and sand should keep people healthy, no?

    The sun and fresh air is probably good for people. Interacting with people you otherwise wouldn’t be in contact with isn’t…. “hey let me swing by your house and we’ll drive down to the beach together” and “Man, I’m hungry after walking on the beach, let’s stop at McDonalds” poses a risk.

  66. @Jedi Night
    Isn't the UV radiation from sunshine really tough on viruses? All that salt sea sun and sand should keep people healthy, no?

    The solar radiation and thus UV will vary a great deal upon your location and TOD, so your worry time will vary once the viruses alight upon the outdoor surfaces.

    Predicted Inactivation of Viruses of Relevance to Biodefense by Solar Radiation

    We compiled available data on virus inactivation as a function of wavelength and calculated a composite action spectrum that allowed extrapolation from the 254-nm data to solar UV. We combined our estimates of virus sensitivity with solar measurements at different geographical locations to predict virus inactivation. Our predictions agreed with the available experimental data. This work should be a useful step to understanding and eventually predicting the survival of viruses after their release in the environment.

    The method developed here for estimating the effective solar flux was relatively straightforward and depended on available and reliable solar radiometry. We predicted virus inactivation by combining viral UV254 sensitivity with effective solar flux at particular geographical sites and times of year. Due mainly to environmental factors which would decrease the available solar UVB (e.g., clouds, air pollution, dust, etc.), the accuracy of the predicted time required for virus inactivation by solar UV is expected to be within a factor of 2 of the actual value (Table ​(Table5).5). This methodology could also be extended to nonhuman viruses of agricultural impact, such as those that infect livestock and major crops.

    Ultimately, the survival of a few selected viruses, or more likely of adequate nonpathogenic viral simulants, should be determined under actual solar exposure at representative locations and times of the year.

    Lacking specific experimental data, our approach can be used to estimate survival of a wide variety of viruses after their release at any location and time of the year. Our approach and estimations of virus survival should be useful to develop more efficient countermeasures and to develop improved quarantine guidelines for cities and other areas contaminated after a viral release.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1280232/

    I suspect that a UV lamp will have to irradiate a virus impacted surface for awhile to be effective in sterilization.

  67. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    I dont know, think that guy is pushing 300 whatever camera you use.

    People dont realize that while Jacksonville is Florida, it can stay chilly there into march say 4 or 5 days a month.

  68. @Anonymous
    As a photographer, one little trick I employ...

    Let’s say I need a landscape pic of a popular place, and want no people in the shot. I’ll set the camera on a tripod, and take a picture every 30 seconds for 10-15 minutes. Then I can take all those exposures, set them up as layers in photoshop, and erase the people by replacing them with the empty space of a later exposure. Using this trick, I’ve taken pictures of a crowded Griffith Park Observatory at night, and made it look deserted when people were all over the damned place.

    On the flip side, I could take a somewhat empty beach, and employing the same strategy, except I’d be adding instead of subtracting people, make it look packed with people. Because it’s a static shot on a tripod, using the same exposure settings for each shot makes it damned hard to call bullshit on the photo, since I’m simply filling in new people into the photo. I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    I’m not saying any professional photographer, or blogging photographer would ever, ever, ever do that. Even a little. I’m just saying... they could.

    Thanks, I’ve seen a lot of pictures where I wondered how the photographer ever managed to find a time when there were no people there. Now I know…

  69. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's another trick used probably more often, that commenters on ZeroHedge pointed out wrt an article about the opening of the Jax beaches a couple of days back. Two words: file photos. It's much easier than even the clever photography tricks.

    ZH had a picture of a crowded (I assumed) Jacksonville, beach. It just wasn't from the day the ban was lifter, or afterwards at all. They stuck a picture taken a good while back at the top of the article. It said "file photo" in small print. You can "save image" or search in bing for an image that goes exactly with your story, if you look for a few minutes.

    In the ZeroHedge article the writer covered some opposition to the opening of the beaches from mayors of 2 south Florida cities, and others with a #FloridaMorons hash tag or something. Need just the right image to bolster your case? FILE PHOTO! In this case, it was out-and-out lying, as the picture was simply not of the proper time, which mattered for a story on re-opening beaches with this virus around and social distancing requested.

    The Peak Stupidity post "Beaches" noted this subterfuge on Zerohedge Monday (including a link to iSteve on that earlier post about telephoto trickery). ZH has gotten sensationalist over the last few years.

    (You can use file photos legitimately, of course, but you have to be careful to not end up lying with them.)

    According to Snopes, this photo manipulation was technically true, but labeled false.

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/jacksonville-beaches-photos/

    A local Jacksonville reporter claims on Facebook that they aren’t lying and posted distorted images next aerial shots that clearly demonstrate how far apart people are on the beach. He seems shocked and can’t imagine why people don’t trust him.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    A local Jacksonville reporter claims on Facebook that they aren’t lying
     
    He or she isn’t lying.

    The Snopes article you cited is correct: It addressed false implications on Facebook, etc. that the beach picture was taken before the beach reopened post Kung Flu lockdown.

    The telephoto effect makes the scene look more dramatic, but it is a legit photo of people on the beach just after it reopened. See my reply to AEN’s post.

  70. anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Another way to depopulate photos is to put the camera on a really solid tripod, put a really dark neutral density filter on the lens, stop the lens down to minimum, then do a really long "bulb" or "time" exposure. As long as the people are moving through the frame, they will not be at any particular place long enough to register. On the other hand, if they move slowly, you might get mysterious ghosted images. And if one guy just stands there the whole time, he will show up, blurred at the edges. This is a good way to photograph at a museum, deliberately choosing the exposure time to get some ghosts in the shot. And this is a trick used by large format architectural photographers to clean up the environment of a building.

    Now that I'm thinking of weird photography techniques, here's another: Shoot a moving person or object while tracking it, with the sky as a background (works best at dusk), with a half second or so exposure. Use on-camera flash to illuminate the person. This requires a second-curtain shutter sync for the flash to work right, so the person will be flashed at the end of the exposure, not the beginning. The flash should be set a stop or two below normal, since you are in daylight and don't really need flash: You're just using it to bring out the person at the end of the exposure. The result is a really atmosphere with a trailing blur. This is sometimes called "solar sync." The math for the flash exposure and the camera settings is a pain, but with digital you can just experiment.

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.

    Another way to depopulate photos is to put the camera on a really solid tripod, put a really dark neutral density filter on the lens, stop the lens down to minimum, then do a really long “bulb” or “time” exposure. As long as the people are moving through the frame, they will not be at any particular place long enough to register. On the other hand, if they move slowly, you might get mysterious ghosted images. And if one guy just stands there the whole time, he will show up, blurred at the edges. This is a good way to photograph at a museum, deliberately choosing the exposure time to get some ghosts in the shot. And this is a trick used by large format architectural photographers to clean up the environment of a building.

    Ohhh, that’s a great idea. I never use that kind of filter, so it didn’t occur to me.
    That actually helps me be more lazy!

    iSteve has the best comments section. Such a wide range of people with interests in everything.

    The math for the flash exposure and the camera settings is a pain, but with digital you can just experiment.

    When I’m trying to do a night landscape, I always say it’s like I’m doing a “quickie quiz” full of math problems on the fly. I’m not pleasant to be around. Don’t want anyone talking to me, because I’m doing math in my head, but everybody does. Complete strangers walk up to me to ask what lens I’m using, what my f-stop is, as if that could possibly help them in ANY fucking way the rest of their lives. But they do. People live aimless lives, and want others to be a part of it.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I used a pinhole and would shoot on single weight uncoated paper. Put the Graphic or other view camera on a tripod and let it open for 8 to 10 hours. You need a really tiny pinhole. Very interesting.

    With more conventional lenses one to five minute exposures were possible wide open and 30 to 45 minutes stopped down. Use VC paper and different filters to taste.
  71. On Google Earth, lifeguard stations visible on Jacksonville Beach appear to be separated by 200 m, and the width of the beach is ~25 m. I see maybe 50 people in the photo between the two lifeguard stations visible in the photo. That’s an average spacing of 30 feet per person or related couple!

  72. @AnonAnon
    That beach photo looks fine as is - they’re all family groups with >6’ radius of space around them. I don’t get all the beach worry bullshit anyway. I’ve never been jammed blanket to blanket with anyone at a southern California beach. Alt Right Moderate is right, DC and NYC media hacks are just bitter their cold weather is still going and they’re not supposed to travel. I don’t care what the various governors say, I think once May 1 rolls around people in the healthier states are not going to put up with restrictions anymore, particularly with respect to outdoor recreation.

    It’s been a very cool and damp spring (as has been typical for NYC for the last 10-15 years). I’m sure that hasn’t helped with CV.

  73. @Anon
    OT

    There's an entertaining dustup at UCLA Law School over the n-word. (UCLA is getting particularly woke because it has a D.I.E. czar named Jerry Kang whose salary was $444,000 in 2016.)

    UCLA Law publicly shames professors for politically incorrect comments on COVID, n-word
    https://www.thecollegefix.com/ucla-law-publicly-shames-professors-for-politically-incorrect-comments-on-covid-n-word/

    Prominent libertarian law professor Eugene Volokh, whose group law blog The Volokh Conspiracy is published at the Reason website (after many years at the Washington Post website), discussed a case that centered on the use of the word [that iSteve will not print]. And he said the word in class while describing the case. It took a few months, but finally the administration got involved. But Volokh has tripled down, explicitly using the word in a dozen or so of his blog posts at Reason, once in the title. I think he wants to provoke the administration to do something that can be made the basis of a lawsuit to demolish the taboo.

    Race-Based Speech Restrictions
    https://reason.com/2020/04/16/race-based-speech-restrictions/

    A Question About Unexpurgated Language and Lawyers or Law Students
    https://reason.com/2020/04/19/a-question-about-unexpurgated-language-and-lawyers-or-law-students/

    Additionally, he is writing about a number of other recent ... in the law classroom" cases. It seems like one of these is bound to wind up in court, and if it's not Volokh's case, he'll definitely submit an amicus curiae brief. I think it's healthy to force campus orthodoxies into court to subject them to the cleansing light of real-world law.

    Volokh was born in the USSR, came to the U.S. at 7, and graduated from UCLA with a B.S. in math-computer science at 15. He worked for 12 years as a programmer. Then he went to law school and clerked for Sandra Day O'Connor. His law review articles are commonly cited up to the Supreme Court level. I think he's a worthy opponent for the likes of Jerry Kang.

    There’s an entertaining dustup at UCLA Law School over the n-word. (UCLA is getting particularly woke because it has a D.I.E. czar named Jerry Kang whose salary was $444,000 in 2016.)

    I guess we really wuz Kangs!

    Volokh was born in the USSR, came to the U.S. at 7, and graduated from UCLA with a B.S. in math-computer science at 15. He worked for 12 years as a programmer. Then he went to law school and clerked for Sandra Day O’Connor. His law review articles are commonly cited up to the Supreme Court level. I think he’s a worthy opponent for the likes of Jerry Kang.

    If we have to import more can’t we find a way to get a lot more of these? We can manufacture our own “Wretched Refuse” quite capably (see “Kangz” above)!

  74. @AnotherDad
    That beach doesn't look crowded even with telephoto compression.

    I will say that the (typical) wild verbiage here:


    States rushing to reopen are likely making a deadly error, coronavirus models and experts warn
    Closing America was hard. Science suggests reopening amid coronavirus will be even harder.
     
    Is poking at a real issue. You don't want the epidemic to pick up any steam again. We were fortunate that China virus only got going--decent # of carriers--at a time when the "flu season" would normally be starting to wind down. The warmer, sunnier, more humid weather now should help--really hinder spread. But we still have something like (probably north of) 95% of the population un-infected.

    So i think the critical issue is to ... stop lying! Stop the sort of silly--really vile--advice from the
    "public health authorities" that we've had so far--ex. "masks don't help", "close the beaches", "don't golf".

    Instead tell people the truth:
    -- if sick, stay home, quarantine yourself
    -- old/health compromised people -- stay locked up
    -- uninfected ... go outside! especially in the sunshine--go golfing, go hiking, go to the beach!
    -- avoid crowded indoor open-mouth activities--i.e. don't go clubbing
    -- mask up for crowded indoor activities (in stores, etc.)
    -- wash hands, use sanitizer when enter/leaving public venue

    That should pretty much suffice to get through the summer without any big restart to the epidemic. Then hopefully by fall, we'll have some sort of vaccine.

    It's the next flu season--if we don't have a vaccine--that will be an issue. If we face that scenario we're going to need much more intelligent leadership than we've seen so far.

    This is correct and all the measures we ever needed to slow this down enough. Media trying to scare everyone with assertions and opinions that have the word “science” somewhere in there, are being irresponsible.

  75. The idea that even if the beach were moderately crowded it would be a deadly mistake is utter nonsense. The goal of social distancing rules is to slow the spread. That means we want to lessen the time of close contact, especially in enclosed poorly ventilated spaces.

    If spread outdoors from strangers were a significant source of spread the original R numbers would make no sense…or almost everyone has it in some of these early hit regions already.

    • Replies: @AnonAnon

    If spread outdoors from strangers were a significant source of spread the original R numbers would make no sense…or almost everyone has it in some of these early hit regions already.
     
    Exactly. If it was easy to catch outside in moving air momentarily passing by random strangers a huge percentage of us would have had it.
  76. @prosa123
    It's long been a truism that crowd estimates at any sort of unticketed outdoor events such as protests or open-air concerts are very rough guesses at best.

    Actually there are fairly accurate ways of determining crowd size by analyzing aerial photos, etc. but what happens is that people lie in both directions depending on whether it is in their interest to maximize or minimize the size of the crowd. Since no one is getting paid or making any legal determination (crowd size is mostly bragging rights) the estimates just hang out there with no one to make an unbiased determination.

    • Replies: @prosa123
    Aerial photo analysis works to some extent if it's a more static crowd, such as for an outdoor concert, but is of much less use for constantly moving crowds like protest marches or (apropos of this post) people walking on beaches.
    And yes, it's very true that crowd size estimates can be highly biased and unchallenged. A well-known case is the Tournament of Roses parade. Years ago some skeptically-minded people looked at the amount of sidewalk space and other viewing spots along the parade route and came to the conclusion that the "official" crowd size estimates from the event organizers were at least three times the number of people who could physically fit into all of the viewing areas.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Jack, when you are trying to land a sponsor or sell ads in an event program..."Last year was the best year ever, over one hundred thousand through the gate." When you are talking to your vendors and staff..."Going to have to wait a few weeks to get your checks, worst year ever."
  77. @AnotherDad
    That beach doesn't look crowded even with telephoto compression.

    I will say that the (typical) wild verbiage here:


    States rushing to reopen are likely making a deadly error, coronavirus models and experts warn
    Closing America was hard. Science suggests reopening amid coronavirus will be even harder.
     
    Is poking at a real issue. You don't want the epidemic to pick up any steam again. We were fortunate that China virus only got going--decent # of carriers--at a time when the "flu season" would normally be starting to wind down. The warmer, sunnier, more humid weather now should help--really hinder spread. But we still have something like (probably north of) 95% of the population un-infected.

    So i think the critical issue is to ... stop lying! Stop the sort of silly--really vile--advice from the
    "public health authorities" that we've had so far--ex. "masks don't help", "close the beaches", "don't golf".

    Instead tell people the truth:
    -- if sick, stay home, quarantine yourself
    -- old/health compromised people -- stay locked up
    -- uninfected ... go outside! especially in the sunshine--go golfing, go hiking, go to the beach!
    -- avoid crowded indoor open-mouth activities--i.e. don't go clubbing
    -- mask up for crowded indoor activities (in stores, etc.)
    -- wash hands, use sanitizer when enter/leaving public venue

    That should pretty much suffice to get through the summer without any big restart to the epidemic. Then hopefully by fall, we'll have some sort of vaccine.

    It's the next flu season--if we don't have a vaccine--that will be an issue. If we face that scenario we're going to need much more intelligent leadership than we've seen so far.

    But we still have something like (probably north of) 95% of the population un-infected.

    All the more reason to let it rip. The lockdowns are doing nothing to actually stop the spread, but what they are very effectively doing is ensuring more and more people will die bleak and often premature deaths in a nasty, brutish world rather than a relatively few dying in a relatively functioning world.

    COVID-19 is not, nor will it ever be, the Black Death, and even if it is, we still have enough knowledge for the vast majority to muddle through. Famine, pestilence, looting, plunder and civil unrest on the other hand are unavoidable if the vast majority of people are cowering in their homes, especially if police are chasing lockdown violators while criminals roam at large and are even being freed from jails.

  78. @Jack D
    Actually there are fairly accurate ways of determining crowd size by analyzing aerial photos, etc. but what happens is that people lie in both directions depending on whether it is in their interest to maximize or minimize the size of the crowd. Since no one is getting paid or making any legal determination (crowd size is mostly bragging rights) the estimates just hang out there with no one to make an unbiased determination.

    Aerial photo analysis works to some extent if it’s a more static crowd, such as for an outdoor concert, but is of much less use for constantly moving crowds like protest marches or (apropos of this post) people walking on beaches.
    And yes, it’s very true that crowd size estimates can be highly biased and unchallenged. A well-known case is the Tournament of Roses parade. Years ago some skeptically-minded people looked at the amount of sidewalk space and other viewing spots along the parade route and came to the conclusion that the “official” crowd size estimates from the event organizers were at least three times the number of people who could physically fit into all of the viewing areas.

  79. @Anon

    The Digital Era released a lot of the Analog Era restrictions, which inspired some people and depressed others.
     
    This article last summer at New York Magazine had a couple of really impactful portraits by Jeff Brown of Harvard Law professor Bruce Hay:

    https://www.thecut.com/2019/07/bruce-hay-paternity-trap-maria-pia-shuman-mischa-haider.html

    https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/fashion/daily/2019/07/18/magazine/harvard/LEDE-Harvard.w570.h712.jpg

    I was really impressed with the photography and put some thought into dissecting how it was done, perhaps with gels and flash and the like. I took a transparency photography class in the evenings at Santa Monica City College back in the day, and the teacher was a working architectural photographer who explained all kinds of tricks, such as the once-a-day perfect time at dusk to take a building photo to get saturated sky color, hosing down the surface around the building with water, having people inside the building to turn lights on and off to get the right exposure for everything, full-window gels, and so on.

    So I imagined that Jeff Brown had similarly engineered his photos of Bruce Hay. I tracked down his email, passed my theories by him, and asked if my reconstruction was correct. His response was quite detailed, but most of it was Photoshop. He used some red gels, but the yellow was 'shopped, as was the sky (taken earlier in the day), and some of the lighting. He apparently shot hundreds of frames and pancaked them together in layers, choosing bits and pieces of the ones he liked best.

    As he summarized, "It's not the same process as the guy you took a course from, I can assure you. I think that takes more of a dedicated mind where I would say my process is a little more sporadic and slightly whimsical."

    Impactful? I’d say garish, and he chopped off the professor’s feet, when he could have moved back a few feet of his own, and arrived at a more pleasing composition.

    The same intensity light splashing all over the guy and his house is a further drawback. For impact, you need contrast between foreground and background, and this photo doesn’t have it.

  80. “As I’ve mentioned a million times before, the oldest trick in the newspaper photographer’s book is using a telephoto lens to make a beach look supercrowded.”

    Sailer’s Plausible Undeniability–Give the appearance that something underhanded may be taking place without necessarily believing it to be intentional or the general case.

    The fact is that the beach is crowded. People are not consistently observing social distancing rules.

    https://www.jacksonville.com/news/20200402/coronavirus-re-open-beaches-to-county-residents-online-petition-to-st-johns-county-officials-grabs-thousands-of-signatures

    Public officials use different photos from a wide range of perspectives, arial footage from local news agencies (found below), and police surveillance when making their decisions to close off or shut down public places.

    Even the protestors of “Stay At Home” orders were not following through with the advice of medical experts for social distancing. For example, in Brookfield, WI…

    https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/politics/2020/04/22/despite-rejected-permit-organizers-forge-ahead-friday-rally-madison-reopen-state/3003267001/

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    arial footage from local news agencies (found below)
     
    Looks more like Helvetica to me.
  81. Lesbian stalker identity theft — from space!

    Though Worden filed for divorce in 2018, McClain continued to ask her highly detailed questions about her financial life, Worden claims. That led Worden to have her bank check into who had recently accessed her bank account, and the bank found access from a NASA computer network, according to reports.

    https://nypost.com/2019/08/24/nasa-astronaut-accused-of-stealing-her-estranged-wifes-identity-from-space/

    Wait, it’s not mysogynist enough.

    McClain was supposed to be part of NASA’s first all-female spacewalk in March before it was canceled for a lack of properly fitting spacesuits.

    Ouch.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    The Apollo spacesuits should have been brought out of storage:


    Eight companies reportedly submitted proposals to NASA for consideration. Almost all were companies that were known within the aerospace industry. One, however, was known for its work in a somewhat different field of endeavor; the International Latex Corporation was best known as the manufacturer of Playtex bras and girdles. Improbably enough though, it would soon be adding Apollo spacesuits to its product line”

    From Part IX of the series “Wagging the Moondoggie” at Centerforaninformedamerica.com
    , @vhrm

    Lesbian stalker identity theft
     
    There's no identity theft, just divorce induced maneuvering where accusing your partner of crimes gives you leverage.
  82. Sometimes you’ve just got to have seventy dollars worth of gourmet ice cream every day for months. But the important thing is that our institutions function and anybody who says otherwise is a Russian hacker.
    https://postimg.cc/z331NBcH

  83. It’s a shithole country full of shitheads.

  84. @Steve Sailer
    Good luck to you intelligent Brazilians. Let us know when you come up with good ideas.

    In North-Western Europe, in the one of the world’s most civilized and bourgeois cities: I think I still see 80-90% of people without any kind of masks or gloves in the supermarket. (And the minority of people with masks often are some kind of lost Chinese students). The native people are walking close together in narrow supermarket corridors, disobeying guidelines for where they are supposed to walk, talking and laughing loudly, touching things they don’t buy, etc.

    Although on the positive, beer shelves are now full again – after all these weeks, panic buying seems to have transferred from beer and toilet paper, to something more essential like flour and eggs.

  85. @gabriel alberton
    You could look at Curitiba. I don't know that city much, but I can say it is less packed than São Paulo and about as packed as my city, Guarulhos, which is home to an international airport and from where massive numbers of people, even upper-class people, commute daily by bus and subway to SP, including myself (though not at the moment). Buses are crammed full around 6 am, as always. Many, but not most people appear to wear masks in there.

    As of April 21, we had 221 confirmed cases and 37 confirmed deaths in the city. I get out to do groceries and again, many, but not most, people are wearing masks at the supermarket, which yesterday was far from empty. Same thing in the bank, in the local soup kitchen (which is now takeout-only), etc.

    people are wearing masks at the supermarket,

    So Brazilians even are behaving better during the epidemic, than people in civilized North-Western Europe? Similarly people are behaving more responsibly to anti-epidemic measures in Ukraine, Russia, than in North-Western Europe.

  86. … distant objects are abnormally large…

    Indeed. The man on the beach wearing the white shirt appears abnormally large. Of all the people compressed into that photo, he is the one who should practice social distancing. The others can live, work and play. Corona-chan finds big daddy men incredibly sexy.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But he's also the guy who looks like he most needs to get out and walk.
  87. @Lockean Proviso
    As well as the continuous transverse breeze blowing virus away from walkers and out into the ocean.

    However, the viruses might mutate in the sea, infect giant squids, and they would go mad and swarm attack a coastal city. We've got to be careful about that sort of thing.

    Lock, as reported in SF Gate, a paddle boarder was forced out of the ocean by police officers. An Oceanographer was quoted as saying that the virus could wash of of him and come ashore as a hazardous spray. Whatever.

  88. @Erik L
    The idea that even if the beach were moderately crowded it would be a deadly mistake is utter nonsense. The goal of social distancing rules is to slow the spread. That means we want to lessen the time of close contact, especially in enclosed poorly ventilated spaces.

    If spread outdoors from strangers were a significant source of spread the original R numbers would make no sense...or almost everyone has it in some of these early hit regions already.

    If spread outdoors from strangers were a significant source of spread the original R numbers would make no sense…or almost everyone has it in some of these early hit regions already.

    Exactly. If it was easy to catch outside in moving air momentarily passing by random strangers a huge percentage of us would have had it.

  89. Out of quarantine, Chris Cuomo gets reported to cops for allegedly threatening ‘jacka**, loser fat-tire biker’
    April 15, 2020

    UPDATE: Chris Cuomo’s wife has tested positive for the coronavirus — just days after he verbally abused a senior citizen, who scolded him for breaking quarantine.

    CNN opinion host Chris Cuomo (a.k.a. – “Fredo Cuomo”) allegedly bullied a 65-year-old Democrat biker who scolded him for not exercising proper social distancing when he’s infected with the coronavirus.

    Cuomo, who claims he tested positive for COVID-19, is supposed to be in quarantine. Instead, Fredo was spotted playing outside with his wife and three children.

    Cuomo recently whined in showboating CNN videos that he had quarantined himself in his basement — away from his family — so he won’t infect them.

    “Sometimes he’s scary-stupid,” an East Hampton man named David told the New York Post. “I hate bullies.”

  90. @South Texas Guy
    Anonymous is on to something here. 15 years ago when I began my stint in journalism, any photographer pulling a photoshop trick like that would have gotten their ass fired (if caught). Nowadays, all bets are off because journos (and media owners) decided they'd rather be full-time democrats than impartial observers getting a balanced story.

    BTW, the same trick used in the beach photo can also be used at protests (as well as other events). Say if 30 people line up in front of the courthouse for a protest, taking a long shot like that will confuse the casual views, but walking across the street and dialing your zoom down to 17 (or whatever you have) would clearly show a piss pore turnout.

    Time magazine once got raked over the coals for darkening O.J.’s mugshot:

    Was that really over 25 years ago? It seems like only yesterday.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Time magazine once got raked over the coals for darkening O.J.’s mugshot:
     
    That was playing fast and Luce with the truth.
  91. @Lockean Proviso
    As well as the continuous transverse breeze blowing virus away from walkers and out into the ocean.

    However, the viruses might mutate in the sea, infect giant squids, and they would go mad and swarm attack a coastal city. We've got to be careful about that sort of thing.

    Squidnado!

  92. @Jack D
    Unfortunately, it's highly unlikely that we will have an effective vaccine by fall. Even operating at an accelerated pace, most experts regard a year as the minimum time in which a vaccine could be deployed.

    The best that we can hope for by next winter is that the Mania will have subsided after the election. In addition to the good advice that you give, treatment protocols will be better understood. Ventilators will be understood to be largely unnecessary and perhaps even counterproductive. Without ventilators as a health care bottleneck and with the understanding that eventually everyone is going to get the disease anyway, there's no point in locking everyone up. (In other words, the original UK strategy of reaching herd immunity was the right one in the first place).

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8248023/Nearly-90-cent-COVID-19-patients-placed-ventilators-NYs-largest-health-DIED.html

    According to this article, 97% of patients over 65 who were ventilated died. They would have had better results applying leaches or casting spells.

    I saw the doctor who recommended pulse oximeters on one of the morning shows today. He said that people were coming in to the emergency room with 50% oxygen readings, which are equivalent to being on the top of Mt. Everest, but felt no shortness of breath. (Normal readings are 95%+ and generally you should receive supplemental oxygen if you are below 90%). They had been told "don't go to the hospital unless you feel short of breath." He couldn't believe that these folks were even standing with such low readings but they were. He thought what was happening was that people's bodies were gradually acclimating to the lack of oxygen so they didn't notice it. By the time they came in, their lungs were badly damaged and most of them died despite being ventilated.

    Hopefully by next winter most older people will have oximeters and will know to come in to the hospital (or be prescribed oxygen at home) long before they are down to unsustainable levels of blood oxygen. Or else there will be some quick and dirty method of guesstimating oxygen starvation even without an oximeter. Or else, for anyone who is over 65 or has risk factors, they will be prescribed oxygen as a standard treatment when they show symptoms of Wuhan Virus - there's no harm in getting a little extra oxygen for a few days until you feel better.

    Which leads me to believe that they are wasting their time furiously building respirators right now and should be building oxygen concentrators and lots of oxygen tanks. Of course when the next wave hits, these will be in short supply. If you are not familiar, an oxygen concentrator is a device that separates oxygen from the air (actually what it does is it removes nitrogen from the air so what is left over is mostly oxygen) . Most are about the size and shape of a dehumidifier - you just plug it in and it outputs enough oxygen for one person. If you want to travel, it can fill an oxygen bottle for portable use but when you're home you just hook your oxygen line directly to it. The advantage over bottled oxygen is that you never run out as long as you have power and you don't need to get constant deliveries. If you are a serious prepper you may want to get yours now because you won't be able to get one later.

    Jack D’s comment and the prior AnotherDad comment he was replying to contain good advice.

    Dissent on vaccine being available a year from now. Ironically, perhaps, Covid-19 isn’t sufficiently terrible for most people, to justify large risks. Rush a vaccine to market and you might discover that the cure is worse than the disease.

    There is a literature on coronavirus vaccines dating back to around 2005, as the aftermath of the first SARS emergence in 2002-03. Multiple approaches looked promising. But there were two unexpected side effects (both did not come up with every approach):

    * Antibody enhancement of infection — some of the antibodies that the vaccination provoked had the paradoxical effect of promoting SARS-CoV infection, when animals were challenged with live virus.

    * Cytokine storms — vaccinated animals successfully fought off infection, but exposure to the live virus precipitated illness akin to a severe systemic allergic reaction.

    This isn’t to say that a Covid-19 vaccine will cause either problem. Just that there are risks. When there are known risks, drug development proceeds slowly for both ethical reasons (do no harm) and practical ones (lawsuits, “60 Minutes” exposes).

    If, as a society, we view this as “damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead” territory, public intellectuals ought to be tackling this and other aspects of rapid vaccine development (ha). And so should bioethicists (ha ha).

    For all the chatter about Covid-19 being the new redlining, all I hear about real issues like these, is crickets.

    • Replies: @Lot
    “ you might discover that the cure is worse than the disease.”

    Seems like this is the case for both hydroxychloroquinine and remdisiver.

    “ but exposure to the live virus precipitated illness akin to a severe systemic allergic reaction”

    I linked a while ago to one such article. The vaccines did great at stopping SARS, they just also caused severe lung damage.

    The true black pill: CV will kill ~0.5% of the developed world population over 2 or 3 years, create another Great Depression, and no shutdown or medication will change this.
    , @AnotherDad
    Thanks ic1000. Good info.

    I wonder if the ticket here might not be "vaccination" with the virus itself? What seems to do in otherwise healthy people--like the scattering of younger medical folks who've died--is getting a mega-dose and your body just running behind and failing to catch up or falling into cytokine storm.

    Maybe we could get away with just dosing folks--who'd like to get it over with and have some immunity--with very small viral doses.

    Maybe what an old guy like me needs is infection by *one* virus particle.

    Of course, seeing as how i'm a "Boomer", there's a number of commenters here i don't want involved in preparing the dose.
  93. @AnonAnon
    That beach photo looks fine as is - they’re all family groups with >6’ radius of space around them. I don’t get all the beach worry bullshit anyway. I’ve never been jammed blanket to blanket with anyone at a southern California beach. Alt Right Moderate is right, DC and NYC media hacks are just bitter their cold weather is still going and they’re not supposed to travel. I don’t care what the various governors say, I think once May 1 rolls around people in the healthier states are not going to put up with restrictions anymore, particularly with respect to outdoor recreation.

    AA, yesterday we had about an inch of snow that covered the lawn and hung on the branches, so our beaches are empty. Today I saw a lone golfer and then a twosome, all carrying their clubs, when I drove past the nearby country club. It was a mix of snow and rain today, temp now 37 dedrees, but people need to get out. We have a ban on launching boats so that a fisherman can’t get on the lake. Lake Erie and Lake Ontario are rather big so don’t see the need to ban fishing from boats. Now I see people driving together in cars so will that stop soon? A conserted effort to drive people crazy. They have already cancelled just about every local festival into the Fall months.

  94. @Inverness
    The infamous "n-word" is a really stupid hill to die on. Only a foreigner would fail to understand that. Do you really need to say the n-word? Really?

    I'd much rather make an issue of the diversicrat's salary. Now that's obscene.

    Do you really need to say the n-word? Really?

  95. @utu
    OT: French researchers plan to give nicotine patches to coronavirus patients and frontline workers after lower rates of infection were found among smokers - but say it's NOT a reason to take up cigarettes
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8246939/French-researchers-plan-nicotine-patches-coronavirus-patients-frontline-workers.html

    Pack of Marlboro beats five humidifiers?

    Thanks for the link. So smokers have an 80% smaller probability of ending up in the hospital. This is completely off the hook, a truly magical fact. Imagine if there was a proven drug with that kind of effect, i.e. reducing hospitalizations by a factor of 5, people would be rioting and asking for that drug to be available to anybody pronto.

    But, the phony MSM is not going to touch this discovery. I guess, it will spread by word of mouth. Might be a good time to buy tobacco stocks. I think most MSM still mentions smoking as a big risk factor. I remember I even considered giving up on vaping when the virus hit – I smoked for about 20 years and switched to vaping about 4 years ago. I think, I’ll hold off for now.

    Now, of course smokers do no live as long so perhaps there are fewer geriatric smokers and that would affect the results. Still a factor of 5 effect is too high to overlook. People who are really paranoid should take up smoking. Oh, and cigarettes should no longer be taxed at such draconian rates – so far this is the only proven cure.

  96. @Anonymous
    As a photographer, one little trick I employ...

    Let’s say I need a landscape pic of a popular place, and want no people in the shot. I’ll set the camera on a tripod, and take a picture every 30 seconds for 10-15 minutes. Then I can take all those exposures, set them up as layers in photoshop, and erase the people by replacing them with the empty space of a later exposure. Using this trick, I’ve taken pictures of a crowded Griffith Park Observatory at night, and made it look deserted when people were all over the damned place.

    On the flip side, I could take a somewhat empty beach, and employing the same strategy, except I’d be adding instead of subtracting people, make it look packed with people. Because it’s a static shot on a tripod, using the same exposure settings for each shot makes it damned hard to call bullshit on the photo, since I’m simply filling in new people into the photo. I’d just have to be careful not to fill in the same people.

    I’m not saying any professional photographer, or blogging photographer would ever, ever, ever do that. Even a little. I’m just saying... they could.

  97. @gabriel alberton
    You could look at Curitiba. I don't know that city much, but I can say it is less packed than São Paulo and about as packed as my city, Guarulhos, which is home to an international airport and from where massive numbers of people, even upper-class people, commute daily by bus and subway to SP, including myself (though not at the moment). Buses are crammed full around 6 am, as always. Many, but not most people appear to wear masks in there.

    As of April 21, we had 221 confirmed cases and 37 confirmed deaths in the city. I get out to do groceries and again, many, but not most, people are wearing masks at the supermarket, which yesterday was far from empty. Same thing in the bank, in the local soup kitchen (which is now takeout-only), etc.

    In Miami, the government made mask-wearing mandatory. Security guards won’t let you into the store unless you have some kind of face covering.

    Are the buses and subways still charging fares? They’re free in Miami right now, but (again) you have to wear a mask and board through the back door.

    • Replies: @gabriel alberton

    Are the buses and subways still charging fares? They’re free in Miami right now, but (again) you have to wear a mask and board through the back door.
     
    I'm not actually sure as of right now. Haven't taken a bus in weeks, just saw they were still full from the outside. I don't think so, however. The bus companies agreeing with making the rides free would be very odd considering how things work here. The first reaction to the pandemic reaching my state was to park around half of the bus fleet, anyway.
  98. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Are there any Slim Fast photography tricks?

    Jim, Oprah Winfrey is always on the cover of her magazine,I see it when in line at the grocery store. She is always posed in a way to make her seem, for lack of a better term, narrower, A slight twist, an object obscuring a hefty hip. Seems to work. Someone can find an example.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    Kind of dumb, but mildly amusing:
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xr4jEG-nQmk
  99. Nearly all of the coronavirus patients in New York’s largest hospital system had at least one underlying health condition, a new study shows.

    Electronic health records of 5,700 COVID-19 patients hospitalized at Northwell Health revealed that more than 94 percent had another disease in addition to the deadly virus.

    The majority of those patients — 88 percent — had more than one pre-existing illness, 6.3 percent had only one and 6.1 percent had none at all, according to the research posted in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    The most common condition among the patients, whose median age was 63, was high blood pressure, with about 57 percent affected.

    Nearly 42 percent of the patients suffered from obesity, and about 34 percent from diabetes, according to the study.

    https://nypost.com/2020/04/23/nearly-all-coronavirus-patients-at-northwell-health-had-underlying-condition-study/

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2765184

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But what % of all adults in New York over, say, 45 suffer from high blood pressure?
  100. anon[225] • Disclaimer says:

    O/T: Is this alarmism or even remotely possible? It is very hard for me to imagine people in tattered clothes selling apples from the back of a pickup truck as we see in some countries in Africa, though the free food lines are terrifyingly long looking. But the cars are good looking, many times better than my vehicles!

    https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2020-04-22/the-coronavirus-recession-will-rival-the-great-depression

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    anon, my wife and I volunteer at an inner city soup kitchen in Buffalo. There are always people that are not in need of a meal or surplus food that show up to participate. The word "Free" is a strong magnet. Whenever I watch one of the food channels they have an in corner ad asking for donations to feed the children who are not in school getting their free breakfasts and lunches, but in WNY all the schools are prepping and giving out lunches. Our district is far from poor and the line of cars to get lunches is blocks long. Right now unemployment benefits make it tiresome to have to actually go back to work.
  101. @prosa123
    It's long been a truism that crowd estimates at any sort of unticketed outdoor events such as protests or open-air concerts are very rough guesses at best.

    It’s long been a truism that crowd estimates at any sort of unticketed outdoor events such as protests or open-air concerts are very rough guesses at best.

    The National Park Service stopped giving such estimates for the Mall years ago. They had no need for them, and one side or both always gave them grief about it.

  102. @Corvinus
    "As I’ve mentioned a million times before, the oldest trick in the newspaper photographer’s book is using a telephoto lens to make a beach look supercrowded."

    Sailer’s Plausible Undeniability–Give the appearance that something underhanded may be taking place without necessarily believing it to be intentional or the general case.

    The fact is that the beach is crowded. People are not consistently observing social distancing rules.

    https://www.jacksonville.com/news/20200402/coronavirus-re-open-beaches-to-county-residents-online-petition-to-st-johns-county-officials-grabs-thousands-of-signatures

    Public officials use different photos from a wide range of perspectives, arial footage from local news agencies (found below), and police surveillance when making their decisions to close off or shut down public places.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZamrmTMs6w&feature=emb_title

    Even the protestors of "Stay At Home" orders were not following through with the advice of medical experts for social distancing. For example, in Brookfield, WI...

    https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/politics/2020/04/22/despite-rejected-permit-organizers-forge-ahead-friday-rally-madison-reopen-state/3003267001/

    arial footage from local news agencies (found below)

    Looks more like Helvetica to me.

  103. @utu
    OT: French researchers plan to give nicotine patches to coronavirus patients and frontline workers after lower rates of infection were found among smokers - but say it's NOT a reason to take up cigarettes
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8246939/French-researchers-plan-nicotine-patches-coronavirus-patients-frontline-workers.html

    Pack of Marlboro beats five humidifiers?

    Substitute a pack of Gallois.

  104. These beaches need to put up f-stop signs.

    • LOL: bruce county
  105. @Buffalo Joe
    Jim, Oprah Winfrey is always on the cover of her magazine,I see it when in line at the grocery store. She is always posed in a way to make her seem, for lack of a better term, narrower, A slight twist, an object obscuring a hefty hip. Seems to work. Someone can find an example.

    Kind of dumb, but mildly amusing:

  106. @J.Ross
    Lesbian stalker identity theft -- from space!

    Though Worden filed for divorce in 2018, McClain continued to ask her highly detailed questions about her financial life, Worden claims. That led Worden to have her bank check into who had recently accessed her bank account, and the bank found access from a NASA computer network, according to reports.
     
    https://nypost.com/2019/08/24/nasa-astronaut-accused-of-stealing-her-estranged-wifes-identity-from-space/

    Wait, it's not mysogynist enough.

    McClain was supposed to be part of NASA’s first all-female spacewalk in March before it was canceled for a lack of properly fitting spacesuits.
     
    Ouch.

    The Apollo spacesuits should have been brought out of storage:


    Eight companies reportedly submitted proposals to NASA for consideration. Almost all were companies that were known within the aerospace industry. One, however, was known for its work in a somewhat different field of endeavor; the International Latex Corporation was best known as the manufacturer of Playtex bras and girdles. Improbably enough though, it would soon be adding Apollo spacesuits to its product line”

    From Part IX of the series “Wagging the Moondoggie” at Centerforaninformedamerica.com

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJbztthNrVQ
  107. @ic1000
    Jack D's comment and the prior AnotherDad comment he was replying to contain good advice.

    Dissent on vaccine being available a year from now. Ironically, perhaps, Covid-19 isn't sufficiently terrible for most people, to justify large risks. Rush a vaccine to market and you might discover that the cure is worse than the disease.

    There is a literature on coronavirus vaccines dating back to around 2005, as the aftermath of the first SARS emergence in 2002-03. Multiple approaches looked promising. But there were two unexpected side effects (both did not come up with every approach):

    * Antibody enhancement of infection -- some of the antibodies that the vaccination provoked had the paradoxical effect of promoting SARS-CoV infection, when animals were challenged with live virus.

    * Cytokine storms -- vaccinated animals successfully fought off infection, but exposure to the live virus precipitated illness akin to a severe systemic allergic reaction.

    This isn't to say that a Covid-19 vaccine will cause either problem. Just that there are risks. When there are known risks, drug development proceeds slowly for both ethical reasons (do no harm) and practical ones (lawsuits, "60 Minutes" exposes).

    If, as a society, we view this as "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" territory, public intellectuals ought to be tackling this and other aspects of rapid vaccine development (ha). And so should bioethicists (ha ha).

    For all the chatter about Covid-19 being the new redlining, all I hear about real issues like these, is crickets.

    “ you might discover that the cure is worse than the disease.”

    Seems like this is the case for both hydroxychloroquinine and remdisiver.

    “ but exposure to the live virus precipitated illness akin to a severe systemic allergic reaction”

    I linked a while ago to one such article. The vaccines did great at stopping SARS, they just also caused severe lung damage.

    The true black pill: CV will kill ~0.5% of the developed world population over 2 or 3 years, create another Great Depression, and no shutdown or medication will change this.

    • Replies: @Mehen

    The true black pill: CV will kill ~0.5% of the developed world population over 2 or 3 years, create another Great Depression, and no shutdown or medication will change this.
     
    Let’s be precise: the political not scientific decisions made regarding the virus will create another Great Depression.
  108. @Known Fact
    It's like watching an old TV show that needed some busy street scenes on a cheesy budget -- the same three extras keep walking back and forth past the stars again and again.

    In the famous chase scene in Bullet, McQueen passes the same VW bug at least twice, I think three times.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    In the famous chase scene in Bullet, McQueen passes the same VW bug at least twice, I think three times.
     
    In her stock car racing movie, Jamie Lee Curtis walks into a bank to get a loan to save her family's track. She's turned down and leaves a few minutes later.

    The difference in temperature on the bank clock has changed at least 25 degrees. That's extreme for North Dakota or Montana, and this was set down South.

    To get back on topic, how does the virus react to rapid temperature change? Would going from a 100°C sauna into an icy lake, and then back, do any good?

  109. @peterike

    Nearly all of the coronavirus patients in New York’s largest hospital system had at least one underlying health condition, a new study shows.

    Electronic health records of 5,700 COVID-19 patients hospitalized at Northwell Health revealed that more than 94 percent had another disease in addition to the deadly virus.

    The majority of those patients — 88 percent — had more than one pre-existing illness, 6.3 percent had only one and 6.1 percent had none at all, according to the research posted in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    The most common condition among the patients, whose median age was 63, was high blood pressure, with about 57 percent affected.

    Nearly 42 percent of the patients suffered from obesity, and about 34 percent from diabetes, according to the study.
     
    https://nypost.com/2020/04/23/nearly-all-coronavirus-patients-at-northwell-health-had-underlying-condition-study/

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2765184

    But what % of all adults in New York over, say, 45 suffer from high blood pressure?

    • Replies: @gabriel alberton
    In related news, 21% of a sample of New York City residents tested positive for antibodies against the new coronavirus.

    New York City, as of today, had around 15k deaths in total, according to the Johns Hopkins University counter.

    , @Buzz Mohawk

    But what % of all adults in New York over, say, 45 suffer from high blood pressure?
     
    Probably a lot, but how many of those people have other conditions with it? Notice the following from the article peterike quoted:

    The majority of those patients — 88 percent — had more than one pre-existing illness, 6.3 percent had only one...
     
    Furthermore, how high was the pressure of those who died? There is high blood pressure, and there is high blood pressure. A few short years ago, the standards were lowered, and there is considerable suspicion that the pharmaceutical industry had something to do with that. Now practically everybody has "high" blood pressure and gets an Rx.

    One would not be surprised to discover that the deaths attributed to COVID-19 and said to occur with hypertension are happening to people with other problems (like obesity) and with truly high blood pressure. Without the details, we cannot know.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Looking at it another way, since so many people now have "high" blood pressure, that could just be a correlation that is not a causation.

    For example:

    Most people are not blond. Therefore, most people who die from COVID-19 are not blond. Does this mean blond hair somehow protects people from the serious effects of the illness? Gee, maybe this is why Sweden is doing okay without a lockdown: They have more blond people.

    You know how this works.
  110. @Steve Sailer
    But what % of all adults in New York over, say, 45 suffer from high blood pressure?

    In related news, 21% of a sample of New York City residents tested positive for antibodies against the new coronavirus.

    New York City, as of today, had around 15k deaths in total, according to the Johns Hopkins University counter.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.
  111. @AnotherDad

    Given the massive climatic differences between different parts of the US in spring, it seems silly not to let states decide there own restrictions and easing schedules.
     
    I think the word is "federalism".

    We lost a hunk in 1865. More in the 30s. And with the rise of minoritarianism, we've had the outright stripping of ("dangerous", "populist", "racist!") republican governance in favor of centralized elite diktat from our super-state--through the courts or administratively.

    But according to our Constitution federalism is what we are supposed to have.

    And as far as i know, the China-virus lockdowns have come down from states. I don't believe Trump ordered anything other than that which is properly a federal (i.e. central) government matter--border control.

    Yes, other than a few frustrated words from President Trump regarding actions by various states, he has adhered to federalism.

    But, as you observed, the longer term Democrat plan is to reduce the role of the federal states, to that of mere administrative districts under the command of the centralized national state. If they were to succeed in packing enough states with Democrat majorities, they would surely move to cancel the 9th and 10th amendments, then moving on to “rationalize” the varying state laws, but always toward the favored Democrat social policies.

    Seeing what I see in the way of media-induced pants-pissing fear leading to automatic compliance with diktats here in NJ, the decades of social conditioning are well on the way to accomplishing this if the CivNat cult continues its sway.

    Today’s post in the ever-provocative Z-Man Blog is relevant to that concern:

    http://thezman.com/wordpress/?p=20300

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    State power is a two edged sword towards liberties too. The AMA, the ABA, and the car stealership unions like it because they can implement restrictions state by state that likely would not survive debate in Washington. You only need to control California, NY,Ill. , NJ, and a couple of southern states and the rest will toady up like Cucksas. In some states one old sonofawhore with seniority can cause no end of trouble.
  112. @Steve Sailer
    I paid a lot of attention to what you could do with photography technology in 1977-1979 and then, to a lesser extent, into the late 1980s, but I'm wholly ignorant about the Photoshop Era. It was a lot of fun, in part because there were strong limits to what you could do using lenses and darkroom developing, so achieving some unusual effect took some cleverness. This was pretty similar to what you could do in music with electric guitars at the same time.

    The Digital Era released a lot of the Analog Era restrictions, which inspired some people and depressed others.

    I ran a small photo processing lab in the late 70’s early 80’s. Next day service kinda thing. It was busy.
    Working and playing with theE-6 process was exciting.
    The owner of the lab also owned a photography store as well. I got into photography every paycheck.
    The Cokin Filter System was a big thing then. I was able to create alot of “impossible ” shots. Nothing even close to what we can do with pixels today.

  113. @Cortes
    The Apollo spacesuits should have been brought out of storage:


    Eight companies reportedly submitted proposals to NASA for consideration. Almost all were companies that were known within the aerospace industry. One, however, was known for its work in a somewhat different field of endeavor; the International Latex Corporation was best known as the manufacturer of Playtex bras and girdles. Improbably enough though, it would soon be adding Apollo spacesuits to its product line”

    From Part IX of the series “Wagging the Moondoggie” at Centerforaninformedamerica.com

    • Replies: @Cortes
    Thanks.

    Dave McGowan did refer to that programme.
  114. @gabriel alberton
    In related news, 21% of a sample of New York City residents tested positive for antibodies against the new coronavirus.

    New York City, as of today, had around 15k deaths in total, according to the Johns Hopkins University counter.

    Thanks.

  115. @Steve Sailer
    But what % of all adults in New York over, say, 45 suffer from high blood pressure?

    But what % of all adults in New York over, say, 45 suffer from high blood pressure?

    Probably a lot, but how many of those people have other conditions with it? Notice the following from the article peterike quoted:

    The majority of those patients — 88 percent — had more than one pre-existing illness, 6.3 percent had only one…

    Furthermore, how high was the pressure of those who died? There is high blood pressure, and there is high blood pressure. A few short years ago, the standards were lowered, and there is considerable suspicion that the pharmaceutical industry had something to do with that. Now practically everybody has “high” blood pressure and gets an Rx.

    One would not be surprised to discover that the deaths attributed to COVID-19 and said to occur with hypertension are happening to people with other problems (like obesity) and with truly high blood pressure. Without the details, we cannot know.

  116. @Stan Adams
    In Miami, the government made mask-wearing mandatory. Security guards won’t let you into the store unless you have some kind of face covering.

    Are the buses and subways still charging fares? They’re free in Miami right now, but (again) you have to wear a mask and board through the back door.

    Are the buses and subways still charging fares? They’re free in Miami right now, but (again) you have to wear a mask and board through the back door.

    I’m not actually sure as of right now. Haven’t taken a bus in weeks, just saw they were still full from the outside. I don’t think so, however. The bus companies agreeing with making the rides free would be very odd considering how things work here. The first reaction to the pandemic reaching my state was to park around half of the bus fleet, anyway.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams

    The bus companies agreeing with making the rides free would be very odd considering how things work here
     
    Your country allows private ownership of public transportation? How barbaric!

    In civilized countries, such as the United States, responsible citizens pay exorbitant taxes to subsidize empty buses and trains driven by surly fat black women. And we're glad to do it.

    Even before the Coronapocalypse, there was a growing consensus among the enlightened that the government should drop the silly pretense of collecting fares and make all rides free for everyone:
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/14/us/free-public-transit.html

    (To paraphrase Papa O'Hanlon, "If you see it in the Times, it's true." So, Greta, bus rides should be free, Orange Man is bad, and, yes, there is a Santa Claus.)

    And why not? They're already pissing away so much money on mass transit that a few more red zeroes won't make a hell of a difference.
  117. @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJbztthNrVQ

    Thanks.

    Dave McGowan did refer to that programme.

  118. @Buzz Mohawk
    Sometimes airline pilots irresponsibly fly too close to the Moon. This guy probably lost his license:

    https://radchickblog.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/moon-plane.jpg

    Father Ted providing a lesson to a trainee Irish sky pilot:

  119. @Steve Sailer
    But what % of all adults in New York over, say, 45 suffer from high blood pressure?

    Looking at it another way, since so many people now have “high” blood pressure, that could just be a correlation that is not a causation.

    For example:

    Most people are not blond. Therefore, most people who die from COVID-19 are not blond. Does this mean blond hair somehow protects people from the serious effects of the illness? Gee, maybe this is why Sweden is doing okay without a lockdown: They have more blond people.

    You know how this works.

  120. @Jack D
    Actually there are fairly accurate ways of determining crowd size by analyzing aerial photos, etc. but what happens is that people lie in both directions depending on whether it is in their interest to maximize or minimize the size of the crowd. Since no one is getting paid or making any legal determination (crowd size is mostly bragging rights) the estimates just hang out there with no one to make an unbiased determination.

    Jack, when you are trying to land a sponsor or sell ads in an event program…”Last year was the best year ever, over one hundred thousand through the gate.” When you are talking to your vendors and staff…”Going to have to wait a few weeks to get your checks, worst year ever.”

  121. @Achmed E. Newman
    There's another trick used probably more often, that commenters on ZeroHedge pointed out wrt an article about the opening of the Jax beaches a couple of days back. Two words: file photos. It's much easier than even the clever photography tricks.

    ZH had a picture of a crowded (I assumed) Jacksonville, beach. It just wasn't from the day the ban was lifter, or afterwards at all. They stuck a picture taken a good while back at the top of the article. It said "file photo" in small print. You can "save image" or search in bing for an image that goes exactly with your story, if you look for a few minutes.

    In the ZeroHedge article the writer covered some opposition to the opening of the beaches from mayors of 2 south Florida cities, and others with a #FloridaMorons hash tag or something. Need just the right image to bolster your case? FILE PHOTO! In this case, it was out-and-out lying, as the picture was simply not of the proper time, which mattered for a story on re-opening beaches with this virus around and social distancing requested.

    The Peak Stupidity post "Beaches" noted this subterfuge on Zerohedge Monday (including a link to iSteve on that earlier post about telephoto trickery). ZH has gotten sensationalist over the last few years.

    (You can use file photos legitimately, of course, but you have to be careful to not end up lying with them.)

    There’s another trick used probably more often, that commenters on ZeroHedge pointed out

    ZH had a picture of a crowded (I assumed) Jacksonville, beach. It just wasn’t from the day the ban was lifter, or afterwards at all. They stuck a picture taken a good while back at the top of the article.

    Achmed, those ZeroHedge commenters were spreading false rumors:

    Photos accurately show reopening of Jacksonville Beach

    False claim: The media is lying about crowds of people on Jacksonville Beach in Florida by using old photos

    You wrote in your cited Peak Stupidity post:

    Though ZH had small print saying “file photo”, the photo was put there to distort the news in the article itself. The guy’s point was just that – this photo on the top of the ZH post was the fake news.

    The ZeroHedge picture showed this beach at a different time from this Kung Flu panic time, and well, not just yesterday, when the beaches re-opened. That’s fake news. Shame on you, Tyler Durden!

    Unless ZeroHedge changed the original post, the in-photo tag doesn’t read “file photo”, it reads “ⓒ Icon Sportswire via Getty Images”, as does the pic’s Twitter cite as featured in the ZeroHedge article. The ZeroHedge tag underneath the picture reads : “Getty Images”. Did ZeroHedge change the tag?

    That same photo leading off your Peak Stupidy post is cropped and resized much smaller—you wouldn’t be engaging in internet trickery of your own, would you? Tsk tsk: The lower left Getty copyright is cropped away, along with some bottom-screen foreground.

    Image hotlink from Peak Stupidity:

    Image hotlink from ZeroHedge (note original material at screen bottom):

    (You can use file photos legitimately, of course, but you have to be careful to not end up lying with them.)

    ZH has gotten sensationalist over the last few years.

    Achmed, there’s a lot of that going around.

    Not to bust your balls, but you might want to update that post… 🙂

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Generic, I cut off and/or reduce whatever photos on the blog need it, just to get them down to well under 500 pixels wide (hardly ever with anything but the same aspect ratio - especially for people, as that can be very misleading). Wben I wrote "file photo" I'd been thinking of the Getty Images because I see plenty of them when I do look for photos on bing. (I don't like using ones with "Getty" spread out across the image.)

    I was not particularly trying to hide the "Getty Images" part, because that was, in fact, what made me see it as a typical "file photo". I just wanted to crop the thing, as to not make the people the view of people too tiny, yet still fit.

    I am reading that Reuters thing now, and I am checking google-maps (street view from the shoreline road, if I can) to see about that pier. If my site is wrong, I will definitely change it out.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Yep, I spent 1/2 hour on this. Firstly, that does look like subterfuge on my part, but as I wrote, it was "Getty images" tag itself that made me think this WAS a file photo. I read all 3 articles, 2 from you and 1 from Barnard. Yeah, whoever mentioned the pier being gone was confused - the last 300 ft. were to be repaired after a hurricane, but nothing is shortened.

    I really didn't trust anything until I got to the Getty site itself, which had the photographer's name, the image location, etc. It says taken between ~ 15 minutes after the beach was re-opened, meaning 5 PM. Now, while looking at the images, the map plan view and then some sunset information,

    I was a little surprised about the shadows, but it's just a little too vague to make any point with. If you zoom in and look at the shadows they are out of the W-NW. At sunset, 17:55 PM, on April 17th, the sun should have been at 284 degrees, but I'm not sure true or magnetic (a 6 deg. difference around there). The best shadow is from the shapely women sitting down who appears just under the one guy's skim-board(?) The direction looks like WNW (the coast line there is aligned at 350/170). I guess the shadows are vague because of general haze in the air. Their lengths look reasonable, I guess, for 2 1/2 hours before sunset, but the direction doesn't quite. (The inclination is over 60-degrees at this time of year at 30-degrees latitude, so the azimuth angle doesn't change that much.) I could spend more time on this, but I'll take the photographers' word on this and change my site.

    My apologies to everyone for taking a commenter's word (and a few others elsewhere) and running with it, but believe me, it wasn't my intention to hide anything off the ZH image. I was also under the impression that Getty Images is a collection from the past. My bad.

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    One more thing, just to explain: I have tried to keep the images on my site at aspect ratios like 1 1/2 to 1 and sometimes 2:1, just because it looks better to me - takes up most of the width (near 500 pixels they mess the text up, but not so much room vertically. I'd thought I'd taken some sky out too. Yes, I know what it looks like, and I should have kept "Getty Images" there to try to "prove my point", erroneously, it turns out.
  122. @Anon
    Why would you wear sneakers/shoes on the beach? that is just weird.

    Why would you wear sneakers/shoes on the beach? that is just weird.

    Sometimes the sand is really fucking hot.

  123. @anonymous
    Some people can't be helped by clothing, period.

    If they're that fat, they shouldn't be out anyway.

    Nothing to do with coronavirus, by the way.

    Fat people should be out and getting exercise. They’re just the people who need it.

    I’m always impressed when I see a red-faced fatty pounding the pavement or doing circuits in the park. Fair play to them, they obviously know at least one half of what’s needed.

    (Eating and drinking less is often harder than forcing yourself to exercise.)

  124. “At Los Angeles beaches, in contrast, the water’s edge tends to be steeper, so the area of wet sand is quite narrow, forcing walkers into a narrow place.”

    You’re showing your age with that remark Steve. Maybe it’s that way now, but back in the early ’50s the Santa Monica beaches were wonderfully made for both walking along the low tide mark on a wide area of solid sand and also right into the water for dozens of feet without getting up to the waist of a full grown man (not mine, but that of my uncle whom I remember lifting me up as the waves came sweetly rolling in. Up, down, up, down. I was four or five.

    I’ve got photos to prove it too – just one more way in which the LA of old was a paradise.

    But much more interesting is that magnificent bird, which, unlike almost all birds other than owls, looks to be having something going on inside the head behind that magnificent beak. “You want a fight? No, I didn’t think so”.

  125. @Lot
    “ you might discover that the cure is worse than the disease.”

    Seems like this is the case for both hydroxychloroquinine and remdisiver.

    “ but exposure to the live virus precipitated illness akin to a severe systemic allergic reaction”

    I linked a while ago to one such article. The vaccines did great at stopping SARS, they just also caused severe lung damage.

    The true black pill: CV will kill ~0.5% of the developed world population over 2 or 3 years, create another Great Depression, and no shutdown or medication will change this.

    The true black pill: CV will kill ~0.5% of the developed world population over 2 or 3 years, create another Great Depression, and no shutdown or medication will change this.

    Let’s be precise: the political not scientific decisions made regarding the virus will create another Great Depression.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    Let’s be precise: the political not scientific decisions made regarding the virus will create another Great Depression.
     
    Mehen, a couple points:

    1) I haven't seen this picked apart, but a huge driver of the recession isn't "political" in the sense of government, but just people making their own self-interested decisions--especially in light of not having full information.

    People decided not to go on cruises, not to fly on vacation, not to go out and sit in a crowded restaurant or movie theater. Granted government--in some cases wisely, in some not--piled on and closed things all the way up. But mostly there is a lot of discretionary spending ... and people are using their discretion and saying ... uh ... no. For instance, you can fly--i just picked up AnotherChild#3 and her intended at the airport--their flight was perfectly legal ... and pretty darn empty. And like any recession, once people lose jobs, then those folks have to be frugal and everyone else is more reluctant to spend.


    2) If we have a "Great Depression" that really is the politicians fault.
    We simply know more now than we did then and can avoid that. This is well trod territory:
    -- The fed let the money supply drop.
    -- Roosevelt's program was a tax increase and later Roosevelt was consistently through regulation and demogoguery, interfering with business' "animal spirits". Roosevelt prematurely pushed for a balanced budget and actually managed to induce a recession within the depression in '37-38. Which he then blamed on business.
    -- The stimulus efforts were insufficient ... until the War spending.

    All that's required is not doing that.
    -- Fed pumps out money (it's doing that and will do that)
    -- Don't get in the way of business restarting. (We need sound science but otherwise get the heck out of the way.)
    -- Big stimulus. Infrastructure is the obvious opportunity. Along with re-shoring. Simply don't let up, keep raising the stimulus as necessary to get unemployment down. (And obviously no immigration--that shouldn't even be an issue in regular times, it's just ridiculous now.)

    Obviously "get it right", hitting the sweet spot, is more art than science. But the basic steps which must be done are very straightforward--not rocket science at all. If we wallow with high unemployment people should be mad. It is not necessary.
  126. @Barnard
    According to Snopes, this photo manipulation was technically true, but labeled false.

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/jacksonville-beaches-photos/

    A local Jacksonville reporter claims on Facebook that they aren't lying and posted distorted images next aerial shots that clearly demonstrate how far apart people are on the beach. He seems shocked and can't imagine why people don't trust him.

    A local Jacksonville reporter claims on Facebook that they aren’t lying

    He or she isn’t lying.

    The Snopes article you cited is correct: It addressed false implications on Facebook, etc. that the beach picture was taken before the beach reopened post Kung Flu lockdown.

    The telephoto effect makes the scene look more dramatic, but it is a legit photo of people on the beach just after it reopened. See my reply to AEN’s post.

  127. @Stan Adams
    Time magazine once got raked over the coals for darkening O.J.’s mugshot:
    https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/555b576fe4b08f7cf526c752/1435171795477-5H13UT1B8D2D56L4E5AT/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kMA-RPZJ9__R8E1-YZP6_poUqsxRUqqbr1mOJYKfIPR7LoDQ9mXPOjoJoqy81S2I8N_N4V1vUb5AoIIIbLZhVYxCRW4BPu10St3TBAUQYVKcEezr4tPLoyQ2NxPpQHhzsj2Sie1_bcPrdHN7tlaAJX0Ql6fdcrJZWYnEtcjmTYrQ/oj_480x318.jpg

    Was that really over 25 years ago? It seems like only yesterday.

    Time magazine once got raked over the coals for darkening O.J.’s mugshot:

    That was playing fast and Luce with the truth.

  128. @Jedi Night
    Isn't the UV radiation from sunshine really tough on viruses? All that salt sea sun and sand should keep people healthy, no?

    The sun will increase your body’s production of Vitamin D, making your immune system better able to fight viruses.

    • Agree: bruce county
  129. @anon
    O/T: Is this alarmism or even remotely possible? It is very hard for me to imagine people in tattered clothes selling apples from the back of a pickup truck as we see in some countries in Africa, though the free food lines are terrifyingly long looking. But the cars are good looking, many times better than my vehicles!

    https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2020-04-22/the-coronavirus-recession-will-rival-the-great-depression

    anon, my wife and I volunteer at an inner city soup kitchen in Buffalo. There are always people that are not in need of a meal or surplus food that show up to participate. The word “Free” is a strong magnet. Whenever I watch one of the food channels they have an in corner ad asking for donations to feed the children who are not in school getting their free breakfasts and lunches, but in WNY all the schools are prepping and giving out lunches. Our district is far from poor and the line of cars to get lunches is blocks long. Right now unemployment benefits make it tiresome to have to actually go back to work.

    • Replies: @anon
    I have seen that too (not poor people coming in nice cars to pick up free food). When did this become commonplace? I thought most people not in poverty do not like to be seen receiving free food.
  130. @FPD72
    In the famous chase scene in Bullet, McQueen passes the same VW bug at least twice, I think three times.

    In the famous chase scene in Bullet, McQueen passes the same VW bug at least twice, I think three times.

    In her stock car racing movie, Jamie Lee Curtis walks into a bank to get a loan to save her family’s track. She’s turned down and leaves a few minutes later.

    The difference in temperature on the bank clock has changed at least 25 degrees. That’s extreme for North Dakota or Montana, and this was set down South.

    To get back on topic, how does the virus react to rapid temperature change? Would going from a 100°C sauna into an icy lake, and then back, do any good?

  131. @Inverness
    You may think you're just kidding around, but take a look at the featured articles on the unz.com home page. The wuhan virus was cooked up at fort detrick by an unholy alliance of anglo-zionists and china-haters and released by the cia etc etc etc. And only trolls who believe the holocaust hoax would deny this obvious truth.

    Giant mutated squids would be a relief after reading some of this tripe. Steve should look for a new home--the credibility of this one is approximately nil.

    Did all these con-theorists crowd out “Ask a Mexican” Arellano? I would rather read his juvenile takes about gringos than some of these featured writers.

    • Agree: Inverness
  132. @Anonymous

    That’s clever.
     
    Laziness is the mother of invention.

    Laziness is the mother of invention.

    It worked for Mitch Hedberg…
    “I write jokes for a living, I sit at my hotel at night, I think of something that’s funny, then I go get a pen and I write it down. Or if the pen is too far away, I have to convince myself that what I thought of ain’t funny.”

  133. @AnotherDad

    Some people can’t be helped by clothing, period.

    If they’re that fat, they shouldn’t be out anyway.

    Nothing to do with coronavirus, by the way.
     
    That's a lockdown i could get behind.

    Maybe, but Shat can’t.

  134. @jim jones
    So my diet of cigarettes and whiskey has now been validated by "Science"

    “So my diet of cigarettes and whiskey has now been validated by “Science””

    Keith Richards could have told them that.

  135. @Anon

    The Digital Era released a lot of the Analog Era restrictions, which inspired some people and depressed others.
     
    This article last summer at New York Magazine had a couple of really impactful portraits by Jeff Brown of Harvard Law professor Bruce Hay:

    https://www.thecut.com/2019/07/bruce-hay-paternity-trap-maria-pia-shuman-mischa-haider.html

    https://pixel.nymag.com/imgs/fashion/daily/2019/07/18/magazine/harvard/LEDE-Harvard.w570.h712.jpg

    I was really impressed with the photography and put some thought into dissecting how it was done, perhaps with gels and flash and the like. I took a transparency photography class in the evenings at Santa Monica City College back in the day, and the teacher was a working architectural photographer who explained all kinds of tricks, such as the once-a-day perfect time at dusk to take a building photo to get saturated sky color, hosing down the surface around the building with water, having people inside the building to turn lights on and off to get the right exposure for everything, full-window gels, and so on.

    So I imagined that Jeff Brown had similarly engineered his photos of Bruce Hay. I tracked down his email, passed my theories by him, and asked if my reconstruction was correct. His response was quite detailed, but most of it was Photoshop. He used some red gels, but the yellow was 'shopped, as was the sky (taken earlier in the day), and some of the lighting. He apparently shot hundreds of frames and pancaked them together in layers, choosing bits and pieces of the ones he liked best.

    As he summarized, "It's not the same process as the guy you took a course from, I can assure you. I think that takes more of a dedicated mind where I would say my process is a little more sporadic and slightly whimsical."

    Am I the only person who looked at that photo and thought, “Where’s me washboard”?

  136. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Another way to depopulate photos is to put the camera on a really solid tripod, put a really dark neutral density filter on the lens, stop the lens down to minimum, then do a really long "bulb" or "time" exposure. As long as the people are moving through the frame, they will not be at any particular place long enough to register. On the other hand, if they move slowly, you might get mysterious ghosted images. And if one guy just stands there the whole time, he will show up, blurred at the edges. This is a good way to photograph at a museum, deliberately choosing the exposure time to get some ghosts in the shot. And this is a trick used by large format architectural photographers to clean up the environment of a building.

    Now that I'm thinking of weird photography techniques, here's another: Shoot a moving person or object while tracking it, with the sky as a background (works best at dusk), with a half second or so exposure. Use on-camera flash to illuminate the person. This requires a second-curtain shutter sync for the flash to work right, so the person will be flashed at the end of the exposure, not the beginning. The flash should be set a stop or two below normal, since you are in daylight and don't really need flash: You're just using it to bring out the person at the end of the exposure. The result is a really atmosphere with a trailing blur. This is sometimes called "solar sync." The math for the flash exposure and the camera settings is a pain, but with digital you can just experiment.

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.

    But it jacked up the chemistry so you usually had to trick them into it and then they would ban you after that. You could do it yourself but some of the chemicals had to be thrown out.

    There was also a film called 5247 which was a negative cinema stock that was processed in a similar but not identical process to C-41. IIRC running it through the C-41 machine didn’t damage the chemicals but the resulting negs were difficult to print.

    In those days I shot a lot of double X and 4X monochrome cinema stock. Freestyle sold it on occasion very cheaply. I always wanted a Hasselblad or similar with the 70mm back because you could get all kind of 70mm cine stock cheap, but never could swing it. The Hassy was actually a clunky beast, the Bronica was smoother and the optics almost as good but getting them repaired was always a bugger. The early 6×6 Bronica was a great concept and would take some magnificent glass but they never got the mechanicals sorted, the later electronic ones were decent but when they did break you were off line a while. The Mamiya RB/RZ were great but bulky. Ed Romney was a friend of mine and got me into the mamiya Press cameras and the later Graflex stuff and I had a lot of fun with that. I lost interest in photography with digital pretty much. The EPA and Kodak-laziness/stupidity end of Kodachrome was the last nail in the coffin. You can still do black and white and get the films, some of them, and the basic chemistry but no one wants to bother much any more. Other than cheap retro junkers does anyone make film cameras any more?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    But it jacked up the chemistry so you usually had to trick them into it

    What would "tricking them into it" involve, exactly? Pasting a fake label on the film roll?
    , @but an humble craftsman
    Linhofin Munich still build cameras (oldest manufacturer on the planet), but if you think Hasselblad was expensive, you might be unpleasantly surprised.
  137. @Buzz Mohawk

    ... distant objects are abnormally large...
     
    Indeed. The man on the beach wearing the white shirt appears abnormally large. Of all the people compressed into that photo, he is the one who should practice social distancing. The others can live, work and play. Corona-chan finds big daddy men incredibly sexy.

    But he’s also the guy who looks like he most needs to get out and walk.

  138. @snorlax
    I'd like to see him try flying that close to the sun!

    The Irish solved that problem.
    Aer Lingus only flies to the sun at night.

  139. @AnotherDad
    That beach doesn't look crowded even with telephoto compression.

    I will say that the (typical) wild verbiage here:


    States rushing to reopen are likely making a deadly error, coronavirus models and experts warn
    Closing America was hard. Science suggests reopening amid coronavirus will be even harder.
     
    Is poking at a real issue. You don't want the epidemic to pick up any steam again. We were fortunate that China virus only got going--decent # of carriers--at a time when the "flu season" would normally be starting to wind down. The warmer, sunnier, more humid weather now should help--really hinder spread. But we still have something like (probably north of) 95% of the population un-infected.

    So i think the critical issue is to ... stop lying! Stop the sort of silly--really vile--advice from the
    "public health authorities" that we've had so far--ex. "masks don't help", "close the beaches", "don't golf".

    Instead tell people the truth:
    -- if sick, stay home, quarantine yourself
    -- old/health compromised people -- stay locked up
    -- uninfected ... go outside! especially in the sunshine--go golfing, go hiking, go to the beach!
    -- avoid crowded indoor open-mouth activities--i.e. don't go clubbing
    -- mask up for crowded indoor activities (in stores, etc.)
    -- wash hands, use sanitizer when enter/leaving public venue

    That should pretty much suffice to get through the summer without any big restart to the epidemic. Then hopefully by fall, we'll have some sort of vaccine.

    It's the next flu season--if we don't have a vaccine--that will be an issue. If we face that scenario we're going to need much more intelligent leadership than we've seen so far.

    Part of the problem is that everybody responds to changes by going to the same place at once. E.g., when L.A. closed shopping malls and restaurants, huge numbers of Angelenos came up independently but simultaneously with the idea of going to the Griffith Park planetarium, which became enormously packed. It’s a little like panic shopping, but in this case, what happened was that everybody got a good idea — The whole family should go for a hike in the mountains — but they weren’t aware of any place to hike other than the Planetarium.

    This in turn led to crazier government shutdowns of most outdoor recreation.

    One thing that authorities can do to get back to normal is to apply license plate even-odd restrictions to parking lots: E.g., “you can park at the beach parking lots today, April 23rd (and odd number) if your license plate ends in an odd number. Tomorrow, the 24th, only even numbered license plates can park there.” This would probably reduce crowds by, I dunno, 30%?

    This kind of thing can then be dropped pretty quickly as people get used to going to the beach or whatever again and demand drops off.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    It’s what I think of as “The China Syndrome Phonecall Effect.”

    Scene 12: Guy in the Control Room, lights flashing red on the consoles, sirens blaring. Speaking furtively on the phone “Honey? That trip we discussed? Where you drop everything, pick up the kids and head to Alaska? No call to the rest of the family? It’s time, Honey! I love you!!!”

    Scene 13: 25-mile tailback at the cloverleaf junction for access to the freeway.
  140. @Buffalo Joe
    anon, my wife and I volunteer at an inner city soup kitchen in Buffalo. There are always people that are not in need of a meal or surplus food that show up to participate. The word "Free" is a strong magnet. Whenever I watch one of the food channels they have an in corner ad asking for donations to feed the children who are not in school getting their free breakfasts and lunches, but in WNY all the schools are prepping and giving out lunches. Our district is far from poor and the line of cars to get lunches is blocks long. Right now unemployment benefits make it tiresome to have to actually go back to work.

    I have seen that too (not poor people coming in nice cars to pick up free food). When did this become commonplace? I thought most people not in poverty do not like to be seen receiving free food.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    In a class, there was an unemployed guy who was getting IL LINK card benefits ("food stamps") and he was married, living with his wife (a nurse) and had a HOUSE.

    It didn't bother him one iota to be accepting the SNAP benefits.

    So whatever social stigma there existed in the past has long since disappeared. Perhaps the growth of the "gig economy" has gotten workers acclimated to state help to tide them over in the absence of employment.
  141. @Anon
    Another way to depopulate photos is to put the camera on a really solid tripod, put a really dark neutral density filter on the lens, stop the lens down to minimum, then do a really long "bulb" or "time" exposure. As long as the people are moving through the frame, they will not be at any particular place long enough to register. On the other hand, if they move slowly, you might get mysterious ghosted images. And if one guy just stands there the whole time, he will show up, blurred at the edges. This is a good way to photograph at a museum, deliberately choosing the exposure time to get some ghosts in the shot. And this is a trick used by large format architectural photographers to clean up the environment of a building.

    Now that I'm thinking of weird photography techniques, here's another: Shoot a moving person or object while tracking it, with the sky as a background (works best at dusk), with a half second or so exposure. Use on-camera flash to illuminate the person. This requires a second-curtain shutter sync for the flash to work right, so the person will be flashed at the end of the exposure, not the beginning. The flash should be set a stop or two below normal, since you are in daylight and don't really need flash: You're just using it to bring out the person at the end of the exposure. The result is a really atmosphere with a trailing blur. This is sometimes called "solar sync." The math for the flash exposure and the camera settings is a pain, but with digital you can just experiment.

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.

    I tried doing an Advanced Search with the term “solar sync” but came up with nothing. I *think* I have an idea of what the technique would look like but would certainly appreciate a link to an example.

    Btw, thanks for making these two posts.

  142. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There’s another trick used probably more often, that commenters on ZeroHedge pointed out
     

    ZH had a picture of a crowded (I assumed) Jacksonville, beach. It just wasn’t from the day the ban was lifter, or afterwards at all. They stuck a picture taken a good while back at the top of the article.
     
    Achmed, those ZeroHedge commenters were spreading false rumors:

    Photos accurately show reopening of Jacksonville Beach

    False claim: The media is lying about crowds of people on Jacksonville Beach in Florida by using old photos

    You wrote in your cited Peak Stupidity post:

    Though ZH had small print saying “file photo”, the photo was put there to distort the news in the article itself. The guy's point was just that - this photo on the top of the ZH post was the fake news.
     

    The ZeroHedge picture showed this beach at a different time from this Kung Flu panic time, and well, not just yesterday, when the beaches re-opened. That's fake news. Shame on you, Tyler Durden!
     
    Unless ZeroHedge changed the original post, the in-photo tag doesn’t read “file photo”, it reads “ⓒ Icon Sportswire via Getty Images”, as does the pic’s Twitter cite as featured in the ZeroHedge article. The ZeroHedge tag underneath the picture reads : “Getty Images”. Did ZeroHedge change the tag?

    That same photo leading off your Peak Stupidy post is cropped and resized much smaller—you wouldn’t be engaging in internet trickery of your own, would you? Tsk tsk: The lower left Getty copyright is cropped away, along with some bottom-screen foreground.

    Image hotlink from Peak Stupidity:

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_1430A.jpg

    Image hotlink from ZeroHedge (note original material at screen bottom):

    https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/flbeaches.jpg

    (You can use file photos legitimately, of course, but you have to be careful to not end up lying with them.)
     

    ZH has gotten sensationalist over the last few years.
     
    Achmed, there’s a lot of that going around.

    Not to bust your balls, but you might want to update that post… :)

    Generic, I cut off and/or reduce whatever photos on the blog need it, just to get them down to well under 500 pixels wide (hardly ever with anything but the same aspect ratio – especially for people, as that can be very misleading). Wben I wrote “file photo” I’d been thinking of the Getty Images because I see plenty of them when I do look for photos on bing. (I don’t like using ones with “Getty” spread out across the image.)

    I was not particularly trying to hide the “Getty Images” part, because that was, in fact, what made me see it as a typical “file photo”. I just wanted to crop the thing, as to not make the people the view of people too tiny, yet still fit.

    I am reading that Reuters thing now, and I am checking google-maps (street view from the shoreline road, if I can) to see about that pier. If my site is wrong, I will definitely change it out.

  143. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    Another way to depopulate photos is to put the camera on a really solid tripod, put a really dark neutral density filter on the lens, stop the lens down to minimum, then do a really long “bulb” or “time” exposure. As long as the people are moving through the frame, they will not be at any particular place long enough to register. On the other hand, if they move slowly, you might get mysterious ghosted images. And if one guy just stands there the whole time, he will show up, blurred at the edges. This is a good way to photograph at a museum, deliberately choosing the exposure time to get some ghosts in the shot. And this is a trick used by large format architectural photographers to clean up the environment of a building.
     
    Ohhh, that's a great idea. I never use that kind of filter, so it didn't occur to me.
    That actually helps me be more lazy!

    iSteve has the best comments section. Such a wide range of people with interests in everything.

    The math for the flash exposure and the camera settings is a pain, but with digital you can just experiment.
     
    When I'm trying to do a night landscape, I always say it's like I'm doing a "quickie quiz" full of math problems on the fly. I'm not pleasant to be around. Don't want anyone talking to me, because I'm doing math in my head, but everybody does. Complete strangers walk up to me to ask what lens I'm using, what my f-stop is, as if that could possibly help them in ANY fucking way the rest of their lives. But they do. People live aimless lives, and want others to be a part of it.

    I used a pinhole and would shoot on single weight uncoated paper. Put the Graphic or other view camera on a tripod and let it open for 8 to 10 hours. You need a really tiny pinhole. Very interesting.

    With more conventional lenses one to five minute exposures were possible wide open and 30 to 45 minutes stopped down. Use VC paper and different filters to taste.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    "I used a pinhole"

    Amazingly enough, there exists a pinhead optic as well!

    Investigating the source of a round patch of light in a dark hallway led to discovery of the pinhead mirror, a reflecting analog of the pinhole lens. Some pinhead mirrors were made and tested. The pinhead mirror’s imaging characteristics appear to be similar to those of the pinhole lens.

    Applied Optics Vol. 25, Issue 17, pp. 2863-2864 (1986)

    https://www.osapublishing.org/ao/abstract.cfm?uri=ao-25-17-2863
     
  144. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @JerseyJeffersonian
    Yes, other than a few frustrated words from President Trump regarding actions by various states, he has adhered to federalism.

    But, as you observed, the longer term Democrat plan is to reduce the role of the federal states, to that of mere administrative districts under the command of the centralized national state. If they were to succeed in packing enough states with Democrat majorities, they would surely move to cancel the 9th and 10th amendments, then moving on to "rationalize" the varying state laws, but always toward the favored Democrat social policies.

    Seeing what I see in the way of media-induced pants-pissing fear leading to automatic compliance with diktats here in NJ, the decades of social conditioning are well on the way to accomplishing this if the CivNat cult continues its sway.

    Today's post in the ever-provocative Z-Man Blog is relevant to that concern:

    http://thezman.com/wordpress/?p=20300

    State power is a two edged sword towards liberties too. The AMA, the ABA, and the car stealership unions like it because they can implement restrictions state by state that likely would not survive debate in Washington. You only need to control California, NY,Ill. , NJ, and a couple of southern states and the rest will toady up like Cucksas. In some states one old sonofawhore with seniority can cause no end of trouble.

  145. @J.Ross
    Lesbian stalker identity theft -- from space!

    Though Worden filed for divorce in 2018, McClain continued to ask her highly detailed questions about her financial life, Worden claims. That led Worden to have her bank check into who had recently accessed her bank account, and the bank found access from a NASA computer network, according to reports.
     
    https://nypost.com/2019/08/24/nasa-astronaut-accused-of-stealing-her-estranged-wifes-identity-from-space/

    Wait, it's not mysogynist enough.

    McClain was supposed to be part of NASA’s first all-female spacewalk in March before it was canceled for a lack of properly fitting spacesuits.
     
    Ouch.

    Lesbian stalker identity theft

    There’s no identity theft, just divorce induced maneuvering where accusing your partner of crimes gives you leverage.

  146. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There’s another trick used probably more often, that commenters on ZeroHedge pointed out
     

    ZH had a picture of a crowded (I assumed) Jacksonville, beach. It just wasn’t from the day the ban was lifter, or afterwards at all. They stuck a picture taken a good while back at the top of the article.
     
    Achmed, those ZeroHedge commenters were spreading false rumors:

    Photos accurately show reopening of Jacksonville Beach

    False claim: The media is lying about crowds of people on Jacksonville Beach in Florida by using old photos

    You wrote in your cited Peak Stupidity post:

    Though ZH had small print saying “file photo”, the photo was put there to distort the news in the article itself. The guy's point was just that - this photo on the top of the ZH post was the fake news.
     

    The ZeroHedge picture showed this beach at a different time from this Kung Flu panic time, and well, not just yesterday, when the beaches re-opened. That's fake news. Shame on you, Tyler Durden!
     
    Unless ZeroHedge changed the original post, the in-photo tag doesn’t read “file photo”, it reads “ⓒ Icon Sportswire via Getty Images”, as does the pic’s Twitter cite as featured in the ZeroHedge article. The ZeroHedge tag underneath the picture reads : “Getty Images”. Did ZeroHedge change the tag?

    That same photo leading off your Peak Stupidy post is cropped and resized much smaller—you wouldn’t be engaging in internet trickery of your own, would you? Tsk tsk: The lower left Getty copyright is cropped away, along with some bottom-screen foreground.

    Image hotlink from Peak Stupidity:

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_1430A.jpg

    Image hotlink from ZeroHedge (note original material at screen bottom):

    https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/flbeaches.jpg

    (You can use file photos legitimately, of course, but you have to be careful to not end up lying with them.)
     

    ZH has gotten sensationalist over the last few years.
     
    Achmed, there’s a lot of that going around.

    Not to bust your balls, but you might want to update that post… :)

    Yep, I spent 1/2 hour on this. Firstly, that does look like subterfuge on my part, but as I wrote, it was “Getty images” tag itself that made me think this WAS a file photo. I read all 3 articles, 2 from you and 1 from Barnard. Yeah, whoever mentioned the pier being gone was confused – the last 300 ft. were to be repaired after a hurricane, but nothing is shortened.

    I really didn’t trust anything until I got to the Getty site itself, which had the photographer’s name, the image location, etc. It says taken between ~ 15 minutes after the beach was re-opened, meaning 5 PM. Now, while looking at the images, the map plan view and then some sunset information,

    I was a little surprised about the shadows, but it’s just a little too vague to make any point with. If you zoom in and look at the shadows they are out of the W-NW. At sunset, 17:55 PM, on April 17th, the sun should have been at 284 degrees, but I’m not sure true or magnetic (a 6 deg. difference around there). The best shadow is from the shapely women sitting down who appears just under the one guy’s skim-board(?) The direction looks like WNW (the coast line there is aligned at 350/170). I guess the shadows are vague because of general haze in the air. Their lengths look reasonable, I guess, for 2 1/2 hours before sunset, but the direction doesn’t quite. (The inclination is over 60-degrees at this time of year at 30-degrees latitude, so the azimuth angle doesn’t change that much.) I could spend more time on this, but I’ll take the photographers’ word on this and change my site.

    My apologies to everyone for taking a commenter’s word (and a few others elsewhere) and running with it, but believe me, it wasn’t my intention to hide anything off the ZH image. I was also under the impression that Getty Images is a collection from the past. My bad.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    My apologies to everyone for taking a commenter’s word (and a few others elsewhere) …
     
    It seems rumor mongers capitalized on ongoing mainstream media lies (e.g. ABC News’s cropped Knob Creek, KY night shoot standing in for an alleged Turkish massacre of Kurdish civilians) to stir up things further.

    … and running with it, but believe me, it wasn’t my intention to hide anything off the ZH image. I was also under the impression that Getty Images is a collection from the past. My bad.
     
    No worries, AEN, I know you’re a straight shooter. It’s easy to get a data point wrong if it seems plausible and conforms to a pattern one is aware of. I’ve accidentally done it myself. BTW, kudos for updating your “Beaches” post with content strikethroughs and a bold update note… 1000x more integrity than MSM outlets that routinely change/delete headlines and content without noting it.

    If you zoom in and look at the shadows they are out of the W-NW. At sunset, 17:55 PM, on April 17th, the sun should have been at 284 degrees, but I’m not sure true or magnetic (a 6 deg. difference around there). The best shadow is from the shapely women sitting down who appears just under the one guy’s skim-board(?) The direction looks like WNW (the coast line there is aligned at 350/170). I guess the shadows are vague because of general haze in the air. Their lengths look reasonable, I guess, for 2 1/2 hours before sunset, but the direction doesn’t quite. (The inclination is over 60-degrees at this time of year at 30-degrees latitude, so the azimuth angle doesn’t change that much.)

     

    I made similar calculations, in a split second, in a past reply to Dave Pinsen:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/neo-colonial-rob-reiner/#comment-2173760 (#57)

    Final verdict: What appears (due in part to telephoto compression) to be a post-lockdown crowded Florida beach is ripe for tricking annoyed people who wish (because optics? ;) ) for it to be fake.
  147. @anon
    I have seen that too (not poor people coming in nice cars to pick up free food). When did this become commonplace? I thought most people not in poverty do not like to be seen receiving free food.

    In a class, there was an unemployed guy who was getting IL LINK card benefits (“food stamps”) and he was married, living with his wife (a nurse) and had a HOUSE.

    It didn’t bother him one iota to be accepting the SNAP benefits.

    So whatever social stigma there existed in the past has long since disappeared. Perhaps the growth of the “gig economy” has gotten workers acclimated to state help to tide them over in the absence of employment.

  148. @Anonymous
    I used a pinhole and would shoot on single weight uncoated paper. Put the Graphic or other view camera on a tripod and let it open for 8 to 10 hours. You need a really tiny pinhole. Very interesting.

    With more conventional lenses one to five minute exposures were possible wide open and 30 to 45 minutes stopped down. Use VC paper and different filters to taste.

    “I used a pinhole”

    Amazingly enough, there exists a pinhead optic as well!

    Investigating the source of a round patch of light in a dark hallway led to discovery of the pinhead mirror, a reflecting analog of the pinhole lens. Some pinhead mirrors were made and tested. The pinhead mirror’s imaging characteristics appear to be similar to those of the pinhole lens.

    Applied Optics Vol. 25, Issue 17, pp. 2863-2864 (1986)

    https://www.osapublishing.org/ao/abstract.cfm?uri=ao-25-17-2863

  149. @Inverness
    The infamous "n-word" is a really stupid hill to die on. Only a foreigner would fail to understand that. Do you really need to say the n-word? Really?

    I'd much rather make an issue of the diversicrat's salary. Now that's obscene.

    Being a foreigner explains John Derbyshire?

  150. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    There’s another trick used probably more often, that commenters on ZeroHedge pointed out
     

    ZH had a picture of a crowded (I assumed) Jacksonville, beach. It just wasn’t from the day the ban was lifter, or afterwards at all. They stuck a picture taken a good while back at the top of the article.
     
    Achmed, those ZeroHedge commenters were spreading false rumors:

    Photos accurately show reopening of Jacksonville Beach

    False claim: The media is lying about crowds of people on Jacksonville Beach in Florida by using old photos

    You wrote in your cited Peak Stupidity post:

    Though ZH had small print saying “file photo”, the photo was put there to distort the news in the article itself. The guy's point was just that - this photo on the top of the ZH post was the fake news.
     

    The ZeroHedge picture showed this beach at a different time from this Kung Flu panic time, and well, not just yesterday, when the beaches re-opened. That's fake news. Shame on you, Tyler Durden!
     
    Unless ZeroHedge changed the original post, the in-photo tag doesn’t read “file photo”, it reads “ⓒ Icon Sportswire via Getty Images”, as does the pic’s Twitter cite as featured in the ZeroHedge article. The ZeroHedge tag underneath the picture reads : “Getty Images”. Did ZeroHedge change the tag?

    That same photo leading off your Peak Stupidy post is cropped and resized much smaller—you wouldn’t be engaging in internet trickery of your own, would you? Tsk tsk: The lower left Getty copyright is cropped away, along with some bottom-screen foreground.

    Image hotlink from Peak Stupidity:

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_1430A.jpg

    Image hotlink from ZeroHedge (note original material at screen bottom):

    https://www.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/flbeaches.jpg

    (You can use file photos legitimately, of course, but you have to be careful to not end up lying with them.)
     

    ZH has gotten sensationalist over the last few years.
     
    Achmed, there’s a lot of that going around.

    Not to bust your balls, but you might want to update that post… :)

    One more thing, just to explain: I have tried to keep the images on my site at aspect ratios like 1 1/2 to 1 and sometimes 2:1, just because it looks better to me – takes up most of the width (near 500 pixels they mess the text up, but not so much room vertically. I’d thought I’d taken some sky out too. Yes, I know what it looks like, and I should have kept “Getty Images” there to try to “prove my point”, erroneously, it turns out.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Not to tell you how to run your blog, but for legit news photos (“file” or otherwise) I would try to find the full original composition and only proportionally resize if necessary, and I wouldn’t crop any content: Disregard the ideal aspect ratio.
  151. @gabriel alberton

    Are the buses and subways still charging fares? They’re free in Miami right now, but (again) you have to wear a mask and board through the back door.
     
    I'm not actually sure as of right now. Haven't taken a bus in weeks, just saw they were still full from the outside. I don't think so, however. The bus companies agreeing with making the rides free would be very odd considering how things work here. The first reaction to the pandemic reaching my state was to park around half of the bus fleet, anyway.

    The bus companies agreeing with making the rides free would be very odd considering how things work here

    Your country allows private ownership of public transportation? How barbaric!

    In civilized countries, such as the United States, responsible citizens pay exorbitant taxes to subsidize empty buses and trains driven by surly fat black women. And we’re glad to do it.

    Even before the Coronapocalypse, there was a growing consensus among the enlightened that the government should drop the silly pretense of collecting fares and make all rides free for everyone:
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/14/us/free-public-transit.html

    (To paraphrase Papa O’Hanlon, “If you see it in the Times, it’s true.” So, Greta, bus rides should be free, Orange Man is bad, and, yes, there is a Santa Claus.)

    And why not? They’re already pissing away so much money on mass transit that a few more red zeroes won’t make a hell of a difference.

  152. @Steve Sailer
    That's interesting.

    Any other countries with a big north-south distance?

    Italy, obviously, with the South being less hard hit than the wealthy North.

    What about Spain? Madrid in the middle is hard hit, but it's at 2200 feet elevation so about 8 degrees F cooler than sealevel at that latitude.

    Vietnam south of China is practically done with the damn thing.

    There are US states with as large climate differences as certain European countries. I live in New Mexico. While all of New Mexico is very dry, there is a significant difference in altitude and climate between north and south (North is mountainous, with cold snowy winters; south is sea-level and hot for most of the year). I believe Arizona is similar.

    Cases in these two states don’t seem to follow any geographic pattern other than being located in the big cities.

    Except in both states, the biggest area hit has been the Navajo Nation.

  153. @Steve Sailer
    That's interesting.

    Any other countries with a big north-south distance?

    Italy, obviously, with the South being less hard hit than the wealthy North.

    What about Spain? Madrid in the middle is hard hit, but it's at 2200 feet elevation so about 8 degrees F cooler than sealevel at that latitude.

    Vietnam south of China is practically done with the damn thing.

    There are US states with as large climate differences as certain European countries. I live in New Mexico. While all of New Mexico is very dry, there is a significant difference in altitude and climate between north and south (North is mountainous, with cold snowy winters; south is sea-level and hot for most of the year). I believe Arizona is similar.

    Cases in these two states don’t seem to follow any geographic pattern other than being located in the big cities.

    Except in both states, the biggest area hit has been the Navajo Nation.

  154. @ic1000
    Jack D's comment and the prior AnotherDad comment he was replying to contain good advice.

    Dissent on vaccine being available a year from now. Ironically, perhaps, Covid-19 isn't sufficiently terrible for most people, to justify large risks. Rush a vaccine to market and you might discover that the cure is worse than the disease.

    There is a literature on coronavirus vaccines dating back to around 2005, as the aftermath of the first SARS emergence in 2002-03. Multiple approaches looked promising. But there were two unexpected side effects (both did not come up with every approach):

    * Antibody enhancement of infection -- some of the antibodies that the vaccination provoked had the paradoxical effect of promoting SARS-CoV infection, when animals were challenged with live virus.

    * Cytokine storms -- vaccinated animals successfully fought off infection, but exposure to the live virus precipitated illness akin to a severe systemic allergic reaction.

    This isn't to say that a Covid-19 vaccine will cause either problem. Just that there are risks. When there are known risks, drug development proceeds slowly for both ethical reasons (do no harm) and practical ones (lawsuits, "60 Minutes" exposes).

    If, as a society, we view this as "damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" territory, public intellectuals ought to be tackling this and other aspects of rapid vaccine development (ha). And so should bioethicists (ha ha).

    For all the chatter about Covid-19 being the new redlining, all I hear about real issues like these, is crickets.

    Thanks ic1000. Good info.

    I wonder if the ticket here might not be “vaccination” with the virus itself? What seems to do in otherwise healthy people–like the scattering of younger medical folks who’ve died–is getting a mega-dose and your body just running behind and failing to catch up or falling into cytokine storm.

    Maybe we could get away with just dosing folks–who’d like to get it over with and have some immunity–with very small viral doses.

    Maybe what an old guy like me needs is infection by *one* virus particle.

    Of course, seeing as how i’m a “Boomer”, there’s a number of commenters here i don’t want involved in preparing the dose.

  155. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.
     
    But it jacked up the chemistry so you usually had to trick them into it and then they would ban you after that. You could do it yourself but some of the chemicals had to be thrown out.

    There was also a film called 5247 which was a negative cinema stock that was processed in a similar but not identical process to C-41. IIRC running it through the C-41 machine didn't damage the chemicals but the resulting negs were difficult to print.

    In those days I shot a lot of double X and 4X monochrome cinema stock. Freestyle sold it on occasion very cheaply. I always wanted a Hasselblad or similar with the 70mm back because you could get all kind of 70mm cine stock cheap, but never could swing it. The Hassy was actually a clunky beast, the Bronica was smoother and the optics almost as good but getting them repaired was always a bugger. The early 6x6 Bronica was a great concept and would take some magnificent glass but they never got the mechanicals sorted, the later electronic ones were decent but when they did break you were off line a while. The Mamiya RB/RZ were great but bulky. Ed Romney was a friend of mine and got me into the mamiya Press cameras and the later Graflex stuff and I had a lot of fun with that. I lost interest in photography with digital pretty much. The EPA and Kodak-laziness/stupidity end of Kodachrome was the last nail in the coffin. You can still do black and white and get the films, some of them, and the basic chemistry but no one wants to bother much any more. Other than cheap retro junkers does anyone make film cameras any more?

    But it jacked up the chemistry so you usually had to trick them into it

    What would “tricking them into it” involve, exactly? Pasting a fake label on the film roll?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Yes. Bulk load the film into a reusable C41 marked cassette was the simple way.
  156. @Mehen

    The true black pill: CV will kill ~0.5% of the developed world population over 2 or 3 years, create another Great Depression, and no shutdown or medication will change this.
     
    Let’s be precise: the political not scientific decisions made regarding the virus will create another Great Depression.

    Let’s be precise: the political not scientific decisions made regarding the virus will create another Great Depression.

    Mehen, a couple points:

    1) I haven’t seen this picked apart, but a huge driver of the recession isn’t “political” in the sense of government, but just people making their own self-interested decisions–especially in light of not having full information.

    People decided not to go on cruises, not to fly on vacation, not to go out and sit in a crowded restaurant or movie theater. Granted government–in some cases wisely, in some not–piled on and closed things all the way up. But mostly there is a lot of discretionary spending … and people are using their discretion and saying … uh … no. For instance, you can fly–i just picked up AnotherChild#3 and her intended at the airport–their flight was perfectly legal … and pretty darn empty. And like any recession, once people lose jobs, then those folks have to be frugal and everyone else is more reluctant to spend.

    2) If we have a “Great Depression” that really is the politicians fault.
    We simply know more now than we did then and can avoid that. This is well trod territory:
    — The fed let the money supply drop.
    — Roosevelt’s program was a tax increase and later Roosevelt was consistently through regulation and demogoguery, interfering with business’ “animal spirits”. Roosevelt prematurely pushed for a balanced budget and actually managed to induce a recession within the depression in ’37-38. Which he then blamed on business.
    — The stimulus efforts were insufficient … until the War spending.

    All that’s required is not doing that.
    — Fed pumps out money (it’s doing that and will do that)
    — Don’t get in the way of business restarting. (We need sound science but otherwise get the heck out of the way.)
    — Big stimulus. Infrastructure is the obvious opportunity. Along with re-shoring. Simply don’t let up, keep raising the stimulus as necessary to get unemployment down. (And obviously no immigration–that shouldn’t even be an issue in regular times, it’s just ridiculous now.)

    Obviously “get it right”, hitting the sweet spot, is more art than science. But the basic steps which must be done are very straightforward–not rocket science at all. If we wallow with high unemployment people should be mad. It is not necessary.

    • Replies: @Mehen
    Fair enough. I would just point out that the “free choices” you attribute to individuals “voluntarily” isolating is due in no small part to the hysterical corporate media and it’s highly selective reporting. That’s an understatement btw
  157. @AnotherDad

    Let’s be precise: the political not scientific decisions made regarding the virus will create another Great Depression.
     
    Mehen, a couple points:

    1) I haven't seen this picked apart, but a huge driver of the recession isn't "political" in the sense of government, but just people making their own self-interested decisions--especially in light of not having full information.

    People decided not to go on cruises, not to fly on vacation, not to go out and sit in a crowded restaurant or movie theater. Granted government--in some cases wisely, in some not--piled on and closed things all the way up. But mostly there is a lot of discretionary spending ... and people are using their discretion and saying ... uh ... no. For instance, you can fly--i just picked up AnotherChild#3 and her intended at the airport--their flight was perfectly legal ... and pretty darn empty. And like any recession, once people lose jobs, then those folks have to be frugal and everyone else is more reluctant to spend.


    2) If we have a "Great Depression" that really is the politicians fault.
    We simply know more now than we did then and can avoid that. This is well trod territory:
    -- The fed let the money supply drop.
    -- Roosevelt's program was a tax increase and later Roosevelt was consistently through regulation and demogoguery, interfering with business' "animal spirits". Roosevelt prematurely pushed for a balanced budget and actually managed to induce a recession within the depression in '37-38. Which he then blamed on business.
    -- The stimulus efforts were insufficient ... until the War spending.

    All that's required is not doing that.
    -- Fed pumps out money (it's doing that and will do that)
    -- Don't get in the way of business restarting. (We need sound science but otherwise get the heck out of the way.)
    -- Big stimulus. Infrastructure is the obvious opportunity. Along with re-shoring. Simply don't let up, keep raising the stimulus as necessary to get unemployment down. (And obviously no immigration--that shouldn't even be an issue in regular times, it's just ridiculous now.)

    Obviously "get it right", hitting the sweet spot, is more art than science. But the basic steps which must be done are very straightforward--not rocket science at all. If we wallow with high unemployment people should be mad. It is not necessary.

    Fair enough. I would just point out that the “free choices” you attribute to individuals “voluntarily” isolating is due in no small part to the hysterical corporate media and it’s highly selective reporting. That’s an understatement btw

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
  158. @Achmed E. Newman
    One more thing, just to explain: I have tried to keep the images on my site at aspect ratios like 1 1/2 to 1 and sometimes 2:1, just because it looks better to me - takes up most of the width (near 500 pixels they mess the text up, but not so much room vertically. I'd thought I'd taken some sky out too. Yes, I know what it looks like, and I should have kept "Getty Images" there to try to "prove my point", erroneously, it turns out.

    Not to tell you how to run your blog, but for legit news photos (“file” or otherwise) I would try to find the full original composition and only proportionally resize if necessary, and I wouldn’t crop any content: Disregard the ideal aspect ratio.

  159. @Achmed E. Newman
    Yep, I spent 1/2 hour on this. Firstly, that does look like subterfuge on my part, but as I wrote, it was "Getty images" tag itself that made me think this WAS a file photo. I read all 3 articles, 2 from you and 1 from Barnard. Yeah, whoever mentioned the pier being gone was confused - the last 300 ft. were to be repaired after a hurricane, but nothing is shortened.

    I really didn't trust anything until I got to the Getty site itself, which had the photographer's name, the image location, etc. It says taken between ~ 15 minutes after the beach was re-opened, meaning 5 PM. Now, while looking at the images, the map plan view and then some sunset information,

    I was a little surprised about the shadows, but it's just a little too vague to make any point with. If you zoom in and look at the shadows they are out of the W-NW. At sunset, 17:55 PM, on April 17th, the sun should have been at 284 degrees, but I'm not sure true or magnetic (a 6 deg. difference around there). The best shadow is from the shapely women sitting down who appears just under the one guy's skim-board(?) The direction looks like WNW (the coast line there is aligned at 350/170). I guess the shadows are vague because of general haze in the air. Their lengths look reasonable, I guess, for 2 1/2 hours before sunset, but the direction doesn't quite. (The inclination is over 60-degrees at this time of year at 30-degrees latitude, so the azimuth angle doesn't change that much.) I could spend more time on this, but I'll take the photographers' word on this and change my site.

    My apologies to everyone for taking a commenter's word (and a few others elsewhere) and running with it, but believe me, it wasn't my intention to hide anything off the ZH image. I was also under the impression that Getty Images is a collection from the past. My bad.

    My apologies to everyone for taking a commenter’s word (and a few others elsewhere) …

    It seems rumor mongers capitalized on ongoing mainstream media lies (e.g. ABC News’s cropped Knob Creek, KY night shoot standing in for an alleged Turkish massacre of Kurdish civilians) to stir up things further.

    … and running with it, but believe me, it wasn’t my intention to hide anything off the ZH image. I was also under the impression that Getty Images is a collection from the past. My bad.

    No worries, AEN, I know you’re a straight shooter. It’s easy to get a data point wrong if it seems plausible and conforms to a pattern one is aware of. I’ve accidentally done it myself. BTW, kudos for updating your “Beaches” post with content strikethroughs and a bold update note… 1000x more integrity than MSM outlets that routinely change/delete headlines and content without noting it.

    If you zoom in and look at the shadows they are out of the W-NW. At sunset, 17:55 PM, on April 17th, the sun should have been at 284 degrees, but I’m not sure true or magnetic (a 6 deg. difference around there). The best shadow is from the shapely women sitting down who appears just under the one guy’s skim-board(?) The direction looks like WNW (the coast line there is aligned at 350/170). I guess the shadows are vague because of general haze in the air. Their lengths look reasonable, I guess, for 2 1/2 hours before sunset, but the direction doesn’t quite. (The inclination is over 60-degrees at this time of year at 30-degrees latitude, so the azimuth angle doesn’t change that much.)

    I made similar calculations, in a split second, in a past reply to Dave Pinsen:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/neo-colonial-rob-reiner/#comment-2173760 (#57)

    Final verdict: What appears (due in part to telephoto compression) to be a post-lockdown crowded Florida beach is ripe for tricking annoyed people who wish (because optics? 😉 ) for it to be fake.

    • Agree: vhrm
  160. @Inverness
    You may think you're just kidding around, but take a look at the featured articles on the unz.com home page. The wuhan virus was cooked up at fort detrick by an unholy alliance of anglo-zionists and china-haters and released by the cia etc etc etc. And only trolls who believe the holocaust hoax would deny this obvious truth.

    Giant mutated squids would be a relief after reading some of this tripe. Steve should look for a new home--the credibility of this one is approximately nil.

    I agree that since about March 5 UNZ has been filled with ; , American evil oligarchs concocted the new Black Plague at Fort Detrick, sent the military teams to sprinkle it around Wuhan , we’re all gonna diee, bizarro octuple exponent math, and endless comments clipping and pasting graphs and projections that never came true.

    As of today 49,900 deaths mostly 70 and over compared to 80,000 flu deaths 2 years ago. This is an average not too bad mild flue season.

    UNZ is as bad as NYSLIMES and Wapo on China flu.
    Maybe Godfree Roberts is the new editor who selects the articles.

    I’ve followed Steve around the internet since the late 1990s. In fact I followed Steve from a cadre post to the comments on UNZ

  161. @The Alarmist
    When authorities insist you must stay inside, it's because they want to kill you.

    Seriously.

    http://sunlightinstitute.org/sun-exposure-antiseptic-antibiotic/

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/chronotherapy/201712/sunlight-is-the-best-medicine

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0262407913629061

    All my long life I’ve read and been told that the winter flu bronchitis pneumonia season is caused by everyone crowded inside with windows and doors closed.

    The science and medical experts claim that the Spanish flu incubated and spread in Leavenworth and other Kansas army base barracks and buildings with the closed doors and windows in winter.

    Now the democrats media and science and medical experts claim the way to avoid the flu is to stay inside with windows closed.

    It’s been a hoax from the start. My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist

    If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.
     
    We call this healthy scepticism.
    , @Corvinus
    "My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true."

    That's called willful ignorance and confirmation bias.
  162. @AnotherDad

    Given the massive climatic differences between different parts of the US in spring, it seems silly not to let states decide there own restrictions and easing schedules.
     
    I think the word is "federalism".

    We lost a hunk in 1865. More in the 30s. And with the rise of minoritarianism, we've had the outright stripping of ("dangerous", "populist", "racist!") republican governance in favor of centralized elite diktat from our super-state--through the courts or administratively.

    But according to our Constitution federalism is what we are supposed to have.

    And as far as i know, the China-virus lockdowns have come down from states. I don't believe Trump ordered anything other than that which is properly a federal (i.e. central) government matter--border control.

    You’re right. The lockdowns have all come from governors, mayors city councils and county boards of supervisors.

  163. Anonymous[146] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    But it jacked up the chemistry so you usually had to trick them into it

    What would "tricking them into it" involve, exactly? Pasting a fake label on the film roll?

    Yes. Bulk load the film into a reusable C41 marked cassette was the simple way.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Yes. Bulk load the film into a reusable C41 marked cassette was the simple way.

    Got it. I sounds like the film labs took it rather badly once they realised they'd been snookered.
  164. @Mr. Anon

    Closing America was hard. Science suggests reopening amid coronavirus will be even harder.
     
    It is notable how people who know little about science, and understand still less, now use the word "Science!" as some kind of mystical incantation.

    … people who know little about science, and understand still less, now use the word “Science!” as some kind of mystical incantation.

    PRO TIP: “¡Science!” has even more magic power than mere “Science!” Just ask ¡Jeb!

  165. @Mr. Anon

    Closing America was hard. Science suggests reopening amid coronavirus will be even harder.
     
    It is notable how people who know little about science, and understand still less, now use the word "Science!" as some kind of mystical incantation.

    … people who know little about science, and understand still less, now use the word “Science!” as some kind of mystical incantation.

    PRO TIP: “¡¡¡Science!!!” has triple the magic power of “Science!” Just ask ¡Jeb!

  166. @Steve Sailer
    Part of the problem is that everybody responds to changes by going to the same place at once. E.g., when L.A. closed shopping malls and restaurants, huge numbers of Angelenos came up independently but simultaneously with the idea of going to the Griffith Park planetarium, which became enormously packed. It's a little like panic shopping, but in this case, what happened was that everybody got a good idea -- The whole family should go for a hike in the mountains -- but they weren't aware of any place to hike other than the Planetarium.

    This in turn led to crazier government shutdowns of most outdoor recreation.

    One thing that authorities can do to get back to normal is to apply license plate even-odd restrictions to parking lots: E.g., "you can park at the beach parking lots today, April 23rd (and odd number) if your license plate ends in an odd number. Tomorrow, the 24th, only even numbered license plates can park there." This would probably reduce crowds by, I dunno, 30%?

    This kind of thing can then be dropped pretty quickly as people get used to going to the beach or whatever again and demand drops off.

    It’s what I think of as “The China Syndrome Phonecall Effect.”

    Scene 12: Guy in the Control Room, lights flashing red on the consoles, sirens blaring. Speaking furtively on the phone “Honey? That trip we discussed? Where you drop everything, pick up the kids and head to Alaska? No call to the rest of the family? It’s time, Honey! I love you!!!”

    Scene 13: 25-mile tailback at the cloverleaf junction for access to the freeway.

  167. @Alden
    All my long life I’ve read and been told that the winter flu bronchitis pneumonia season is caused by everyone crowded inside with windows and doors closed.

    The science and medical experts claim that the Spanish flu incubated and spread in Leavenworth and other Kansas army base barracks and buildings with the closed doors and windows in winter.

    Now the democrats media and science and medical experts claim the way to avoid the flu is to stay inside with windows closed.

    It’s been a hoax from the start. My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.

    If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.

    We call this healthy scepticism.

  168. @Alden
    All my long life I’ve read and been told that the winter flu bronchitis pneumonia season is caused by everyone crowded inside with windows and doors closed.

    The science and medical experts claim that the Spanish flu incubated and spread in Leavenworth and other Kansas army base barracks and buildings with the closed doors and windows in winter.

    Now the democrats media and science and medical experts claim the way to avoid the flu is to stay inside with windows closed.

    It’s been a hoax from the start. My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.

    “My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.”

    That’s called willful ignorance and confirmation bias.

    • Replies: @peterike

    “My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.”

     

    That’s called willful ignorance and confirmation bias.

    And THAT is called projection!
  169. @Anonymous

    In film days, processing E-6 film (Ektachrome) in C-41 (Kodachrome) chemicals was another nice effect, slightly weird colors and high contrast. I think you just do this in Photoshop these days.
     
    But it jacked up the chemistry so you usually had to trick them into it and then they would ban you after that. You could do it yourself but some of the chemicals had to be thrown out.

    There was also a film called 5247 which was a negative cinema stock that was processed in a similar but not identical process to C-41. IIRC running it through the C-41 machine didn't damage the chemicals but the resulting negs were difficult to print.

    In those days I shot a lot of double X and 4X monochrome cinema stock. Freestyle sold it on occasion very cheaply. I always wanted a Hasselblad or similar with the 70mm back because you could get all kind of 70mm cine stock cheap, but never could swing it. The Hassy was actually a clunky beast, the Bronica was smoother and the optics almost as good but getting them repaired was always a bugger. The early 6x6 Bronica was a great concept and would take some magnificent glass but they never got the mechanicals sorted, the later electronic ones were decent but when they did break you were off line a while. The Mamiya RB/RZ were great but bulky. Ed Romney was a friend of mine and got me into the mamiya Press cameras and the later Graflex stuff and I had a lot of fun with that. I lost interest in photography with digital pretty much. The EPA and Kodak-laziness/stupidity end of Kodachrome was the last nail in the coffin. You can still do black and white and get the films, some of them, and the basic chemistry but no one wants to bother much any more. Other than cheap retro junkers does anyone make film cameras any more?

    Linhofin Munich still build cameras (oldest manufacturer on the planet), but if you think Hasselblad was expensive, you might be unpleasantly surprised.

    • Replies: @donvonburg
    Linhof manufacture "large format" cameras, they are by no means alone, large format cameras are still made by several companies, many quite small. By their nature they are small shop, even DIY friendly. The lenses and shutters not so much, but several companies still make them.

    My father owned a few Linhof cameras, along with a Horseman, a Gowlandflex and several other large format cameras.

    Leica also makes the latest iteration of their classic M rangefinder, at prices that seem insane. They are often bought and never used: estate sales in certain neighborhoods turn new ones in sealed factory boxes up on a regular basis. See if you can guess the ethnicity/religion of 90-95% of the decedents whose estates turn these up!

    On the other end several companies make crude cheap plastic film cameras such as the old Diana, Holga, etc.

    The total lack of anything in between may be a consequence of the huge glut of used film cameras out there, but replacement parts are nonexistent for most. Will medium and small format film photography totally go away or will it maintain enough of a user base to keep some product open? Users of vacuum tubes and magnetic recording tape have seen those things pretty well head for oblivion despite an optimistic hope for a steady legacy market, but the user base was just not quite big enough and what was available was often variable enough in quality a lot of people just gave up.
  170. seriously, how can this be spam? It’s an answer t a question.

    http://linhof.com

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Sorry
  171. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Yes. Bulk load the film into a reusable C41 marked cassette was the simple way.

    Yes. Bulk load the film into a reusable C41 marked cassette was the simple way.

    Got it. I sounds like the film labs took it rather badly once they realised they’d been snookered.

  172. @MEH 0910

  173. @but an humble craftsman
    seriously, how can this be spam? It's an answer t a question.

    http://linhof.com

    Sorry

  174. @Corvinus
    "My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true."

    That's called willful ignorance and confirmation bias.

    “My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.”

    That’s called willful ignorance and confirmation bias.

    And THAT is called projection!

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    There is no projection in calling someone (Alden) who exclusively relies on believing that everything and anything the MSM says is false.
  175. @peterike

    “My method of discerning truth from falsehood is simple. If something is in the MSM the opposite is true.”

     

    That’s called willful ignorance and confirmation bias.

    And THAT is called projection!

    There is no projection in calling someone (Alden) who exclusively relies on believing that everything and anything the MSM says is false.

  176. @but an humble craftsman
    Linhofin Munich still build cameras (oldest manufacturer on the planet), but if you think Hasselblad was expensive, you might be unpleasantly surprised.

    Linhof manufacture “large format” cameras, they are by no means alone, large format cameras are still made by several companies, many quite small. By their nature they are small shop, even DIY friendly. The lenses and shutters not so much, but several companies still make them.

    My father owned a few Linhof cameras, along with a Horseman, a Gowlandflex and several other large format cameras.

    Leica also makes the latest iteration of their classic M rangefinder, at prices that seem insane. They are often bought and never used: estate sales in certain neighborhoods turn new ones in sealed factory boxes up on a regular basis. See if you can guess the ethnicity/religion of 90-95% of the decedents whose estates turn these up!

    On the other end several companies make crude cheap plastic film cameras such as the old Diana, Holga, etc.

    The total lack of anything in between may be a consequence of the huge glut of used film cameras out there, but replacement parts are nonexistent for most. Will medium and small format film photography totally go away or will it maintain enough of a user base to keep some product open? Users of vacuum tubes and magnetic recording tape have seen those things pretty well head for oblivion despite an optimistic hope for a steady legacy market, but the user base was just not quite big enough and what was available was often variable enough in quality a lot of people just gave up.

  177. Let us NOTICE that this “telephoto lens menace” reared its ugly head in iSteve’s own backyard.

  178. And I bet that bird video was shot with a wide angle lens, probably a handheld mobile phone camera.

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