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With the Los Angeles suburb of Compton back in the news due to the hit biopic “Straight Outta Compton” about the 1980s gangsta rap group N.W.A., it’s worth noting that Compton has a pretty interesting real estate history. In the 1950s and 1960s, Compton represented the black version of what Kevin Starr and Benjamin Schwarz call “the California Dream” of pleasant lower middle class life for the masses.

With Ta-Nehisi Coates popularizing the genre of real estate histories, lets look at a less tendentious academic work covering Compton, the U. of California Press book, L.A. City Limits: African American Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the Present by historian Josh Sides, director of the Center for Southern California Studies at Cal State Northridge in the San Fernando Valley.

“Ganton” in Grand Theft Auto

One of Los Angeles’ older independent suburbs, conveniently located a little over halfway from downtown L.A. to the L.A. / Long Beach Harbor, Compton started out pretty much all-white until the courts banned restrictive covenants in 1948.

Compton offered its predominantly blue-collar residents affordable suburban homes in the heart of a thriving industrial area. … During the 1940s, Compton eagerly annexed almost fifteen hundred acres, hoping that added resident and industrial growth would contribute to the city’s already substantial tax base.

Compton was nice enough that two future Presidents lived in Compton in 1949-50: George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush.

George W. Bush, Compton, CA 1949

This tax base allowed the city to develop a strong public educational system …

As late as 1948, fewer than fifty African Americans lived in among Compton’s forty-five thousand residents. … Yet during the 1950s, Compton underwent the most profound racial change of any city in Southern California. Responding to the great demand for African American housing outside the ghetto, a new group of tract home developers and real estate brokers found a niche in the unrestricted housing market. … This undeveloped property became a fertile area for the growth of the city’s black population. Davenport builders, a large developer, quickly built unrestricted tract homes on the western edge of Compton. … This was one of the few places in Los Angeles County where blacks could buy new tract housing. … “For once, the Negro did not move into slums; for once he came into good housing.” Indeed, the 1960 census revealed that 93 percent of blacks in Compton lived in homes built since 1940, with more than half residing in homes built since 1950. Compton’s houses were also large: almost 75 percent of black households in Compton had four to five rooms.

Keep in mind that “large” by postwar L.A. County standards is not large by 21st Century national standards. A sizable fraction of the housing in L.A. County was built during the egalitarian decades after Pearl Harbor when the emphasis was on quickly and cheaply providing single family homes for the huge growth in population that got into high gear during the War. These days it’s easy to think that back then they should have known how much the land would eventually be worth and thus build on a more sumptuous scale, as some pre-1929 stock market crash communities like Pasadena and Hancock Park were laid out with ample amenities.

But the emphasis after the extreme overcrowding in SoCal during WWII was on building fast and cheap. This was most vividly conveyed to me by a 1946 Robert A. Heinlein non-sci-fi short story about local Southern California politics called “A Bathroom of Her Own.” In it, an experienced political staffer (i.e., RAH) teams up with a talented female political novice (presumably, the 3rd Mrs. Heinlein) to get her elected on a platform of getting houses built fast for the returning troops. Her motivation is that she’s been bunking with her relatives throughout the War, and now after a half-decade, she wants a bathroom of her own, and thinks others should have some privacy and space too.

My parents bought their first house in 1946, a duplex in Sun Valley near Lockheed. My impression is that they didn’t make any money on their investment when they sold it five years later because the supply of housing was so much larger by 1951 than it had been 1946.

Compton was not part of the Watts’ riot of 1965. Sides continues:

… Despite the persistence of racism in Compton, African Americans truly benefited from their suburban relocation. Indeed, the much vaunted suburban dream of peace comfort came true for the thousands of blue-collar African-Americans who moved ot Compton during the 1950s. When white novelist and journalist Richard Elman visited Compton in the 1960s, he was amazed by this new black suburbia:

… Here, it seems, a man has a chance to find decent housing and educate his children. Here it is possible ot enjoy the great lower middle class dream of private life without feeling as if one were in a private hell.

Furthermore, Elman observed, Compton’s superior racially integrated schools created a much better crop of blacks students that could be found in the ghettos of Watts or South Central: “Compton has become a city which sends its Negro high-school graduates to state colleges, to Berkeley and UCLA, and some even can afford to go as far away as Fisk.” Locally, black families increasingly sent their children to Compton Community College, considered at the time to be one of the state’s best community colleges.

As in West Adams, African Americans in Compton perceived themselves(and were perceived by others) as middle class. Elman noticed that in Compton, “people never tire of telling you: “We’re different here than in Watts.'” And they certainly were. … While unemployment passed 30 percent in Watts, it stood at 8.7 percent in Compton. Compared to Watts, a mcuh higher proportion of men and women in Compton worked as full-time factory operatives. …

For Compton’s residents, the city was far from the ghetto. …

In contrast to the physical deterioration of Watts, Compton’s proud black homeowners had meticulously groomed gardens and, for the most part, well-maintained housing.

 
• Category: Race/Ethnicity • Tags: Blacks, Compton, Race/Crime 
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  1. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Well, I don’t know about ‘Compton’ but I do know about ‘Crompton’, most particularly, ‘Colin Crompton’ the 1970s English Lancastrian comedian who famously featured on Granada TV’s iconic ‘Wheeltapper’s and Shunter’s Social Club’ TV show.
    Basically, the show was a TV mock up of one of those cherished and fabled ‘northern working men’s clubs’, where the beer flowed freely, bingo was called, and if the club was big enough, Dean Martin might perform. But oh, yes, the comedians usually of the ‘big fat northern bastard’ school were the Kings, Princes, Dictators and court jesters of the whole set up.Colin Crompton was actually quite a thin man.
    As I recall, Colin Crompton acted as a faux chairman of the club, wore a huge flat cap (indoors) and interrupted the show every so often with a hand-rung fire-bell, which he carried with him, with the stock catchphrase ‘…..the committee will have you suspended..’.

    All very bizarre to you, I know.

  2. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    http://www.theoccidentalobserver.net/2015/08/the-labour-party-turns-on-the-israel-lobby/#more-29703

    “There is another factor that no-one is mentioning. There are only about 300,000 Jews in Britain. The potential four million Muslim block has formed an increasing proportion of the Labour vote and will only grow larger. Indeed, Muslim Labour Party voters control some of the most rotten and corrupt boroughs in Britain. It is a fair bet they will not be turning out for Israel’s convenience.”

    Whoops.

    LOL.

    Go Corbyn.

  3. I’ve previously engaged in an act of Noticing that in Southern California, areas where cities and streets have very classically English names like Compton are more likely to be black, while in the upper-middle-class NAM-less exurbs you’ll often find that every city and street name is in Spanish. I wonder if it’s just that older neighborhoods took large influxes from the Great Migration, and different naming conventions were in fashion when new master-planned cities were built for the white-flighting former residents of Compton et al. Or perhaps they thought Spanish names would be confusing for blacks and frustrate their attempts to move there. Maybe telling someone that in order to get to an open house they have to take Paseo Paloma to Vista del Palo to Via Monte Santa Las Altas Buenas serves as a disparately impactful cognitive test.

    Somewhat relatedly, on a recent trip, Google Maps instructed me to drive down a Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. for the first time in my life. I knew what to expect, but boy, was I bewildered by how rapidly the scenery changed just a single block to either side of it. Without knowing detailed history of the neighborhood, I’m not sure whether it’s because cities carefully select which streets to rename after Dr. King or because the renaming sends a strong signal that initiates a feedback loop.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    There are only a few major public high schools in Los Angeles with Spanish names: El Camino Real in the southwest San Fernando Valley is one of the more posh LAUSD high schools. It wasn't opened until 1969.

    In contrast, LA high school named for Presidents tend to have race riots, like Mexicans v. blacks at Jefferson a decade ago or Armenians v. Mexicans at Grant from roughly 1975-2005.

    , @Jim Sweeney
    You don't find such nomenclature prevalent in Santa Monica, Brentwood or Pacific Palisades
  4. @WowJustWow
    I've previously engaged in an act of Noticing that in Southern California, areas where cities and streets have very classically English names like Compton are more likely to be black, while in the upper-middle-class NAM-less exurbs you'll often find that every city and street name is in Spanish. I wonder if it's just that older neighborhoods took large influxes from the Great Migration, and different naming conventions were in fashion when new master-planned cities were built for the white-flighting former residents of Compton et al. Or perhaps they thought Spanish names would be confusing for blacks and frustrate their attempts to move there. Maybe telling someone that in order to get to an open house they have to take Paseo Paloma to Vista del Palo to Via Monte Santa Las Altas Buenas serves as a disparately impactful cognitive test.

    Somewhat relatedly, on a recent trip, Google Maps instructed me to drive down a Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. for the first time in my life. I knew what to expect, but boy, was I bewildered by how rapidly the scenery changed just a single block to either side of it. Without knowing detailed history of the neighborhood, I'm not sure whether it's because cities carefully select which streets to rename after Dr. King or because the renaming sends a strong signal that initiates a feedback loop.

    There are only a few major public high schools in Los Angeles with Spanish names: El Camino Real in the southwest San Fernando Valley is one of the more posh LAUSD high schools. It wasn’t opened until 1969.

    In contrast, LA high school named for Presidents tend to have race riots, like Mexicans v. blacks at Jefferson a decade ago or Armenians v. Mexicans at Grant from roughly 1975-2005.

    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    Now that you mention it, that might be also a real naming pattern that people pick up on. In the Wes Anderson film Rushmore, Max gets kicked out of Rushmore Academy and starts attending Grover Cleveland High School, named after a president not quite famous enough to be on Mount Rushmore, of course. GCHS looks like this: http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lgcjobDNTJ1qzpkri.png

    The earliest instance of political correctness that I can vividly remember from my childhood was a segment from Nick News with Linda Ellerbee about a movement to rename a George Washington High School because old Georgie owned slaves. Even then I thought it was silly.
  5. For Compton’s residents, the city was far from the ghetto. …

    So what happened? When and why did it start to transform into the gang central that it became in the 1980’s/1990’s?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    That seems like an important question.

    The three main guys in N.W.A., Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, and Easy-E, were all pretty much respectable working class by background. They were each born legitimately to married parents. Two were born in Compton, one in South-Central L.A.

    Easy-E: "Eric Wright was born to Richard and Kathie Wright on September 7, 1963, in Compton, California, a Los Angeles suburb notorious for gang activity and crime. His father was a postal worker and his mother was a grade school administrator."

    Ice Cube: "O'Shea Jackson was born on June 15, 1969 in Los Angeles, in the South Central area, the son of Doris, a hospital clerk and custodian, and Hosea Jackson, who worked as a groundskeeper at UCLA." The movie depicts his parents being still together when he's launching his career.

    Dr. Dre: "Andre Romelle Young was born in Compton, California on February 18, 1965. He was the first child of Theodore and Verna Young. Young's middle name, Romelle, is derived from his father's amateur R&B singing group, The Romells. Married in 1964, Young's parents separated in 1968 and divorced in 1972.[5] Verna later married Curtis Crayon."

    - From various Wikipedia articles.

    , @Steve Sailer
    That seems like an important question.

    The three main guys in N.W.A., Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, and Easy-E, were all pretty much respectable working class by background. They were each born legitimately to married parents. Two were born in Compton, one in South-Central L.A.

    Easy-E: "Eric Wright was born to Richard and Kathie Wright on September 7, 1963, in Compton, California, a Los Angeles suburb notorious for gang activity and crime. His father was a postal worker and his mother was a grade school administrator."

    Ice Cube: "O'Shea Jackson was born on June 15, 1969 in Los Angeles, in the South Central area, the son of Doris, a hospital clerk and custodian, and Hosea Jackson, who worked as a groundskeeper at UCLA." The movie depicts his parents being still together when he's launching his career.

    Dr. Dre: "Andre Romelle Young was born in Compton, California on February 18, 1965. He was the first child of Theodore and Verna Young. Young's middle name, Romelle, is derived from his father's amateur R&B singing group, The Romells. Married in 1964, Young's parents separated in 1968 and divorced in 1972.[5] Verna later married Curtis Crayon."

    - From various Wikipedia articles.

    , @Big Bill
    Excellent question. I don't have an answer. In Compton you have a community of strivers. They are all employed (bought houses, right?) They are all married (dual income to pay for house). They cultivate white "open space" and "green yards" values. They show initiative, leaving their sharecropper shack relatives behind, migrating all the way from Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas way out to California, and gathering together like pilgrims in a brand new City on a Hill ... and then it all turns to crap.

    We can't blame lack of jobs. They had them. We can't blame poor cultural values. They were house-proud. We can't blame ghetto schools. They attended new California schools. We can't blame lack of opportunity. They moved there because there WERE jobs. We can't blame Brutalist, rat warren high rises. They were spread out in lovely small-holder bungalows. We can't blame fatherless families. They were married.

    They were self-selected for success, they created (at least initially) thriving, self-selected communities, scratch-built for them ... and then they and/or their kids fsck up, big time.

    What on earth happened? Reversion to the black mean? The families that moved to Compton weren't gun-toting, dueling, honor-defending thugs, and yet their NWA kids, raised by married, working parents chose that path deliberately. Was it the Second Generation Immigrant Phenomenon, like the Ali G/Paki hoodlums, or the Italian Mafia (ca. 1915)? What happened? What am I missing?
    , @BB753
    Regression to the mean? Successful working class black families have trouble just staying working class through the next generation. Throw in a recession, cocaine being in demand, and you've got yourself a crime wave set to rap "music". Black bodies and white lines.
    , @Anonymous

    So what happened? When and why did it start to transform into the gang central that it became in the 1980′s/1990′s?
     
    What happened was the 80s crack epidemic. Gangs are inextricably tied to drugs and controlling drug territory. Read the story of Freeway Ricky Ross. It gets pretty deep. There were even connections between the Reagan Administration, the Nicaraguan Contras and the CIA which helped to funnel crack into black neighborhoods in South Central. This isn't conspiracy, it's something the CIA later admitted. It's really a dark stain on our government's history.

    LA has calmed down a lot in recent decades. Probably due to crack going out of fashion.

  6. As late as 1948, fewer than fifty African Americans lived in among Compton’s forty-five thousand residents

    Also here: “It’s difficult to overstate how white Compton was in the early 50s and late 40s–exclusively white with an extraordinary web of racially restrictive covenants with a very aggressive policing strategy about keeping black people out,”

    This would make Compton in 1948 over 99% white.

    According the the US Census Compton is today 0.8% Non-hispanic white.

    This makes for an astonishing story about the near total dispossession of whites from a community.

    • Replies: @fnn

    This makes for an astonishing story about the near total dispossession of whites from a community.
     
    Of course it's a very common story in many cities of the Northeast and Midwest.
  7. Speaking of meticulously groomed lawns, what is surprising to me is how all the lawns of inhabited homes in America seem to be mown nowadays, even in the worst slums. When I was a kid I remember how the shape of the lawn told you a lot about socio-economic status of the residents living inside. Even in middle-class neighborhoods a fair number of lawns were overgrown. But, for instance, take a google earth drive down some of Detroit’s worst streets (or for the brave, try it in person). You’ll see abandoned houses with overgrown lawns, but next door often an inhabited home with obviously impoverished residents, but with neatly mown lawns. I just took a google earth drive through Compton and most lawns were well taken care of their as well.

    Is this because most homes in the slum are now section-8, and lawn care is cheap enough that owners just hire lawn care? Or is it owner-residents taking pride in their homes? I guess it is probably a combination of both. But if many of these homes are occupied by welfare-dependent single mothers, it would seem unlikely that the residents are maintaining the equipment and mowing the lawn themselves.

    I know it seems like a trivial thing, but it really does puzzle me as it is so at odds with my childhood impression of what a slum should look like.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In 2002, I drove around the Florence-Normandie neighborhood where the 1992 Rodney King riot started. The yards on the residential streets were well kept up, with maybe 1 out of every 8 scruffy.

    But that's not a particularly impoverished neighborhood.

    Here's a picture of a house for sale in the Florence-Normandie neighborhood:

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8020-S-Normandie-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90044/20947236_zpid/

    In 1977 I drove around Watts where the 1965 Watts Riot, not surprisingly, happened. It wasn't as nice as Florence-Normandie in 2002, but it wasn't as bad as I had expected from reading about it.

    Driving around the affluent 99% black neighborhood of Baldwin Hills, or whatever the north-facing hillside neighborhood with the great views toward Beverly Hills is called, I noticed the lawn care was outstanding. With the way my lawn is this summer due to the drought, I'd probably get tarred and feathered if I lived in Baldwin Hills.

    I have a vague impression that lawn care is a big deal to black homeowners in L.A. (My impression is that Mexicans care a lot less about a green lawn. That may have something to do with coming to L.A. from the fairly dry to very dry northern half of Mexico rather than from very green places in the South like Louisiana and East Texas). Maybe that's a warning sign that black homeowners employ to decide when to go talk to their neighbors about property values and how things can slip away pretty fast for everybody?

    Due to the drought, there's a big push on from the bigshots like Jerry Brown and Mayor Garcetti to move past all this outdated green lawn stuff and put in gravel and cactuses in front of your house, or at least stop watering your lawn. And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive. It's global warming!

    I wonder if a decade from now, white people will decide that back in 2015 they managed to screw up black home-owning neighborhoods by demonizing lawn care, a traditional standard by which black homeowners monitored and regulated each other's behavior? Thus giving layabouts an excuse to let everything go to hell?

    I may be just making this all up, but, also, I might be on to something.

    , @Anonymous
    Perhaps it has something to do with the availability of cheap Mexican labor? In my small (under 90,000 people) city in south-central Indiana, there's very few Hispanics and most of the lawncare businesses are still owned and staffed by local working-class whites, and there seem to be a suspiciously large number of unkempt lawns around here. Heck, even my comfortably middle class white high school math teacher neighbor doesn't seem to mow his lawn more than once a month or so. My grandmother's twentysomething neighbors are even worse; their front yard looks downright wild.
    , @AndrewR
    I used to work for a landscaping company here in MI. A large part of the company's business came from mowing lawns. We had multiple customers that paid with some sort of government voucher that allowed them to get one lawnmowing every two weeks. I don't know if that was only for disabled people or what though.
  8. @jon

    For Compton’s residents, the city was far from the ghetto. …
     
    So what happened? When and why did it start to transform into the gang central that it became in the 1980's/1990's?

    That seems like an important question.

    The three main guys in N.W.A., Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, and Easy-E, were all pretty much respectable working class by background. They were each born legitimately to married parents. Two were born in Compton, one in South-Central L.A.

    Easy-E: “Eric Wright was born to Richard and Kathie Wright on September 7, 1963, in Compton, California, a Los Angeles suburb notorious for gang activity and crime. His father was a postal worker and his mother was a grade school administrator.”

    Ice Cube: “O’Shea Jackson was born on June 15, 1969 in Los Angeles, in the South Central area, the son of Doris, a hospital clerk and custodian, and Hosea Jackson, who worked as a groundskeeper at UCLA.” The movie depicts his parents being still together when he’s launching his career.

    Dr. Dre: “Andre Romelle Young was born in Compton, California on February 18, 1965. He was the first child of Theodore and Verna Young. Young’s middle name, Romelle, is derived from his father’s amateur R&B singing group, The Romells. Married in 1964, Young’s parents separated in 1968 and divorced in 1972.[5] Verna later married Curtis Crayon.”

    – From various Wikipedia articles.

    • Replies: @Sean
    So tough they paid protection money to nice Jewish boys


    http://www.jpost.com/Jewish-World/Jewish-News/Files-show-FBI-suspected-JDL-of-extorting-Tupac
  9. @jon

    For Compton’s residents, the city was far from the ghetto. …
     
    So what happened? When and why did it start to transform into the gang central that it became in the 1980's/1990's?

    That seems like an important question.

    The three main guys in N.W.A., Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, and Easy-E, were all pretty much respectable working class by background. They were each born legitimately to married parents. Two were born in Compton, one in South-Central L.A.

    Easy-E: “Eric Wright was born to Richard and Kathie Wright on September 7, 1963, in Compton, California, a Los Angeles suburb notorious for gang activity and crime. His father was a postal worker and his mother was a grade school administrator.”

    Ice Cube: “O’Shea Jackson was born on June 15, 1969 in Los Angeles, in the South Central area, the son of Doris, a hospital clerk and custodian, and Hosea Jackson, who worked as a groundskeeper at UCLA.” The movie depicts his parents being still together when he’s launching his career.

    Dr. Dre: “Andre Romelle Young was born in Compton, California on February 18, 1965. He was the first child of Theodore and Verna Young. Young’s middle name, Romelle, is derived from his father’s amateur R&B singing group, The Romells. Married in 1964, Young’s parents separated in 1968 and divorced in 1972.[5] Verna later married Curtis Crayon.”

    – From various Wikipedia articles.

  10. @David M.
    Speaking of meticulously groomed lawns, what is surprising to me is how all the lawns of inhabited homes in America seem to be mown nowadays, even in the worst slums. When I was a kid I remember how the shape of the lawn told you a lot about socio-economic status of the residents living inside. Even in middle-class neighborhoods a fair number of lawns were overgrown. But, for instance, take a google earth drive down some of Detroit's worst streets (or for the brave, try it in person). You'll see abandoned houses with overgrown lawns, but next door often an inhabited home with obviously impoverished residents, but with neatly mown lawns. I just took a google earth drive through Compton and most lawns were well taken care of their as well.

    Is this because most homes in the slum are now section-8, and lawn care is cheap enough that owners just hire lawn care? Or is it owner-residents taking pride in their homes? I guess it is probably a combination of both. But if many of these homes are occupied by welfare-dependent single mothers, it would seem unlikely that the residents are maintaining the equipment and mowing the lawn themselves.

    I know it seems like a trivial thing, but it really does puzzle me as it is so at odds with my childhood impression of what a slum should look like.

    In 2002, I drove around the Florence-Normandie neighborhood where the 1992 Rodney King riot started. The yards on the residential streets were well kept up, with maybe 1 out of every 8 scruffy.

    But that’s not a particularly impoverished neighborhood.

    Here’s a picture of a house for sale in the Florence-Normandie neighborhood:

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8020-S-Normandie-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90044/20947236_zpid/

    In 1977 I drove around Watts where the 1965 Watts Riot, not surprisingly, happened. It wasn’t as nice as Florence-Normandie in 2002, but it wasn’t as bad as I had expected from reading about it.

    Driving around the affluent 99% black neighborhood of Baldwin Hills, or whatever the north-facing hillside neighborhood with the great views toward Beverly Hills is called, I noticed the lawn care was outstanding. With the way my lawn is this summer due to the drought, I’d probably get tarred and feathered if I lived in Baldwin Hills.

    I have a vague impression that lawn care is a big deal to black homeowners in L.A. (My impression is that Mexicans care a lot less about a green lawn. That may have something to do with coming to L.A. from the fairly dry to very dry northern half of Mexico rather than from very green places in the South like Louisiana and East Texas). Maybe that’s a warning sign that black homeowners employ to decide when to go talk to their neighbors about property values and how things can slip away pretty fast for everybody?

    Due to the drought, there’s a big push on from the bigshots like Jerry Brown and Mayor Garcetti to move past all this outdated green lawn stuff and put in gravel and cactuses in front of your house, or at least stop watering your lawn. And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive. It’s global warming!

    I wonder if a decade from now, white people will decide that back in 2015 they managed to screw up black home-owning neighborhoods by demonizing lawn care, a traditional standard by which black homeowners monitored and regulated each other’s behavior? Thus giving layabouts an excuse to let everything go to hell?

    I may be just making this all up, but, also, I might be on to something.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    Yes, I've seen homes in CA that used to have lawns that now just have gravel: it's called "xero scaping", or "dry scaping" but since the "x" is pronounced as "z" you have a built in pun there.
    , @Formerly CARealist
    in AZ it's called "desert landscaping". Up here in Sac we call it "low-water yards". Some of what people put in is quite pretty, with bark, pavers, and little bushes on drip lines. I think in the long-run, though, it's going to increase city air pollution. Green lawns, growing quickly, soak up a lot of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Sulfur (in various forms) from the air and make it cleaner. Also, kids can't play on the low-water yards.

    I look forward to some real rain this year. My Japanese Maples are suffering. Does anyone know if they'll survive?
    , @International Jew

    And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive.
     
    Yep, that's my neighborhood.

    Here's my theory. A year ago, before things fell apart, everyone relied on a gardening service. Once people decided to let their lawns go brown, they suspended the service. Unfortunately, no one owns a lawnmower! So those brown lawns are turning into fields of foot-high weeds.

    For the record, I do own a lawnmower and I've always done my own gardening (1) because I enjoy it, (2) because it's a way to give my kids chores (chores are good), (3) because I meet my neighbors (as they stroll by with their dogs), and last but not least (4) I'd feel like a hypocrite if I wrote what I write here and in my real life employed illegal immigrants.

    , @NorthOfTheOneOhOne

    Due to the drought, there’s a big push on from the bigshots like Jerry Brown and Mayor Garcetti to move past all this outdated green lawn stuff and put in gravel and cactuses in front of your house, or at least stop watering your lawn.
     
    So their long term goal is to turn LA into Phoenix?
  11. I have a stack of Architectural Forum magazines from 1944 and 1945. The most conspicuous theme in this run is the need to bring down the price of individual family homes. Many times, the fear is expressed that if the home building industry can’t get the basic house below $10,000, the Federal Government will take over the process of providing housing to returning veterans. It looks like they beat that goal by about $4000.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I live in a part of the suburban San Fernando Valley of L.A. built in the early 1950s. For people who went through the Depression and the War, it was paradise.

    But it's also easy to see where the developers chintzed on amenities it would be nice to have today. For example a lot of streets don't have sidewalks -- gotta preserve that rural feel! Fortunately, I've got a sidewalk out front, but they made it about six inches too narrow for two people to walk side by side and converse -- concrete isn't free, you know.

  12. @David
    I have a stack of Architectural Forum magazines from 1944 and 1945. The most conspicuous theme in this run is the need to bring down the price of individual family homes. Many times, the fear is expressed that if the home building industry can't get the basic house below $10,000, the Federal Government will take over the process of providing housing to returning veterans. It looks like they beat that goal by about $4000.

    I live in a part of the suburban San Fernando Valley of L.A. built in the early 1950s. For people who went through the Depression and the War, it was paradise.

    But it’s also easy to see where the developers chintzed on amenities it would be nice to have today. For example a lot of streets don’t have sidewalks — gotta preserve that rural feel! Fortunately, I’ve got a sidewalk out front, but they made it about six inches too narrow for two people to walk side by side and converse — concrete isn’t free, you know.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    I've always surmised that the lack of sidewalks in suburban neighborhood planning has something to do with inconveniencing bums, vagrants, flim-flam artists and door-to-door solicitors and therefore keeping them out, or at least making them easily identifiable as such by the local police department. A man walking down the sidewalk is just that; a man traipsing through Mrs. O'Brien's tulips is a trespasser justifying a search of his person. It also helps keep a tab on teens, who don't have a corner to hang out on, and so they're more liable to spend time in one home or another under the supervision of a parent or two.
  13. This compton story is grounds for an excellent piece of research. We do hear all the time that if they had put more money into housing, schools, security and various amenities the african american minority would thrive.

    In a sense, the experiment of transplanting people that have evolved for malthusian conditions into a modern day 1950s backdrop would never happen today, but I can’t believe it actually happened in Compton. This is an amazing experiment that hasn’t been looked at much until now.

    This mini case also shows the problem with the World Bank’s work in directing finance and infrastructure spending to undeveloped places worldwide, or multilateral aid spending. The goal of aid should not be development assistance but to mitigate the worst effects of barbarism against women and children and innoculate against future mass immigration and terrorism.

    Spending x amount to make life bearable in the slum, is an investment. It means we avoid spending x+10,000y amount in policing, welfare, healthcare, education, housing etc should the incentives to move closer to home become compelling.

    Dark economics for dark truths about humanity.

    • Replies: @AUGUSTUS FINKIN
    "This compton story is grounds for an excellent piece of research. We do hear all the time that if they had put more money into housing, schools, security and various amenities the african american minority would thrive"

    " The goal of aid should not be development assistance but to mitigate the worst effects of barbarism against women and children and inoculate against future mass immigration and terrorism"

    Absolutely. Here you are pointing directly at the problem - throwing money at it alone will never solve it.

    But, then, aside from all the talk about genetic predisposition, let's just state an unpalatable truth - The chief enemy of black people is their culture. The culture that, in Africa, allows predominantly young males to abandon their women and children and escape the continent; that ensures the majority of inmates of the refugee camps are women, children and old men; the culture which allows men to be warriors, hunters and baby-makers while at the same time leaving all the drudgery to their women; the culture that declares "live for today!' and, in Zimbabwe, resulted in the requisitioned crops and livestock of the white farmers all being eaten - with absolutely no thought of where the next harvest would come from; and the culture that makes Africa the most sexually promiscuous society on earth (with its inevitable highest incidence of STDs). Much of this is perpetuated in the USA and even the Caribbean (e.g. Haiti) - there, it has given us rap, glorified criminality, drug-worship and the ghettos.

    So, rather than celebrating and glorifying black culture in the name of cultural diversity, the right course of action is to eradicate its worst aspects (your "barbarism") and replace them - using the same media that are currently making billions from perpetuating it.

    The first step towards solving a problem is to recognize it and to be able to discuss it critically - due to vested interests and demented altruism even that is going to take a while.
  14. My Dad always told me stories about when he would visit his siblings and cousins in Southern California in the 1940’s and 1950’s. With the exception of his sister, who lived in North Hollywood, the rest all lived in places that today have reputations like Compton.

  15. @jon

    For Compton’s residents, the city was far from the ghetto. …
     
    So what happened? When and why did it start to transform into the gang central that it became in the 1980's/1990's?

    Excellent question. I don’t have an answer. In Compton you have a community of strivers. They are all employed (bought houses, right?) They are all married (dual income to pay for house). They cultivate white “open space” and “green yards” values. They show initiative, leaving their sharecropper shack relatives behind, migrating all the way from Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas way out to California, and gathering together like pilgrims in a brand new City on a Hill … and then it all turns to crap.

    We can’t blame lack of jobs. They had them. We can’t blame poor cultural values. They were house-proud. We can’t blame ghetto schools. They attended new California schools. We can’t blame lack of opportunity. They moved there because there WERE jobs. We can’t blame Brutalist, rat warren high rises. They were spread out in lovely small-holder bungalows. We can’t blame fatherless families. They were married.

    They were self-selected for success, they created (at least initially) thriving, self-selected communities, scratch-built for them … and then they and/or their kids fsck up, big time.

    What on earth happened? Reversion to the black mean? The families that moved to Compton weren’t gun-toting, dueling, honor-defending thugs, and yet their NWA kids, raised by married, working parents chose that path deliberately. Was it the Second Generation Immigrant Phenomenon, like the Ali G/Paki hoodlums, or the Italian Mafia (ca. 1915)? What happened? What am I missing?

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe
    "What on earth happened? Reversion to the black mean?"

    Uh, yeah, I think that pretty well nails it.
    , @Alec Leamas
    The societal devolution of the 1960s seems to have had something to do with it, as it has in white communities leading to the eventual white flight from formerly solidly middle class neighborhoods. It just seems that moral degeneracy has a disproportionately negative effect on lower classes who don't have the reserve resources to recover from bad decisions. Kids from upper middle class and upper middle class families could cut their hair, stop smoking dope, tone down the revolutionary bullshit and get jobs. I don't think that blacks or lower middle class whites have ever had that luxury.
    , @Anonymous
    What happened was the wholesale black allegiance to the democrat party and it's policies after the civil rights act was signed by Johnson. Once the Black community - across America - went full left, the writing was on the wall, and the effects of the cultural shift in political/social allegiance were self evident in just a decade.
  16. @Steve Sailer
    In 2002, I drove around the Florence-Normandie neighborhood where the 1992 Rodney King riot started. The yards on the residential streets were well kept up, with maybe 1 out of every 8 scruffy.

    But that's not a particularly impoverished neighborhood.

    Here's a picture of a house for sale in the Florence-Normandie neighborhood:

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8020-S-Normandie-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90044/20947236_zpid/

    In 1977 I drove around Watts where the 1965 Watts Riot, not surprisingly, happened. It wasn't as nice as Florence-Normandie in 2002, but it wasn't as bad as I had expected from reading about it.

    Driving around the affluent 99% black neighborhood of Baldwin Hills, or whatever the north-facing hillside neighborhood with the great views toward Beverly Hills is called, I noticed the lawn care was outstanding. With the way my lawn is this summer due to the drought, I'd probably get tarred and feathered if I lived in Baldwin Hills.

    I have a vague impression that lawn care is a big deal to black homeowners in L.A. (My impression is that Mexicans care a lot less about a green lawn. That may have something to do with coming to L.A. from the fairly dry to very dry northern half of Mexico rather than from very green places in the South like Louisiana and East Texas). Maybe that's a warning sign that black homeowners employ to decide when to go talk to their neighbors about property values and how things can slip away pretty fast for everybody?

    Due to the drought, there's a big push on from the bigshots like Jerry Brown and Mayor Garcetti to move past all this outdated green lawn stuff and put in gravel and cactuses in front of your house, or at least stop watering your lawn. And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive. It's global warming!

    I wonder if a decade from now, white people will decide that back in 2015 they managed to screw up black home-owning neighborhoods by demonizing lawn care, a traditional standard by which black homeowners monitored and regulated each other's behavior? Thus giving layabouts an excuse to let everything go to hell?

    I may be just making this all up, but, also, I might be on to something.

    Yes, I’ve seen homes in CA that used to have lawns that now just have gravel: it’s called “xero scaping”, or “dry scaping” but since the “x” is pronounced as “z” you have a built in pun there.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    Xeriscaping (not xero scaping) is using plants native and/or easily adapted to the area, in this case plants that work well in the semi-arid desert climate of coastal Southern California. Xeriscape can be quite attractive with a judicious use of grass or other more conventional landscape. Those awful gravel lawns are not xeriscape; they're, well, awful gravel lawns. But many water districts are giving rebates for anything that reduces water usage, and HOAs are mostly powerless to stop it in the face of the drought.
  17. Mexicans don’t need grass, they are just going to park there anyway.

  18. I must remember, the next time I’m at the library, to take another look at The World Mine Oyster by Matila Ghyka. Besides having been many many other things, like professor of torpedoes at the Romanian naval academy, he was professor of esthetics at USC. He enjoyed a lot of things in life but post-WWII L.A. wasn’t one of them. I can’t remember the precise complaint. Maybe gunfire. Not that it was close; more that it was there at all. The word “vibe” was hardly current in his lifetime, and even if it had been he was too well-bred to use it; but I think his objection was indeed to the city’s vibe.

    • Replies: @Ozymandias
    "professor of torpedoes at the Romanian naval academy"

    You sure that's not some kind of gypsy pick-up line?
  19. I am left wondering this: is it the racial demographics or the economic graphics of a community that make it attractive to blacks. Early Compton seemed to be Nirvana to employed blacks who didn’t mind living in an all most all black community. As soon as poverty enters the picture blacks have to get away from blacks, so you get the new HUD agenda.

  20. @Drake

    As late as 1948, fewer than fifty African Americans lived in among Compton’s forty-five thousand residents
     
    Also here: "It's difficult to overstate how white Compton was in the early 50s and late 40s--exclusively white with an extraordinary web of racially restrictive covenants with a very aggressive policing strategy about keeping black people out,"

    This would make Compton in 1948 over 99% white.

    According the the US Census Compton is today 0.8% Non-hispanic white.

    This makes for an astonishing story about the near total dispossession of whites from a community.

    This makes for an astonishing story about the near total dispossession of whites from a community.

    Of course it’s a very common story in many cities of the Northeast and Midwest.

  21. Oakland used to be a nice city too. Then blackness happened.

  22. @jon

    For Compton’s residents, the city was far from the ghetto. …
     
    So what happened? When and why did it start to transform into the gang central that it became in the 1980's/1990's?

    Regression to the mean? Successful working class black families have trouble just staying working class through the next generation. Throw in a recession, cocaine being in demand, and you’ve got yourself a crime wave set to rap “music”. Black bodies and white lines.

  23. Why did the British poster go off on a tangent to Colin Crompton ? For most of us in Broken Britain Compton means Denis Compton – the famous cricketer and soccer player. He was also known as the “Brylcreem boy.” I don’t know if you have Brylcreem in America, but it is smelly white cream that young men used to rub into their hair. Teddy Boys loved it. The original “Brylcreem boy” was not Compton. It was HB Gibson – a male model, a conscientious objector and a Psychology lecturer. He had a very strong stutter. Despite this handicap he was an entertaining lecturer and a well known hypnotist. He was also a debunker of ESP and other nonsense. His main work was a biography of his friend Hans Eysenck.

  24. For we twenty-somethings, Friday, with Ice Cube and Chris Tucker, is a pretty vivid reference point for what life in sunny Compton is like, just as you say. My impression is that turf wars are worse when there is actually turf at stake, and that giving criminals suburban property to smoke J’s about is more dangerous and harder for police to patrol than say dense NYC. The movie has a good message: fisticuffs is more manly than drivebys, which is rather like invincible sniping…which getting fired on your day off elicits ample opportunity to encounter in Compton, CA I guess.

  25. In regards to lawn care, one of the sad features of neighborhoods in transition from being owner occupied to rentals ( occurring everywhere these days) is the state of the landscaping. Tenants are obviously not going to invest their own money in planting shrubs or buying lawn care products.

    It would be surprising to me that Mexican American homeowners would be less likely to maintain their yards than blacks given the number of Mexican Americans who do landscaping as their business and would either have the know how or know someone who does to keep a nice yard. I do know that when I sold my house and bought a condo saying good-bye to lawn care was a major factor in the decision. That and a thunderstorm taking down a tree and smashing the tool shed while my house was in escrow!

  26. @Steve Sailer
    In 2002, I drove around the Florence-Normandie neighborhood where the 1992 Rodney King riot started. The yards on the residential streets were well kept up, with maybe 1 out of every 8 scruffy.

    But that's not a particularly impoverished neighborhood.

    Here's a picture of a house for sale in the Florence-Normandie neighborhood:

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8020-S-Normandie-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90044/20947236_zpid/

    In 1977 I drove around Watts where the 1965 Watts Riot, not surprisingly, happened. It wasn't as nice as Florence-Normandie in 2002, but it wasn't as bad as I had expected from reading about it.

    Driving around the affluent 99% black neighborhood of Baldwin Hills, or whatever the north-facing hillside neighborhood with the great views toward Beverly Hills is called, I noticed the lawn care was outstanding. With the way my lawn is this summer due to the drought, I'd probably get tarred and feathered if I lived in Baldwin Hills.

    I have a vague impression that lawn care is a big deal to black homeowners in L.A. (My impression is that Mexicans care a lot less about a green lawn. That may have something to do with coming to L.A. from the fairly dry to very dry northern half of Mexico rather than from very green places in the South like Louisiana and East Texas). Maybe that's a warning sign that black homeowners employ to decide when to go talk to their neighbors about property values and how things can slip away pretty fast for everybody?

    Due to the drought, there's a big push on from the bigshots like Jerry Brown and Mayor Garcetti to move past all this outdated green lawn stuff and put in gravel and cactuses in front of your house, or at least stop watering your lawn. And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive. It's global warming!

    I wonder if a decade from now, white people will decide that back in 2015 they managed to screw up black home-owning neighborhoods by demonizing lawn care, a traditional standard by which black homeowners monitored and regulated each other's behavior? Thus giving layabouts an excuse to let everything go to hell?

    I may be just making this all up, but, also, I might be on to something.

    in AZ it’s called “desert landscaping”. Up here in Sac we call it “low-water yards”. Some of what people put in is quite pretty, with bark, pavers, and little bushes on drip lines. I think in the long-run, though, it’s going to increase city air pollution. Green lawns, growing quickly, soak up a lot of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Sulfur (in various forms) from the air and make it cleaner. Also, kids can’t play on the low-water yards.

    I look forward to some real rain this year. My Japanese Maples are suffering. Does anyone know if they’ll survive?

  27. As I recall, and I have a good memory, Compton had gone to hell by the early seventies. I lived in a nearby town, and Compton was a no-go zone. When our high school football team played them in the mid-seventies, we were forced to go to Compton High’s playing field for a… NIGHT GAME! : 0

    We were accompanied to and from the game by four police cars with all their lights on. I asked our coach, if it was so dangerous to go to Compton, why spend all the money on police cars escorting us? Why not have them play at our field? He said the reason we go there, is so Comptonites don’t come to OUR school for night games. A couple of times they tried it, and there were assaults, strong-armed robberies, and purse snatchings galore after the game. My three years in High School, we always went to them. They never played a night game on our field.

    The Crips, Bloods, and Piru’s were in full effect there by 1973. They were well known by us at that time.

    In any case, I believe the quotes about Compton being some black Shangri-la isn’t as descriptive as it needs to be to reflect the truth.

    It’s hard to believe Compton went from a nice suburban black area in the sixties, to hell in a matter of a few years. I think it sucked for quite a bit longer than the author is sharing. It may have been all right in the sixties in and of itself, but you didn’t want to be caught there while being white.

    By the sixties, as I recall, Compton had a major influx of inbred, dumb black rednecks from the south, and they hadn’t been imprisoned or killed by the police yet. They didn’t look like black guys you see today. Quite scary, black as a frying pan, and dumb as a post. By “dumb” I mean functionally retarded. When some of the vaguely normal ones decided to organize gangs, all hell broke loose in Compton.

    The failure of Compton is the same problem we have today. Blacks who can function effectively in modern civilization arrive, have some success, then their POS relatives show up, and destroy their dreams. It’s the whole point of “red-lining,” or “black-a-block” strategies. It’s actually good for blacks, because it makes it harder for successful blacks to be destroyed by their relatives, and it allows white people to stay in their homes, rather than flee.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    It’s hard to believe Compton went from a nice suburban black area in the sixties, to hell in a matter of a few years.

    It is not unbelievable. I worked in a gas station in Lynwood when it was going from mostly white to black in 75-76. The speed in which the place went downhill was significant. The first thing you noticed was all the increased sirens at night. Then the city finally threw in the towel on having their own police and contracted with the sheriff in order to have more available cars when the action got heavy.

    People there told me that the commissioner of the NFL Pete Rozell used to live there and the city motto was something like "The Bel-Air of the central city".
  28. @WowJustWow
    I've previously engaged in an act of Noticing that in Southern California, areas where cities and streets have very classically English names like Compton are more likely to be black, while in the upper-middle-class NAM-less exurbs you'll often find that every city and street name is in Spanish. I wonder if it's just that older neighborhoods took large influxes from the Great Migration, and different naming conventions were in fashion when new master-planned cities were built for the white-flighting former residents of Compton et al. Or perhaps they thought Spanish names would be confusing for blacks and frustrate their attempts to move there. Maybe telling someone that in order to get to an open house they have to take Paseo Paloma to Vista del Palo to Via Monte Santa Las Altas Buenas serves as a disparately impactful cognitive test.

    Somewhat relatedly, on a recent trip, Google Maps instructed me to drive down a Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. for the first time in my life. I knew what to expect, but boy, was I bewildered by how rapidly the scenery changed just a single block to either side of it. Without knowing detailed history of the neighborhood, I'm not sure whether it's because cities carefully select which streets to rename after Dr. King or because the renaming sends a strong signal that initiates a feedback loop.

    You don’t find such nomenclature prevalent in Santa Monica, Brentwood or Pacific Palisades

    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    The main drag is San Vicente, and just east of Palisades Park you have a cluster of all Spanish-named streets. Other than Wilshire, not many names are very British-sounding surnames, as opposed to Crenshaw, Hawthorne, Inglewood, Gage, Wilmington...

    The San Fernando Valley is an exception, with lots of Chatsworths and Shermans cutting through neighborhoods of highly variable ethnic distributions.

    Beverly Hills is full of British street names, but of course it's always been a rich neighborhood that hasn't experienced a major demographic transition.

    Perhaps the most counterintuitive thing is that heavily Hispanic areas usually don't have many Spanish names around, while South Orange County's bedroom communities went all in on the Spanish naming scheme.
  29. @Steve Sailer
    In 2002, I drove around the Florence-Normandie neighborhood where the 1992 Rodney King riot started. The yards on the residential streets were well kept up, with maybe 1 out of every 8 scruffy.

    But that's not a particularly impoverished neighborhood.

    Here's a picture of a house for sale in the Florence-Normandie neighborhood:

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8020-S-Normandie-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90044/20947236_zpid/

    In 1977 I drove around Watts where the 1965 Watts Riot, not surprisingly, happened. It wasn't as nice as Florence-Normandie in 2002, but it wasn't as bad as I had expected from reading about it.

    Driving around the affluent 99% black neighborhood of Baldwin Hills, or whatever the north-facing hillside neighborhood with the great views toward Beverly Hills is called, I noticed the lawn care was outstanding. With the way my lawn is this summer due to the drought, I'd probably get tarred and feathered if I lived in Baldwin Hills.

    I have a vague impression that lawn care is a big deal to black homeowners in L.A. (My impression is that Mexicans care a lot less about a green lawn. That may have something to do with coming to L.A. from the fairly dry to very dry northern half of Mexico rather than from very green places in the South like Louisiana and East Texas). Maybe that's a warning sign that black homeowners employ to decide when to go talk to their neighbors about property values and how things can slip away pretty fast for everybody?

    Due to the drought, there's a big push on from the bigshots like Jerry Brown and Mayor Garcetti to move past all this outdated green lawn stuff and put in gravel and cactuses in front of your house, or at least stop watering your lawn. And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive. It's global warming!

    I wonder if a decade from now, white people will decide that back in 2015 they managed to screw up black home-owning neighborhoods by demonizing lawn care, a traditional standard by which black homeowners monitored and regulated each other's behavior? Thus giving layabouts an excuse to let everything go to hell?

    I may be just making this all up, but, also, I might be on to something.

    And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive.

    Yep, that’s my neighborhood.

    Here’s my theory. A year ago, before things fell apart, everyone relied on a gardening service. Once people decided to let their lawns go brown, they suspended the service. Unfortunately, no one owns a lawnmower! So those brown lawns are turning into fields of foot-high weeds.

    For the record, I do own a lawnmower and I’ve always done my own gardening (1) because I enjoy it, (2) because it’s a way to give my kids chores (chores are good), (3) because I meet my neighbors (as they stroll by with their dogs), and last but not least (4) I’d feel like a hypocrite if I wrote what I write here and in my real life employed illegal immigrants.

  30. […] [email protected] (VD) That’s how long it took African-Americans to transform excellent, oversized, newly constructed suburban housing into a community that became infamous […]

  31. Steve;
    You probably recall the small war that Compton had with its neighbor Gardena a decade or more back. Compton Blvd. ran west through Gardena, eventually turns into Marine Ave, and peters out in the middle of two and half million dollar houses in Manhattan Beach.
    Gardena was still a middle to lower middle class neighborhood that had a dwindling number of Japanese-American and White residents and businesses. With all the publicity about Compton from NWA, the Gardena city council voted to rename Compton Blvd. Marine Ave where it ran through Gardena in an effort to buttress the city’s image.
    The Compton city council launched a PR blitz accusing Gardena of being Racist! for trying to dissociate themselves from the fine city of Compton. Gardena renamed it anyway. It doesn’t matter much now since both cities are pretty much turning overwhelmingly Hispanic but it was entertaining. I was a little disappointed that it didn’t devolve into one of those obscure Latin American style soccer wars with the two combatants strafing each other with obsolete WWII fighters.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Steve;
    You probably recall the small war that Compton had with its neighbor Gardena a decade or more back. Compton Blvd. ran west through Gardena, eventually turns into Marine Ave, and peters out in the middle of two and half million dollar houses in Manhattan Beach.
    Gardena was still a middle to lower middle class neighborhood that had a dwindling number of Japanese-American and White residents and businesses. With all the publicity about Compton from NWA, the Gardena city council voted to rename Compton Blvd. Marine Ave where it ran through Gardena in an effort to buttress the city’s image.
    The Compton city council launched a PR blitz accusing Gardena of being Racist! for trying to dissociate themselves from the fine city of Compton. Gardena renamed it anyway. It doesn’t matter much now since both cities are pretty much turning overwhelmingly Hispanic but it was entertaining. I was a little disappointed that it didn’t devolve into one of those obscure Latin American style soccer wars with the two combatants strafing each other with obsolete WWII fighters."

    Speaking of Gardena, I am surprised at how extremely low their per capita homicide rate is for a city that is 23 percent Black.
    http://www.city-data.com/city/Gardena-California.html

    In the years 2012 and 2013 Gardena had zero homicides, despite 23 percent of the population being Black.

    Is Gardena one of those cities that overwhelmingly attracts the talented tenth of the most law abiding Blacks?
  32. Duke snider was from compton.he said he perfected his swing by regularly “tuning up some coloreds who didn’t know their place.”
    Actually I made up the quote but I believe the Duke was straight out compton !

    • Replies: @FLgeezer
    Duke was my boyhood hero. Seems to me that his family raised avocados on their property in Compton didn't they? Those were assuredly the Good Old Days.
  33. The Bush family once lived in Compton. The spy business takes one to unexpected places.

    “Actually, the Bush family only called the Los Angeles County suburb home for six short months in 1949 and 1950. George H. W. Bush, the future 41st president of the United States, was on a temporary assignment to California for Dresser Industries, selling oil drilling bits for a Dresser subsidiary named Security Engineering Company. His son and the future 43rd president—pictured above playing cowboy outside the Bushes’ Compton home—was only three years old at the time. They lived in a now-demolished apartment complex at 624 S. Santa Fe Avenue. “

    • Replies: @Semi-employed White Guy
    Their stay in Compton, however brief, only adds to their cuckservative bona fides.
  34. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @David M.
    Speaking of meticulously groomed lawns, what is surprising to me is how all the lawns of inhabited homes in America seem to be mown nowadays, even in the worst slums. When I was a kid I remember how the shape of the lawn told you a lot about socio-economic status of the residents living inside. Even in middle-class neighborhoods a fair number of lawns were overgrown. But, for instance, take a google earth drive down some of Detroit's worst streets (or for the brave, try it in person). You'll see abandoned houses with overgrown lawns, but next door often an inhabited home with obviously impoverished residents, but with neatly mown lawns. I just took a google earth drive through Compton and most lawns were well taken care of their as well.

    Is this because most homes in the slum are now section-8, and lawn care is cheap enough that owners just hire lawn care? Or is it owner-residents taking pride in their homes? I guess it is probably a combination of both. But if many of these homes are occupied by welfare-dependent single mothers, it would seem unlikely that the residents are maintaining the equipment and mowing the lawn themselves.

    I know it seems like a trivial thing, but it really does puzzle me as it is so at odds with my childhood impression of what a slum should look like.

    Perhaps it has something to do with the availability of cheap Mexican labor? In my small (under 90,000 people) city in south-central Indiana, there’s very few Hispanics and most of the lawncare businesses are still owned and staffed by local working-class whites, and there seem to be a suspiciously large number of unkempt lawns around here. Heck, even my comfortably middle class white high school math teacher neighbor doesn’t seem to mow his lawn more than once a month or so. My grandmother’s twentysomething neighbors are even worse; their front yard looks downright wild.

  35. @Steve Sailer
    There are only a few major public high schools in Los Angeles with Spanish names: El Camino Real in the southwest San Fernando Valley is one of the more posh LAUSD high schools. It wasn't opened until 1969.

    In contrast, LA high school named for Presidents tend to have race riots, like Mexicans v. blacks at Jefferson a decade ago or Armenians v. Mexicans at Grant from roughly 1975-2005.

    Now that you mention it, that might be also a real naming pattern that people pick up on. In the Wes Anderson film Rushmore, Max gets kicked out of Rushmore Academy and starts attending Grover Cleveland High School, named after a president not quite famous enough to be on Mount Rushmore, of course. GCHS looks like this:

    The earliest instance of political correctness that I can vividly remember from my childhood was a segment from Nick News with Linda Ellerbee about a movement to rename a George Washington High School because old Georgie owned slaves. Even then I thought it was silly.

  36. @Steve Sailer
    In 2002, I drove around the Florence-Normandie neighborhood where the 1992 Rodney King riot started. The yards on the residential streets were well kept up, with maybe 1 out of every 8 scruffy.

    But that's not a particularly impoverished neighborhood.

    Here's a picture of a house for sale in the Florence-Normandie neighborhood:

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8020-S-Normandie-Ave-Los-Angeles-CA-90044/20947236_zpid/

    In 1977 I drove around Watts where the 1965 Watts Riot, not surprisingly, happened. It wasn't as nice as Florence-Normandie in 2002, but it wasn't as bad as I had expected from reading about it.

    Driving around the affluent 99% black neighborhood of Baldwin Hills, or whatever the north-facing hillside neighborhood with the great views toward Beverly Hills is called, I noticed the lawn care was outstanding. With the way my lawn is this summer due to the drought, I'd probably get tarred and feathered if I lived in Baldwin Hills.

    I have a vague impression that lawn care is a big deal to black homeowners in L.A. (My impression is that Mexicans care a lot less about a green lawn. That may have something to do with coming to L.A. from the fairly dry to very dry northern half of Mexico rather than from very green places in the South like Louisiana and East Texas). Maybe that's a warning sign that black homeowners employ to decide when to go talk to their neighbors about property values and how things can slip away pretty fast for everybody?

    Due to the drought, there's a big push on from the bigshots like Jerry Brown and Mayor Garcetti to move past all this outdated green lawn stuff and put in gravel and cactuses in front of your house, or at least stop watering your lawn. And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive. It's global warming!

    I wonder if a decade from now, white people will decide that back in 2015 they managed to screw up black home-owning neighborhoods by demonizing lawn care, a traditional standard by which black homeowners monitored and regulated each other's behavior? Thus giving layabouts an excuse to let everything go to hell?

    I may be just making this all up, but, also, I might be on to something.

    Due to the drought, there’s a big push on from the bigshots like Jerry Brown and Mayor Garcetti to move past all this outdated green lawn stuff and put in gravel and cactuses in front of your house, or at least stop watering your lawn.

    So their long term goal is to turn LA into Phoenix?

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "So their long term goal is to turn LA into Phoenix?"

    Phoenix is basically Los Angeles with with no beach and a lower cost of living. Scottsdale is the Phoenix metropolitan area's version of Beverly Hills.

  37. “And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive.”

    That’s me. Maybe because I’m from the midwest where your lawn will be a jungle if you don’t mow it every week but I find lawns in California are a real PITA. Keeping the grass alive and not filled with weeds was a challenge even during non-drought years. At some point I’m just going to rip out my grass and do the natural or drought-resistant landscaping.

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    In the very hot months you will not like a rock garden as the place heats up during the day and disburses that heat at night. Maybe using some type of bark covering but I lived in Tucson for awhile - they had rock gardens. I hated it.
  38. @Steve Sailer
    That seems like an important question.

    The three main guys in N.W.A., Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, and Easy-E, were all pretty much respectable working class by background. They were each born legitimately to married parents. Two were born in Compton, one in South-Central L.A.

    Easy-E: "Eric Wright was born to Richard and Kathie Wright on September 7, 1963, in Compton, California, a Los Angeles suburb notorious for gang activity and crime. His father was a postal worker and his mother was a grade school administrator."

    Ice Cube: "O'Shea Jackson was born on June 15, 1969 in Los Angeles, in the South Central area, the son of Doris, a hospital clerk and custodian, and Hosea Jackson, who worked as a groundskeeper at UCLA." The movie depicts his parents being still together when he's launching his career.

    Dr. Dre: "Andre Romelle Young was born in Compton, California on February 18, 1965. He was the first child of Theodore and Verna Young. Young's middle name, Romelle, is derived from his father's amateur R&B singing group, The Romells. Married in 1964, Young's parents separated in 1968 and divorced in 1972.[5] Verna later married Curtis Crayon."

    - From various Wikipedia articles.

  39. @Alfa158
    Steve;
    You probably recall the small war that Compton had with its neighbor Gardena a decade or more back. Compton Blvd. ran west through Gardena, eventually turns into Marine Ave, and peters out in the middle of two and half million dollar houses in Manhattan Beach.
    Gardena was still a middle to lower middle class neighborhood that had a dwindling number of Japanese-American and White residents and businesses. With all the publicity about Compton from NWA, the Gardena city council voted to rename Compton Blvd. Marine Ave where it ran through Gardena in an effort to buttress the city's image.
    The Compton city council launched a PR blitz accusing Gardena of being Racist! for trying to dissociate themselves from the fine city of Compton. Gardena renamed it anyway. It doesn't matter much now since both cities are pretty much turning overwhelmingly Hispanic but it was entertaining. I was a little disappointed that it didn't devolve into one of those obscure Latin American style soccer wars with the two combatants strafing each other with obsolete WWII fighters.

    “Steve;
    You probably recall the small war that Compton had with its neighbor Gardena a decade or more back. Compton Blvd. ran west through Gardena, eventually turns into Marine Ave, and peters out in the middle of two and half million dollar houses in Manhattan Beach.
    Gardena was still a middle to lower middle class neighborhood that had a dwindling number of Japanese-American and White residents and businesses. With all the publicity about Compton from NWA, the Gardena city council voted to rename Compton Blvd. Marine Ave where it ran through Gardena in an effort to buttress the city’s image.
    The Compton city council launched a PR blitz accusing Gardena of being Racist! for trying to dissociate themselves from the fine city of Compton. Gardena renamed it anyway. It doesn’t matter much now since both cities are pretty much turning overwhelmingly Hispanic but it was entertaining. I was a little disappointed that it didn’t devolve into one of those obscure Latin American style soccer wars with the two combatants strafing each other with obsolete WWII fighters.”

    Speaking of Gardena, I am surprised at how extremely low their per capita homicide rate is for a city that is 23 percent Black.
    http://www.city-data.com/city/Gardena-California.html

    In the years 2012 and 2013 Gardena had zero homicides, despite 23 percent of the population being Black.

    Is Gardena one of those cities that overwhelmingly attracts the talented tenth of the most law abiding Blacks?

    • Replies: @Barry

    Is Gardena one of those cities that overwhelmingly attracts the talented tenth of the most law abiding Blacks?
     
    In the large city I lived in, there was a smaller incorporated kind of "city" that had it's own police force. This police force became known for clobbering you if you significantly got out of line with them. Didn't matter what race you were, if you started getting fancy during a stop, you could pretty much bet on getting your ass slung.
    They developed a solid reputation for being fair, but tough if you started playing games. They were nice guys, until you weren't. And again, white guys got it too. They did not care about your race.

    Crime was committed with verve just outside the community, but rarely inside. Everybody knew what to expect, and their crime level was ridiculously low. Even with the blacks.

    Perhaps Gardena had a similarly progressive police force. As Bloomberg has shown, that approach works.
  40. @John
    I must remember, the next time I'm at the library, to take another look at The World Mine Oyster by Matila Ghyka. Besides having been many many other things, like professor of torpedoes at the Romanian naval academy, he was professor of esthetics at USC. He enjoyed a lot of things in life but post-WWII L.A. wasn't one of them. I can't remember the precise complaint. Maybe gunfire. Not that it was close; more that it was there at all. The word "vibe" was hardly current in his lifetime, and even if it had been he was too well-bred to use it; but I think his objection was indeed to the city's vibe.

    “professor of torpedoes at the Romanian naval academy”

    You sure that’s not some kind of gypsy pick-up line?

    • Replies: @5371
    Reminds me of Edward VII's telegram to Mrs. Keppel about the Whitehead torpedo.
  41. Compton strikes extreme fear in the heart of White Angelenos like Steve Sailer who are too afraid to step foot there even during the daytime, let alone during at night. Driving by quickly with your windows up does not count. I am talking actually parking your car there somewhere and eating at one of their restaurants in the commercial district.

    Most White Angelenos would rather take their chances petting a lion than walk on a Compton sidewalk if those were their only two options.

    • Replies: @Barry

    Compton strikes extreme fear in the heart of White Angelenos like Steve Sailer who are too afraid to step foot there even during the daytime, let alone during at night.
     
    It's clear you haven't stepped foot in Compton in quite a while yourself, "Jefferson." Blacks are almost irrelevant there now. Seems blacks don't like being confronted with organized Mexican gangs, and Mexicans have no problem with confronting them, so they ran straight outta Compton.

    Thanks to the purge, Compton is enjoying record low crime rates, and Steve wouldn't be showboating his bravery driving around in a convertible today, blaring NWA out of his speakers. The blacks you're referring to are either dead, in prison, moved to the high desert areas, down south, or back to Chicago.

    Today's Compton is kind of nice. Even at night. As is just about every place where blacks aren't a majority.

    Latino's have their problems, but they generally don't turn their own neighborhoods into chaos. That's where mom and dad lives, after all. Latino's tend to have a strong sense of family cohesion that blacks collectively find to be impossible.

    That's how Latino's conquered Compton.
    , @MarkinLA
    The gas station I normally worked at was on Atlantic Blvd. The owner had two smaller stations, one was in Compton just down the street and around the corner. I worked at both stations. The owner would not let white people work any shift other than the day shift. I would open the station at about 8:00 AM and at 1:00 PM a black guy doing his second job would take over and run the place until 9:00 PM. Nobody worked there past that. The main station stayed open until 11 or 12 but that was on a busy well lighted section of the street.
    , @Semi-employed White Guy
    Why would any white Angeleno visit Compton, regardless of its current crime rate?
    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    "Most White Angelenos would rather take their chances petting a lion than walk on a Compton sidewalk if those were their only two options."

    I wouldn't be remotely afraid to visit Compton. But I'd simply have no reason to ever go there. If there were some restaurant located in Compton, at which I wished to eat, I wouldn't hesitate to visit. But of course, no such restaurant would actually exist.
  42. This is actually something I always wondered about growing up. When “west coast” and “gangster” rap became things, many music videos and movies promoting it would show shots or sequences in the supposed Compton ghetto. It always struck me how the neighborhoods seemed so suburban and nice; I half-wondered whether the guys from LA claiming to be tough guys were making it up. (of course, they were making it up, but for different reasons, and that’s a different story,).

    Take the popular black movie Friday, which successfully springboarded rapper Ice-Cube into a more movie-oriented career path. The movie is set in South Central, where Ice Cube is supposedly from. The setting is supposed to show a black ghetto/lower class area, yet everyone had a decent to nice suburban home in sunny Southern California. I watched it with my friends thinking “How could this be considered a ghetto, when you literally have houses and weather and land that most people would see as middle class?”

    East coast rappers, meanwhile, showed shots of the denser urban projects, which always seemed miserable to live in. That, to me, screamed ghetto, and could explain violence and hatred—who would want to live there? But Compton? The visuals alone made it seem nice. Ditto for the Grand Theft Auto 3 video game, which used Compton and South Central as the geographical basis of the ghetto the lead character was born and raised in.

    But, I suppose, wherever blacks take over, no matter how nice, it becomes a ghetto. See: the U.S. with Barack Obama in charge.

    • Replies: @silviosilver

    It always struck me how the neighborhoods seemed so suburban and nice
     
    I've thought the same thing too.

    I first got curious about south LA from playing a computer game called "Police Quest IV." That was set in LA and came out in 1993, which was near the height of the early 90s crime wave, and only a year after the LA riots.

    A decade later I was flying from Europe to Australia, with a stopover in LA. I decided to do a bit of sight-seeing in south LA by taking a train ride through there, going fro LAX to downtown. Apart from all the blacks and latinos on the train (which I'm just totally unaccustomed to), it all seemed disappointingly normal to me.

    When Google Earth came on line I took a huge number of virtual tours through south central trying to find some place that looked properly ghetto - to no avail. Compton in particular, perhaps because of its notoriety, actually seemed quite pleasant to me.

    As you point out, for real ghetto-looking environments you've got to turn east. Phewee, places like Camden, NJ or heck, anywhere in all-black Philly look really depressing. Not even south Chicago looks that bad, imo.

    Also, the all-latino areas in Texas look a lot scummier than the all-latino areas in California. Is that just me or is this a real phenomenon? If so, what accounts for it?
  43. I got a poker buddy a black guy works construction has four kids in his forties.he doesn’t let his kids listen to rap although he’s a big fan.i asked him why and he tells me his dad was also a construction worker and he and his brother grew up middle class with 2 parents in south central l.a. but because of gangster rap he’s driving around with a sawed off shotgun thinking he’s a bad ass.he knows he dodged a bullet those years and tries to educate his kids how stupid it all is.

  44. I know someone who works at one of those movie theater/restaurant combos. It was overrun by black audiences for the opening weekend of “Straight Outta Compton.” They behaved as you might expect … constantly arguing with the staff and with each other and basically causing a commotion. It was an eye-opener for some of the kids working.

    There were so many patrons there looking for a handout that the managers spent the entire weekend giving away meals and alcohol to try and keep everyone in check.

    The staff was all joking that the movie should have been called “Straight Outta Comps.”

  45. @Ozymandias
    "professor of torpedoes at the Romanian naval academy"

    You sure that's not some kind of gypsy pick-up line?

    Reminds me of Edward VII’s telegram to Mrs. Keppel about the Whitehead torpedo.

  46. My great-grandfather owned a gas station in Watts. He sold it in the early 1970s after he got fed up with being robbed. He never moved out of Lynwood, though. Nor was he as racist as you might expect. He’d lived in South L.A. since the 1920s, and the first blacks he got to know were the hard-working blue collar types mentioned in this post. His dislike of young black males was always sugar-coated with “kids these days” rhetoric.

    Post 1970s, most of the family abandoned Lynwood and Watts for the eastern suburbs (and by east, I mean east of the 605 and the 57). However, my grandmother and a few aunts stayed in Downey, which is still a nice place to live (and expensive) despite abutting South Gate, Lynwood, and Compton. Downey just shuts its eyes to that side of its borders and pretends it’s just hanging out with Lakewood and Bellflower. The Stonewood Mall and surrounding area has been completely remodeled in recent years. Just had dinner at B.J.’s there the other day. You’d never know you were eight miles from the infamous Compton.

    • Replies: @silviosilver

    You’d never know you were eight miles from the infamous Compton.
     
    You say that as though eight miles is close. The city I grew up in was about ten miles north to south. I lived in pretty much the nicest area (or very close to it). Eight miles away was a dump populated by the criminal class. For the first eighteen years of my life I barely knew that place existed. I mean, I'd heard tell of goings on there, but in my home-school-sport-entertainment cycle nothing that went on there ever affected me even slightly.

    Later in life I began paying attention to these sorts of things. Today I've come to believe that, provided there is a decent barrier like a major highway or a river or train tracks or merely open ground, even one mile is ample distance to keep undesirables out of sight/out of mind. And it's not because those barriers are so difficult to cross - they're not - but because they cause people to mentally mark out which areas they belong in and which they don't.

  47. “For Compton’s residents, the city was far from the ghetto. …”

    So then what happened? What happened between then and now so that Compton is known for now being less than stellar?

    What happened?

    Or did Compton, over the decades, finally catch up to Watts and South Central in the later’s unappealing characteristics?

    What happened to Compton?

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    So then what happened? What happened between then and now so that Compton is known for now being less than stellar?

    What happened?
     
    A strange witches brew of:

    1. Unwanted Black Babies with No Fathers, which led to

    2. Poverty, which led to

    3. Lack of a sense of community, which led to

    4. Gangs, which led to

    5. Drug dealing, which led to

    6. Stupid Black Drug Dealers Sampling Their Wares, which led to

    7. Community Chaos

    8. By the late 1980's most gang members had Cell Phones, which allowed them to organize for

    9. The Rodney King Riots, which created more

    10. Community Chaos, Drug Dealing, and Slavery. Blacks were now pimping teen girls. The girls, in return, got their crack.

    11. All this was enabled, and centralized thanks to President Clinton ramping up HUD vouchers. This allowed many citizens of Compton to have their rent paid by the government, in case they had a bad month selling crack to their peers. It allowed crack dealers to maintain their base of operations even in hard times.

    12. Throughout the worst of it, the rap album by "NWA" blared through the subwoofers of all gang members speeding down the residential streets at 3 in the morning, serving as the soundtrack for their lives, such as they were. Think of "NWA" as the cheerleaders for Black Wretchedness.

    And that is how Compton finally collapsed. It was a troubled city by the seventies, and gradually turned into a low security prison yard by it's stupid, aimless citizens.
  48. @Jefferson
    "Steve;
    You probably recall the small war that Compton had with its neighbor Gardena a decade or more back. Compton Blvd. ran west through Gardena, eventually turns into Marine Ave, and peters out in the middle of two and half million dollar houses in Manhattan Beach.
    Gardena was still a middle to lower middle class neighborhood that had a dwindling number of Japanese-American and White residents and businesses. With all the publicity about Compton from NWA, the Gardena city council voted to rename Compton Blvd. Marine Ave where it ran through Gardena in an effort to buttress the city’s image.
    The Compton city council launched a PR blitz accusing Gardena of being Racist! for trying to dissociate themselves from the fine city of Compton. Gardena renamed it anyway. It doesn’t matter much now since both cities are pretty much turning overwhelmingly Hispanic but it was entertaining. I was a little disappointed that it didn’t devolve into one of those obscure Latin American style soccer wars with the two combatants strafing each other with obsolete WWII fighters."

    Speaking of Gardena, I am surprised at how extremely low their per capita homicide rate is for a city that is 23 percent Black.
    http://www.city-data.com/city/Gardena-California.html

    In the years 2012 and 2013 Gardena had zero homicides, despite 23 percent of the population being Black.

    Is Gardena one of those cities that overwhelmingly attracts the talented tenth of the most law abiding Blacks?

    Is Gardena one of those cities that overwhelmingly attracts the talented tenth of the most law abiding Blacks?

    In the large city I lived in, there was a smaller incorporated kind of “city” that had it’s own police force. This police force became known for clobbering you if you significantly got out of line with them. Didn’t matter what race you were, if you started getting fancy during a stop, you could pretty much bet on getting your ass slung.
    They developed a solid reputation for being fair, but tough if you started playing games. They were nice guys, until you weren’t. And again, white guys got it too. They did not care about your race.

    Crime was committed with verve just outside the community, but rarely inside. Everybody knew what to expect, and their crime level was ridiculously low. Even with the blacks.

    Perhaps Gardena had a similarly progressive police force. As Bloomberg has shown, that approach works.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yeah, Barry, the U. of Chicago's private police force can come down like a ton of bricks on anybody from over the border.
  49. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "For Compton’s residents, the city was far from the ghetto. …"

    So then what happened? What happened between then and now so that Compton is known for now being less than stellar?

    What happened?

    Or did Compton, over the decades, finally catch up to Watts and South Central in the later's unappealing characteristics?

    What happened to Compton?

    So then what happened? What happened between then and now so that Compton is known for now being less than stellar?

    What happened?

    A strange witches brew of:

    1. Unwanted Black Babies with No Fathers, which led to

    2. Poverty, which led to

    3. Lack of a sense of community, which led to

    4. Gangs, which led to

    5. Drug dealing, which led to

    6. Stupid Black Drug Dealers Sampling Their Wares, which led to

    7. Community Chaos

    8. By the late 1980’s most gang members had Cell Phones, which allowed them to organize for

    9. The Rodney King Riots, which created more

    10. Community Chaos, Drug Dealing, and Slavery. Blacks were now pimping teen girls. The girls, in return, got their crack.

    11. All this was enabled, and centralized thanks to President Clinton ramping up HUD vouchers. This allowed many citizens of Compton to have their rent paid by the government, in case they had a bad month selling crack to their peers. It allowed crack dealers to maintain their base of operations even in hard times.

    12. Throughout the worst of it, the rap album by “NWA” blared through the subwoofers of all gang members speeding down the residential streets at 3 in the morning, serving as the soundtrack for their lives, such as they were. Think of “NWA” as the cheerleaders for Black Wretchedness.

    And that is how Compton finally collapsed. It was a troubled city by the seventies, and gradually turned into a low security prison yard by it’s stupid, aimless citizens.

  50. @NorthOfTheOneOhOne

    Due to the drought, there’s a big push on from the bigshots like Jerry Brown and Mayor Garcetti to move past all this outdated green lawn stuff and put in gravel and cactuses in front of your house, or at least stop watering your lawn.
     
    So their long term goal is to turn LA into Phoenix?

    “So their long term goal is to turn LA into Phoenix?”

    Phoenix is basically Los Angeles with with no beach and a lower cost of living. Scottsdale is the Phoenix metropolitan area’s version of Beverly Hills.

  51. @Barry

    Is Gardena one of those cities that overwhelmingly attracts the talented tenth of the most law abiding Blacks?
     
    In the large city I lived in, there was a smaller incorporated kind of "city" that had it's own police force. This police force became known for clobbering you if you significantly got out of line with them. Didn't matter what race you were, if you started getting fancy during a stop, you could pretty much bet on getting your ass slung.
    They developed a solid reputation for being fair, but tough if you started playing games. They were nice guys, until you weren't. And again, white guys got it too. They did not care about your race.

    Crime was committed with verve just outside the community, but rarely inside. Everybody knew what to expect, and their crime level was ridiculously low. Even with the blacks.

    Perhaps Gardena had a similarly progressive police force. As Bloomberg has shown, that approach works.

    Yeah, Barry, the U. of Chicago’s private police force can come down like a ton of bricks on anybody from over the border.

  52. @Jefferson
    Compton strikes extreme fear in the heart of White Angelenos like Steve Sailer who are too afraid to step foot there even during the daytime, let alone during at night. Driving by quickly with your windows up does not count. I am talking actually parking your car there somewhere and eating at one of their restaurants in the commercial district.

    Most White Angelenos would rather take their chances petting a lion than walk on a Compton sidewalk if those were their only two options.

    Compton strikes extreme fear in the heart of White Angelenos like Steve Sailer who are too afraid to step foot there even during the daytime, let alone during at night.

    It’s clear you haven’t stepped foot in Compton in quite a while yourself, “Jefferson.” Blacks are almost irrelevant there now. Seems blacks don’t like being confronted with organized Mexican gangs, and Mexicans have no problem with confronting them, so they ran straight outta Compton.

    Thanks to the purge, Compton is enjoying record low crime rates, and Steve wouldn’t be showboating his bravery driving around in a convertible today, blaring NWA out of his speakers. The blacks you’re referring to are either dead, in prison, moved to the high desert areas, down south, or back to Chicago.

    Today’s Compton is kind of nice. Even at night. As is just about every place where blacks aren’t a majority.

    Latino’s have their problems, but they generally don’t turn their own neighborhoods into chaos. That’s where mom and dad lives, after all. Latino’s tend to have a strong sense of family cohesion that blacks collectively find to be impossible.

    That’s how Latino’s conquered Compton.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    When I was teaching my son how to drive in the previous decade we drove around the LA Basin one day and eventually wound up in Compton, where we had dinner at a fast food joint. It seemed okay. The "Welcome to Compton" granite signs and the landscaping on the median of the main drag seemed pretty posh compared to rest of the region: the municipal government seemed to like spending money on sprucing the public areas up.
  53. @John D
    As I recall, and I have a good memory, Compton had gone to hell by the early seventies. I lived in a nearby town, and Compton was a no-go zone. When our high school football team played them in the mid-seventies, we were forced to go to Compton High's playing field for a... NIGHT GAME! : 0

    We were accompanied to and from the game by four police cars with all their lights on. I asked our coach, if it was so dangerous to go to Compton, why spend all the money on police cars escorting us? Why not have them play at our field? He said the reason we go there, is so Comptonites don't come to OUR school for night games. A couple of times they tried it, and there were assaults, strong-armed robberies, and purse snatchings galore after the game. My three years in High School, we always went to them. They never played a night game on our field.

    The Crips, Bloods, and Piru's were in full effect there by 1973. They were well known by us at that time.

    In any case, I believe the quotes about Compton being some black Shangri-la isn't as descriptive as it needs to be to reflect the truth.

    It's hard to believe Compton went from a nice suburban black area in the sixties, to hell in a matter of a few years. I think it sucked for quite a bit longer than the author is sharing. It may have been all right in the sixties in and of itself, but you didn't want to be caught there while being white.

    By the sixties, as I recall, Compton had a major influx of inbred, dumb black rednecks from the south, and they hadn't been imprisoned or killed by the police yet. They didn't look like black guys you see today. Quite scary, black as a frying pan, and dumb as a post. By "dumb" I mean functionally retarded. When some of the vaguely normal ones decided to organize gangs, all hell broke loose in Compton.

    The failure of Compton is the same problem we have today. Blacks who can function effectively in modern civilization arrive, have some success, then their POS relatives show up, and destroy their dreams. It's the whole point of "red-lining," or "black-a-block" strategies. It's actually good for blacks, because it makes it harder for successful blacks to be destroyed by their relatives, and it allows white people to stay in their homes, rather than flee.

    It’s hard to believe Compton went from a nice suburban black area in the sixties, to hell in a matter of a few years.

    It is not unbelievable. I worked in a gas station in Lynwood when it was going from mostly white to black in 75-76. The speed in which the place went downhill was significant. The first thing you noticed was all the increased sirens at night. Then the city finally threw in the towel on having their own police and contracted with the sheriff in order to have more available cars when the action got heavy.

    People there told me that the commissioner of the NFL Pete Rozell used to live there and the city motto was something like “The Bel-Air of the central city”.

  54. @Steven
    "And a lot of people seem to be getting into permanently giving up on lawn care under the guise of being drought-sensitive."

    That's me. Maybe because I'm from the midwest where your lawn will be a jungle if you don't mow it every week but I find lawns in California are a real PITA. Keeping the grass alive and not filled with weeds was a challenge even during non-drought years. At some point I'm just going to rip out my grass and do the natural or drought-resistant landscaping.

    In the very hot months you will not like a rock garden as the place heats up during the day and disburses that heat at night. Maybe using some type of bark covering but I lived in Tucson for awhile – they had rock gardens. I hated it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Your kids can't play sports on your cactus and rock garden either. Maybe black homeowners look forward to their grandchildren playing football on their lawn? Is that a dream our society can't afford anymore? I guess so ...
  55. @Jefferson
    Compton strikes extreme fear in the heart of White Angelenos like Steve Sailer who are too afraid to step foot there even during the daytime, let alone during at night. Driving by quickly with your windows up does not count. I am talking actually parking your car there somewhere and eating at one of their restaurants in the commercial district.

    Most White Angelenos would rather take their chances petting a lion than walk on a Compton sidewalk if those were their only two options.

    The gas station I normally worked at was on Atlantic Blvd. The owner had two smaller stations, one was in Compton just down the street and around the corner. I worked at both stations. The owner would not let white people work any shift other than the day shift. I would open the station at about 8:00 AM and at 1:00 PM a black guy doing his second job would take over and run the place until 9:00 PM. Nobody worked there past that. The main station stayed open until 11 or 12 but that was on a busy well lighted section of the street.

  56. @MarkinLA
    In the very hot months you will not like a rock garden as the place heats up during the day and disburses that heat at night. Maybe using some type of bark covering but I lived in Tucson for awhile - they had rock gardens. I hated it.

    Your kids can’t play sports on your cactus and rock garden either. Maybe black homeowners look forward to their grandchildren playing football on their lawn? Is that a dream our society can’t afford anymore? I guess so …

  57. @Barry

    Compton strikes extreme fear in the heart of White Angelenos like Steve Sailer who are too afraid to step foot there even during the daytime, let alone during at night.
     
    It's clear you haven't stepped foot in Compton in quite a while yourself, "Jefferson." Blacks are almost irrelevant there now. Seems blacks don't like being confronted with organized Mexican gangs, and Mexicans have no problem with confronting them, so they ran straight outta Compton.

    Thanks to the purge, Compton is enjoying record low crime rates, and Steve wouldn't be showboating his bravery driving around in a convertible today, blaring NWA out of his speakers. The blacks you're referring to are either dead, in prison, moved to the high desert areas, down south, or back to Chicago.

    Today's Compton is kind of nice. Even at night. As is just about every place where blacks aren't a majority.

    Latino's have their problems, but they generally don't turn their own neighborhoods into chaos. That's where mom and dad lives, after all. Latino's tend to have a strong sense of family cohesion that blacks collectively find to be impossible.

    That's how Latino's conquered Compton.

    When I was teaching my son how to drive in the previous decade we drove around the LA Basin one day and eventually wound up in Compton, where we had dinner at a fast food joint. It seemed okay. The “Welcome to Compton” granite signs and the landscaping on the median of the main drag seemed pretty posh compared to rest of the region: the municipal government seemed to like spending money on sprucing the public areas up.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "When I was teaching my son how to drive in the previous decade we drove around the LA Basin one day and eventually wound up in Compton, where we had dinner at a fast food joint. It seemed okay. The “Welcome to Compton” granite signs and the landscaping on the median of the main drag seemed pretty posh compared to rest of the region: the municipal government seemed to like spending money on sprucing the public areas up."

    Steve did you and your son get any long stares from NAMs at the Compton fast food joint? Especially since you two obviously racially stick out like a sore thumb there.
  58. @Jim Sweeney
    You don't find such nomenclature prevalent in Santa Monica, Brentwood or Pacific Palisades

    The main drag is San Vicente, and just east of Palisades Park you have a cluster of all Spanish-named streets. Other than Wilshire, not many names are very British-sounding surnames, as opposed to Crenshaw, Hawthorne, Inglewood, Gage, Wilmington…

    The San Fernando Valley is an exception, with lots of Chatsworths and Shermans cutting through neighborhoods of highly variable ethnic distributions.

    Beverly Hills is full of British street names, but of course it’s always been a rich neighborhood that hasn’t experienced a major demographic transition.

    Perhaps the most counterintuitive thing is that heavily Hispanic areas usually don’t have many Spanish names around, while South Orange County’s bedroom communities went all in on the Spanish naming scheme.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Beverly Hills was named after Beverly, MA, a nice town north of Boston, so it comes by its WASP heritage naturally.
    , @JimmyDeeOC
    In the old days, roads got named after the original farmers, ranchers, developers, and developer's kids.

    S.S. will recognize this two-fer : General Moses HAZELTINE SHERMAN, for example. CHANDLER whence from the LA Times' Chandlers. Henry WILSHIRE, small-time late-19th century developer. Etc.

    Yes, south Orange County (mostly laid out in the 60s, 70s and 80s, went koo-koo for Spanish (think "Avenida Del Taco")

    Lately, EVERYTHING is marketed as "Tuscan", at least where I live, on the Irvine Ranch (and over 80% of all new development in OC takes place on The Irvine Company (TIC) land). All the architecture, the named developments, apartments etc. are all given a Tuscan moniker.

    Naming the smaller streets and courtyards, on the other hand, are almost laughable, as they have no doubt been focus-grouped to the breaking point (And TIC doesn't take a dump without first focus-grouping it).

    Point your Google Machines here and take a gaze at some very silly street names.

    https://www.villagesofirvine.com/villages-neighborhoods/portola-springs/village-map/

    Imagine telling the guy at the call center in Bangalore (or your friends) your live on any of the following----

    Sacred Path
    Conservancy
    Pawprint
    Seedling
    Shaman
    Native Trails (Some of these are starting to sound more like Pine Ridge)
    Loneflower
    Bell Chime
    Telstar (!!!!)
    Keepsake
    Denim

    I'm roughly Sailer's age, and grew up roughly 50 miles north and west of his San Fernando Valley. The term we would have used back in the 5th grade would have been: "Those all sound very homo."

  59. That is GTA San Andreas from 2004 with Grove Street being the home of the protagonist who is a black thug amidst gang and drug wars of the 80s.

    Located in-game in Ganton, named after Compton. Quite the game.

  60. @Seth Largo
    My great-grandfather owned a gas station in Watts. He sold it in the early 1970s after he got fed up with being robbed. He never moved out of Lynwood, though. Nor was he as racist as you might expect. He'd lived in South L.A. since the 1920s, and the first blacks he got to know were the hard-working blue collar types mentioned in this post. His dislike of young black males was always sugar-coated with "kids these days" rhetoric.

    Post 1970s, most of the family abandoned Lynwood and Watts for the eastern suburbs (and by east, I mean east of the 605 and the 57). However, my grandmother and a few aunts stayed in Downey, which is still a nice place to live (and expensive) despite abutting South Gate, Lynwood, and Compton. Downey just shuts its eyes to that side of its borders and pretends it's just hanging out with Lakewood and Bellflower. The Stonewood Mall and surrounding area has been completely remodeled in recent years. Just had dinner at B.J.'s there the other day. You'd never know you were eight miles from the infamous Compton.

    You’d never know you were eight miles from the infamous Compton.

    You say that as though eight miles is close. The city I grew up in was about ten miles north to south. I lived in pretty much the nicest area (or very close to it). Eight miles away was a dump populated by the criminal class. For the first eighteen years of my life I barely knew that place existed. I mean, I’d heard tell of goings on there, but in my home-school-sport-entertainment cycle nothing that went on there ever affected me even slightly.

    Later in life I began paying attention to these sorts of things. Today I’ve come to believe that, provided there is a decent barrier like a major highway or a river or train tracks or merely open ground, even one mile is ample distance to keep undesirables out of sight/out of mind. And it’s not because those barriers are so difficult to cross – they’re not – but because they cause people to mentally mark out which areas they belong in and which they don’t.

    • Agree: Wizard of Oz
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    They don't call them homeboys for nothing.
    , @Seth Largo
    Eight miles isn't very far in L.A. metro, although it can take you 20 minutes to drive it. Downtown L.A. straight south into Watts is 13 miles.
  61. @whorefinder
    This is actually something I always wondered about growing up. When "west coast" and "gangster" rap became things, many music videos and movies promoting it would show shots or sequences in the supposed Compton ghetto. It always struck me how the neighborhoods seemed so suburban and nice; I half-wondered whether the guys from LA claiming to be tough guys were making it up. (of course, they were making it up, but for different reasons, and that's a different story,).

    Take the popular black movie Friday, which successfully springboarded rapper Ice-Cube into a more movie-oriented career path. The movie is set in South Central, where Ice Cube is supposedly from. The setting is supposed to show a black ghetto/lower class area, yet everyone had a decent to nice suburban home in sunny Southern California. I watched it with my friends thinking "How could this be considered a ghetto, when you literally have houses and weather and land that most people would see as middle class?"

    East coast rappers, meanwhile, showed shots of the denser urban projects, which always seemed miserable to live in. That, to me, screamed ghetto, and could explain violence and hatred---who would want to live there? But Compton? The visuals alone made it seem nice. Ditto for the Grand Theft Auto 3 video game, which used Compton and South Central as the geographical basis of the ghetto the lead character was born and raised in.

    But, I suppose, wherever blacks take over, no matter how nice, it becomes a ghetto. See: the U.S. with Barack Obama in charge.

    It always struck me how the neighborhoods seemed so suburban and nice

    I’ve thought the same thing too.

    I first got curious about south LA from playing a computer game called “Police Quest IV.” That was set in LA and came out in 1993, which was near the height of the early 90s crime wave, and only a year after the LA riots.

    A decade later I was flying from Europe to Australia, with a stopover in LA. I decided to do a bit of sight-seeing in south LA by taking a train ride through there, going fro LAX to downtown. Apart from all the blacks and latinos on the train (which I’m just totally unaccustomed to), it all seemed disappointingly normal to me.

    When Google Earth came on line I took a huge number of virtual tours through south central trying to find some place that looked properly ghetto – to no avail. Compton in particular, perhaps because of its notoriety, actually seemed quite pleasant to me.

    As you point out, for real ghetto-looking environments you’ve got to turn east. Phewee, places like Camden, NJ or heck, anywhere in all-black Philly look really depressing. Not even south Chicago looks that bad, imo.

    Also, the all-latino areas in Texas look a lot scummier than the all-latino areas in California. Is that just me or is this a real phenomenon? If so, what accounts for it?

  62. @silviosilver

    You’d never know you were eight miles from the infamous Compton.
     
    You say that as though eight miles is close. The city I grew up in was about ten miles north to south. I lived in pretty much the nicest area (or very close to it). Eight miles away was a dump populated by the criminal class. For the first eighteen years of my life I barely knew that place existed. I mean, I'd heard tell of goings on there, but in my home-school-sport-entertainment cycle nothing that went on there ever affected me even slightly.

    Later in life I began paying attention to these sorts of things. Today I've come to believe that, provided there is a decent barrier like a major highway or a river or train tracks or merely open ground, even one mile is ample distance to keep undesirables out of sight/out of mind. And it's not because those barriers are so difficult to cross - they're not - but because they cause people to mentally mark out which areas they belong in and which they don't.

    They don’t call them homeboys for nothing.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "They don’t call them homeboys for nothing."

    Sometimes there are cases on the news of underclass Blacks burglarizing homes in more affluent areas. So not all ghetto Blacks are too lazy to get out of their comfort zone and travel a few miles to commit crimes in less Negro areas.

    A couple of months ago, a bunch of Black thugs in the flat lands of Oakland burglarized several homes in the more affluent Oakland hills.
  63. I live in a part of the suburban San Fernando Valley of L.A. built in the early 1950s. For people who went through the Depression and the War, it was paradise.

    If I could choose any other time and place to have lived, it would be to have been born in 1950 in the San Fernando Valley. There are nicer places than that, of course, but I am trying to keep it “realistic” by imagining somewhere my working class parents could have afforded.

    School would have been stricter than what I had in the 80s, but I don’t think this would have mattered much. When I look back at my teachers I realize that many of them must have been hippies, but I experienced them as Authority all the same.

    I would have been in my late teens in the late 60s, just as traditional morality was been rapidly replaced by sexual standards familiar to me, so that would have been much the same.

    My father could have made a killing in California real estate up through the 70s – he was a financial dunce, but a good saver – and then I could have made a killing in the stock market in the 80s and 90s and retired young.

    Mexifornication would have been no picnic, but I would have dodged the worst of it.

    If I was really luck I might even have lived long enough to make use of the upcoming longevity treatments.

    I don’t think you can beat that.

  64. @SPMoore8
    Yes, I've seen homes in CA that used to have lawns that now just have gravel: it's called "xero scaping", or "dry scaping" but since the "x" is pronounced as "z" you have a built in pun there.

    Xeriscaping (not xero scaping) is using plants native and/or easily adapted to the area, in this case plants that work well in the semi-arid desert climate of coastal Southern California. Xeriscape can be quite attractive with a judicious use of grass or other more conventional landscape. Those awful gravel lawns are not xeriscape; they’re, well, awful gravel lawns. But many water districts are giving rebates for anything that reduces water usage, and HOAs are mostly powerless to stop it in the face of the drought.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    Yes, someone mentioned to me in a conversation about the gravel, and they called it "Xero gardening", and I laughed, because I heard "Zero". But in fact they were referencing the "Xeri-" root. The first time I saw a gravel lawn was in Florida. Struck me as extremely tacky. But, that's life ....
  65. @Steve Sailer
    When I was teaching my son how to drive in the previous decade we drove around the LA Basin one day and eventually wound up in Compton, where we had dinner at a fast food joint. It seemed okay. The "Welcome to Compton" granite signs and the landscaping on the median of the main drag seemed pretty posh compared to rest of the region: the municipal government seemed to like spending money on sprucing the public areas up.

    “When I was teaching my son how to drive in the previous decade we drove around the LA Basin one day and eventually wound up in Compton, where we had dinner at a fast food joint. It seemed okay. The “Welcome to Compton” granite signs and the landscaping on the median of the main drag seemed pretty posh compared to rest of the region: the municipal government seemed to like spending money on sprucing the public areas up.”

    Steve did you and your son get any long stares from NAMs at the Compton fast food joint? Especially since you two obviously racially stick out like a sore thumb there.

  66. @Steve Sailer
    They don't call them homeboys for nothing.

    “They don’t call them homeboys for nothing.”

    Sometimes there are cases on the news of underclass Blacks burglarizing homes in more affluent areas. So not all ghetto Blacks are too lazy to get out of their comfort zone and travel a few miles to commit crimes in less Negro areas.

    A couple of months ago, a bunch of Black thugs in the flat lands of Oakland burglarized several homes in the more affluent Oakland hills.

  67. @cthulhu
    Xeriscaping (not xero scaping) is using plants native and/or easily adapted to the area, in this case plants that work well in the semi-arid desert climate of coastal Southern California. Xeriscape can be quite attractive with a judicious use of grass or other more conventional landscape. Those awful gravel lawns are not xeriscape; they're, well, awful gravel lawns. But many water districts are giving rebates for anything that reduces water usage, and HOAs are mostly powerless to stop it in the face of the drought.

    Yes, someone mentioned to me in a conversation about the gravel, and they called it “Xero gardening”, and I laughed, because I heard “Zero”. But in fact they were referencing the “Xeri-” root. The first time I saw a gravel lawn was in Florida. Struck me as extremely tacky. But, that’s life ….

  68. @Stan
    The Bush family once lived in Compton. The spy business takes one to unexpected places.

    "Actually, the Bush family only called the Los Angeles County suburb home for six short months in 1949 and 1950. George H. W. Bush, the future 41st president of the United States, was on a temporary assignment to California for Dresser Industries, selling oil drilling bits for a Dresser subsidiary named Security Engineering Company. His son and the future 43rd president—pictured above playing cowboy outside the Bushes' Compton home—was only three years old at the time. They lived in a now-demolished apartment complex at 624 S. Santa Fe Avenue. "

    Their stay in Compton, however brief, only adds to their cuckservative bona fides.

  69. @Jefferson
    Compton strikes extreme fear in the heart of White Angelenos like Steve Sailer who are too afraid to step foot there even during the daytime, let alone during at night. Driving by quickly with your windows up does not count. I am talking actually parking your car there somewhere and eating at one of their restaurants in the commercial district.

    Most White Angelenos would rather take their chances petting a lion than walk on a Compton sidewalk if those were their only two options.

    Why would any white Angeleno visit Compton, regardless of its current crime rate?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Because so much illegal immigration hit Compton, the city has come a long way from its lowest ebb during the crack wars of the early 90s. It is now halfway on the path to gentrification like many other improving ghettos in CA because of the illegal immigrant Hispanic vanguard.
  70. The South Bronx, especially during the 70’s and 80’s, always represented the classic imagery I associate with being ghetto. When you type “Compton ghetto” in google images there’s very few street shots showing run down buildings and graffiti covered alley ways that one finds in eastern cities. A lot of it of course has to do with the fact that Compton was mostly built post world war two and doesn’t seem to have too many high rise “commie” blocks like Cabrini Green.

  71. @WowJustWow
    The main drag is San Vicente, and just east of Palisades Park you have a cluster of all Spanish-named streets. Other than Wilshire, not many names are very British-sounding surnames, as opposed to Crenshaw, Hawthorne, Inglewood, Gage, Wilmington...

    The San Fernando Valley is an exception, with lots of Chatsworths and Shermans cutting through neighborhoods of highly variable ethnic distributions.

    Beverly Hills is full of British street names, but of course it's always been a rich neighborhood that hasn't experienced a major demographic transition.

    Perhaps the most counterintuitive thing is that heavily Hispanic areas usually don't have many Spanish names around, while South Orange County's bedroom communities went all in on the Spanish naming scheme.

    Beverly Hills was named after Beverly, MA, a nice town north of Boston, so it comes by its WASP heritage naturally.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    Fortunately, they got the name right, unlike Berkeley, CA and Berkley, MA.
  72. @Big Bill
    Excellent question. I don't have an answer. In Compton you have a community of strivers. They are all employed (bought houses, right?) They are all married (dual income to pay for house). They cultivate white "open space" and "green yards" values. They show initiative, leaving their sharecropper shack relatives behind, migrating all the way from Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas way out to California, and gathering together like pilgrims in a brand new City on a Hill ... and then it all turns to crap.

    We can't blame lack of jobs. They had them. We can't blame poor cultural values. They were house-proud. We can't blame ghetto schools. They attended new California schools. We can't blame lack of opportunity. They moved there because there WERE jobs. We can't blame Brutalist, rat warren high rises. They were spread out in lovely small-holder bungalows. We can't blame fatherless families. They were married.

    They were self-selected for success, they created (at least initially) thriving, self-selected communities, scratch-built for them ... and then they and/or their kids fsck up, big time.

    What on earth happened? Reversion to the black mean? The families that moved to Compton weren't gun-toting, dueling, honor-defending thugs, and yet their NWA kids, raised by married, working parents chose that path deliberately. Was it the Second Generation Immigrant Phenomenon, like the Ali G/Paki hoodlums, or the Italian Mafia (ca. 1915)? What happened? What am I missing?

    “What on earth happened? Reversion to the black mean?”

    Uh, yeah, I think that pretty well nails it.

    • Replies: @FLgeezer
    "Reversion to the black mean?"

    Certainly, but reversion to the mean black describes things equally well.
  73. @Jefferson
    Compton strikes extreme fear in the heart of White Angelenos like Steve Sailer who are too afraid to step foot there even during the daytime, let alone during at night. Driving by quickly with your windows up does not count. I am talking actually parking your car there somewhere and eating at one of their restaurants in the commercial district.

    Most White Angelenos would rather take their chances petting a lion than walk on a Compton sidewalk if those were their only two options.

    “Most White Angelenos would rather take their chances petting a lion than walk on a Compton sidewalk if those were their only two options.”

    I wouldn’t be remotely afraid to visit Compton. But I’d simply have no reason to ever go there. If there were some restaurant located in Compton, at which I wished to eat, I wouldn’t hesitate to visit. But of course, no such restaurant would actually exist.

  74. @silviosilver

    You’d never know you were eight miles from the infamous Compton.
     
    You say that as though eight miles is close. The city I grew up in was about ten miles north to south. I lived in pretty much the nicest area (or very close to it). Eight miles away was a dump populated by the criminal class. For the first eighteen years of my life I barely knew that place existed. I mean, I'd heard tell of goings on there, but in my home-school-sport-entertainment cycle nothing that went on there ever affected me even slightly.

    Later in life I began paying attention to these sorts of things. Today I've come to believe that, provided there is a decent barrier like a major highway or a river or train tracks or merely open ground, even one mile is ample distance to keep undesirables out of sight/out of mind. And it's not because those barriers are so difficult to cross - they're not - but because they cause people to mentally mark out which areas they belong in and which they don't.

    Eight miles isn’t very far in L.A. metro, although it can take you 20 minutes to drive it. Downtown L.A. straight south into Watts is 13 miles.

  75. @L7's
    Duke snider was from compton.he said he perfected his swing by regularly "tuning up some coloreds who didn't know their place."
    Actually I made up the quote but I believe the Duke was straight out compton !

    Duke was my boyhood hero. Seems to me that his family raised avocados on their property in Compton didn’t they? Those were assuredly the Good Old Days.

  76. @Some Guy
    This compton story is grounds for an excellent piece of research. We do hear all the time that if they had put more money into housing, schools, security and various amenities the african american minority would thrive.

    In a sense, the experiment of transplanting people that have evolved for malthusian conditions into a modern day 1950s backdrop would never happen today, but I can't believe it actually happened in Compton. This is an amazing experiment that hasn't been looked at much until now.

    This mini case also shows the problem with the World Bank's work in directing finance and infrastructure spending to undeveloped places worldwide, or multilateral aid spending. The goal of aid should not be development assistance but to mitigate the worst effects of barbarism against women and children and innoculate against future mass immigration and terrorism.

    Spending x amount to make life bearable in the slum, is an investment. It means we avoid spending x+10,000y amount in policing, welfare, healthcare, education, housing etc should the incentives to move closer to home become compelling.

    Dark economics for dark truths about humanity.

    “This compton story is grounds for an excellent piece of research. We do hear all the time that if they had put more money into housing, schools, security and various amenities the african american minority would thrive”

    ” The goal of aid should not be development assistance but to mitigate the worst effects of barbarism against women and children and inoculate against future mass immigration and terrorism”

    Absolutely. Here you are pointing directly at the problem – throwing money at it alone will never solve it.

    But, then, aside from all the talk about genetic predisposition, let’s just state an unpalatable truth – The chief enemy of black people is their culture. The culture that, in Africa, allows predominantly young males to abandon their women and children and escape the continent; that ensures the majority of inmates of the refugee camps are women, children and old men; the culture which allows men to be warriors, hunters and baby-makers while at the same time leaving all the drudgery to their women; the culture that declares “live for today!’ and, in Zimbabwe, resulted in the requisitioned crops and livestock of the white farmers all being eaten – with absolutely no thought of where the next harvest would come from; and the culture that makes Africa the most sexually promiscuous society on earth (with its inevitable highest incidence of STDs). Much of this is perpetuated in the USA and even the Caribbean (e.g. Haiti) – there, it has given us rap, glorified criminality, drug-worship and the ghettos.

    So, rather than celebrating and glorifying black culture in the name of cultural diversity, the right course of action is to eradicate its worst aspects (your “barbarism”) and replace them – using the same media that are currently making billions from perpetuating it.

    The first step towards solving a problem is to recognize it and to be able to discuss it critically – due to vested interests and demented altruism even that is going to take a while.

  77. @WowJustWow
    The main drag is San Vicente, and just east of Palisades Park you have a cluster of all Spanish-named streets. Other than Wilshire, not many names are very British-sounding surnames, as opposed to Crenshaw, Hawthorne, Inglewood, Gage, Wilmington...

    The San Fernando Valley is an exception, with lots of Chatsworths and Shermans cutting through neighborhoods of highly variable ethnic distributions.

    Beverly Hills is full of British street names, but of course it's always been a rich neighborhood that hasn't experienced a major demographic transition.

    Perhaps the most counterintuitive thing is that heavily Hispanic areas usually don't have many Spanish names around, while South Orange County's bedroom communities went all in on the Spanish naming scheme.

    In the old days, roads got named after the original farmers, ranchers, developers, and developer’s kids.

    S.S. will recognize this two-fer : General Moses HAZELTINE SHERMAN, for example. CHANDLER whence from the LA Times’ Chandlers. Henry WILSHIRE, small-time late-19th century developer. Etc.

    Yes, south Orange County (mostly laid out in the 60s, 70s and 80s, went koo-koo for Spanish (think “Avenida Del Taco”)

    Lately, EVERYTHING is marketed as “Tuscan”, at least where I live, on the Irvine Ranch (and over 80% of all new development in OC takes place on The Irvine Company (TIC) land). All the architecture, the named developments, apartments etc. are all given a Tuscan moniker.

    Naming the smaller streets and courtyards, on the other hand, are almost laughable, as they have no doubt been focus-grouped to the breaking point (And TIC doesn’t take a dump without first focus-grouping it).

    Point your Google Machines here and take a gaze at some very silly street names.

    https://www.villagesofirvine.com/villages-neighborhoods/portola-springs/village-map/

    Imagine telling the guy at the call center in Bangalore (or your friends) your live on any of the following—-

    Sacred Path
    Conservancy
    Pawprint
    Seedling
    Shaman
    Native Trails (Some of these are starting to sound more like Pine Ridge)
    Loneflower
    Bell Chime
    Telstar (!!!!)
    Keepsake
    Denim

    I’m roughly Sailer’s age, and grew up roughly 50 miles north and west of his San Fernando Valley. The term we would have used back in the 5th grade would have been: “Those all sound very homo.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    You can tell from the street names whose influence -- husband's or wife's -- the Irvine Company's marketing researchers have recommended focusing upon.
  78. @Brutusale
    Beverly Hills was named after Beverly, MA, a nice town north of Boston, so it comes by its WASP heritage naturally.

    Fortunately, they got the name right, unlike Berkeley, CA and Berkley, MA.

  79. @Kevin O'Keeffe
    "What on earth happened? Reversion to the black mean?"

    Uh, yeah, I think that pretty well nails it.

    “Reversion to the black mean?”

    Certainly, but reversion to the mean black describes things equally well.

  80. @JimmyDeeOC
    In the old days, roads got named after the original farmers, ranchers, developers, and developer's kids.

    S.S. will recognize this two-fer : General Moses HAZELTINE SHERMAN, for example. CHANDLER whence from the LA Times' Chandlers. Henry WILSHIRE, small-time late-19th century developer. Etc.

    Yes, south Orange County (mostly laid out in the 60s, 70s and 80s, went koo-koo for Spanish (think "Avenida Del Taco")

    Lately, EVERYTHING is marketed as "Tuscan", at least where I live, on the Irvine Ranch (and over 80% of all new development in OC takes place on The Irvine Company (TIC) land). All the architecture, the named developments, apartments etc. are all given a Tuscan moniker.

    Naming the smaller streets and courtyards, on the other hand, are almost laughable, as they have no doubt been focus-grouped to the breaking point (And TIC doesn't take a dump without first focus-grouping it).

    Point your Google Machines here and take a gaze at some very silly street names.

    https://www.villagesofirvine.com/villages-neighborhoods/portola-springs/village-map/

    Imagine telling the guy at the call center in Bangalore (or your friends) your live on any of the following----

    Sacred Path
    Conservancy
    Pawprint
    Seedling
    Shaman
    Native Trails (Some of these are starting to sound more like Pine Ridge)
    Loneflower
    Bell Chime
    Telstar (!!!!)
    Keepsake
    Denim

    I'm roughly Sailer's age, and grew up roughly 50 miles north and west of his San Fernando Valley. The term we would have used back in the 5th grade would have been: "Those all sound very homo."

    You can tell from the street names whose influence — husband’s or wife’s — the Irvine Company’s marketing researchers have recommended focusing upon.

  81. AndrewR [AKA "Aiden"] says:
    @David M.
    Speaking of meticulously groomed lawns, what is surprising to me is how all the lawns of inhabited homes in America seem to be mown nowadays, even in the worst slums. When I was a kid I remember how the shape of the lawn told you a lot about socio-economic status of the residents living inside. Even in middle-class neighborhoods a fair number of lawns were overgrown. But, for instance, take a google earth drive down some of Detroit's worst streets (or for the brave, try it in person). You'll see abandoned houses with overgrown lawns, but next door often an inhabited home with obviously impoverished residents, but with neatly mown lawns. I just took a google earth drive through Compton and most lawns were well taken care of their as well.

    Is this because most homes in the slum are now section-8, and lawn care is cheap enough that owners just hire lawn care? Or is it owner-residents taking pride in their homes? I guess it is probably a combination of both. But if many of these homes are occupied by welfare-dependent single mothers, it would seem unlikely that the residents are maintaining the equipment and mowing the lawn themselves.

    I know it seems like a trivial thing, but it really does puzzle me as it is so at odds with my childhood impression of what a slum should look like.

    I used to work for a landscaping company here in MI. A large part of the company’s business came from mowing lawns. We had multiple customers that paid with some sort of government voucher that allowed them to get one lawnmowing every two weeks. I don’t know if that was only for disabled people or what though.

  82. @Steve Sailer
    I live in a part of the suburban San Fernando Valley of L.A. built in the early 1950s. For people who went through the Depression and the War, it was paradise.

    But it's also easy to see where the developers chintzed on amenities it would be nice to have today. For example a lot of streets don't have sidewalks -- gotta preserve that rural feel! Fortunately, I've got a sidewalk out front, but they made it about six inches too narrow for two people to walk side by side and converse -- concrete isn't free, you know.

    I’ve always surmised that the lack of sidewalks in suburban neighborhood planning has something to do with inconveniencing bums, vagrants, flim-flam artists and door-to-door solicitors and therefore keeping them out, or at least making them easily identifiable as such by the local police department. A man walking down the sidewalk is just that; a man traipsing through Mrs. O’Brien’s tulips is a trespasser justifying a search of his person. It also helps keep a tab on teens, who don’t have a corner to hang out on, and so they’re more liable to spend time in one home or another under the supervision of a parent or two.

  83. @Big Bill
    Excellent question. I don't have an answer. In Compton you have a community of strivers. They are all employed (bought houses, right?) They are all married (dual income to pay for house). They cultivate white "open space" and "green yards" values. They show initiative, leaving their sharecropper shack relatives behind, migrating all the way from Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas way out to California, and gathering together like pilgrims in a brand new City on a Hill ... and then it all turns to crap.

    We can't blame lack of jobs. They had them. We can't blame poor cultural values. They were house-proud. We can't blame ghetto schools. They attended new California schools. We can't blame lack of opportunity. They moved there because there WERE jobs. We can't blame Brutalist, rat warren high rises. They were spread out in lovely small-holder bungalows. We can't blame fatherless families. They were married.

    They were self-selected for success, they created (at least initially) thriving, self-selected communities, scratch-built for them ... and then they and/or their kids fsck up, big time.

    What on earth happened? Reversion to the black mean? The families that moved to Compton weren't gun-toting, dueling, honor-defending thugs, and yet their NWA kids, raised by married, working parents chose that path deliberately. Was it the Second Generation Immigrant Phenomenon, like the Ali G/Paki hoodlums, or the Italian Mafia (ca. 1915)? What happened? What am I missing?

    The societal devolution of the 1960s seems to have had something to do with it, as it has in white communities leading to the eventual white flight from formerly solidly middle class neighborhoods. It just seems that moral degeneracy has a disproportionately negative effect on lower classes who don’t have the reserve resources to recover from bad decisions. Kids from upper middle class and upper middle class families could cut their hair, stop smoking dope, tone down the revolutionary bullshit and get jobs. I don’t think that blacks or lower middle class whites have ever had that luxury.

  84. @Semi-employed White Guy
    Why would any white Angeleno visit Compton, regardless of its current crime rate?

    Because so much illegal immigration hit Compton, the city has come a long way from its lowest ebb during the crack wars of the early 90s. It is now halfway on the path to gentrification like many other improving ghettos in CA because of the illegal immigrant Hispanic vanguard.

  85. If you’d care to see a great documentary of the South Central area of Los Angeles and how poverty happened there this is the film to watch, “Crips and Bloods: Made in America.” It goes in depth about the history of this area in a city where swat teams were first used. This shows the blue print for what is happening to the rest of America.

    Another film on urban destruction and government programs is “The Pruitt- Igoe Myth.” It chronicles urban development in St. Louis through government programs and their destructive effects on the black family and community. What is going on around the country today shows how things are not changing for the better for African Americans.

  86. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Big Bill
    Excellent question. I don't have an answer. In Compton you have a community of strivers. They are all employed (bought houses, right?) They are all married (dual income to pay for house). They cultivate white "open space" and "green yards" values. They show initiative, leaving their sharecropper shack relatives behind, migrating all the way from Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas way out to California, and gathering together like pilgrims in a brand new City on a Hill ... and then it all turns to crap.

    We can't blame lack of jobs. They had them. We can't blame poor cultural values. They were house-proud. We can't blame ghetto schools. They attended new California schools. We can't blame lack of opportunity. They moved there because there WERE jobs. We can't blame Brutalist, rat warren high rises. They were spread out in lovely small-holder bungalows. We can't blame fatherless families. They were married.

    They were self-selected for success, they created (at least initially) thriving, self-selected communities, scratch-built for them ... and then they and/or their kids fsck up, big time.

    What on earth happened? Reversion to the black mean? The families that moved to Compton weren't gun-toting, dueling, honor-defending thugs, and yet their NWA kids, raised by married, working parents chose that path deliberately. Was it the Second Generation Immigrant Phenomenon, like the Ali G/Paki hoodlums, or the Italian Mafia (ca. 1915)? What happened? What am I missing?

    What happened was the wholesale black allegiance to the democrat party and it’s policies after the civil rights act was signed by Johnson. Once the Black community – across America – went full left, the writing was on the wall, and the effects of the cultural shift in political/social allegiance were self evident in just a decade.

  87. Here is a young rapper Vince Staples describing his upbringing in Long Beach and Compton as “ghetto Leave it to Beaver”

    Likely it is hard for someone from Baltimore to see those decent homes and palm trees and conclude this is in fact the ghetto.

    Also, Steve update you references as this kid is pretty interesting and Dr Dre is 50 years old now

  88. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @jon

    For Compton’s residents, the city was far from the ghetto. …
     
    So what happened? When and why did it start to transform into the gang central that it became in the 1980's/1990's?

    So what happened? When and why did it start to transform into the gang central that it became in the 1980′s/1990′s?

    What happened was the 80s crack epidemic. Gangs are inextricably tied to drugs and controlling drug territory. Read the story of Freeway Ricky Ross. It gets pretty deep. There were even connections between the Reagan Administration, the Nicaraguan Contras and the CIA which helped to funnel crack into black neighborhoods in South Central. This isn’t conspiracy, it’s something the CIA later admitted. It’s really a dark stain on our government’s history.

    LA has calmed down a lot in recent decades. Probably due to crack going out of fashion.

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