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The Shadowy Force Behind the Outside Agitators Infiltrating Campuses
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From the New York Times:

The Conservative Force Behind Speeches Roiling College Campuses
By STEPHANIE SAUL MAY 20, 2017

Close to 200 students kept up the noise for more than an hour in a University at Buffalo lecture hall on May 1, mostly drowning out the evening’s featured speaker, Robert [not Richard] Spencer, a conservative author and blogger who espouses a dark view of Islam.

The event appeared to follow a familiar script, in which a large contingent of liberals muzzles a provocative speaker invited by a small conservative student club. But the propelling force behind the event — and a number of recent heat-seeking speeches on college campuses — was a national conservative group that is well funded, highly organized and on a mission, in its words, to “restore sanity at your school.”

The group, the Young America’s Foundation, had paid Mr. Spencer’s $2,000 fee, trained the student leader who organized the event and provided literature for distribution. Other than the possibility of outside interference, little had been left to chance.

The speeches are a part of the group’s mission of grooming future conservative leaders — Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Stephen Miller, a White House adviser, are among its alumni — and its long list of donors has included the television game show host Pat Sajak, the novelist Tom Clancy, the billionaire brothers David H. and Charles G. Koch, and the Amway billionaires Richard and Helen Devos, who gave $10 million to endow the Reagan Ranch near Santa Barbara, Calif., which the foundation runs as a preserve.

The Reagans gave the mountaintop ranch, which I visited recently, to the foundation to use as a campus for educational programs, but it’s so remote that they later bought a building on a great location in downtown Santa Barbara to host attendees. Young people can walk back from the bars on State St., whereas trying to drive back from the bars up the endless one-lane mountain road to the Reagan Ranch would probably get people killed.

… In that time, the speakers have gotten edgier, more in-your-face and sometimes even meanspirited. Among them is Ann Coulter, whose canceled speech last month at the University of California, Berkeley, led the foundation, which was covering most of her $20,000 fee, to sue the college, arguing that it had violated the First Amendment in its failure to provide a suitable time and place for the event.

To put this in perspective, Ann, who has been a TV celebrity for a couple of decades, gets significantly less than Ta-Nehisi Coates, who was paid $30k and $40k for a couple of college speeches in Oregon recently.

In the meantime, protesters have questioned whether such events are cynically intended to provoke reactions.

“It’s part of a larger systematic and extremely well-funded effort to disrupt public universities and create tension among student groups on campus,” said Alexandra Prince, a doctoral student at Buffalo who circulated a petition to block Mr. Spencer. …

Outside agitators!

The foundation teaches essentials such as when it is legal to record a conversation with a college administrator; how to press schools to cover some of the security costs; regulations on sidewalk chalking, fliers and other forms of promotion and whether they can be challenged; and when to call the foundation’s legal staff for help. ..

Among the foundation’s most popular speakers is Ben Shapiro, a 33-year-old author and columnist, whose recent appearances were blocked by security at DePaul University, loudly protested at the University of Wisconsin and initially barred, then permitted, by California State University, Los Angeles.

In 2015, Mr. Shapiro spoke at the University of Missouri shortly after protests erupted over racist incidents there. He argued that “white privilege” was simply a way of telling white people to “shut up,” and that President Barack Obama, our first “white black president,” was not as articulate as the news media had made him seem but got “affirmative action points.”

“First white black President” is pretty good.

This reminds me that it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates, the way, say, George Bernard Shaw and G.K. Chesterton jousted a century ago. Perhaps Ann Coulter and Jon Stewart? The overarching idea would be to remind students and administrators to think of political speech as a sport, with rules of fair play, not as an opportunity for witch-sniffing.

 
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  1. Literally blaming the messengers. Un-freakin’-believable.

    Seriously, commies are threatening violence to anyone speaking who is right of Mao Ze Dung, and it’s our fault?

    Screw the NY Times. It’s becoming more and more apparent that either (1) these big media corporations need to be broken up; or (2) they will antagonize the population into outright physical confrontation.

    Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it’s communist. Scumbags.

    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @whorefinder

    The major papers of this country haven't been profitable for years, since Craigslist came along and wiped out classified advertising. But the uber-wealthy, like Buffet, Slim and Bezos, need to keep journalists on the payroll to curry favor in the corridors of power. And unlike lobbying, losing money in news media is tax deductible.

    Replies: @unpc downunder

    , @Anonym
    @whorefinder

    Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it’s communist. Scumbags.

    I just watched The Killing Fields (1984). In what is typical of the Durantyesque yellow journalism at the NYT, one of the two protagonists, Schanberg blamed the US bombing of Cambodia for what Pol Pot orchestrated. By that logic, I guess Dresden and the bombing of Germany in general was sufficient cause for the Holocaust then. As long as your regime is nominally Communist, you can count on the NYT to cover up your crimes.

    Interestingly, Pol Pot and his cadres were trained in North Viet Nam by the Communists there. And yet, when they gained power in Cambodia they slaughtered more than half it seems of all the non-Khmer ethnicity. There appeared to be 1-3M people killed by the regime. If you add up the ~400k Vietnamese, ~400k Chinese and ~250k Muslim Cham, you have a little over 1M people.

    It seems that the Chinese and Vietnamese had become sizable minorities within Cambodia. Most Vietnamese were ethnically cleansed - by being driven out, bullets, overworked or starved it appears, and ditto for the Chinese and the Cham.

    https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/survival-cambodias-ethnic-minorities

    I guess the key is that if you want to engage in industrial scale ethnic cleansing with the sanction of the NYT, you need to be nominally Communist. Actual Communists will even train you for free. After you are done, they will make movies about you that blame your actions on the Americans and you can live a long and happy life. (Cambodia was invaded by Vietnam, but Pol Pot lived until 1998.)

    You know what guys, face it - we've been doing it wrong. Excuse me while I break out into "Imagine"... "whoo hoo-oooo"

    , @CAL
    @whorefinder

    One thing that would help is going back to no foreign ownership of papers, and radio and tv stations. Kill Murdoch's holdings now that his progeny are determined to swing left. Force Slim to divest from his NYT blog. Then force all of the entities to break up into smaller pieces. Most will die but that's the point. Oh and force cable to offer ala carte.

    , @e
    @whorefinder

    or (2) they will antagonize the population into outright physical confrontation.

    I don't believe they think "conservatives" will take to the streets.
    They are playing with fire. The constant harassment of Trump by Lefties and their puppets, the press, is incensing the very population they think is passive.

    , @Stan Adams
    @whorefinder

    In 1910, the Los Angeles Times building was blown up by leftist union agitators:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Angeles_Times_bombing

    Harry Chandler, the longtime publisher of the Times, thereafter kept a ten-gauge shotgun in his office.

  2. “…disrupt public universities and create tension among student groups on campus.” Well, Middlebury, Yale, Notre Dame, Oberlin et al are not public universities. And all of the disruption is coming from one direction, the left. Coming soon to a campus near you the definitive list of approved speakers.

  3. Maybe schools could start offering a ‘Skull and Bones’ elective where snowflakes get challenged to toughen up against every flavor of abuse?

  4. …it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates…to remind students and administrators to think of political speech as a sport, with rules of fair play…

    How very English of you to suggest that, Steve. How very Anglo-Saxon — right out of the Anglosphere and the culture that created America and the Modern World.

    Too many recent arrivals are unable to comprehend what you’re talking about.

    BTW I remember when Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy in Boulder, Colorado. They did exactly that kind of tour. It was still possible then, even in Boulder.

    • Replies: @aceofspades
    @Buzz Mohawk

    True....for many of our "recent arrivals", might makes right!

    , @Lot
    @Buzz Mohawk


    Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy
     
    Two men made famous by criminal acts they served time in prison for.
    , @Miss Laura
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Ronnie Dugger, editor of the Texas Observer, versus William F. Buckley, UT Austin.

    , @ia
    @Buzz Mohawk


    How very English of you to suggest that, Steve.
     
    LOL. I was thinking the same thing. We're long past those days.
    , @neovictorian23
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I too attended a Liddy-Leary debate, in Reno in 1983. It was billed as "Individual Rights v. Government Responsibilities." I believe they also did another tour some years later.

    It was fun, interesting and entertaining. Steve's suggestion is right on. I bet Coulter v. Some Coherent SJW (there must be one?) could actually make serious $$$ for all concerned!

  5. Quite honestly, these college speaking fees are obscene.
    More palatable for the likes of Coulter but come on.

  6. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    To put this in perspective, Ann, who has been a TV celebrity for a couple of decades, gets significantly less than Ta-Nehisi Coates, who was paid $30k and $40k for a couple of college speeches in Oregon recently.

    Yeah, but Ann doesn’t have Ta’s awesome super power of being able make white people give her lots of money.

  7. mobi says:

    OT:

    Did the uber-liberal Tides Foundation – beloved of ‘West Coast progressives’, and George Soros – illegally interfere in the 2015 Canadian election, to oust Conservatives in favor of Liberals?:

    http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/canadian-politics/millions-in-foreign-funds-spent-in-2015-federal-election-to-defeat-harper-government-report-alleges

    “Americans are rightly concerned about Russia hacking into U.S. government emails. Well, this appears to be much worse”

  8. Fair play to you ain’t in the realm of possibility with these anti-free speech scoundrels in academia or the media. They want a complete totalitarian shutdown of all competing worldviews. The corporate propaganda apparatus and academia must be completely and totally dismantled.

    Van Morrison wrote this song after his divorce from a creature called Planet Janet Rigsbee. The Rigsbee surname brings us back to the Manchester terrorist attack. The Manchester terrorist attack happened on the 4th anniversary of British soldier Lee Rigby’s murder at the hands of sub-Saharan African Islamists in Woolwich, England.

    Fair Play To You is out the window; total victory is the name of the game now.

  9. Jonah Goldberg and Peter Beinart used to have civil, good-natured debates that were posted online (maybe conducted online, as well – I don’t remember.)

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Anonymous

    I think that would be okay with today's college students since Jonah Goldberg is basically a liberal.

  10. Anonymous [AKA "Louie Louie"] says:

    If it is true that the DNC had Seth Rich killed (which I am perfectly prepared to believe), do HRC and Podesta skate? I believe Kim Dotcom and Assange a lot more than CNN and the Washington Post.

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/05/breaking-internet-hacker-kim-dot-com-releases-documents-seth-rich-leaked-podesta-wikileaks-emails/

  11. BTW I remember when Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy in Boulder, Colorado. They did exactly that kind of tour. It was still possible then, even in Boulder.

    I came to the comments to post this very thing. As I recall, the Village Voice had a story on their tour with the headline “Nice Scary Guy vs. Scary Nice Guy.”

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Clark Westwood

    When I saw Liddy in 1986 he was doing a campus debate tour with Abbie Hoffman.

    , @Josh
    @Clark Westwood

    Were they both CIA?

  12. Stewart did that sort of tour with Bill O’Reilly, but Bill (like many at FNC) was a closet liberal, so no big deal. He’d really have to man up and swallow his pride to tour with a stalwart like Coulter. Even Maher treads lightly around her … don’t know if it is because there is any truth that they might have had a fling at some point in the past.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @The Alarmist

    They called Ann "Dash Nine" at the old GE owned MSNBC, and it was not without reason.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Mr. Anon

  13. Ann, who has been a TV celebrity for a couple of decades, gets significantly less than Ta-Nehisi Coates, who was paid $30k and $40k for a couple of college speeches in Oregon recently.

    Coates gets to keep some of the money that has to be spent on security and insurance for Coulter, but not for him.

    “First white black President” is pretty good

    Well, it would make more sense if we’d previously had a black black President.

    This reminds me that it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates

    They tried that at Middlebury when Charles Murray went there.

    • Replies: @black sea
    @International Jew

    "First white black President” is pretty good, but first Black Wigger is better.

    HT to Steve.

    , @Pericles
    @International Jew



    “First white black President” is pretty good

     

    Well, it would make more sense if we’d previously had a black black President.

     

    You had the first black white President in the 90s.

    Replies: @International Jew

  14. Someone should count how many times Obama said “you know” during press conferences.

  15. Sean says:

    https://www.thecairoreview.com/essays/on-the-state-of-nature/
    Whereas the journalist Walter Lippmann saw the frequent ignorance of the American public as a barrier to democracy, John Dewey viewed it more optimistically, as a signal of individual freedom not to be informed about each and every public issue. Instead, each political issue defines its own new public, and each issue remains a subject of controversy and uncertainty for as long as it is with us. Much like Socrates never reaching a final definition of justice or virtue, the democratic public never reaches the final truth of an issue, but also (one hopes) never resorts to brute force alone in dealing with it. Yet the opposite feature also follows. Just as no political issue can ever be thoroughly illuminated, we also cannot let action be delayed indefinitely by the unattainability of direct political knowledge. At some point a decision is needed. […]
    Even before Socrates, philosophers were in the habit of belittling politicians as cynical manipulators with forked tongues and crooked speech. The honest person was supposed to engage in “straight talk,” which the politician seemed inherently unable to provide. According to this model of transparency, the people should speak to their representative (democratically elected or otherwise), who should faithfully express their will, while the people in turn would transparently follow the commands of the government. Yet all this assumes that the will of the people and the orders of the sovereign power are transparently intelligible, though the arts of commanding and obeying involve as much interpretation as art or food criticism. Latour views politics as a continually revived circular motion, a perpetual translation between people and sovereign that has nothing in common with direct knowledge.

  16. They banned Richard Spencer from Soundcloud today, so add that small piece of evidence to the stack already proving the West no longer wishes to carry on with democratic self-government. All these terror attacks just make it too dangerous for people to have an open exchange of political ideas, I guess. Can’t have multiculturalism and liberal democracy. Pick one.

    • Replies: @Clark Westwood
    @Cagey Beast


    Can’t have multiculturalism and liberal democracy. Pick one.
     
    I agree (unless the multiculturalism is in very small doses).

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

  17. This reminds me that it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates, the way, say, George Bernard Shaw and G.K. Chesterton jousted a century ago. Perhaps Ann Coulter and Jon Stewart.

    I’d like to see that. Coulter would wipe the floor with Stewart. He’s not that smart.

    • Agree: BenKenobi, Forbes
  18. @whorefinder
    Literally blaming the messengers. Un-freakin'-believable.

    Seriously, commies are threatening violence to anyone speaking who is right of Mao Ze Dung, and it's our fault?

    Screw the NY Times. It's becoming more and more apparent that either (1) these big media corporations need to be broken up; or (2) they will antagonize the population into outright physical confrontation.

    Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it's communist. Scumbags.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Anonym, @CAL, @e, @Stan Adams

    The major papers of this country haven’t been profitable for years, since Craigslist came along and wiped out classified advertising. But the uber-wealthy, like Buffet, Slim and Bezos, need to keep journalists on the payroll to curry favor in the corridors of power. And unlike lobbying, losing money in news media is tax deductible.

    • Replies: @unpc downunder
    @Maj. Kong

    There definitely seems to be a growing disconnect between what newspapers say and what readers want to hear. You can see this in the comments thread of online newspaper sites. Most readers are to the right of the journalists they are responding to (or sometimes to the left on economic issues).

    As you point out, the most likely reason is that the papers are now much more dependent on big money investors for their survival. Back when they depended on classified ads they tended to be more populist. For example, back in the 1990s there was a lot of criticism of NAFTA in the NY Times, but you wouldn't see that today.

  19. The Hitchens brothers did a college tour, debating religion.

    There’s an funny video of a pre-debate press conference for the local media:

    An interesting study in sibling relations. Poor Peter; he really grew up in his older brother’s shadow. You can see how ridiculously uptight he is, whilst Christopher is completely at ease and throwing out bon mots left and right.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    @jimmyriddle

    Christopher was also most likely drunk on Bushmills at the time. Combined with his long-experience in front of the camera, this explains his devil-may-care attitude here.

    That's not a criticism, btw; Chris was a notorious alcoholic (he died of an alcohol-related cancer), and, like many a historical great British public figure, believed he wasn't fully dressed in public unless his breath smelled of fermented liquid. I liked Chris a lot, even when I disagreed with him, because he was (1) principled; (2) non-partisan; and (3) willing to change his opinion if facts changed.

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Harry Baldwin, @black sea

  20. Great scam, isn’t it. First freak out, then attack with “you were just trying to freak me out”.

  21. @whorefinder
    Literally blaming the messengers. Un-freakin'-believable.

    Seriously, commies are threatening violence to anyone speaking who is right of Mao Ze Dung, and it's our fault?

    Screw the NY Times. It's becoming more and more apparent that either (1) these big media corporations need to be broken up; or (2) they will antagonize the population into outright physical confrontation.

    Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it's communist. Scumbags.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Anonym, @CAL, @e, @Stan Adams

    Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it’s communist. Scumbags.

    I just watched The Killing Fields (1984). In what is typical of the Durantyesque yellow journalism at the NYT, one of the two protagonists, Schanberg blamed the US bombing of Cambodia for what Pol Pot orchestrated. By that logic, I guess Dresden and the bombing of Germany in general was sufficient cause for the Holocaust then. As long as your regime is nominally Communist, you can count on the NYT to cover up your crimes.

    Interestingly, Pol Pot and his cadres were trained in North Viet Nam by the Communists there. And yet, when they gained power in Cambodia they slaughtered more than half it seems of all the non-Khmer ethnicity. There appeared to be 1-3M people killed by the regime. If you add up the ~400k Vietnamese, ~400k Chinese and ~250k Muslim Cham, you have a little over 1M people.

    It seems that the Chinese and Vietnamese had become sizable minorities within Cambodia. Most Vietnamese were ethnically cleansed – by being driven out, bullets, overworked or starved it appears, and ditto for the Chinese and the Cham.

    https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/survival-cambodias-ethnic-minorities

    I guess the key is that if you want to engage in industrial scale ethnic cleansing with the sanction of the NYT, you need to be nominally Communist. Actual Communists will even train you for free. After you are done, they will make movies about you that blame your actions on the Americans and you can live a long and happy life. (Cambodia was invaded by Vietnam, but Pol Pot lived until 1998.)

    You know what guys, face it – we’ve been doing it wrong. Excuse me while I break out into “Imagine”… “whoo hoo-oooo”

  22. @jimmyriddle
    The Hitchens brothers did a college tour, debating religion.

    There's an funny video of a pre-debate press conference for the local media:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODJDFnmnqqo


    An interesting study in sibling relations. Poor Peter; he really grew up in his older brother's shadow. You can see how ridiculously uptight he is, whilst Christopher is completely at ease and throwing out bon mots left and right.

    Replies: @whorefinder

    Christopher was also most likely drunk on Bushmills at the time. Combined with his long-experience in front of the camera, this explains his devil-may-care attitude here.

    That’s not a criticism, btw; Chris was a notorious alcoholic (he died of an alcohol-related cancer), and, like many a historical great British public figure, believed he wasn’t fully dressed in public unless his breath smelled of fermented liquid. I liked Chris a lot, even when I disagreed with him, because he was (1) principled; (2) non-partisan; and (3) willing to change his opinion if facts changed.

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    @whorefinder

    Bushmills? More likely, Johnnie Walker Black Label - the breakfast of champions.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @whorefinder

    I didn't understand the principle by which Christopher Hitchens opposed Desert Storm but supported Operation Iraqi Freedom. The reverse would make sense to me.

    , @black sea
    @whorefinder

    Re: Hitchens


    willing to change his opinion if facts changed.
     
    Hitchens never faced up to the monumental misjudgements he'd made about Iraq. As the situation there deteriorated, you could see him becoming increasingly exasperated and peevish when trying to justify his support for the invasion and overthrow, but he stuck with it, as far as I know, until the end of his life. At least in public.

    Hitchens, though not a realistic political thinker, was a very good writer, and like a lot of very good writers, a complicated and difficult man. He was drawn to secular crusades of various sorts, and was bound to wind up disappointed.

    As Martin Amis said of him shortly after his death, he wasn't a very common-sensical person. He did, however, face his death with admirable courage and stoicism.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong

  23. I thought Clinton was the first white black president. Seems like Obama was the first black white president.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @anonymous

    "I thought Clinton was the first white black president. Seems like Obama was the first black white president."

    Barack Hussein Obama was America's first Muslim president/first Non Christian president. He studied at a Muslim school in Indonesia and that's good enough evidence for me.

  24. Robert [not Richard] Spencer

    I talked with Spencer after a presentation here recently. He has enough to deal with with Moslems critics, but in addition now has the peeve of being constantly confused with Richard.

    Robert, however, looks very Mediterranean, and might even be able to swing sneaking into Mecca. Not to recommend it, though. The softest penalty, for those genuinely innocently doing so in ignorance, is lifetime banishment from the Kingdom. And there’s no way Spencer could conceivably plead ignorance.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @Reg Cæsar

    Robert is too closely tied with Geller and Pipes, even though he's "problematic" for Kristol. Alerting people that Islam is bad isn't enough, a compelling counter must be created, which explains the whole pan-European paganism 'revival'.

    Bin Laden was always wanting to target the 'far enemy' of the West, and then go after the 'near enemy' of Arab monarchies and secular dictators. ISIS is the reversal of that position, which is why they split.

    For us, the Muslim horde is the far enemy. The near enemy is the corporate elite that are running the invade/invite paradigm. We should pay more attention to stopping the ongoing 'refugee resettlement' and give Russian an equal share in being the Middle East hegemon.

  25. “how the ‘alt-right’ is weaponizing irony to spread fascism”

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/23/alt-right-online-humor-as-a-weapon-facism

    There’s quite a cottage industry in deconstructing 4chan threads and Pepe twitter memes for shock horror presentation to the masses. A few people perhaps hoping to find it a way to tenure, following Matthew Goodwin in the UK, who parlayed being the go-to media talking head on “right-wing extremists” into a professorship at Kent (UK).

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    @Anonymous Nephew

    The more they do that, the more the phrase "Dictators fear laughter most because they can't control it" rings true.

    The funniest part is that the more they try to "explain" or "deconstruct" it, the funnier the jokes become, and the worse/more "square" the Left looks.

    As Scott Adams said, , when Hillary Clinton took time in September to lecture us about the evils of Pepe the Frog and the Alt-Right, "Is it my imagination, or is Clinton losing a fight with a cartoon frog?"

    https://twitter.com/scottadamssays/status/776119023083806720?lang=en

  26. CAL says:
    @whorefinder
    Literally blaming the messengers. Un-freakin'-believable.

    Seriously, commies are threatening violence to anyone speaking who is right of Mao Ze Dung, and it's our fault?

    Screw the NY Times. It's becoming more and more apparent that either (1) these big media corporations need to be broken up; or (2) they will antagonize the population into outright physical confrontation.

    Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it's communist. Scumbags.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Anonym, @CAL, @e, @Stan Adams

    One thing that would help is going back to no foreign ownership of papers, and radio and tv stations. Kill Murdoch’s holdings now that his progeny are determined to swing left. Force Slim to divest from his NYT blog. Then force all of the entities to break up into smaller pieces. Most will die but that’s the point. Oh and force cable to offer ala carte.

  27. @Cagey Beast
    They banned Richard Spencer from Soundcloud today, so add that small piece of evidence to the stack already proving the West no longer wishes to carry on with democratic self-government. All these terror attacks just make it too dangerous for people to have an open exchange of political ideas, I guess. Can't have multiculturalism and liberal democracy. Pick one.

    Replies: @Clark Westwood

    Can’t have multiculturalism and liberal democracy. Pick one.

    I agree (unless the multiculturalism is in very small doses).

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    @Clark Westwood

    True and we don't have to have the bullying 19th and 20th century kind of nationalism the French Republic invented and that was aped all over the place.

  28. This reminds me that it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates, the way, say, George Bernard Shaw and G.K. Chesterton jousted a century ago. Perhaps Ann Coulter and Jon Stewart? The overarching idea would be to remind students and administrators to think of political speech as a sport, with rules of fair play, not as an opportunity for witch-sniffing.

    Why would the Progs ever agree to such a crazy idea? What they have, they hold and they have all the high ground in the culture, politics, the law and finance. The only way they make room for anyone else is by force. You have a better chance of talking someone out of having a heart attach.

    No, the answer is force. It has always been force.

  29. @whorefinder
    @jimmyriddle

    Christopher was also most likely drunk on Bushmills at the time. Combined with his long-experience in front of the camera, this explains his devil-may-care attitude here.

    That's not a criticism, btw; Chris was a notorious alcoholic (he died of an alcohol-related cancer), and, like many a historical great British public figure, believed he wasn't fully dressed in public unless his breath smelled of fermented liquid. I liked Chris a lot, even when I disagreed with him, because he was (1) principled; (2) non-partisan; and (3) willing to change his opinion if facts changed.

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Harry Baldwin, @black sea

    Bushmills? More likely, Johnnie Walker Black Label – the breakfast of champions.

  30. I think Stanley Fish and Dinesh D’Souza had a series of debates back in the ’90s in the wake of ‘Illiberal Education’.

  31. @Maj. Kong
    @whorefinder

    The major papers of this country haven't been profitable for years, since Craigslist came along and wiped out classified advertising. But the uber-wealthy, like Buffet, Slim and Bezos, need to keep journalists on the payroll to curry favor in the corridors of power. And unlike lobbying, losing money in news media is tax deductible.

    Replies: @unpc downunder

    There definitely seems to be a growing disconnect between what newspapers say and what readers want to hear. You can see this in the comments thread of online newspaper sites. Most readers are to the right of the journalists they are responding to (or sometimes to the left on economic issues).

    As you point out, the most likely reason is that the papers are now much more dependent on big money investors for their survival. Back when they depended on classified ads they tended to be more populist. For example, back in the 1990s there was a lot of criticism of NAFTA in the NY Times, but you wouldn’t see that today.

  32. @The Alarmist
    Stewart did that sort of tour with Bill O'Reilly, but Bill (like many at FNC) was a closet liberal, so no big deal. He'd really have to man up and swallow his pride to tour with a stalwart like Coulter. Even Maher treads lightly around her ... don't know if it is because there is any truth that they might have had a fling at some point in the past.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    They called Ann “Dash Nine” at the old GE owned MSNBC, and it was not without reason.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Anonymous

    Please elaborate.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Anonymous

    Are you Lefty McStinky? There aren't many hits to this rumor, but this one comes up prominently:

    http://leftyshefty.blogspot.com/2014/09/

    And with very similar wording to what you used above.

    How do we know this is not simply a rumor that you are trying to start?

  33. @Buzz Mohawk

    ...it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates...to remind students and administrators to think of political speech as a sport, with rules of fair play...
     
    How very English of you to suggest that, Steve. How very Anglo-Saxon -- right out of the Anglosphere and the culture that created America and the Modern World.

    Too many recent arrivals are unable to comprehend what you're talking about.

    BTW I remember when Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy in Boulder, Colorado. They did exactly that kind of tour. It was still possible then, even in Boulder.

    Replies: @aceofspades, @Lot, @Miss Laura, @ia, @neovictorian23

    True….for many of our “recent arrivals”, might makes right!

  34. “To put this in perspective, Ann, who has been a TV celebrity for a couple of decades, gets significantly less than Ta-Nehisi Coates, who was paid $30k and $40k for a couple of college speeches in Oregon recently.”

    Rich White limousine liberals pay Ta-Nehisi Coates $30k-$40k to basically just say this.

    They must use it as a tax write off.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    @Jefferson

    It's merely some white bastard's tuition money. There's plenty more where that came from.

  35. @whorefinder
    Literally blaming the messengers. Un-freakin'-believable.

    Seriously, commies are threatening violence to anyone speaking who is right of Mao Ze Dung, and it's our fault?

    Screw the NY Times. It's becoming more and more apparent that either (1) these big media corporations need to be broken up; or (2) they will antagonize the population into outright physical confrontation.

    Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it's communist. Scumbags.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Anonym, @CAL, @e, @Stan Adams

    or (2) they will antagonize the population into outright physical confrontation.

    I don’t believe they think “conservatives” will take to the streets.
    They are playing with fire. The constant harassment of Trump by Lefties and their puppets, the press, is incensing the very population they think is passive.

  36. @Anonymous
    @The Alarmist

    They called Ann "Dash Nine" at the old GE owned MSNBC, and it was not without reason.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Mr. Anon

    Please elaborate.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jim Don Bob

    It's a GE product, look it up.
    The connotation is obvious.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

  37. The Conservative Force Behind Speeches Roiling College Campuses

    NYT, all the lies fit to print.

    It’s speech roiling radical leftists college campuses, SPEECH I tell u!

    Like that Black Bolt guy from the Marvel Comics!

    … In that time, the speakers have gotten edgier, more in-your-face and sometimes even meanspirited. Among them is Ann Coulter, whose canceled speech last month at the University of California, Berkeley, led the foundation, which was covering most of her $20,000 fee, to sue the college, arguing that it had violated the First Amendment in its failure to provide a suitable time and place for the event.

    They should be suing Congress, for making unconstitutional laws granting federal money to these speech suppression centers (universities). And the judiciary, for upholding those unconstitutional laws.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    @Svigor


    The Conservative Force Behind Speeches Roiling College Campuses
     
    The speeches generally do not even take place because they are shut down by pre-speech threats and violence. So it can't be speeches that are roiling college campuses because they are not even happening.
  38. @Anonymous Nephew
    "how the 'alt-right' is weaponizing irony to spread fascism"

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/23/alt-right-online-humor-as-a-weapon-facism

    There's quite a cottage industry in deconstructing 4chan threads and Pepe twitter memes for shock horror presentation to the masses. A few people perhaps hoping to find it a way to tenure, following Matthew Goodwin in the UK, who parlayed being the go-to media talking head on "right-wing extremists" into a professorship at Kent (UK).

    Replies: @whorefinder

    The more they do that, the more the phrase “Dictators fear laughter most because they can’t control it” rings true.

    The funniest part is that the more they try to “explain” or “deconstruct” it, the funnier the jokes become, and the worse/more “square” the Left looks.

    As Scott Adams said, , when Hillary Clinton took time in September to lecture us about the evils of Pepe the Frog and the Alt-Right, “Is it my imagination, or is Clinton losing a fight with a cartoon frog?”

  39. Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it’s communist. Scumbags.

    First they came for the anti-semites, but I didn’t speak out, because I’m not an anti-semite.
    Then they came for the racists, but I didn’t speak out, because I’m not a racist.
    Then they came for the Conservatives, but I didn’t speak out, because I’m not a Conservative.
    Then they came for the moderates, but I didn’t speak out, because I’m not a moderate.
    Then I threw a party, because I’m a communist.

    If it is true that the DNC had Seth Rich killed (which I am perfectly prepared to believe), do HRC and Podesta skate? I believe Kim Dotcom and Assange a lot more than CNN and the Washington Post.

    What’s interesting is that the Rich/DNC leaks connections go waaaay back on this site, to many commenters, and the Kim DotCom/Rich/Leaks connections go waaay back on this site, to at least one commenter. Many months ago, both of these “revelations” were predicted by commenters here.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Svigor

    I thought KimDotCom was supposed to be the 400 pound hacker sitting on his bed that Trump referred to in a debate?

    I can't keep track of all this spy vs. spy stuff.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @unpc downunder, @Olorin, @Reg Cæsar

  40. @Jim Don Bob
    @Anonymous

    Please elaborate.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    It’s a GE product, look it up.
    The connotation is obvious.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Anonymous

    The little engine that could?

  41. Obviously, those students who rioted at Berkeley, as well as the students who assaulted the professor during Charles Murray’s talk, had no agency. The ghosts of Ronald Reagan and William Buckley made them do it!

  42. Very reminiscent of Hutu radio broadcasts just before the massacre of the Tutsi.

  43. @Svigor

    Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it’s communist. Scumbags.
     
    First they came for the anti-semites, but I didn't speak out, because I'm not an anti-semite.
    Then they came for the racists, but I didn't speak out, because I'm not a racist.
    Then they came for the Conservatives, but I didn't speak out, because I'm not a Conservative.
    Then they came for the moderates, but I didn't speak out, because I'm not a moderate.
    Then I threw a party, because I'm a communist.

    If it is true that the DNC had Seth Rich killed (which I am perfectly prepared to believe), do HRC and Podesta skate? I believe Kim Dotcom and Assange a lot more than CNN and the Washington Post.
     
    What's interesting is that the Rich/DNC leaks connections go waaaay back on this site, to many commenters, and the Kim DotCom/Rich/Leaks connections go waaay back on this site, to at least one commenter. Many months ago, both of these "revelations" were predicted by commenters here.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I thought KimDotCom was supposed to be the 400 pound hacker sitting on his bed that Trump referred to in a debate?

    I can’t keep track of all this spy vs. spy stuff.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Steve Sailer

    KDC, founder of MegaShare (which was the best free direct download site before they all got shut down), tweeted contantly about being able to prove that Hilary was a criminal. Everyone thought he was promising that he actually had new, unique evidence himself. He happens to be originally German and some of these tweets caused angst with their unclear English. The end caused more angst: instead of a dynamite packet, Kim's promised payload was a description of government surveillance stuff that everybody was already aware of, which theoretically could yield new evidence. Around the same time Comey said that Hilary broke the law but he would not prosecute her.
    Kim still deserves respect for fighting the FCC. The "400lb hacker" could also refer to a certain anonymous Khazakh fingerpainting discussion forum, which held parsing sessions for the various WikiLeaks releases. Trump winked at this site by including its 4-leaf clover symbol on a special edition hat, which clueless Buzzfeed promptly criticized as "incorrect."

    , @unpc downunder
    @Steve Sailer

    Harsh Steve, he does at least manage to waddle around at the pool or beach entertaining the odd beach babe. And besides he provides excellent slow news day fodder for UK Commonwealth journalists. In IT terms he's like the anti-Bill Gates.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3445234/Is-Kim-Dotcom-21-year-old-girlfriend-Elizabeth.html

    , @Olorin
    @Steve Sailer


    I can’t keep track of all this spy vs. spy stuff.
     
    • The pointynosed guy in the white hat/clothes is the good guy.

    • The pointynosed guy in the black hat/clothes is the bad guy.

    • They both do the same things and are surprised at the outcomes.

    Interesting facts: Antonio Prohias was anti-Batista till he got to see what Fidel did to free speech. So he left Cooba and moved to Donald Trump's and Michael Harrington's borough--Queens. Whether or not he was actually a CIA asset, who knows. I'm guessing yes, since most of us are about one degree removed from the Agency if that much. CIA is as much meme as manpower.

    I seem to recall that Prohias died in Miami among the gusanos.

    Speaking of spies, Cuba, and stuff dropped in the iSteve commentariat pub, I am SO down with the idea of stealing some DNA from Justin Trudeau and comparing it to Fidel's in the CIA archives.

    And why not? Soon we peons will be forced to provide DNA scrapings for everything from getting married (to our cats, duh) to buying a toaster oven. But the globodarlings will maintain genetic privacy via FiatBucks or favors that pay for X units of media disinterest.

    Genetic piracy has long been a Big Globo enterprise, considered to be on the up-and-up and enthusiastically practiced by giant corporations' tiny unfamiliar-named subsidiaries.

    So it's just a matter of time before we learn of a dark economy in it. In fact if I were temperamentally inclined, 30 years younger, and could stand the smell of hairspray/cosmetics and ego, I'd establish a Celebrity Venue Green Room Attendant business. Imagine the DNA you could heist!

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Steve Sailer


    I thought KimDotCom was supposed to be the 400 pound hacker sitting on his bed that Trump referred to in a debate?
     
    I always think of Kim Komando. But she looks a lot better (damnation with faint praise!) and goes by the name she was born with.
  44. @whorefinder
    Literally blaming the messengers. Un-freakin'-believable.

    Seriously, commies are threatening violence to anyone speaking who is right of Mao Ze Dung, and it's our fault?

    Screw the NY Times. It's becoming more and more apparent that either (1) these big media corporations need to be broken up; or (2) they will antagonize the population into outright physical confrontation.

    Remember all those leftist groups bombing targets in the U.S. in the 60s and 70s, and the commies bombing places in the 1900s and 1910s? Guess the NY Times feels safe because it's communist. Scumbags.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong, @Anonym, @CAL, @e, @Stan Adams

    In 1910, the Los Angeles Times building was blown up by leftist union agitators:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Angeles_Times_bombing

    Harry Chandler, the longtime publisher of the Times, thereafter kept a ten-gauge shotgun in his office.

  45. @Clark Westwood
    @Cagey Beast


    Can’t have multiculturalism and liberal democracy. Pick one.
     
    I agree (unless the multiculturalism is in very small doses).

    Replies: @Cagey Beast

    True and we don’t have to have the bullying 19th and 20th century kind of nationalism the French Republic invented and that was aped all over the place.

  46. @Anonymous
    Jonah Goldberg and Peter Beinart used to have civil, good-natured debates that were posted online (maybe conducted online, as well - I don't remember.)

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    I think that would be okay with today’s college students since Jonah Goldberg is basically a liberal.

  47. @Clark Westwood

    BTW I remember when Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy in Boulder, Colorado. They did exactly that kind of tour. It was still possible then, even in Boulder.
     
    I came to the comments to post this very thing. As I recall, the Village Voice had a story on their tour with the headline "Nice Scary Guy vs. Scary Nice Guy."

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Josh

    When I saw Liddy in 1986 he was doing a campus debate tour with Abbie Hoffman.

  48. @Clark Westwood

    BTW I remember when Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy in Boulder, Colorado. They did exactly that kind of tour. It was still possible then, even in Boulder.
     
    I came to the comments to post this very thing. As I recall, the Village Voice had a story on their tour with the headline "Nice Scary Guy vs. Scary Nice Guy."

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @Josh

    Were they both CIA?

  49. It’s a great idea in theory to have a travelling tour of two debaters. To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an “acceptable” establishment Republican be used. Someone like a Ted Cruz or John McCain.

    Anyone with something interesting to say like Richard Spencer would be blacklisted because he is a non-person who isn’t even allowed to maintain a GYM membership.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Canadian Observer

    "It’s a great idea in theory to have a travelling tour of two debaters. To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an “acceptable” establishment Republican be used. Someone like a Ted Cruz or John McCain."

    Nobody on the Left sees Ted Cruz as acceptable. The Left sees Ted Cruz as a far Right Wing bible thumper. The Left's idea of an acceptable "Conservatives" is Joe Scarborough, Marco Rubio, Jennifer Rubin, Meg Whitman, and Evan McMullin for example.

    Replies: @okie

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Canadian Observer


    To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an “acceptable” establishment Republican be used.
     
    Back in the first, ie, HW's, Bush Administration, the Minnesota Daily put out a call for a columnist "to the right of Walter Mondale."

    At least they were trying. Rah, rah, rah for Ski-U-Mah.

    Someone like a Ted Cruz…
     
    Many would consider Cruz a "Canadian observer", too.

    …or John McCain.
     
    Tom what's-his-face, the Ohioan who founded the basement band Boston, didn't find McCain acceptable enough to let him use "More Than a Feeling" in a campaign. He was in fact quite scathing about it.

    Then again, Boston was at best a very, very distant second to the Cars among Ohioan-founded bands in Beantown. (I can be scathing, too.)

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    , @Pericles
    @Canadian Observer

    Do the students then have to attack both lecturers? Isn't one enough? I'm confused.

  50. @whorefinder
    @jimmyriddle

    Christopher was also most likely drunk on Bushmills at the time. Combined with his long-experience in front of the camera, this explains his devil-may-care attitude here.

    That's not a criticism, btw; Chris was a notorious alcoholic (he died of an alcohol-related cancer), and, like many a historical great British public figure, believed he wasn't fully dressed in public unless his breath smelled of fermented liquid. I liked Chris a lot, even when I disagreed with him, because he was (1) principled; (2) non-partisan; and (3) willing to change his opinion if facts changed.

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Harry Baldwin, @black sea

    I didn’t understand the principle by which Christopher Hitchens opposed Desert Storm but supported Operation Iraqi Freedom. The reverse would make sense to me.

  51. @anonymous
    I thought Clinton was the first white black president. Seems like Obama was the first black white president.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “I thought Clinton was the first white black president. Seems like Obama was the first black white president.”

    Barack Hussein Obama was America’s first Muslim president/first Non Christian president. He studied at a Muslim school in Indonesia and that’s good enough evidence for me.

  52. So, Ann Coulter is “mean-spirited” but Ta Nehisi is not? About the police and firefighters who died at the World Trade Center, he wrote, “They were not human to me. Black, white, or whatever, they were menaces of nature; they were the fire, the comet, the storm, which could — with no justification — shatter my body.”

    That wasn’t mean-spirited enough?

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @Harry Baldwin

    Blacks are allowed, arguably encouraged (note the commemoration of James Baldwin), to despise YT. The only time it stops is when there is a backlash that imperils the electoral fortunes of the Democrats. That's why you aren't hearing about BLM anymore. Soros lost confidence in them.

    Replies: @Jefferson

  53. This reminds me that it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates, the way, say, George Bernard Shaw and G.K. Chesterton jousted a century ago. Perhaps Ann Coulter and Jon Stewart?

    “It is not fun to watch public arguments between two people who legitimately hate each other, as they will inevitably spend 95 percent of the conversation pretending they’re cordial. Real enemies can only disagree once; after that, they will only do battle in absentia or in court. If you want people to go for the jugular every single weekend, they need to enjoy the foe they’re assaulting.” – Chuck Klosterman, on why The McLaughlin Group succeeded, Esquire, 2008

    http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/news/a4232/mclaughlin-0308/

    • Replies: @guest
    @Njguy73

    That writer is stuck in the world of modern, democratic manners, where disagreement is an affront. (Because how can you be wrong or point out wrongness when everybody's equal?) Steve once posted a series of clips of microaggressions from the old British class system. They had no trouble offending eachother head-on.

    What's pretending to be cordial, by the way? If you act cordially you are cordial. People don't understand manners anymore.

  54. What these conservative speakers need is a device that will, in real time, spell out their spoken words on a large screen behind them so that all the noise in the world will not prevent them from communicating their messages.

  55. OT:
    Hiding in plain sight: how the ‘alt-right’ is weaponizing irony to spread fascism
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/23/alt-right-online-humor-as-a-weapon-facism

    The Guardian doesn’t seem to get that edgy humour is one of the ways people warn others that they’re really pushing it. Of course White guys cannot have any legitimate grounds for claiming that others are really trying their patience, so that idea would never occur to Guardian types.

    It’s worth noting too that the Kek, Pepe, Kekistani stuff is also being used by classical liberal types who similarly want to use humour to tell the SJWs and globalists that it’s “getting a little much now, so quit it”. See Sargon of Akkad for details on that crowd.

  56. @Svigor

    The Conservative Force Behind Speeches Roiling College Campuses
     
    NYT, all the lies fit to print.

    It's speech roiling radical leftists college campuses, SPEECH I tell u!

    Like that Black Bolt guy from the Marvel Comics!

    … In that time, the speakers have gotten edgier, more in-your-face and sometimes even meanspirited. Among them is Ann Coulter, whose canceled speech last month at the University of California, Berkeley, led the foundation, which was covering most of her $20,000 fee, to sue the college, arguing that it had violated the First Amendment in its failure to provide a suitable time and place for the event.
     
    They should be suing Congress, for making unconstitutional laws granting federal money to these speech suppression centers (universities). And the judiciary, for upholding those unconstitutional laws.

    Replies: @anonymous

    The Conservative Force Behind Speeches Roiling College Campuses

    The speeches generally do not even take place because they are shut down by pre-speech threats and violence. So it can’t be speeches that are roiling college campuses because they are not even happening.

  57. @Canadian Observer
    It's a great idea in theory to have a travelling tour of two debaters. To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an "acceptable" establishment Republican be used. Someone like a Ted Cruz or John McCain.

    Anyone with something interesting to say like Richard Spencer would be blacklisted because he is a non-person who isn't even allowed to maintain a GYM membership.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Reg Cæsar, @Pericles

    “It’s a great idea in theory to have a travelling tour of two debaters. To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an “acceptable” establishment Republican be used. Someone like a Ted Cruz or John McCain.”

    Nobody on the Left sees Ted Cruz as acceptable. The Left sees Ted Cruz as a far Right Wing bible thumper. The Left’s idea of an acceptable “Conservatives” is Joe Scarborough, Marco Rubio, Jennifer Rubin, Meg Whitman, and Evan McMullin for example.

    • Replies: @okie
    @Jefferson

    The sad fact is that Cruz is actually where Trump claims to be on a lot of the Policy stuff that matters to the readers of this blog, but his sincerely held religion obscures it to a substantial part of the audience both here and in the establishment. The Establishment and a pretty large part of the audience here are the ones who think they are too smart for religion, and true believers are missing brain cells. It starts in 4th grade and is a article of faith by upper division college classes, that you can't believe and actually be intelligent.

    I never thought his evangelical appeals would work in the primaries cuz they took as many votes off at the top end of the demographic as they appealed to in the middle. Trump won on a Democratic strategy (top and bottom vs the middle)once it boiled down to Cruz and him, with trump taking the low end for whom his celebrity worked and those of the higher end who may be repubs but can't stomach evangelists, and there are a lot of those.

    getting back o the subject of the post, a left vs slightly less left is as far as you can go on campus today without triggering. I mean Murray was a never Trumper and is pretty left on everything but seeing races in his statistics, and there was violence at his appearance.

  58. One possible way to confront this would be to start hosting speakers using a closed circuit TV where the audience and speakers can interact but don’t have to be physically in the building or country while giving the talk. It might make the events less enjoyable but it would still be every bit as informative. It also might allow the speakers to open up because they cannot be intimidated. They could also mute the sound at will so the speakers would not be disrupted. It might be hard for the audience to hear over the animal noises but they could just record and replay forever.

  59. O/T but speaking of shadowy forces our old friends The Turks are back in the news again. NBA player Enes Kanter, a Turk, had his Turkish passport revoked for supporting Steve’s Pocono buddy Gulen. Kanter had a “Man without a Country” weekend in Indonesia and Romania trying to get back to the U.S without a valid passport. Someone at Homeland Security pulled some strings to get him back to the U.S.

    http://www.cbc.ca/m/sports/basketball/nba/enes-kanter-death-threats-turkish-government-1.4126680

  60. … In that time, the speakers have gotten edgier, more in-your-face

    Just like Poochie!!!

    • LOL: 27 year old
    • Replies: @Pericles
    @MEH 0910

    Hush, Poochie is Hillary's secret weapon for defeating Trump in 2020. Don't spoil it.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

  61. @Harry Baldwin
    So, Ann Coulter is "mean-spirited" but Ta Nehisi is not? About the police and firefighters who died at the World Trade Center, he wrote, “They were not human to me. Black, white, or whatever, they were menaces of nature; they were the fire, the comet, the storm, which could — with no justification — shatter my body.”

    That wasn't mean-spirited enough?

    Replies: @Maj. Kong

    Blacks are allowed, arguably encouraged (note the commemoration of James Baldwin), to despise YT. The only time it stops is when there is a backlash that imperils the electoral fortunes of the Democrats. That’s why you aren’t hearing about BLM anymore. Soros lost confidence in them.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Maj. Kong

    "That’s why you aren’t hearing about BLM anymore. Soros lost confidence in them."

    Black Lies Matter have been low key ever since Donald J. Trump became POTUS and Barack Hussein Obama left office. Black Lies Matter feel a lot more emboldened when there is a Democrat POTUS, for obvious reasons.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong

  62. @Anonymous
    @The Alarmist

    They called Ann "Dash Nine" at the old GE owned MSNBC, and it was not without reason.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob, @Mr. Anon

    Are you Lefty McStinky? There aren’t many hits to this rumor, but this one comes up prominently:

    http://leftyshefty.blogspot.com/2014/09/

    And with very similar wording to what you used above.

    How do we know this is not simply a rumor that you are trying to start?

  63. okie says:
    @Jefferson
    @Canadian Observer

    "It’s a great idea in theory to have a travelling tour of two debaters. To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an “acceptable” establishment Republican be used. Someone like a Ted Cruz or John McCain."

    Nobody on the Left sees Ted Cruz as acceptable. The Left sees Ted Cruz as a far Right Wing bible thumper. The Left's idea of an acceptable "Conservatives" is Joe Scarborough, Marco Rubio, Jennifer Rubin, Meg Whitman, and Evan McMullin for example.

    Replies: @okie

    The sad fact is that Cruz is actually where Trump claims to be on a lot of the Policy stuff that matters to the readers of this blog, but his sincerely held religion obscures it to a substantial part of the audience both here and in the establishment. The Establishment and a pretty large part of the audience here are the ones who think they are too smart for religion, and true believers are missing brain cells. It starts in 4th grade and is a article of faith by upper division college classes, that you can’t believe and actually be intelligent.

    I never thought his evangelical appeals would work in the primaries cuz they took as many votes off at the top end of the demographic as they appealed to in the middle. Trump won on a Democratic strategy (top and bottom vs the middle)once it boiled down to Cruz and him, with trump taking the low end for whom his celebrity worked and those of the higher end who may be repubs but can’t stomach evangelists, and there are a lot of those.

    getting back o the subject of the post, a left vs slightly less left is as far as you can go on campus today without triggering. I mean Murray was a never Trumper and is pretty left on everything but seeing races in his statistics, and there was violence at his appearance.

  64. @Maj. Kong
    @Harry Baldwin

    Blacks are allowed, arguably encouraged (note the commemoration of James Baldwin), to despise YT. The only time it stops is when there is a backlash that imperils the electoral fortunes of the Democrats. That's why you aren't hearing about BLM anymore. Soros lost confidence in them.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “That’s why you aren’t hearing about BLM anymore. Soros lost confidence in them.”

    Black Lies Matter have been low key ever since Donald J. Trump became POTUS and Barack Hussein Obama left office. Black Lies Matter feel a lot more emboldened when there is a Democrat POTUS, for obvious reasons.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @Jefferson

    BLM owes its origins to NBC doctoring the Zimmerman 911 call, and the Democrats noticed how black turnout spiked in 2012, especially amongst middle-aged women. A logical progression might be the solution to their chronic midterm turnout deficits.

    The Democrats weren't able to run the "War on Women" narrative in '16, which we can credit to the prominent presence of Ivanka. (Romney should have relied on one of his daughters-in-law, his sons were a PR disaster)

    The Russia angle is smarter than it looks to us. Most mainstream conservatives have a residual Cold War dislike of Russia, and neocons tribally hate it. It's a good way to split the GOP camp, and it unifies the D base by creating a far more compelling social conservative threat than could ever have been envisaged by Pat Robertson &co.

    And if (when) they come up with nothing, the Dems have easy rebuttal by referring to the Benghazi hearings.

    There aren't enough of Russian descent in America* to create an ethnic lobby, but the Russians could buy the existing Armenian/Irish lobbyists, and split the Jewish lobby by creating a American cousin to Avigdor Lieberman's Russian-speaker party in Israel. That is the only long term way they can head this off.

    *A larger number of this are "Old Believers" that don't get along with the Russian Orthodox Church.

  65. @Canadian Observer
    It's a great idea in theory to have a travelling tour of two debaters. To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an "acceptable" establishment Republican be used. Someone like a Ted Cruz or John McCain.

    Anyone with something interesting to say like Richard Spencer would be blacklisted because he is a non-person who isn't even allowed to maintain a GYM membership.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Reg Cæsar, @Pericles

    To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an “acceptable” establishment Republican be used.

    Back in the first, ie, HW’s, Bush Administration, the Minnesota Daily put out a call for a columnist “to the right of Walter Mondale.”

    At least they were trying. Rah, rah, rah for Ski-U-Mah.

    Someone like a Ted Cruz…

    Many would consider Cruz a “Canadian observer”, too.

    …or John McCain.

    Tom what’s-his-face, the Ohioan who founded the basement band Boston, didn’t find McCain acceptable enough to let him use “More Than a Feeling” in a campaign. He was in fact quite scathing about it.

    Then again, Boston was at best a very, very distant second to the Cars among Ohioan-founded bands in Beantown. (I can be scathing, too.)

    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Then again, Boston was at best a very, very distant second to the Cars among Ohioan-founded bands in Beantown. (I can be scathing, too.)"

    Don't forget the Del Fuegos, founded at Oberlin College in the early '80's, and then based in Boston. Great first album, good-but-not-great second album, and then, well,...

    When they briefly got back together in 2012 to do a "reunion tour" as a one-off, they did a few shows in Ohio, and posted this on Facebook: "The Del Fuegos formed in Oberlin, Ohio over 30 years ago. Tonight we'll play in Kent, Ohio. This will most certainly be our last Ohio show....ever. Not because we're not enjoying ourselves but because we all have amazing day jobs. Come out and celebrate our Ohio roots with us!" https://www.facebook.com/thedelfuegos/

    Saw them in NYC in 1985, between The Longest Day and Boston, Mass. Good band, tight, straightforward and completely without pretension (compared to Ric Ocasek's stuffed-nose vocal impression of Bryan Ferry).

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  66. @International Jew

    Ann, who has been a TV celebrity for a couple of decades, gets significantly less than Ta-Nehisi Coates, who was paid $30k and $40k for a couple of college speeches in Oregon recently.
     
    Coates gets to keep some of the money that has to be spent on security and insurance for Coulter, but not for him.

    “First white black President” is pretty good
     
    Well, it would make more sense if we'd previously had a black black President.

    This reminds me that it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates
     
    They tried that at Middlebury when Charles Murray went there.

    Replies: @black sea, @Pericles

    “First white black President” is pretty good, but first Black Wigger is better.

    HT to Steve.

  67. @whorefinder
    @jimmyriddle

    Christopher was also most likely drunk on Bushmills at the time. Combined with his long-experience in front of the camera, this explains his devil-may-care attitude here.

    That's not a criticism, btw; Chris was a notorious alcoholic (he died of an alcohol-related cancer), and, like many a historical great British public figure, believed he wasn't fully dressed in public unless his breath smelled of fermented liquid. I liked Chris a lot, even when I disagreed with him, because he was (1) principled; (2) non-partisan; and (3) willing to change his opinion if facts changed.

    Replies: @jimmyriddle, @Harry Baldwin, @black sea

    Re: Hitchens

    willing to change his opinion if facts changed.

    Hitchens never faced up to the monumental misjudgements he’d made about Iraq. As the situation there deteriorated, you could see him becoming increasingly exasperated and peevish when trying to justify his support for the invasion and overthrow, but he stuck with it, as far as I know, until the end of his life. At least in public.

    Hitchens, though not a realistic political thinker, was a very good writer, and like a lot of very good writers, a complicated and difficult man. He was drawn to secular crusades of various sorts, and was bound to wind up disappointed.

    As Martin Amis said of him shortly after his death, he wasn’t a very common-sensical person. He did, however, face his death with admirable courage and stoicism.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    @black sea


    Hitchens, though not a realistic political thinker
     
    Neither is his brother Peter.
  68. @Buzz Mohawk

    ...it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates...to remind students and administrators to think of political speech as a sport, with rules of fair play...
     
    How very English of you to suggest that, Steve. How very Anglo-Saxon -- right out of the Anglosphere and the culture that created America and the Modern World.

    Too many recent arrivals are unable to comprehend what you're talking about.

    BTW I remember when Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy in Boulder, Colorado. They did exactly that kind of tour. It was still possible then, even in Boulder.

    Replies: @aceofspades, @Lot, @Miss Laura, @ia, @neovictorian23

    Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy

    Two men made famous by criminal acts they served time in prison for.

  69. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    @Svigor

    I thought KimDotCom was supposed to be the 400 pound hacker sitting on his bed that Trump referred to in a debate?

    I can't keep track of all this spy vs. spy stuff.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @unpc downunder, @Olorin, @Reg Cæsar

    KDC, founder of MegaShare (which was the best free direct download site before they all got shut down), tweeted contantly about being able to prove that Hilary was a criminal. Everyone thought he was promising that he actually had new, unique evidence himself. He happens to be originally German and some of these tweets caused angst with their unclear English. The end caused more angst: instead of a dynamite packet, Kim’s promised payload was a description of government surveillance stuff that everybody was already aware of, which theoretically could yield new evidence. Around the same time Comey said that Hilary broke the law but he would not prosecute her.
    Kim still deserves respect for fighting the FCC. The “400lb hacker” could also refer to a certain anonymous Khazakh fingerpainting discussion forum, which held parsing sessions for the various WikiLeaks releases. Trump winked at this site by including its 4-leaf clover symbol on a special edition hat, which clueless Buzzfeed promptly criticized as “incorrect.”

  70. @Njguy73

    This reminds me that it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates, the way, say, George Bernard Shaw and G.K. Chesterton jousted a century ago. Perhaps Ann Coulter and Jon Stewart?
     
    "It is not fun to watch public arguments between two people who legitimately hate each other, as they will inevitably spend 95 percent of the conversation pretending they're cordial. Real enemies can only disagree once; after that, they will only do battle in absentia or in court. If you want people to go for the jugular every single weekend, they need to enjoy the foe they're assaulting." - Chuck Klosterman, on why The McLaughlin Group succeeded, Esquire, 2008

    http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/news/a4232/mclaughlin-0308/

    Replies: @guest

    That writer is stuck in the world of modern, democratic manners, where disagreement is an affront. (Because how can you be wrong or point out wrongness when everybody’s equal?) Steve once posted a series of clips of microaggressions from the old British class system. They had no trouble offending eachother head-on.

    What’s pretending to be cordial, by the way? If you act cordially you are cordial. People don’t understand manners anymore.

  71. @Reg Cæsar
    @Canadian Observer


    To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an “acceptable” establishment Republican be used.
     
    Back in the first, ie, HW's, Bush Administration, the Minnesota Daily put out a call for a columnist "to the right of Walter Mondale."

    At least they were trying. Rah, rah, rah for Ski-U-Mah.

    Someone like a Ted Cruz…
     
    Many would consider Cruz a "Canadian observer", too.

    …or John McCain.
     
    Tom what's-his-face, the Ohioan who founded the basement band Boston, didn't find McCain acceptable enough to let him use "More Than a Feeling" in a campaign. He was in fact quite scathing about it.

    Then again, Boston was at best a very, very distant second to the Cars among Ohioan-founded bands in Beantown. (I can be scathing, too.)

    Replies: @Gary in Gramercy

    “Then again, Boston was at best a very, very distant second to the Cars among Ohioan-founded bands in Beantown. (I can be scathing, too.)”

    Don’t forget the Del Fuegos, founded at Oberlin College in the early ’80’s, and then based in Boston. Great first album, good-but-not-great second album, and then, well,…

    When they briefly got back together in 2012 to do a “reunion tour” as a one-off, they did a few shows in Ohio, and posted this on Facebook: “The Del Fuegos formed in Oberlin, Ohio over 30 years ago. Tonight we’ll play in Kent, Ohio. This will most certainly be our last Ohio show….ever. Not because we’re not enjoying ourselves but because we all have amazing day jobs. Come out and celebrate our Ohio roots with us!” https://www.facebook.com/thedelfuegos/

    Saw them in NYC in 1985, between The Longest Day and Boston, Mass. Good band, tight, straightforward and completely without pretension (compared to Ric Ocasek’s stuffed-nose vocal impression of Bryan Ferry).

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Which states were Human Sexual Response and the Throbbing Members from?

  72. @Steve Sailer
    @Svigor

    I thought KimDotCom was supposed to be the 400 pound hacker sitting on his bed that Trump referred to in a debate?

    I can't keep track of all this spy vs. spy stuff.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @unpc downunder, @Olorin, @Reg Cæsar

    Harsh Steve, he does at least manage to waddle around at the pool or beach entertaining the odd beach babe. And besides he provides excellent slow news day fodder for UK Commonwealth journalists. In IT terms he’s like the anti-Bill Gates.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3445234/Is-Kim-Dotcom-21-year-old-girlfriend-Elizabeth.html

  73. @International Jew

    Ann, who has been a TV celebrity for a couple of decades, gets significantly less than Ta-Nehisi Coates, who was paid $30k and $40k for a couple of college speeches in Oregon recently.
     
    Coates gets to keep some of the money that has to be spent on security and insurance for Coulter, but not for him.

    “First white black President” is pretty good
     
    Well, it would make more sense if we'd previously had a black black President.

    This reminds me that it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates
     
    They tried that at Middlebury when Charles Murray went there.

    Replies: @black sea, @Pericles

    “First white black President” is pretty good

    Well, it would make more sense if we’d previously had a black black President.

    You had the first black white President in the 90s.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Pericles

    I stand corrected. My point only makes sense if you emphasize the first word, ie "white black President".

  74. @Jefferson
    "To put this in perspective, Ann, who has been a TV celebrity for a couple of decades, gets significantly less than Ta-Nehisi Coates, who was paid $30k and $40k for a couple of college speeches in Oregon recently."

    Rich White limousine liberals pay Ta-Nehisi Coates $30k-$40k to basically just say this.
    https://youtu.be/kga2soqvMF0

    They must use it as a tax write off.

    Replies: @Pericles

    It’s merely some white bastard’s tuition money. There’s plenty more where that came from.

  75. @Canadian Observer
    It's a great idea in theory to have a travelling tour of two debaters. To make it work in the real world, however, the liberal colleges would demand that an "acceptable" establishment Republican be used. Someone like a Ted Cruz or John McCain.

    Anyone with something interesting to say like Richard Spencer would be blacklisted because he is a non-person who isn't even allowed to maintain a GYM membership.

    Replies: @Jefferson, @Reg Cæsar, @Pericles

    Do the students then have to attack both lecturers? Isn’t one enough? I’m confused.

  76. @MEH 0910

    … In that time, the speakers have gotten edgier, more in-your-face
     
    Just like Poochie!!!

    Replies: @Pericles

    Hush, Poochie is Hillary’s secret weapon for defeating Trump in 2020. Don’t spoil it.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Pericles

    "I'm With Her...TO THE EXTREME!!!"

  77. @Jefferson
    @Maj. Kong

    "That’s why you aren’t hearing about BLM anymore. Soros lost confidence in them."

    Black Lies Matter have been low key ever since Donald J. Trump became POTUS and Barack Hussein Obama left office. Black Lies Matter feel a lot more emboldened when there is a Democrat POTUS, for obvious reasons.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong

    BLM owes its origins to NBC doctoring the Zimmerman 911 call, and the Democrats noticed how black turnout spiked in 2012, especially amongst middle-aged women. A logical progression might be the solution to their chronic midterm turnout deficits.

    The Democrats weren’t able to run the “War on Women” narrative in ’16, which we can credit to the prominent presence of Ivanka. (Romney should have relied on one of his daughters-in-law, his sons were a PR disaster)

    The Russia angle is smarter than it looks to us. Most mainstream conservatives have a residual Cold War dislike of Russia, and neocons tribally hate it. It’s a good way to split the GOP camp, and it unifies the D base by creating a far more compelling social conservative threat than could ever have been envisaged by Pat Robertson &co.

    And if (when) they come up with nothing, the Dems have easy rebuttal by referring to the Benghazi hearings.

    There aren’t enough of Russian descent in America* to create an ethnic lobby, but the Russians could buy the existing Armenian/Irish lobbyists, and split the Jewish lobby by creating a American cousin to Avigdor Lieberman’s Russian-speaker party in Israel. That is the only long term way they can head this off.

    *A larger number of this are “Old Believers” that don’t get along with the Russian Orthodox Church.

  78. @black sea
    @whorefinder

    Re: Hitchens


    willing to change his opinion if facts changed.
     
    Hitchens never faced up to the monumental misjudgements he'd made about Iraq. As the situation there deteriorated, you could see him becoming increasingly exasperated and peevish when trying to justify his support for the invasion and overthrow, but he stuck with it, as far as I know, until the end of his life. At least in public.

    Hitchens, though not a realistic political thinker, was a very good writer, and like a lot of very good writers, a complicated and difficult man. He was drawn to secular crusades of various sorts, and was bound to wind up disappointed.

    As Martin Amis said of him shortly after his death, he wasn't a very common-sensical person. He did, however, face his death with admirable courage and stoicism.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong

    Hitchens, though not a realistic political thinker

    Neither is his brother Peter.

  79. @Reg Cæsar

    Robert [not Richard] Spencer
     
    I talked with Spencer after a presentation here recently. He has enough to deal with with Moslems critics, but in addition now has the peeve of being constantly confused with Richard.

    Robert, however, looks very Mediterranean, and might even be able to swing sneaking into Mecca. Not to recommend it, though. The softest penalty, for those genuinely innocently doing so in ignorance, is lifetime banishment from the Kingdom. And there's no way Spencer could conceivably plead ignorance.

    Replies: @Maj. Kong

    Robert is too closely tied with Geller and Pipes, even though he’s “problematic” for Kristol. Alerting people that Islam is bad isn’t enough, a compelling counter must be created, which explains the whole pan-European paganism ‘revival’.

    Bin Laden was always wanting to target the ‘far enemy’ of the West, and then go after the ‘near enemy’ of Arab monarchies and secular dictators. ISIS is the reversal of that position, which is why they split.

    For us, the Muslim horde is the far enemy. The near enemy is the corporate elite that are running the invade/invite paradigm. We should pay more attention to stopping the ongoing ‘refugee resettlement’ and give Russian an equal share in being the Middle East hegemon.

  80. DePaul is the university that caved in to Alan Dershowitz and denied Norman Finkelstein his tenure.

  81. @Pericles
    @MEH 0910

    Hush, Poochie is Hillary's secret weapon for defeating Trump in 2020. Don't spoil it.

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    “I’m With Her…TO THE EXTREME!!!”

  82. @Buzz Mohawk

    ...it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates...to remind students and administrators to think of political speech as a sport, with rules of fair play...
     
    How very English of you to suggest that, Steve. How very Anglo-Saxon -- right out of the Anglosphere and the culture that created America and the Modern World.

    Too many recent arrivals are unable to comprehend what you're talking about.

    BTW I remember when Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy in Boulder, Colorado. They did exactly that kind of tour. It was still possible then, even in Boulder.

    Replies: @aceofspades, @Lot, @Miss Laura, @ia, @neovictorian23

    Ronnie Dugger, editor of the Texas Observer, versus William F. Buckley, UT Austin.

  83. @Buzz Mohawk

    ...it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates...to remind students and administrators to think of political speech as a sport, with rules of fair play...
     
    How very English of you to suggest that, Steve. How very Anglo-Saxon -- right out of the Anglosphere and the culture that created America and the Modern World.

    Too many recent arrivals are unable to comprehend what you're talking about.

    BTW I remember when Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy in Boulder, Colorado. They did exactly that kind of tour. It was still possible then, even in Boulder.

    Replies: @aceofspades, @Lot, @Miss Laura, @ia, @neovictorian23

    How very English of you to suggest that, Steve.

    LOL. I was thinking the same thing. We’re long past those days.

  84. Ta-Nehisi-Coats gonna need some Tallahassee Totes to carry all that speech loot.

  85. I thought KimDotCom was supposed to be the 400 pound hacker sitting on his bed that Trump referred to in a debate?

    I can’t keep track of all this spy vs. spy stuff.

    To be frank, I don’t know who he is. First I heard of him was the mention here by the conspiracy theorist (that’s what I call Konspiracy Kooks when they turn out to be truly prescient). A quick web search told me that he was a tech multi-millionaire who ran into trouble with the law and had his site confiscated (apparently it was a file-sharing site, or something). I have no idea how much he weighs.

  86. @Buzz Mohawk

    ...it would be a good thing if two opposing speakers got together to tour campuses doing debates...to remind students and administrators to think of political speech as a sport, with rules of fair play...
     
    How very English of you to suggest that, Steve. How very Anglo-Saxon -- right out of the Anglosphere and the culture that created America and the Modern World.

    Too many recent arrivals are unable to comprehend what you're talking about.

    BTW I remember when Timothy Leary debated G. Gordon Liddy in Boulder, Colorado. They did exactly that kind of tour. It was still possible then, even in Boulder.

    Replies: @aceofspades, @Lot, @Miss Laura, @ia, @neovictorian23

    I too attended a Liddy-Leary debate, in Reno in 1983. It was billed as “Individual Rights v. Government Responsibilities.” I believe they also did another tour some years later.

    It was fun, interesting and entertaining. Steve’s suggestion is right on. I bet Coulter v. Some Coherent SJW (there must be one?) could actually make serious $$$ for all concerned!

  87. @Pericles
    @International Jew



    “First white black President” is pretty good

     

    Well, it would make more sense if we’d previously had a black black President.

     

    You had the first black white President in the 90s.

    Replies: @International Jew

    I stand corrected. My point only makes sense if you emphasize the first word, ie “white black President”.

  88. Why did Hillary Clinton mention the Alt-Right in a speech? Why didn’t Hillary Clinton visit Wisconsin during the election? How much booze did Hillary Clinton imbibe on September 10, 2016 so as to render her incapable of standing upright on September 11, 2016?

    Hillary is a Booze Hound; that, in itself, doesn’t make her a bad person.

  89. @Anonymous
    @Jim Don Bob

    It's a GE product, look it up.
    The connotation is obvious.

    Replies: @The Alarmist

    The little engine that could?

  90. @Steve Sailer
    @Svigor

    I thought KimDotCom was supposed to be the 400 pound hacker sitting on his bed that Trump referred to in a debate?

    I can't keep track of all this spy vs. spy stuff.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @unpc downunder, @Olorin, @Reg Cæsar

    I can’t keep track of all this spy vs. spy stuff.

    • The pointynosed guy in the white hat/clothes is the good guy.

    • The pointynosed guy in the black hat/clothes is the bad guy.

    • They both do the same things and are surprised at the outcomes.

    Interesting facts: Antonio Prohias was anti-Batista till he got to see what Fidel did to free speech. So he left Cooba and moved to Donald Trump’s and Michael Harrington’s borough–Queens. Whether or not he was actually a CIA asset, who knows. I’m guessing yes, since most of us are about one degree removed from the Agency if that much. CIA is as much meme as manpower.

    I seem to recall that Prohias died in Miami among the gusanos.

    Speaking of spies, Cuba, and stuff dropped in the iSteve commentariat pub, I am SO down with the idea of stealing some DNA from Justin Trudeau and comparing it to Fidel’s in the CIA archives.

    And why not? Soon we peons will be forced to provide DNA scrapings for everything from getting married (to our cats, duh) to buying a toaster oven. But the globodarlings will maintain genetic privacy via FiatBucks or favors that pay for X units of media disinterest.

    Genetic piracy has long been a Big Globo enterprise, considered to be on the up-and-up and enthusiastically practiced by giant corporations’ tiny unfamiliar-named subsidiaries.

    So it’s just a matter of time before we learn of a dark economy in it. In fact if I were temperamentally inclined, 30 years younger, and could stand the smell of hairspray/cosmetics and ego, I’d establish a Celebrity Venue Green Room Attendant business. Imagine the DNA you could heist!

  91. @Gary in Gramercy
    @Reg Cæsar

    "Then again, Boston was at best a very, very distant second to the Cars among Ohioan-founded bands in Beantown. (I can be scathing, too.)"

    Don't forget the Del Fuegos, founded at Oberlin College in the early '80's, and then based in Boston. Great first album, good-but-not-great second album, and then, well,...

    When they briefly got back together in 2012 to do a "reunion tour" as a one-off, they did a few shows in Ohio, and posted this on Facebook: "The Del Fuegos formed in Oberlin, Ohio over 30 years ago. Tonight we'll play in Kent, Ohio. This will most certainly be our last Ohio show....ever. Not because we're not enjoying ourselves but because we all have amazing day jobs. Come out and celebrate our Ohio roots with us!" https://www.facebook.com/thedelfuegos/

    Saw them in NYC in 1985, between The Longest Day and Boston, Mass. Good band, tight, straightforward and completely without pretension (compared to Ric Ocasek's stuffed-nose vocal impression of Bryan Ferry).

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Which states were Human Sexual Response and the Throbbing Members from?

  92. @Steve Sailer
    @Svigor

    I thought KimDotCom was supposed to be the 400 pound hacker sitting on his bed that Trump referred to in a debate?

    I can't keep track of all this spy vs. spy stuff.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @unpc downunder, @Olorin, @Reg Cæsar

    I thought KimDotCom was supposed to be the 400 pound hacker sitting on his bed that Trump referred to in a debate?

    I always think of Kim Komando. But she looks a lot better (damnation with faint praise!) and goes by the name she was born with.

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