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The Scramble from Africa / the Scramble for America
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From Wikipedia:

The “Scramble for Africa” was the invasion, occupation, division, colonization and annexation of African territory by European powers during the period of New Imperialism, between 1881 and 1914. It is also called the Partition of Africa and the Conquest of Africa. In 1870, only 10 percent of Africa was under European control; by 1914 it had increased to 90 percent of the continent, with only Ethiopia (Abyssinia), the Dervish state (Present day Somalia) and Liberia still being independent.

Today, with the population of Africa estimated by the U.N. to grow from 500 million in 1990 to 4 billion in 2100, we are witnessing the Scramble from Africa and the Middle East.

Inevitably, this is turning into the Scramble for America and Europe.

Commenter Shine a Light observes:

Žižek’s and Ahmadinejad’s comments are further evidence of a world-wide neo-colonialist “Scramble for America.” Just as Africa was once considered good for the taking, in light of the failure of post-colonial non-white societies to make good (with a few Asian exceptions), there is now a mad rush by the rest-of-the-world towards America (and Europe).

One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.

Of course during colonialism the costs were socialized within colonizing states and so it was the people of the colonial power who paid those costs that weren’t borne by the colonial subjects themselves, who of course paid dearly, and it was the oligarchic class that privatized the colonial profits.

For example, consider the infamous Heart of Darkness-exploitation of the Congo Free State by King Leopold II of Belgium that shocked even Joseph Conrad.

Leo owned the Congo personally.

But the 1st world oligarchs and their urban bourgeoisie are in strong agreement that the current deplorable working classes are to blame for systems that hurt their working class ancestors but powerfully enriched the wealthy of that time!

And so with the recent rebellions against Globalization, the 1st and 3rd world oligarchs are convinced these are nothing more than the 1st world working classes attempting to shirk their historic guilt debt by refusing to respect the Zeroth Amendment to pay the rightful reparations in terms of standard of living that workers deserve to pay for the crimes committed in the past by their wealthy co-nationals.

 
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  1. All of this would just go away if we realized “historical guilt” is nonsense. The past doesn’t exist. All those people are gone now. There’s only the present, and the future for your children. Even if colonialism had been ten times worse, so what? Why handicap yourself if you don’t have to?

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @kihowi


    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.
     
    It doesn't "work" any more than "the white man's burden" worked on Africans. In both cases they're just rationalizations for the dominant class to do what they're going to do. The only way to stop it is to change the underlying costs and benefits and/or that dominance itself.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    @kihowi

    I think its notable too, that any historic guilt should be paid directly by the perpetrators of those atrocities: notably the same elites who are, instead, offloading their problems upon us. Again.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    @kihowi

    'All of this would just go away if we realized “historical guilt” is nonsense.... Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.'

    I agree that Whites should behave like Vibrants: live without shame for past, present, or future, and thrive as parasitic opportunists. And if Whites 'working the system' en masse causes a collapse of our social welfare schemes (schemes that now mostly benefit Vibrants), I say good riddance.

    , @Erik Sieven
    @kihowi

    the concept of historical guilt is not wrong I think. When somebody wants to take part in a national tradition he should take the good things but also acknowledge the bad things. The problem is that historical guilt mostly gets counted wrong. Some historical get underrated (e.g. Bantu Expansion, Armenians, what happened to native Americans, slavery of Europeans by North Africans and Turks, Islamic conquests in South Asia) and other stories are overrated (colonization in Africa, Tibet)

    , @Anonym
    @kihowi

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.

    It only can work if people are ignorant of history or are taught a one sided view of it. There is always a who and a whom. If there are a lot of who in a territory, it is because the whom who once lived there are dispossed except for perhaps some maternal DNA.

    Most people do not know about the ethnic cleansing of whites from Africa on both sides of the Sahara. They do not know about the Moorish invasions. They do not know about the history of slavery in the Arab world. They do not know about how China has treated Tibet, although they are getting a glimpse now through the South China Sea issue that Chinese in power can be dishonest bullies and not your subservient servers of Chinese food.

    White people understand reciprocity very well. The golden rule of Christianity is a part of that. If the teachers of history leave out all the parts that make other peoples out to be anything other than selfless matyrs, it is easy to make white people feel guilty.

    I think a lot of these things are changing. One piece of knowledge that people are now understanding is that whites are a definite global minority. And I think the other aspects of history are getting more air time, though probably not in schools.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    , @WowJustWow
    @kihowi

    What's really surprising is that it works even when two peoples have had no meaningful prior historical interaction whatsoever. What could Swedes possibly owe Somalis?

    Replies: @Anonymous

  2. The scramble is indeed on for the lands of Europe and the United States (and the rest of the Anglosphere). The commenter is dead right about that.

    He or she is mistaken in identifying an explanation for this in anything having to do with justice or recompense.

    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    (And, likewise, men take another group’s women because they can.)

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    @Opinionator

    people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    Sure, but for the most part immigration patterns to Europe are heavily determined by 19th/20th century colonialism. Pakistanis, Jamaicans, Nigerians and Indians go to the UK, North Africans and West Africans go to France, Central Asians go to Russia. Germany also started with guest workers from areas that had been in the greater German (or at least Habsburg) cultural sphere - northern Italy and northern Yugoslavia.

    I wouldn't say it is all colonial guilt. For employers and government administrators bringing in ex-colonials made sense - they had been using these people as cheap labor already, they speak the language, they kind of know the culture. Since, especially in the 1970s, the natives were prone to things like strikes and joining labor unions, it seemed like a good idea to ship some docile colonials in. That opened the doors for immigration in the 1970s and no one has managed to shut them again.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Frau Katze

    , @Arclight
    @Opinionator

    This. Too many people gloss over the reality that huge swathes of the planet are terrible places to live with little to no major cultural or scientific achievements, not to mention mismanagement of whatever natural resources they have available.

    I can't blame huge numbers of people wanting to leave their native hellholes for a significantly better quality of life in the US or Western Europe. However, I can blame the leaders of the West for failing to firmly say "no" and closing their eyes to the implications of mass immigration by people with little to nothing to offer their prospective new home countries.

    The US is not beyond saving...not sure I could say the same thing about Germany or France.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    , @Anonymous
    @Opinionator


    He or she is mistaken in identifying an explanation for this in anything having to do with justice or recompense.
     
    Right. Did non-colonial Sweden decide to take on all of the white man's guilt, like it's Jesus?

    ... people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.
     
    And they can because we let them, because someone morally incentivized us to let them.

    I don't recognize this fellow among the rich oligarchs putting the sins of colonialism on us: https://translate.google.ca/translate?hl=en&sl=sv&u=https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Schwarz -- he's just part of a foreign element whose intellectual mission is to blur the distinction between foreign and native.

    Seems to me the guilt comes from Nazism and is imposed upon all of us by its biggest victims, and is expiated in this roundabout way, by opening the floodgates to the Third World. When has having it good while others don't triggered such pangs of guilt whose restitution must be paid by opening borders and unilaterally disarming from tribalism -- except post-War? Once it was thought global inequality was the natural order of things.

    , @Desiderius
    @Opinionator


    And, likewise, men take another group’s women because they can.
     
    The women take can do where they get it.

    Replies: @Light Roast

    , @ic1000
    @Opinionator

    Shine A Light (OP):


    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.
     
    Opinionator:

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.
     
    No, it illuminates rather than obscures. All of us frame our experiences in terms of stories, and Shine A Light's post is a perceptive high-level summary of an important narrative. Important not for its truth value, but because it is widely held.

    The following seems to be a common iSteve-commentariat theme: In discussing politics with family members, I'm struck by how dumb they sound as they counter my concerns with mainstream-approved talking points. Matt Yglesias may make seemingly-logical arguments with subtle flaws: my family doesn't. I heard Charlie Rose say something-like-that or read something-like-that in the church bulletin, so it must be so.

    Among other things, Immigration Patriots need simple, easy-to-grasp talking points that will resonate with the many non-politically-sophisticated Americans who would favor our side, but currently do not.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia, @ben tillman

  3. the colonial subjects themselves, who of course paid dearly

    Why “of course”? — neglecting concerns like eg political and psychological effects of self rule vs colonial rule, re the “colonial subjects”, what is the evidence they would have been better off under self rule? — I realize this is asking a question that is impossible to answer: what their living standard may have been had there been no colonial rule.

    Let me give the example of Rhodesia vs Zimbabwe: since self (ie black) rule in Zimbabwe, the per capita GDP has halved while the population has doubled — I think there it would be difficult to argue that the former “colonial subjects” are economically better off than they were under ‘colonial’ (ie white) rule.

    Just like I cannot believe Blacks in America are better off since the advent of the ‘Civil Rights’ era in the 1960s — certainly per some metrics, eg illegitimacy and single parenthood, they are far worse off — and it is very clear these metrics have a direct impact on standard of living.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @eah
    @eah

    To correct an unfortunate misstatement:

    ... in Zimbabwe, the per capita GDP has halved while the population has doubled...

    This should be: GDP in Zimbabwe has halved since self rule, while the population has doubled -- with the obvious attendant consequences for per capita GDP.

    , @Patrick Harris
    @eah

    Comparing hypothetical GDP rates is kind of abstract compared to, say, the genocide of the Herero in Namibia or the deaths of more than a million people in the Congo after being reduced to slave labor for rubber interests.

    Omelet, meet egg.

    Replies: @Gabriel M

    , @Pericles
    @eah


    since self (ie black) rule in Zimbabwe, the per capita GDP has halved while the population has doubled

     

    Worse than that, I would think, since that would leave the GDP steady. And honestly, that seems unlikely after all the malignant nonsense they have done, like land confiscation, driving out the productive and educated, record hyperinflation, etc.

    Wikipedia indicates the GDP per capita has gone from 60% of world average to 10%.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_history_of_Zimbabwe

    On the other hand, in support of what you write, another graph from the page below tells us they have gone from $1100 GDP/cap. in 1980 to $900 in 2012, with a supposed great recovery after dollarisation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Zimbabwe

    However, I'm less than convinced of the reliability of those numbers, partially because of wonderful sentences like this:


    In January, 2013 Finance Minister Tendai Biti announced that Zimbabwe's national public account held just $217.

     

  4. I forget the term Tom Freidman but his point is that people are fleeing the disorder to order. I also wonder if colonialism will return?

    There was a poll a few years ago that showed 60% of Jamaicans regretted independence, I bet that number is higher in most of black Africa.

    • Replies: @Federalist
    @Ed

    If Tom Freidman says that people are fleeing the disorder to order, does he recognize that the people fleeing are bringing their disorder with them and thereby destroying order in places where it does exist (or did until recently)? Not likely.

    Replies: @mobi

  5. @eah
    the colonial subjects themselves, who of course paid dearly

    Why "of course"? -- neglecting concerns like eg political and psychological effects of self rule vs colonial rule, re the "colonial subjects", what is the evidence they would have been better off under self rule? -- I realize this is asking a question that is impossible to answer: what their living standard may have been had there been no colonial rule.

    Let me give the example of Rhodesia vs Zimbabwe: since self (ie black) rule in Zimbabwe, the per capita GDP has halved while the population has doubled -- I think there it would be difficult to argue that the former "colonial subjects" are economically better off than they were under 'colonial' (ie white) rule.

    Just like I cannot believe Blacks in America are better off since the advent of the 'Civil Rights' era in the 1960s -- certainly per some metrics, eg illegitimacy and single parenthood, they are far worse off -- and it is very clear these metrics have a direct impact on standard of living.

    Replies: @eah, @Patrick Harris, @Pericles

    To correct an unfortunate misstatement:

    … in Zimbabwe, the per capita GDP has halved while the population has doubled…

    This should be: GDP in Zimbabwe has halved since self rule, while the population has doubled — with the obvious attendant consequences for per capita GDP.

  6. the 1st and 3rd world oligarchs are convinced these are nothing more than the 1st world working classes attempting to shirk their historic guilt debt by refusing to respect the Zeroth Amendment to pay the rightful reparations in terms of standard of living that workers deserve to pay for the crimes committed in the past by their wealthy co-nationals.

    That’s what they tell the upper middle class so they’ll go along with it. (Cheap nannies are too obvious a justification–the UMC likes to feel good about itself.) They want cheap labor so they make more money. Splitting the working class by race (why are we the only rich country with no national health plan and no vacation?) is a nice bonus.

  7. @Opinionator
    The scramble is indeed on for the lands of Europe and the United States (and the rest of the Anglosphere). The commenter is dead right about that.

    He or she is mistaken in identifying an explanation for this in anything having to do with justice or recompense.


    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.

     

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    (And, likewise, men take another group's women because they can.)

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Arclight, @Anonymous, @Desiderius, @ic1000

    people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    Sure, but for the most part immigration patterns to Europe are heavily determined by 19th/20th century colonialism. Pakistanis, Jamaicans, Nigerians and Indians go to the UK, North Africans and West Africans go to France, Central Asians go to Russia. Germany also started with guest workers from areas that had been in the greater German (or at least Habsburg) cultural sphere – northern Italy and northern Yugoslavia.

    I wouldn’t say it is all colonial guilt. For employers and government administrators bringing in ex-colonials made sense – they had been using these people as cheap labor already, they speak the language, they kind of know the culture. Since, especially in the 1970s, the natives were prone to things like strikes and joining labor unions, it seemed like a good idea to ship some docile colonials in. That opened the doors for immigration in the 1970s and no one has managed to shut them again.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Peter Akuleyev


    For employers and government administrators bringing in ex-colonials made sense
     
    How ex- then are they?
    , @Frau Katze
    @Peter Akuleyev

    How do explain the Swedes?

  8. @Opinionator
    The scramble is indeed on for the lands of Europe and the United States (and the rest of the Anglosphere). The commenter is dead right about that.

    He or she is mistaken in identifying an explanation for this in anything having to do with justice or recompense.


    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.

     

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    (And, likewise, men take another group's women because they can.)

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Arclight, @Anonymous, @Desiderius, @ic1000

    This. Too many people gloss over the reality that huge swathes of the planet are terrible places to live with little to no major cultural or scientific achievements, not to mention mismanagement of whatever natural resources they have available.

    I can’t blame huge numbers of people wanting to leave their native hellholes for a significantly better quality of life in the US or Western Europe. However, I can blame the leaders of the West for failing to firmly say “no” and closing their eyes to the implications of mass immigration by people with little to nothing to offer their prospective new home countries.

    The US is not beyond saving…not sure I could say the same thing about Germany or France.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Arclight

    I fell in love with an Austrian once, but, as for Germans, I have never met one who did not simultaneously make me like and detest him. I am guessing the positive emotion is some form of genetic recognition (as I'm half), and the negative one arises from their current self-imposed condition.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  9. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Opinionator
    The scramble is indeed on for the lands of Europe and the United States (and the rest of the Anglosphere). The commenter is dead right about that.

    He or she is mistaken in identifying an explanation for this in anything having to do with justice or recompense.


    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.

     

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    (And, likewise, men take another group's women because they can.)

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Arclight, @Anonymous, @Desiderius, @ic1000

    He or she is mistaken in identifying an explanation for this in anything having to do with justice or recompense.

    Right. Did non-colonial Sweden decide to take on all of the white man’s guilt, like it’s Jesus?

    … people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    And they can because we let them, because someone morally incentivized us to let them.

    I don’t recognize this fellow among the rich oligarchs putting the sins of colonialism on us: https://translate.google.ca/translate?hl=en&sl=sv&u=https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Schwarz — he’s just part of a foreign element whose intellectual mission is to blur the distinction between foreign and native.

    Seems to me the guilt comes from Nazism and is imposed upon all of us by its biggest victims, and is expiated in this roundabout way, by opening the floodgates to the Third World. When has having it good while others don’t triggered such pangs of guilt whose restitution must be paid by opening borders and unilaterally disarming from tribalism — except post-War? Once it was thought global inequality was the natural order of things.

  10. @Ed
    I forget the term Tom Freidman but his point is that people are fleeing the disorder to order. I also wonder if colonialism will return?

    There was a poll a few years ago that showed 60% of Jamaicans regretted independence, I bet that number is higher in most of black Africa.

    Replies: @Federalist

    If Tom Freidman says that people are fleeing the disorder to order, does he recognize that the people fleeing are bringing their disorder with them and thereby destroying order in places where it does exist (or did until recently)? Not likely.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @mobi
    @Federalist


    If Tom Freidman says that people are fleeing the disorder to order, does he recognize that the people fleeing are bringing their disorder with them and thereby destroying order in places where it does exist (or did until recently)? Not likely.
     
    Unfortunately, I think it's very likely.
  11. @kihowi
    All of this would just go away if we realized "historical guilt" is nonsense. The past doesn't exist. All those people are gone now. There's only the present, and the future for your children. Even if colonialism had been ten times worse, so what? Why handicap yourself if you don't have to?

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It's a very strange achilles heel.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Daniel Chieh, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Erik Sieven, @Anonym, @WowJustWow

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.

    It doesn’t “work” any more than “the white man’s burden” worked on Africans. In both cases they’re just rationalizations for the dominant class to do what they’re going to do. The only way to stop it is to change the underlying costs and benefits and/or that dominance itself.

  12. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Opinionator

    people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    Sure, but for the most part immigration patterns to Europe are heavily determined by 19th/20th century colonialism. Pakistanis, Jamaicans, Nigerians and Indians go to the UK, North Africans and West Africans go to France, Central Asians go to Russia. Germany also started with guest workers from areas that had been in the greater German (or at least Habsburg) cultural sphere - northern Italy and northern Yugoslavia.

    I wouldn't say it is all colonial guilt. For employers and government administrators bringing in ex-colonials made sense - they had been using these people as cheap labor already, they speak the language, they kind of know the culture. Since, especially in the 1970s, the natives were prone to things like strikes and joining labor unions, it seemed like a good idea to ship some docile colonials in. That opened the doors for immigration in the 1970s and no one has managed to shut them again.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Frau Katze

    For employers and government administrators bringing in ex-colonials made sense

    How ex- then are they?

  13. Odd isn’t it, that the United States is now the ‘right of every person’ on the planet. How can we keep the wretched refuge of the world from our shores. The Zeroth Amendment is alive and well – come one, come all, and a hearty welcome to you and yours.

    • Replies: @mobi
    @Hubbub


    Odd isn’t it, that the United States is now the ‘right of every person’ on the planet. How can we keep the wretched refuge of the world from our shores. The Zeroth Amendment is alive and well – come one, come all, and a hearty welcome to you and yours.
     
    Who controls what is and isn't placed at the base of the Statue of Liberty?

    Who decided 'that poem' was the be all and end all of it, for all time?

    Why not mount beside it something like Kipling's The Stranger?

    "The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk--
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wont to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control--
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    ..."

    Perhaps superimposed on a picture of Lady Liberty with the smoking, flaming ruins of WTC in the background.

    Just for balance. Balance is good.
    , @Frau Katze
    @Hubbub

    And you can likely add Canada to that. The flight to Canada of illegal migrants in the US has begun. Not a chance that Trudope will send them back.

    So the US/Canadian border will become meaningless. Just one huge area for the whole world to descend upon.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

  14. @Opinionator
    The scramble is indeed on for the lands of Europe and the United States (and the rest of the Anglosphere). The commenter is dead right about that.

    He or she is mistaken in identifying an explanation for this in anything having to do with justice or recompense.


    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.

     

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    (And, likewise, men take another group's women because they can.)

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Arclight, @Anonymous, @Desiderius, @ic1000

    And, likewise, men take another group’s women because they can.

    The women take can do where they get it.

    • Replies: @Light Roast
    @Desiderius


    The women take can do where they get it.
     
    Huh?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @res

  15. @eah
    the colonial subjects themselves, who of course paid dearly

    Why "of course"? -- neglecting concerns like eg political and psychological effects of self rule vs colonial rule, re the "colonial subjects", what is the evidence they would have been better off under self rule? -- I realize this is asking a question that is impossible to answer: what their living standard may have been had there been no colonial rule.

    Let me give the example of Rhodesia vs Zimbabwe: since self (ie black) rule in Zimbabwe, the per capita GDP has halved while the population has doubled -- I think there it would be difficult to argue that the former "colonial subjects" are economically better off than they were under 'colonial' (ie white) rule.

    Just like I cannot believe Blacks in America are better off since the advent of the 'Civil Rights' era in the 1960s -- certainly per some metrics, eg illegitimacy and single parenthood, they are far worse off -- and it is very clear these metrics have a direct impact on standard of living.

    Replies: @eah, @Patrick Harris, @Pericles

    Comparing hypothetical GDP rates is kind of abstract compared to, say, the genocide of the Herero in Namibia or the deaths of more than a million people in the Congo after being reduced to slave labor for rubber interests.

    Omelet, meet egg.

    • Replies: @Gabriel M
    @Patrick Harris

    Judging "imperialism" by two data points is like judging "the nation state" by Nazi Germany and the French Revolution.

    Are there actually still people who can say with a straight face that the transition of British colonies to "democracy" (American imperialism) or "socialism" (Russian imperialism) was, on balance, a good thing? Really?

    Replies: @Patrick Harris

  16. @eah
    the colonial subjects themselves, who of course paid dearly

    Why "of course"? -- neglecting concerns like eg political and psychological effects of self rule vs colonial rule, re the "colonial subjects", what is the evidence they would have been better off under self rule? -- I realize this is asking a question that is impossible to answer: what their living standard may have been had there been no colonial rule.

    Let me give the example of Rhodesia vs Zimbabwe: since self (ie black) rule in Zimbabwe, the per capita GDP has halved while the population has doubled -- I think there it would be difficult to argue that the former "colonial subjects" are economically better off than they were under 'colonial' (ie white) rule.

    Just like I cannot believe Blacks in America are better off since the advent of the 'Civil Rights' era in the 1960s -- certainly per some metrics, eg illegitimacy and single parenthood, they are far worse off -- and it is very clear these metrics have a direct impact on standard of living.

    Replies: @eah, @Patrick Harris, @Pericles

    since self (ie black) rule in Zimbabwe, the per capita GDP has halved while the population has doubled

    Worse than that, I would think, since that would leave the GDP steady. And honestly, that seems unlikely after all the malignant nonsense they have done, like land confiscation, driving out the productive and educated, record hyperinflation, etc.

    Wikipedia indicates the GDP per capita has gone from 60% of world average to 10%.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_history_of_Zimbabwe

    On the other hand, in support of what you write, another graph from the page below tells us they have gone from $1100 GDP/cap. in 1980 to $900 in 2012, with a supposed great recovery after dollarisation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Zimbabwe

    However, I’m less than convinced of the reliability of those numbers, partially because of wonderful sentences like this:

    In January, 2013 Finance Minister Tendai Biti announced that Zimbabwe’s national public account held just $217.

  17. @Arclight
    @Opinionator

    This. Too many people gloss over the reality that huge swathes of the planet are terrible places to live with little to no major cultural or scientific achievements, not to mention mismanagement of whatever natural resources they have available.

    I can't blame huge numbers of people wanting to leave their native hellholes for a significantly better quality of life in the US or Western Europe. However, I can blame the leaders of the West for failing to firmly say "no" and closing their eyes to the implications of mass immigration by people with little to nothing to offer their prospective new home countries.

    The US is not beyond saving...not sure I could say the same thing about Germany or France.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    I fell in love with an Austrian once, but, as for Germans, I have never met one who did not simultaneously make me like and detest him. I am guessing the positive emotion is some form of genetic recognition (as I’m half), and the negative one arises from their current self-imposed condition.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Chrisnonymous


    I fell in love with an Austrian once, but, as for Germans, I have never met one who did not simultaneously make me like and detest him. I am guessing the positive emotion is some form of genetic recognition (as I’m half), and the negative one arises from their current self-imposed condition.
     
    There's nothing self-imposed about it.
  18. @Opinionator
    The scramble is indeed on for the lands of Europe and the United States (and the rest of the Anglosphere). The commenter is dead right about that.

    He or she is mistaken in identifying an explanation for this in anything having to do with justice or recompense.


    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.

     

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    (And, likewise, men take another group's women because they can.)

    Replies: @Peter Akuleyev, @Arclight, @Anonymous, @Desiderius, @ic1000

    Shine A Light (OP):

    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.

    Opinionator:

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    No, it illuminates rather than obscures. All of us frame our experiences in terms of stories, and Shine A Light’s post is a perceptive high-level summary of an important narrative. Important not for its truth value, but because it is widely held.

    The following seems to be a common iSteve-commentariat theme: In discussing politics with family members, I’m struck by how dumb they sound as they counter my concerns with mainstream-approved talking points. Matt Yglesias may make seemingly-logical arguments with subtle flaws: my family doesn’t. I heard Charlie Rose say something-like-that or read something-like-that in the church bulletin, so it must be so.

    Among other things, Immigration Patriots need simple, easy-to-grasp talking points that will resonate with the many non-politically-sophisticated Americans who would favor our side, but currently do not.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @ic1000

    One of the reasons ordinary people sound dumb when discussing politics is because they are ignorant of basic statistics about the surrounding world.

    They probably simply have no idea what percentage of the American population is foreign born. Also probably have no idea how many countries have a much lower standard of living than us, the populations of these countries (or our country, for that matter), or the rate in which global pop is projected to grow over the next couple of decades. After all, the average American believes that 30 + percentage of the U.S population is gay, 30 + percentage is black, etc.

    People don't think it is important to know facts anymore, and modern education exacerbates this trend, because "recall is the lowest form of learning, it's just regurgitation, blah blah, children must solve problems, etc, etc." The problem there is, you can't really "solve problems", analyze things correctly, understand the world we live in, unless you have a solid base of knowledge (facts) to draw from.

    I'd say your best bet with your family is to just help them gain some perspective. Inform them of basic statistics on human geography.

    Replies: @Parbes, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anonymous

    , @ben tillman
    @ic1000


    No, it illuminates rather than obscures. All of us frame our experiences in terms of stories, and Shine A Light’s post is a perceptive high-level summary of an important narrative. Important not for its truth value, but because it is widely held.
     
    But it's not widely held. No one anywhere believes that the "working classes" (but not the upper classes) are responsible for colonialism or anything else the First World did to the Third World. Lots of people do, however, believe that the working classes are irredeemably racist *now*, and that propagated belief is a common justification for policies of race replacement.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Anonymous

  19. “we are witnessing the Scramble from Africa and the Middle East.”

    Here’s a list of nations by net emigration rate:
    https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/fields/2112.html

    There’s a bit of wild fluctuation year-to-year (Syria was about -2 percent in 2015 but seems to have reduced drastically in 2016). But it’s worth emphasizing that migration is basically irrelevant as a solution to a demographic problem. Niger has a population growth rate of 3.22 percent and a net migration rate of -0.05 percent

    It’s fine to worry about immigration to the West but if any of you imagine that nations can rely on migration to relieve overcrowding, you’re simply wrong. For most nations, migration is a rounding error in population growth.

    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    @Vinay

    the four billion projection is likely to be corrected soon, the next projection will be much higher. This means Africa has so many people that by 2100 there could be more Afro Chinese in China than Han Chinese, and more Afro Indians in India that Indian Indians and at the same time the population in subsaharan Africa itself would still have exploded and multiplied. There is no relieve when there is exponential growth

  20. Mr Sailer, please forgive my insolence, but why don’t you spell check your posts before publishing? Spelling errors detract from the credibility of your work. Sounds silly, but it’s true.

  21. New overclass mantra: “Let’s you and him share.”

    • Replies: @mobi
    @Luke Lea


    New overclass mantra: “Let’s you and him share.”
     
    That's good.
  22. I remember reading a book, King Leopold’s Ghost, about the governance of the Belgian Congo and the “rubber terror.” It does seem to have been the inspiration for Heart of Darkness, although I think that Kurtz is described as an ivory trader “whose methods have become unsound.”

  23. @ic1000
    @Opinionator

    Shine A Light (OP):


    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.
     
    Opinionator:

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.
     
    No, it illuminates rather than obscures. All of us frame our experiences in terms of stories, and Shine A Light's post is a perceptive high-level summary of an important narrative. Important not for its truth value, but because it is widely held.

    The following seems to be a common iSteve-commentariat theme: In discussing politics with family members, I'm struck by how dumb they sound as they counter my concerns with mainstream-approved talking points. Matt Yglesias may make seemingly-logical arguments with subtle flaws: my family doesn't. I heard Charlie Rose say something-like-that or read something-like-that in the church bulletin, so it must be so.

    Among other things, Immigration Patriots need simple, easy-to-grasp talking points that will resonate with the many non-politically-sophisticated Americans who would favor our side, but currently do not.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia, @ben tillman

    One of the reasons ordinary people sound dumb when discussing politics is because they are ignorant of basic statistics about the surrounding world.

    They probably simply have no idea what percentage of the American population is foreign born. Also probably have no idea how many countries have a much lower standard of living than us, the populations of these countries (or our country, for that matter), or the rate in which global pop is projected to grow over the next couple of decades. After all, the average American believes that 30 + percentage of the U.S population is gay, 30 + percentage is black, etc.

    People don’t think it is important to know facts anymore, and modern education exacerbates this trend, because “recall is the lowest form of learning, it’s just regurgitation, blah blah, children must solve problems, etc, etc.” The problem there is, you can’t really “solve problems”, analyze things correctly, understand the world we live in, unless you have a solid base of knowledge (facts) to draw from.

    I’d say your best bet with your family is to just help them gain some perspective. Inform them of basic statistics on human geography.

    • Replies: @Parbes
    @S. Anonyia

    Great post! Agree wholeheartedly!

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @S. Anonyia


    People don’t think it is important to know facts anymore, and modern education exacerbates this trend, because “recall is the lowest form of learning, it’s just regurgitation, blah blah, children must solve problems, etc, etc.” The problem there is, you can’t really “solve problems”, analyze things correctly, understand the world we live in, unless you have a solid base of knowledge (facts) to draw from.

     

    This is utterly, comprehensively -- tragically -- true.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    , @Anonymous
    @S. Anonyia

    Disagree. Really, you're having a moral dispute disguised as a factual dispute. Someone, somewhere, has inculcated in them virtues that, for you, spell disaster. (So you need to get to the heart of who and why.) The relevant facts imply or involve some degree of HBD, but again, the objections to them are moral ones.

  24. Well this just misses the point, you see. White people can’t be indigenous. When they live somewhere for a long time we call them xenophobic racists and when they go somewhere else we call them xenophobic imperialists. It’s very simple.

  25. @ic1000
    @Opinionator

    Shine A Light (OP):


    One way to look at Globalization is as an updated version of the post WW1 Versailles Treaty which imposed reparations on a defeated Germany for all the harm they caused during the Great War. The Globalized Versailles Treaty is aimed at the American (and European) working classes for the crimes of colonialism, racism, slavery and any other bad things the 1st world has done to the 3rd in the past.
     
    Opinionator:

    That obfuscates rather than illuminates. As Steve notes in the prior post on the Viking invasion of England, people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.
     
    No, it illuminates rather than obscures. All of us frame our experiences in terms of stories, and Shine A Light's post is a perceptive high-level summary of an important narrative. Important not for its truth value, but because it is widely held.

    The following seems to be a common iSteve-commentariat theme: In discussing politics with family members, I'm struck by how dumb they sound as they counter my concerns with mainstream-approved talking points. Matt Yglesias may make seemingly-logical arguments with subtle flaws: my family doesn't. I heard Charlie Rose say something-like-that or read something-like-that in the church bulletin, so it must be so.

    Among other things, Immigration Patriots need simple, easy-to-grasp talking points that will resonate with the many non-politically-sophisticated Americans who would favor our side, but currently do not.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia, @ben tillman

    No, it illuminates rather than obscures. All of us frame our experiences in terms of stories, and Shine A Light’s post is a perceptive high-level summary of an important narrative. Important not for its truth value, but because it is widely held.

    But it’s not widely held. No one anywhere believes that the “working classes” (but not the upper classes) are responsible for colonialism or anything else the First World did to the Third World. Lots of people do, however, believe that the working classes are irredeemably racist *now*, and that propagated belief is a common justification for policies of race replacement.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @ben tillman

    "But it’s not widely held. No one anywhere believes that the “working classes” (but not the upper classes) are responsible for colonialism or anything else the First World did to the Third World."

    The "working classes" were those groups of people who arrived from the First World to the Third World as colonists and immigrants. They sought a better life by imposing their will upon newcomers, as promoted by their nation and government policies. While the "working classes" did not create the agenda, they certainly played an integral role in implementing it.

    Replies: @ic1000

    , @Anonymous
    @ben tillman

    There's more than a few lefties who think that the relatively comfortable existence of the Western working class is entirely due to historical and current exploitation of Third World labor and resources.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  26. Again, as per normal, Steve Sailer nails it. His smartass summations always dig at the most important truths, most of which we have been trained, by our Emperor’s New Clothes world, not to see, much less to acknowledge.

    The Elites ARE the problem. And these Elites belong to post-Christendom, secular democratic thought. Yes, that includes the Queen of England and her heirs.

  27. @kihowi
    All of this would just go away if we realized "historical guilt" is nonsense. The past doesn't exist. All those people are gone now. There's only the present, and the future for your children. Even if colonialism had been ten times worse, so what? Why handicap yourself if you don't have to?

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It's a very strange achilles heel.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Daniel Chieh, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Erik Sieven, @Anonym, @WowJustWow

    I think its notable too, that any historic guilt should be paid directly by the perpetrators of those atrocities: notably the same elites who are, instead, offloading their problems upon us. Again.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @Daniel Chieh

    "I think its notable too, that any historic guilt should be paid directly by the perpetrators of those atrocities: notably the same elites who are, instead, offloading their problems upon us. Again."

    The "perps" of colonialism were government officials, church authorities, and business owners. Together, they believed that the greater good of their nation would be best served if they were able to procure new markets and resources. The policies of these "elites" were highly supported by the citizens of their nations. In essence, you are blaming tens of millions of Europeans for engaging in what amounts to be the pursuit of progress. Congratulations.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

  28. @Desiderius
    @Opinionator


    And, likewise, men take another group’s women because they can.
     
    The women take can do where they get it.

    Replies: @Light Roast

    The women take can do where they get it.

    Huh?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Light Roast

    Can beats cant.

    , @res
    @Light Roast

    I found that hard to interpret at first too. Try adding quotes like this:

    The women take "can do" where they get it.

    Replies: @Light Roast

  29. You went there so we are coming here.

    Karma’s a witch isn’t it?

    How does it feel? Knowing your descendents will be People of Color. Knowing your womenfolk will be the lovers of Men of Color

    • Replies: @mobi
    @Tiny Duck


    You went there so we are coming here.

    Karma’s a witch isn’t it?
     
    They have in common that neither is up to you.
  30. Last year I read a large comprehensive history of the African liberation movements in the 1960s. I was a tough slog to get through that book. It all read like the same sad story over and over with only the names of the leaders changing. Every story in every country had a strong man who established some kind of socialism with his relatives or tribesmen put in positions where they could rape the economy. Political opponents were imprisoned or shot or fed to wild animals. Quite a few of these new emerging black leaders kept crocodile farms so they would have a colorful way of thinning out the ranks of their opponents.

    It was a very depressing book. Several of these indigenous leaders literally ate their opponents – eg. Bokassa and Amin.

    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    @Pat Boyle

    What's the title, if you don't mind?

    , @Ed
    @Pat Boyle

    Would you happen to have the title or author of this book?

    , @Anonymous
    @Pat Boyle

    "Political opponents were imprisoned or shot or fed to wild animals. Quite a few of these new emerging black leaders kept crocodile farms so they would have a colorful way of thinning out the ranks of their opponents.

    "It was a very depressing book. Several of these indigenous leaders literally ate their opponents – eg. Bokassa and Amin."

    I bet they at least weren't racist.

  31. @kihowi
    All of this would just go away if we realized "historical guilt" is nonsense. The past doesn't exist. All those people are gone now. There's only the present, and the future for your children. Even if colonialism had been ten times worse, so what? Why handicap yourself if you don't have to?

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It's a very strange achilles heel.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Daniel Chieh, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Erik Sieven, @Anonym, @WowJustWow

    ‘All of this would just go away if we realized “historical guilt” is nonsense…. Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.’

    I agree that Whites should behave like Vibrants: live without shame for past, present, or future, and thrive as parasitic opportunists. And if Whites ‘working the system’ en masse causes a collapse of our social welfare schemes (schemes that now mostly benefit Vibrants), I say good riddance.

  32. White America is Humpty Dumpty – a large but fragile egg that’s now being cracked, cooked, and scrambled on a vast black skillet.

    Burn, baby, burn, indeed.

  33. Since the election of Trump the Elites are taking a page from Michel Houellebecq’s Submission.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submission_(novel)

    Their fear/revulsion of normal white Americans has shortened the timetable of their suicide pact.

    They want it all right now.

  34. Even if we get rid of historical guilt and shame that won’t be enough.

    When Africa’s population explodes and we are subjected to unending video and images of African children dying of starvation, the guilt won’t need to be historical. American and European unwillingness to accept millions of starving Africans will be cast as pure selfish cruelty at that moment.

    I’m not sure how we psychically prepare our children for this.

    • Replies: @Parbes
    @juster

    "When Africa’s population explodes and we are subjected to unending video and images of African children dying of starvation, the guilt won’t need to be historical....I’m not sure how we psychically prepare our children for this."

    The thing to do is NOT, to try to "psychically prepare your children" for that. The thing to do, is to PREEMPTIVELY PREPARE for that inevitable population explosion by fighting and neutralizing those who will attempt to lay the guilt on you and your children via those "unending video and images of African children dying of starvation" and the accompanying stupid bleeding-heart propaganda - NOW!

    Replies: @Old fogey

    , @Anonym
    @juster

    I’m not sure how we psychically prepare our children for this.

    I suggest watching Zulu on repeat.

  35. @Light Roast
    @Desiderius


    The women take can do where they get it.
     
    Huh?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @res

    Can beats cant.

  36. “… there is now a mad rush by the rest-of-the-world towards America (and Europe).”

    Why?
    One robs banks because that’s where the money is.

  37. @Pat Boyle
    Last year I read a large comprehensive history of the African liberation movements in the 1960s. I was a tough slog to get through that book. It all read like the same sad story over and over with only the names of the leaders changing. Every story in every country had a strong man who established some kind of socialism with his relatives or tribesmen put in positions where they could rape the economy. Political opponents were imprisoned or shot or fed to wild animals. Quite a few of these new emerging black leaders kept crocodile farms so they would have a colorful way of thinning out the ranks of their opponents.

    It was a very depressing book. Several of these indigenous leaders literally ate their opponents - eg. Bokassa and Amin.

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool, @Ed, @Anonymous

    What’s the title, if you don’t mind?

  38. No, it was zero percent.

    Italy had the upper hand in Ethiopia and Somalia (and Britain in Somaliland), while everyone knew Liberia was kind of a US colony.

    On 1913, the only truly independent non-Western nation on earth was Japan.

  39. People…quit whining. Europeans and Americans have as much say in being swamped as the Native American did when Europeans starting swamping them.

    By the way, the story of the population of the world by humanity is hominids moving out of Africa and colonizing other continents. Why act like this modern wave is unprecedented?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @Marco Polo

    There's also the story of Vikings that came to the New World and got repelled. The story of the population of the world also involves defense, just so you know.

    Replies: @Marco Polo

  40. @Pat Boyle
    Last year I read a large comprehensive history of the African liberation movements in the 1960s. I was a tough slog to get through that book. It all read like the same sad story over and over with only the names of the leaders changing. Every story in every country had a strong man who established some kind of socialism with his relatives or tribesmen put in positions where they could rape the economy. Political opponents were imprisoned or shot or fed to wild animals. Quite a few of these new emerging black leaders kept crocodile farms so they would have a colorful way of thinning out the ranks of their opponents.

    It was a very depressing book. Several of these indigenous leaders literally ate their opponents - eg. Bokassa and Amin.

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool, @Ed, @Anonymous

    Would you happen to have the title or author of this book?

    • Agree: PV van der Byl
  41. @Light Roast
    @Desiderius


    The women take can do where they get it.
     
    Huh?

    Replies: @Desiderius, @res

    I found that hard to interpret at first too. Try adding quotes like this:

    The women take “can do” where they get it.

    • Replies: @Light Roast
    @res

    Ah. Thanks res.

    I think another "can" near the end would make it even more intelligible.

    "The women take can-do where they can get it."

    Nicely done, Desiderius.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  42. “The Race To Fashoda” by David Levering Lewis tells the tale of imperial conflict in Africa. The Limeys and the Frogs were battling for control of a fort on the Nile to determine who would control the interior of Africa. The Limeys won.

    David Levering Lewis is a mulatto professor who looks a bit like the baseball player Roy White. I never bought Lewis’ arguments that Africa had a culture anywhere close to Europe in achievement. I had to listen to him twice a week for a bit. I agree with Hegel, Africa is not civilizationally comparable to Europe in any way.

  43. @Daniel Chieh
    @kihowi

    I think its notable too, that any historic guilt should be paid directly by the perpetrators of those atrocities: notably the same elites who are, instead, offloading their problems upon us. Again.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    “I think its notable too, that any historic guilt should be paid directly by the perpetrators of those atrocities: notably the same elites who are, instead, offloading their problems upon us. Again.”

    The “perps” of colonialism were government officials, church authorities, and business owners. Together, they believed that the greater good of their nation would be best served if they were able to procure new markets and resources. The policies of these “elites” were highly supported by the citizens of their nations. In essence, you are blaming tens of millions of Europeans for engaging in what amounts to be the pursuit of progress. Congratulations.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @Corvinus

    That's a ridiculous effort to diffuse responsibility from very specific individuals and families. Holding the average Belgium citizen now as equally responsible for the atrocity in the Congo as King Leopold II is effectively senseless; reparations should be paid from his estate, not from the average taxpayer's.

    Of course, I find all of this pretty senseless.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

  44. http://www.nbcnews.com/id/26755692/ns/technology_and_science-science/t/viking-age-triggered-shortage-wives/#.WLR7Q9SLSt
    During the Viking Age from the late eighth to the mid-eleventh centuries, Scandinavians tore across Europe attacking, robbing and terrorizing locals. According to a new study, the young warriors were driven to seek their fortunes to better their chances of finding wives.
    The odd twist to the story, said researcher James Barrett, is that it was the selective killing of female newborns that led to a shortage of Scandinavian women in the first place, resulting later in intense competition over eligible women.

    https://www.unz.com/pfrost/african-outlier/

    https://www.unz.com/pfrost/the-contradictions-of-polygyny/
    For young men in a high-polygyny society, warfare—typically raids against neighboring communities—is the main way to gain access to women. In a sense, war becomes a means of resolving the demographic contradictions of a high-polygyny society. Polygyny creates a wife shortage among young men, and this contradiction is resolved by turning it outward. As warriors, young men are encouraged to satisfy their sexual urges through raids against neighboring peoples.

  45. @ben tillman
    @ic1000


    No, it illuminates rather than obscures. All of us frame our experiences in terms of stories, and Shine A Light’s post is a perceptive high-level summary of an important narrative. Important not for its truth value, but because it is widely held.
     
    But it's not widely held. No one anywhere believes that the "working classes" (but not the upper classes) are responsible for colonialism or anything else the First World did to the Third World. Lots of people do, however, believe that the working classes are irredeemably racist *now*, and that propagated belief is a common justification for policies of race replacement.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Anonymous

    “But it’s not widely held. No one anywhere believes that the “working classes” (but not the upper classes) are responsible for colonialism or anything else the First World did to the Third World.”

    The “working classes” were those groups of people who arrived from the First World to the Third World as colonists and immigrants. They sought a better life by imposing their will upon newcomers, as promoted by their nation and government policies. While the “working classes” did not create the agenda, they certainly played an integral role in implementing it.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    @Corvinus

    "The 'working classes' were those groups of people who arrived from the First World to the Third World as colonists and immigrants. They sought a better life by imposing their will upon newcomers those already there, as promoted by their nation and government policies. While the 'working classes' did not create the agenda, they certainly played an integral role in implementing it."

    I think that's what you meant.

    It seems to me that your focus is much too narrow. You seem to portray this process as the whites of the First World sinning against the diverse (and blameless) peoples of the Third World.

    Perhaps the process is better stated as:

    From prehistory to the present, groups of people have migrated from their birthplace to another place. At their destination, the newcomers sought a better life by imposing their will upon the different group of people who already lived there. With fairly rare exceptions, the outcome was an unhappy one for the host group.

    Off the top of my head and in no particular order, examples include Polynesian migrations, Han in Tibet, the Bantu Expansion, Huns in Germania, Romans in Celtic Gaul, Goths in Roman Gaul, Saxons in Britain, Danes in England, English in Ireland, Toltecs, Aztecs, Bengalis in Burma, Khmers in Thailand, Vietnamese in Cambodia. Some Googling could expand the list to hundreds.

    So as an original sin of Europeans: not very original.

  46. @Patrick Harris
    @eah

    Comparing hypothetical GDP rates is kind of abstract compared to, say, the genocide of the Herero in Namibia or the deaths of more than a million people in the Congo after being reduced to slave labor for rubber interests.

    Omelet, meet egg.

    Replies: @Gabriel M

    Judging “imperialism” by two data points is like judging “the nation state” by Nazi Germany and the French Revolution.

    Are there actually still people who can say with a straight face that the transition of British colonies to “democracy” (American imperialism) or “socialism” (Russian imperialism) was, on balance, a good thing? Really?

    • Replies: @Patrick Harris
    @Gabriel M

    The point isn't that you can judge "imperialism" in toto by those two events, but that it's not remotely a stretch to say colonized peoples "paid dearly" for whatever it achieved.

    As a side note, whether it was a good thing to be initially colonized is a separate question from whether the postcolonial states were an improvement.

  47. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Pat Boyle
    Last year I read a large comprehensive history of the African liberation movements in the 1960s. I was a tough slog to get through that book. It all read like the same sad story over and over with only the names of the leaders changing. Every story in every country had a strong man who established some kind of socialism with his relatives or tribesmen put in positions where they could rape the economy. Political opponents were imprisoned or shot or fed to wild animals. Quite a few of these new emerging black leaders kept crocodile farms so they would have a colorful way of thinning out the ranks of their opponents.

    It was a very depressing book. Several of these indigenous leaders literally ate their opponents - eg. Bokassa and Amin.

    Replies: @Negrolphin Pool, @Ed, @Anonymous

    “Political opponents were imprisoned or shot or fed to wild animals. Quite a few of these new emerging black leaders kept crocodile farms so they would have a colorful way of thinning out the ranks of their opponents.

    “It was a very depressing book. Several of these indigenous leaders literally ate their opponents – eg. Bokassa and Amin.”

    I bet they at least weren’t racist.

  48. @S. Anonyia
    @ic1000

    One of the reasons ordinary people sound dumb when discussing politics is because they are ignorant of basic statistics about the surrounding world.

    They probably simply have no idea what percentage of the American population is foreign born. Also probably have no idea how many countries have a much lower standard of living than us, the populations of these countries (or our country, for that matter), or the rate in which global pop is projected to grow over the next couple of decades. After all, the average American believes that 30 + percentage of the U.S population is gay, 30 + percentage is black, etc.

    People don't think it is important to know facts anymore, and modern education exacerbates this trend, because "recall is the lowest form of learning, it's just regurgitation, blah blah, children must solve problems, etc, etc." The problem there is, you can't really "solve problems", analyze things correctly, understand the world we live in, unless you have a solid base of knowledge (facts) to draw from.

    I'd say your best bet with your family is to just help them gain some perspective. Inform them of basic statistics on human geography.

    Replies: @Parbes, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anonymous

    Great post! Agree wholeheartedly!

  49. @Corvinus
    @Daniel Chieh

    "I think its notable too, that any historic guilt should be paid directly by the perpetrators of those atrocities: notably the same elites who are, instead, offloading their problems upon us. Again."

    The "perps" of colonialism were government officials, church authorities, and business owners. Together, they believed that the greater good of their nation would be best served if they were able to procure new markets and resources. The policies of these "elites" were highly supported by the citizens of their nations. In essence, you are blaming tens of millions of Europeans for engaging in what amounts to be the pursuit of progress. Congratulations.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    That’s a ridiculous effort to diffuse responsibility from very specific individuals and families. Holding the average Belgium citizen now as equally responsible for the atrocity in the Congo as King Leopold II is effectively senseless; reparations should be paid from his estate, not from the average taxpayer’s.

    Of course, I find all of this pretty senseless.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Daniel Chieh



    atrocity in the Congo

     

    Mythologies About Leopold’s Congo Free State


    in response to public outcry over the Congo, an independent council created by Italy, Switzerland and Belgium conducted an ongoing investigation and released periodical reports called The Official Bulletin of the Congo Free State (translation).

    Of course this council did not report extreme genocide going at the behest of Leopold’s government. In fact, they reported that the abuses occurred almost exclusively when FP detachments were sent out WITHOUT a European commander, and that the presence of European commanders was what prevented atrocities and rape.

    (It is interesting to read these bulletins and see just how matter-of-fact they are about it; it’s just assumed that blacks will rape unless kept in order by whites.)

     

  50. @juster
    Even if we get rid of historical guilt and shame that won't be enough.

    When Africa's population explodes and we are subjected to unending video and images of African children dying of starvation, the guilt won't need to be historical. American and European unwillingness to accept millions of starving Africans will be cast as pure selfish cruelty at that moment.

    I'm not sure how we psychically prepare our children for this.

    Replies: @Parbes, @Anonym

    “When Africa’s population explodes and we are subjected to unending video and images of African children dying of starvation, the guilt won’t need to be historical….I’m not sure how we psychically prepare our children for this.”

    The thing to do is NOT, to try to “psychically prepare your children” for that. The thing to do, is to PREEMPTIVELY PREPARE for that inevitable population explosion by fighting and neutralizing those who will attempt to lay the guilt on you and your children via those “unending video and images of African children dying of starvation” and the accompanying stupid bleeding-heart propaganda – NOW!

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    @Parbes

    Please, everybody, look at a globe. The size of Africa compared to that of Europe is immense. There is absolutely no need geographically for Africans to invade Europe.

    If Europeans wish to help Africans, the best way to do so would be to assist them in building their own countries to a higher standard of living. Physically, Africans are far better suited to life in the tropics than to life in places with harsh winters and little sunlight much of the year.

  51. @juster
    Even if we get rid of historical guilt and shame that won't be enough.

    When Africa's population explodes and we are subjected to unending video and images of African children dying of starvation, the guilt won't need to be historical. American and European unwillingness to accept millions of starving Africans will be cast as pure selfish cruelty at that moment.

    I'm not sure how we psychically prepare our children for this.

    Replies: @Parbes, @Anonym

    I’m not sure how we psychically prepare our children for this.

    I suggest watching Zulu on repeat.

  52. @kihowi
    All of this would just go away if we realized "historical guilt" is nonsense. The past doesn't exist. All those people are gone now. There's only the present, and the future for your children. Even if colonialism had been ten times worse, so what? Why handicap yourself if you don't have to?

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It's a very strange achilles heel.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Daniel Chieh, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Erik Sieven, @Anonym, @WowJustWow

    the concept of historical guilt is not wrong I think. When somebody wants to take part in a national tradition he should take the good things but also acknowledge the bad things. The problem is that historical guilt mostly gets counted wrong. Some historical get underrated (e.g. Bantu Expansion, Armenians, what happened to native Americans, slavery of Europeans by North Africans and Turks, Islamic conquests in South Asia) and other stories are overrated (colonization in Africa, Tibet)

  53. @Vinay
    "we are witnessing the Scramble from Africa and the Middle East."

    Here's a list of nations by net emigration rate:
    https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/fields/2112.html

    There's a bit of wild fluctuation year-to-year (Syria was about -2 percent in 2015 but seems to have reduced drastically in 2016). But it's worth emphasizing that migration is basically irrelevant as a solution to a demographic problem. Niger has a population growth rate of 3.22 percent and a net migration rate of -0.05 percent

    It's fine to worry about immigration to the West but if any of you imagine that nations can rely on migration to relieve overcrowding, you're simply wrong. For most nations, migration is a rounding error in population growth.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven

    the four billion projection is likely to be corrected soon, the next projection will be much higher. This means Africa has so many people that by 2100 there could be more Afro Chinese in China than Han Chinese, and more Afro Indians in India that Indian Indians and at the same time the population in subsaharan Africa itself would still have exploded and multiplied. There is no relieve when there is exponential growth

  54. @kihowi
    All of this would just go away if we realized "historical guilt" is nonsense. The past doesn't exist. All those people are gone now. There's only the present, and the future for your children. Even if colonialism had been ten times worse, so what? Why handicap yourself if you don't have to?

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It's a very strange achilles heel.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Daniel Chieh, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Erik Sieven, @Anonym, @WowJustWow

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.

    It only can work if people are ignorant of history or are taught a one sided view of it. There is always a who and a whom. If there are a lot of who in a territory, it is because the whom who once lived there are dispossed except for perhaps some maternal DNA.

    Most people do not know about the ethnic cleansing of whites from Africa on both sides of the Sahara. They do not know about the Moorish invasions. They do not know about the history of slavery in the Arab world. They do not know about how China has treated Tibet, although they are getting a glimpse now through the South China Sea issue that Chinese in power can be dishonest bullies and not your subservient servers of Chinese food.

    White people understand reciprocity very well. The golden rule of Christianity is a part of that. If the teachers of history leave out all the parts that make other peoples out to be anything other than selfless matyrs, it is easy to make white people feel guilty.

    I think a lot of these things are changing. One piece of knowledge that people are now understanding is that whites are a definite global minority. And I think the other aspects of history are getting more air time, though probably not in schools.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Anonym


    White people understand reciprocity very well. The golden rule of Christianity is a part of that. If the teachers of history leave out all the parts that make other peoples out to be anything other than selfless matyrs, it is easy to make white people feel guilty.
     
    Yes, that a huge part of the problem.

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.

    It only can work if people are ignorant of history or are taught a one sided view of it. There is always a who and a whom.
     
    This is true to an extent. White history is decontextualized; no one is taught that other races did all the stuff whites are demonized for. Racial differences are deliberately concealed, and truth-tellers are pathologized. The basic truths of Salter's works are ignored,

    But there's something important that you didn't mention:

    It's not just about ignorance. In essence, we are manipulated by pheromones, as James Bowery has observed:

    [C]onnotation-loaded words like “racism” are not used to communicate any more than are pheromones. Indeed, the art of connotation-loading is the art of engineering words as pheromones. These “words” are emitted and the higher brain functions are over-ridden by more primitive brain structures rendering rational interpretation impractical.
     

    Replies: @Anonym

  55. Hollywood is about to discover that anything short of complete black domination will satisfy that demographic:

    CNN’s Nia-Malika Henderson: ‘Laughable’ for ‘racist, ageist, sexist’ Hollywood to lecture anyone

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/feb/27/nia-malika-henderson-laughable-for-racist-ageist-s/

    They had it coming.

  56. @Marco Polo
    People...quit whining. Europeans and Americans have as much say in being swamped as the Native American did when Europeans starting swamping them.

    By the way, the story of the population of the world by humanity is hominids moving out of Africa and colonizing other continents. Why act like this modern wave is unprecedented?

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    There’s also the story of Vikings that came to the New World and got repelled. The story of the population of the world also involves defense, just so you know.

    • Replies: @Marco Polo
    @Daniel Chieh

    That story stands out mainly because it is the exception rather than the rule.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

  57. @Hubbub
    Odd isn't it, that the United States is now the 'right of every person' on the planet. How can we keep the wretched refuge of the world from our shores. The Zeroth Amendment is alive and well - come one, come all, and a hearty welcome to you and yours.

    Replies: @mobi, @Frau Katze

    Odd isn’t it, that the United States is now the ‘right of every person’ on the planet. How can we keep the wretched refuge of the world from our shores. The Zeroth Amendment is alive and well – come one, come all, and a hearty welcome to you and yours.

    Who controls what is and isn’t placed at the base of the Statue of Liberty?

    Who decided ‘that poem’ was the be all and end all of it, for all time?

    Why not mount beside it something like Kipling’s The Stranger?

    “The Stranger within my gate,
    He may be true or kind,
    But he does not talk my talk–
    I cannot feel his mind.
    I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
    But not the soul behind.

    The men of my own stock,
    They may do ill or well,
    But they tell the lies I am wont to,
    They are used to the lies I tell;
    And we do not need interpreters
    When we go to buy or sell.

    The Stranger within my gates,
    He may be evil or good,
    But I cannot tell what powers control–
    What reasons sway his mood;
    Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
    Shall repossess his blood.

    …”

    Perhaps superimposed on a picture of Lady Liberty with the smoking, flaming ruins of WTC in the background.

    Just for balance. Balance is good.

  58. @res
    @Light Roast

    I found that hard to interpret at first too. Try adding quotes like this:

    The women take "can do" where they get it.

    Replies: @Light Roast

    Ah. Thanks res.

    I think another “can” near the end would make it even more intelligible.

    “The women take can-do where they can get it.”

    Nicely done, Desiderius.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Light Roast

    Del "get it" at the end

  59. @Federalist
    @Ed

    If Tom Freidman says that people are fleeing the disorder to order, does he recognize that the people fleeing are bringing their disorder with them and thereby destroying order in places where it does exist (or did until recently)? Not likely.

    Replies: @mobi

    If Tom Freidman says that people are fleeing the disorder to order, does he recognize that the people fleeing are bringing their disorder with them and thereby destroying order in places where it does exist (or did until recently)? Not likely.

    Unfortunately, I think it’s very likely.

  60. @Corvinus
    @ben tillman

    "But it’s not widely held. No one anywhere believes that the “working classes” (but not the upper classes) are responsible for colonialism or anything else the First World did to the Third World."

    The "working classes" were those groups of people who arrived from the First World to the Third World as colonists and immigrants. They sought a better life by imposing their will upon newcomers, as promoted by their nation and government policies. While the "working classes" did not create the agenda, they certainly played an integral role in implementing it.

    Replies: @ic1000

    “The ‘working classes’ were those groups of people who arrived from the First World to the Third World as colonists and immigrants. They sought a better life by imposing their will upon newcomers those already there, as promoted by their nation and government policies. While the ‘working classes’ did not create the agenda, they certainly played an integral role in implementing it.”

    I think that’s what you meant.

    It seems to me that your focus is much too narrow. You seem to portray this process as the whites of the First World sinning against the diverse (and blameless) peoples of the Third World.

    Perhaps the process is better stated as:

    From prehistory to the present, groups of people have migrated from their birthplace to another place. At their destination, the newcomers sought a better life by imposing their will upon the different group of people who already lived there. With fairly rare exceptions, the outcome was an unhappy one for the host group.

    Off the top of my head and in no particular order, examples include Polynesian migrations, Han in Tibet, the Bantu Expansion, Huns in Germania, Romans in Celtic Gaul, Goths in Roman Gaul, Saxons in Britain, Danes in England, English in Ireland, Toltecs, Aztecs, Bengalis in Burma, Khmers in Thailand, Vietnamese in Cambodia. Some Googling could expand the list to hundreds.

    So as an original sin of Europeans: not very original.

  61. @Luke Lea
    New overclass mantra: "Let's you and him share."

    Replies: @mobi

    New overclass mantra: “Let’s you and him share.”

    That’s good.

  62. @Tiny Duck
    You went there so we are coming here.

    Karma's a witch isn't it?

    How does it feel? Knowing your descendents will be People of Color. Knowing your womenfolk will be the lovers of Men of Color

    Replies: @mobi

    You went there so we are coming here.

    Karma’s a witch isn’t it?

    They have in common that neither is up to you.

  63. @Chrisnonymous
    @Arclight

    I fell in love with an Austrian once, but, as for Germans, I have never met one who did not simultaneously make me like and detest him. I am guessing the positive emotion is some form of genetic recognition (as I'm half), and the negative one arises from their current self-imposed condition.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    I fell in love with an Austrian once, but, as for Germans, I have never met one who did not simultaneously make me like and detest him. I am guessing the positive emotion is some form of genetic recognition (as I’m half), and the negative one arises from their current self-imposed condition.

    There’s nothing self-imposed about it.

  64. Why does the Third World think of these reparations as lebensraum for them and not a brain drain from them?

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    @Anonymous

    Because the last thing it could be characterised as is as a "brain drain". Check the cheery mop-headed scallywags scaling the fences of Spain's remaining colonies even last week, for example, or the typical European "Syrian"+"child"+"refugee".
    "They're not sending us their best, you know." Remember?

  65. @ben tillman
    @ic1000


    No, it illuminates rather than obscures. All of us frame our experiences in terms of stories, and Shine A Light’s post is a perceptive high-level summary of an important narrative. Important not for its truth value, but because it is widely held.
     
    But it's not widely held. No one anywhere believes that the "working classes" (but not the upper classes) are responsible for colonialism or anything else the First World did to the Third World. Lots of people do, however, believe that the working classes are irredeemably racist *now*, and that propagated belief is a common justification for policies of race replacement.

    Replies: @Corvinus, @Anonymous

    There’s more than a few lefties who think that the relatively comfortable existence of the Western working class is entirely due to historical and current exploitation of Third World labor and resources.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Anonymous


    There’s more than a few lefties who think that the relatively comfortable existence of the Western working class is entirely due to historical and current exploitation of Third World labor and resources.
     
    But that's nothing like the original claim I was responding to.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  66. As an English teacher in China back in the mid-90s I had occasion to discuss US immigration policy with my Chinese students. To illustrate a point I asked whether the Chinese would object to x number of y people moving to China every year. One student responded in complete sincerity with “But that’s different. China belongs to the Chinese people. America belongs to the world.”

    Restricting immigration at all was a legitimate cause for retaliation. She had as much claim on US immigration policy as I did, in her and her classmates’ view.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @Craig Nelsen

    As an English teacher in China back in the mid-90s I had occasion to discuss US immigration policy with my Chinese students. To illustrate a point I asked whether the Chinese would object to x number of y people moving to China every year. One student responded in complete sincerity with “But that’s different. China belongs to the Chinese people. America belongs to the world.”

    What's mine is mine and what's yours is mine, basically.

    Americans have been known as "the ugly American" since forever, when overseas. I didn't realize but it came from the eponymous movie in 1958. Yet today there are a lot of ugly people when they travel overseas. Ugliness is not exclusive to Americans abroad. Pakistanis in Rotherham (and all the towns they have unexposed sex slavery gangs) are ugly. Muslims in Sweden are ugly. East Asians thinking they can colonize through an initially bloodless economic conquest are ugly. Africans Detroitizing the world are ugly.

  67. @Peter Akuleyev
    @Opinionator

    people (in particular men) take over territory because they can.

    Sure, but for the most part immigration patterns to Europe are heavily determined by 19th/20th century colonialism. Pakistanis, Jamaicans, Nigerians and Indians go to the UK, North Africans and West Africans go to France, Central Asians go to Russia. Germany also started with guest workers from areas that had been in the greater German (or at least Habsburg) cultural sphere - northern Italy and northern Yugoslavia.

    I wouldn't say it is all colonial guilt. For employers and government administrators bringing in ex-colonials made sense - they had been using these people as cheap labor already, they speak the language, they kind of know the culture. Since, especially in the 1970s, the natives were prone to things like strikes and joining labor unions, it seemed like a good idea to ship some docile colonials in. That opened the doors for immigration in the 1970s and no one has managed to shut them again.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Frau Katze

    How do explain the Swedes?

  68. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Endangered Species Act selectively protects certain species(deemed ‘endangered’) from hunting and habitat destruction.

    There is something like the Ennobled Races Act in the West.

    It selectively favors certain races and groups from standards of Equal Treatment and Equal Justice. On grounds that they were denied equality or suffered some great trauma in the past, they are collectively compensated with special privileges. So, if they do something that would call for punishment under equal application of the law, they are spared the penalty on grounds that they are currently ‘ennobled’.

    The three groups favored for Ennobled Races Act or Ennobled Groups Act are blacks, Jews, and homos. Of late, Muslims are partly recognized because they are useful in attacking Trump as ‘xenophobe’ and ‘Islamophobe’. But the very people who profess to care about Muslims said and did nothing when Obama and Hillary were destroying the Muslim World and reducing Muslims into refugees. And they did precious little for Palestinians.

    But how long can this charade go on when so many black Africans are migrating in huge numbers into EU and US? At least US gets the ones with enough brains and money to buy airplane tickets. EU has to taken in boatloads of morons. When there were just a handful of black Africans in the EU, Europeans could take pride in some of these Africans partaking of superior European culture. Or, Europeans have had this view of Africans as poor helpless folks in need of handouts and sympathy, especially as so many news reports focus on poor African babies without enough food. It’s like Europeans see African as forever-child, ignoring the fact that babies eventually grow up. And African nations have been destroyed not by babies but by full-grown adults who were once babies. Europeans seem to be realizing only now that Africans aren’t so helpless and pitiable. If given the chance and freedom in the West, they have the agency to destroy and africanize entire areas. After all, that’s why Africans or Africaniziers do. They africanize.

    And given the great power and privilege of the Jewish Globalist elites who machinations have done so much damage to finance and foreign policy, for how much longer should they be protected by the Ennobled Races Act that say we must tolerate Jewish bad behavior since they are a special people deserving of special sympathy?

    Anyway, because of our culture centered around Ennobled Races Act, we have so much behavior like this:

    http://dailycaller.com/2017/02/25/lawyer-racist-note-given-to-black-waitress-in-virginia-is-a-fake/

  69. @Gabriel M
    @Patrick Harris

    Judging "imperialism" by two data points is like judging "the nation state" by Nazi Germany and the French Revolution.

    Are there actually still people who can say with a straight face that the transition of British colonies to "democracy" (American imperialism) or "socialism" (Russian imperialism) was, on balance, a good thing? Really?

    Replies: @Patrick Harris

    The point isn’t that you can judge “imperialism” in toto by those two events, but that it’s not remotely a stretch to say colonized peoples “paid dearly” for whatever it achieved.

    As a side note, whether it was a good thing to be initially colonized is a separate question from whether the postcolonial states were an improvement.

  70. @Hubbub
    Odd isn't it, that the United States is now the 'right of every person' on the planet. How can we keep the wretched refuge of the world from our shores. The Zeroth Amendment is alive and well - come one, come all, and a hearty welcome to you and yours.

    Replies: @mobi, @Frau Katze

    And you can likely add Canada to that. The flight to Canada of illegal migrants in the US has begun. Not a chance that Trudope will send them back.

    So the US/Canadian border will become meaningless. Just one huge area for the whole world to descend upon.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @Frau Katze

    Really? I have been going to Canada in the summer for years and I haven't seen them waving van loads of Joses and Consuelas through ever. Got any cites?

    Replies: @Frau Katze, @republic

  71. Sailer strikes me as a closet bleeding heart leftist. Not too different than Obama. Colonialism under Britain and France was mostly a good thing. Deal with it. The USA was never a major colonial power.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    @GSR

    Was there something not quite up to scratch about Spanish, Portuguese or Dutch colonialism?

  72. @S. Anonyia
    @ic1000

    One of the reasons ordinary people sound dumb when discussing politics is because they are ignorant of basic statistics about the surrounding world.

    They probably simply have no idea what percentage of the American population is foreign born. Also probably have no idea how many countries have a much lower standard of living than us, the populations of these countries (or our country, for that matter), or the rate in which global pop is projected to grow over the next couple of decades. After all, the average American believes that 30 + percentage of the U.S population is gay, 30 + percentage is black, etc.

    People don't think it is important to know facts anymore, and modern education exacerbates this trend, because "recall is the lowest form of learning, it's just regurgitation, blah blah, children must solve problems, etc, etc." The problem there is, you can't really "solve problems", analyze things correctly, understand the world we live in, unless you have a solid base of knowledge (facts) to draw from.

    I'd say your best bet with your family is to just help them gain some perspective. Inform them of basic statistics on human geography.

    Replies: @Parbes, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anonymous

    People don’t think it is important to know facts anymore, and modern education exacerbates this trend, because “recall is the lowest form of learning, it’s just regurgitation, blah blah, children must solve problems, etc, etc.” The problem there is, you can’t really “solve problems”, analyze things correctly, understand the world we live in, unless you have a solid base of knowledge (facts) to draw from.

    This is utterly, comprehensively — tragically — true.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Well said. If you do not know that 2 + 2 does equal 4, how can you refute someone who says that 2 + 2 equals 5, because math is raaaaacist and sheeeit?

    As Daniel Moynihan once said, "You are entitled to your own opinions, but not to your own set of facts".

    http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/63402-you-are-entitled-to-your-opinion-but-you-are-not

  73. @Daniel Chieh
    @Corvinus

    That's a ridiculous effort to diffuse responsibility from very specific individuals and families. Holding the average Belgium citizen now as equally responsible for the atrocity in the Congo as King Leopold II is effectively senseless; reparations should be paid from his estate, not from the average taxpayer's.

    Of course, I find all of this pretty senseless.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

    atrocity in the Congo

    Mythologies About Leopold’s Congo Free State

    in response to public outcry over the Congo, an independent council created by Italy, Switzerland and Belgium conducted an ongoing investigation and released periodical reports called The Official Bulletin of the Congo Free State (translation).

    Of course this council did not report extreme genocide going at the behest of Leopold’s government. In fact, they reported that the abuses occurred almost exclusively when FP detachments were sent out WITHOUT a European commander, and that the presence of European commanders was what prevented atrocities and rape.

    (It is interesting to read these bulletins and see just how matter-of-fact they are about it; it’s just assumed that blacks will rape unless kept in order by whites.)

  74. @Anonym
    @kihowi

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.

    It only can work if people are ignorant of history or are taught a one sided view of it. There is always a who and a whom. If there are a lot of who in a territory, it is because the whom who once lived there are dispossed except for perhaps some maternal DNA.

    Most people do not know about the ethnic cleansing of whites from Africa on both sides of the Sahara. They do not know about the Moorish invasions. They do not know about the history of slavery in the Arab world. They do not know about how China has treated Tibet, although they are getting a glimpse now through the South China Sea issue that Chinese in power can be dishonest bullies and not your subservient servers of Chinese food.

    White people understand reciprocity very well. The golden rule of Christianity is a part of that. If the teachers of history leave out all the parts that make other peoples out to be anything other than selfless matyrs, it is easy to make white people feel guilty.

    I think a lot of these things are changing. One piece of knowledge that people are now understanding is that whites are a definite global minority. And I think the other aspects of history are getting more air time, though probably not in schools.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    White people understand reciprocity very well. The golden rule of Christianity is a part of that. If the teachers of history leave out all the parts that make other peoples out to be anything other than selfless matyrs, it is easy to make white people feel guilty.

    Yes, that a huge part of the problem.

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.

    It only can work if people are ignorant of history or are taught a one sided view of it. There is always a who and a whom.

    This is true to an extent. White history is decontextualized; no one is taught that other races did all the stuff whites are demonized for. Racial differences are deliberately concealed, and truth-tellers are pathologized. The basic truths of Salter’s works are ignored,

    But there’s something important that you didn’t mention:

    It’s not just about ignorance. In essence, we are manipulated by pheromones, as James Bowery has observed:

    [C]onnotation-loaded words like “racism” are not used to communicate any more than are pheromones. Indeed, the art of connotation-loading is the art of engineering words as pheromones. These “words” are emitted and the higher brain functions are over-ridden by more primitive brain structures rendering rational interpretation impractical.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    @ben tillman

    It’s not just about ignorance. In essence, we are manipulated by pheromones, as James Bowery has observed:

    I am not sure pheromones is the right word but the concept holds. Words like "racism" have been imbued with a visceral response of fear, repulsion and hate, in what is basically operant conditioning. When we are called "racist", it (at least used to) be akin to telling a conditioned dog "No!".

    Of course, that has broken down through overuse. I tried to find a recent comment by someone on Breitbart, but failed. In essence though, someone had said that they (the media) are using the "nationalist" term, because they wore out "racist". I don't think they had anything worse than racist. Maybe Nazi. But I found the following quote, which is similar.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/ClarkHat/status/797923080320536577

    Regardless, "racist" or "racism" did not have the power it once had to intimidate, shame and induce guilt. Sooner or later when white people are called racist, they will say something to the effect of "If I am to be insulted, it would be better for it to be anything else other than to say that I prioritized others over my own people."

  75. @Frau Katze
    @Hubbub

    And you can likely add Canada to that. The flight to Canada of illegal migrants in the US has begun. Not a chance that Trudope will send them back.

    So the US/Canadian border will become meaningless. Just one huge area for the whole world to descend upon.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Really? I have been going to Canada in the summer for years and I haven’t seen them waving van loads of Joses and Consuelas through ever. Got any cites?

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    @Jim Don Bob

    It's very recent, since Trump.

    http://www.dailywire.com/news/13881/illegals-now-fleeing-us-canada-joseph-curl

    , @republic
    @Jim Don Bob

    Those people leaving the US for Canada cannot use an official border entry post into Canada. In order to get into Canada as refugees they have to cross into Canada via a border fence.

  76. @S. Anonyia
    @ic1000

    One of the reasons ordinary people sound dumb when discussing politics is because they are ignorant of basic statistics about the surrounding world.

    They probably simply have no idea what percentage of the American population is foreign born. Also probably have no idea how many countries have a much lower standard of living than us, the populations of these countries (or our country, for that matter), or the rate in which global pop is projected to grow over the next couple of decades. After all, the average American believes that 30 + percentage of the U.S population is gay, 30 + percentage is black, etc.

    People don't think it is important to know facts anymore, and modern education exacerbates this trend, because "recall is the lowest form of learning, it's just regurgitation, blah blah, children must solve problems, etc, etc." The problem there is, you can't really "solve problems", analyze things correctly, understand the world we live in, unless you have a solid base of knowledge (facts) to draw from.

    I'd say your best bet with your family is to just help them gain some perspective. Inform them of basic statistics on human geography.

    Replies: @Parbes, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Anonymous

    Disagree. Really, you’re having a moral dispute disguised as a factual dispute. Someone, somewhere, has inculcated in them virtues that, for you, spell disaster. (So you need to get to the heart of who and why.) The relevant facts imply or involve some degree of HBD, but again, the objections to them are moral ones.

  77. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @S. Anonyia


    People don’t think it is important to know facts anymore, and modern education exacerbates this trend, because “recall is the lowest form of learning, it’s just regurgitation, blah blah, children must solve problems, etc, etc.” The problem there is, you can’t really “solve problems”, analyze things correctly, understand the world we live in, unless you have a solid base of knowledge (facts) to draw from.

     

    This is utterly, comprehensively -- tragically -- true.

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Well said. If you do not know that 2 + 2 does equal 4, how can you refute someone who says that 2 + 2 equals 5, because math is raaaaacist and sheeeit?

    As Daniel Moynihan once said, “You are entitled to your own opinions, but not to your own set of facts”.

    http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/63402-you-are-entitled-to-your-opinion-but-you-are-not

  78. @Jim Don Bob
    @Frau Katze

    Really? I have been going to Canada in the summer for years and I haven't seen them waving van loads of Joses and Consuelas through ever. Got any cites?

    Replies: @Frau Katze, @republic

  79. @Anonymous
    @ben tillman

    There's more than a few lefties who think that the relatively comfortable existence of the Western working class is entirely due to historical and current exploitation of Third World labor and resources.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    There’s more than a few lefties who think that the relatively comfortable existence of the Western working class is entirely due to historical and current exploitation of Third World labor and resources.

    But that’s nothing like the original claim I was responding to.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @ben tillman

    Didn't say it was, I'm just pointing out that the (non-neoliberal?) left puts the burden on the Western working class not because their ancestors were responsible but because they supposedly benefited, and these benefits have been passed down; therefore it's their responsibility to do something to resolve this global inequality.

    Similarly, because your ancestors' overlords placated your ancestors by putting them above some other group, and this snowballed into the disparities that exist today, you must atone for that covenant between your ancestors and their masters, i.e. acknowledge your white privilege, as the first step towards overthrowing the system. (Of course, some would rather you stop right there.)

    Either pay that debt to the Third World for your better conditions and cheap goods, or shun your capitalist-colonialist masters and unite with the non-white working class against them -- because if you don't, we'll agitate for your replacement by foreigners who will be more on board with our wealth redistribution program because we can fill them with ethnic resentment towards you.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

  80. @Parbes
    @juster

    "When Africa’s population explodes and we are subjected to unending video and images of African children dying of starvation, the guilt won’t need to be historical....I’m not sure how we psychically prepare our children for this."

    The thing to do is NOT, to try to "psychically prepare your children" for that. The thing to do, is to PREEMPTIVELY PREPARE for that inevitable population explosion by fighting and neutralizing those who will attempt to lay the guilt on you and your children via those "unending video and images of African children dying of starvation" and the accompanying stupid bleeding-heart propaganda - NOW!

    Replies: @Old fogey

    Please, everybody, look at a globe. The size of Africa compared to that of Europe is immense. There is absolutely no need geographically for Africans to invade Europe.

    If Europeans wish to help Africans, the best way to do so would be to assist them in building their own countries to a higher standard of living. Physically, Africans are far better suited to life in the tropics than to life in places with harsh winters and little sunlight much of the year.

  81. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @ben tillman
    @Anonymous


    There’s more than a few lefties who think that the relatively comfortable existence of the Western working class is entirely due to historical and current exploitation of Third World labor and resources.
     
    But that's nothing like the original claim I was responding to.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Didn’t say it was, I’m just pointing out that the (non-neoliberal?) left puts the burden on the Western working class not because their ancestors were responsible but because they supposedly benefited, and these benefits have been passed down; therefore it’s their responsibility to do something to resolve this global inequality.

    Similarly, because your ancestors’ overlords placated your ancestors by putting them above some other group, and this snowballed into the disparities that exist today, you must atone for that covenant between your ancestors and their masters, i.e. acknowledge your white privilege, as the first step towards overthrowing the system. (Of course, some would rather you stop right there.)

    Either pay that debt to the Third World for your better conditions and cheap goods, or shun your capitalist-colonialist masters and unite with the non-white working class against them — because if you don’t, we’ll agitate for your replacement by foreigners who will be more on board with our wealth redistribution program because we can fill them with ethnic resentment towards you.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @Anonymous

    We should start calling this idea what it is: "generational karma."

    I think if you called it generational karma enough, it would seem sillier and emptier.

    We should start asking, rhetorically, if it applies to the children of criminals too.....your grandfather murdered someone, therefore you must be closely monitored and must pay penance and small favors to the descendants and associates of the victim.

  82. @kihowi
    All of this would just go away if we realized "historical guilt" is nonsense. The past doesn't exist. All those people are gone now. There's only the present, and the future for your children. Even if colonialism had been ten times worse, so what? Why handicap yourself if you don't have to?

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It's a very strange achilles heel.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Daniel Chieh, @Je Suis Omar Mateen, @Erik Sieven, @Anonym, @WowJustWow

    What’s really surprising is that it works even when two peoples have had no meaningful prior historical interaction whatsoever. What could Swedes possibly owe Somalis?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @WowJustWow

    Not only do you not have to be colonialists, you can be the aggrieved victims of colonialists: Ireland's drinking the Kool Aid too.

  83. For no good reason, I put on the start of the Henry Louis Gates multipart program on PBS on Africa. The premise being that Africa is the source of all, close to divine and contributed to modern global life. We suddenly swooped from East and South Africa tens of thousands of years ago……… and 27 minutes in, where are we?

    The Great Pyramid at Giza. We wuz kangs. Etc. Much chatter about Nubia and Kush. More kangs.

  84. @Light Roast
    @res

    Ah. Thanks res.

    I think another "can" near the end would make it even more intelligible.

    "The women take can-do where they can get it."

    Nicely done, Desiderius.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Del “get it” at the end

  85. @ben tillman
    @Anonym


    White people understand reciprocity very well. The golden rule of Christianity is a part of that. If the teachers of history leave out all the parts that make other peoples out to be anything other than selfless matyrs, it is easy to make white people feel guilty.
     
    Yes, that a huge part of the problem.

    Really, the interesting thing is that this works on white people at all. It’s a very strange achilles heel.

    It only can work if people are ignorant of history or are taught a one sided view of it. There is always a who and a whom.
     
    This is true to an extent. White history is decontextualized; no one is taught that other races did all the stuff whites are demonized for. Racial differences are deliberately concealed, and truth-tellers are pathologized. The basic truths of Salter's works are ignored,

    But there's something important that you didn't mention:

    It's not just about ignorance. In essence, we are manipulated by pheromones, as James Bowery has observed:

    [C]onnotation-loaded words like “racism” are not used to communicate any more than are pheromones. Indeed, the art of connotation-loading is the art of engineering words as pheromones. These “words” are emitted and the higher brain functions are over-ridden by more primitive brain structures rendering rational interpretation impractical.
     

    Replies: @Anonym

    It’s not just about ignorance. In essence, we are manipulated by pheromones, as James Bowery has observed:

    I am not sure pheromones is the right word but the concept holds. Words like “racism” have been imbued with a visceral response of fear, repulsion and hate, in what is basically operant conditioning. When we are called “racist”, it (at least used to) be akin to telling a conditioned dog “No!”.

    Of course, that has broken down through overuse. I tried to find a recent comment by someone on Breitbart, but failed. In essence though, someone had said that they (the media) are using the “nationalist” term, because they wore out “racist”. I don’t think they had anything worse than racist. Maybe Nazi. But I found the following quote, which is similar.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/ClarkHat/status/797923080320536577

    Regardless, “racist” or “racism” did not have the power it once had to intimidate, shame and induce guilt. Sooner or later when white people are called racist, they will say something to the effect of “If I am to be insulted, it would be better for it to be anything else other than to say that I prioritized others over my own people.”

  86. @Jim Don Bob
    @Frau Katze

    Really? I have been going to Canada in the summer for years and I haven't seen them waving van loads of Joses and Consuelas through ever. Got any cites?

    Replies: @Frau Katze, @republic

    Those people leaving the US for Canada cannot use an official border entry post into Canada. In order to get into Canada as refugees they have to cross into Canada via a border fence.

  87. @Daniel Chieh
    @Marco Polo

    There's also the story of Vikings that came to the New World and got repelled. The story of the population of the world also involves defense, just so you know.

    Replies: @Marco Polo

    That story stands out mainly because it is the exception rather than the rule.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    @Marco Polo

    What about the Moors getting pushed out of Spain?

  88. @WowJustWow
    @kihowi

    What's really surprising is that it works even when two peoples have had no meaningful prior historical interaction whatsoever. What could Swedes possibly owe Somalis?

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Not only do you not have to be colonialists, you can be the aggrieved victims of colonialists: Ireland’s drinking the Kool Aid too.

  89. @Craig Nelsen
    As an English teacher in China back in the mid-90s I had occasion to discuss US immigration policy with my Chinese students. To illustrate a point I asked whether the Chinese would object to x number of y people moving to China every year. One student responded in complete sincerity with "But that's different. China belongs to the Chinese people. America belongs to the world."

    Restricting immigration at all was a legitimate cause for retaliation. She had as much claim on US immigration policy as I did, in her and her classmates' view.

    Replies: @Anonym

    As an English teacher in China back in the mid-90s I had occasion to discuss US immigration policy with my Chinese students. To illustrate a point I asked whether the Chinese would object to x number of y people moving to China every year. One student responded in complete sincerity with “But that’s different. China belongs to the Chinese people. America belongs to the world.”

    What’s mine is mine and what’s yours is mine, basically.

    Americans have been known as “the ugly American” since forever, when overseas. I didn’t realize but it came from the eponymous movie in 1958. Yet today there are a lot of ugly people when they travel overseas. Ugliness is not exclusive to Americans abroad. Pakistanis in Rotherham (and all the towns they have unexposed sex slavery gangs) are ugly. Muslims in Sweden are ugly. East Asians thinking they can colonize through an initially bloodless economic conquest are ugly. Africans Detroitizing the world are ugly.

  90. @Marco Polo
    @Daniel Chieh

    That story stands out mainly because it is the exception rather than the rule.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

    What about the Moors getting pushed out of Spain?

  91. @Anonymous
    @ben tillman

    Didn't say it was, I'm just pointing out that the (non-neoliberal?) left puts the burden on the Western working class not because their ancestors were responsible but because they supposedly benefited, and these benefits have been passed down; therefore it's their responsibility to do something to resolve this global inequality.

    Similarly, because your ancestors' overlords placated your ancestors by putting them above some other group, and this snowballed into the disparities that exist today, you must atone for that covenant between your ancestors and their masters, i.e. acknowledge your white privilege, as the first step towards overthrowing the system. (Of course, some would rather you stop right there.)

    Either pay that debt to the Third World for your better conditions and cheap goods, or shun your capitalist-colonialist masters and unite with the non-white working class against them -- because if you don't, we'll agitate for your replacement by foreigners who will be more on board with our wealth redistribution program because we can fill them with ethnic resentment towards you.

    Replies: @S. Anonyia

    We should start calling this idea what it is: “generational karma.”

    I think if you called it generational karma enough, it would seem sillier and emptier.

    We should start asking, rhetorically, if it applies to the children of criminals too…..your grandfather murdered someone, therefore you must be closely monitored and must pay penance and small favors to the descendants and associates of the victim.

  92. @Anonymous
    Why does the Third World think of these reparations as lebensraum for them and not a brain drain from them?

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    Because the last thing it could be characterised as is as a “brain drain”. Check the cheery mop-headed scallywags scaling the fences of Spain’s remaining colonies even last week, for example, or the typical European “Syrian”+”child”+”refugee”.
    “They’re not sending us their best, you know.” Remember?

  93. @GSR
    Sailer strikes me as a closet bleeding heart leftist. Not too different than Obama. Colonialism under Britain and France was mostly a good thing. Deal with it. The USA was never a major colonial power.

    Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    Was there something not quite up to scratch about Spanish, Portuguese or Dutch colonialism?

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