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The Revival of New Orleans: a White Coup?
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The shadowy concept of a municipal coup goes back at least to the feds setting up and arresting Washington D.C. mayor Marion Barry in 1990. Similarly, the revival of New Orleans over the last ten years since Hurricane Katrina has some of the indications of a slow white coup overthrowing the old black/creole of color power structure and its poor black base of support. The black mayor who was in charge in 2005 is now in jail and the white family that used to run the city government is back in the mayor’s office.

The celebrated improvement in New Orleans public schools seems to have much to do with firing lots of black administrators and teachers. From the NYT:

The Myth of the New Orleans School Makeover
By ANDREA GABOR AUG. 22, 2015

WAS Hurricane Katrina “the best thing that happened to the education system in New Orleans,” as Education Secretary Arne Duncan once said? Nearly 10 years after the disaster, this has become a dominant narrative among a number of school reformers and education scholars.

Before the storm, the New Orleans public school system had suffered from white flight, neglect, mismanagement and corruption, which left the schools in a state of disrepair. …

“We don’t want to replicate a lot of the things that took place to get here,” said Andre Perry, who was one of the few black charter-school leaders in the city. “There were some pretty nefarious things done in the pursuit of academic gain,” Mr. Perry acknowledged, including “suspensions, pushouts, skimming, counseling out, and not handling special needs kids well.” …

Meanwhile, black charter advocates charge that the local charter “club” leaves little room for African-American leadership. Howard L. Fuller, a former Milwaukee superintendent, said the charter movement won’t have “any type of long-term sustainability” without meaningful participation from the black community. ..

A key part of the New Orleans narrative is that firing the unionized, mostly black teachers after Katrina cleared the way for young, idealistic (mostly white) educators who are willing to work 12- to 14-hour days.

And also from the NYT:

Racially Disparate Views of New Orleans’s Recovery After Hurricane Katrina
By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON AUG. 24, 2015

NEW ORLEANS — As the 10th anniversary approaches of Hurricane Katrina and the catastrophic levee breaches in New Orleans, a new survey finds a stark racial divide in how residents here view the recovery.

Nearly four out of five white residents believe the city has mostly recovered, while nearly three out of five blacks say it has not, a division sustained over a variety of issues including the local economy, the state of schools and the quality of life. …

But comparisons are also made difficult because many of those here in the city now are not those who left. The L.S.U. survey found that more than a quarter of the city’s current residents had moved here since Katrina. Those who did so were wealthier and more likely to be white and college educated than those who lived here before 2005.

My impression of visiting New Orleans a couple of years after the hurricane is that it looked like a great place to have a trust fund. Not much of a city for earning a living, but a nice place to spend inherited wealth.

 
• Category: Race/Ethnicity • Tags: New Orleans, Political Economy 
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  1. I take it that most of the city is still below sea level and that the environmentalists still won’t let proper flood barriers be built.

    Oh well.

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    @anony-mouse

    There are no flood barriers that will stop another Katrina event from happening. I've talked to engineers who will readily say that. It's about as good as it's going to get, other than maintenance.

    , @By-tor
    @anony-mouse

    New Orleans' levees and pumping stations have been overhauled to the tune of $12 billion- triple the original estimate. Catch up a bit on current events from 2012.

    Replies: @BigGaySteve, @EriK

  2. New Orleans is still only about 30% NH White.

    A key part of the New Orleans narrative is that firing the unionized, mostly black teachers after Katrina cleared the way for young, idealistic (mostly white) educators who are willing to work 12- to 14-hour days.

    I’m surprised that the NY Times would print this.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    @JohnnyWalker123

    Are they idealistically working 12 hours a day for WHITE students?

  3. Steve – out there somewhere is an article about New Orleans post-Katrina. The reporter interviewed some of the Old Money, and I distinctly remember this one blueblood telling the reporter that he and his fellows had met with city officials and told them things were going to change or they and their money were gone.

  4. Pat Casey says:

    I won’t clog the place with video frames but Juvenile and Lil Wayne music videos take great pride in showing how damn rancid the neighborhoods they grew up in were–were, cause as I understand those are which got washed out. Steve’s post yesterday about the transplants to Houston after Katrina going back to prison less often seemed pretty intuitive causal-wise: the type who thinks going back to that is a bad idea is the type that thinks. My favorite American cities are Charleston, S.C. usually ranked politest place in the nation, and Boston. If New Orleans comes back to life under pale power, she could be the New York City of the south.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Pat Casey

    >My favorite American cities are Charleston, S.C. usually ranked politest place in the nation,
    >and Boston.

    Boston? For its politeness?

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    , @BigGaySteve
    @Pat Casey

    Its far more likely they had a lower capture rate because they moved to a new area that cops didn't know them. EMTS, ERs, and cops get to know the same people over and over. If the cops see Carlos the Car stealer they will run his plates, if they see Dindu da drug dealer they will frisk him for drugs, & Proropo the Pimp will have the women that hang around him asked if he is mistreating them. That is one of the big drivers of recidivism,cops knowing what crimes people do. DeMarcus Sanders the 2013 ACLU poster boy for driving while black was pulled over while on probation for a gangland shooting. by officers that knew him.

    Replies: @Pat Casey

  5. @JohnnyWalker123
    New Orleans is still only about 30% NH White.

    A key part of the New Orleans narrative is that firing the unionized, mostly black teachers after Katrina cleared the way for young, idealistic (mostly white) educators who are willing to work 12- to 14-hour days.

     

    I'm surprised that the NY Times would print this.

    Replies: @Father O'Hara

    Are they idealistically working 12 hours a day for WHITE students?

  6. My daughter and son-in-law, both college graduates, each moved to New Orleans in 2011 and both rented in Uptown, the area of town they still reside in after getting married. From what I’ve seen on numerous visits, that area of New Orleans is predominantly white, and the rents reflect that. The cost of housing in New Orleans in a decent area (but still not as safe as I’d like) is ridiculously expensive, which probably accounts for that area of town being so white.

  7. Steve, I lived in New Orleans in the late 1990s before Katrina. I hated the place, and loved it. I understood Louis Armstrong who felt the same way, though for different reasons.

    The heat in the Summer is stifling, and even as late as October can be tropical murderous. If ever cockroach in the city died, the place would fall ten feet further down below sea level. All the scrofulous young White gutter punks without the ambition to make it to Los Angeles roll into New Orleans, and congregate around the riverbank section of Jackson Square, squatting, and hassling ordinary people. The place is casually corrupt, where a female cop in a robbery gang murders her own partner when he recognizes her during her robbery of the place he’s guarding on a moonlighting job. Said female cop also suspected of murdering her own father and burying him under her house.

    I’ve been amazed at the musical virtuosity of a ten year old Black boy blowing his trumpet while walking down the street, just for the fun of it. And amazed at the casual criminal behavior of an eight year old boy walking down a row of parked cars and trying every door handle to see what he could get into and steal. When I drove in their I went past a crime scene, at the corner of Carrolton (end of the St. Charles Streetcar line) and Claiborne. One crack head had beaten another to death with a pipe over $20 of crack.

    New Orleans is small, has great architecture having missed suburbanization, is a pre-auto city with development patterns to match (the great houses are on the main drags, where the street cars ran, the nasty places off in the sidestreets). But the crime and violence and dysfunction of the Black lower class was just too deadening. Everyone had to make just a single trip in from your car with groceries, Black criminals would watch you like a hawk for even a bit of vulnerability. Street crime was common. And vicious. I got real tired of having my head on a swivel 24/7.

    The place did teach me race realism however. I will say that.

    New Orleans could be a boutique tourist place where during reasonable weather, before Christmas, through say early April, cooking, jazz, blues, rock camps and fantasy camps etc. take place, with some port action given the unique geography. I think there are still just too many underclass criminal Black population for that to happen — crime has its own taxes which stifle pretty much most entrepreneurial activity that is positive.

    • Agree: Vendetta
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Whiskey

    Your posts are ****, Evil Neocon. You don't fool anyone.

    No matter how many times you link to your blog there is no traffic there.

    , @Jim
    @Whiskey

    Aside fron it's demographic problems New Orleans has a fundamental problem of being a hurricane deathtrap. Galveston is like that but Galveston at least can probably be evacuated with sufficent warning. The potential death toll from a future Katrina could easily greatly exceed 1800.

    Replies: @Federalist

    , @Jeff77450
    @Whiskey

    Well said.

    , @Brutusale
    @Whiskey

    Yes. The girl and I went the first week of February in 2012, and we never felt the least bit apprehensive. Of course, we never left the Quarter and the Warehouse District.

    Go to New Orleans; otherwise you're denying yourself one of the better eating and drinking towns in the world. We ate more great meals for short money than just about anywhere we've been.

    This place is worth the visit, too:

    https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=national+wwii+museum

  8. @anony-mouse
    I take it that most of the city is still below sea level and that the environmentalists still won't let proper flood barriers be built.

    Oh well.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @By-tor

    There are no flood barriers that will stop another Katrina event from happening. I’ve talked to engineers who will readily say that. It’s about as good as it’s going to get, other than maintenance.

  9. Not much of a city for earning a living, but a nice place to spend inherited wealth.

    Yes, it’s a party city. “Twelve inches of paradise.”*

    After the hurricane, a client informed me that he was going down there to build things. I said something like, “Oh that’s good. You’re going to help those poor folks re-build their homes.”

    His reply was something to the effect that no, he wasn’t going to build anything for those lazy asses. He was going to build for people who could pay! I saw the beginning of a gentrification process…

    *A Confederacy of Dunces, by John Kennedy Toole. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Confederacy_of_Dunces

  10. New Orleans would probably have a similar crime and murder rate as Quebec if most of the inhabitants there were Cajun and not Black.

    • Replies: @Federalist
    @Jefferson

    Acadians (Cajuns) for the most part did not settle in New Orleans. The original white inhabitants of New Orleans were mostly French and some Spanish when New Orleans was controlled by those two nations. Later, "Americans" settled in New Orleans after the Louisiana Purchase. The existing French speaking white population did not initially think of themselves as American. The Americans mostly settled Uptown while the French speaking population remained in what became known as the French Quarter. There were later many German, Irish, and Italian (especially Sicilian) immigrants from which the present native white population is descended.

    I know I am being too technical. I get your point and you are correct. The white population of New Orleans (and for that matter the Cajuns and other whites in south Louisiana) commit a negligible portion of the violent crime.

  11. @Jefferson
    New Orleans would probably have a similar crime and murder rate as Quebec if most of the inhabitants there were Cajun and not Black.

    Replies: @Federalist

    Acadians (Cajuns) for the most part did not settle in New Orleans. The original white inhabitants of New Orleans were mostly French and some Spanish when New Orleans was controlled by those two nations. Later, “Americans” settled in New Orleans after the Louisiana Purchase. The existing French speaking white population did not initially think of themselves as American. The Americans mostly settled Uptown while the French speaking population remained in what became known as the French Quarter. There were later many German, Irish, and Italian (especially Sicilian) immigrants from which the present native white population is descended.

    I know I am being too technical. I get your point and you are correct. The white population of New Orleans (and for that matter the Cajuns and other whites in south Louisiana) commit a negligible portion of the violent crime.

  12. @Pat Casey
    I won't clog the place with video frames but Juvenile and Lil Wayne music videos take great pride in showing how damn rancid the neighborhoods they grew up in were--were, cause as I understand those are which got washed out. Steve's post yesterday about the transplants to Houston after Katrina going back to prison less often seemed pretty intuitive causal-wise: the type who thinks going back to that is a bad idea is the type that thinks. My favorite American cities are Charleston, S.C. usually ranked politest place in the nation, and Boston. If New Orleans comes back to life under pale power, she could be the New York City of the south.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @BigGaySteve

    >My favorite American cities are Charleston, S.C. usually ranked politest place in the nation,
    >and Boston.

    Boston? For its politeness?

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Mainly for being the Irish hub of America. Seems like we get along with each other though. (And check out the trailer for Black Mass.) Charleston to New Orleans as Boston to New York, I was thinking, for lots of reasons.

    Replies: @Brutusale

  13. By-tor [AKA "Jesse James"] says:
    @anony-mouse
    I take it that most of the city is still below sea level and that the environmentalists still won't let proper flood barriers be built.

    Oh well.

    Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist, @By-tor

    New Orleans’ levees and pumping stations have been overhauled to the tune of $12 billion- triple the original estimate. Catch up a bit on current events from 2012.

    • Replies: @BigGaySteve
    @By-tor

    I have no doubt the money was spent but it could be like Harrisburg PA's incinerator where a non white was given a preference contract only to do multiple times the damage they had been paid to fix, & not smart enough to check if they are bonded to cover mistakes. This bankrupted the city.

    , @EriK
    @By-tor

    I happened to catch part of the Spike Lee documentary on HBO
    http://www.hbo.com/documentaries/when-the-levees-broke-a-requiem-in-four-acts

    Being naive, I was surprised at the many people interviewed who were convinced the levees were blown up on purpose.

  14. I was surprised to see that the demographics haven’t changed all that much, percentage wise. In 1990, non-hispanic whites were 33.1% and blacks were 61.9%. By 2010, those numbers were 30.5% and 60.2% (Wikipedia didn’t list the 2000 census numbers).

    But the big change was in total population – 496,938 versus 343,829. So if that’s the bottom 150,000 residents, I suppose it could make a significant difference. Kind of the opposite of Detroit,where they have bleeding from the top since probably the 1960’s.

  15. Steve,

    You left out the Rock’n Robin Roberts Katrina love fest video.It’s Cajun Free! (It was also poor people free too, or at least the poor rich tourists don’t like to see.) She should really get a better cameraman however since he (she) still managed to get in a shot of a police cruiser blocking traffic a lonnnng way back during her interview with the mayor. Wouldn’t want any pesky pedestrian or car traffic to spoil that dog and pony show. However it is nice to know that the Pravda on the Hudson standards are spreading to other media outlets in the only city in America that matters. Maybe for her next Rock’n Robin production she can find out how all the poor black lives matter people – the ones who are still not back home in N’orleans – are doing, or isn’t that a story worth Robbin’s time?

  16. …young, idealistic (mostly white) educators who are willing to work 12- to 14-hour days.

    Are such people even normal? I wouldn’t trust my kid to a teacher who didn’t clock out and go home on time.

    Ronald Reagan used to shoo his people out of the office at 4:30.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    @Reg Cæsar


    who are willing to work 12- to 14-hour days.
     
    14-hour days? What are these teachers doing for 6-7 hours after students have for the day?

    Replies: @Triumph104

  17. @Pat Casey
    I won't clog the place with video frames but Juvenile and Lil Wayne music videos take great pride in showing how damn rancid the neighborhoods they grew up in were--were, cause as I understand those are which got washed out. Steve's post yesterday about the transplants to Houston after Katrina going back to prison less often seemed pretty intuitive causal-wise: the type who thinks going back to that is a bad idea is the type that thinks. My favorite American cities are Charleston, S.C. usually ranked politest place in the nation, and Boston. If New Orleans comes back to life under pale power, she could be the New York City of the south.

    Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson, @BigGaySteve

    Its far more likely they had a lower capture rate because they moved to a new area that cops didn’t know them. EMTS, ERs, and cops get to know the same people over and over. If the cops see Carlos the Car stealer they will run his plates, if they see Dindu da drug dealer they will frisk him for drugs, & Proropo the Pimp will have the women that hang around him asked if he is mistreating them. That is one of the big drivers of recidivism,cops knowing what crimes people do. DeMarcus Sanders the 2013 ACLU poster boy for driving while black was pulled over while on probation for a gangland shooting. by officers that knew him.

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    @BigGaySteve

    Oh I know exactly how much patrols snoop ex-cons. I also know the past moves with you, or rather is already there. I also know that the cops in New Orleans are less corrupt than amazingly lazy and apathetic and semi-corrupt. (I know an incredible story re stolen car) Houston barely had a lower rate, 45 to 60. The difference that didn't go back probably decided not to go back.

  18. @Whiskey
    Steve, I lived in New Orleans in the late 1990s before Katrina. I hated the place, and loved it. I understood Louis Armstrong who felt the same way, though for different reasons.

    The heat in the Summer is stifling, and even as late as October can be tropical murderous. If ever cockroach in the city died, the place would fall ten feet further down below sea level. All the scrofulous young White gutter punks without the ambition to make it to Los Angeles roll into New Orleans, and congregate around the riverbank section of Jackson Square, squatting, and hassling ordinary people. The place is casually corrupt, where a female cop in a robbery gang murders her own partner when he recognizes her during her robbery of the place he's guarding on a moonlighting job. Said female cop also suspected of murdering her own father and burying him under her house.

    I've been amazed at the musical virtuosity of a ten year old Black boy blowing his trumpet while walking down the street, just for the fun of it. And amazed at the casual criminal behavior of an eight year old boy walking down a row of parked cars and trying every door handle to see what he could get into and steal. When I drove in their I went past a crime scene, at the corner of Carrolton (end of the St. Charles Streetcar line) and Claiborne. One crack head had beaten another to death with a pipe over $20 of crack.

    New Orleans is small, has great architecture having missed suburbanization, is a pre-auto city with development patterns to match (the great houses are on the main drags, where the street cars ran, the nasty places off in the sidestreets). But the crime and violence and dysfunction of the Black lower class was just too deadening. Everyone had to make just a single trip in from your car with groceries, Black criminals would watch you like a hawk for even a bit of vulnerability. Street crime was common. And vicious. I got real tired of having my head on a swivel 24/7.

    The place did teach me race realism however. I will say that.

    New Orleans could be a boutique tourist place where during reasonable weather, before Christmas, through say early April, cooking, jazz, blues, rock camps and fantasy camps etc. take place, with some port action given the unique geography. I think there are still just too many underclass criminal Black population for that to happen -- crime has its own taxes which stifle pretty much most entrepreneurial activity that is positive.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jim, @Jeff77450, @Brutusale

    Your posts are ****, Evil Neocon. You don’t fool anyone.

    No matter how many times you link to your blog there is no traffic there.

  19. @By-tor
    @anony-mouse

    New Orleans' levees and pumping stations have been overhauled to the tune of $12 billion- triple the original estimate. Catch up a bit on current events from 2012.

    Replies: @BigGaySteve, @EriK

    I have no doubt the money was spent but it could be like Harrisburg PA’s incinerator where a non white was given a preference contract only to do multiple times the damage they had been paid to fix, & not smart enough to check if they are bonded to cover mistakes. This bankrupted the city.

  20. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Pat Casey

    >My favorite American cities are Charleston, S.C. usually ranked politest place in the nation,
    >and Boston.

    Boston? For its politeness?

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    Mainly for being the Irish hub of America. Seems like we get along with each other though. (And check out the trailer for Black Mass.) Charleston to New Orleans as Boston to New York, I was thinking, for lots of reasons.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @Pat Casey

    As one myself, I can unequivocally state that the average Bostonian is much ruder than the average New Yorker.

  21. I lived there for a long nine months, back in 1981-1982. I probably had as much fun, in those nine months, as I ever have had, anywhere, in such a time frame. Nonetheless, within a few months, I absolutely despised living there. Every day, when I woke up, I knew that there was someone out there who was going to ruin my day– and I was seldom disappointed. Our apartment was robbed twice– in eight days! The first time, about half of my wardrobe was stolen by a “friend” of my live-in landlord’s best friend, theater director and actor Stocker Fontelieu (see IMDb), when I made the mistake of leaving the miscreant alone in the apartment, as I went to a nearby grocery store, for about twenty minutes, on a Saturday afternoon, to buy something to cook for my dinner. The following weekend, early Sunday morning, a guy who had been doing work on the place decided to bring a friend along to rob it, while four of us were at home in bed. The landlord awoke and discovered them, and then ran back into his room, and locked the door. The miscreants fled with what they already had collected. Knowing the identity of the leader, the police quickly caught up with the pair, who had a car trunk full of stolen loot, from a series of such robberies. I was on the porch, listening, as a policeman told my landlord that they did not know to whom most of the loot belonged– so we should just help ourselves! N.O.P.D.: “To Protect and To Serve.”

  22. Pat Casey says:
    @BigGaySteve
    @Pat Casey

    Its far more likely they had a lower capture rate because they moved to a new area that cops didn't know them. EMTS, ERs, and cops get to know the same people over and over. If the cops see Carlos the Car stealer they will run his plates, if they see Dindu da drug dealer they will frisk him for drugs, & Proropo the Pimp will have the women that hang around him asked if he is mistreating them. That is one of the big drivers of recidivism,cops knowing what crimes people do. DeMarcus Sanders the 2013 ACLU poster boy for driving while black was pulled over while on probation for a gangland shooting. by officers that knew him.

    Replies: @Pat Casey

    Oh I know exactly how much patrols snoop ex-cons. I also know the past moves with you, or rather is already there. I also know that the cops in New Orleans are less corrupt than amazingly lazy and apathetic and semi-corrupt. (I know an incredible story re stolen car) Houston barely had a lower rate, 45 to 60. The difference that didn’t go back probably decided not to go back.

  23. @By-tor
    @anony-mouse

    New Orleans' levees and pumping stations have been overhauled to the tune of $12 billion- triple the original estimate. Catch up a bit on current events from 2012.

    Replies: @BigGaySteve, @EriK

    I happened to catch part of the Spike Lee documentary on HBO
    http://www.hbo.com/documentaries/when-the-levees-broke-a-requiem-in-four-acts

    Being naive, I was surprised at the many people interviewed who were convinced the levees were blown up on purpose.

  24. @Whiskey
    Steve, I lived in New Orleans in the late 1990s before Katrina. I hated the place, and loved it. I understood Louis Armstrong who felt the same way, though for different reasons.

    The heat in the Summer is stifling, and even as late as October can be tropical murderous. If ever cockroach in the city died, the place would fall ten feet further down below sea level. All the scrofulous young White gutter punks without the ambition to make it to Los Angeles roll into New Orleans, and congregate around the riverbank section of Jackson Square, squatting, and hassling ordinary people. The place is casually corrupt, where a female cop in a robbery gang murders her own partner when he recognizes her during her robbery of the place he's guarding on a moonlighting job. Said female cop also suspected of murdering her own father and burying him under her house.

    I've been amazed at the musical virtuosity of a ten year old Black boy blowing his trumpet while walking down the street, just for the fun of it. And amazed at the casual criminal behavior of an eight year old boy walking down a row of parked cars and trying every door handle to see what he could get into and steal. When I drove in their I went past a crime scene, at the corner of Carrolton (end of the St. Charles Streetcar line) and Claiborne. One crack head had beaten another to death with a pipe over $20 of crack.

    New Orleans is small, has great architecture having missed suburbanization, is a pre-auto city with development patterns to match (the great houses are on the main drags, where the street cars ran, the nasty places off in the sidestreets). But the crime and violence and dysfunction of the Black lower class was just too deadening. Everyone had to make just a single trip in from your car with groceries, Black criminals would watch you like a hawk for even a bit of vulnerability. Street crime was common. And vicious. I got real tired of having my head on a swivel 24/7.

    The place did teach me race realism however. I will say that.

    New Orleans could be a boutique tourist place where during reasonable weather, before Christmas, through say early April, cooking, jazz, blues, rock camps and fantasy camps etc. take place, with some port action given the unique geography. I think there are still just too many underclass criminal Black population for that to happen -- crime has its own taxes which stifle pretty much most entrepreneurial activity that is positive.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jim, @Jeff77450, @Brutusale

    Aside fron it’s demographic problems New Orleans has a fundamental problem of being a hurricane deathtrap. Galveston is like that but Galveston at least can probably be evacuated with sufficent warning. The potential death toll from a future Katrina could easily greatly exceed 1800.

    • Replies: @Federalist
    @Jim

    New Orleans can be evacuated if people will actually leave. The vast majority of whites and of middle and working class blacks evacuated prior to Katrina. (New Orleans does have many middle class and working class blacks. They mostly evacuated so you didn't see them on TV). A few regular people who were brave and/or crazy decided to "ride out" Katrina. Most probably learned their lesson and wouldn't do it again.

    Those who did not evacuate were overwhelmingly from the black underclass. These are obviously the extremely poor and dysfunctional, which explains why New Orleans devolved into utter chaos. The majority white suburbs of New Orleans and surrounding parishes did not have the same issues.

    The black underclass either did not have the means to evacuate or were just too irresponsible to do so or some combination of the two. If another hurricane comes along, I suspect many of this group will find a way to get out. Also, I imagine the Jindal administration or whoever is in charge of Louisiana's state government at the time will get buses, the National Guard, etc. to evacuate people. Louisiana is not known for efficient government but the state is still far more competent than the city government in New Orleans. I really don't think that the state would let a Katrina happen again (I mean in terms of allowing large numbers of people to be trapped in New Orleans again).

    The buses could go to the Superdome and Convention Center again and perhaps other central locations. This is basically what happened after Katrina. But it is far easier for the government to evacuate these people before a hurricane strikes that after the city is flooded. The real question is how many of the most dysfunctional segment of society will still refuse to avail themselves of a government evacuation service. Prior to Katrina, people had to evacuate themselves (and most did). Those who stayed were told that the Superdome was the "shelter of last resort." There is no way that the Saints, NFL, City or State govt. will ever allow the Superdome to be ransacked and pillaged by savage hordes again.

  25. @Whiskey
    Steve, I lived in New Orleans in the late 1990s before Katrina. I hated the place, and loved it. I understood Louis Armstrong who felt the same way, though for different reasons.

    The heat in the Summer is stifling, and even as late as October can be tropical murderous. If ever cockroach in the city died, the place would fall ten feet further down below sea level. All the scrofulous young White gutter punks without the ambition to make it to Los Angeles roll into New Orleans, and congregate around the riverbank section of Jackson Square, squatting, and hassling ordinary people. The place is casually corrupt, where a female cop in a robbery gang murders her own partner when he recognizes her during her robbery of the place he's guarding on a moonlighting job. Said female cop also suspected of murdering her own father and burying him under her house.

    I've been amazed at the musical virtuosity of a ten year old Black boy blowing his trumpet while walking down the street, just for the fun of it. And amazed at the casual criminal behavior of an eight year old boy walking down a row of parked cars and trying every door handle to see what he could get into and steal. When I drove in their I went past a crime scene, at the corner of Carrolton (end of the St. Charles Streetcar line) and Claiborne. One crack head had beaten another to death with a pipe over $20 of crack.

    New Orleans is small, has great architecture having missed suburbanization, is a pre-auto city with development patterns to match (the great houses are on the main drags, where the street cars ran, the nasty places off in the sidestreets). But the crime and violence and dysfunction of the Black lower class was just too deadening. Everyone had to make just a single trip in from your car with groceries, Black criminals would watch you like a hawk for even a bit of vulnerability. Street crime was common. And vicious. I got real tired of having my head on a swivel 24/7.

    The place did teach me race realism however. I will say that.

    New Orleans could be a boutique tourist place where during reasonable weather, before Christmas, through say early April, cooking, jazz, blues, rock camps and fantasy camps etc. take place, with some port action given the unique geography. I think there are still just too many underclass criminal Black population for that to happen -- crime has its own taxes which stifle pretty much most entrepreneurial activity that is positive.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jim, @Jeff77450, @Brutusale

    Well said.

  26. @Reg Cæsar

    …young, idealistic (mostly white) educators who are willing to work 12- to 14-hour days.
     
    Are such people even normal? I wouldn't trust my kid to a teacher who didn't clock out and go home on time.

    Ronald Reagan used to shoo his people out of the office at 4:30.

    Replies: @Forbes

    who are willing to work 12- to 14-hour days.

    14-hour days? What are these teachers doing for 6-7 hours after students have for the day?

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @Forbes

    Almost all of the public schools in New Orleans are charter schools. Charter schools have longer hours, 7:30am-4pm or 8am-4:30pm, and maybe an occasional Saturday. In addition, teachers tutor before and after school. Teachers are given cell phones and have to be on call until 9pm to answer homework questions from students and talk to parents.

  27. San Francisco did the same thing, but with rents and whites who work. Oakland is doing the same thing.

  28. @Jim
    @Whiskey

    Aside fron it's demographic problems New Orleans has a fundamental problem of being a hurricane deathtrap. Galveston is like that but Galveston at least can probably be evacuated with sufficent warning. The potential death toll from a future Katrina could easily greatly exceed 1800.

    Replies: @Federalist

    New Orleans can be evacuated if people will actually leave. The vast majority of whites and of middle and working class blacks evacuated prior to Katrina. (New Orleans does have many middle class and working class blacks. They mostly evacuated so you didn’t see them on TV). A few regular people who were brave and/or crazy decided to “ride out” Katrina. Most probably learned their lesson and wouldn’t do it again.

    Those who did not evacuate were overwhelmingly from the black underclass. These are obviously the extremely poor and dysfunctional, which explains why New Orleans devolved into utter chaos. The majority white suburbs of New Orleans and surrounding parishes did not have the same issues.

    The black underclass either did not have the means to evacuate or were just too irresponsible to do so or some combination of the two. If another hurricane comes along, I suspect many of this group will find a way to get out. Also, I imagine the Jindal administration or whoever is in charge of Louisiana’s state government at the time will get buses, the National Guard, etc. to evacuate people. Louisiana is not known for efficient government but the state is still far more competent than the city government in New Orleans. I really don’t think that the state would let a Katrina happen again (I mean in terms of allowing large numbers of people to be trapped in New Orleans again).

    The buses could go to the Superdome and Convention Center again and perhaps other central locations. This is basically what happened after Katrina. But it is far easier for the government to evacuate these people before a hurricane strikes that after the city is flooded. The real question is how many of the most dysfunctional segment of society will still refuse to avail themselves of a government evacuation service. Prior to Katrina, people had to evacuate themselves (and most did). Those who stayed were told that the Superdome was the “shelter of last resort.” There is no way that the Saints, NFL, City or State govt. will ever allow the Superdome to be ransacked and pillaged by savage hordes again.

  29. Southern Living had a cover story a couple of months ago on the “comeback cottages of New Orleans.” I’ve tossed the issue already but I remember noticing that, judging from the photos, all the restored houses but one appeared to have been inhabited before and after by white people. In the Lower Ninth! Southern Living has been taken over by earnest GenX journalism grads and makes a big show of Diversity, so it surprised me that they ran the story at all.

  30. @Whiskey
    Steve, I lived in New Orleans in the late 1990s before Katrina. I hated the place, and loved it. I understood Louis Armstrong who felt the same way, though for different reasons.

    The heat in the Summer is stifling, and even as late as October can be tropical murderous. If ever cockroach in the city died, the place would fall ten feet further down below sea level. All the scrofulous young White gutter punks without the ambition to make it to Los Angeles roll into New Orleans, and congregate around the riverbank section of Jackson Square, squatting, and hassling ordinary people. The place is casually corrupt, where a female cop in a robbery gang murders her own partner when he recognizes her during her robbery of the place he's guarding on a moonlighting job. Said female cop also suspected of murdering her own father and burying him under her house.

    I've been amazed at the musical virtuosity of a ten year old Black boy blowing his trumpet while walking down the street, just for the fun of it. And amazed at the casual criminal behavior of an eight year old boy walking down a row of parked cars and trying every door handle to see what he could get into and steal. When I drove in their I went past a crime scene, at the corner of Carrolton (end of the St. Charles Streetcar line) and Claiborne. One crack head had beaten another to death with a pipe over $20 of crack.

    New Orleans is small, has great architecture having missed suburbanization, is a pre-auto city with development patterns to match (the great houses are on the main drags, where the street cars ran, the nasty places off in the sidestreets). But the crime and violence and dysfunction of the Black lower class was just too deadening. Everyone had to make just a single trip in from your car with groceries, Black criminals would watch you like a hawk for even a bit of vulnerability. Street crime was common. And vicious. I got real tired of having my head on a swivel 24/7.

    The place did teach me race realism however. I will say that.

    New Orleans could be a boutique tourist place where during reasonable weather, before Christmas, through say early April, cooking, jazz, blues, rock camps and fantasy camps etc. take place, with some port action given the unique geography. I think there are still just too many underclass criminal Black population for that to happen -- crime has its own taxes which stifle pretty much most entrepreneurial activity that is positive.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Jim, @Jeff77450, @Brutusale

    Yes. The girl and I went the first week of February in 2012, and we never felt the least bit apprehensive. Of course, we never left the Quarter and the Warehouse District.

    Go to New Orleans; otherwise you’re denying yourself one of the better eating and drinking towns in the world. We ate more great meals for short money than just about anywhere we’ve been.

    This place is worth the visit, too:

    https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=national+wwii+museum

  31. @Pat Casey
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Mainly for being the Irish hub of America. Seems like we get along with each other though. (And check out the trailer for Black Mass.) Charleston to New Orleans as Boston to New York, I was thinking, for lots of reasons.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    As one myself, I can unequivocally state that the average Bostonian is much ruder than the average New Yorker.

  32. @Forbes
    @Reg Cæsar


    who are willing to work 12- to 14-hour days.
     
    14-hour days? What are these teachers doing for 6-7 hours after students have for the day?

    Replies: @Triumph104

    Almost all of the public schools in New Orleans are charter schools. Charter schools have longer hours, 7:30am-4pm or 8am-4:30pm, and maybe an occasional Saturday. In addition, teachers tutor before and after school. Teachers are given cell phones and have to be on call until 9pm to answer homework questions from students and talk to parents.

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