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From my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

The Reviled Right

by Steve Sailer, October 23, 2019

In 2019, two books demanding more censorship have each devoted a chapter to portraying me as a historic villain.

In the first, Angela Saini’s Superior: The Return of Race Science, I was cast as a bad guy along with Sir Francis Galton, James D. Watson, David Reich, Morrissey, and Albert Einstein, which, I must say, is pretty cool company.

Sadly, in New Yorker writer Andrew Marantz’s new Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation, the chapter about me (“The Sailer Strategy”) is folded in amidst interminable profiles of right-wing nutrition supplement hucksters like that Ape Brain guy, which I found less edifying than being included on Saini’s list of evil great white men.

Both authors are convinced that I helped hijack something big, although they disagree about whether it was science or politics. (I’ve been busy, apparently.)

Marantz has a noticeably higher IQ than Saini … But Marantz’s Ctrl-Left thesis is much the same as Saini’s: Something must be done about all the bad people, like me, who have been “hijacking the American conversation” with our control of the media.

Read the whole thing there.

Unlike a hijacked conversation, this is what The American Conversation ought to look like:

 
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  1. Techno-Utopians Hijack the American Conversation by Conspiring to Hide Tulsi Gabbard Search Results:

    • Replies: @Charon
    @J.Ross

    It's not called hijacking when it's just the Establishment enforcing its Narratives.

    But then, as Steve says, how can Google, Twitter, Facebook, CNN, the NYT and WP (and on and on) ever possibly hope to counter the terrible might of, um, this blog?

    , @Anonymous
    @J.Ross

    God, I hate that kind of "I got a secret" style of discussion on the Internet. Just have someone make the argument and discuss (and show) the evidence. But this spooky mood music with some evidence is for losers. Like the Q crowd. Not for smart people in the Steve-o-sphere.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  2. >Marantz g‘ier than Saini
    Is he, or does (((he))) just have much greater verbal acuity, and being that Saini is a South Asian snob it would be part of her cultural standards (and not her intelligence) to be arrogantly inarticulate?

  3. Essentially, the conventional wisdom increasingly boils down to: “White man bad.” But this growing racist hatred, which is more and more promoted by The New Yorker and The New York Times, bodes poorly for our future.

    No. I’m the only true race-ist.

  4. So, you’re telling us you are not a tech utopian?

    … they disagree about whether it was science or politics.

    The new discipline of scielitics.

  5. Steve, one problem with your memelord deficit is consistency. Is it “coalition of the fringes” or “coalition of the margins”? (I prefer fringes, which sounds kookier than margins, which sounds like it’s from a liberation theology textbook.)

    And do you really use “citizenism” that much? I mean, you know more about branding than I do, but shouldn’t you really be hitting that one home–particularly since it answers so well one of the most pernicious charges against you?

    • Agree: Abe
  6. Steve, that column is a blast. It’s great when you come out swinging, even when tempered with your gentlemanly restraint. I liked it so much I read it twice.

    • Agree: Hail, Desiderius, Bill, Dissident
    • Replies: @Morton's toes
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The New Yorker guy seems to be bad at writing criticism.


    Yiannopoulos, writing on Breitbart the next day, called Clinton’s speech “a drive-by shooting with a water pistol fired from a mobility scooter.”
     
    No way this ain't an own-goal. That might be the single cleverest thing Milo ever came up with.
  7. Oh David Remnick redlighted Andrew Marantz’s New Yorker article about you. Hm.

    It’s a bit disappointing from a free-market of opinions point of view, that Marantz did then not walk away and publish this article about you and your opposition against the Iraq war elsewhere. It almost looks as if there’d be no more elsewhere there.

    What your term citizenism is concerned: What is the difference between a Citizenist and – a Citoyen (Citoyen being the republican version of the Burgois, who is rather concerned about his private life than about politics)? – Nothing, I guess. But the Citoyen is the prototype of the good person in LRB and NRB etc. – so what is this fuzz all about? – Definitely not about citizenism. There’s something else going on.

    Marantz’s claim, that citizenism would equal white suprematism is foul and vile. –

    -Would you talk to him again on the phone?

    (Many are the afflictions of the righteous. But the Lord delivereth him out of them all. Psalm 34:19)

    • Replies: @Bugg
    @Dieter Kief

    Probably because exposing our genial host's simple, reasonable and obvious grasp of electoral math and typical white people cannot be allowed to infest the more genteel precincts. Heaven forbid the right people read it and say "hey, rule of law, sensible immigration policies, pointless endless Middle Eastern war is bad, this kinda.... makes sense." Even if you like cheap salad and nannies.

    Way easier to demonize. Heck, 2 Proud Boys in NYC are going to jail for a fistfight in which the Antifa "victims" refused to cooperate.

    As to the sainted Bill Buckley-would note he was probably scared of being blackmailed. His...habits...were well known. He was good friend with Ed Koch (a good mayor who unlike Buckley didn't really care if anyone knew he was gay). He was a good example of the Washington Generals style of tolerated conservatism.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Dieter Kief


    Marantz’s claim, that citizenism would equal white suprematism is foul and vile. –
     
    Marantz said citizenism would equal white "nationalism" which is natural and beautiful. Only a CivNat could say that the desire to live among and be ruled by your own people is something "foul and vile."

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @guest

  8. I assume “hijacking the American conversation” means temporary interrupting lectures based upon the Narrative. Who even thinks in terms of one national conversation ? It’s weird.

    Of course, if you’re an idiot and highly programmable, distraction from whatever false dichotomy is currently monopolizing public attention could make you a sort of Nazi automaton. I’ve met such people.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @guest


    I assume “hijacking the American conversation” means temporary interrupting lectures based upon the Narrative.
     
    Yes, this. In Leftist terms, a "conversation" no longer means a dialogue, it means "shut up Whitey while we lecture you about privilege." The sistah is supposed to grab the metaphorical microphone and whitey is supposed to step aside and be edumacated by her as to what a terrible racist he is.

    If you don't go along with this program then you are "hijacking the conversation". The Left is all about projection.
  9. Anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:

    Apparently publishing idiots are just very anti-index.

    A philosopher I had was somewhat excited to do be involved with a pop book that was a collection of people discussing the philosophy of “[X]”–I think thered been a couple of successful books in this vein like “The Philosophy of the Matrix” or whatever.

    He one day came into our seminar ranting about how they weren’t allowed to have an index because the people supposedly didn’t like it and did we believe that? “But they’re buying a book called The Philosophy of [X], written by professional philosophers. Why would they be so against an index?”

    • Replies: @kihowi
    @Anonymous

    I was reading a book full of short science-y articles about every subject under the sun. The perfect kind of book for an index. None to be found.

    I think they just think it's very uncool and would turn off a certain kind of reader. An index suggests a serious nerdy man doing research, no index suggests a novel, something a bubbly woman might read at a fashionable place between two extremely social activities. You read it, you enjoy the emotions that the product has provided you, you move on.

    Replies: @Justice Duvall

  10. By the way, I LOLed when I got to this sentence:

    My immigration policy recommendations have always been lifted from Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, a black lesbian Democrat whom Bill Clinton appointed chairwoman of the commission on immigration reform.

    Why not write this up into an article? You could title it something like ‘Immigration Reform: The Barbara Jordan Plan’.

    You never know; maybe it would finally go viral.

    • Replies: @StAugustine
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Yeah, the BJ Plan, that'll get some eyeballs

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    , @Hail
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMywOal05s0


    Barbara Jordan
    Chair of the Immigration Reform Commission formed by Pres. Clinton
    Washington, D.C., June 8, 1995
    Press conference (aired by C-SPAN)

    [Barbara Jordan:] "The commission had concluded that a properly regulated system of legal immigration is in the national interest in the United States. The commission recommends a significant re-definition of priorities and admission numbers, to fulfill, more effectively, the objectives of our immigration system. ... We propose core immigration levels of 550,000 a year. ...

    What the commission is concerned about is the unskilled workers in our society, in an age in which unskilled workers have far too few opportunities open to them. When immigrants are less well educated and less skilled, they may pose economic hardships on the most vulnerable of Americans, particularly those who are unemployed and underemployed. The commission sees no justification in the continued entry of unskilled foreign workers..."
     

    Replies: @Hail

    , @Desiderius
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Steve’s been viral his whole life. Viruses aren’t easy to see.

    Their effects are.

    , @Abe
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    Why not write this up into an article? You could title it something like ‘Immigration Reform: The Barbara Jordan Plan’.
     
    Marantz (the kind of guy whose entire existence, if he had come into this world as a slightly defective, sub-audiophile grade stereo receiver which then sat on Best Buy’s open box shelf for several months, could not have been any more of a net-negative to the universe than it has turned out now that he’s an elite East Coast journalist) shows the big shift in consensus among our Woke Elite regarding the role of the Internet: from decentralization to centralization, from the freedom of anonymity to the Newspeak-esque Total Monitoring is Freedom! From let a thousand (weird) flowers bloom, to track-target-and-destroy anything that does not totally conform to our wishes- think of the national conversation!

    So in addition to wanting my Clinton-era immigration reform back, I want my Clinton-era Internet!

    Replies: @Anonymous

  11. Maybe Steve, thousands of years from now, you will be read as a voice of wisdom. Kind of like obscure philosophers that more people read now than ever did when they were alive.
    And if citizenism is white nationalism, maybe Mr. Marantz doesn’t want to help his non-white fellow citizens? He probably couldn’t sell an article entitled “Why Care About N*****s As Long As They Stay Away From Me”.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    @Redneck farmer

    I doubt digital media will have that kind of continuity. You keep finding manuscripts of this or that philosopher, or at least portions, but Steve's work is on some guy's servers and, presumably, on his home computer, with the exception of his only paperback book and the existing issues of NR to which he contributed.

    All it takes is one systemic collapse or one EMP event, and most of what he wrote, and the best of what he wrote, will be gone forever. It is only a matter of time really.

    Other systemic transformations also pose an issue. Playing back media from way back, in formats that are no longer used, is an example. Very few games from before the 2000s can be played on modern PCs without modification or emulation. The digital sphere is already developing its own archaeology. Who knows what Windows 3000 will be (in)capable of?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hail

  12. Yet “citizenism” stands out even among my many stillborn neologisms for getting perhaps the least traction ever.

    There used to be a Chinese commenter on Zero Hedge who referred to American Citizenism, but not quite in the context you intended.

  13. Keep on hijacking, Steve! Our culture’s never needed it more.

    • Agree: Hail, Dtbb
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    @RichardTaylor

    Never give in.

  14. The Democrats’ plan has been to achieve one-party rule by using immigration to juice their vote totals while ginning up hatred of white men to keep their unwieldy Coalition of the Margins from collapsing in internecine strife. Leaving aside its shameful ethics, the Democrats’ plan to take control of the White House forever deserved to be taken seriously.

    This really says it all.

    • Replies: @theMann
    @TTSSYF

    If the Democrats had raised an Army comprised of foreigners, and used it in an attempt to seize power, they would have been executed for treason. And there would have been no doubt of their guilt.

    How is raising an army of foriegners, injecting them into judiciously chosen states, and then overturning the legitimate results of elections any different? What the Democrats are doing is treason, the most despicable and vile treason imaginable. For the sake of winning a handful of Presidential elections, they have permanently damaged the social cohesion of our nation, and made Babel of our country. This is a crime for whose enormity they must be held accountable.

    Replies: @Charon, @AndrewR, @Corvinus

    , @El Dato
    @TTSSYF

    It mainly says that WHITE DEMOCRATS and their spawn are already dead. What they gonna do when Diversity tolls for them with rope and a gas canister? Seek asylum in Chinaland or Wacanada? Ask Fed.Police to make a sortie from the donut shoppe?

  15. I can’t imagine Trump has any idea who I am.

    He probably doesn’t. since you don’t appear on Fox News. However, I’d bet Stephen Miller knows who you are.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @Harry Baldwin

    More important, Annie the Trannie Coulter certainly does.

  16. Great article Steve. One of your best ever.

    On a side note, you need to review HBO’s Watchmen.

  17. In the first, Angela Saini’s Superior: The Return of Race Science, I was cast as a bad guy along with Sir Francis Galton, James D. Watson, David Reich, Morrissey, and Albert Einstein, which, I must say, is pretty cool company.

    Anyone should be honoured to be cast into that group.

  18. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:

    If “Young Marantz” or another of his ilk ever want to interview you by phone in the future, Skype plus Call Recorder will give you a perfect digital record, which can be attached to an email and sent for surprisingly inexpensive transcription by an Upwork freelancer in Arkansas or the like.

    Ask permission. California is a two-party state.

  19. Congratulations Mr. Sailer – it looks like you have become the conservative Saul Alinsky.

  20. Well if you ask me, the “reviled right” has (for the time being) got the last laugh. The Weekly Standard is bankrupt and the plucky American Conservative lives on. Meanwhile, the Unz Review exceeds the traffic of both The New Republic and the Nation!

    I can’t wait to see how American Affairs does (the coolest new magazine of the dissident right).

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Kaplan Turqweather

    Claremont Institute has finally recognized where the action is.

    https://twitter.com/theammind/status/1187120818150461443

  21. Marantz stated that far-right heretics found their own publications (American Conservative, Taki’s Magazine, VDARE). Their foundings were only preliminary foreplay. Of course, the ultimate coup de grace was the founding of the Unz Review!

  22. The great irony is that Trump, more than any other politician, pursued the “Sailer strategy,” yet he actually did better with Latinos than Romney, who pursued the old, traditional, Bush approach. The notion that all Latinos necessarily favor increased immigration is just not true, so taking a strongly restrictionist approach would not actually alienate all of them. The real way to win a larger share of Latinos would be through conservative cultural positions, but it is just really uncomfortable for progressives to acknowledge that.

    • Replies: @Kaplan Turqweather
    @Senor Moose

    Indeed. Over half of Latinos favour immigration restriction and about a quarter favour Trump's wall.

    In the middle of this decade, an overlooked milestone was past; native-born Latinos surpassed immigrant Latinos and numbers...and they are converging with deplorable opinions fast. Ironically, this is most true where they are geographically concentrated.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

  23. Boy that really is. Youve earned a place in history, though thats some rare air. You should have been comped vastly more.

  24. @TTSSYF

    The Democrats’ plan has been to achieve one-party rule by using immigration to juice their vote totals while ginning up hatred of white men to keep their unwieldy Coalition of the Margins from collapsing in internecine strife. Leaving aside its shameful ethics, the Democrats’ plan to take control of the White House forever deserved to be taken seriously.
     
    This really says it all.

    Replies: @theMann, @El Dato

    If the Democrats had raised an Army comprised of foreigners, and used it in an attempt to seize power, they would have been executed for treason. And there would have been no doubt of their guilt.

    How is raising an army of foriegners, injecting them into judiciously chosen states, and then overturning the legitimate results of elections any different? What the Democrats are doing is treason, the most despicable and vile treason imaginable. For the sake of winning a handful of Presidential elections, they have permanently damaged the social cohesion of our nation, and made Babel of our country. This is a crime for whose enormity they must be held accountable.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @theMann


    This is a crime for whose enormity they must be held accountable.
     
    But it's increasingly unlikely that they ever will be. We are right now on the verge of a one-party state, which will persist until the next revolution.

    If it weren't for the flood of third world immigrants these past few decades, ironically enough, the Democratic party wouldn't even exist.
    , @AndrewR
    @theMann

    But if you say the perps deserve to be executed then Sailer will faint.

    , @Corvinus
    @theMann

    "How is raising an army of foriegners, injecting them into judiciously chosen states, and then overturning the legitimate results of elections any different? What the Democrats are doing is treason, the most despicable and vile treason imaginable."

    LOL, thanks for the false premise that a number of posters fell for. It's so much easier just taking your silly statement as absolute truth without having to actually think about how irrational you sound.

    Now, does this "army of foreigners" include white Europeans who came to our great nation as immigrants? If yes, then you have to go back.

  25. @The Last Real Calvinist
    By the way, I LOLed when I got to this sentence:

    My immigration policy recommendations have always been lifted from Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, a black lesbian Democrat whom Bill Clinton appointed chairwoman of the commission on immigration reform.

     

    Why not write this up into an article? You could title it something like 'Immigration Reform: The Barbara Jordan Plan'.

    You never know; maybe it would finally go viral.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @Hail, @Desiderius, @Abe

    Yeah, the BJ Plan, that’ll get some eyeballs

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    @StAugustine


    Yeah, the BJ Plan, that’ll get some eyeballs
     
    So that's what caught Bill Clinton's eye!
  26. Beginning with the word “clueless” and prior to the word “2008” you’ve got a large block of text needlessly linking to the article the reader is already reading.

  27. The real problem, as far as he could tell, was that his ideas made powerful people uncomfortable.

    Indeed.

    Speaking truth to power? How gay.

    No, seriously. White conservatives can’t speak truth to power? Is that cultural appropriation?

    Or is that old chestnut passe now that sassy truth speakers are in power and The Truth is Settled Science?

  28. What’s obvious is that the facts are clearly on our side which is why there is no room for debate.

  29. The progressive gatekeepers decided long ago that white people don’t deserve to advocate for themselves because of the real or perceived sins of white people in the past – they are to provide financial resources and votes for the left, but remain silent and comply with whatever masochistic policies the elites decide upon. As long as you understand that the modern left is a religious cult, their extreme desire for sanctioning and punishment of dissenters makes sense.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    @Arclight

    What you write is true. But given that Whites are a majority, and the most heavily armed civilian population in history, future historians will not look upon them sympathetically if they go quietly into the night.

    At some point they will either stand up for themselves, or deservedly be displaced. There are many achievements of European peoples of which to be proud. This current mess is not one of them. In fact given that Whites worldwide are being suppressed with words, not guns, makes our current situation even more embarrassing.

    Replies: @Arclight

    , @Alden
    @Arclight

    I don’t like to see the Minions of Satan refereed to as a religious cult. But Satanism is as much a religion as the others.

    I’ve been following Steve around the internet since maybe 97,98? I loved his contrast and compare articles about the crime ridden black ghetto Austin neighborhood of Chicago and just across the line, the then White suburb I think it’s Oak Park.

    I found UNZ through a Steve article on Vdare.

  30. @Dieter Kief
    Oh David Remnick redlighted Andrew Marantz's New Yorker article about you. Hm.

    It's a bit disappointing from a free-market of opinions point of view, that Marantz did then not walk away and publish this article about you and your opposition against the Iraq war elsewhere. It almost looks as if there'd be no more elsewhere there.

    What your term citizenism is concerned: What is the difference between a Citizenist and - a Citoyen (Citoyen being the republican version of the Burgois, who is rather concerned about his private life than about politics)? - Nothing, I guess. But the Citoyen is the prototype of the good person in LRB and NRB etc. - so what is this fuzz all about? - Definitely not about citizenism. There's something else going on.

    Marantz's claim, that citizenism would equal white suprematism is foul and vile. -

    -Would you talk to him again on the phone?

    (Many are the afflictions of the righteous. But the Lord delivereth him out of them all. Psalm 34:19)

    Replies: @Bugg, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Probably because exposing our genial host’s simple, reasonable and obvious grasp of electoral math and typical white people cannot be allowed to infest the more genteel precincts. Heaven forbid the right people read it and say “hey, rule of law, sensible immigration policies, pointless endless Middle Eastern war is bad, this kinda…. makes sense.” Even if you like cheap salad and nannies.

    Way easier to demonize. Heck, 2 Proud Boys in NYC are going to jail for a fistfight in which the Antifa “victims” refused to cooperate.

    As to the sainted Bill Buckley-would note he was probably scared of being blackmailed. His…habits…were well known. He was good friend with Ed Koch (a good mayor who unlike Buckley didn’t really care if anyone knew he was gay). He was a good example of the Washington Generals style of tolerated conservatism.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Bugg

    His…habits…were well known. He was good friend with Ed Koch (a good mayor who unlike Buckley didn’t really care if anyone knew he was gay).

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination. Been an education.

  31. @theMann
    @TTSSYF

    If the Democrats had raised an Army comprised of foreigners, and used it in an attempt to seize power, they would have been executed for treason. And there would have been no doubt of their guilt.

    How is raising an army of foriegners, injecting them into judiciously chosen states, and then overturning the legitimate results of elections any different? What the Democrats are doing is treason, the most despicable and vile treason imaginable. For the sake of winning a handful of Presidential elections, they have permanently damaged the social cohesion of our nation, and made Babel of our country. This is a crime for whose enormity they must be held accountable.

    Replies: @Charon, @AndrewR, @Corvinus

    This is a crime for whose enormity they must be held accountable.

    But it’s increasingly unlikely that they ever will be. We are right now on the verge of a one-party state, which will persist until the next revolution.

    If it weren’t for the flood of third world immigrants these past few decades, ironically enough, the Democratic party wouldn’t even exist.

  32. @Anonymous
    Apparently publishing idiots are just very anti-index.

    A philosopher I had was somewhat excited to do be involved with a pop book that was a collection of people discussing the philosophy of "[X]"--I think thered been a couple of successful books in this vein like "The Philosophy of the Matrix" or whatever.

    He one day came into our seminar ranting about how they weren't allowed to have an index because the people supposedly didn't like it and did we believe that? "But they're buying a book called The Philosophy of [X], written by professional philosophers. Why would they be so against an index?"

    Replies: @kihowi

    I was reading a book full of short science-y articles about every subject under the sun. The perfect kind of book for an index. None to be found.

    I think they just think it’s very uncool and would turn off a certain kind of reader. An index suggests a serious nerdy man doing research, no index suggests a novel, something a bubbly woman might read at a fashionable place between two extremely social activities. You read it, you enjoy the emotions that the product has provided you, you move on.

    • Replies: @Justice Duvall
    @kihowi

    Creating an index costs money.

  33. @J.Ross
    Techno-Utopians Hijack the American Conversation by Conspiring to Hide Tulsi Gabbard Search Results:
    https://youtu.be/7TdAWj4vDYY

    Replies: @Charon, @Anonymous

    It’s not called hijacking when it’s just the Establishment enforcing its Narratives.

    But then, as Steve says, how can Google, Twitter, Facebook, CNN, the NYT and WP (and on and on) ever possibly hope to counter the terrible might of, um, this blog?

  34. The point of my word is to emphasize the duty we owe to our fellow American citizens, and citizenship is obviously a legal rather than a racial category. As I wrote in 2008

    Hopefully this won’t make “citizenism” get pigeon holed as another “dog whistle” thing for white supremacists, like forming the OK symbol with your hand. You would think that if authors are going to write so much about you, they would actually go out to the Unz review and read your articles, to at the very least get some more material.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Mike Zwick

    As we write some "Proud Boys" (the "alt-right" self-strawman co-founded by a black homosexual and at great pains to fit through the "not nazis" hoop) are being sentenced to something like a decade for being in a fight with antifa street thugs. The control mechanism for being declared a Nazi is the exact same one used in being declared a witch or an enemy of the Revolution.

    , @gregor
    @Mike Zwick

    What Steve doesn’t seem to realize is that Jews like Marantz et al are not misunderstanding his “citizenist” position. They get it, but to them it’s just a thinly disguised form of what they call white nationalism. They are pushing a program of race replacement and any attempt to attenuate that is seen as white nationalism. Call it citizenism if you want but if most of the citizens happen to be white and you advocate policies that would freeze the demographics as they are or even slow the rate of white dispossession, they see this at best as incidental white nationalism. A bit like disparate impact doctrine.

  35. Marantz’s Ctrl-Left thesis is much the same as Saini’s: Something must be done about all the bad people, like me, who have been “hijacking the American conversation” with our control of the media.

    To such worthies, ‘control of the media’ refers to the courage and ingenuity necessary to survive as a dissident voice while dodging the merciless gnashing gears of a Great Clanking Freedom Machine designed specifically to isolate and destroy such voices.

    Funny, innit? A scream, it’s!

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Ragno

    LOL - "the merciless gnashing gears of a Great Clanking Freedom Machine"

    This is the il ragno I remember!

    Drop by my site and send me an email, old friend.

  36. @theMann
    @TTSSYF

    If the Democrats had raised an Army comprised of foreigners, and used it in an attempt to seize power, they would have been executed for treason. And there would have been no doubt of their guilt.

    How is raising an army of foriegners, injecting them into judiciously chosen states, and then overturning the legitimate results of elections any different? What the Democrats are doing is treason, the most despicable and vile treason imaginable. For the sake of winning a handful of Presidential elections, they have permanently damaged the social cohesion of our nation, and made Babel of our country. This is a crime for whose enormity they must be held accountable.

    Replies: @Charon, @AndrewR, @Corvinus

    But if you say the perps deserve to be executed then Sailer will faint.

  37. Is it “hijacking” if you’re trying to gently persuade those who have taken over the cockpit, intent on flying the plane into a building, to desist and allow the actual pilots to resume control?

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Matthew Kelly

    Jet fuel can’t melt Sailer’s steely resolve.

  38. @Senor Moose
    The great irony is that Trump, more than any other politician, pursued the “Sailer strategy,” yet he actually did better with Latinos than Romney, who pursued the old, traditional, Bush approach. The notion that all Latinos necessarily favor increased immigration is just not true, so taking a strongly restrictionist approach would not actually alienate all of them. The real way to win a larger share of Latinos would be through conservative cultural positions, but it is just really uncomfortable for progressives to acknowledge that.

    Replies: @Kaplan Turqweather

    Indeed. Over half of Latinos favour immigration restriction and about a quarter favour Trump’s wall.

    In the middle of this decade, an overlooked milestone was past; native-born Latinos surpassed immigrant Latinos and numbers…and they are converging with deplorable opinions fast. Ironically, this is most true where they are geographically concentrated.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Kaplan Turqweather

    The Alt-Right is a Latino/Persian/Lebanese/Italian/Coptic/Balkan/Hindu movement. Very intersectional!

  39. So, it was none other than Steve Sailer who stole 2016 from Hillary!

    I knew it, I knew it.

    Thank you Mr Marantz for pulling the Trump curtain aside and exposing this man who poses as a mild-mannered ex-marketer! George Soros eat ya heart out!

    – and you iSteve readers believed Hillary was robbed of her turn because of the Hilltendo video game and Macedonian Content Farms. You fools!

  40. While I obviously would NEVER™ condone illegal acts, I must reluctantly confess that if some Evil Monster™ rapes, tortures and murders the NYT staff and their kin to the sixth degree, and I am on the jury at the trial: they finna get acquitted.

  41. @The Last Real Calvinist
    By the way, I LOLed when I got to this sentence:

    My immigration policy recommendations have always been lifted from Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, a black lesbian Democrat whom Bill Clinton appointed chairwoman of the commission on immigration reform.

     

    Why not write this up into an article? You could title it something like 'Immigration Reform: The Barbara Jordan Plan'.

    You never know; maybe it would finally go viral.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @Hail, @Desiderius, @Abe

    Barbara Jordan
    Chair of the Immigration Reform Commission formed by Pres. Clinton
    Washington, D.C., June 8, 1995
    Press conference (aired by C-SPAN)

    [Barbara Jordan:] “The commission had concluded that a properly regulated system of legal immigration is in the national interest in the United States. The commission recommends a significant re-definition of priorities and admission numbers, to fulfill, more effectively, the objectives of our immigration system. … We propose core immigration levels of 550,000 a year. …

    What the commission is concerned about is the unskilled workers in our society, in an age in which unskilled workers have far too few opportunities open to them. When immigrants are less well educated and less skilled, they may pose economic hardships on the most vulnerable of Americans, particularly those who are unemployed and underemployed. The commission sees no justification in the continued entry of unskilled foreign workers…”

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Hail

    Correction: I believe the press conference was June 7, 1995. The video that survives online is of a C-SPAN re-broadcast the next morning (June 8). The New York Times headline of June 8, the day after the press conference, reported the following:


    [President] Clinton Embraces a Proposal to Cut Immigration by a Third ...
     
    Washington Post, June 8, 1995:

    Clinton Backs Call to Reduce Immigration

    President Clinton yesterday endorsed the recommendations of a congressional commission calling for a substantial reduction in the number of legal immigrants allowed to enter the country. [...]
     

    Believe it or not. Truly incredible, even in the literal sense of that word (i.e., not believable). It seems something like a parallel universe, when viewed from our time.

    As Steve wrote, this has been completely memory-holed from US culture.

    ___________

    Donald Trump started his campaign in the 11 AM hour of June 15, 2015, which was, coincidentally, (within eight days of) exactly twenty years after this Barbara Jordan press conference called for lower legal immigration and an end to illegal immigration.

    The funny thing is, Trump's immigration sloganeering in 2015 was similar to the Barbara Jordan-led immigration commission's recommendations of 1994-1995. Trump's clumsy, undiplomatic language ("barroom stool" style, as Ron Unz once put it) notwithstanding.

    Twenty years difference: The same proposals once endorsed by major Democrats, by President Clinton himself, and tacitly by the Big Media axis (still all-powerful in 1995), caused, twenty years later, the Establishment to don some Red Guard suits and go into fits of rage, attempting to destroy Trump in 2015 (and since) for Treason Against Immigration.

  42. “If it is fine for Mexican-American voters to organize in the interest of illegal aliens from Mexico, how is it bad for white Americans to organize in their own interest?”

    Steve, Steve, Steve… Your question almost answers itself: Wanting to preserve the majority white country in which you (we) born is a racism. Therefore prioritizing the still (for now) majority white citizenry is a racism. Therefore any desire to limit immigration is a racism. Therefore whites organizing to limit immigration is a a doubleplusbad racism. Therefore citizenism can’t be a word. Therefore the non-person who coined the phrase is an enemy of the state and rightly is the subject of a two minutes hate.

    Whites can’t organize in their own interest because they might decide that a white majority country is in their interest. Once whites are safely a permanent minority Big Brother may reconsider this.

  43. Sailer felt confident that no part of the Sailer Strategy was unconstitutional or illegal. In more than a decade, no one had been able to point out any serious mistakes in his arithmetic or his logic. The real problem, as far as he could tell, was that his ideas made powerful people uncomfortable.

    Surely as Marantz would agree, Sailer clearly didn’t believe in the sanctity of the Zeroth Amemdment!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Kaplan Turqweather

    [I believe] the relevant legal reasoning here is that one of the later, experimental, equity-law amendments (not the articles, not the constitution, not the Bill of Rights, but Woodrow Wilson or Lyndon Johnson playing with automatic writing while high) makes a narrow sort of discrimination bad, which is interpreted to mean "discrimination is the only bad, else do what thou wilt, and the whole duty of the state is to prevent or prosecute that one bad," and immigration restriction discriminates. So "unconstitutional" the same way a martini is.

  44. @Hail
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMywOal05s0


    Barbara Jordan
    Chair of the Immigration Reform Commission formed by Pres. Clinton
    Washington, D.C., June 8, 1995
    Press conference (aired by C-SPAN)

    [Barbara Jordan:] "The commission had concluded that a properly regulated system of legal immigration is in the national interest in the United States. The commission recommends a significant re-definition of priorities and admission numbers, to fulfill, more effectively, the objectives of our immigration system. ... We propose core immigration levels of 550,000 a year. ...

    What the commission is concerned about is the unskilled workers in our society, in an age in which unskilled workers have far too few opportunities open to them. When immigrants are less well educated and less skilled, they may pose economic hardships on the most vulnerable of Americans, particularly those who are unemployed and underemployed. The commission sees no justification in the continued entry of unskilled foreign workers..."
     

    Replies: @Hail

    Correction: I believe the press conference was June 7, 1995. The video that survives online is of a C-SPAN re-broadcast the next morning (June 8). The New York Times headline of June 8, the day after the press conference, reported the following:

    [President] Clinton Embraces a Proposal to Cut Immigration by a Third …

    Washington Post, June 8, 1995:

    Clinton Backs Call to Reduce Immigration

    President Clinton yesterday endorsed the recommendations of a congressional commission calling for a substantial reduction in the number of legal immigrants allowed to enter the country. […]

    Believe it or not. Truly incredible, even in the literal sense of that word (i.e., not believable). It seems something like a parallel universe, when viewed from our time.

    As Steve wrote, this has been completely memory-holed from US culture.

    ___________

    Donald Trump started his campaign in the 11 AM hour of June 15, 2015, which was, coincidentally, (within eight days of) exactly twenty years after this Barbara Jordan press conference called for lower legal immigration and an end to illegal immigration.

    The funny thing is, Trump’s immigration sloganeering in 2015 was similar to the Barbara Jordan-led immigration commission’s recommendations of 1994-1995. Trump’s clumsy, undiplomatic language (“barroom stool” style, as Ron Unz once put it) notwithstanding.

    Twenty years difference: The same proposals once endorsed by major Democrats, by President Clinton himself, and tacitly by the Big Media axis (still all-powerful in 1995), caused, twenty years later, the Establishment to don some Red Guard suits and go into fits of rage, attempting to destroy Trump in 2015 (and since) for Treason Against Immigration.

  45. Sadly, in New Yorker writer Andrew Marantz’s new Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation……

    Over the course of my lifetime, the only people I have observed “hijacking the American conversation” have been people like Andrew Marantz.

  46. @StAugustine
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Yeah, the BJ Plan, that'll get some eyeballs

    Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Yeah, the BJ Plan, that’ll get some eyeballs

    So that’s what caught Bill Clinton’s eye!

  47. @Dieter Kief
    Oh David Remnick redlighted Andrew Marantz's New Yorker article about you. Hm.

    It's a bit disappointing from a free-market of opinions point of view, that Marantz did then not walk away and publish this article about you and your opposition against the Iraq war elsewhere. It almost looks as if there'd be no more elsewhere there.

    What your term citizenism is concerned: What is the difference between a Citizenist and - a Citoyen (Citoyen being the republican version of the Burgois, who is rather concerned about his private life than about politics)? - Nothing, I guess. But the Citoyen is the prototype of the good person in LRB and NRB etc. - so what is this fuzz all about? - Definitely not about citizenism. There's something else going on.

    Marantz's claim, that citizenism would equal white suprematism is foul and vile. -

    -Would you talk to him again on the phone?

    (Many are the afflictions of the righteous. But the Lord delivereth him out of them all. Psalm 34:19)

    Replies: @Bugg, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Marantz’s claim, that citizenism would equal white suprematism is foul and vile. –

    Marantz said citizenism would equal white “nationalism” which is natural and beautiful. Only a CivNat could say that the desire to live among and be ruled by your own people is something “foul and vile.”

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I agree, but still - Ms. Rubin writes in the WaPo:

    "White Nationalism: White nationalism is a term that originated among white supremacists as a euphemism for white supremacy. Eventually, some white supremacists tried to distinguish it further by using it to refer to a form of white supremacy that emphasizes defining a country or region by white racial identity and which seeks to promote the interests of whites exclusively, typically at the expense of people of other backgrounds."

    So I might have been a bit over the top - but only a little bit. And I'd still say, it was quite unfair by Marantz to say, Steve Sailer was a White Nationalist. It is simply not true. There is a big difference between the a) - multiracial at its core - concept of Citizenism and b) White Nationalism. Marantz needs a scapegoat and so he comes up with one.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @guest

    , @guest
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    "White nationalism" = white supremacy to people who aren't nationalists. We know that's what people who aren't nationalists mean for us to understand when they say it.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country

  48. @Redneck farmer
    Maybe Steve, thousands of years from now, you will be read as a voice of wisdom. Kind of like obscure philosophers that more people read now than ever did when they were alive.
    And if citizenism is white nationalism, maybe Mr. Marantz doesn't want to help his non-white fellow citizens? He probably couldn't sell an article entitled "Why Care About N*****s As Long As They Stay Away From Me".

    Replies: @Romanian

    I doubt digital media will have that kind of continuity. You keep finding manuscripts of this or that philosopher, or at least portions, but Steve’s work is on some guy’s servers and, presumably, on his home computer, with the exception of his only paperback book and the existing issues of NR to which he contributed.

    All it takes is one systemic collapse or one EMP event, and most of what he wrote, and the best of what he wrote, will be gone forever. It is only a matter of time really.

    Other systemic transformations also pose an issue. Playing back media from way back, in formats that are no longer used, is an example. Very few games from before the 2000s can be played on modern PCs without modification or emulation. The digital sphere is already developing its own archaeology. Who knows what Windows 3000 will be (in)capable of?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Romanian


    I doubt digital media will have that kind of continuity.
     
    First rule of the Internet: whatever you want saved will disappear. What you want to disappear will be saved.

    Forever.

    The Ten Most Embarrassing Moments To Ever Hit The Internet
    , @Hail
    @Romanian

    Solution:

    Steve Sailer print editions.

    How many pages would all his VDare andn Takimag columns of the past take, if printed together in paper book form?

    How many pages would six months of blogging require? And how many extra pages if including all comments / selected comments? Maybe many of the blogposts don't need to be saved. A good editor's hand is called for.

    Replies: @ic1000

  49. Marantz has a noticeably higher IQ than Saini … But Marantz’s Ctrl-Left thesis is much the same as Saini’s: Something must be done about all the bad people, like me, who have been “hijacking the American conversation” with our control of the media.

    It’s well known in the Carol Alt Right Cognoscenti that Ed Dutton’s impressionistic mimicking of Angela Saini is much better than Steve Sailer’s. This is completely and totally attributable to Steve Sailer never bothering to let off some steam by mocking by mimicry that anti-White interloper of Ancient England who calls herself Angela Saini.

    Angie, you’re not beautiful and you have left Ed Dutton with less money in his coat, and everywhere true English people look in England there’s more of you and less of them.

    Civil War II is coming to England.

    Ed Dutton shall honor his Norman ancestors and do his part to defend the honor of the True English and True England.

    Angela Saini and John Bercow and Oliver Letwin and David Lammy and the Hippopotamus called Diane Abbott shall lead the forces of the non-English interlopers.

    The American old stocker contingent shall tip the scales in favor of the True English and that blessed green island shall be rid of the globalizers and the non-English and the plutocrats and the corrupt and crooked government workers and the treasonite transnationalists who have attacked English sovereignty by using the EU as a fig leaf to hide their own behind the scene actions.

    Mad Dog English Man Dutton Does Arrogant Asian Indian Interloper Saini:


  50. Steve, I haven’t read the book of course but none of what you quote makes you seem too bad and all of what you quote makes you seem important enough to be written about in a book of complaints so I’m happy for you! You’ve long deserved more public attention then you’ve received so, whenever you get it, and it ain’t too libelous, I’m happy about it.

  51. Leaving aside its shameful ethics, the Democrats’ plan to take control of the White House forever deserved to be taken seriously.

    Steve,

    Serious question: Why was/is the Dems use of immigration to win “shameful?”

    They believe that their policies will benefit mankind and punish the wicked. (Mind you, I think that the Dems’ policies will cause unimaginable harm, but what I believe isn’t the point here.) Why shouldn’t they use any means necessary to accomplish that goal?

    Also, isn’t all of this vote gathering by any means just the nature consequence of democracy? First, you expand the vote to non land-owning white men. Then to women. Then to blacks. Then non-citizen residents. Etc. etc. Democracy greatly rewards those who will expand the vote to win. What the Dems are doing is exactly what you’d expect in a democracy.

    Therefore, if you have a problem with what the Dems are doing, you really have a problem with democracy itself. Goodness knows that I do.

  52. First, I’m not aware of much evidence that the late Mr. Buckley was even cognizant of my existence, so Marantz’s regret that he’s not around anymore to silence me seems…odd.

    I suspect Mr. Buckley could recognize the names of occasional contributors to the magazine he founded (run by a trusteeship he’d appointed).

    This chump Marantz is the issue of Brown University, the latrine of the Ivy League. It was a singularly clownish place 35 years ago, before clownishness was de rigeur among American universities.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Art Deco

    Cut flowers long since wilted.

  53. Steve Sailer wrote:

    it’s not as if I was the only person in America [in 2000 and since] capable of noticing that the most plausible Republican road to 270 electoral votes led through the Northern white working class.

    This is ultimately the Nixon Coalition of 1968 and 1972. It has been the key to Republican wins ever since.

    Pat Buchanan wrote a political memoir of his first three years as Nixon’s strategy wingman (from his being hired in early Jan. 1966, to election night of Nov. 1968) that discusses this. (The book’s title, The Greatest Comeback, doesn’t necessarily match the contents. The book is really more a series of personal reminiscences than some kind grand-narrative political history of the Nixon ‘comeback’ of 1968. It’s good reading all the same, and includes a lot of primary documents from Pat’s file cabinets.)

    Buchanan writes throughout that book that this was the strategy he was pushing from 1966 onward, and it had Nixon’s confidence the whole way. Buchanan characterizes the Nov. 1966 midterm elections as the first time this strategy was ever employed, with some success, with 1968 as a more important turning point. US politics as we have known it for the next fifty years largely follows from that realignment.

    The difference in 1966 and 1968 was the South was still in party-support flux — including the important caveat that third-party Wallace took much of the South’s electoral votes in 1968. And that at his peak, Wallace may have had support pushing up towards a third of the Nixon Coalition. (Buchanan thinks Wallace’s big mistake in fall ’68 was taking on Gen. Curtis Le May as VP, after which Buchanan says his polled support faded.) The Sailer Strategy (2000 to present) assumes a Solid South for R-team, whereas the Nixon Coalition that was being born 1966-1968 had to juggle the two balls at once.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Hail


    The Sailer Strategy...assumes a Solid South for the R-team
     
    Here is a question: What comes after the Sailer Strategy?

    If Texas (38 EVs) and Georgia (16 EVs), maybe North Carolina (15 EVs), soon follow once-solid Virginia (13 EVs) on the sad path of "Solid R --> Likely D" in presidential voting, the Sailer Strategy as we have understood it in the 2000s and 2010s (and actually since the Nixon Coalition) begins to come apart. What then?

    In related news, Ann Coulter yesterday called for dissolution of the United States.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Hail


    Buchanan thinks Wallace’s big mistake in fall ’68 was taking on Gen. Curtis Le May as VP, after which Buchanan says his polled support faded.
     
    Choosing an admitted war criminal neutralized one of Dixie's favorite objections to the Union side in the "Waw".

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    , @Art Deco
    @Hail

    Pat Buchanan wrote a political memoir of his first three years as Nixon’s strategy wingman

    Buchanan was in that era an editorial writer for one of the St. Louis papers. The positions he held in the Nixon and Reagan administrations were in the public relations apparat.

    Replies: @Hail

    , @Art Deco
    @Hail

    Buchanan should talk to Wm. Schneider about what survey research reveals about the significance of VP picks. They can cause unwanted distractions, but they seldom make any difference one way or another. Wallace's problem was the problem any 3d party candidate faces when 1st-past-the-post is the order of the day. About 3/4 of John Anderson's polled support evaporated during his campaign, and his VP candidate said nothing embarrassing at all.

  54. In contrast, the burgeoning Mexican-American vote was concentrated in California, which a GOP presidential candidate couldn’t win after 1988 (although Rove wasted $20 million advertising in California in 2000 anyway)

    Here is a NY Times article from October 2000 promoting the “tightening” race in California. I assume the polls from the Public Policy Institute of California had a bad sample or methodology. I am also assuming the Democrat consultants “even closer” polls were intentionally bogus to get Gore to pay them to run expensive TV ads.

    The long term problem is that Trump lost among white California voters. His margin with whites in New York was 51-45 and in New Mexico was 47-42. If he isn’t going to make a serious move to pause immigration, it appears the long term trend is bad even among white voters.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2000/10/26/us/2000-campaign-race-california-offensive-bush-producing-results-across-california.html

  55. The Sailer Strategy was genius, but unless it was used to put a moratorium on immigration, it was destined to be nothing more than a clever rear-guard action in a larger lost war. Trump used it but has backed away from curbing immigration. As a result, sooner or later Texas or Florida (or Georgia or Arizona) will turn blue and it’s over.

    Unless whites become supremely race conscious – along with the GOP – over the next decade or two (which likely won’t happen), we’re in for one-party rule in the White House, which, of course, also means the judiciary. Whatever the United States was, it will not be that country any longer. (Indeed, it’s mostly gone already.)

    It’ll be interesting to see how CivNats deal with the reality that their religion has failed. I suspect that much like the white liberal of today, they’ll insulate and isolate and ignore painful truths.

  56. The way this clown gives praise for Buckley has to be the final proof for all of us what WFB has always been and what his use was to the Left. The way the feds plant there own in nefarious groups for control. He was way more than a gatekeeper.

  57. Steve the article is sorry to say this proof of your failure. Citizenship is dead. Whites and particularly White men will either be at the bottom o r top of a racial caste system.

    That is the choice.

    Hating White men is the nature of non Whites and White women. You can’t change it. They will never accept you as anything other than evil to be exterminated.

    Donning the swastikas is to quote Zman surrender but you will be called Nazi anyway.

    You should fight. And sue both Saini and Marantz. The process being punishment.

    If you don’t fight you become Pierre Delecto. Fight.

  58. Anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:

    You may not want to approve this comment for reasons of “optics” as they now say.

    But I can see where he’s coming from on the question of “citizenism.” I’m a longtime millennial reader and I don’t have any interest in that and neither do any of the other dozen or so millennial fans of yours I talk to.

    We are all white nationalists.

    So when it’s clear you do have some “traction” but as you yourself acknowledge “citizenism” does not, there’s probably a reason for that.

    Technically, you are not vulnerable to criticism of anything but what you actually say. You are perfectly justified in refuting things you’ve already disavowed in print.

    But if you’re wondering why he’s imagining you stand for something, I’m just offering some background as to why he might come up with that. As opposed to, say, imagining you think the sky is green.

    The unchecked media power of the Sailersphere is quite hilarious and is clearly pure projection. It reminds me of how much people liked to condemn Chomsky after they’d canceled him from the mainstream. Turns out Chomsky is a lot easier to debate when you don’t allow him in the room. And yet, he still bothered them.

    “A rite of passage for apostates peculiar to U.S. political culture is bashing Noam Chomsky. It’s the political equivalent of a bar mitzvah, a ritual signaling that one has “grown up” – i.e., grown out of one’s “childish” past. It’s hard to pick up an article or book by ex-radicals – Gitlin’s Letters to a Young Activist, Paul Berman’s Terror and Liberalism… – that doesn’t include a hysterical attack on him. Behind this venom there’s also a transparent psychological factor at play. Chomsky mirrors their idealistic past as well as sordid present, an obstinate reminder that they once had principles but no longer do, that they sold out but he didn’t. Hating to be reminded, they keep trying to shatter the glass. He’s the demon from the past that, after recantation, no amount of incantation can exorcise”

    Just imagine someone who has worked at or been well reviewed in the New Yorker or NYT accusing Steve of possessing plenary media powers. The accusation is so objectively laughable we must infer the psychological defect at play really is that transparent.

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Anonymous

    It's ironic that Steve's baby "Citizenism" failed because Steve - of all people - refused to acknowledge HBD and the ties of family (remember that Steve defines race as an extended family).

    Like Communism and Libertarianism, Citizenism strips people of their humanity, treating humans as economic units whose sole purpose is the betterment of the state (communism) or the economy (libertarianism) or the Constitution (Citizenism). You are asked to put strangers ahead of your own extended family (and sometimes close family) because of a piece of a paper.

    It would never have worked because it shouldn't work. America's original Civic Nationalism worked reasonably well because it was implicitly White Civic Nationalism, an attempt to blend various European tribes into a new white people, much like the Angles, Saxons and Jutes became the English. Once you threw in other races and religions in large numbers, Civic Nationalism was bound to fail.

    Politics is downstream from culture. Culture is downstream from biology.

  59. istevefan says:
    @Arclight
    The progressive gatekeepers decided long ago that white people don't deserve to advocate for themselves because of the real or perceived sins of white people in the past - they are to provide financial resources and votes for the left, but remain silent and comply with whatever masochistic policies the elites decide upon. As long as you understand that the modern left is a religious cult, their extreme desire for sanctioning and punishment of dissenters makes sense.

    Replies: @istevefan, @Alden

    What you write is true. But given that Whites are a majority, and the most heavily armed civilian population in history, future historians will not look upon them sympathetically if they go quietly into the night.

    At some point they will either stand up for themselves, or deservedly be displaced. There are many achievements of European peoples of which to be proud. This current mess is not one of them. In fact given that Whites worldwide are being suppressed with words, not guns, makes our current situation even more embarrassing.

    • Replies: @Arclight
    @istevefan

    Agreed - not historically literate enough to say for certain, but I'm not aware of any group that managed to get to the point at which it dominated science, politics, and art and then basically just rolled over and voluntarily gave it all away. Europeans and European-descended people are a shrinking share of the world's population in absolute numbers and in its traditional homelands and its elites are just fine with that.

    The percentage of whites voting for the Democrats declines year after year, although they are still the largest group numerically. At some point the continued erosion of white support for the party means it will be majority-minority, and not too long after I would expect a pretty significant share of the remaining white Democrats to leave for good. The question is whether this happens at a point at which the country's demographics have changed to the point that Democrats have a near unbreakable grip on the Senate and Executive. Not sure what happens if what is still the largest, best armed, and wealthiest group in a country wakes up and realizes it is politically disenfranchised, but it's nothing good.

    Replies: @anon

  60. Didn’t a great actor say that a bad review is better than none at all? At least they are writing about you. Maybe this will help spread the memes and get more people to read you.

    (I like the way you concluded with David Mitchell, BTW;)

  61. @Hail

    Steve Sailer wrote:

    it’s not as if I was the only person in America [in 2000 and since] capable of noticing that the most plausible Republican road to 270 electoral votes led through the Northern white working class.
     

    This is ultimately the Nixon Coalition of 1968 and 1972. It has been the key to Republican wins ever since.

    Pat Buchanan wrote a political memoir of his first three years as Nixon's strategy wingman (from his being hired in early Jan. 1966, to election night of Nov. 1968) that discusses this. (The book's title, The Greatest Comeback, doesn't necessarily match the contents. The book is really more a series of personal reminiscences than some kind grand-narrative political history of the Nixon 'comeback' of 1968. It's good reading all the same, and includes a lot of primary documents from Pat's file cabinets.)

    Buchanan writes throughout that book that this was the strategy he was pushing from 1966 onward, and it had Nixon's confidence the whole way. Buchanan characterizes the Nov. 1966 midterm elections as the first time this strategy was ever employed, with some success, with 1968 as a more important turning point. US politics as we have known it for the next fifty years largely follows from that realignment.

    The difference in 1966 and 1968 was the South was still in party-support flux -- including the important caveat that third-party Wallace took much of the South's electoral votes in 1968. And that at his peak, Wallace may have had support pushing up towards a third of the Nixon Coalition. (Buchanan thinks Wallace's big mistake in fall '68 was taking on Gen. Curtis Le May as VP, after which Buchanan says his polled support faded.) The Sailer Strategy (2000 to present) assumes a Solid South for R-team, whereas the Nixon Coalition that was being born 1966-1968 had to juggle the two balls at once.

    Replies: @Hail, @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    The Sailer Strategy…assumes a Solid South for the R-team

    Here is a question: What comes after the Sailer Strategy?

    If Texas (38 EVs) and Georgia (16 EVs), maybe North Carolina (15 EVs), soon follow once-solid Virginia (13 EVs) on the sad path of “Solid R –> Likely D” in presidential voting, the Sailer Strategy as we have understood it in the 2000s and 2010s (and actually since the Nixon Coalition) begins to come apart. What then?

    In related news, Ann Coulter yesterday called for dissolution of the United States.

    • Agree: Houston 1992
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Hail

    "dissolution of the United States"

    This is inevitable. We should now be in the design phase of the new republic.

  62. Steve should be afraid. A lot of ways the government can put people in prison. And supporters are pretty much powerless to defend those targeted and are also quick to put problems of others out of their mind. Look at how these two young guys who fought Antifa in Manhattan have been sentenced to 4 years in jail. No demonstrations in their defense, no prominent people in the media speak to the unfairness of them being targeted.

    • Agree: jim jones
  63. @istevefan
    @Arclight

    What you write is true. But given that Whites are a majority, and the most heavily armed civilian population in history, future historians will not look upon them sympathetically if they go quietly into the night.

    At some point they will either stand up for themselves, or deservedly be displaced. There are many achievements of European peoples of which to be proud. This current mess is not one of them. In fact given that Whites worldwide are being suppressed with words, not guns, makes our current situation even more embarrassing.

    Replies: @Arclight

    Agreed – not historically literate enough to say for certain, but I’m not aware of any group that managed to get to the point at which it dominated science, politics, and art and then basically just rolled over and voluntarily gave it all away. Europeans and European-descended people are a shrinking share of the world’s population in absolute numbers and in its traditional homelands and its elites are just fine with that.

    The percentage of whites voting for the Democrats declines year after year, although they are still the largest group numerically. At some point the continued erosion of white support for the party means it will be majority-minority, and not too long after I would expect a pretty significant share of the remaining white Democrats to leave for good. The question is whether this happens at a point at which the country’s demographics have changed to the point that Democrats have a near unbreakable grip on the Senate and Executive. Not sure what happens if what is still the largest, best armed, and wealthiest group in a country wakes up and realizes it is politically disenfranchised, but it’s nothing good.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Arclight


    I’m not aware of any group that managed to get to the point at which it dominated science, politics, and art and then basically just rolled over and voluntarily gave it all away.
     
    The Romans.
    Roman patricians complained bitterly when Christians took over the temples and the ancient pagan religion was outlawed and replaced. The patricians couldn't believe they were losing their society to a bunch of cult idiots. Letters of the time sound like the ISteve blog today.
    The dominate majority had no will to fight for an old religion they no longer really believed in.
    The new cult fanatics were unstoppable.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  64. Steve — Would you rather be quoted in ‘National Review’ or ‘Golf Digest’?

  65. In related news, Ann Coulter yesterday called for dissolution of the United States.

    Ann Coulter also chimed in on the Robert Shiller bit about Trump being a one man market mover.

    I say there are no markets, there is no price discovery, there’s only central banker shyster interventionism and monetary extremism that created and sustains the asset bubbles in stocks, bonds and real estate.

    Ann Coulter reads Unz Review and Steve Sailer too!

    I say this about Robert Shiller and monetary extremism:

    Robert Shiller is a baby boomer stooge whore for the hostile JEW/WASP ruling class of the American Empire.

    The Federal Reserve Bank and monetary extremism from the Fed is the cause and reason for the subsequent continuation of the asset bubbles in stocks, bonds and real estate.

    Shiller is a high IQ baby boomer moron stooge boy who knows damn well that the Federal Reserve Bank is the reason that the asset bubbles in real estate — commercial/residential — and stocks and bonds has been kept inflated.

    Shiller is a shyster who hides the fact that central banker shysters are using mass legal immigration and mass illegal immigration as wage-reducing agents to suppress the wage inflation that would ordinarily occur during bouts of monetary extremism.

    This filthy propaganda stooge Shiller is full of shit about some vague and hazy Trumpian consumer animal spirits that are magically levitating the asset bubbles in stocks, bonds and real estate!

    This state university peasant bastard writer says that MIT sonofabitch Shiller can go straight to Hell!

    Attention Shiller: What would the GDP be without a trillion dollar yearly deficit or a 23 trillion dollar federal government debt?

    Attention Shiller: What would be the GDP and how would the asset bubbles fare if the federal funds rate were at the normal level of 6 percent?

    Attention Shiller: If the economy is booming like a bastard, why is it necessary to cut the federal funds rate and pour in more liquidity to the money supply?

    I hereby challenge this MIT bigshot Shiller to a debate on monetary extremism and the asset bubbles in stocks, bonds and real estate.

  66. Divide and subjugate must be upheld.

    Citizenism and avoiding foreign wars are unifying and so must be fought with all strength. Same with campaign finance reform. Most non-politicians and non-lobbyists would love it. So those that profit don’t allow us to rally around it.

  67. iSteve, isn’t a confederate of Galton, Einstein, or Watson, but the Morrissey allegation is definitely true. I recall seeing a VH-1 special in the 90s which said that iSteve provided the handclaps and cowbell on the ”Strangeways, Here We Come” LP — which only exacerbated the Marr/Morrissey breakdown. Somehow Mr. Unz has caused this to be deleted on the worldwide web because I can’t find the clip on youtube or elsewhere.

  68. @Romanian
    @Redneck farmer

    I doubt digital media will have that kind of continuity. You keep finding manuscripts of this or that philosopher, or at least portions, but Steve's work is on some guy's servers and, presumably, on his home computer, with the exception of his only paperback book and the existing issues of NR to which he contributed.

    All it takes is one systemic collapse or one EMP event, and most of what he wrote, and the best of what he wrote, will be gone forever. It is only a matter of time really.

    Other systemic transformations also pose an issue. Playing back media from way back, in formats that are no longer used, is an example. Very few games from before the 2000s can be played on modern PCs without modification or emulation. The digital sphere is already developing its own archaeology. Who knows what Windows 3000 will be (in)capable of?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hail

    I doubt digital media will have that kind of continuity.

    First rule of the Internet: whatever you want saved will disappear. What you want to disappear will be saved.

    Forever.

    The Ten Most Embarrassing Moments To Ever Hit The Internet

  69. @Romanian
    @Redneck farmer

    I doubt digital media will have that kind of continuity. You keep finding manuscripts of this or that philosopher, or at least portions, but Steve's work is on some guy's servers and, presumably, on his home computer, with the exception of his only paperback book and the existing issues of NR to which he contributed.

    All it takes is one systemic collapse or one EMP event, and most of what he wrote, and the best of what he wrote, will be gone forever. It is only a matter of time really.

    Other systemic transformations also pose an issue. Playing back media from way back, in formats that are no longer used, is an example. Very few games from before the 2000s can be played on modern PCs without modification or emulation. The digital sphere is already developing its own archaeology. Who knows what Windows 3000 will be (in)capable of?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Hail

    Solution:

    Steve Sailer print editions.

    How many pages would all his VDare andn Takimag columns of the past take, if printed together in paper book form?

    How many pages would six months of blogging require? And how many extra pages if including all comments / selected comments? Maybe many of the blogposts don’t need to be saved. A good editor’s hand is called for.

    • Replies: @ic1000
    @Hail

    > Steve Sailer print editions

    Steve has generated so much good stuff over the years that it would be editing rather than writing to produce Volume 1 (movie reviews), Volume 2 (affordable family formation), Volume 3 (resurgent anti-science progressivism), Volume 4 (golf course architecture). And so forth. Unfortunately, Steve clearly has an aversion to that kind of drudgery.

    Replies: @Hail

  70. I , for one welcome Steve’s ascension to super-villain hood. In keeping with tradition, he has the same initial first and last names so prized by super-villains- Lex Luthor, Dr. Doom et al. Perhaps he will be introduced into the Marvelverse as the bete noir of one of the new angsty SJW superheroes? Hell , maybe he can make one of TNC’s plots? The sky is the limit here!

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @kaganovitch

    And Judge Reinhold can finally get an Oscar by playing the supervillain Noticer.

    , @Known Fact
    @kaganovitch

    As a true super-villain Steve would have to abandon sunny California for some forbidding undersea or mountaintop fortress, or perhaps an orbiting deathstar

    , @ChrisZ
    @kaganovitch

    It's not so far fetched that Steve could be adapted as a Marvel supervillain. One of his periodic subjects, T-N Coates, currently writes the "Captain America" comic book. If he doesn't know of Steve already (he *should* know of him, but he may be that dull), it's likely he'll learn about him from this Marantz book.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Harry Baldwin

  71. @Hail

    Steve Sailer wrote:

    it’s not as if I was the only person in America [in 2000 and since] capable of noticing that the most plausible Republican road to 270 electoral votes led through the Northern white working class.
     

    This is ultimately the Nixon Coalition of 1968 and 1972. It has been the key to Republican wins ever since.

    Pat Buchanan wrote a political memoir of his first three years as Nixon's strategy wingman (from his being hired in early Jan. 1966, to election night of Nov. 1968) that discusses this. (The book's title, The Greatest Comeback, doesn't necessarily match the contents. The book is really more a series of personal reminiscences than some kind grand-narrative political history of the Nixon 'comeback' of 1968. It's good reading all the same, and includes a lot of primary documents from Pat's file cabinets.)

    Buchanan writes throughout that book that this was the strategy he was pushing from 1966 onward, and it had Nixon's confidence the whole way. Buchanan characterizes the Nov. 1966 midterm elections as the first time this strategy was ever employed, with some success, with 1968 as a more important turning point. US politics as we have known it for the next fifty years largely follows from that realignment.

    The difference in 1966 and 1968 was the South was still in party-support flux -- including the important caveat that third-party Wallace took much of the South's electoral votes in 1968. And that at his peak, Wallace may have had support pushing up towards a third of the Nixon Coalition. (Buchanan thinks Wallace's big mistake in fall '68 was taking on Gen. Curtis Le May as VP, after which Buchanan says his polled support faded.) The Sailer Strategy (2000 to present) assumes a Solid South for R-team, whereas the Nixon Coalition that was being born 1966-1968 had to juggle the two balls at once.

    Replies: @Hail, @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    Buchanan thinks Wallace’s big mistake in fall ’68 was taking on Gen. Curtis Le May as VP, after which Buchanan says his polled support faded.

    Choosing an admitted war criminal neutralized one of Dixie’s favorite objections to the Union side in the “Waw”.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Reg Cæsar

    On the other hand, USAF Gen. Curtis Le May is why you have an AR-15 in defense of home and country:


    "However, military history buffs and firearms enthusiasts can also point to another hallmark in LeMay’s long career: he’s the man responsible for bringing the AR-15 rifle to the U.S. military, which would go on to inspire the M16 rifle and change the face of military arms forever. "

    https://www.nrablog.com/articles/2017/9/remembering-the-air-force-general-who-helped-usher-in-the-m16-rifle/
     

    as well as making Single Side band (SSB) voice the mode of military communications:

    In the mid-1950s, hams and amateur sideband actually had a hand in altering the course of the Cold War. General Curtis LeMay, W6EZV, was Commander of the Strategic Air Command (SAC), charged with deterrence of the Soviet nuclear threat. See Figure 4. New jet air-craft then being introduced were result-ing in the elimination of in-flight radio operators and SAC was planning on the use of AM voice equipment in the cockpit. LeMay became aware of the successes of amateur SSB work, and in 1956 undertook two flights, one to Okinawa and the other to Greenland, during which SSB was put to the test using Amateur Radio gear and hams themselves. Two of the hams invited to operate on those flights were Art Collins, WØCXX, of Collins Radio, and Leo Meyerson, WØGFQ, of World Radio Labs. SSB far outperformed the conventional AM communications systems then in use by the military. In 1957, it was formally adopted by SAC for use in its (then) new B-52 bombers,4 the same year that General Francis “Butch” Griswold, KØDWC, of SAC would give the keynote address on the subject at the ARRL National Convention in Chicago.

    http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Technology/pdf/McElroy.pdf
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alfa158

  72. @The Last Real Calvinist
    By the way, I LOLed when I got to this sentence:

    My immigration policy recommendations have always been lifted from Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, a black lesbian Democrat whom Bill Clinton appointed chairwoman of the commission on immigration reform.

     

    Why not write this up into an article? You could title it something like 'Immigration Reform: The Barbara Jordan Plan'.

    You never know; maybe it would finally go viral.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @Hail, @Desiderius, @Abe

    Steve’s been viral his whole life. Viruses aren’t easy to see.

    Their effects are.

  73. I would prefer that everyone live together under the same laws and standards, with no government favoritism, but it was never going to happen. Human nature, HBD, ideology, culture, greed, the fact that most legal and illegal immigrants were never wanted or needed by most Americans, and don’t make a good fit, or have any love, respect or understanding for America or Americans, etc. pretty much make it good odds that nothing is going to stave off disaster or collapse.

    I’ve read Sailer for decades, and his heart is in the right place, but there is no solution to the mess within an already current system that was too diverse 60 years ago.

    I’m not sure if it’s a sign that people like Marantz is frightened or feeling his oats when he attacks someone as centrist as Sailer.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @OilcanFloyd

    I think that people like Marantz are both. However, he would do what he does even if neither is true. In his case his cultural inheritance compels him to savage at every opportunity the people who he identifies as his racial enemies. Additionally, as someone pointed out on this site, "journalists" in general today are nothing more than dogs who are rewarded for barking at the people their masters hate.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd

  74. The New York Times and New Yorker have collectively lost about 30 IQ points and have degenerated into screeching, name-calling purveyor of the leftist Party Line. The NYT in particular is now basically at the level of propaganda for Third-Graders, written by Fourth-Graders. It’s totally ineffectual and uninteresting to anyone who has any sense of intellectual curiosity or rationality.

    So their new business model is to try to lean on Big Tech to deplatform and censor their ideological competitors. Here’s a visual representation of the “conversation” they feel is being “hijacked” by the internet:

  75. @Art Deco
    First, I’m not aware of much evidence that the late Mr. Buckley was even cognizant of my existence, so Marantz’s regret that he’s not around anymore to silence me seems…odd.

    I suspect Mr. Buckley could recognize the names of occasional contributors to the magazine he founded (run by a trusteeship he'd appointed).

    This chump Marantz is the issue of Brown University, the latrine of the Ivy League. It was a singularly clownish place 35 years ago, before clownishness was de rigeur among American universities.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Cut flowers long since wilted.

  76. Andrew Marantz wrote:

    Sailer felt confident that no part of the Sailer Strategy was unconstitutional or illegal.

    I’d like to highlight this line, as Steve does not in his article. It is one of those dishonest constructions that is easy to slip by one’s radar.

    So what is this? Rabbi Marantz has, by that line (which opens a subsection of his book) released into the air the notion that appealing to white working-class voters in the Midwest might be “unconstitutional”(!) or “illegal”(!).

    And he leaves it ambiguous. “Sailer felt,” indeed.

    There are all kinds of better ways to say this without making Steve look like a malicious, rogue actor, whose possibly-criminal political writing ought to get him a bright-red place on the political commissars’ lists. (And maybe Marantz knows some people whose great-uncles were real-deal, credentialed commissars.)

    But I see no need for this sentence at all. Marantz, or another like him, would never subtly suggest that appealing to any group of nonwhite voters might be “illegal.”

    • Replies: @ATBOTL
    @Hail

    Marrantz is making a push for European style speech crime laws, that's why this line was included. Expect to see a lot more of this kind of language in the near future -- suggestions that that legality of non-PC speech is already in doubt.

    , @Tex
    @Hail


    But I see no need for this sentence at all. Marantz, or another like him, would never subtly suggest that appealing to any group of nonwhite voters might be “illegal.”
     
    I suppose a great many people, myself included, never considered that appealing to working class white voters in the Midwest might be illegal or unconstitutional in any way, shape or form. In fact, I assumed that courting voting blocks based on race or class was pretty much how politics works.

    Cue Marantz's brave new world where winning an election by getting people to vote for you is some sort of devious hijack of our sacred electoral system. It's of a piece with the whole "Trump is Hitler!" which they've been pushing for years (I guess Hitler was elected to office and tolerated lots of public criticism while downplaying foreign adventurism). I suppose stuff this infantile is for internal consumption. Marantz can sell books to goodthinkers by giving them a handy list of people to hate.

    Replies: @snorlax

    , @ChrisZ
    @Hail

    Great close reading, and great point, Hail.

    This is how the enemy operates. Frankly, it's exhausting to police their (ab)use of language, but it's necessary. It's one of the ways to fight back against their war on noticing.

    , @J.Ross
    @Hail

    "And if you ask me, Mr Marantz was pretty confident -- a little too confident -- that there were no kidnapped, frightened, telegenic children in his bedroom. At least not at the time of our interview."
    But this is what NPR and Bezos Blog are like 24 hours a day on every Trump story. Just now they were babbling about Trump "running away" from a Hitlerian act of unconstitutional aggression and terrorism "with his tail between his legs," and the whole thing about Mulvaney being a TOTAL F*A*I*L*U*R*R*E as White House Chief of Staff for [spit!] carrying out the President's wishes. Leon Panetta warns that this makes him a glorified secretary. I'm sure we all remember when Obama's chief of staff slapped him in the face, called him an uppity negro, and commanded the President to let the police do their jobs. I mean honestly, a chief of staff who does the bidding of the president, feh.

  77. Marantz has also tried to crack the core alt-right as documented by Mike Enoch. He contacts them pretending to want to have a good faith debate and understand their positions better. In actuality, as you point out, he side-steps the debate and changes the subject whenever he gets his arguments refuted or is presented with incontrovertible facts. Eventually his targets realize that all he is doing is trolling for outrageous quotes he can use to condemn them. In the case of Mike he finally cut Marantz off and ignored Andy’s plaintive follow-up efforts to talk some more.
    Marantz is following the new Leftist meme I have seen simultaneously spring up with the Progs I talk to, which is blatant demands for censorship of mass media and suppression of dissenting opinions. They are especially outraged by what they see as a betrayal by one of their own, Mark Zuckerberg who has displayed less than the absolute commitment to the censorship of political dissent that the Left demands.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Alfa158

    Marantz is a J-school graduate. The work history he bothers to mention consists of his employment at The New Yorker. He likely doesn't know much.

    , @MEH 0910
    @Alfa158

    https://twitter.com/peterbrimelow/status/1181996071079354370

    , @Kolya Krassotkin
    @Alfa158

    I am grateful to Marantz. I learned about Mike Enoch and The Right Stuff radio from him. Those guys are hoot.

  78. @Hail

    Steve Sailer wrote:

    it’s not as if I was the only person in America [in 2000 and since] capable of noticing that the most plausible Republican road to 270 electoral votes led through the Northern white working class.
     

    This is ultimately the Nixon Coalition of 1968 and 1972. It has been the key to Republican wins ever since.

    Pat Buchanan wrote a political memoir of his first three years as Nixon's strategy wingman (from his being hired in early Jan. 1966, to election night of Nov. 1968) that discusses this. (The book's title, The Greatest Comeback, doesn't necessarily match the contents. The book is really more a series of personal reminiscences than some kind grand-narrative political history of the Nixon 'comeback' of 1968. It's good reading all the same, and includes a lot of primary documents from Pat's file cabinets.)

    Buchanan writes throughout that book that this was the strategy he was pushing from 1966 onward, and it had Nixon's confidence the whole way. Buchanan characterizes the Nov. 1966 midterm elections as the first time this strategy was ever employed, with some success, with 1968 as a more important turning point. US politics as we have known it for the next fifty years largely follows from that realignment.

    The difference in 1966 and 1968 was the South was still in party-support flux -- including the important caveat that third-party Wallace took much of the South's electoral votes in 1968. And that at his peak, Wallace may have had support pushing up towards a third of the Nixon Coalition. (Buchanan thinks Wallace's big mistake in fall '68 was taking on Gen. Curtis Le May as VP, after which Buchanan says his polled support faded.) The Sailer Strategy (2000 to present) assumes a Solid South for R-team, whereas the Nixon Coalition that was being born 1966-1968 had to juggle the two balls at once.

    Replies: @Hail, @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    Pat Buchanan wrote a political memoir of his first three years as Nixon’s strategy wingman

    Buchanan was in that era an editorial writer for one of the St. Louis papers. The positions he held in the Nixon and Reagan administrations were in the public relations apparat.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Art Deco

    Buchanan describes being hired by Nixon directly from that St. Louis newspaper at which he was writing weekly editorials. (His daily strategy memos to Nixon starting in 1966 were also kind of in editorial form, so his day-to-day job, in one sense, had some real continuity. And his weekly columns to this day are similar in format, length, and tone to his 1960s editorials. He reproduces some of the strategy memos he wrote to Nixon, including Nixon's handwritten comments -- the analog version of comments such as the one you are reading here.)

    I think it was one of these editorials that somehow got Nixon's attention in 1965.

    I believe Buchanan wrote that he was asked to fly out to interview in late Dec. 1965, Nixon being at a Manhattan law firm which partly bore his name at this time, but dreaming of a 1968 presidential run -- anticipating weak competition from Gov. Romney of Michigan and Gov. Rockefeller of NY. Buchanan says he was on the Nixon team full time as of Jan. 1966, and stayed loyal until the very end (Aug. 1974 resignation). I think he wrote he was the only full-time, paid, political staff member of Nixon's in 1966.

    Pat characterizes himself in 1964, 1965, 1966 (in his mid-late 20s) as an enthusiastic Nixon supporter, a personal loyalty borne out of admiration. But also a conservative ideologue -- which he says Nixon was not (in the sense of the post-1950s "conservative movement"). When asked by friends if he was the conservatives' line to Nixon, or Nixon's line to the conservatives, Pat said without hesitation that it was the latter.

  79. @Hail

    Steve Sailer wrote:

    it’s not as if I was the only person in America [in 2000 and since] capable of noticing that the most plausible Republican road to 270 electoral votes led through the Northern white working class.
     

    This is ultimately the Nixon Coalition of 1968 and 1972. It has been the key to Republican wins ever since.

    Pat Buchanan wrote a political memoir of his first three years as Nixon's strategy wingman (from his being hired in early Jan. 1966, to election night of Nov. 1968) that discusses this. (The book's title, The Greatest Comeback, doesn't necessarily match the contents. The book is really more a series of personal reminiscences than some kind grand-narrative political history of the Nixon 'comeback' of 1968. It's good reading all the same, and includes a lot of primary documents from Pat's file cabinets.)

    Buchanan writes throughout that book that this was the strategy he was pushing from 1966 onward, and it had Nixon's confidence the whole way. Buchanan characterizes the Nov. 1966 midterm elections as the first time this strategy was ever employed, with some success, with 1968 as a more important turning point. US politics as we have known it for the next fifty years largely follows from that realignment.

    The difference in 1966 and 1968 was the South was still in party-support flux -- including the important caveat that third-party Wallace took much of the South's electoral votes in 1968. And that at his peak, Wallace may have had support pushing up towards a third of the Nixon Coalition. (Buchanan thinks Wallace's big mistake in fall '68 was taking on Gen. Curtis Le May as VP, after which Buchanan says his polled support faded.) The Sailer Strategy (2000 to present) assumes a Solid South for R-team, whereas the Nixon Coalition that was being born 1966-1968 had to juggle the two balls at once.

    Replies: @Hail, @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco, @Art Deco

    Buchanan should talk to Wm. Schneider about what survey research reveals about the significance of VP picks. They can cause unwanted distractions, but they seldom make any difference one way or another. Wallace’s problem was the problem any 3d party candidate faces when 1st-past-the-post is the order of the day. About 3/4 of John Anderson’s polled support evaporated during his campaign, and his VP candidate said nothing embarrassing at all.

  80. @kaganovitch
    I , for one welcome Steve's ascension to super-villain hood. In keeping with tradition, he has the same initial first and last names so prized by super-villains- Lex Luthor, Dr. Doom et al. Perhaps he will be introduced into the Marvelverse as the bete noir of one of the new angsty SJW superheroes? Hell , maybe he can make one of TNC's plots? The sky is the limit here!

    Replies: @njguy73, @Known Fact, @ChrisZ

    And Judge Reinhold can finally get an Oscar by playing the supervillain Noticer.

  81. @Alfa158
    Marantz has also tried to crack the core alt-right as documented by Mike Enoch. He contacts them pretending to want to have a good faith debate and understand their positions better. In actuality, as you point out, he side-steps the debate and changes the subject whenever he gets his arguments refuted or is presented with incontrovertible facts. Eventually his targets realize that all he is doing is trolling for outrageous quotes he can use to condemn them. In the case of Mike he finally cut Marantz off and ignored Andy’s plaintive follow-up efforts to talk some more.
    Marantz is following the new Leftist meme I have seen simultaneously spring up with the Progs I talk to, which is blatant demands for censorship of mass media and suppression of dissenting opinions. They are especially outraged by what they see as a betrayal by one of their own, Mark Zuckerberg who has displayed less than the absolute commitment to the censorship of political dissent that the Left demands.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @MEH 0910, @Kolya Krassotkin

    Marantz is a J-school graduate. The work history he bothers to mention consists of his employment at The New Yorker. He likely doesn’t know much.

  82. @Art Deco
    @Hail

    Pat Buchanan wrote a political memoir of his first three years as Nixon’s strategy wingman

    Buchanan was in that era an editorial writer for one of the St. Louis papers. The positions he held in the Nixon and Reagan administrations were in the public relations apparat.

    Replies: @Hail

    Buchanan describes being hired by Nixon directly from that St. Louis newspaper at which he was writing weekly editorials. (His daily strategy memos to Nixon starting in 1966 were also kind of in editorial form, so his day-to-day job, in one sense, had some real continuity. And his weekly columns to this day are similar in format, length, and tone to his 1960s editorials. He reproduces some of the strategy memos he wrote to Nixon, including Nixon’s handwritten comments — the analog version of comments such as the one you are reading here.)

    I think it was one of these editorials that somehow got Nixon’s attention in 1965.

    I believe Buchanan wrote that he was asked to fly out to interview in late Dec. 1965, Nixon being at a Manhattan law firm which partly bore his name at this time, but dreaming of a 1968 presidential run — anticipating weak competition from Gov. Romney of Michigan and Gov. Rockefeller of NY. Buchanan says he was on the Nixon team full time as of Jan. 1966, and stayed loyal until the very end (Aug. 1974 resignation). I think he wrote he was the only full-time, paid, political staff member of Nixon’s in 1966.

    Pat characterizes himself in 1964, 1965, 1966 (in his mid-late 20s) as an enthusiastic Nixon supporter, a personal loyalty borne out of admiration. But also a conservative ideologue — which he says Nixon was not (in the sense of the post-1950s “conservative movement”). When asked by friends if he was the conservatives’ line to Nixon, or Nixon’s line to the conservatives, Pat said without hesitation that it was the latter.

  83. @TTSSYF

    The Democrats’ plan has been to achieve one-party rule by using immigration to juice their vote totals while ginning up hatred of white men to keep their unwieldy Coalition of the Margins from collapsing in internecine strife. Leaving aside its shameful ethics, the Democrats’ plan to take control of the White House forever deserved to be taken seriously.
     
    This really says it all.

    Replies: @theMann, @El Dato

    It mainly says that WHITE DEMOCRATS and their spawn are already dead. What they gonna do when Diversity tolls for them with rope and a gas canister? Seek asylum in Chinaland or Wacanada? Ask Fed.Police to make a sortie from the donut shoppe?

  84. Congratulations, Mr. Sailer, on frightening the narrative monkeys.

    William F. Buckley, the last singular arbiter of conservative opinion,

    “Singular arbiter of conservative opinion”? Is that another way of saying “gatekeeper”?

    The left keeps trying to erect a new conservative gatekeeper, but they don’t seem to be getting much traction. And they all seem to have something in common. You know, Prager, Shapiro, et al.

  85. ” I spoke to Marantz for several hours in 2017 over the phone”

    Several hours? I think you should have better uses for your time. What was he doing? Trying to get you to say something embarassing? There is twenty years of your writing on the web he can read to grasp your ideas. I don’t think you are hard to understand for someone with at least an average IQ.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @mercer

    That's exactly what he was doing.

  86. @Reg Cæsar
    @Hail


    Buchanan thinks Wallace’s big mistake in fall ’68 was taking on Gen. Curtis Le May as VP, after which Buchanan says his polled support faded.
     
    Choosing an admitted war criminal neutralized one of Dixie's favorite objections to the Union side in the "Waw".

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    On the other hand, USAF Gen. Curtis Le May is why you have an AR-15 in defense of home and country:

    “However, military history buffs and firearms enthusiasts can also point to another hallmark in LeMay’s long career: he’s the man responsible for bringing the AR-15 rifle to the U.S. military, which would go on to inspire the M16 rifle and change the face of military arms forever. ”

    https://www.nrablog.com/articles/2017/9/remembering-the-air-force-general-who-helped-usher-in-the-m16-rifle/

    as well as making Single Side band (SSB) voice the mode of military communications:

    In the mid-1950s, hams and amateur sideband actually had a hand in altering the course of the Cold War. General Curtis LeMay, W6EZV, was Commander of the Strategic Air Command (SAC), charged with deterrence of the Soviet nuclear threat. See Figure 4. New jet air-craft then being introduced were result-ing in the elimination of in-flight radio operators and SAC was planning on the use of AM voice equipment in the cockpit. LeMay became aware of the successes of amateur SSB work, and in 1956 undertook two flights, one to Okinawa and the other to Greenland, during which SSB was put to the test using Amateur Radio gear and hams themselves. Two of the hams invited to operate on those flights were Art Collins, WØCXX, of Collins Radio, and Leo Meyerson, WØGFQ, of World Radio Labs. SSB far outperformed the conventional AM communications systems then in use by the military. In 1957, it was formally adopted by SAC for use in its (then) new B-52 bombers,4 the same year that General Francis “Butch” Griswold, KØDWC, of SAC would give the keynote address on the subject at the ARRL National Convention in Chicago.

    http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Technology/pdf/McElroy.pdf

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Joe Stalin


    On the other hand, USAF Gen. Curtis Le May is why you have an AR-15 in defense of home and country:
     
    In the same fashion, W T Sherman is why South Carolina has a white majority today.
    , @Alfa158
    @Joe Stalin

    I was in the Air Force when it was still equipped with the original M-16 that had the three
    prong bottle opener flash suppressor, non-chromed chamber, no forward bolt assist and the cartridge propellant Stoner told the military not to use. On a dust-free, dry firing range, using a freshly cleaned and lubed rifle you were lucky to get 100 rounds off in slow, semi-auto fire without having a failure to go into battery. I consoled myself that if I was in a situation in which a bunch of us nerdy Airmen was having to defend a base against an infantry assault, we would be hosed anyway. I can’t imagine being in the jungle firing off magazine after magazine and praying the thing would keep running while hot and contaminated.
    I know there have been a lot of improvements but it has left me with an irrational prejudice against the whole platform.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Joe Stalin

  87. Trump almost used the exact words “Invade the world invite the world” from the President of the United States today, as Trump announced the permanent Turkish cease fire. Even if he didn’t say those words, he definitely stated the concept in more words.

    Though I wonder if the fact that it was so easy for Erdogan to agree to a cease fire had anything to do with Trump maybe pointing in the general direction of the Poconos. You know, three years ago might have succeeded if the rebels had more “help,” cough cough.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @countenance


    Trump almost used the exact words “Invade the world invite the world”...today
     
    I believe the phrase has appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, which is the most likely place he'd have gotten it.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

  88. Good article Steve, but you write as if Marantz was acting in good faith. He’s not. He has an agenda and he’ll push it come hell or high water, and he will take any measures he needs to push it: spin, twist, ignore, or just outright lie when he needs to. This is what Marantz does. For goodness sake, if he had an honest job description it would say “take any measures needed to push the agenda you’ve been assigned. Please avoid any and all ethical considerations that might impede your progress.”

    Anyway, to the extent that Marantz’ book gets any attention it can only help reveal the dastardly world of the Alt-right to normies. But few will buy his book and fewer still will read it. It will get purchased in a few hundreds of thousands by the usual New York City Jewish cat ladies and wine moms, who will display it for a few weeks on their coffee tables as a way of inspiring some more “Can you BELIEVE that Trump and those Alt-right Nazis?” eye-rolling (for the ten thousandth time, but it never gets old for them).

    Then they will put it up on the shelf, unread, right next to all their unread Ta-Nehisi Coates books.

    And this is why there’s no index in the book. Nobody reads these books, so nobody needs an index. These books are designed from start to finish as virtue signalling exercises with specific audiences in mind. The Jewish ladies mentioned above, who will dutifully purchase whatever Screed of the Week the NY Times Book Review tells them to purchase, plus libraries. Thousands and thousands of lie-braries will order this book, and hence tax payer money is doled out to yet another dissenter termite undermining the nation. It will go on the shelf and a few old fart Communist academics might take it out to read after they have a good schvitz (it’s an excellent lifestyle, don’t you know).

    In the end, selected quotes from the book will be used for years to come as “proof” that the dangerous very-white Alt-Right controls the entire American media landscape and hence must be censored, out of fairness for all views. Progressives have managed to square the circle: they don’t need actual proof for anything. They simply manufacture fraudulent “proof” and point to it as actual proof.

    “See, this must be true, it’s in a well regarded book that the New York Times reviewed.” And thus the prison wall gets another row of bricks on top.

    • Agree: Hail
  89. @The Last Real Calvinist
    By the way, I LOLed when I got to this sentence:

    My immigration policy recommendations have always been lifted from Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, a black lesbian Democrat whom Bill Clinton appointed chairwoman of the commission on immigration reform.

     

    Why not write this up into an article? You could title it something like 'Immigration Reform: The Barbara Jordan Plan'.

    You never know; maybe it would finally go viral.

    Replies: @StAugustine, @Hail, @Desiderius, @Abe

    Why not write this up into an article? You could title it something like ‘Immigration Reform: The Barbara Jordan Plan’.

    Marantz (the kind of guy whose entire existence, if he had come into this world as a slightly defective, sub-audiophile grade stereo receiver which then sat on Best Buy’s open box shelf for several months, could not have been any more of a net-negative to the universe than it has turned out now that he’s an elite East Coast journalist) shows the big shift in consensus among our Woke Elite regarding the role of the Internet: from decentralization to centralization, from the freedom of anonymity to the Newspeak-esque Total Monitoring is Freedom! From let a thousand (weird) flowers bloom, to track-target-and-destroy anything that does not totally conform to our wishes- think of the national conversation!

    So in addition to wanting my Clinton-era immigration reform back, I want my Clinton-era Internet!

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Abe

    Saul Marantz, though Jewish, was a poor businessman who in trying to build the finest stereo equipment in the world went broke. The Scotsmen McIntosh and Gow made it work by building decent but not really lab grade equipment that measured well and looked impressive while tightly controlling build cost.

    I wonder if this sheep is related to Saul.

    Replies: @donvonburg

  90. @Alfa158
    Marantz has also tried to crack the core alt-right as documented by Mike Enoch. He contacts them pretending to want to have a good faith debate and understand their positions better. In actuality, as you point out, he side-steps the debate and changes the subject whenever he gets his arguments refuted or is presented with incontrovertible facts. Eventually his targets realize that all he is doing is trolling for outrageous quotes he can use to condemn them. In the case of Mike he finally cut Marantz off and ignored Andy’s plaintive follow-up efforts to talk some more.
    Marantz is following the new Leftist meme I have seen simultaneously spring up with the Progs I talk to, which is blatant demands for censorship of mass media and suppression of dissenting opinions. They are especially outraged by what they see as a betrayal by one of their own, Mark Zuckerberg who has displayed less than the absolute commitment to the censorship of political dissent that the Left demands.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @MEH 0910, @Kolya Krassotkin

  91. @Hail

    Andrew Marantz wrote:

    Sailer felt confident that no part of the Sailer Strategy was unconstitutional or illegal.
     

    I'd like to highlight this line, as Steve does not in his article. It is one of those dishonest constructions that is easy to slip by one's radar.

    So what is this? Rabbi Marantz has, by that line (which opens a subsection of his book) released into the air the notion that appealing to white working-class voters in the Midwest might be "unconstitutional"(!) or "illegal"(!).

    And he leaves it ambiguous. "Sailer felt," indeed.

    There are all kinds of better ways to say this without making Steve look like a malicious, rogue actor, whose possibly-criminal political writing ought to get him a bright-red place on the political commissars' lists. (And maybe Marantz knows some people whose great-uncles were real-deal, credentialed commissars.)

    But I see no need for this sentence at all. Marantz, or another like him, would never subtly suggest that appealing to any group of nonwhite voters might be "illegal."

    Replies: @ATBOTL, @Tex, @ChrisZ, @J.Ross

    Marrantz is making a push for European style speech crime laws, that’s why this line was included. Expect to see a lot more of this kind of language in the near future — suggestions that that legality of non-PC speech is already in doubt.

  92. Read the Taki piece. Don’t know where to start so won’t even bother, other than to state that if Marantz had even bothered to do even a bit of research he would know that to the extent that Buckley was ever the “single arbiter of conservative opinion”–an assertion which is highly questionable if one studies the history of conservatism in the US–by the time Buckley died he had long since lost that distinction.

  93. @kaganovitch
    I , for one welcome Steve's ascension to super-villain hood. In keeping with tradition, he has the same initial first and last names so prized by super-villains- Lex Luthor, Dr. Doom et al. Perhaps he will be introduced into the Marvelverse as the bete noir of one of the new angsty SJW superheroes? Hell , maybe he can make one of TNC's plots? The sky is the limit here!

    Replies: @njguy73, @Known Fact, @ChrisZ

    As a true super-villain Steve would have to abandon sunny California for some forbidding undersea or mountaintop fortress, or perhaps an orbiting deathstar

  94. I haven’t read the Marantz book, and I won’t, because the quotes from it in the article reveal a fairly obvious leftist bias. To those who have read it, though, I’m curious: Is there a chapter on Antifa? Because it seems like there’s a pretty strong movement away from “the American conversation” by Antifa…greater than any current right wing movement I can think of.

    The strong left honestly thinks it can make ideological opposition disappear by whatever means it takes, either by Antifa riots or by books that aren’t so much intended – in a macro sense – to intimidate Steve Sailer as to intimidate all the people in the periphery of Steve Sailer. (They’re trying to scare people into self-deporting from sound ideas and realities coming from the right.) Not very conversational, if you ask me, or any one else who takes the word “conversation” seriously.

    Of course, they would like to Steve and VDARE and others (maybe Unz) to get shut down in the micro sense. They’d like to see left-biased censorship expand from youtube to all corners of the web, if necessary, but would prefer not to reveal their true selves so blatantly. The only genuine sincerity I get from the strong left is that they believe they come such morally superior position that their books can actually intimidate thinking people.

  95. In contrast to the Marantz book and so many others, whenever you see a roundup on the voices of the extreme left, the theme is always “what a wacky, fun, irreverent young gang of counterculture cowboys!” Even if they are literally getting people killed.

  96. @Hail

    Andrew Marantz wrote:

    Sailer felt confident that no part of the Sailer Strategy was unconstitutional or illegal.
     

    I'd like to highlight this line, as Steve does not in his article. It is one of those dishonest constructions that is easy to slip by one's radar.

    So what is this? Rabbi Marantz has, by that line (which opens a subsection of his book) released into the air the notion that appealing to white working-class voters in the Midwest might be "unconstitutional"(!) or "illegal"(!).

    And he leaves it ambiguous. "Sailer felt," indeed.

    There are all kinds of better ways to say this without making Steve look like a malicious, rogue actor, whose possibly-criminal political writing ought to get him a bright-red place on the political commissars' lists. (And maybe Marantz knows some people whose great-uncles were real-deal, credentialed commissars.)

    But I see no need for this sentence at all. Marantz, or another like him, would never subtly suggest that appealing to any group of nonwhite voters might be "illegal."

    Replies: @ATBOTL, @Tex, @ChrisZ, @J.Ross

    But I see no need for this sentence at all. Marantz, or another like him, would never subtly suggest that appealing to any group of nonwhite voters might be “illegal.”

    I suppose a great many people, myself included, never considered that appealing to working class white voters in the Midwest might be illegal or unconstitutional in any way, shape or form. In fact, I assumed that courting voting blocks based on race or class was pretty much how politics works.

    Cue Marantz’s brave new world where winning an election by getting people to vote for you is some sort of devious hijack of our sacred electoral system. It’s of a piece with the whole “Trump is Hitler!” which they’ve been pushing for years (I guess Hitler was elected to office and tolerated lots of public criticism while downplaying foreign adventurism). I suppose stuff this infantile is for internal consumption. Marantz can sell books to goodthinkers by giving them a handy list of people to hate.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @Tex


    I guess Hitler was elected to office
     
    Er, he was?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Tex

  97. • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    Zero Tolerance (full film) | FRONTLINE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW4kQ4akZ1A


    Premiered Oct 22, 2019
    FRONTLINE investigates how President Trump turned immigration into a powerful political weapon that fueled division and violence.

    The documentary goes inside the efforts of three political insurgents to tap into populist anger, transform the Republican Party and crack down on immigration.
     
    , @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    Zero Tolerance: Steven Bannon Interview | FRONTLINE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKuPYArH0Gs


    Published on Oct 22, 2019
    Steve Bannon is a media executive and political strategist. He served as executive chairman of Breitbart News, as an adviser to Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and later as chief strategist in the Trump White House.

    Bannon's candid, full interview was conducted with FRONTLINE during the making of the October 2019 documentary “Zero Tolerance.”
     
    , @MEH 0910
    @MEH 0910

    https://twitter.com/RyanGirdusky/status/1190378414831628288

  98. @Arclight
    The progressive gatekeepers decided long ago that white people don't deserve to advocate for themselves because of the real or perceived sins of white people in the past - they are to provide financial resources and votes for the left, but remain silent and comply with whatever masochistic policies the elites decide upon. As long as you understand that the modern left is a religious cult, their extreme desire for sanctioning and punishment of dissenters makes sense.

    Replies: @istevefan, @Alden

    I don’t like to see the Minions of Satan refereed to as a religious cult. But Satanism is as much a religion as the others.

    I’ve been following Steve around the internet since maybe 97,98? I loved his contrast and compare articles about the crime ridden black ghetto Austin neighborhood of Chicago and just across the line, the then White suburb I think it’s Oak Park.

    I found UNZ through a Steve article on Vdare.

  99. Good article, Steve, and I note that you successfully coined a great new username, too:

    right-wing nutrition supplement huckster

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @Charlie_U

    "Ape Brain guy"

    That caused a chuckle. He must be talking about Alt-Right lifestyle celebrity, Mike Cernovich.

  100. Anon[213] • Disclaimer says:

    Its 380 pages are printed in a tiny typeface with an even teenier font used for the many footnotes. It should have come with a magnifying glass.

    So … you’re not reading stuff on a Kindle? I switched right about the time my eyes started to lose their close focus.

    The Kindle is perfect for book reviewers. The current OS allows really quick highlighting of passages, which can be reviewed in a list. The text is searchable, which makes indices mostly obsolete.

    (I really do miss the wonderful aroma of cheap acid paper bound using the grind-and-glue perfectbinding technique, however, formerly available only on paperbacks. Well, maybe not. But I miss the illustrations and images, like the 17 images of Abraham Lincoln in a biography I read … wait, there are several websites with all extant Lincoln photos, including the crowd scene where Lincoln’s head is formed from seven silver halide grains. Well, there are the Civil War battle maps … wait, some geek made all of those for Wikipedia.)

  101. @countenance
    Trump almost used the exact words "Invade the world invite the world" from the President of the United States today, as Trump announced the permanent Turkish cease fire. Even if he didn't say those words, he definitely stated the concept in more words.

    Though I wonder if the fact that it was so easy for Erdogan to agree to a cease fire had anything to do with Trump maybe pointing in the general direction of the Poconos. You know, three years ago might have succeeded if the rebels had more "help," cough cough.

    Replies: @Hail

    Trump almost used the exact words “Invade the world invite the world”…today

    I believe the phrase has appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, which is the most likely place he’d have gotten it.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @Hail


    I believe the phrase has appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, which is the most likely place he’d have gotten it.
     
    I would not be surprised at all if Tucker was familiar with Steve's work. Also, Trump was clearly influenced by Coulter's Adios America, which I would imagine was heavily influenced by Peter Brimelow's work. So Trump may be getting ideas from VDARE and iSteve second-hand, but he's getting them.

    Replies: @Prester John

  102. Perhaps nobody talks about citizenism because citizenism is simply the default ideology of sensible, busy Americans, as open-borders advocate Bryan Caplan complains.

    That’s the exact opposite of the truth. Nobody talks about citizenism because the idea of it hurts their heads.

    Like the Wilsonian 14 Points (which it somewhat resembles), citizenism presumes that people are capable of conducting their lives with an abstract principle held firmly before them, and that they will actually use that principle to make practical decisions. Even in the best case scenario, even in those rare, transient, and punch drunk periods of human history when idealistic thinking really does seem to dominate the public mood (the decades before and after the French Revolution, for instance), all that this conduces to in practice is endless bickering over what really is in the best interest of citizens, while popinjays step into the political vacuum and make a bloody mess of things.

    In reality, politics proceeds not from such intellectual considerations but from the murky and scarcely conscious recesses of the will, involving motives and actions that are difficult to describe analytically but which generally redound to the acquisition, maintenance, consolidation, and advancement of personal power. It was Machiavelli’s great insight—much misunderstood and maligned as it is—that a good politician should therefore devote himself primarily to power and not to theory, that if he does this the rest will pretty much fall into place on its own; and that even if it doesn’t, there wasn’t anything he could have done about it anyway. Citizenism sounds like a good idea, but every ideology sounds like a good idea at the time. The problem with all of them is that men never have been and never will be capable of living according to theory.

    The same fatal flaw afflicts “White Nationalism,” despite the WN’s insistence that they are the hardcore realists in the Dissident Right spectrum. The whole notion of a white identity is a ideological construct, not a felt reality. The fiercest political divide in the West is between whites and other whites, namely between the top 20% oligarchic Globo-Homos and the formerly middle- and working-classes. Minorities are simply pawns in the political game and are of no weight on their own. The Globos want me dead and, to be honest, I want them dead. This is the gut-level stuff from whence springs politics. I feel no such animosity towards blacks as a group, however little I care for most of them. I strongly suspect that most normal people don’t, either. Ethnic designations are usually not the sort of things that spur actionable political loves/hatreds. There are special conditions in which that occurs, but we do not live within them.

    At this point someone might be wondering, “If you don’t like citizenism and you don’t like white nationalism, what do you propose?” The same thing I’ve always proposed: economic realism backed up by force. Close the borders to both immigration and trade, destroy the financial class, eliminate welfare subsidies and punish the unproductive. Introduce hard currency and let the market set interest rates. Renormalize the income distribution. Nationalize all major industry but allow a very lightly regulated free market for small business. Eliminate Big Tech completely and turn Silicon Valley into a ghost town. Completely shut down electronic media; send the US Marshals to occupy Facebook’s server farms and CNN headquarters if we must, but put them out of business. Stick Jeff Bezos’ dripping head on the White House fence as a warning to never allow an abomination like Amazon to exist again. Withdraw the US military back within national borders and cut 90% of the Pentagon’s budget. Criminalize student lending, eliminate three-quarters of all schools and universities, and start tracking students based on academic aptitude; anyone not in the top 10% gets sent to trade school or apprenticeship after 8th grade. Replace university credentialization with certified board exams for licensed professions.

    I can keep going, but I think you get my drift. We need a heavily dirigiste, caretaker government to bash the skulls of the oligarchs and incentivize the people to live within their means, while at the same time keeping the trains running and the lights on. We need to retool our economy and our culture for living in a managed decline, and the sooner we take heed of that reality the better.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Intelligent Dasein

    The managed decline part you write about seems to be happening already - since 1975 ca.

    , @Old Palo Altan
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I agree with your last two paragraphs in the main, but have a question:

    does religion (the true one) play a part in your ideal state?

    Perhaps you have already answered me by calling your governemnt as here presented a caretaker one: perhaps, order once restored, religion will have a role, and even a normative one?

  103. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Steve, that column is a blast. It's great when you come out swinging, even when tempered with your gentlemanly restraint. I liked it so much I read it twice.

    Replies: @Morton's toes

    The New Yorker guy seems to be bad at writing criticism.

    Yiannopoulos, writing on Breitbart the next day, called Clinton’s speech “a drive-by shooting with a water pistol fired from a mobility scooter.”

    No way this ain’t an own-goal. That might be the single cleverest thing Milo ever came up with.

  104. @Joe Stalin
    @Reg Cæsar

    On the other hand, USAF Gen. Curtis Le May is why you have an AR-15 in defense of home and country:


    "However, military history buffs and firearms enthusiasts can also point to another hallmark in LeMay’s long career: he’s the man responsible for bringing the AR-15 rifle to the U.S. military, which would go on to inspire the M16 rifle and change the face of military arms forever. "

    https://www.nrablog.com/articles/2017/9/remembering-the-air-force-general-who-helped-usher-in-the-m16-rifle/
     

    as well as making Single Side band (SSB) voice the mode of military communications:

    In the mid-1950s, hams and amateur sideband actually had a hand in altering the course of the Cold War. General Curtis LeMay, W6EZV, was Commander of the Strategic Air Command (SAC), charged with deterrence of the Soviet nuclear threat. See Figure 4. New jet air-craft then being introduced were result-ing in the elimination of in-flight radio operators and SAC was planning on the use of AM voice equipment in the cockpit. LeMay became aware of the successes of amateur SSB work, and in 1956 undertook two flights, one to Okinawa and the other to Greenland, during which SSB was put to the test using Amateur Radio gear and hams themselves. Two of the hams invited to operate on those flights were Art Collins, WØCXX, of Collins Radio, and Leo Meyerson, WØGFQ, of World Radio Labs. SSB far outperformed the conventional AM communications systems then in use by the military. In 1957, it was formally adopted by SAC for use in its (then) new B-52 bombers,4 the same year that General Francis “Butch” Griswold, KØDWC, of SAC would give the keynote address on the subject at the ARRL National Convention in Chicago.

    http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Technology/pdf/McElroy.pdf
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alfa158

    On the other hand, USAF Gen. Curtis Le May is why you have an AR-15 in defense of home and country:

    In the same fashion, W T Sherman is why South Carolina has a white majority today.

  105. From Marantz’s book:

    “the arbiters of palatable conservative opinion, such as the editors of National Review and The Weekly Standard”

    I always thought liberal journalists (and recently, Social Justice Warriors) were the arbiters of palatable conservative opinion, The editors of National Review and The Weekly Standard were merely taking orders from them.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  106. @Bugg
    @Dieter Kief

    Probably because exposing our genial host's simple, reasonable and obvious grasp of electoral math and typical white people cannot be allowed to infest the more genteel precincts. Heaven forbid the right people read it and say "hey, rule of law, sensible immigration policies, pointless endless Middle Eastern war is bad, this kinda.... makes sense." Even if you like cheap salad and nannies.

    Way easier to demonize. Heck, 2 Proud Boys in NYC are going to jail for a fistfight in which the Antifa "victims" refused to cooperate.

    As to the sainted Bill Buckley-would note he was probably scared of being blackmailed. His...habits...were well known. He was good friend with Ed Koch (a good mayor who unlike Buckley didn't really care if anyone knew he was gay). He was a good example of the Washington Generals style of tolerated conservatism.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    His…habits…were well known. He was good friend with Ed Koch (a good mayor who unlike Buckley didn’t really care if anyone knew he was gay).

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination. Been an education.

  107. Many decisions about the spread of information were now made algorithmically. The algorithms were not designed to gauge whether an idea was true or false, prosocial or antisocial; they were designed to measure whether a meme was causing a spike of activating emotion in a large number of people. And Sailer’s citizenism—more colloquially known as intellectualized white nationalism—was just such a meme.

    Any dope who uses the word “intellectualized” is a real corker!

    There is an ancestral core in the USA. The ancestral core of the USA is European Christian. Some Harvard guy named Sam Huntington said the USA has a British Protestant ancestral core.

    Huntington might have been referring to the creators of the political and cultural atmosphere in the USA, or the actual creation of the political entity called the USA. We need FREE SPEECH to talk and debate about things like American national identity.

    Marantz is anti-White.

    Marantz is anti-Christian.

    Marantz is a propaganda whore for the JEW/WASP ruling class of the American Empire.

    Tweet from 2014:


  108. His…habits…were well known.

    Thanks for the issue of your imagination. Been an education.

    Makes you wonder what “Bugg” is short for.

  109. @Mike Zwick

    The point of my word is to emphasize the duty we owe to our fellow American citizens, and citizenship is obviously a legal rather than a racial category. As I wrote in 2008
     
    Hopefully this won't make "citizenism" get pigeon holed as another "dog whistle" thing for white supremacists, like forming the OK symbol with your hand. You would think that if authors are going to write so much about you, they would actually go out to the Unz review and read your articles, to at the very least get some more material.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @gregor

    As we write some “Proud Boys” (the “alt-right” self-strawman co-founded by a black homosexual and at great pains to fit through the “not nazis” hoop) are being sentenced to something like a decade for being in a fight with antifa street thugs. The control mechanism for being declared a Nazi is the exact same one used in being declared a witch or an enemy of the Revolution.

  110. Not my imagination. My dad was assigned as as supervisor to NYPD’s Intelligence Division, which was responsible for guarding politicians and dignitaries. Among his charges was Mayor Koch. Was an open secret he was gay, and in the end, nobody much cared. Koch, unlike many pols, was a very personable guy and well-liked by his security team.He was also a very good mayor who brooked no bullshit. But among his security team, was well-known Koch and Buckley would often spent afternoons together behind locked doors with instructions not to be disturbed. 2 very famous middle-aged men in a locked room in Manhattan is charitably odd.

    Buckley’s affected speech, dandy dress, mannerisms were to be polite, dainty and prissy. I am not knocking the man, in fact, he was sensibly one of the few associated with NR who didn’t like the Iraq War. And based on his son’s writings, appears he had a very dim view of Bush Jr. as well. Nonetheless was the tradeoff Buckley was tolerated by liberal opinion makers(he had a show on PBS !) in part because he was scared he might be exposed?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Bugg

    Thanks for the more verbose issue of your imagination. More education for me.

  111. Marantz is lazy, he doesn’t even know what Chronicles Magazine is and that Steve Sailer published there.

    This laziness is rather typical of liberal journalists who claim to be experts on Alt Right

    • Agree: sayless
  112. This makes it sound like I was some kind of genius at manipulating the public who made so much money I could retire at age 41. In reality, I was largely in marketing research, which is different from marketing, in the way that, say, accounting is different from entrepreneurship. I was a nerdy numbers guy who analyzed other people’s marketing brainstorms.

    How about the difference between electronic engineers and electronic technicians?

  113. It’s amazing that they’ve stolen the country from a people, completely disenfranchised them, accused those now powerless people of being the all-powerful cause of others’ problems and then prevented anyone standing up for those people.

    The mendacity is shocking. They appear to have solidified complete control.

    Throughout history people have perched on similar heights and fallen hard. So they ought to not get too comfortable.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
  114. @Kaplan Turqweather
    Sailer felt confident that no part of the Sailer Strategy was unconstitutional or illegal. In more than a decade, no one had been able to point out any serious mistakes in his arithmetic or his logic. The real problem, as far as he could tell, was that his ideas made powerful people uncomfortable.

    Surely as Marantz would agree, Sailer clearly didn't believe in the sanctity of the Zeroth Amemdment!

    Replies: @J.Ross

    [I believe] the relevant legal reasoning here is that one of the later, experimental, equity-law amendments (not the articles, not the constitution, not the Bill of Rights, but Woodrow Wilson or Lyndon Johnson playing with automatic writing while high) makes a narrow sort of discrimination bad, which is interpreted to mean “discrimination is the only bad, else do what thou wilt, and the whole duty of the state is to prevent or prosecute that one bad,” and immigration restriction discriminates. So “unconstitutional” the same way a martini is.

  115. In the Electoral College, to be precise. In 2000, Bush lost narrowly in a number of northern Rust Belt states like Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and Michigan, so if he had only performed three percentage points better among whites in every state, he would have cruised to an Electoral College landslide of 367 to 171 instead of squeaking to his notoriously thin edge.

    RUST BELT?

    Steve Sailer must be gently encouraged to use the much more benign and rugged sounding GREAT LAKES STATES instead of that crappy phrase Rust Belt states.

    Maybe we can get that blueberry broad in the White House to do some polling on Great Lakes states vs Rust Belt states to get some numbers.

    Great Lakes states has permanence and majesty and blue water and great in it and the Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

  116. All this talk about “legacy of slavery” and yet you rarely hear “legacy of the Golfocaust.” That’s what tells me Sailer’s words aren’t circulating enough.

  117. And in his book, Marantz worries: How can underdog media outlets like The New Yorker, The New York Times, and National Review stand up to the might of the Sailersphere?

    iSteve as Governor Tarkin!

    From “The Sailersphere is now operational” to
    “Enough of this bickering! Bannon, release him!”

  118. I just looked up this Marantz guy on YouTube. What’s even worse than his personal appearance is his voice. He’s a grown man with American teenage girl vocal fry. I mean, seriously, is that now a thing in your country?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Matra

    Pretty much every male on NPR sounds seven years old. I remember seeing a photo of Ira Glass and being certain the caption was wrong.

    , @sayless
    @Matra

    “Is that now a thing in your country?”

    Well it’s something we’re undergoing temporarily. Not long-term.

  119. @Anonymous
    You may not want to approve this comment for reasons of "optics" as they now say.

    But I can see where he's coming from on the question of "citizenism." I'm a longtime millennial reader and I don't have any interest in that and neither do any of the other dozen or so millennial fans of yours I talk to.

    We are all white nationalists.

    So when it's clear you do have some "traction" but as you yourself acknowledge "citizenism" does not, there's probably a reason for that.


    Technically, you are not vulnerable to criticism of anything but what you actually say. You are perfectly justified in refuting things you've already disavowed in print.

    But if you're wondering why he's imagining you stand for something, I'm just offering some background as to why he might come up with that. As opposed to, say, imagining you think the sky is green.


    The unchecked media power of the Sailersphere is quite hilarious and is clearly pure projection. It reminds me of how much people liked to condemn Chomsky after they'd canceled him from the mainstream. Turns out Chomsky is a lot easier to debate when you don't allow him in the room. And yet, he still bothered them.

    "A rite of passage for apostates peculiar to U.S. political culture is bashing Noam Chomsky. It’s the political equivalent of a bar mitzvah, a ritual signaling that one has "grown up" – i.e., grown out of one’s "childish" past. It’s hard to pick up an article or book by ex-radicals – Gitlin’s Letters to a Young Activist, Paul Berman’s Terror and Liberalism… – that doesn’t include a hysterical attack on him. Behind this venom there’s also a transparent psychological factor at play. Chomsky mirrors their idealistic past as well as sordid present, an obstinate reminder that they once had principles but no longer do, that they sold out but he didn’t. Hating to be reminded, they keep trying to shatter the glass. He’s the demon from the past that, after recantation, no amount of incantation can exorcise"

    Just imagine someone who has worked at or been well reviewed in the New Yorker or NYT accusing Steve of possessing plenary media powers. The accusation is so objectively laughable we must infer the psychological defect at play really is that transparent.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country

    It’s ironic that Steve’s baby “Citizenism” failed because Steve – of all people – refused to acknowledge HBD and the ties of family (remember that Steve defines race as an extended family).

    Like Communism and Libertarianism, Citizenism strips people of their humanity, treating humans as economic units whose sole purpose is the betterment of the state (communism) or the economy (libertarianism) or the Constitution (Citizenism). You are asked to put strangers ahead of your own extended family (and sometimes close family) because of a piece of a paper.

    It would never have worked because it shouldn’t work. America’s original Civic Nationalism worked reasonably well because it was implicitly White Civic Nationalism, an attempt to blend various European tribes into a new white people, much like the Angles, Saxons and Jutes became the English. Once you threw in other races and religions in large numbers, Civic Nationalism was bound to fail.

    Politics is downstream from culture. Culture is downstream from biology.

  120. And while Saini’s book climaxes wonderfully

    So she hasn’t undergone female grammatical mutilation. That’s good.

    William F. Buckley

    Can’t even get the guy’s name right. It was Wm. F. Buckley, Jr. (Oh, and sticking with primates, it’s the man with the yellow hat, never the man in the yellow hat.)

    Citizenism calls upon Americans to favor the well-being, even at some cost to ourselves, of our current fellow citizens over that of foreigners and internal factions. Among American citizens, it calls for individuals to be treated equally by the state, no matter what their race.

    Good heavens, how radical! Next thing you know, they’ll be campaigning to amend the Constitution to say this. I mean, the GOP has tried this sort of thing before, hasn’t it?

    Yet “citizenism” stands out even among my many stillborn neologisms for getting perhaps the least traction ever.

    Remember Allegis, the United Airlines travel octopus that lasted all of 13 months? The grade-school son of the CEO told his dad that it failed because it had a stupid name.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UAL_Corporation#History

    Why not upgrade to Greek? In that language, “fellow citizen” is Συμπολίτες (sympolitēs).

    Sympolitanism has class, and is the perfect counterpart to cosmopolitanism.

    And it sounds sympathetic!

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Reg Cæsar

    I'm a bit worried about Sympolitanism. - This word sounds not terribly good in my ears, even rough in the middle. And its a bit long, no? Some five syllables quite easily.

    Citizenity?

    Shorter - and self-explaining for most people.

  121. @Hail

    Andrew Marantz wrote:

    Sailer felt confident that no part of the Sailer Strategy was unconstitutional or illegal.
     

    I'd like to highlight this line, as Steve does not in his article. It is one of those dishonest constructions that is easy to slip by one's radar.

    So what is this? Rabbi Marantz has, by that line (which opens a subsection of his book) released into the air the notion that appealing to white working-class voters in the Midwest might be "unconstitutional"(!) or "illegal"(!).

    And he leaves it ambiguous. "Sailer felt," indeed.

    There are all kinds of better ways to say this without making Steve look like a malicious, rogue actor, whose possibly-criminal political writing ought to get him a bright-red place on the political commissars' lists. (And maybe Marantz knows some people whose great-uncles were real-deal, credentialed commissars.)

    But I see no need for this sentence at all. Marantz, or another like him, would never subtly suggest that appealing to any group of nonwhite voters might be "illegal."

    Replies: @ATBOTL, @Tex, @ChrisZ, @J.Ross

    Great close reading, and great point, Hail.

    This is how the enemy operates. Frankly, it’s exhausting to police their (ab)use of language, but it’s necessary. It’s one of the ways to fight back against their war on noticing.

  122. @kaganovitch
    I , for one welcome Steve's ascension to super-villain hood. In keeping with tradition, he has the same initial first and last names so prized by super-villains- Lex Luthor, Dr. Doom et al. Perhaps he will be introduced into the Marvelverse as the bete noir of one of the new angsty SJW superheroes? Hell , maybe he can make one of TNC's plots? The sky is the limit here!

    Replies: @njguy73, @Known Fact, @ChrisZ

    It’s not so far fetched that Steve could be adapted as a Marvel supervillain. One of his periodic subjects, T-N Coates, currently writes the “Captain America” comic book. If he doesn’t know of Steve already (he *should* know of him, but he may be that dull), it’s likely he’ll learn about him from this Marantz book.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @ChrisZ

    Indeed, that was the TNC I was talking about.

    Replies: @ChrisZ

    , @Harry Baldwin
    @ChrisZ

    it’s likely he’ll learn about him from this Marantz book

    Ta Nehisi Coates doesn't read books, he writes them!

  123. “To appeal to Rust Belt blue-collar voters, I theorized back then, the GOP would need to be more moderate on economics as well as on cultural issues”

    This also works for the white middle class. In the age of gender fluidity, intersectionality, and Invade the World Invite the World, the vote of the suburban white middle class remains in play. The Democratic Party has become brazenly hostile towards whites — much of this venom emanating from childless white progressive elites. If they haven’t already, the white middle class will begin to fear the future their children will inhabit.

    If Trumpism succeeds in dismantling the Republican Party of country club cronyism, fundamentalist capitalism, and establishmentarian foreign policy, a new reconstituted GOP can become the voice of whites and like-minded Asians and Hispanics (we need their restaurants) who crave societal and economic stability. A country where their kids can be productive and free.

    This in stark opposition to what the Democrats have become: the political arm of the civilian intelligence agencies, Woke Capital, Luciferian decadence.

    “I answered: ‘The Iraq War.’”

    There are people who need to be killed. But in order for us to evolve we have to reject elite-initiated wars between nations. The Iraq War was nothing but Bushian monetized mass carnage.

  124. @Bugg
    Not my imagination. My dad was assigned as as supervisor to NYPD's Intelligence Division, which was responsible for guarding politicians and dignitaries. Among his charges was Mayor Koch. Was an open secret he was gay, and in the end, nobody much cared. Koch, unlike many pols, was a very personable guy and well-liked by his security team.He was also a very good mayor who brooked no bullshit. But among his security team, was well-known Koch and Buckley would often spent afternoons together behind locked doors with instructions not to be disturbed. 2 very famous middle-aged men in a locked room in Manhattan is charitably odd.

    Buckley's affected speech, dandy dress, mannerisms were to be polite, dainty and prissy. I am not knocking the man, in fact, he was sensibly one of the few associated with NR who didn't like the Iraq War. And based on his son's writings, appears he had a very dim view of Bush Jr. as well. Nonetheless was the tradeoff Buckley was tolerated by liberal opinion makers(he had a show on PBS !) in part because he was scared he might be exposed?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Thanks for the more verbose issue of your imagination. More education for me.

  125. Anonymous[506] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    Techno-Utopians Hijack the American Conversation by Conspiring to Hide Tulsi Gabbard Search Results:
    https://youtu.be/7TdAWj4vDYY

    Replies: @Charon, @Anonymous

    God, I hate that kind of “I got a secret” style of discussion on the Internet. Just have someone make the argument and discuss (and show) the evidence. But this spooky mood music with some evidence is for losers. Like the Q crowd. Not for smart people in the Steve-o-sphere.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Anonymous

    Videos are consistently garbage, I don't vet them before posting because I cannot, but the story is legitimate: Tulsi is the new Bernie (except she would defend a podium better).

  126. As to the sainted Bill Buckley-would note he was probably scared of being blackmailed. His…habits…were well known.

    But he seemed so masculine! What’s next? Newt Gingrich likes to eat? Teddy Kennedy liked to drink?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @OilcanFloyd

    The three Buckley brothers attended the same boarding school and had the same way of speaking. They sired 11 children between them.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd

    , @Prester John
    @OilcanFloyd

    Are you suggesting that The Buck was a swish? If so, I doubt it. However, son Christopher has acknowledged that by the end of his life his father was hopelessly into the "sauce". And that his mother was also a bottle baby. In the case of his father that might have accounted for the acute deterioration in quality of his columns starting in the late 90s. In his prime Buckley had a razor-sharp wit (even if his intellect was a tad overrated) and was an accomplished debater.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd, @Art Deco

  127. Anonymous[506] • Disclaimer says:

    It is the Steve-o-sphere after all. You’re just getting credit.

    Personally, I think you are wicked smart. And enjoy the massively linked articles as well as the diversity of topics (with connections) from art to sports to golf courses. And of course the non PC realism.

    I do find it a bit depressing after a while, so end up not looking at times. If there was some way to keep the provacative interest but make it a less of a down pill, I would read more. Not sure how to craft this. But suspect I’m not alone.

  128. @Matthew Kelly
    Is it "hijacking" if you're trying to gently persuade those who have taken over the cockpit, intent on flying the plane into a building, to desist and allow the actual pilots to resume control?

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    Jet fuel can’t melt Sailer’s steely resolve.

  129. @Charlie_U
    Good article, Steve, and I note that you successfully coined a great new username, too:

    right-wing nutrition supplement huckster
     

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “Ape Brain guy”

    That caused a chuckle. He must be talking about Alt-Right lifestyle celebrity, Mike Cernovich.

  130. @Hail
    @countenance


    Trump almost used the exact words “Invade the world invite the world”...today
     
    I believe the phrase has appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, which is the most likely place he'd have gotten it.

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    I believe the phrase has appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, which is the most likely place he’d have gotten it.

    I would not be surprised at all if Tucker was familiar with Steve’s work. Also, Trump was clearly influenced by Coulter’s Adios America, which I would imagine was heavily influenced by Peter Brimelow’s work. So Trump may be getting ideas from VDARE and iSteve second-hand, but he’s getting them.

    • Replies: @Prester John
    @Hypnotoad666

    I would be shocked if Tucker WASN'T "familiar with Steve's work." Though obviously I can't prove this, I have long harbored the suspicion that he is under marching orders from management not to book Steve on his show under the theory that he may be too "lethal."

    And as a footnote, can't remember the last time Coulter was on Fox. Or, for that matter, Pat Buchanan.

    Replies: @Hail, @Charles Erwin Wilson

  131. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:

    William F. Buckley, the last singular arbiter of conservative opinion, died in 2008…. He had no comparable successor, no conservative panjandrum who could dictate which ideas deserved to flourish and which did not…. Many decisions about the spread of information were now made algorithmically

    Having such an all-powerful figure in control of the respectable right must have been very convenient for leftists, but bad for the actual right itself. Has there ever been an equivalent figure on the left? Seems to me that leftists(wisely) wouldn’t stand for it.

  132. @Hail
    @Hail


    The Sailer Strategy...assumes a Solid South for the R-team
     
    Here is a question: What comes after the Sailer Strategy?

    If Texas (38 EVs) and Georgia (16 EVs), maybe North Carolina (15 EVs), soon follow once-solid Virginia (13 EVs) on the sad path of "Solid R --> Likely D" in presidential voting, the Sailer Strategy as we have understood it in the 2000s and 2010s (and actually since the Nixon Coalition) begins to come apart. What then?

    In related news, Ann Coulter yesterday called for dissolution of the United States.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “dissolution of the United States”

    This is inevitable. We should now be in the design phase of the new republic.

  133. @Tex
    @Hail


    But I see no need for this sentence at all. Marantz, or another like him, would never subtly suggest that appealing to any group of nonwhite voters might be “illegal.”
     
    I suppose a great many people, myself included, never considered that appealing to working class white voters in the Midwest might be illegal or unconstitutional in any way, shape or form. In fact, I assumed that courting voting blocks based on race or class was pretty much how politics works.

    Cue Marantz's brave new world where winning an election by getting people to vote for you is some sort of devious hijack of our sacred electoral system. It's of a piece with the whole "Trump is Hitler!" which they've been pushing for years (I guess Hitler was elected to office and tolerated lots of public criticism while downplaying foreign adventurism). I suppose stuff this infantile is for internal consumption. Marantz can sell books to goodthinkers by giving them a handy list of people to hate.

    Replies: @snorlax

    I guess Hitler was elected to office

    Er, he was?

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @snorlax



    I guess Hitler was elected to office

     


    Er, he was?
     

     
    The Nazis got about 33% of the vote in the 1932 election. This was enough to form a coalition government with Hitler as Chancellor. The next year he managed to get 2/3 of the democratically elected Reichstag (except the Communists who were arrested), to pass the 1933 Enabling Act that allowed the government to rule by decree. Everything he did after 1933 was under the legal authority of the Enabling Act.

    As far as I know, this was all technically legit under the terms of the Weimar Constitution (which actually remained nominally in effect throughout the war). But it's a pretty good historical illustration of why the U.S. system of divided government, with constitutional "checks and balances" is the way to go if you are designing a constitutional system.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/November_1932_German_federal_election

    https://www.historyonthenet.com/enabling-act-1933
    , @Tex
    @snorlax

    Hitler was appointed to form a government by President Hindenburg. The National Socialists had about a third of the Reichstag, a plurality. Hindenburg had a pretty free hand to appoint who he saw fit. Hitler's only political office was leader of the NSDAP, he was not elected to the Reichstag or any other office. Hitler's appointment as chancellor was fundamentally a political deal involving top-level politicians.

    Of course, one Hitler had power he didn't bother with that election nonsense any more.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong

  134. Bush’s decision to invade Iraq for no good reason was when conservatives distinctly divided up over the administration’s grand strategy of Invade the World/Invite the World into the triumphant globalists versus the despised nationalists. For example, The American Conservative magazine was founded in 2002 by Taki, Pat Buchanan, and Scott McConnell, with me as movie reviewer, to oppose Bush’s horrible plan for war.

    Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden were both big backers of George W Bush’s Iraq War debacle.

    Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden both voted to give authority to George W Bush to launch the Iraq War debacle.

    Now geezer boy globalizer Joe Biden says he didn’t support the Iraq War debacle. Green Party Rising.

    I see a Green Party rising, I see trouble on the way for the Democrat Party, I see millions of voters rejecting Biden and joining up with the Green Party.

    Hillary Clinton tried to weasel out of her prior support for George W Bush’s Iraq War debacle, too.

    Tweet from 2015:

  135. @Intelligent Dasein

    Perhaps nobody talks about citizenism because citizenism is simply the default ideology of sensible, busy Americans, as open-borders advocate Bryan Caplan complains.
     
    That's the exact opposite of the truth. Nobody talks about citizenism because the idea of it hurts their heads.

    Like the Wilsonian 14 Points (which it somewhat resembles), citizenism presumes that people are capable of conducting their lives with an abstract principle held firmly before them, and that they will actually use that principle to make practical decisions. Even in the best case scenario, even in those rare, transient, and punch drunk periods of human history when idealistic thinking really does seem to dominate the public mood (the decades before and after the French Revolution, for instance), all that this conduces to in practice is endless bickering over what really is in the best interest of citizens, while popinjays step into the political vacuum and make a bloody mess of things.

    In reality, politics proceeds not from such intellectual considerations but from the murky and scarcely conscious recesses of the will, involving motives and actions that are difficult to describe analytically but which generally redound to the acquisition, maintenance, consolidation, and advancement of personal power. It was Machiavelli's great insight---much misunderstood and maligned as it is---that a good politician should therefore devote himself primarily to power and not to theory, that if he does this the rest will pretty much fall into place on its own; and that even if it doesn't, there wasn't anything he could have done about it anyway. Citizenism sounds like a good idea, but every ideology sounds like a good idea at the time. The problem with all of them is that men never have been and never will be capable of living according to theory.

    The same fatal flaw afflicts "White Nationalism," despite the WN's insistence that they are the hardcore realists in the Dissident Right spectrum. The whole notion of a white identity is a ideological construct, not a felt reality. The fiercest political divide in the West is between whites and other whites, namely between the top 20% oligarchic Globo-Homos and the formerly middle- and working-classes. Minorities are simply pawns in the political game and are of no weight on their own. The Globos want me dead and, to be honest, I want them dead. This is the gut-level stuff from whence springs politics. I feel no such animosity towards blacks as a group, however little I care for most of them. I strongly suspect that most normal people don't, either. Ethnic designations are usually not the sort of things that spur actionable political loves/hatreds. There are special conditions in which that occurs, but we do not live within them.

    At this point someone might be wondering, "If you don't like citizenism and you don't like white nationalism, what do you propose?" The same thing I've always proposed: economic realism backed up by force. Close the borders to both immigration and trade, destroy the financial class, eliminate welfare subsidies and punish the unproductive. Introduce hard currency and let the market set interest rates. Renormalize the income distribution. Nationalize all major industry but allow a very lightly regulated free market for small business. Eliminate Big Tech completely and turn Silicon Valley into a ghost town. Completely shut down electronic media; send the US Marshals to occupy Facebook's server farms and CNN headquarters if we must, but put them out of business. Stick Jeff Bezos' dripping head on the White House fence as a warning to never allow an abomination like Amazon to exist again. Withdraw the US military back within national borders and cut 90% of the Pentagon's budget. Criminalize student lending, eliminate three-quarters of all schools and universities, and start tracking students based on academic aptitude; anyone not in the top 10% gets sent to trade school or apprenticeship after 8th grade. Replace university credentialization with certified board exams for licensed professions.

    I can keep going, but I think you get my drift. We need a heavily dirigiste, caretaker government to bash the skulls of the oligarchs and incentivize the people to live within their means, while at the same time keeping the trains running and the lights on. We need to retool our economy and our culture for living in a managed decline, and the sooner we take heed of that reality the better.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Old Palo Altan

    The managed decline part you write about seems to be happening already – since 1975 ca.

  136. ” I helped hijack something big”

    Ann Coulter discusses Trump and how he got elected.

    Zero Tolerance: Ann Coulter Interview | FRONTLINE

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @George

    Thanks, good interview. Lively Ann Coulter is impressive. 11:00 in when she talks about the average American vs. the Koch brothers and Gstaad and Davos and Wall St. on immigration - David Goddharts Anywheres vs. the (US-)Somewheres - that's very clear and spot on.

    (I imagine somebody joking: The closest a simulation of a female ever got to the impersonation of a bright and even charming human being. Her mind seems like trapped in this body, which is only there to make this energetic - southern, right? - mind happen...).

    Replies: @Autochthon

  137. @Reg Cæsar

    And while Saini’s book climaxes wonderfully
     
    So she hasn't undergone female grammatical mutilation. That's good.

    William F. Buckley
     
    Can't even get the guy's name right. It was Wm. F. Buckley, Jr. (Oh, and sticking with primates, it's the man with the yellow hat, never the man in the yellow hat.)

    Citizenism calls upon Americans to favor the well-being, even at some cost to ourselves, of our current fellow citizens over that of foreigners and internal factions. Among American citizens, it calls for individuals to be treated equally by the state, no matter what their race.
     
    Good heavens, how radical! Next thing you know, they'll be campaigning to amend the Constitution to say this. I mean, the GOP has tried this sort of thing before, hasn't it?

    Yet “citizenism” stands out even among my many stillborn neologisms for getting perhaps the least traction ever.
     
    Remember Allegis, the United Airlines travel octopus that lasted all of 13 months? The grade-school son of the CEO told his dad that it failed because it had a stupid name.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UAL_Corporation#History

    Why not upgrade to Greek? In that language, "fellow citizen" is Συμπολίτες (sympolitēs).

    Sympolitanism has class, and is the perfect counterpart to cosmopolitanism.

    And it sounds sympathetic!

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    I’m a bit worried about Sympolitanism. – This word sounds not terribly good in my ears, even rough in the middle. And its a bit long, no? Some five syllables quite easily.

    Citizenity?

    Shorter – and self-explaining for most people.

  138. @ChrisZ
    @kaganovitch

    It's not so far fetched that Steve could be adapted as a Marvel supervillain. One of his periodic subjects, T-N Coates, currently writes the "Captain America" comic book. If he doesn't know of Steve already (he *should* know of him, but he may be that dull), it's likely he'll learn about him from this Marantz book.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Harry Baldwin

    Indeed, that was the TNC I was talking about.

    • Replies: @ChrisZ
    @kaganovitch

    I may have thought you were referencing some gossip website. Maybe I was mixing it up with TMZ?

    Anyway, SJW, NPC, TNC, RBG, SWPL, NAM, NIMBY (not to mention DNA, IQ, SAT) ... you’ve got to juggle a lot of letters on the dissident right.

  139. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Dieter Kief


    Marantz’s claim, that citizenism would equal white suprematism is foul and vile. –
     
    Marantz said citizenism would equal white "nationalism" which is natural and beautiful. Only a CivNat could say that the desire to live among and be ruled by your own people is something "foul and vile."

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @guest

    I agree, but still – Ms. Rubin writes in the WaPo:

    “White Nationalism: White nationalism is a term that originated among white supremacists as a euphemism for white supremacy. Eventually, some white supremacists tried to distinguish it further by using it to refer to a form of white supremacy that emphasizes defining a country or region by white racial identity and which seeks to promote the interests of whites exclusively, typically at the expense of people of other backgrounds.”

    So I might have been a bit over the top – but only a little bit. And I’d still say, it was quite unfair by Marantz to say, Steve Sailer was a White Nationalist. It is simply not true. There is a big difference between the a) – multiracial at its core – concept of Citizenism and b) White Nationalism. Marantz needs a scapegoat and so he comes up with one.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Dieter Kief

    If words have any meaning at all then this definition is gibberish because nationalism and supremacism (~imperialism) are opposites. Guessing Ms Rubin has no problem with respecting the efforts of one nation to maintain its safety, its sovereignty, and the character of it population. What a non-Orwellian use of "white nationalism" really means in the modern American context is "I am not paying one cent for Shaniqua's kids."

    Replies: @guest

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Dieter Kief

    You're correct about Marantz slurring Steve as a White Nationalist. Citizenism fails exactly because its NOT race conscious.

    As to Rubin, well, she's a Jew. She's not a part of my people, so I don't care one fig what she thinks gentile whites should think or do. If she's want to discuss math or science, I'm more than happy to sit down with her and chat. I certainly don't hate other races because their not my race, but I do draw the line at them telling my extended family how to live. She has her family, I have mine.

    , @guest
    @Dieter Kief

    Mz. Rubin is of course talking out her bottom.

  140. @Dieter Kief
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I agree, but still - Ms. Rubin writes in the WaPo:

    "White Nationalism: White nationalism is a term that originated among white supremacists as a euphemism for white supremacy. Eventually, some white supremacists tried to distinguish it further by using it to refer to a form of white supremacy that emphasizes defining a country or region by white racial identity and which seeks to promote the interests of whites exclusively, typically at the expense of people of other backgrounds."

    So I might have been a bit over the top - but only a little bit. And I'd still say, it was quite unfair by Marantz to say, Steve Sailer was a White Nationalist. It is simply not true. There is a big difference between the a) - multiracial at its core - concept of Citizenism and b) White Nationalism. Marantz needs a scapegoat and so he comes up with one.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @guest

    If words have any meaning at all then this definition is gibberish because nationalism and supremacism (~imperialism) are opposites. Guessing Ms Rubin has no problem with respecting the efforts of one nation to maintain its safety, its sovereignty, and the character of it population. What a non-Orwellian use of “white nationalism” really means in the modern American context is “I am not paying one cent for Shaniqua’s kids.”

    • Replies: @guest
    @J.Ross

    Well now, it's possible to have no imperial intentions while maintaing your race should be superior at home. Maybe it wouldn't be an issue if there was only one kind of person in your country, but if you happen to have minority populations, or if your heritage population happens to be surrounded by superior numbers in certain subdivisions of your nation--as in the segregated South--then you're putting different groups in superior and inferior positions.

    But ya know, we still maintain legal and all sorts of other distinctions between children and adults, but no one thinks of themselves as and Adult Supremacist. Though technically that might be an accurate distinction.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  141. @Matra
    I just looked up this Marantz guy on YouTube. What's even worse than his personal appearance is his voice. He's a grown man with American teenage girl vocal fry. I mean, seriously, is that now a thing in your country?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @sayless

    Pretty much every male on NPR sounds seven years old. I remember seeing a photo of Ira Glass and being certain the caption was wrong.

  142. @Anonymous
    @J.Ross

    God, I hate that kind of "I got a secret" style of discussion on the Internet. Just have someone make the argument and discuss (and show) the evidence. But this spooky mood music with some evidence is for losers. Like the Q crowd. Not for smart people in the Steve-o-sphere.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Videos are consistently garbage, I don’t vet them before posting because I cannot, but the story is legitimate: Tulsi is the new Bernie (except she would defend a podium better).

  143. @OilcanFloyd

    As to the sainted Bill Buckley-would note he was probably scared of being blackmailed. His…habits…were well known.
     
    But he seemed so masculine! What's next? Newt Gingrich likes to eat? Teddy Kennedy liked to drink?

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Prester John

    The three Buckley brothers attended the same boarding school and had the same way of speaking. They sired 11 children between them.

    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
    @Art Deco


    The three Buckley brothers attended the same boarding school and had the same way of speaking. They sired 11 children between them.

     

    I know he had brothers and children, and attended boarding school. I think I've heard one of his brothers speak, but I only know of his sons from a book where they were mentioned.

    I don't know or care if Buckley were a homosexual. But he sure came off as feminine. My problem with Buckley is that he really only seemed to like to hear himself speak, and only seemed to care about acceptance from the Establishment, which was of the Left.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Art Deco, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

  144. @Dieter Kief
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I agree, but still - Ms. Rubin writes in the WaPo:

    "White Nationalism: White nationalism is a term that originated among white supremacists as a euphemism for white supremacy. Eventually, some white supremacists tried to distinguish it further by using it to refer to a form of white supremacy that emphasizes defining a country or region by white racial identity and which seeks to promote the interests of whites exclusively, typically at the expense of people of other backgrounds."

    So I might have been a bit over the top - but only a little bit. And I'd still say, it was quite unfair by Marantz to say, Steve Sailer was a White Nationalist. It is simply not true. There is a big difference between the a) - multiracial at its core - concept of Citizenism and b) White Nationalism. Marantz needs a scapegoat and so he comes up with one.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @guest

    You’re correct about Marantz slurring Steve as a White Nationalist. Citizenism fails exactly because its NOT race conscious.

    As to Rubin, well, she’s a Jew. She’s not a part of my people, so I don’t care one fig what she thinks gentile whites should think or do. If she’s want to discuss math or science, I’m more than happy to sit down with her and chat. I certainly don’t hate other races because their not my race, but I do draw the line at them telling my extended family how to live. She has her family, I have mine.

  145. @Hypnotoad666
    @Hail


    I believe the phrase has appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight, which is the most likely place he’d have gotten it.
     
    I would not be surprised at all if Tucker was familiar with Steve's work. Also, Trump was clearly influenced by Coulter's Adios America, which I would imagine was heavily influenced by Peter Brimelow's work. So Trump may be getting ideas from VDARE and iSteve second-hand, but he's getting them.

    Replies: @Prester John

    I would be shocked if Tucker WASN’T “familiar with Steve’s work.” Though obviously I can’t prove this, I have long harbored the suspicion that he is under marching orders from management not to book Steve on his show under the theory that he may be too “lethal.”

    And as a footnote, can’t remember the last time Coulter was on Fox. Or, for that matter, Pat Buchanan.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Prester John

    Hasn't Steve said he has been invited on Tucker Carlson? But that his appearance(s) were cancelled at the last minute with the producer citing scheduling conflicts.

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    @Prester John


    And as a footnote, can’t remember the last time Coulter was on Fox. Or, for that matter, Pat Buchanan.
     
    Ever since Lachlan took the helm Fox has been tacking Left.
  146. @guest
    I assume "hijacking the American conversation" means temporary interrupting lectures based upon the Narrative. Who even thinks in terms of one national conversation ? It's weird.

    Of course, if you're an idiot and highly programmable, distraction from whatever false dichotomy is currently monopolizing public attention could make you a sort of Nazi automaton. I've met such people.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I assume “hijacking the American conversation” means temporary interrupting lectures based upon the Narrative.

    Yes, this. In Leftist terms, a “conversation” no longer means a dialogue, it means “shut up Whitey while we lecture you about privilege.” The sistah is supposed to grab the metaphorical microphone and whitey is supposed to step aside and be edumacated by her as to what a terrible racist he is.

    If you don’t go along with this program then you are “hijacking the conversation”. The Left is all about projection.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  147. @kihowi
    @Anonymous

    I was reading a book full of short science-y articles about every subject under the sun. The perfect kind of book for an index. None to be found.

    I think they just think it's very uncool and would turn off a certain kind of reader. An index suggests a serious nerdy man doing research, no index suggests a novel, something a bubbly woman might read at a fashionable place between two extremely social activities. You read it, you enjoy the emotions that the product has provided you, you move on.

    Replies: @Justice Duvall

    Creating an index costs money.

  148. “For example, when I spoke to Marantz for several hours in 2017 over the phone, my impression was that he was most disappointed by my answer to his question about which historical event was the dividing point between establishment and antiestablishment conservatives.

    I answered: “The Iraq War.”

    ….

    I could sense Marantz’s hope for an acclaimed New Yorker article suddenly deflating as he realized my fundamental explanation of the history of the 21st-century right was correct.”

    Hope deflating? I’m thinking he swallowed his tongue.

  149. @OilcanFloyd

    As to the sainted Bill Buckley-would note he was probably scared of being blackmailed. His…habits…were well known.
     
    But he seemed so masculine! What's next? Newt Gingrich likes to eat? Teddy Kennedy liked to drink?

    Replies: @Art Deco, @Prester John

    Are you suggesting that The Buck was a swish? If so, I doubt it. However, son Christopher has acknowledged that by the end of his life his father was hopelessly into the “sauce”. And that his mother was also a bottle baby. In the case of his father that might have accounted for the acute deterioration in quality of his columns starting in the late 90s. In his prime Buckley had a razor-sharp wit (even if his intellect was a tad overrated) and was an accomplished debater.

    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
    @Prester John


    Are you suggesting that The Buck was a swish?
     
    No. That was someone else. I have no way of knowing about Buckley's sexuality. However, if someone says he was a fruit, I could believe It.
    , @Art Deco
    @Prester John

    He published 12 books during the period running from 1990 to 2008. He and his wife lived past 80. They didn't die of alcohol-related ailments. They each died of emphysema. (He wasn't much of a smoker; she was). As he got older, he cut out activities in stages, leaving the editor's chair at NR in 1990, bringing Firing Line to a close in 1999, &c. He continued to write columns, but they grew ruminative and inconclusive. People age.

  150. @Art Deco
    @OilcanFloyd

    The three Buckley brothers attended the same boarding school and had the same way of speaking. They sired 11 children between them.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd

    The three Buckley brothers attended the same boarding school and had the same way of speaking. They sired 11 children between them.

    I know he had brothers and children, and attended boarding school. I think I’ve heard one of his brothers speak, but I only know of his sons from a book where they were mentioned.

    I don’t know or care if Buckley were a homosexual. But he sure came off as feminine. My problem with Buckley is that he really only seemed to like to hear himself speak, and only seemed to care about acceptance from the Establishment, which was of the Left.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @OilcanFloyd

    I think one of his son's wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world's worst parents. In his telling, they love the bottle a lot and don't really care (in any sense of the word) for their children. The kind of rich parents that ship their kids off to boarding school at the earliest possible opportunity and have the help raise them otherwise.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @OilcanFloyd, @kaganovitch

    , @Art Deco
    @OilcanFloyd

    That's a strange description of Buckley, who came to public attention as a critic of Yale University and started National Review from nothing. He was self-employed from the time he was 25 and made himself wealthy from his writing, his fiction in particular. He had a program on PBS and a syndicated column. Well, Joseph Sobran also had a syndicated column and a gig with CBS Radio.

    This particular discussions seems derived from a garbled memory of some decisions National Review made in regard to the editorial policy during the period running from 1955 to 1964, in which National Review defined itself contra various others. That included the 'New Conservatism' of Peter Viereck and Clinton Rossiter, Max Eastman's atheism, Ayn Rand and the Objectivist circle, the John Birch Society, The American Mercury as it was ca. 1959, George Wallace &c. It seems rather contrived to attribute Buckley & co.'s antagonism to this motley collection as jonesing after establishment approval (rather than the more prosaic explanation that they did not wish to make common cause with this crew).

    Well, there is one other thing people fuss over, and that's the falling out between Buckley and Joseph Sobran in 1993. Buckley had no interest in incorporating Sobran's increasingly bizarre musings into his magazine's product. It irritates people here because they think Sobran's bizarro turn was perfectly normal.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd

    , @Anonymous
    @OilcanFloyd

    For what it's worth, WFB said that he didn't like to listen to his own shows because he didn't like his voice and mannerisms, himself!

    , @J.Ross
    @OilcanFloyd

    My problem with Buckley is that he really only seemed to like to hear himself speak

    Yes, that's the dishonest tack SCTV took with him too (but look how they represented Jesse Jackson), but how we all do miss him in these echo chambered times since Firing Line was the one place literally anybody -- Black Panthers, Rhodies, Chomsky, GV, anybody -- could speak.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

  151. I wonder if any of these authors or reporters ever read what to many of us sound like perfectly sensible policy ideas and agree with them. Secretly, of course. It must horrify them.

    I couldn’t find it, but remember there was an old Onion article along the lines of “Conversation with white supremacist terrifying” because he had some good points.

  152. @Prester John
    @OilcanFloyd

    Are you suggesting that The Buck was a swish? If so, I doubt it. However, son Christopher has acknowledged that by the end of his life his father was hopelessly into the "sauce". And that his mother was also a bottle baby. In the case of his father that might have accounted for the acute deterioration in quality of his columns starting in the late 90s. In his prime Buckley had a razor-sharp wit (even if his intellect was a tad overrated) and was an accomplished debater.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd, @Art Deco

    Are you suggesting that The Buck was a swish?

    No. That was someone else. I have no way of knowing about Buckley’s sexuality. However, if someone says he was a fruit, I could believe It.

  153. Recall that the New York Times editorial board was also against amnesty as late as 2000, not switching until George W. Bush got to the left of them in 2001. Young Marantz’s naive assumption that immigration was always as sacrosanct in American politics as it’s treated today is due to the massive retconning by the left made politically feasible by Bush and Rove’s disastrous stratagem.

    Retconning is a consistent Dem strategy, made possible by the Left’s young and low information (minority) voting base, who don’t remember what happened yesterday (unless it’s something like the death of St. Emmett Till or Redlining, which will be remembered forever). I’m not sure that many blacks even realize that Abraham Lincoln was a Republican and all those Confederate Generals whose statues they want torn down were all Democrats.

    Orwell predicted how retconning would work: “We have ALWAYS been at war with Eastasia”.

    In the case of Democrats, not only are positions even 1mm to the right of this week’s Overton Window forgotten (as to Democrats) they are also immoral and deplorable. Anyone who is against gay marriage is some kind of Bible thumpin cousin lovin (cousin lovin is bad and backward for hillbillies but vibrant and good for Muslims – in addition to retconning you also have cultural relativity) Jesus freak. What, you say that was Barack Obama’s position until midway thru his 2nd term? Well, he “evolved” and you are a Neanderthal because you won’t keep up.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Jack D

    What, you say that was Barack Obama’s position until midway thru his 2nd term?

    I think the left knew, as I knew, that Obama was always for gay marriage and anything else gays demanded, but he had to be coy about it for electoral purposes. I don't think Obama has a sincere bone in his body, except when it comes to his racial resentments. Remember how he told us that in the unlikely event that Trump were to be elected, he would hand over power and do his best to ensure an orderly transition. He sounded nice as pie about the whole thing. He said that even as he knew his minions in the DOJ and CIA were actively sabotaging Trump.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

    , @black sea
    @Jack D


    the Left’s young and low information (minority) voting base, who don’t remember what happened yesterday (unless it’s something like the death of St. Emmett Till or Redlining . .
    . .
     
    I wonder what percentage of "low information" voters could recall the term "redlining," or could somewhat accurately describe what it is, was, or is claimed to be.
  154. @OilcanFloyd
    I would prefer that everyone live together under the same laws and standards, with no government favoritism, but it was never going to happen. Human nature, HBD, ideology, culture, greed, the fact that most legal and illegal immigrants were never wanted or needed by most Americans, and don't make a good fit, or have any love, respect or understanding for America or Americans, etc. pretty much make it good odds that nothing is going to stave off disaster or collapse.

    I've read Sailer for decades, and his heart is in the right place, but there is no solution to the mess within an already current system that was too diverse 60 years ago.

    I'm not sure if it's a sign that people like Marantz is frightened or feeling his oats when he attacks someone as centrist as Sailer.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    I think that people like Marantz are both. However, he would do what he does even if neither is true. In his case his cultural inheritance compels him to savage at every opportunity the people who he identifies as his racial enemies. Additionally, as someone pointed out on this site, “journalists” in general today are nothing more than dogs who are rewarded for barking at the people their masters hate.

    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
    @Alfa158

    I can't disagree.

  155. @OilcanFloyd
    @Art Deco


    The three Buckley brothers attended the same boarding school and had the same way of speaking. They sired 11 children between them.

     

    I know he had brothers and children, and attended boarding school. I think I've heard one of his brothers speak, but I only know of his sons from a book where they were mentioned.

    I don't know or care if Buckley were a homosexual. But he sure came off as feminine. My problem with Buckley is that he really only seemed to like to hear himself speak, and only seemed to care about acceptance from the Establishment, which was of the Left.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Art Deco, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    I think one of his son’s wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world’s worst parents. In his telling, they love the bottle a lot and don’t really care (in any sense of the word) for their children. The kind of rich parents that ship their kids off to boarding school at the earliest possible opportunity and have the help raise them otherwise.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    I think one of his son’s wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world’s worst parents. In his telling, they love the bottle a lot and don’t really care (in any sense of the word) for their children. The kind of rich parents that ship their kids off to boarding school at the earliest possible opportunity and have the help raise them otherwise.

    There's the book he wrote and the book you've conjured up in the space between your ears. Christopher Buckley never made any such claims implicitly or explicitly about his mother or his father. He did claim they quarreled a great deal and that his mother was an embarrassing yarn-puller. I have news for you: that's not what 'the world's worst parents' are like. The book was exploitative and generally disrespectful (animated by petty resentments), but that's injurious to Christopher Buckley's reputation, not theirs.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong

    , @OilcanFloyd
    @Jack D


    I think one of his son’s wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world’s worst parents.
     
    I have no knowledge of Buckley's family life, other than what I read in one of his books about sailing across the Atlantic with his sons and some friends. Granted, Buckley wrote the book, so he's going to make himself look good, but a father who sails the Atlantic with his sons can't be that bad, unless he abused them the whole way.
    , @kaganovitch
    @Jack D

    I think one of his son’s wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world’s worst parents.

    The Buckleys only had the one child. Buckley himself grew up in a huge Irish catholic family where the older siblings contributed greatly to the raising of the younger ones. It is this among other things that made him unprepared to raise an only child in the post-war period. That being said, I thought Christopher's book was simply disgraceful. Petty , mean-spirited and spiteful.

    Replies: @Jack D

  156. @mercer
    " I spoke to Marantz for several hours in 2017 over the phone"

    Several hours? I think you should have better uses for your time. What was he doing? Trying to get you to say something embarassing? There is twenty years of your writing on the web he can read to grasp your ideas. I don't think you are hard to understand for someone with at least an average IQ.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    That’s exactly what he was doing.

  157. @snorlax
    @Tex


    I guess Hitler was elected to office
     
    Er, he was?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Tex

    I guess Hitler was elected to office

    Er, he was?

    The Nazis got about 33% of the vote in the 1932 election. This was enough to form a coalition government with Hitler as Chancellor. The next year he managed to get 2/3 of the democratically elected Reichstag (except the Communists who were arrested), to pass the 1933 Enabling Act that allowed the government to rule by decree. Everything he did after 1933 was under the legal authority of the Enabling Act.

    As far as I know, this was all technically legit under the terms of the Weimar Constitution (which actually remained nominally in effect throughout the war). But it’s a pretty good historical illustration of why the U.S. system of divided government, with constitutional “checks and balances” is the way to go if you are designing a constitutional system.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/November_1932_German_federal_election

    https://www.historyonthenet.com/enabling-act-1933

  158. @OilcanFloyd
    @Art Deco


    The three Buckley brothers attended the same boarding school and had the same way of speaking. They sired 11 children between them.

     

    I know he had brothers and children, and attended boarding school. I think I've heard one of his brothers speak, but I only know of his sons from a book where they were mentioned.

    I don't know or care if Buckley were a homosexual. But he sure came off as feminine. My problem with Buckley is that he really only seemed to like to hear himself speak, and only seemed to care about acceptance from the Establishment, which was of the Left.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Art Deco, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    That’s a strange description of Buckley, who came to public attention as a critic of Yale University and started National Review from nothing. He was self-employed from the time he was 25 and made himself wealthy from his writing, his fiction in particular. He had a program on PBS and a syndicated column. Well, Joseph Sobran also had a syndicated column and a gig with CBS Radio.

    This particular discussions seems derived from a garbled memory of some decisions National Review made in regard to the editorial policy during the period running from 1955 to 1964, in which National Review defined itself contra various others. That included the ‘New Conservatism’ of Peter Viereck and Clinton Rossiter, Max Eastman’s atheism, Ayn Rand and the Objectivist circle, the John Birch Society, The American Mercury as it was ca. 1959, George Wallace &c. It seems rather contrived to attribute Buckley & co.’s antagonism to this motley collection as jonesing after establishment approval (rather than the more prosaic explanation that they did not wish to make common cause with this crew).

    Well, there is one other thing people fuss over, and that’s the falling out between Buckley and Joseph Sobran in 1993. Buckley had no interest in incorporating Sobran’s increasingly bizarre musings into his magazine’s product. It irritates people here because they think Sobran’s bizarro turn was perfectly normal.

    • Replies: @OilcanFloyd
    @Art Deco


    That’s a strange description of Buckley, who came to public attention as a critic of Yale University and started National Review from nothing.
     
    My opinion is based on my impression of Buckley. Buckley was well-established before I was even born, so I missed a good bit of his career. I used to watch Firing Line when I was in high school, but lost interest and permanently cancelled my subscription to NR in my early 20s. By that time, Buckley seemed like a windbag who was more concerned with socializing (often with his political opposites, which is fine. I have friends that I disagree with) than anything else. He just had nothing to offer to this particular Middle American. I much preferred Dam Francis.
  159. @snorlax
    @Tex


    I guess Hitler was elected to office
     
    Er, he was?

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666, @Tex

    Hitler was appointed to form a government by President Hindenburg. The National Socialists had about a third of the Reichstag, a plurality. Hindenburg had a pretty free hand to appoint who he saw fit. Hitler’s only political office was leader of the NSDAP, he was not elected to the Reichstag or any other office. Hitler’s appointment as chancellor was fundamentally a political deal involving top-level politicians.

    Of course, one Hitler had power he didn’t bother with that election nonsense any more.

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
    @Tex

    Sounds like ballot not bullet to me.

    Replies: @Tex

  160. @Jack D
    @OilcanFloyd

    I think one of his son's wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world's worst parents. In his telling, they love the bottle a lot and don't really care (in any sense of the word) for their children. The kind of rich parents that ship their kids off to boarding school at the earliest possible opportunity and have the help raise them otherwise.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @OilcanFloyd, @kaganovitch

    I think one of his son’s wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world’s worst parents. In his telling, they love the bottle a lot and don’t really care (in any sense of the word) for their children. The kind of rich parents that ship their kids off to boarding school at the earliest possible opportunity and have the help raise them otherwise.

    There’s the book he wrote and the book you’ve conjured up in the space between your ears. Christopher Buckley never made any such claims implicitly or explicitly about his mother or his father. He did claim they quarreled a great deal and that his mother was an embarrassing yarn-puller. I have news for you: that’s not what ‘the world’s worst parents’ are like. The book was exploitative and generally disrespectful (animated by petty resentments), but that’s injurious to Christopher Buckley’s reputation, not theirs.

    • Replies: @Jack Armstrong
    @Art Deco


    The author is generous when praising his father’s accomplishments and nerve, but he also sticks up for himself in little bracketed phrases that are never really vengeful but which do succeed in making their point. He declares, for example, that it is difficult to refuse help to “someone who has raised you, clothed you, fed you from Day 1 — well, even if, in Pup’s case, these actual duties were elaborately subcontracted.”
     
    Maybe World’s Worst Parents of Means?

    Replies: @Art Deco

  161. Anonymous[506] • Disclaimer says:

    I knew John Buckley (WFB cousin) when he was in the VA legislature and a rising Conservative star. Got specially targeted, effectively, by some out of state Democratic money.

    He was not effeminate (not like the WFB speech patterns), or out, at the time. So was surprised to learn many years later that he was gay.

    His mom was cool to talk to, also. Patrician, but intelligent.

  162. @George
    " I helped hijack something big"

    Ann Coulter discusses Trump and how he got elected.

    Zero Tolerance: Ann Coulter Interview | FRONTLINE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXOFHr6tGMQ

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Thanks, good interview. Lively Ann Coulter is impressive. 11:00 in when she talks about the average American vs. the Koch brothers and Gstaad and Davos and Wall St. on immigration – David Goddharts Anywheres vs. the (US-)Somewheres – that’s very clear and spot on.

    (I imagine somebody joking: The closest a simulation of a female ever got to the impersonation of a bright and even charming human being. Her mind seems like trapped in this body, which is only there to make this energetic – southern, right? – mind happen…).

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Dieter Kief

    No; not southern. Ann Coulter is from Connecticut, and very much of that culture in her manners, speech, etc.

    I understand entirely the subtleties are inscrutable to a German, just as I would doubtless never master the nuanced differences among Germany's regions as well as you, so that's quite alright.

    What's more, since the southeastern F.U.S.A. has long been sociopolitically sensible in the face of lunacy from other regions, your guess is understandable. However, there is a particular strain of northeasterner, independent and self-sufficient rural (or urban, working class) Yankees, who are very much kindred to traditional southerners in many ways (though these are usually found more in places like New Hampshire and Maine than in Connecticut. Coulter is not representative of prevailing attitudes in her homeland much as Stephen Miller is unrepresentative of prevailing attitudes in Santa Barbara, especially among Jews....

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Reg Cæsar

  163. @OilcanFloyd
    @Art Deco


    The three Buckley brothers attended the same boarding school and had the same way of speaking. They sired 11 children between them.

     

    I know he had brothers and children, and attended boarding school. I think I've heard one of his brothers speak, but I only know of his sons from a book where they were mentioned.

    I don't know or care if Buckley were a homosexual. But he sure came off as feminine. My problem with Buckley is that he really only seemed to like to hear himself speak, and only seemed to care about acceptance from the Establishment, which was of the Left.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Art Deco, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    For what it’s worth, WFB said that he didn’t like to listen to his own shows because he didn’t like his voice and mannerisms, himself!

  164. @Alfa158
    Marantz has also tried to crack the core alt-right as documented by Mike Enoch. He contacts them pretending to want to have a good faith debate and understand their positions better. In actuality, as you point out, he side-steps the debate and changes the subject whenever he gets his arguments refuted or is presented with incontrovertible facts. Eventually his targets realize that all he is doing is trolling for outrageous quotes he can use to condemn them. In the case of Mike he finally cut Marantz off and ignored Andy’s plaintive follow-up efforts to talk some more.
    Marantz is following the new Leftist meme I have seen simultaneously spring up with the Progs I talk to, which is blatant demands for censorship of mass media and suppression of dissenting opinions. They are especially outraged by what they see as a betrayal by one of their own, Mark Zuckerberg who has displayed less than the absolute commitment to the censorship of political dissent that the Left demands.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @MEH 0910, @Kolya Krassotkin

    I am grateful to Marantz. I learned about Mike Enoch and The Right Stuff radio from him. Those guys are hoot.

  165. @Art Deco
    @Jack D

    I think one of his son’s wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world’s worst parents. In his telling, they love the bottle a lot and don’t really care (in any sense of the word) for their children. The kind of rich parents that ship their kids off to boarding school at the earliest possible opportunity and have the help raise them otherwise.

    There's the book he wrote and the book you've conjured up in the space between your ears. Christopher Buckley never made any such claims implicitly or explicitly about his mother or his father. He did claim they quarreled a great deal and that his mother was an embarrassing yarn-puller. I have news for you: that's not what 'the world's worst parents' are like. The book was exploitative and generally disrespectful (animated by petty resentments), but that's injurious to Christopher Buckley's reputation, not theirs.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong

    The author is generous when praising his father’s accomplishments and nerve, but he also sticks up for himself in little bracketed phrases that are never really vengeful but which do succeed in making their point. He declares, for example, that it is difficult to refuse help to “someone who has raised you, clothed you, fed you from Day 1 — well, even if, in Pup’s case, these actual duties were elaborately subcontracted.”

    Maybe World’s Worst Parents of Means?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Jack Armstrong

    Is it really your contention that the employ of domestic staff by the Buckleys makes them 'the world's worst parents'? Schoolteachers are 'subcontractors'. Is it your contention that anyone who is not home-schooling is among 'the world's worst parents'? (His father was careful to provide his son with considerable one-on-one instruction in his late adolescent and young adult years, btw).

  166. @kaganovitch
    @ChrisZ

    Indeed, that was the TNC I was talking about.

    Replies: @ChrisZ

    I may have thought you were referencing some gossip website. Maybe I was mixing it up with TMZ?

    Anyway, SJW, NPC, TNC, RBG, SWPL, NAM, NIMBY (not to mention DNA, IQ, SAT) … you’ve got to juggle a lot of letters on the dissident right.

    • LOL: kaganovitch
  167. @Tex
    @snorlax

    Hitler was appointed to form a government by President Hindenburg. The National Socialists had about a third of the Reichstag, a plurality. Hindenburg had a pretty free hand to appoint who he saw fit. Hitler's only political office was leader of the NSDAP, he was not elected to the Reichstag or any other office. Hitler's appointment as chancellor was fundamentally a political deal involving top-level politicians.

    Of course, one Hitler had power he didn't bother with that election nonsense any more.

    Replies: @Jack Armstrong

    Sounds like ballot not bullet to me.

    • Replies: @Tex
    @Jack Armstrong


    Sounds like ballot not bullet to me.
     
    Sure, and Stalin was elected to his post as General Secretary by the Politburo. So I guess that makes it valid to say Trump is pretty similar to Hitler and Stalin.
  168. @Hail

    Andrew Marantz wrote:

    Sailer felt confident that no part of the Sailer Strategy was unconstitutional or illegal.
     

    I'd like to highlight this line, as Steve does not in his article. It is one of those dishonest constructions that is easy to slip by one's radar.

    So what is this? Rabbi Marantz has, by that line (which opens a subsection of his book) released into the air the notion that appealing to white working-class voters in the Midwest might be "unconstitutional"(!) or "illegal"(!).

    And he leaves it ambiguous. "Sailer felt," indeed.

    There are all kinds of better ways to say this without making Steve look like a malicious, rogue actor, whose possibly-criminal political writing ought to get him a bright-red place on the political commissars' lists. (And maybe Marantz knows some people whose great-uncles were real-deal, credentialed commissars.)

    But I see no need for this sentence at all. Marantz, or another like him, would never subtly suggest that appealing to any group of nonwhite voters might be "illegal."

    Replies: @ATBOTL, @Tex, @ChrisZ, @J.Ross

    “And if you ask me, Mr Marantz was pretty confident — a little too confident — that there were no kidnapped, frightened, telegenic children in his bedroom. At least not at the time of our interview.”
    But this is what NPR and Bezos Blog are like 24 hours a day on every Trump story. Just now they were babbling about Trump “running away” from a Hitlerian act of unconstitutional aggression and terrorism “with his tail between his legs,” and the whole thing about Mulvaney being a TOTAL F*A*I*L*U*R*R*E as White House Chief of Staff for [spit!] carrying out the President’s wishes. Leon Panetta warns that this makes him a glorified secretary. I’m sure we all remember when Obama’s chief of staff slapped him in the face, called him an uppity negro, and commanded the President to let the police do their jobs. I mean honestly, a chief of staff who does the bidding of the president, feh.

  169. @Jack Armstrong
    @Art Deco


    The author is generous when praising his father’s accomplishments and nerve, but he also sticks up for himself in little bracketed phrases that are never really vengeful but which do succeed in making their point. He declares, for example, that it is difficult to refuse help to “someone who has raised you, clothed you, fed you from Day 1 — well, even if, in Pup’s case, these actual duties were elaborately subcontracted.”
     
    Maybe World’s Worst Parents of Means?

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Is it really your contention that the employ of domestic staff by the Buckleys makes them ‘the world’s worst parents’? Schoolteachers are ‘subcontractors’. Is it your contention that anyone who is not home-schooling is among ‘the world’s worst parents’? (His father was careful to provide his son with considerable one-on-one instruction in his late adolescent and young adult years, btw).

  170. @OilcanFloyd
    @Art Deco


    The three Buckley brothers attended the same boarding school and had the same way of speaking. They sired 11 children between them.

     

    I know he had brothers and children, and attended boarding school. I think I've heard one of his brothers speak, but I only know of his sons from a book where they were mentioned.

    I don't know or care if Buckley were a homosexual. But he sure came off as feminine. My problem with Buckley is that he really only seemed to like to hear himself speak, and only seemed to care about acceptance from the Establishment, which was of the Left.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Art Deco, @Anonymous, @J.Ross

    My problem with Buckley is that he really only seemed to like to hear himself speak

    Yes, that’s the dishonest tack SCTV took with him too (but look how they represented Jesse Jackson), but how we all do miss him in these echo chambered times since Firing Line was the one place literally anybody — Black Panthers, Rhodies, Chomsky, GV, anybody — could speak.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    @J.Ross

    Except Joe Sobran.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  171. That Starbucks picture says a thousand words. And more of them are about class than race.

  172. Treasonous rat William F Buckley attacked Pat Buchanan because Buchanan had patriotic skepticism about George HW Bush’s Iraq War.

    George W Bush’s Iraq war debacle paved the way for Trump to get the votes of Whites Without College Degrees in the GOP presidential primaries and then the general election.

    IMMIGRATION was the deal maker for Trump and the Iraq War debacle was the action that split the Republican Party.

    Tweets from 2015 and 2014:

  173. @Prester John
    @OilcanFloyd

    Are you suggesting that The Buck was a swish? If so, I doubt it. However, son Christopher has acknowledged that by the end of his life his father was hopelessly into the "sauce". And that his mother was also a bottle baby. In the case of his father that might have accounted for the acute deterioration in quality of his columns starting in the late 90s. In his prime Buckley had a razor-sharp wit (even if his intellect was a tad overrated) and was an accomplished debater.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd, @Art Deco

    He published 12 books during the period running from 1990 to 2008. He and his wife lived past 80. They didn’t die of alcohol-related ailments. They each died of emphysema. (He wasn’t much of a smoker; she was). As he got older, he cut out activities in stages, leaving the editor’s chair at NR in 1990, bringing Firing Line to a close in 1999, &c. He continued to write columns, but they grew ruminative and inconclusive. People age.

  174. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Dieter Kief


    Marantz’s claim, that citizenism would equal white suprematism is foul and vile. –
     
    Marantz said citizenism would equal white "nationalism" which is natural and beautiful. Only a CivNat could say that the desire to live among and be ruled by your own people is something "foul and vile."

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @guest

    “White nationalism” = white supremacy to people who aren’t nationalists. We know that’s what people who aren’t nationalists mean for us to understand when they say it.

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @guest

    Well, then it's time that we correct them.

    Actually, I no longer care about debating them. That time has passed. We aren't going to vote our way out of this nor will we debate our way out. In my mind, I've divorced myself from this society. Sure, we still live in the same house, but I no longer want to argue about things that we'll never agree upon. It's over. The only question is whether I have to move out or can I takeover a part of the house and start putting up walls to make it a duplex.

  175. @Dieter Kief
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I agree, but still - Ms. Rubin writes in the WaPo:

    "White Nationalism: White nationalism is a term that originated among white supremacists as a euphemism for white supremacy. Eventually, some white supremacists tried to distinguish it further by using it to refer to a form of white supremacy that emphasizes defining a country or region by white racial identity and which seeks to promote the interests of whites exclusively, typically at the expense of people of other backgrounds."

    So I might have been a bit over the top - but only a little bit. And I'd still say, it was quite unfair by Marantz to say, Steve Sailer was a White Nationalist. It is simply not true. There is a big difference between the a) - multiracial at its core - concept of Citizenism and b) White Nationalism. Marantz needs a scapegoat and so he comes up with one.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @Citizen of a Silly Country, @guest

    Mz. Rubin is of course talking out her bottom.

  176. @Harry Baldwin
    I can’t imagine Trump has any idea who I am.

    He probably doesn't. since you don't appear on Fox News. However, I'd bet Stephen Miller knows who you are.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    More important, Annie the Trannie Coulter certainly does.

  177. @J.Ross
    @OilcanFloyd

    My problem with Buckley is that he really only seemed to like to hear himself speak

    Yes, that's the dishonest tack SCTV took with him too (but look how they represented Jesse Jackson), but how we all do miss him in these echo chambered times since Firing Line was the one place literally anybody -- Black Panthers, Rhodies, Chomsky, GV, anybody -- could speak.

    Replies: @Bill Jones

    Except Joe Sobran.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Bill Jones

    He provided Mr. Sobran with a salary for 21 years and his imprimatur allowed Sobran to land a syndicated column and a contract to produce radio commentaries.

    Replies: @Peterike

  178. @J.Ross
    @Dieter Kief

    If words have any meaning at all then this definition is gibberish because nationalism and supremacism (~imperialism) are opposites. Guessing Ms Rubin has no problem with respecting the efforts of one nation to maintain its safety, its sovereignty, and the character of it population. What a non-Orwellian use of "white nationalism" really means in the modern American context is "I am not paying one cent for Shaniqua's kids."

    Replies: @guest

    Well now, it’s possible to have no imperial intentions while maintaing your race should be superior at home. Maybe it wouldn’t be an issue if there was only one kind of person in your country, but if you happen to have minority populations, or if your heritage population happens to be surrounded by superior numbers in certain subdivisions of your nation–as in the segregated South–then you’re putting different groups in superior and inferior positions.

    But ya know, we still maintain legal and all sorts of other distinctions between children and adults, but no one thinks of themselves as and Adult Supremacist. Though technically that might be an accurate distinction.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @guest

    maintaining that your race should be superior at home

    Gibberish, there is nothing supremacist about accommodating one's own constituents, that's the basis of government, and we wouldn't be defining it racially. Supremacism is locking a helot caste into an exploitative position, like the globalists want.

    Replies: @guest

  179. B

    lack lesbian Congresswoman Barbara Jordan died of cancer in 1996.

    Has anyone ever crunched the numbers on cancer deaths among lesbians?
    Or all causes of lesbian deaths?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    I read a long time ago somewhere that women who don't get pregnant in their lives have a higher chance of breast cancer. Lesbians and nuns hardest hit.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    , @Art Deco
    @anon

    The woman was a medical disaster zone. She had multiple sclerosis, diabetes, and some sort of leukemia.

    The lesbian claim (due to her association with Nancy Earl) is promoted by the gay press. The one full-dress biography done of her does not make that contention.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

  180. @anon
    B

    lack lesbian Congresswoman Barbara Jordan died of cancer in 1996.
     
    Has anyone ever crunched the numbers on cancer deaths among lesbians?
    Or all causes of lesbian deaths?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Art Deco

    I read a long time ago somewhere that women who don’t get pregnant in their lives have a higher chance of breast cancer. Lesbians and nuns hardest hit.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @Steve Sailer

    She didn't have breast cancer.

  181. @Joe Stalin
    @Reg Cæsar

    On the other hand, USAF Gen. Curtis Le May is why you have an AR-15 in defense of home and country:


    "However, military history buffs and firearms enthusiasts can also point to another hallmark in LeMay’s long career: he’s the man responsible for bringing the AR-15 rifle to the U.S. military, which would go on to inspire the M16 rifle and change the face of military arms forever. "

    https://www.nrablog.com/articles/2017/9/remembering-the-air-force-general-who-helped-usher-in-the-m16-rifle/
     

    as well as making Single Side band (SSB) voice the mode of military communications:

    In the mid-1950s, hams and amateur sideband actually had a hand in altering the course of the Cold War. General Curtis LeMay, W6EZV, was Commander of the Strategic Air Command (SAC), charged with deterrence of the Soviet nuclear threat. See Figure 4. New jet air-craft then being introduced were result-ing in the elimination of in-flight radio operators and SAC was planning on the use of AM voice equipment in the cockpit. LeMay became aware of the successes of amateur SSB work, and in 1956 undertook two flights, one to Okinawa and the other to Greenland, during which SSB was put to the test using Amateur Radio gear and hams themselves. Two of the hams invited to operate on those flights were Art Collins, WØCXX, of Collins Radio, and Leo Meyerson, WØGFQ, of World Radio Labs. SSB far outperformed the conventional AM communications systems then in use by the military. In 1957, it was formally adopted by SAC for use in its (then) new B-52 bombers,4 the same year that General Francis “Butch” Griswold, KØDWC, of SAC would give the keynote address on the subject at the ARRL National Convention in Chicago.

    http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Technology/pdf/McElroy.pdf
     

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Alfa158

    I was in the Air Force when it was still equipped with the original M-16 that had the three
    prong bottle opener flash suppressor, non-chromed chamber, no forward bolt assist and the cartridge propellant Stoner told the military not to use. On a dust-free, dry firing range, using a freshly cleaned and lubed rifle you were lucky to get 100 rounds off in slow, semi-auto fire without having a failure to go into battery. I consoled myself that if I was in a situation in which a bunch of us nerdy Airmen was having to defend a base against an infantry assault, we would be hosed anyway. I can’t imagine being in the jungle firing off magazine after magazine and praying the thing would keep running while hot and contaminated.
    I know there have been a lot of improvements but it has left me with an irrational prejudice against the whole platform.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Alfa158

    No, you’re postjudiced, not prejudiced. And the M16 is not a true battle rifle. It is now a fine weapon for certain purposes but it’s not a FAL, or its contemporaries.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    , @Joe Stalin
    @Alfa158

    I saw some of the original USAF AR-15s when visiting an air show and they were used to guard an F-117 Nighthawk stealth bomber (No storage compartment in buttstock); personally, I've never encountered any stoppages with a Colt AR-15 SP1.

    The AR has been developed for almost 6 decades in the USA and is a mature platform. Just look at these videos made by Iraqveteran8888 on testing run of the mill ARs to destruction:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSizVpfqFtw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cr9e3N6HEw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNG7Kkk_s6o

    Chris Bartoli of Small Arms Solutions is a former Colt employee and expert on the AR-15:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYar4Zf8jH8

  182. @Bill Jones
    @J.Ross

    Except Joe Sobran.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    He provided Mr. Sobran with a salary for 21 years and his imprimatur allowed Sobran to land a syndicated column and a contract to produce radio commentaries.

    • Replies: @Peterike
    @Art Deco

    “He provided Mr. Sobran with a salary for 21 years and his imprimatur allowed Sobran to land a syndicated column and a contract to produce radio commentaries.”

    And in return he got the most brilliant Conservative writer of his generation. No, the most brilliant political and cultural writer period.

    In a sane nation, Sobran would have been a national hero. There should be a holiday named after him.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco

  183. @guest
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    "White nationalism" = white supremacy to people who aren't nationalists. We know that's what people who aren't nationalists mean for us to understand when they say it.

    Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Well, then it’s time that we correct them.

    Actually, I no longer care about debating them. That time has passed. We aren’t going to vote our way out of this nor will we debate our way out. In my mind, I’ve divorced myself from this society. Sure, we still live in the same house, but I no longer want to argue about things that we’ll never agree upon. It’s over. The only question is whether I have to move out or can I takeover a part of the house and start putting up walls to make it a duplex.

  184. @Mike Zwick

    The point of my word is to emphasize the duty we owe to our fellow American citizens, and citizenship is obviously a legal rather than a racial category. As I wrote in 2008
     
    Hopefully this won't make "citizenism" get pigeon holed as another "dog whistle" thing for white supremacists, like forming the OK symbol with your hand. You would think that if authors are going to write so much about you, they would actually go out to the Unz review and read your articles, to at the very least get some more material.

    Replies: @J.Ross, @gregor

    What Steve doesn’t seem to realize is that Jews like Marantz et al are not misunderstanding his “citizenist” position. They get it, but to them it’s just a thinly disguised form of what they call white nationalism. They are pushing a program of race replacement and any attempt to attenuate that is seen as white nationalism. Call it citizenism if you want but if most of the citizens happen to be white and you advocate policies that would freeze the demographics as they are or even slow the rate of white dispossession, they see this at best as incidental white nationalism. A bit like disparate impact doctrine.

  185. @anon
    B

    lack lesbian Congresswoman Barbara Jordan died of cancer in 1996.
     
    Has anyone ever crunched the numbers on cancer deaths among lesbians?
    Or all causes of lesbian deaths?

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Art Deco

    The woman was a medical disaster zone. She had multiple sclerosis, diabetes, and some sort of leukemia.

    The lesbian claim (due to her association with Nancy Earl) is promoted by the gay press. The one full-dress biography done of her does not make that contention.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    @Art Deco

    Once again, I'm curious as to how you just happen to have all these obscure facts at your fingertips. True enough, anybody can Google anything these days, but few people would want to do what you do, i.e. take a never ending series of pedantic potshots at other people's thowaway internet comments, armed with your own inexhaustible supply of old newspaper clippings.

    You seem to be either an extremely spergy editor associated with the east coast publishing industry, or some kind of content-generating bot who filters the Unz Review through wikipedia looking for statements to contradict.

    When have you ever actually written something, that is stated an opinion with any kind of force or conviction? This constant quibbling is a pretty lame hobby you've got.

  186. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    I read a long time ago somewhere that women who don't get pregnant in their lives have a higher chance of breast cancer. Lesbians and nuns hardest hit.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    She didn’t have breast cancer.

  187. Your Taki column was well done.

  188. @Jack D
    @OilcanFloyd

    I think one of his son's wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world's worst parents. In his telling, they love the bottle a lot and don't really care (in any sense of the word) for their children. The kind of rich parents that ship their kids off to boarding school at the earliest possible opportunity and have the help raise them otherwise.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @OilcanFloyd, @kaganovitch

    I think one of his son’s wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world’s worst parents.

    I have no knowledge of Buckley’s family life, other than what I read in one of his books about sailing across the Atlantic with his sons and some friends. Granted, Buckley wrote the book, so he’s going to make himself look good, but a father who sails the Atlantic with his sons can’t be that bad, unless he abused them the whole way.

  189. @Kaplan Turqweather
    Well if you ask me, the "reviled right" has (for the time being) got the last laugh. The Weekly Standard is bankrupt and the plucky American Conservative lives on. Meanwhile, the Unz Review exceeds the traffic of both The New Republic and the Nation!

    I can't wait to see how American Affairs does (the coolest new magazine of the dissident right).

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    Claremont Institute has finally recognized where the action is.

  190. @Art Deco
    @Bill Jones

    He provided Mr. Sobran with a salary for 21 years and his imprimatur allowed Sobran to land a syndicated column and a contract to produce radio commentaries.

    Replies: @Peterike

    “He provided Mr. Sobran with a salary for 21 years and his imprimatur allowed Sobran to land a syndicated column and a contract to produce radio commentaries.”

    And in return he got the most brilliant Conservative writer of his generation. No, the most brilliant political and cultural writer period.

    In a sane nation, Sobran would have been a national hero. There should be a holiday named after him.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Peterike


    In a sane nation, Sobran would have been a national hero. There should be a holiday named after him.
     
    How about April 23 or 24? William Shakespeare's birthday.

    Replies: @Hail

    , @Art Deco
    @Peterike

    And in return he got the most brilliant Conservative writer of his generation. No, the most brilliant political and cultural writer period.

    What he got was a man who could write well. As a stylist, unusually elegant. He also had a knack in some cases for thinking of an angle to a story you didn't. Alas, he was also a crank given to hopeless ineptitude in his mundane life. What Buckley provided for him for him was shelter. When he was outside of Buckley's stable, his life fell apart pretty completely (in spite of the efforts of others to assist him in various ways). And we know this because people fond of Sobran personally and in his circle of friends have let slip with enough details of the course of his life between 1993 and 2010 for the rest of us to get the gist of it.



    In a sane nation, Sobran would have been a national hero. There should be a holiday named after him.

    Why would you make a hero out of a newspaper columnist?

  191. @Art Deco
    @anon

    The woman was a medical disaster zone. She had multiple sclerosis, diabetes, and some sort of leukemia.

    The lesbian claim (due to her association with Nancy Earl) is promoted by the gay press. The one full-dress biography done of her does not make that contention.

    Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    Once again, I’m curious as to how you just happen to have all these obscure facts at your fingertips. True enough, anybody can Google anything these days, but few people would want to do what you do, i.e. take a never ending series of pedantic potshots at other people’s thowaway internet comments, armed with your own inexhaustible supply of old newspaper clippings.

    You seem to be either an extremely spergy editor associated with the east coast publishing industry, or some kind of content-generating bot who filters the Unz Review through wikipedia looking for statements to contradict.

    When have you ever actually written something, that is stated an opinion with any kind of force or conviction? This constant quibbling is a pretty lame hobby you’ve got.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
  192. @Art Deco
    @OilcanFloyd

    That's a strange description of Buckley, who came to public attention as a critic of Yale University and started National Review from nothing. He was self-employed from the time he was 25 and made himself wealthy from his writing, his fiction in particular. He had a program on PBS and a syndicated column. Well, Joseph Sobran also had a syndicated column and a gig with CBS Radio.

    This particular discussions seems derived from a garbled memory of some decisions National Review made in regard to the editorial policy during the period running from 1955 to 1964, in which National Review defined itself contra various others. That included the 'New Conservatism' of Peter Viereck and Clinton Rossiter, Max Eastman's atheism, Ayn Rand and the Objectivist circle, the John Birch Society, The American Mercury as it was ca. 1959, George Wallace &c. It seems rather contrived to attribute Buckley & co.'s antagonism to this motley collection as jonesing after establishment approval (rather than the more prosaic explanation that they did not wish to make common cause with this crew).

    Well, there is one other thing people fuss over, and that's the falling out between Buckley and Joseph Sobran in 1993. Buckley had no interest in incorporating Sobran's increasingly bizarre musings into his magazine's product. It irritates people here because they think Sobran's bizarro turn was perfectly normal.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd

    That’s a strange description of Buckley, who came to public attention as a critic of Yale University and started National Review from nothing.

    My opinion is based on my impression of Buckley. Buckley was well-established before I was even born, so I missed a good bit of his career. I used to watch Firing Line when I was in high school, but lost interest and permanently cancelled my subscription to NR in my early 20s. By that time, Buckley seemed like a windbag who was more concerned with socializing (often with his political opposites, which is fine. I have friends that I disagree with) than anything else. He just had nothing to offer to this particular Middle American. I much preferred Dam Francis.

  193. @Ragno

    Marantz’s Ctrl-Left thesis is much the same as Saini’s: Something must be done about all the bad people, like me, who have been “hijacking the American conversation” with our control of the media.
     
    To such worthies, 'control of the media' refers to the courage and ingenuity necessary to survive as a dissident voice while dodging the merciless gnashing gears of a Great Clanking Freedom Machine designed specifically to isolate and destroy such voices.

    Funny, innit? A scream, it's!

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    LOL – “the merciless gnashing gears of a Great Clanking Freedom Machine”

    This is the il ragno I remember!

    Drop by my site and send me an email, old friend.

  194. Marantz is lamenting that white gentiles now have more outlets to communicate with each other without being filtered through a handful of tribe-controlled media chokepoints. And no good can come of that!

    In the video below, ADL lady explains before Congress that having free speech on the internet is like a “non-stop white supremacist rally.” She’s not entirely wrong.

    A huge disadvantage for them is that in many cases it takes very little counter-narrative to undo decades of indoctrination. It is that fragile. At some point they will not even try to convince; they will just dare people to do anything about it.

    • Replies: @Kaplan Turqweather
    @gregor

    Moral panics occur not when moral narratives are at their strongest and most confident (i.e. PC in the mid-1990s) but when they sense vulnerability.

    For example, the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in China was instigated by Map feeling personally threatened by a "bourgeois class" in his party. The same is true for what we may call the Great Intersectionalitarian Cultural Revolution (https://www.takimag.com/article/mao_and_again/#axzz5MpxmjAY6)

    , @Jack D
    @gregor


    A huge disadvantage for them is that in many cases it takes very little counter-narrative to undo decades of indoctrination. It is that fragile.
     
    Who are you going to believe, me or your lying eyes?
  195. @Kaplan Turqweather
    @Senor Moose

    Indeed. Over half of Latinos favour immigration restriction and about a quarter favour Trump's wall.

    In the middle of this decade, an overlooked milestone was past; native-born Latinos surpassed immigrant Latinos and numbers...and they are converging with deplorable opinions fast. Ironically, this is most true where they are geographically concentrated.

    Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    The Alt-Right is a Latino/Persian/Lebanese/Italian/Coptic/Balkan/Hindu movement. Very intersectional!

  196. @Prester John
    @Hypnotoad666

    I would be shocked if Tucker WASN'T "familiar with Steve's work." Though obviously I can't prove this, I have long harbored the suspicion that he is under marching orders from management not to book Steve on his show under the theory that he may be too "lethal."

    And as a footnote, can't remember the last time Coulter was on Fox. Or, for that matter, Pat Buchanan.

    Replies: @Hail, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Hasn’t Steve said he has been invited on Tucker Carlson? But that his appearance(s) were cancelled at the last minute with the producer citing scheduling conflicts.

  197. Trump seems to be aware of Steve’s “Invade the World, Invite the World” formula. He said the following in his press conference this afternoon:

    We have spent $8 trillion on wars in the Middle East, never really wanting to win those wars. But after all that money was spent and all of those lives lost, the young men and women gravely wounded — so many — the Middle East is less safe, less stable, and less secure than before these conflicts began.

    The same people pushing for these wars are often the ones demanding America open its doors to unlimited migration from war-torn regions, importing the terrorism and the threat of terrorism right to our own shores. But not anymore. My administration understands that immigration security is national security.

  198. @gregor
    Marantz is lamenting that white gentiles now have more outlets to communicate with each other without being filtered through a handful of tribe-controlled media chokepoints. And no good can come of that!

    In the video below, ADL lady explains before Congress that having free speech on the internet is like a “non-stop white supremacist rally.” She’s not entirely wrong.

    A huge disadvantage for them is that in many cases it takes very little counter-narrative to undo decades of indoctrination. It is that fragile. At some point they will not even try to convince; they will just dare people to do anything about it.

    https://youtu.be/ZygphSaNd8U

    Replies: @Kaplan Turqweather, @Jack D

    Moral panics occur not when moral narratives are at their strongest and most confident (i.e. PC in the mid-1990s) but when they sense vulnerability.

    For example, the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in China was instigated by Map feeling personally threatened by a “bourgeois class” in his party. The same is true for what we may call the Great Intersectionalitarian Cultural Revolution (https://www.takimag.com/article/mao_and_again/#axzz5MpxmjAY6)

  199. Anonymous[113] • Disclaimer says:
    @Abe
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    Why not write this up into an article? You could title it something like ‘Immigration Reform: The Barbara Jordan Plan’.
     
    Marantz (the kind of guy whose entire existence, if he had come into this world as a slightly defective, sub-audiophile grade stereo receiver which then sat on Best Buy’s open box shelf for several months, could not have been any more of a net-negative to the universe than it has turned out now that he’s an elite East Coast journalist) shows the big shift in consensus among our Woke Elite regarding the role of the Internet: from decentralization to centralization, from the freedom of anonymity to the Newspeak-esque Total Monitoring is Freedom! From let a thousand (weird) flowers bloom, to track-target-and-destroy anything that does not totally conform to our wishes- think of the national conversation!

    So in addition to wanting my Clinton-era immigration reform back, I want my Clinton-era Internet!

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Saul Marantz, though Jewish, was a poor businessman who in trying to build the finest stereo equipment in the world went broke. The Scotsmen McIntosh and Gow made it work by building decent but not really lab grade equipment that measured well and looked impressive while tightly controlling build cost.

    I wonder if this sheep is related to Saul.

    • Replies: @donvonburg
    @Anonymous

    Saul Marantz was focused entirely on being thought of as building the best stereo equipment on earth and apparently was of modestly independent means, though not enormously wealthy. He put a lot of build cost in his equipment-early Marantz equipment used oil filled filter capacitors instead of electrolytics, and he had his own transformers wound inhouse using more expensive and harder to work with materials like square secondary wire. Later on he had to go to electrolytic caps, but they were "telco grade" ones that were considerably more expensive than the common ones. He also manufactured in New York City or immediately adjacent to it which even by then was marginally cost effective.

    marantz (he always used lower case in branding) equipment was profitable to build, but not terribly so. It was very expensive. His only real rival by 1957 or so was Southern Tier Upstate NY based McIntosh Laboratory, who had far lower overhead, and did in fact manufacture equipment that used engineering ingenuity over high build cost. At similar retail price points, McIntosh probably spent half the money in the actual materials and labor than Marantz did. McIntosh did, however, send a fair amount on advertising. Mc's ad campaign, like everything else at Mcintosh & Gow era McIntosh, was based on the principles of General Semantics as taught by "Count" Korzybski. it was innovative and effective.

    What killed Saul Marantz's company was a massive engineering effort to build the finest FM tuner in the industry. The marantz 10B was and is a legend, featuring industry leading RF performance and a built in small oscilloscope tube to display correct tuning and problems such as multipath. It was, however, way over budget, late to market, and the build cost was untenable.

    In retrospect Saul Marantz's error was he had a bunch of audio guys go all out on an RF design-kind of like asking heart surgeons to take out brain tumors or classical musicians to play improvisatory jazz. He should have hired a couple of top engineers from a top notch RF outfit of the day to do the front end, local oscillator and detector sections and let his guys do the power supply and audio output. The financials of the late 60s changes (the overall move to solid state was technically sweet for Marantz engineers Sid Smith and James Bongiorno, but a manufacturing and marketing failure) meant Marantz was to be sold to Superscope and soon became a Japanese brand.

    McIntosh by contrast hired a young engineer named Richard Modafferi. He was academically an RF engineer by training and an audio guy by avocation and he was also a pioneer in computational approaches to filter design. He wound up turning out the MR 78 tuner which is still the finest fully tuneable FM broadcast band receiver in the world. (It is outdone by crystallized single channel rebroadcast receivers, but not by much.)

    Replies: @Anonymous

  200. @Jack D
    @OilcanFloyd

    I think one of his son's wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world's worst parents. In his telling, they love the bottle a lot and don't really care (in any sense of the word) for their children. The kind of rich parents that ship their kids off to boarding school at the earliest possible opportunity and have the help raise them otherwise.

    Replies: @Art Deco, @OilcanFloyd, @kaganovitch

    I think one of his son’s wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world’s worst parents.

    The Buckleys only had the one child. Buckley himself grew up in a huge Irish catholic family where the older siblings contributed greatly to the raising of the younger ones. It is this among other things that made him unprepared to raise an only child in the post-war period. That being said, I thought Christopher’s book was simply disgraceful. Petty , mean-spirited and spiteful.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @kaganovitch

    I blame the mother more than the father but there really is a type of WASPY parent (including some Jews who LARP as WASPs) who "subcontract" as much of child care as possible because they see it as less important than the other stuff that they do or just because they would rather be drinking or playing golf or doing anything other than taking care of their own damn children. The British upper classes (whom the WASPs emulate) also did this. Going sailing and doing other fun activities when they are full grown adults doesn't count - kids need their parents (especially their mothers) when they are little and cranky and can't sleep, not when they are 24 and witty. This is (to me) a type of child abuse.

  201. @Alfa158
    @Joe Stalin

    I was in the Air Force when it was still equipped with the original M-16 that had the three
    prong bottle opener flash suppressor, non-chromed chamber, no forward bolt assist and the cartridge propellant Stoner told the military not to use. On a dust-free, dry firing range, using a freshly cleaned and lubed rifle you were lucky to get 100 rounds off in slow, semi-auto fire without having a failure to go into battery. I consoled myself that if I was in a situation in which a bunch of us nerdy Airmen was having to defend a base against an infantry assault, we would be hosed anyway. I can’t imagine being in the jungle firing off magazine after magazine and praying the thing would keep running while hot and contaminated.
    I know there have been a lot of improvements but it has left me with an irrational prejudice against the whole platform.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Joe Stalin

    No, you’re postjudiced, not prejudiced. And the M16 is not a true battle rifle. It is now a fine weapon for certain purposes but it’s not a FAL, or its contemporaries.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    @Anonymous

    If you want a "true battle rifle" i.e. full power military cartridge (e.g. 7.62x51mm) rather than the 5.56mm M16, then American capitalism has granted your wish for a contemporary of the 1950s vintage FAL - the Brownell's BRN-10. And unlike the EVIL AR-15, you will be able to buy "battle rifle" ammunition from Wal-Mart!

    And what a GREAT weapon it is:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a91nJOD31Lk

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_tjKISQs2c

    Look at how it handles against other "battle rifles":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pClJVKfFyY

  202. @Peterike
    @Art Deco

    “He provided Mr. Sobran with a salary for 21 years and his imprimatur allowed Sobran to land a syndicated column and a contract to produce radio commentaries.”

    And in return he got the most brilliant Conservative writer of his generation. No, the most brilliant political and cultural writer period.

    In a sane nation, Sobran would have been a national hero. There should be a holiday named after him.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco

    In a sane nation, Sobran would have been a national hero. There should be a holiday named after him.

    How about April 23 or 24? William Shakespeare’s birthday.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @Reg Cæsar

    What was the Earl of Oxford's birthday?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  203. @Prester John
    @Hypnotoad666

    I would be shocked if Tucker WASN'T "familiar with Steve's work." Though obviously I can't prove this, I have long harbored the suspicion that he is under marching orders from management not to book Steve on his show under the theory that he may be too "lethal."

    And as a footnote, can't remember the last time Coulter was on Fox. Or, for that matter, Pat Buchanan.

    Replies: @Hail, @Charles Erwin Wilson

    And as a footnote, can’t remember the last time Coulter was on Fox. Or, for that matter, Pat Buchanan.

    Ever since Lachlan took the helm Fox has been tacking Left.

  204. @Alfa158
    @Joe Stalin

    I was in the Air Force when it was still equipped with the original M-16 that had the three
    prong bottle opener flash suppressor, non-chromed chamber, no forward bolt assist and the cartridge propellant Stoner told the military not to use. On a dust-free, dry firing range, using a freshly cleaned and lubed rifle you were lucky to get 100 rounds off in slow, semi-auto fire without having a failure to go into battery. I consoled myself that if I was in a situation in which a bunch of us nerdy Airmen was having to defend a base against an infantry assault, we would be hosed anyway. I can’t imagine being in the jungle firing off magazine after magazine and praying the thing would keep running while hot and contaminated.
    I know there have been a lot of improvements but it has left me with an irrational prejudice against the whole platform.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Joe Stalin

    I saw some of the original USAF AR-15s when visiting an air show and they were used to guard an F-117 Nighthawk stealth bomber (No storage compartment in buttstock); personally, I’ve never encountered any stoppages with a Colt AR-15 SP1.

    The AR has been developed for almost 6 decades in the USA and is a mature platform. Just look at these videos made by Iraqveteran8888 on testing run of the mill ARs to destruction:

    Chris Bartoli of Small Arms Solutions is a former Colt employee and expert on the AR-15:

  205. @Reg Cæsar
    @Peterike


    In a sane nation, Sobran would have been a national hero. There should be a holiday named after him.
     
    How about April 23 or 24? William Shakespeare's birthday.

    Replies: @Hail

    What was the Earl of Oxford’s birthday?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Hail


    What was the Earl of Oxford’s birthday?

     

    Which one?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Oxford#List_of_title_holders

    The title is "dormant", but a descendant is carrying on the madness:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Beauclerk,_Earl_of_Burford


    If Beauvoir is pronounced "beaver", is Beauclerk pronounced "bugger"? It's sad that the old pronunciation of Pontefract is dying out.

    In deference to a sweet young lass I once knew who hailed from Burford, I will refrain from any cracks about her hometown.

  206. @gregor
    Marantz is lamenting that white gentiles now have more outlets to communicate with each other without being filtered through a handful of tribe-controlled media chokepoints. And no good can come of that!

    In the video below, ADL lady explains before Congress that having free speech on the internet is like a “non-stop white supremacist rally.” She’s not entirely wrong.

    A huge disadvantage for them is that in many cases it takes very little counter-narrative to undo decades of indoctrination. It is that fragile. At some point they will not even try to convince; they will just dare people to do anything about it.

    https://youtu.be/ZygphSaNd8U

    Replies: @Kaplan Turqweather, @Jack D

    A huge disadvantage for them is that in many cases it takes very little counter-narrative to undo decades of indoctrination. It is that fragile.

    Who are you going to believe, me or your lying eyes?

  207. @kaganovitch
    @Jack D

    I think one of his son’s wrote a book and Buckley and spouse come off as the world’s worst parents.

    The Buckleys only had the one child. Buckley himself grew up in a huge Irish catholic family where the older siblings contributed greatly to the raising of the younger ones. It is this among other things that made him unprepared to raise an only child in the post-war period. That being said, I thought Christopher's book was simply disgraceful. Petty , mean-spirited and spiteful.

    Replies: @Jack D

    I blame the mother more than the father but there really is a type of WASPY parent (including some Jews who LARP as WASPs) who “subcontract” as much of child care as possible because they see it as less important than the other stuff that they do or just because they would rather be drinking or playing golf or doing anything other than taking care of their own damn children. The British upper classes (whom the WASPs emulate) also did this. Going sailing and doing other fun activities when they are full grown adults doesn’t count – kids need their parents (especially their mothers) when they are little and cranky and can’t sleep, not when they are 24 and witty. This is (to me) a type of child abuse.

  208. @ChrisZ
    @kaganovitch

    It's not so far fetched that Steve could be adapted as a Marvel supervillain. One of his periodic subjects, T-N Coates, currently writes the "Captain America" comic book. If he doesn't know of Steve already (he *should* know of him, but he may be that dull), it's likely he'll learn about him from this Marantz book.

    Replies: @kaganovitch, @Harry Baldwin

    it’s likely he’ll learn about him from this Marantz book

    Ta Nehisi Coates doesn’t read books, he writes them!

  209. @Jack D

    Recall that the New York Times editorial board was also against amnesty as late as 2000, not switching until George W. Bush got to the left of them in 2001. Young Marantz’s naive assumption that immigration was always as sacrosanct in American politics as it’s treated today is due to the massive retconning by the left made politically feasible by Bush and Rove’s disastrous stratagem.
     
    Retconning is a consistent Dem strategy, made possible by the Left's young and low information (minority) voting base, who don't remember what happened yesterday (unless it's something like the death of St. Emmett Till or Redlining, which will be remembered forever). I'm not sure that many blacks even realize that Abraham Lincoln was a Republican and all those Confederate Generals whose statues they want torn down were all Democrats.

    Orwell predicted how retconning would work: "We have ALWAYS been at war with Eastasia".

    In the case of Democrats, not only are positions even 1mm to the right of this week's Overton Window forgotten (as to Democrats) they are also immoral and deplorable. Anyone who is against gay marriage is some kind of Bible thumpin cousin lovin (cousin lovin is bad and backward for hillbillies but vibrant and good for Muslims - in addition to retconning you also have cultural relativity) Jesus freak. What, you say that was Barack Obama's position until midway thru his 2nd term? Well, he "evolved" and you are a Neanderthal because you won't keep up.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @black sea

    What, you say that was Barack Obama’s position until midway thru his 2nd term?

    I think the left knew, as I knew, that Obama was always for gay marriage and anything else gays demanded, but he had to be coy about it for electoral purposes. I don’t think Obama has a sincere bone in his body, except when it comes to his racial resentments. Remember how he told us that in the unlikely event that Trump were to be elected, he would hand over power and do his best to ensure an orderly transition. He sounded nice as pie about the whole thing. He said that even as he knew his minions in the DOJ and CIA were actively sabotaging Trump.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    @Harry Baldwin


    I don’t think Obama has a sincere bone in his body, except when it comes to his racial resentments. Remember how he told us that in the unlikely event that Trump were to be elected, he would hand over power and do his best to ensure an orderly transition. He sounded nice as pie about the whole thing. He said that even as he knew his minions in the DOJ and CIA were actively sabotaging Trump.
     
    Could not agree more. As one observer (David Gelerntner?) described Obama, his so-called "principles" are like mind furniture -- unfixed and easily rearrangeable on any given day to fit the moment. Except for the racial resentment, which is the structure housing the moveable furniture.

    The only people I despise more than Obama are those who defend him to the hilt while knowing all t00 well what he was / is.

    Replies: @Art Deco

  210. the chapter about me (“The Sailer Strategy”) is folded in amidst interminable profiles of right-wing nutrition supplement hucksters like that Ape Brain guy

    Who is the the “Ape Brain guy”?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    @Anonymous


    Who is the the “Ape Brain guy”?
     
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61dDDVMD2bL.jpg
  211. anon[372] • Disclaimer says:
    @Arclight
    @istevefan

    Agreed - not historically literate enough to say for certain, but I'm not aware of any group that managed to get to the point at which it dominated science, politics, and art and then basically just rolled over and voluntarily gave it all away. Europeans and European-descended people are a shrinking share of the world's population in absolute numbers and in its traditional homelands and its elites are just fine with that.

    The percentage of whites voting for the Democrats declines year after year, although they are still the largest group numerically. At some point the continued erosion of white support for the party means it will be majority-minority, and not too long after I would expect a pretty significant share of the remaining white Democrats to leave for good. The question is whether this happens at a point at which the country's demographics have changed to the point that Democrats have a near unbreakable grip on the Senate and Executive. Not sure what happens if what is still the largest, best armed, and wealthiest group in a country wakes up and realizes it is politically disenfranchised, but it's nothing good.

    Replies: @anon

    I’m not aware of any group that managed to get to the point at which it dominated science, politics, and art and then basically just rolled over and voluntarily gave it all away.

    The Romans.
    Roman patricians complained bitterly when Christians took over the temples and the ancient pagan religion was outlawed and replaced. The patricians couldn’t believe they were losing their society to a bunch of cult idiots. Letters of the time sound like the ISteve blog today.
    The dominate majority had no will to fight for an old religion they no longer really believed in.
    The new cult fanatics were unstoppable.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @anon

    Persians probably felt the same about Muslim Arabs, Irish monks about vikings, Hindus about Persian/Afghan warlords, and everybody felt that way about Mongols. This isn't exceptional, it's normal, it's the people who make history being passively observed by the people who discuss it.

  212. @RichardTaylor
    Keep on hijacking, Steve! Our culture's never needed it more.

    Replies: @Frau Katze

    Never give in.

  213. @Jack D

    Recall that the New York Times editorial board was also against amnesty as late as 2000, not switching until George W. Bush got to the left of them in 2001. Young Marantz’s naive assumption that immigration was always as sacrosanct in American politics as it’s treated today is due to the massive retconning by the left made politically feasible by Bush and Rove’s disastrous stratagem.
     
    Retconning is a consistent Dem strategy, made possible by the Left's young and low information (minority) voting base, who don't remember what happened yesterday (unless it's something like the death of St. Emmett Till or Redlining, which will be remembered forever). I'm not sure that many blacks even realize that Abraham Lincoln was a Republican and all those Confederate Generals whose statues they want torn down were all Democrats.

    Orwell predicted how retconning would work: "We have ALWAYS been at war with Eastasia".

    In the case of Democrats, not only are positions even 1mm to the right of this week's Overton Window forgotten (as to Democrats) they are also immoral and deplorable. Anyone who is against gay marriage is some kind of Bible thumpin cousin lovin (cousin lovin is bad and backward for hillbillies but vibrant and good for Muslims - in addition to retconning you also have cultural relativity) Jesus freak. What, you say that was Barack Obama's position until midway thru his 2nd term? Well, he "evolved" and you are a Neanderthal because you won't keep up.

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin, @black sea

    the Left’s young and low information (minority) voting base, who don’t remember what happened yesterday (unless it’s something like the death of St. Emmett Till or Redlining . .
    . .

    I wonder what percentage of “low information” voters could recall the term “redlining,” or could somewhat accurately describe what it is, was, or is claimed to be.

  214. Marantz seems to accidentally let some truth leak out:

    He knew the mainstream counterarguments, which all seemed to boil down to the same thing: White people shouldn’t organize in their own interest, because that would be racist, and racism is bad.

  215. @Anonymous

    the chapter about me (“The Sailer Strategy”) is folded in amidst interminable profiles of right-wing nutrition supplement hucksters like that Ape Brain guy
     
    Who is the the "Ape Brain guy"?

    Replies: @MEH 0910

    Who is the the “Ape Brain guy”?

  216. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs/status/1186884127649390592

    https://twitter.com/ZoeHTodd/status/1186729742990479361

    https://twitter.com/ZoeHTodd/status/1186759285080035330

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    Zero Tolerance (full film) | FRONTLINE

    Premiered Oct 22, 2019
    FRONTLINE investigates how President Trump turned immigration into a powerful political weapon that fueled division and violence.

    The documentary goes inside the efforts of three political insurgents to tap into populist anger, transform the Republican Party and crack down on immigration.

  217. @guest
    @J.Ross

    Well now, it's possible to have no imperial intentions while maintaing your race should be superior at home. Maybe it wouldn't be an issue if there was only one kind of person in your country, but if you happen to have minority populations, or if your heritage population happens to be surrounded by superior numbers in certain subdivisions of your nation--as in the segregated South--then you're putting different groups in superior and inferior positions.

    But ya know, we still maintain legal and all sorts of other distinctions between children and adults, but no one thinks of themselves as and Adult Supremacist. Though technically that might be an accurate distinction.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    maintaining that your race should be superior at home

    Gibberish, there is nothing supremacist about accommodating one’s own constituents, that’s the basis of government, and we wouldn’t be defining it racially. Supremacism is locking a helot caste into an exploitative position, like the globalists want.

    • Replies: @guest
    @J.Ross

    You could accommodate your own kind and be supremacist on top of that without at all being imperialist or globalist. No, supremacism does not require helotism. Lincoln was a white supremacist, despite being anti-slavery. So were most people throughout American history.

  218. @anon
    @Arclight


    I’m not aware of any group that managed to get to the point at which it dominated science, politics, and art and then basically just rolled over and voluntarily gave it all away.
     
    The Romans.
    Roman patricians complained bitterly when Christians took over the temples and the ancient pagan religion was outlawed and replaced. The patricians couldn't believe they were losing their society to a bunch of cult idiots. Letters of the time sound like the ISteve blog today.
    The dominate majority had no will to fight for an old religion they no longer really believed in.
    The new cult fanatics were unstoppable.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Persians probably felt the same about Muslim Arabs, Irish monks about vikings, Hindus about Persian/Afghan warlords, and everybody felt that way about Mongols. This isn’t exceptional, it’s normal, it’s the people who make history being passively observed by the people who discuss it.

  219. @Harry Baldwin
    @Jack D

    What, you say that was Barack Obama’s position until midway thru his 2nd term?

    I think the left knew, as I knew, that Obama was always for gay marriage and anything else gays demanded, but he had to be coy about it for electoral purposes. I don't think Obama has a sincere bone in his body, except when it comes to his racial resentments. Remember how he told us that in the unlikely event that Trump were to be elected, he would hand over power and do his best to ensure an orderly transition. He sounded nice as pie about the whole thing. He said that even as he knew his minions in the DOJ and CIA were actively sabotaging Trump.

    Replies: @TTSSYF

    I don’t think Obama has a sincere bone in his body, except when it comes to his racial resentments. Remember how he told us that in the unlikely event that Trump were to be elected, he would hand over power and do his best to ensure an orderly transition. He sounded nice as pie about the whole thing. He said that even as he knew his minions in the DOJ and CIA were actively sabotaging Trump.

    Could not agree more. As one observer (David Gelerntner?) described Obama, his so-called “principles” are like mind furniture — unfixed and easily rearrangeable on any given day to fit the moment. Except for the racial resentment, which is the structure housing the moveable furniture.

    The only people I despise more than Obama are those who defend him to the hilt while knowing all t00 well what he was / is.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    @TTSSYF

    Could not agree more. As one observer (David Gelerntner?) described Obama, his so-called “principles” are like mind furniture — unfixed and easily rearrangeable on any given day to fit the moment. Except for the racial resentment, which is the structure housing the moveable furniture.

    That's a great simile.

    Not sure what the structure is, but my guess would be common vanity rather than racial resentment. It's tough to make sense of Obama; he seems manufactured.

  220. @J.Ross
    @guest

    maintaining that your race should be superior at home

    Gibberish, there is nothing supremacist about accommodating one's own constituents, that's the basis of government, and we wouldn't be defining it racially. Supremacism is locking a helot caste into an exploitative position, like the globalists want.

    Replies: @guest

    You could accommodate your own kind and be supremacist on top of that without at all being imperialist or globalist. No, supremacism does not require helotism. Lincoln was a white supremacist, despite being anti-slavery. So were most people throughout American history.

  221. @Jack Armstrong
    @Tex

    Sounds like ballot not bullet to me.

    Replies: @Tex

    Sounds like ballot not bullet to me.

    Sure, and Stalin was elected to his post as General Secretary by the Politburo. So I guess that makes it valid to say Trump is pretty similar to Hitler and Stalin.

  222. @Hail
    @Romanian

    Solution:

    Steve Sailer print editions.

    How many pages would all his VDare andn Takimag columns of the past take, if printed together in paper book form?

    How many pages would six months of blogging require? And how many extra pages if including all comments / selected comments? Maybe many of the blogposts don't need to be saved. A good editor's hand is called for.

    Replies: @ic1000

    > Steve Sailer print editions

    Steve has generated so much good stuff over the years that it would be editing rather than writing to produce Volume 1 (movie reviews), Volume 2 (affordable family formation), Volume 3 (resurgent anti-science progressivism), Volume 4 (golf course architecture). And so forth. Unfortunately, Steve clearly has an aversion to that kind of drudgery.

    • Replies: @Hail
    @ic1000


    > Steve Sailer print editions

    Steve has generated so much good stuff over the years that it would be editing rather than writing to produce Volume 1 (movie reviews), Volume 2 (affordable family formation), Volume 3 (resurgent anti-science progressivism), Volume 4 (golf course architecture). And so forth.
     

    I suggest someone at VDare do it.

    The search function at Unz here, once one gets comfortable with it, makes digging up old blog posts for each of those proposed compilation volumes, and more, much easier than the old days.

    I nominate Sailer's Bulldog, Mr. John Derbsyhire, for Foreword writer or the like.

    Please make this happen, someone. @VDare!

  223. @Dieter Kief
    @George

    Thanks, good interview. Lively Ann Coulter is impressive. 11:00 in when she talks about the average American vs. the Koch brothers and Gstaad and Davos and Wall St. on immigration - David Goddharts Anywheres vs. the (US-)Somewheres - that's very clear and spot on.

    (I imagine somebody joking: The closest a simulation of a female ever got to the impersonation of a bright and even charming human being. Her mind seems like trapped in this body, which is only there to make this energetic - southern, right? - mind happen...).

    Replies: @Autochthon

    No; not southern. Ann Coulter is from Connecticut, and very much of that culture in her manners, speech, etc.

    I understand entirely the subtleties are inscrutable to a German, just as I would doubtless never master the nuanced differences among Germany’s regions as well as you, so that’s quite alright.

    What’s more, since the southeastern F.U.S.A. has long been sociopolitically sensible in the face of lunacy from other regions, your guess is understandable. However, there is a particular strain of northeasterner, independent and self-sufficient rural (or urban, working class) Yankees, who are very much kindred to traditional southerners in many ways (though these are usually found more in places like New Hampshire and Maine than in Connecticut. Coulter is not representative of prevailing attitudes in her homeland much as Stephen Miller is unrepresentative of prevailing attitudes in Santa Barbara, especially among Jews….

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Autochthon

    Thanks.


    However, there is a particular strain of northeasterner, independent and self-sufficient rural (or urban, working class) Yankees, who are very much kindred to traditional southerners in many ways (though these are usually found more in places like New Hampshire and Maine than in Connecticut.
     
    That's what I was after! - How she at times makes words - sound broad. - Rural, down to earth but not dumb at all. Autonomous. And I only knew this attitude from Southerners - until now! - Except for that: If I vary my musings above about her I could also say: She looks and talks and - behaves even - like the perfect political animal.

    Btw. - she is hardly mentioned in the German press at all. - Maybe because she is a conservative woman - she does not fit in the narrative.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Autochthon


    No; not southern. Ann Coulter is from Connecticut, and very much of that culture in her manners, speech, etc.

     

    Her parents hail from Kentucky. She was born in New York City, but they were smart enough to move to Connecticut to avoid the state income tax. She may have attended Cornell to avoid the drinking age. (Westchester boy Loudon Wainwright III once sang, "I'm as old as the King of Sweden; I can drink in Connecticut...")

    However, there is a particular strain of northeasterner, independent and self-sufficient rural (or urban, working class) Yankees, who are very much kindred to traditional southerners in many ways (though these are usually found more in places like New Hampshire and Maine than in Connecticut
     
    The rural Yankees rebelled against FDR, as did rural New Yorkers, Pennsylvanians, and Jerseymen. It took a couple of elections before the Midwest's Germans did, but boy did they ever.

    More recently, a Southern poetess relocated to Maine admitted her new neighbors were just "hillbillies with different accents". I'm pretty sure she meant that as a compliment. The gun laws in northern New England were, until recently, as lax as anywhere in the English-speaking world. There was never any need to pass any. Implicit license for concealed is called the Vermont-style law for a reason.
  224. @Peterike
    @Art Deco

    “He provided Mr. Sobran with a salary for 21 years and his imprimatur allowed Sobran to land a syndicated column and a contract to produce radio commentaries.”

    And in return he got the most brilliant Conservative writer of his generation. No, the most brilliant political and cultural writer period.

    In a sane nation, Sobran would have been a national hero. There should be a holiday named after him.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Art Deco

    And in return he got the most brilliant Conservative writer of his generation. No, the most brilliant political and cultural writer period.

    What he got was a man who could write well. As a stylist, unusually elegant. He also had a knack in some cases for thinking of an angle to a story you didn’t. Alas, he was also a crank given to hopeless ineptitude in his mundane life. What Buckley provided for him for him was shelter. When he was outside of Buckley’s stable, his life fell apart pretty completely (in spite of the efforts of others to assist him in various ways). And we know this because people fond of Sobran personally and in his circle of friends have let slip with enough details of the course of his life between 1993 and 2010 for the rest of us to get the gist of it.

    In a sane nation, Sobran would have been a national hero. There should be a holiday named after him.

    Why would you make a hero out of a newspaper columnist?

  225. @Alfa158
    @OilcanFloyd

    I think that people like Marantz are both. However, he would do what he does even if neither is true. In his case his cultural inheritance compels him to savage at every opportunity the people who he identifies as his racial enemies. Additionally, as someone pointed out on this site, "journalists" in general today are nothing more than dogs who are rewarded for barking at the people their masters hate.

    Replies: @OilcanFloyd

    I can’t disagree.

  226. @TTSSYF
    @Harry Baldwin


    I don’t think Obama has a sincere bone in his body, except when it comes to his racial resentments. Remember how he told us that in the unlikely event that Trump were to be elected, he would hand over power and do his best to ensure an orderly transition. He sounded nice as pie about the whole thing. He said that even as he knew his minions in the DOJ and CIA were actively sabotaging Trump.
     
    Could not agree more. As one observer (David Gelerntner?) described Obama, his so-called "principles" are like mind furniture -- unfixed and easily rearrangeable on any given day to fit the moment. Except for the racial resentment, which is the structure housing the moveable furniture.

    The only people I despise more than Obama are those who defend him to the hilt while knowing all t00 well what he was / is.

    Replies: @Art Deco

    Could not agree more. As one observer (David Gelerntner?) described Obama, his so-called “principles” are like mind furniture — unfixed and easily rearrangeable on any given day to fit the moment. Except for the racial resentment, which is the structure housing the moveable furniture.

    That’s a great simile.

    Not sure what the structure is, but my guess would be common vanity rather than racial resentment. It’s tough to make sense of Obama; he seems manufactured.

  227. We’re having a conversation, so sit down and shut up.

  228. @Anonymous
    @Alfa158

    No, you’re postjudiced, not prejudiced. And the M16 is not a true battle rifle. It is now a fine weapon for certain purposes but it’s not a FAL, or its contemporaries.

    Replies: @Joe Stalin

    If you want a “true battle rifle” i.e. full power military cartridge (e.g. 7.62x51mm) rather than the 5.56mm M16, then American capitalism has granted your wish for a contemporary of the 1950s vintage FAL – the Brownell’s BRN-10. And unlike the EVIL AR-15, you will be able to buy “battle rifle” ammunition from Wal-Mart!

    And what a GREAT weapon it is:

    Look at how it handles against other “battle rifles”:

  229. …. Marantz means Orange in Yiddish.

    Perhaps from Spanish ?
    “Naranja”

  230. @Autochthon
    @Dieter Kief

    No; not southern. Ann Coulter is from Connecticut, and very much of that culture in her manners, speech, etc.

    I understand entirely the subtleties are inscrutable to a German, just as I would doubtless never master the nuanced differences among Germany's regions as well as you, so that's quite alright.

    What's more, since the southeastern F.U.S.A. has long been sociopolitically sensible in the face of lunacy from other regions, your guess is understandable. However, there is a particular strain of northeasterner, independent and self-sufficient rural (or urban, working class) Yankees, who are very much kindred to traditional southerners in many ways (though these are usually found more in places like New Hampshire and Maine than in Connecticut. Coulter is not representative of prevailing attitudes in her homeland much as Stephen Miller is unrepresentative of prevailing attitudes in Santa Barbara, especially among Jews....

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Reg Cæsar

    Thanks.

    However, there is a particular strain of northeasterner, independent and self-sufficient rural (or urban, working class) Yankees, who are very much kindred to traditional southerners in many ways (though these are usually found more in places like New Hampshire and Maine than in Connecticut.

    That’s what I was after! – How she at times makes words – sound broad. – Rural, down to earth but not dumb at all. Autonomous. And I only knew this attitude from Southerners – until now! – Except for that: If I vary my musings above about her I could also say: She looks and talks and – behaves even – like the perfect political animal.

    Btw. – she is hardly mentioned in the German press at all. – Maybe because she is a conservative woman – she does not fit in the narrative.

  231. @Hail
    @Reg Cæsar

    What was the Earl of Oxford's birthday?

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    What was the Earl of Oxford’s birthday?

    Which one?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Oxford#List_of_title_holders

    The title is “dormant”, but a descendant is carrying on the madness:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Beauclerk,_Earl_of_Burford

    If Beauvoir is pronounced “beaver”, is Beauclerk pronounced “bugger”? It’s sad that the old pronunciation of Pontefract is dying out.

    In deference to a sweet young lass I once knew who hailed from Burford, I will refrain from any cracks about her hometown.

  232. @Autochthon
    @Dieter Kief

    No; not southern. Ann Coulter is from Connecticut, and very much of that culture in her manners, speech, etc.

    I understand entirely the subtleties are inscrutable to a German, just as I would doubtless never master the nuanced differences among Germany's regions as well as you, so that's quite alright.

    What's more, since the southeastern F.U.S.A. has long been sociopolitically sensible in the face of lunacy from other regions, your guess is understandable. However, there is a particular strain of northeasterner, independent and self-sufficient rural (or urban, working class) Yankees, who are very much kindred to traditional southerners in many ways (though these are usually found more in places like New Hampshire and Maine than in Connecticut. Coulter is not representative of prevailing attitudes in her homeland much as Stephen Miller is unrepresentative of prevailing attitudes in Santa Barbara, especially among Jews....

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Reg Cæsar

    No; not southern. Ann Coulter is from Connecticut, and very much of that culture in her manners, speech, etc.

    Her parents hail from Kentucky. She was born in New York City, but they were smart enough to move to Connecticut to avoid the state income tax. She may have attended Cornell to avoid the drinking age. (Westchester boy Loudon Wainwright III once sang, “I’m as old as the King of Sweden; I can drink in Connecticut…”)

    However, there is a particular strain of northeasterner, independent and self-sufficient rural (or urban, working class) Yankees, who are very much kindred to traditional southerners in many ways (though these are usually found more in places like New Hampshire and Maine than in Connecticut

    The rural Yankees rebelled against FDR, as did rural New Yorkers, Pennsylvanians, and Jerseymen. It took a couple of elections before the Midwest’s Germans did, but boy did they ever.

    More recently, a Southern poetess relocated to Maine admitted her new neighbors were just “hillbillies with different accents”. I’m pretty sure she meant that as a compliment. The gun laws in northern New England were, until recently, as lax as anywhere in the English-speaking world. There was never any need to pass any. Implicit license for concealed is called the Vermont-style law for a reason.

  233. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs/status/1186884127649390592

    https://twitter.com/ZoeHTodd/status/1186729742990479361

    https://twitter.com/ZoeHTodd/status/1186759285080035330

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

    Zero Tolerance: Steven Bannon Interview | FRONTLINE

    Published on Oct 22, 2019
    Steve Bannon is a media executive and political strategist. He served as executive chairman of Breitbart News, as an adviser to Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and later as chief strategist in the Trump White House.

    Bannon’s candid, full interview was conducted with FRONTLINE during the making of the October 2019 documentary “Zero Tolerance.”

  234. @Intelligent Dasein

    Perhaps nobody talks about citizenism because citizenism is simply the default ideology of sensible, busy Americans, as open-borders advocate Bryan Caplan complains.
     
    That's the exact opposite of the truth. Nobody talks about citizenism because the idea of it hurts their heads.

    Like the Wilsonian 14 Points (which it somewhat resembles), citizenism presumes that people are capable of conducting their lives with an abstract principle held firmly before them, and that they will actually use that principle to make practical decisions. Even in the best case scenario, even in those rare, transient, and punch drunk periods of human history when idealistic thinking really does seem to dominate the public mood (the decades before and after the French Revolution, for instance), all that this conduces to in practice is endless bickering over what really is in the best interest of citizens, while popinjays step into the political vacuum and make a bloody mess of things.

    In reality, politics proceeds not from such intellectual considerations but from the murky and scarcely conscious recesses of the will, involving motives and actions that are difficult to describe analytically but which generally redound to the acquisition, maintenance, consolidation, and advancement of personal power. It was Machiavelli's great insight---much misunderstood and maligned as it is---that a good politician should therefore devote himself primarily to power and not to theory, that if he does this the rest will pretty much fall into place on its own; and that even if it doesn't, there wasn't anything he could have done about it anyway. Citizenism sounds like a good idea, but every ideology sounds like a good idea at the time. The problem with all of them is that men never have been and never will be capable of living according to theory.

    The same fatal flaw afflicts "White Nationalism," despite the WN's insistence that they are the hardcore realists in the Dissident Right spectrum. The whole notion of a white identity is a ideological construct, not a felt reality. The fiercest political divide in the West is between whites and other whites, namely between the top 20% oligarchic Globo-Homos and the formerly middle- and working-classes. Minorities are simply pawns in the political game and are of no weight on their own. The Globos want me dead and, to be honest, I want them dead. This is the gut-level stuff from whence springs politics. I feel no such animosity towards blacks as a group, however little I care for most of them. I strongly suspect that most normal people don't, either. Ethnic designations are usually not the sort of things that spur actionable political loves/hatreds. There are special conditions in which that occurs, but we do not live within them.

    At this point someone might be wondering, "If you don't like citizenism and you don't like white nationalism, what do you propose?" The same thing I've always proposed: economic realism backed up by force. Close the borders to both immigration and trade, destroy the financial class, eliminate welfare subsidies and punish the unproductive. Introduce hard currency and let the market set interest rates. Renormalize the income distribution. Nationalize all major industry but allow a very lightly regulated free market for small business. Eliminate Big Tech completely and turn Silicon Valley into a ghost town. Completely shut down electronic media; send the US Marshals to occupy Facebook's server farms and CNN headquarters if we must, but put them out of business. Stick Jeff Bezos' dripping head on the White House fence as a warning to never allow an abomination like Amazon to exist again. Withdraw the US military back within national borders and cut 90% of the Pentagon's budget. Criminalize student lending, eliminate three-quarters of all schools and universities, and start tracking students based on academic aptitude; anyone not in the top 10% gets sent to trade school or apprenticeship after 8th grade. Replace university credentialization with certified board exams for licensed professions.

    I can keep going, but I think you get my drift. We need a heavily dirigiste, caretaker government to bash the skulls of the oligarchs and incentivize the people to live within their means, while at the same time keeping the trains running and the lights on. We need to retool our economy and our culture for living in a managed decline, and the sooner we take heed of that reality the better.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief, @Old Palo Altan

    I agree with your last two paragraphs in the main, but have a question:

    does religion (the true one) play a part in your ideal state?

    Perhaps you have already answered me by calling your governemnt as here presented a caretaker one: perhaps, order once restored, religion will have a role, and even a normative one?

  235. does religion (the true one) play a part in your ideal state?

    Yes, it does. I would envisage something like factories with an attached chapel, on-sight worker housing and a school, a resident priest or two, communal prayers before shifts, an icon on the workroom floor…basically, a countryside dotted with a bunch of largely autonomous Wieliczkas (if not so fancy) performing diverse economic functions. There is no reason that a modern power plant or warehouse cannot also be a beautiful, theonomous space, honoring God and man. I have been thinking about this for quite some time, actually.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    @Intelligent Dasein

    I've only just seen ths, as your comment does not appear as a response to mine. Another example of the trouble you refer to above.
    I agree with your outline, but of course it is incmplete; the Church must also be an integral part of the State, and Throne and Altar must once again be inseparably united.

    I would also suggest that there should not be "one or two resident priests" but a collegial body, such that the liturgy will be performed daily in al its splendour. The priests should travel, perhaps in rotation, to the factories and other work places in the area, but return home each night to resfresh themselves spiritually. Nemo dat quod non habet, after all.

  236. @theMann
    @TTSSYF

    If the Democrats had raised an Army comprised of foreigners, and used it in an attempt to seize power, they would have been executed for treason. And there would have been no doubt of their guilt.

    How is raising an army of foriegners, injecting them into judiciously chosen states, and then overturning the legitimate results of elections any different? What the Democrats are doing is treason, the most despicable and vile treason imaginable. For the sake of winning a handful of Presidential elections, they have permanently damaged the social cohesion of our nation, and made Babel of our country. This is a crime for whose enormity they must be held accountable.

    Replies: @Charon, @AndrewR, @Corvinus

    “How is raising an army of foriegners, injecting them into judiciously chosen states, and then overturning the legitimate results of elections any different? What the Democrats are doing is treason, the most despicable and vile treason imaginable.”

    LOL, thanks for the false premise that a number of posters fell for. It’s so much easier just taking your silly statement as absolute truth without having to actually think about how irrational you sound.

    Now, does this “army of foreigners” include white Europeans who came to our great nation as immigrants? If yes, then you have to go back.

  237. @Matra
    I just looked up this Marantz guy on YouTube. What's even worse than his personal appearance is his voice. He's a grown man with American teenage girl vocal fry. I mean, seriously, is that now a thing in your country?

    Replies: @J.Ross, @sayless

    “Is that now a thing in your country?”

    Well it’s something we’re undergoing temporarily. Not long-term.

  238. Shorter version:

    Marantz is a Jewish minoritarian, believes white gentile peoples and nations have no right to exist and wants them destroyed, so finds your ho-hum citizenism … racist and extremist!

  239. @ic1000
    @Hail

    > Steve Sailer print editions

    Steve has generated so much good stuff over the years that it would be editing rather than writing to produce Volume 1 (movie reviews), Volume 2 (affordable family formation), Volume 3 (resurgent anti-science progressivism), Volume 4 (golf course architecture). And so forth. Unfortunately, Steve clearly has an aversion to that kind of drudgery.

    Replies: @Hail

    > Steve Sailer print editions

    Steve has generated so much good stuff over the years that it would be editing rather than writing to produce Volume 1 (movie reviews), Volume 2 (affordable family formation), Volume 3 (resurgent anti-science progressivism), Volume 4 (golf course architecture). And so forth.

    I suggest someone at VDare do it.

    The search function at Unz here, once one gets comfortable with it, makes digging up old blog posts for each of those proposed compilation volumes, and more, much easier than the old days.

    I nominate Sailer’s Bulldog, Mr. John Derbsyhire, for Foreword writer or the like.

    Please make this happen, someone. @VDare!

  240. @Anonymous
    @Abe

    Saul Marantz, though Jewish, was a poor businessman who in trying to build the finest stereo equipment in the world went broke. The Scotsmen McIntosh and Gow made it work by building decent but not really lab grade equipment that measured well and looked impressive while tightly controlling build cost.

    I wonder if this sheep is related to Saul.

    Replies: @donvonburg

    Saul Marantz was focused entirely on being thought of as building the best stereo equipment on earth and apparently was of modestly independent means, though not enormously wealthy. He put a lot of build cost in his equipment-early Marantz equipment used oil filled filter capacitors instead of electrolytics, and he had his own transformers wound inhouse using more expensive and harder to work with materials like square secondary wire. Later on he had to go to electrolytic caps, but they were “telco grade” ones that were considerably more expensive than the common ones. He also manufactured in New York City or immediately adjacent to it which even by then was marginally cost effective.

    marantz (he always used lower case in branding) equipment was profitable to build, but not terribly so. It was very expensive. His only real rival by 1957 or so was Southern Tier Upstate NY based McIntosh Laboratory, who had far lower overhead, and did in fact manufacture equipment that used engineering ingenuity over high build cost. At similar retail price points, McIntosh probably spent half the money in the actual materials and labor than Marantz did. McIntosh did, however, send a fair amount on advertising. Mc’s ad campaign, like everything else at Mcintosh & Gow era McIntosh, was based on the principles of General Semantics as taught by “Count” Korzybski. it was innovative and effective.

    What killed Saul Marantz’s company was a massive engineering effort to build the finest FM tuner in the industry. The marantz 10B was and is a legend, featuring industry leading RF performance and a built in small oscilloscope tube to display correct tuning and problems such as multipath. It was, however, way over budget, late to market, and the build cost was untenable.

    In retrospect Saul Marantz’s error was he had a bunch of audio guys go all out on an RF design-kind of like asking heart surgeons to take out brain tumors or classical musicians to play improvisatory jazz. He should have hired a couple of top engineers from a top notch RF outfit of the day to do the front end, local oscillator and detector sections and let his guys do the power supply and audio output. The financials of the late 60s changes (the overall move to solid state was technically sweet for Marantz engineers Sid Smith and James Bongiorno, but a manufacturing and marketing failure) meant Marantz was to be sold to Superscope and soon became a Japanese brand.

    McIntosh by contrast hired a young engineer named Richard Modafferi. He was academically an RF engineer by training and an audio guy by avocation and he was also a pioneer in computational approaches to filter design. He wound up turning out the MR 78 tuner which is still the finest fully tuneable FM broadcast band receiver in the world. (It is outdone by crystallized single channel rebroadcast receivers, but not by much.)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @donvonburg

    Mc stuff is built like Fender guitar amps. Marantz was built like telephone equipment of the day but prettier.

    In general Mc stuff is more reliable. Marantz arguably sounds better. But the people who claim it does think that old telephone company stuff sounds even better which is falsifiable just by preliminary lab work. Well, they may like that sound better, but it is demonstratedly not accurate. There was a reason so much of that stuff was junked.

    Orientals have bought up most all of that stuff and few Americans give a shit any more.

  241. Anonymous[113] • Disclaimer says:
    @donvonburg
    @Anonymous

    Saul Marantz was focused entirely on being thought of as building the best stereo equipment on earth and apparently was of modestly independent means, though not enormously wealthy. He put a lot of build cost in his equipment-early Marantz equipment used oil filled filter capacitors instead of electrolytics, and he had his own transformers wound inhouse using more expensive and harder to work with materials like square secondary wire. Later on he had to go to electrolytic caps, but they were "telco grade" ones that were considerably more expensive than the common ones. He also manufactured in New York City or immediately adjacent to it which even by then was marginally cost effective.

    marantz (he always used lower case in branding) equipment was profitable to build, but not terribly so. It was very expensive. His only real rival by 1957 or so was Southern Tier Upstate NY based McIntosh Laboratory, who had far lower overhead, and did in fact manufacture equipment that used engineering ingenuity over high build cost. At similar retail price points, McIntosh probably spent half the money in the actual materials and labor than Marantz did. McIntosh did, however, send a fair amount on advertising. Mc's ad campaign, like everything else at Mcintosh & Gow era McIntosh, was based on the principles of General Semantics as taught by "Count" Korzybski. it was innovative and effective.

    What killed Saul Marantz's company was a massive engineering effort to build the finest FM tuner in the industry. The marantz 10B was and is a legend, featuring industry leading RF performance and a built in small oscilloscope tube to display correct tuning and problems such as multipath. It was, however, way over budget, late to market, and the build cost was untenable.

    In retrospect Saul Marantz's error was he had a bunch of audio guys go all out on an RF design-kind of like asking heart surgeons to take out brain tumors or classical musicians to play improvisatory jazz. He should have hired a couple of top engineers from a top notch RF outfit of the day to do the front end, local oscillator and detector sections and let his guys do the power supply and audio output. The financials of the late 60s changes (the overall move to solid state was technically sweet for Marantz engineers Sid Smith and James Bongiorno, but a manufacturing and marketing failure) meant Marantz was to be sold to Superscope and soon became a Japanese brand.

    McIntosh by contrast hired a young engineer named Richard Modafferi. He was academically an RF engineer by training and an audio guy by avocation and he was also a pioneer in computational approaches to filter design. He wound up turning out the MR 78 tuner which is still the finest fully tuneable FM broadcast band receiver in the world. (It is outdone by crystallized single channel rebroadcast receivers, but not by much.)

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Mc stuff is built like Fender guitar amps. Marantz was built like telephone equipment of the day but prettier.

    In general Mc stuff is more reliable. Marantz arguably sounds better. But the people who claim it does think that old telephone company stuff sounds even better which is falsifiable just by preliminary lab work. Well, they may like that sound better, but it is demonstratedly not accurate. There was a reason so much of that stuff was junked.

    Orientals have bought up most all of that stuff and few Americans give a shit any more.

  242. @Intelligent Dasein

    does religion (the true one) play a part in your ideal state?
     
    Yes, it does. I would envisage something like factories with an attached chapel, on-sight worker housing and a school, a resident priest or two, communal prayers before shifts, an icon on the workroom floor...basically, a countryside dotted with a bunch of largely autonomous Wieliczkas (if not so fancy) performing diverse economic functions. There is no reason that a modern power plant or warehouse cannot also be a beautiful, theonomous space, honoring God and man. I have been thinking about this for quite some time, actually.

    Replies: @Old Palo Altan

    I’ve only just seen ths, as your comment does not appear as a response to mine. Another example of the trouble you refer to above.
    I agree with your outline, but of course it is incmplete; the Church must also be an integral part of the State, and Throne and Altar must once again be inseparably united.

    I would also suggest that there should not be “one or two resident priests” but a collegial body, such that the liturgy will be performed daily in al its splendour. The priests should travel, perhaps in rotation, to the factories and other work places in the area, but return home each night to resfresh themselves spiritually. Nemo dat quod non habet, after all.

  243. Sailer was the first to apply successfully market research technology to American politics. He discovered the family formation thing. I always wondered why he chose to be a public observer, a “noticer”, and never sold his talents to practicing politicians.

  244. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs/status/1186884127649390592

    https://twitter.com/ZoeHTodd/status/1186729742990479361

    https://twitter.com/ZoeHTodd/status/1186759285080035330

    Replies: @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910, @MEH 0910

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