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From my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

Build Back Dumber
Steve Sailer

November 18, 2020

With Moderna’s announcement on Monday of a second extremely effective vaccine (which reduces your chance of getting COVID by 18/19ths) to go along with Pfizer’s vaccine, we can now see a definite light at the end of the pandemic tunnel.

This will prove disappointing to many elites, who have enthusiastically latched onto the idea that the virus justifies “The Great Reset”: policies hyped to, as Joe Biden would say, “Build Back Better,” which, coincidentally, happen to be whatever they had already felt like doing to us beforehand.

For example, Time magazine’s Nov. 2, 2020, cover story “The Great Reset” includes a collection of featurettes by the Great and the Good explaining what they have in mind for us, which is mostly more of the same, only more so. …

I’m less worried that there is a carefully calculated master plan than that our elites are just making things up as they go along based on the latest Woke bad ideas.

Read the whole thing there.

By the way, I’ve long argued that a noteworthy real-life conspiracy is that the roots of the Obama Administration go back to a late 1980s plan by white Chicago Democrats (the Daleys, Rahm, the Pritzkers, etc.) to recruit classy blacks like Valerie Jarrett (who later hired Michelle Obama) as a front for tearing down near-Loop black housing projects and replacing them with upscale condos and retail for whites.

But nobody else seems much interested in my conspiracy theory, which I more or less adapted from a 2008 speech by Robert Fitch.

 
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  1. They had a lot of things in the idea mill, but because they thought it would take the proverbial twelve years to pull any of the off, nobody had put a game plan down to paper or bits. It’s as if the “leaders” of the Western a world watched China lock down its society and economy and said, “You can do that? Hey, hold my beer!”

  2. They had a lot of things in the idea mill, but because they thought it would take the proverbial twelve years to pull any of them off, nobody had put a game plan down to paper or bits. It’s as if the “leaders” of the Western a world watched China lock down its society and economy and said, “You can do that? Hey, hold my beer!”

  3. anon[502] • Disclaimer says:

    The idea of an oversupply of elites sort of connects to Gresham’s law. Too many elite-wannabes really aren’t competent enough to be elite, but, well, Daddy bought an elite education, so….

    Just as bad money drives out good, incompetent elites make it very difficult for competent people to become part of the elite. If it’s impossible then there may well be a Great Reset out there in the future, but it will involve the vast majority of elites becoming very much non elite, one way or another. In the process a whole lot of ordinary people may well get very much hurt.

  4. Gordo says:

    Similarly, tax revenues in most cities are way down, so various types of government employees are trying out arguments for why they are more indispensable than other government workers. Fearing the ax, social workers, for instance, have been trying to avoid budget cuts by contending they should go on more 911 calls and police officers on fewer.

    A point which I hadn’t really noticed, but I can see it now.

    I wonder what in their imaginations they would have done when called out to a strongly built violent overdosing psychotic criminal?

  5. Thought-provoking column, Steve.

    I think this is the key insight:

    But I think what is really going on is this:

    Elites never actually admitted to themselves that they were hypocritical. Instead, they just didn’t think about it. Inertia, not hypocrisy, ruled.

    That’s certainly plausible. And so is this:

    Fortunately, as Adam Smith pointed out, “There is a great deal of ruin in a nation.”

    Much in America is yet to be ruined, especially in fields where the Woke aren’t looking for sinecures, such as sewer systems.

    Here’s an analogy. The USA has been burning its accumulated cultural capital for quite some time now. But until 2020, that cultural bonfire’s been consuming the heavy beams tossed on way back in the 1960s. So nobody’s had to tend the fire much — until COVID. Suddenly today’s ‘elites’ can no longer sit back and warm themselves by the flames built up and fanned by their forbears’ commitment to cultural destruction. They’ve had to get up and go search for firewood of their own.

    The question is, how much of that cultural capital still remains for the burning.

  6. anon[312] • Disclaimer says:

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  7. @anon

    Freddie Freeman had a fairly bad case of the virus a few weeks before baseball season started but then had a career year and won the National League MVP award.

    On the other hand, not all of us are outstanding athletes in our thirties.

  8. OTish:

    White applicants are offered places to study for a PhD at a higher rate than black, Asian and ethnic minority candidates, data obtained by BBC Newsnight has found.

    The programme sent freedom of information requests to 133 UK universities, requesting data for the academic years between 2015 and 2020. Of the 62 universities which responded, all but one had a higher acceptance rate for white applicants.

    The data shows the imbalance was starkest for black applicants.

    A first-class or upper-second degree is normally required to go on to postgraduate research. A report by Universities UK shows that white undergraduate students are awarded higher grades in comparison to their black, Asian and minority ethnic peers.

    Former Education Secretary Damien Hinds spoke to BBC Newsnight about the degree attainment: “I think your research on PhDs is important and ground-breaking. What we were absolutely aware of was this gap in attainment at firsts and 2:1s. The Office for Students is focused on this, trying to identify what the blockage is.”

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-54934953

  9. Pericles says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The question is, how much of that cultural capital still remains for the burning.

    We might ask, what will America look like after a decade or two (sic) of the Biden Era. For starters, it looks like elections will be pro forma from here on. White culture will be replaced by … NBA, Sabado Gigante and petty bribes at the DMV? Complex, exquisite thought pieces on autoethnography in the NYT (mandatory). Strictly controlled media and internet.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    , @Jack D
  10. @anon

    Just as bad money drives out good, incompetent elites make it very difficult for competent people to become part of the elite.

    You don’t even have to be part of any elite at all. Take a glance at any government office as the numinous ones take over. It quickly becomes hell for anyone even remotely competent, not to mention the public who once upon a time were considered ‘customers’ to be served, as opposed to enemies to be ruined.

    If it’s impossible then there may well be a Great Reset out there in the future, but it will involve the vast majority of elites becoming very much non elite, one way or another. In the process a whole lot of ordinary people may well get very much hurt.

    There will probably also be some disadvantages to the scheme.

    • Replies: @guest007
    , @Svevlad
  11. The existing dumbness and mistakes and misfortunes have somehow to be dealt with. Since these aren’t the days of the miracles and wonders (1950 – 80) any longer, the regressive left has taken over and the (regressive indeed) prole drift (Ibram X. Kendi) is finding its way through the system destroying quite some past accomplishments.

    The good news is, that it is clearly not rocket science to look through these actual conundrums and see that there is indeed something quite destructive going on. Heck – even a humble guy like me checks that stuff. So – sursum corda! – Everything will eventually come back to normal, I’d like to guess.

    • Replies: @Gordo
    , @PhysicistDave
  12. Gordo says:
    @Dieter Kief

    The existing dumbness and mistakes and misfortunes have somehow to be dealt with. Since these aren’t the days of the miracles and wonders (1950 – 80) any longer, the regressive left has taken over and the (regressive indeed) prole drift (Ibram X. Kendi) is finding its way through the system destroying quite some past accomplishments.

    Let’s not delude ourselves that those like Kendi are anything but puppets.

    On wrong word on their part and they will be destroyed.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  13. The HBD world gets that there is an anti-White religion afoot (actually been around a long time). But the vibe is that they only care because it disrupts better social engineering, policy and statecraft.

    That is, they don’t feel for the Whites. They’re just frustrated that all this wokeness gets in the way of better management. It leaves one with a chill. A world with no real loyalty or fellow-feeling is a horrifying world.

    It would be like living in a family that was “rational” and basically did the right things, but had no real feeling for the children. One shudders to think what would happen if one day, the rational self-interested calculation was to drop the kids off at an orphanage.

  14. @The Last Real Calvinist

    My apologies for the multiple posting; I was getting the CloudFlare page, and thought there was no way my comment had gone through.

  15. If You Voted for Joe Biden, You Ain’t White!

    • Agree: Old Prude
  16. In American Greatness, Theodore Roosevelt Malloch wrote that originally, Davos was set up to get people would invest in Switzerland. It just gradually became what it is today.
    The Great Reset, in large part, seems to be driven by Let’s All Live Just As Miserable As People In The World’s Most Expensive Cities. Us meaning the rabble that didn’t go to the right schools, and from the right families.

  17. @Gordo

    Maybe you could kill two birds with one stone by sending out Ibram X Kendi instead of the social worker.

  18. @Henry's Cat

    awarded higher grades

    Whenever it’s white students, good grades are “awarded” not earned. Got it.

    • Replies: @res
  19. Anonymous[864] • Disclaimer says:

    Meanwhile, is it possible for a locked down city to be driven collectively mad?

    And in the case of New York, how can you tell?

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Known Fact
  20. Anon55uu says:

    It sometimes comes up in mainstream media, often with an annoying “executive feminist” spin, but Davos is also known for attracting – like many such conferences – large numbers of high class prostitutes who operate beside the main program. Whether this is mainly for blackmail purposes, or simply a “side benefit” is not clear.

  21. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Seems like we were down for an hour this time. Wonder who offended whom.

    Whenever this happens I think about how one day it may be permanent.

    And I think that the doomsday clock has lately inched closer to midnight.

  22. Old Prude says:

    Steve, your Chicago conspiracy is probably right. The only reason nowadays people conspire is to score a lot of dough, or become a celebrity, from which the dough flows. There seems no longer a Will to Power. Think of Trump this last weekend: He masses his people in the streets of the capital, and instead of firing them to action, he waves and goes off to play golf. He already has what he wants: Celebriity and money. That was all the presidency was to him apparently.

    And all the other deep state actors are just trying to keep their snouts in the trough. They don’t care about an over-arching agenda, or getting any more power than they need to keep their sinecures and pensions.

    Sure there are a handful of sociopaths who like power, but all the other money-suckers aren’t going to let them have enough power to derail the gravy train. (Sorry for all the mixed metaphors. The gravy-train runs through the trough delivering dough.)

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    , @Marat
  23. utu says:

    “Amongst all the controversial figures of the first half of the 20th century, one man stands out – as allegedly a quadruple agent, a lord of Freemasonry, a Catholic Jew, a clandestine communist and a persevering Polish patriot. But despite being involved in many pivotal events, you won’t find Józef Retinger’s name in most history books.”
    https://culture.pl/en/article/the-most-mysterious-man-in-20th-century-politics

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  24. Mike Tre says:

    “With Moderna’s announcement on Monday of a second extremely effective vaccine (which reduces your chance of getting COVID by 18/19ths) to go along with Pfizer’s vaccine, we can now see a definite light at the end of the pandemic tunnel.”

    Yeah well, here in Illinois, our disgustingly obese governor has mandated an additional “not a lock down” lock down to commence November 20th.

    What makes anyone think these oligarchs are going to relinquish the power that we the people have so easily granted them?

  25. @utu

    I never heard of Jozef Retinger until a few months ago, so I wanted to slip his name in something.

    He’s a little bit like Father Rothschild, the Jesuit conspirator in Evelyn Waugh’s 1930 satire “Vile Bodies.” But Retinger spent much of the 1920s in Mexico, so I doubt if Waugh met in 1920s London. On the other hand, Retinger had been the London agent of Polish nationalists before WWI and hung out in literary circles (he was a friend of Joseph Conrad). So maybe Waugh heard about him from his father or something. Or maybe there is no connection at all.

    Then Retinger was chief of staff in London for Sikorski’s Polish government in exile during WWII and that’s when he became extremely well connected with Churchill and Roosevelt. An interesting figure, but one who is rather forgotten in the English-speaking world.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @utu
    , @Luke Lea
  26. bjdubbs says:

    Steve is obviously pro-SAT but there’s reason to believe that massing all of the smart people in a few universities has had a lot of bad effects, including a supreme court that draws from two universities and an increasingly remote elite. Maybe America needs more elite talent emergin from places like UVA and Ohio State instead. Countries like Canada and UK do fine with the equivalent of AP course grades substituting for SATs. Eliminating the SAT would also make elite lacrosse competition less cut-throat because grades would begin to matter more.

  27. bjdubbs says:

    Steve is obviously pro-SAT but there’s reason to believe that massing all of the smart people in a few universities has had a lot of bad effects, including a supreme court that draws from two universities and an increasingly remote elite. Maybe America needs more elite talent emerging from places like UVA and Ohio State instead. Countries like Canada and UK do fine with the equivalent of AP course grades substituting for SATs. And maybe elite lacrosse competition would be less cutthroat if the top schools weren’t as prestigious.

    • Replies: @rebel yell
  28. @The Last Real Calvinist

    It’s not just cultural. It’s roads, manufacturing, mechanical engineering, nuclear engineering, houses, hospitals, ….

  29. Tyrade says:

    I’ve been screaming, a lot less eloquently than Mr Sailer, for years about the growth-destruction involved in all this progressive self harm. It’s getting so obvious that I can now see what must happen; just as SAT scores are simply not recorded (hide the race dispersion), so ‘GDP’ as we knew it will be ‘enhanced’ then replaced by some woollier measure of ‘happiness’ (where ‘diversity’ and ‘equality’ score highest; well-being now a racist concept).

    I worked for a prof in the mid 1970s who subsequently devised a ranking of ‘happiness’ (Richard Layard). This is now almost institutionalised. Here’s the 7th annual report!

    https://worldhappiness.report/ed/2019/

    Feel the wool !

    • Replies: @Kronos
  30. Tyrade says:
    @Henry's Cat

    Henry’s Cat: the BBC is BLM central. There’s an ‘imbalance’ in blacks even getting on the starting line for higher education slots because they disproportionately do not pass muster.

  31. @Dieter Kief

    Dieter Kief wrote

    :The good news is, that it is clearly not rocket science to look through these actual conundrums and see that there is indeed something quite destructive going on. Heck – even a humble guy like me checks that stuff. So – sursum corda! – Everything will eventually come back to normal, I’d like to guess.

    People are afraid, very, very afraid.

    A few months back, my daughter suggested in an online chat for a campus club that a prof at her university did not intend to do anything wrong when he read MLK’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” as written — i.e., he pronounced the “N-word” where King wrote it, warning the class ahead of time that he would do so.

    Not only was she hounded out of the club, but so also was a guy who disagreed with her but tried to defend her right to express her opinion.

    Yeah, it was just a stupid college club, but Americans feel the same way now about losing their jobs or their entire careers with one word that is not PC.

    Yes, Dieter, you do not have to be a rocket scientist to see that it is all nonsense, but in much of the USA people are afraid to say so out loud. I myself worry about expressing my opinions to most of my neighbors, and no one has ever accused me of being shy in expressing my opinions!

  32. unit472 says:

    I suspect “The Great Reset” will be more like the Great Reranking for what constitutes an elite college. The reason Harvard and Stanford became that was because their student body was as elite as their faculties. If Berkeley and Yale become more like Oakland and New Haven in terms of the type of people one runs into on campus the elite will choose to send their kids to Dartmouth or Pepperdine. Colleges, like prime real estate will be about location, location, location. Schools located in ‘Woke’ run lawless jurisdictions will lose out to those located in safe well run communities.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    , @guest007
  33. bomag says:
    @Henry's Cat

    The Office for Students is focused on this…

    I suppose they once had other duties: improving dining hall food; campus safety; better lighting in the libraries; more.

    Must be a social law that every institution eventually becomes obsessed with race.

  34. LondonBob says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Trump has been in fine form since Covid too, as Ferdinand Ossendowski remarked, nature destroys the weak, but helps the strong.

    Remarkable they view now despised grifter Tony Blair, and the ridiculed Harry and Meghan, as experts whose opinions are worth considering. The elite really are bluffing it.

    • Agree: unit472
  35. With Moderna’s announcement on Monday of a second extremely effective vaccine…we can now see a definite light at the end of the pandemic tunnel

    LOL. … No.

    Social distancing, masks still necessary after getting COVID-19 vaccine says Fauci | New York Post

    extremely effective vaccine (which reduces your chance of getting COVID by 18/19ths)

    No. As long as there is a small percentage of people who don’t get the vaccine they ruin it for everyone and the vaccine is 0% effective. That’s why they need to be mandatory.

    • Replies: @TheTrumanShow
  36. As well as the tens of thousands civilian dead to come, one thing I remind my mates so glad at the demise of Trump is, as you said, he was a peace-monger, what’s to come now?

    At least we don’t have to be on some newscast between prime time news stories with our family being slaughtered by the CIA which the media will portray as at the hands of designated hate nation.

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
  37. Art Deco says:

    as a front for tearing down near-Loop black housing projects and replacing them with upscale condos and retail for whites.

    The only housing provided by governments or state-affiliated corporations should be institutional in character – prison cells, barracks and other garrison housing, berths in asylums, state college dormitories, &c. Housing is a commodity frequently replenished wherein consumption is sensitive to taste in amenities. The same is true of groceries and the services provided by public utilities. These are not problem markets where the quality of the product is occult or where households have to suffer unpredictable spikes in expenditure. If you are concerned about the real incomes of the people who are the sort who might live in public housing, you can enact an earned-income subsidy. Households will allocate the additional increment of income according to their own preference architecture. You let them deal with their (private) landlords on their own. Which means all public housing projects go on the auction bloc and you don’t build any more of them.

  38. @Pat Hannagan

    On a separate note, whats with the government of South Australia closing down the state on such a paltry pretext?

    She goes for her medical
    She’s passed, its’ a miracle
    She’s up over the moon
    She whistles nonsense tunes
    She wants drinks for everyone
    She’s found a chord that she can strum
    Emotions peaking out
    Her paints all over town.
    What’s that she’s playing?
    Annie get your gun
    What’s that she’s taking
    The song has to be sung
    She’s gone electric
    Annie wipe them out
    That’s unexpected
    Strum that thing and shout
    Don’t pull that trigger
    Annie get your gun

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  39. @Steve Sailer

    Freddie Freeman had a fairly bad case of the virus

    Sure he did.

    On the night of July 3, his fever jumped to 104.5 degrees, and he nearly went to the hospital.

    Oh, dear. A FEVER. And he NEARLY went to the hospital.

    “…I said a little prayer that night, ‘Please don’t take me.’ wasn’t ready.”

    LOL. This Covid s**** is just retarded. Upvote this post if you have had a FEVER more than 5 times in your life.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  40. AndrewR says:
    @Pericles

    Sábado Gigante beats half of American TV.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    , @James O'Meara
  41. AndrewR says:
    @Gordo

    Asked him to give his own lived experience of the cishet white patriarchy holding him down.

  42. AndrewR says:
    @Gordo

    I wouldn’t say “destroyed.” Black privilege involves much more immunity to harsh consequences after saying un-PC things about women, transgenderism, race or the JQ. At worst, they’re quietly shelved and replaced with less rebellious black puppets.

  43. @Hippopotamusdrome

    104.5 is pretty high.

    Freddie Freeman, the baseball National League’s 2020 Most Valuable Player, is a guy who stands in to 100 mph fastballs. COVID in July had him worried.

  44. @Pat Hannagan

    This Squeeze song is about Annie Lennox, right?

    • Replies: @Pat Hannagan
  45. @PhysicistDave

    … but Americans feel the same way now about losing their jobs or their entire careers with one word that is not PC.

    I don’t think the inward was originally a slur, but rather the way “negro” was pronounced in tidewater colonies. It was the behavior we associate with Them that turned it into a slur, namely the poor impulse control, the spontaneous violence and the inability to understand morals due to the inability to engage in abstract thought.

    Starting with the big lie “Black is Beautiful” we have not been allowed to tell the truth.* PC means “believe our lies or we will ruin you.”

    I think it is important to find ways to tell the truth. Relay FBI statistics, the results of IQ tests and any other data that demonstrates the immutable inability to partake of civilization. Do not be afraid to say “it is okay to be white.”

    Tell the truth. It’s our right as guaranteed by the First Amendment, and anyone who says otherwise is un-American.

    *To be clear, black is ugly and whenever I see the facial characteristics common to MLK and Michelle Obama, I see a wild animal in human disguise.

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  46. IHTG says:
    @RichardTaylor

    White ain’t no country I ever heard of. They speak English in White?

    • LOL: Gary in Gramercy
    • Replies: @Pierre de Craon
  47. @Steve Sailer

    Difford said that he did not know what the song was about and was “not sure [he] care[s] about it very much either”. He concluded, “It’s not a great song, but a good vocal performance”.[4] The Los Angeles Times described the song as being “about the boisterous pleasures of rocking out”.[5]

    Played that to my boy on the way to his pre-apprenticeship carpentry course yesterday and we both ended up rocking out.

    As a sort of riposte encapsulation of the morning’s trip (NSW is the only state in Astralia to not have succumbed to coronavius hysteria) we played this

    • Replies: @ganderson
  48. It’s a strange thing how tabloids like the New York Post and the Daily Mail often have some of the most courageous editorials, but it’s a thing nonetheless.

    https://nypost.com/2020/11/17/leaks-and-lies-as-the-military-tries-to-undermine-president-trump/

  49. Anonymous[353] • Disclaimer says:
    @RichardTaylor

    Excellent point. Sailer expresses no loyalty to his ethnic group.

  50. bomag says:

    …will we continue to Build Back Dumber?

    I often think of our elites as cult leaders.

    On one hand, they fuss about food and personal safety for their minions: must maintain the flock!

    On the other hand, they like to dish out lots of flesh mortification for the thrill of ruling, and for establishing status challenges among the minions.

    Alas, cult leaders are prone to walling themselves away from feedback from the minions; and the whole enterprise can drift into a holiness death spiral.

    Purple kool-aid hovers over the horizon.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  51. Coemgen says:

    Well, where there’s smoke; there’s fire.

    How do we explain the fervor for demographic replacement of white natives of western countries the past six decades? Isn’t “invade the world; invite the world” just another way of saying “divide and conquer?”

    How do we explain “news” sources in the U.S. one by one turning into unrelenting propagandists for the Democrat Party?

    How do we explain this sequence of events?
    1. Crossfire Hurricane
    2. Mueller Special Counsel
    3. Impeachment
    4. Pandemic

    Aren’t there such things as megalomania and asymmetric warfare?

  52. I’m less worried that there is a carefully calculated master plan than that our elites are just making things up as they go along based on the latest Woke bad ideas.

    Hmmm, I don’t know which is worse. I agree with your leanings toward the latter, though. Your small-scale conspiracy theories are likely accurate, IMO. There aren’t as many pieces to fall into place and as many people to keep mum, as in these grandiose, sometimes century-long theories. (That’s not to say there’s nothing to some of them either.)

    As usual, I’m looking forward to reading your Takimag column. I only go there for your stuff on Wednesdays, but I need to catch up on Jim Goad’s stuff and a few other guys’.

  53. @The Alarmist

    This non-existent virus is one of Mencken’s hobgoblins:

    “The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by an endless series of hobgoblins, most of them imaginary.”

    We compliant idjits owe the future an apology: https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/11/bretigne-shaffer/letter-to-my-grandchildren-from-inside-a-cult/

    This very great reset – which is thoroughly in progress, and succeeding – is backed by technology undreamt of by oligarchs past.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  54. J.Ross says:
    @Steve Sailer

    A positive Covid test is an unquestionable week or two off at a time when the elite have decided that nobody should ever get a non-holiday day off. The former head of research for Pfizer said that this second wave was baccalaureate science resulting from over-testing with a bad test.
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2020/11/joseph-mercola/why-covid-19-testing-is-a-tragic-waste/

    Dr. Mike Yeadon, former vice president and scientific director of Pfizer, has even gone on record stating1 that false positive results from unreliable PCR tests are being used to “manufacture a ‘second wave’ based on ‘new cases,’” when in fact a second wave is highly unlikely.

    • Replies: @European-American
  55. ganderson says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Our modern elites are completely uninterested in roads, sewers, water systems, plowing, the power grid (unless it’s solar or wind), in short, the things that make modern life possible.

    Of all the woke plans for us, the war on fossil fuels is going to do the most damage.

    I’ve made this point often, but the old big city machines, the Daleys etc, were corrupt as hell, but understood the things that made a city run. The modern big city pols don’t give a shit- hell most of them are not corrupt in the old fashioned sense- i don’t think Jacob Frey’s in it for the graft- he just likes imposing his stupid agenda.

    • Agree: Alden, Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Ben tillman
  56. Jtgw says:

    So we just speculated that Pfizer delayed testing in order not to boost Trump before election, but if TPTB really wanted to keep the crisis going through the next administration couldn’t they find a way to make the vaccines look less promising?

    • Replies: @Anon7
    , @Travis
    , @By-tor
  57. ganderson says:
    @Pat Hannagan

    I have a Swedish version of this GREAT song : Slå Mej Med Din Rytmenpinne by the great, if unheard of outside Scandinavia, Aston Reymers Rivaler.

    “…In the wilds of Borneo
    And the vineyards of Bordeaux
    Eskimo, Arapaho
    Move their body to and fro.
    Hit me with your rhythm stick.
    Hit me! Hit me!
    Das ist gut! C’est fantastique!
    Hit me! hit me! hit me!
    Hit me with your rhythm stick.
    It’s nice to be a lunatic.
    Hit me! Hit me! Hit me!

    Loved Ian Dury- quite a clever bastard… lucky bleeder…

    Are we still allowed to say ‘Eskimo’?

  58. Walsh2 says:

    To dovetail off your conspiracy theory re: Chicago housing –

    Affirmative Fair Housing Act Chinese style:

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-migration-rural-return-xi-economy-11605632518

    Dollars to donuts they’ll cite the “entrepreneurs and innovators” language when they start moving “urbanites” into the burbs and beyond.

  59. Anon7 says:
    @Jtgw

    F***ing science. You just can’t count on science and scientists. If bureaucratic restraints are removed, sometimes progress can be made. I blame Trump.

    OTOH, in Michigan, reliance on mathematical models once again determines public policy. Governor Whitmer recently referenced a model that says that Michigan will suffer 1,000 fatalities per week till next summer if we don’t stay in our houses wearing masks. And so that’s the basis for state government policy.

  60. Pericles says:
    @AndrewR

    OK, so I guess it won’t be all bad.

    • LOL: bomag
  61. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer

    You are not going to convince the “it’s just the flu, bro” guys with facts and figures. There are guys (for some reason it’s always guys) who keep saying this up until their last breath before the Covid kills them.

    People are really really lousy about assessing risks, especially relatively small risks. If I ask you whether you would prefer 1 free roll of toilet paper or 10 free rolls you have no problem understanding that 10 is a lot better. Even a two year old would prefer a pile of 10 stuffed animals. But if I ask you to distinguish between say a 1% risk and a 0.1% risk, our brains can’t really process that. You can process it on a rational level but not really on an emotional one where we make our actual decisions.

    People also tend to overestimate their own skills/strength – EVERYONE thinks that they are “above average drivers”. Covid is going to kill the OTHER guy, not them. When your mechanism for assessing risk is imperfect, you will make irrational decisions – you’ll drive to the airport without wearing your seatbelt and while smoking a cigarette but get really worried about getting on the plane.

  62. Anon[168] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “ Retinger spent much of the 1920s in Mexico, ”

    But naturally. The 20s was the time of a ferocious attempt by the government to quash Christianity in Mexico. Still, a government that sent socialist painters to Rockefeller in NY. American capitalists heavily funded our better artists at the time, one of which, Diego Rivera, later was Trotsky’s ambassador to Lázaro Cárdenas so Trotsky could exile in Mexico City. No doubt demise was “ironed” in an Anglo-Mexican lodge.

    MEXICO City’s arguably most expensive avenue, developed in the 1940s, is quaintly named after one of freemasonry’s greatest exploits, namely the breakup of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The name is “Masaryk Avenue”.

    Regular folk in MEXICO neither know nor care about Tomas Masaryk. The surrounding streets are named after well known English and French writers.

    • Replies: @utu
  63. Travis says:
    @Jtgw

    They still want make money from their investment. If they downplayed the results the other vaccine makers would make all the money.

    eventually the pandemic mongering needs to end to avoid tremendous economic and political disruptions. Eventually printing billions of dollars of fiat money each day will have consequences. Our government has been buying $100 billion dollars worth of bonds each month this year. The fed balance sheet will soon exceed $5 Trillion , more than all the bonds owned by China, Japan and Europe combined. The Biden administration plans on raising taxes, increasing regulations, expanding medicare and medicaid. Amnesty will encourage million more to enter the US just as Biden allows aliens to obtain free government healthcare. Already 75 million Americans are on Medicaid and another 55 million are on Medicaid. By 2022 150 million Americans will be on a government health insurance plan and another 20 million aliens. SAT testing will be at the bottom of our concerns after amnesty is passed.

    • Replies: @Jtgw
  64. Jack D says:
    @RichardTaylor

    No, people are being rational because all white people are not really your “family” and white people have never behaved as if all white people were each other’s family. Your family is your family. Even in the days when America was mostly white, rich whites did not treat poor whites as family, Protestants didn’t think of Catholics as family, Northerners didn’t think of Southerners as family, city people didn’t think of country people as family and so on. In the UK with its class system, it was even worse even though everyone was 100% white.

    The natural tendency of status seeking humans is to kick the people who are just below you on the ladder because they pose the greatest threat. Expressing solidarity with people who pose no social threat to you is much easier because they are not in competition with you for status.

    People who belong to beleaguered minorities will sometimes think of each other as family as a protective mechanism but that is a sign of weakness, not strength. If white people start thinking that way, it will only be because they have themselves become a beleaguered minority.

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonymous
  65. Jack D says:
    @Pericles

    For starters, it looks like elections will be pro forma from here on.

    Don’t be so sure. Democrats keep thinking that the Millenium is coming but somehow it never quite seems to arrive. After the lash comes the backlash. The more Wokeness we get in the next two years, the bigger the Democrat losses will be in the 2022 election. There are plenty of Democrats in marginal seats who barely hung on this time and two more years of rising crime and “Defund the Police” would be the end for them. The “Liberals” of the 1960s permanently destroyed the “Liberal” brand and today’s “Progressives” are likely to do the same for themselves.

  66. Charon says:
    @Jack D

    There are guys (for some reason it’s always guys)

    Because guys, on average, are vastly less neurotic than girls. Or jews for that matter.

  67. utu says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Some referred to him as devil’s little cousin. A connection to Waugh via Conrad makes sense.

    A very smart and talented man but I can’t help thinking of Greene’s Our Man in Havana, le Carré’s Tailor of Panama, Gogol’s Government Inspector, Zuckmayer’s Captain of Köpenick, Kosinski’s Chauncey Gardiner and Dolega-Mostowicz’s Nicodemus Dyzma. What was real and what was fiction in his life? In the end all his connections to the powerful people were real but what if it was all born out of mystification and happy circumstance. A common belief in powerful but hidden forces of Freemasons and Jews and secret organizations creates a great opportunity for a very smart conman. And in the end a made up fictitious conspiracy can turn out to be quite real like in the Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @James O'Meara
  68. utu says:
    @Jack D

    “People are really really lousy about assessing risks..” – I do not think this is about risk assessment. A psychological need to negate some aspect of reality is first and the faulty risk assessment comes later as rationalization. The question is where does this need come from and what is its function.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  69. rebunga says:

    Its all about the devaluation of our institutions. Like when a hedge fund buys a heritage USA tool brand and then has all the tools made in China.

    Journalism has totally sold out. I have been thinking that the huge 60% swing to Biden in the Pennsylvania mail-in ballots has got to be the political science story of the century. Nearly a 40% swing in Michigan. Way more than similar states, and determinative of the presidential race. How did this get pulled off? Nobody in the press seems to care much . . . . . I guess they determined that its “not news.”

  70. The man made plague-lite was just their test on submissiveness. We passed, or flunked, depending on your eternal freedom needs. As for their master plan, it is more likely grand daddy’s master plan. The III is only as capable as the brainy minions around him. Maybe we should be celebrating his current embrace of wokeness over meritocracy. You know things are about to fall apart for the one percenters when the elite genuinely fear bright people. The sad thing the fall apart is going to impact all of us in a bad way. I’m a pessimist so I am thinking Bronze age like fall apart.

  71. @anon

    There is an UNDERsupply of elites.

    • Replies: @anon
  72. Anon[168] • Disclaimer says:
    @utu

    I’ve mentioned before here at Unz’s.. to grasp how much a man can network and facilitate, a very useful book is Henry Wickham Steed’s Memoirs.

    Big networks (say, freemasonry and YPO) can chug along because everybody can benefit materially from them. You could ignite them for a cause at key points: a certain negotiation, a war, etc. A bit like how ONGs are ignited and turned off to effect political change, say student protests in Chile 2020 to write a new Constitution (not sure it’s Soros, just an example) or Catalonia referendum (Soros) or Polish abortion (Soros) or BLM. But, unlike ONGs, these secretive networks cannot go public with their political agendas.

    A sect has three key components:
    a) charismatic leader
    b) methods of indoctrination and control
    c) exploitative —sexual or $$. Here’s a good insight https://quillette.com/2020/10/26/podcast-119-cult-expert-and-deprogrammer-rick-ross-on-nxivm-founder-keith-raniere-and-the-many-tactics-cults-use-to-exploit-the-unwary/

    A secretive society could look like this:
    a) an ideology with political objectives
    b) methods of indoctrination & control: status network, privileged info, oaths or personal disclosures, specific socialization
    c) occasionally exploitative: favors must be returned

    Sects evolve around the life-arc of the founder, often becoming more radical. It makes sense that secretive societies evolve according to the political reality around them. Unelected high profile power structures like the WEF perhaps wouldn’t have been possible when Bilderberg was created. One has to question if their is a continuity of aims, of vision, so to speak, with older secret societies.

    • Replies: @utu
  73. Thomas says:

    If anybody out there is seeking some career advice for these times, I have some: become a turnaround expert. Meaning: someone who is adept at fixing the past screw ups of unqualified, over-promoted and incompetent people who got the project wrong the first time. A world that has thrown away rational qualifications, pretends that competence is equally distributed, and has grand dreams of rebuilding everything in this image is going to wind up with a lot of stuff flying off the rails. It’ll need actually competent people to come in after the fact to fix, contain the damage, find a way out for the client, and do so quickly and discreetly. Such people won’t lack for work in the coming years, and they’ll be in a position to charge an arm and a leg.

    There are plenty of opportunities. You’re best advised to find a niche where specialized expertise is required but it isn’t obvious that it’s required, so a good many unqualified generalists come in not knowing what they’re doing. There’s no shortage of fields where this is going to be required. Plumbers and carpenters will have to fix the last guy’s screwy work. Programmers will have to unscramble old code nobody knows how to maintain anymore. Lawyers will have to rescue botched lawsuits coming up fast on deadlines. Analysts will have to pick through spreadsheets to figure out what the heck the last guy was doing. Whatever you’re doing, just find out where the hairpin turns are that people wipe out on, and set yourself up there to clean up the wrecks.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  74. This from Canada… They have a plan… Looks the same as what every one in the US has been saying.

    READ THIS and prepare for what is about to go down ..
    This letter is from a Committee member within the liberal party of Canada with the strategic planning committee which is steered by the PMO. Roughly 30% of the liberal party did not want to go along with this plan that was handed down to them from basically ” the powers that be ‘ however they were told that regardless of what they say , the plans will go ahead. And it goes as follows >>
    Faze in secondary lock down restrictions on a rolling basis starting with major metropolitan areas first and expanding outward expected by late November 2020. Rush the acquisition of or construction of isolation facilities across every province and territory expected by December 2020. Daily new cases of Covd 19 will surge beyond capacity of testing including increases in covid related deaths following the same growth course expected by the end of November 2020. Complete and total secondary lock down much stricter then the first and second rolling faze restrictions expected by the end of December early 2021 . Reform the expansion of the unemployment program to be transitioned into the universal basic income program expected by quarter one 2021 . Projected covid 19 mutation and orco-infection with secondary virus referred to as covid 21 leading to a third wave with much higher mortality rate and higher rate of infection expected by Feb 2021. Daily new cases of Covid 21 hospitalizations and covid 19 and covid 21 related deaths will exceed medical facility capacities expected by quarter first of quarter 2 of february 2021 .
    Enhanced lock down restrictions referred to as third lock down will be implemented .Full travel restrictions will be imposed including inter province and inter city expected by quarter two 2021 .Transitioning of individuals into the universal basic income program expected mid quarter two 2021 . Projected supply chain breakdowns in inventory storage large economic instability all expected late second quarter 2021 . Deployment of military personnel into major metropolitan areas as well as all major roadways to establish travel check points restrict travel and movement providing logistical support to the area expected by third quarter 2021. Along with that provided road map the strategic planning committee was asked to design an effective way of transitioning Canadians to meet an unprecedented economic endeavour one that would change the face of Canada and forever alter the lives of Canadians . A total debt relief offer is in place called the world debt reset program in exchange for acceptance of this total debt forgiveness the individual will forfeit ownership of any and all property and assets FOREVER . The individual would also have to agree to partake in the covid 19 covid 21 vaccination schedule which will provide the individual with unrestricted travel and unrestricted living even under a full lock down through the use of a photo identification referred to as Canadas health pass . Committee members asked what would happen to those that refuse to participate in the world debt reset program or the vaccination schedule. The answer was very troubling .They were told it was their duty to make sure they come up with a plan that would never happen they were also told it would be in the individuals best interest to participate . Those who refuse would first live under the lock down
    restrictions INDEFINITELY and over a short period of time as more Canadians transition into the debt forgiveness program the ones that refuse to participate would be deemed a public safety risk and would be relocated into isolation facilities .Once in those facilities they would be given 2 options participate in the program and be released or stay indefinitely in the isolation facility under the classification of a serious public health risk and have all your assets seized . They were also told the whole agenda will move forward no matter who agrees with it or not.
    From the Liberal Party at The PMO of Canada October 22/2020

  75. neutral says:
    @Jack D

    It is not killing the average person, not even close. It does not even kill the OTHER guy, the irrational thing here is the total hysteria of something that kills a fraction of a fraction of the population.

  76. Alfa158 says:
    @Jack D

    It’s assumed there is always a backlash because there was before, but that doesn’t mean there will continue to be, or that the backlash won’t be smothered by greater forces. Patterns of history don’t always repeat. Consider:

    The percentage of White voters will be shrinking with every future election, and in any event, many of those White voters are the young millennials I know who have the BLM signs prominently displayed on their properties, rather than aging Maga-people.

    The Biden-Harris administrations will put the pedal to the metal on enfranchising natural Democrats such as felons and immigrants, and immigration will go back to the usual 2-3 million people a year, 75% of who eventually vote D.

    Easily harvested and/or falsified mail-in ballots will likely be the norm for all future elections.

    Dissident political opinions are going to be increasingly suppressed.

    So I’m not as sanguine as some about the pendulum swinging. Every pendulum stops sooner or later, and it is possible that the 2022 elections will look like a replay of 2020. The 2020 election was a backlash but it got smothered anyway.

    I think it’s more likely we will slowly slide over the decades into a Brazil Norte society with effectively a single party system like California. Perhaps in decades a socialist party rises to become the new alternative to the global capitalist Democratic Party.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  77. @PhysicistDave

    Is that what those knights in Holy Grail were on about? The Knights Who Say Ni——?

    It is beyond belief that anyone actually thinks there’s something wrong with pronouncing the word.

    • LOL: El Dato, Escher
    • Replies: @Joseph Doaks
  78. The WEF Great Reset has posted some of the dumbest word salad ever written:

    Welcome to 2030. I own nothing, have no privacy, and life has never been better

    Once in awhile, I will choose to cook for myself. It is easy – the necessary kitchen equipment is delivered at my door within minutes. Since transport became free, we stopped having all those things stuffed into our home. Why keep a pasta-maker and a crepe cooker crammed into our cupboards? We can just order them when we need them.

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/shopping-i-can-t-really-remember-what-that-is/

    Needless to say, the author is a textbook Eloi airhead:

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/authors/ida-auken

    I would not shed a single tear if the Morlocks took her.

  79. @Jack D

    That “pro forma elections” part bears reiterating, as so many seem to rush giddily ahead to the prospect of Democrats getting punished in the “next” election, as though they weren’t supposed to get punished in the current one.

    Heck, downticket they did take some punishment, or at least saw their “wave” broken with impunity. But with each “election” they’ll get better about that . . .

  80. More word salad trash from the WEF:

    2030: the rise of compassion, or a world of warships and walls?

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/refugees-in-2030

    In particular, Syria is likely no longer to loom so large. Perhaps many of today’s Syrian refugees will be back home, rebuilding. Many will have made successes of themselves in the West – they’ll be CEOs, often employing fellow Syrians, as refugee businesses have always done. So, if Syrian refugee flows continue in 2030, Syrian-run businesses will help mitigate the problem.

    The best part:

    By 2030, I hope the Arab world will be taking its fair share of Muslim refugees; with the new administration in the United States, this has become even more urgent as a moral imperative.

    Translation: “I am the dumbest bitch on Earth”

  81. Pericles says:
    @Jack D

    What if anything can or will be done about the shameless electoral skullduggery?

  82. Travis says:
    @RichardTaylor

    True enough. Whites do no see being white as the core of their identity. While Blacks see Blackness as the center of their being, the most important aspect of their being. The most important aspect of their lives is being Black. Our education system teaches them that they are poor because of racism. They are incarcerated because of racism….etc.. We encourage every ethnic group to be proud of their heritage while indoctrinating whites that all the problems in the world are caused by whites.

    The promoters of HBD have almost no concern for the drug epidemic which is effecting far more white families than the whites effected by affirmative action at our elite institutions. 50,000 whites are dying each year from drugs. Yet at the Unz Review they are more concerned with Black homicides increasing from 8,000 deaths to 9,000 deaths this year, while drug deaths are on track to increase from 72,000 last year to 77,000 this year (a record high). Since Trump was elected President 200,000 whites have overdosed on drugs, at an average age of 37 while 150,000 whites have died of COVID, at an average age of 79. Everyone here is more concerned with the elderly losing a few years of life than the youths who are losing their entire lives to drugs.

    The whites here are upset because it is getting harder for their middle class kids to get into elite colleges. Most whites do not have this concern, since most white children will not attend college at all. It seems that most upper class whites are actually glad that so many whites are dying from drugs and alcohol. Most hear will respond that they deserve to die, and we should have no sympathy for the families losing members to drugs and booze. Serves them right. They deserve it…

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Hangnail Hans
  83. @Old Prude

    He masses his people in the streets of the capital, and instead of firing them to action, he waves and goes off to play golf.

    What should he have done? Incited them to riot?

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  84. All that talk of The Great Reset and the World Economic Forum and the name Klaus Schwab doesn’t even get mentioned?

  85. Dumbo says:

    There’s no “hidden conspiracy”. Billionaires and world leaders keep telling us over and over very much in the open what they want and how.

    But now we must believe that they “just make things up as they go along”.

    Sure.

    So the 1965 immigration act was passed without anyone thinking about its consequences 50 years later.

    And in Europe about the same time, many countries started bringing lots of immigrants, but that was also just a coincidence, or something not well thought up in advance.

    Now the whole Western world “locks down” and goes into hysteria mode and destroys the living of millions of people because of a disease that has a 1% death rate, but, it’s just that they didn’t think about it so well…

    The accidental death of a black criminal high on all kinds of drugs is transformed into a major international event and is used to promote riots all over (even in Finland!), but, somehow, the elites didn’t really want this, it was unplanned, “they just didn’t think about it”.

    Sure. If it helps you sleep at night.

  86. By-tor says:
    @Jtgw

    I think the EU-US oligarchy decided that a year would be sufficient to implement the Certificate Of Vaccination ID program that was formally rolled out in 2019. Trump has been standing in their way in the USA which they knew would be the most difficult population to subdue. There is still the question of the 350-plus million firearms in the hands of private citizens inside the US an obstacle that the EU elite class solved decades ago.

  87. Jack D says:
    @utu

    “Denial ain’t just a river in Egypt.”

    Denial as a psychological defense mechanism plays a big part but there are other elements. For example, in fear of flying denial doesn’t really play a big role. Rather that fear is usually more rooted in loss of control and lack of familiarity. Driving your old jalopy to the airport may be 100x more dangerous than flying on a full sized commercial jet flown by a major US carrier, but if you are driving yourself you feel as if you are in control – you do that every day and you haven’t died yet. Putting your life in the hands of strangers seems much more risky even if those strangers are highly experienced professional pilots flying a rigorously maintained aircraft.

  88. guest007 says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    The problem is many is that they defended an incompetent president and his administration while worrying about non-whites being incompetent.

    Also, why have those on the right began to worry about the rules after four yeas of an administration that basically ignored to rules.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  89. @Jack D

    But if I ask you to distinguish between say a 1% risk and a 0.1% risk, our brains can’t really process that. You can process it on a rational level but not really on an emotional one where we make our actual decisions.

    Fuck it. If going out and living my life kills me, so be it.

    Yes, there is a risk that I might contract this virus. But there’s also a risk that I might get plastered by a truck when I cross the street. There’s a risk that I might choke on a piece of lettuce when I eat a salad. There’s a risk that I might develop a skin lesion when I walk down the sidewalk in the boiling sun.

    You cannot live your life without being able to accept a certain amount of risk. I know that I’m taking a risk every time I leave the house. I accept any and all consequences that might flow from my behavior.

    I have been taking public transportation nearly every day throughout this entire crisis, including the period where my county was posting the highest number of new cases in the entire world. I have been eating at restaurants ever since they reopened. I have been shopping in stores.

    I wear a mask only when it is absolutely necessary.

    I feel fine.

    After all this time, I still don’t know a single person who’s contracted this stupid virus. (Yes, I know it’s not a hoax.) I do know tons of people who’ve lost their jobs because of it, and I know tons of people whose lives have been ruined by the lockdowns.

    Yes, yes, yes, millions of people have contracted COVID-19 and hundreds of thousands of people have died. But, quite frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  90. Jack D says:
    @Alfa158

    I think that in the long run you are right and the US will become more like California. California always seems to be in the vanguard of trends. However, in the long run we are all dead. I don’t have the feeling that the tipping point is going to be in the next 2 to 4 years. Maybe not even in the next 10 or 20.

    BTW, California is not the paradise that it once was, but neither is it exactly Brazil. If America’s fate is to be like California today (except without the nice weather) this is not the worst fate in the world.

    • Replies: @Travis
  91. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    You are not going to convince the “it’s just the flu, bro” guys with facts and figures. There are guys (for some reason it’s always guys) who keep saying this up until their last breath before the Covid kills them.

    If they’re under the age of 50, it’s highly unlikely to kill them. The ratio of COVID to non-COVID deaths since last March are as follows for the following age segments:

    Under 25: 0.01
    25-34: 0.032
    35-44: 0.062
    45-54: 0.097
    55-: =.11

    Note, the ratio of influenza and pneumonia deaths to all other deaths in a typical year is about 0.025.

  92. Mr. Anon says:

    Not surprisingly, in social scientist Richard Rosenfeld’s study of twenty cities, homicides are up 53 percent during the George Floyd Mourning Process of June–August vs. the same months last year. It’s almost as if the ruling class is making bad decisions.

    This presupposes that the ruling class is discomfitted by crime and urban decay. Or that they care about what happens to lower and middle-class people. They don’t.

    The very rich don’t even live in the same World as the rest of us. Their wealth provides them a World-within-a-World that is always clean, safe, and orderly. They don’t have to live in and amongst drug-dealers, car-jackers, and derelicts defecating on the street.

    You misunderstand the global overclass, Steve, if you think that your grading of their performance is anything they would even remotely care about. They care only about power – their own power – what happens to the hoi-polloi is of no concern to them.

    And the “Great Reset” has been in the works for some time. It used to be called “The New World Order” – remember that? The current bio-security hysteria has been in the works for twenty years; it is just now coming into fruition.

    You think vaccines will put an end to it? The vaccines are the start of it. They will become routine and mandatory. Maybe they’ll add lithium or thorazine to them as well. Don’t laugh – such things have been suggested – for your own good of course. Digital cash and UBI will allow them to impose a social credit system. It’s not like these are the paranoid rantings of Alex Jones – the WEF and allied organizations are openly talking about all of this, i.e., they are preparing people to accept them.

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    , @dfordoom
  93. Svevlad says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    Government offices are the unholy combination of competent-but-evil “elites” who can only work good when someone is breathing down their neck, and total subhuman dumbasses who can’t figure out how to start a computer.

    The end result is a shitshow, of course, and the two work together to keep out outsiders so they aren’t threatened, because their actual competence level demands that the only job they ever have is cleaning septic tanks bare handed

  94. res says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    It looks like the multiple posting was cleaned up. That’s unusual.

    Two practices I recommend here.
    1. Always do a Ctrl-A Ctrl-C to copy all contents before submitting any non-trivial comments.
    2. If anything abnormal happens and you don’t see your comment then open the post in another tab (or even better another browser) and see if it is there.

    An important additional point is there has been a bug with first comments not being posted (is it still around?). If you don’t see ANY comments hold off on reposting until some appear.

  95. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jack D

    You are not going to convince the “it’s just the flu, bro” guys with facts and figures. There are guys (for some reason it’s always guys) who keep saying this up until their last breath before the Covid kills them.

    That is a strawman, at least for anyone posting here. We have not argued “it’s just the flu” – as in the seasonal flu. We have argued “it’s just the Asian Flu” – as in a viral pandemic of the kind that happen every fifty years or so.

    As pandemics go, this one is not out of the ordinary. It hasn’t been any worse than the Asian Flu, all things considered. And yet the response to it has been unprecedented. More than unprecedented – completely stark-raving bat-s**t insane. One can argue about why that is – there are many possible reasons.

  96. El Dato says:
    @Henry's Cat

    The Office for Students is focused on this

    Bringing concentrated Woke IQ of maybe 180 (in toto) to bear on this massive problem.

    “what the blockage is”

    It’s called blacks.

    I can understand why these people fear “eugenics”. Or nuclear power stations for that matter.

  97. res says:
    @Mike Pierson, Davenport Rector, Midfielder

    It is amazing how telling subtleties of language can be. The “awarded” vs. “earned” distinction is a particularly good example in many areas. I think many people really do believe once they have been “awarded” a grade that immediately bestows all the good things which are supposed to follow. For example, a good job. And the ability to do it. The latter is of course much more difficult to “award” (and important) than the former.

    Whites getting higher undergraduate grades than Asians is interesting. I wonder if it is due to Asians taking harder classes there. I am always amused by discussion using college grades as a metric which fail to account for course difficultly.

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    , @Rob
  98. anon[359] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ben tillman

    There is an UNDERsupply of elites.

    No True Elite!

  99. El Dato says:

    Similarly, tax revenues in most cities are way down, so various types of government employees are trying out arguments for why they are more indispensable than other government workers.

    About that:

    NY Governor Cuomo set to get $25k pay rise despite massive budget deficit

    “We don’t have a shovel big enough to dig out of [the deficit]. It’s the biggest number in history. We need help from Washington,” the governor said on Tuesday.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  100. res says:
    @Art Deco

    55-: =.11

    Do you have a finer grained breakdown for the over 55 group? Is the calculation yours or is there a source?

    Here is another way of looking at this.
    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6942e2.htm

    From January 26, 2020, through October 3, 2020, an estimated 299,028 more persons than expected have died in the United States.** Excess deaths reached their highest points to date during the weeks ending April 11 (40.4% excess) and August 8, 2020 (23.5% excess) (Figure 1). Two thirds of excess deaths during the analysis period (66.2%; 198,081) were attributed to COVID-19 and the remaining third to other causes†† (Figure 1).

    The total number of excess deaths (deaths above average levels) from January 26 through October 3 ranged from a low of approximately 841 in the youngest age group (<25 years) to a high of 94,646 among adults aged 75–84 years.§§ However, the average percentage change in deaths over this period compared with previous years was largest for adults aged 25–44 years (26.5%) (Figure 2). Overall, numbers of deaths among persons aged <25 years were 2.0% below average,¶¶ and among adults aged 45–64, 65–74 years, 75–84, and ≥85 years were 14.4%, 24.1%, 21.5%, and 14.7% above average, respectively.

    When examined by race and ethnicity, the total numbers of excess deaths during the analysis period ranged from a low of approximately 3,412 among AI/AN persons to a high of 171,491 among White persons. For White persons, deaths were 11.9% higher when compared to average numbers during 2015–2019. However, some racial and ethnic subgroups experienced disproportionately higher percentage increases in deaths (Figure 3). Specifically, the average percentage increase over this period was largest for Hispanic persons (53.6%). Deaths were 28.9% above average for AI/AN persons, 32.9% above average for Black persons, 34.6% above average for those of other or unknown race or ethnicity, and 36.6% above average for Asian persons.

    Notice that the relationship becomes U shaped once you get past 75.

    • Thanks: European-American
  101. @res

    Whites getting higher undergraduate grades than Asians is interesting.

    Asians in Britain skew more toward South Asia than East Asia. But there may be other factors in play. Only ~30% of white students (post-age 18) presently go on to higher education, lower than for blacks or Asians, so those who do go are more likely to be ones who more academically able, motivated, etc.

    • Agree: Rob McX
  102. Yep. The comforting thing is that the Smart Set is Not That Smart.

    If they were smart, they would come up with fresh new ideas.

  103. Old Prude says:
    @Jack D

    I’ve seen the facts and figures. It’s just the flu, bro. Diaper up. It’s done SO much good.

  104. El Dato says:
    @Thomas

    The guy you are looking for:

    Also deals in removal of problematic leftovers from last night’s house-defense event.

    Programmers will have to unscramble old code nobody knows how to maintain anymore.

    There recently was an article in the tech-crazed IEEE Spectrum:

    Inside the Hidden World of Legacy IT Systems: How and why we spend trillions to keep old software going

    It’s gonna blow.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the debilitating consequences of relying on antiquated IT systems for essential services. Unfortunately, that dependence, along with legacy IT’s enormous and increasing costs, will still be with us long after the pandemic has ended. For the U.S. government alone, even a concerted and well-executed effort would take decades to replace the thousands of existing legacy systems. Over that time, current IT systems will also become legacy and themselves require replacement. Given the budgetary impacts of the pandemic, even less money for legacy system modernization may be available in the future across all government sectors.

    Which brings us to another article in the same zine on a completely different topic:

    Turing Award for Computer Scientists: More Inclusiveness Needed by Chai K. Toh

    From the complete list of past winners, one can observe the lack of ethnic diversity. Few winners are Asians and no recipients are of African or Hispanic descent. Most of the winners are male and they are from university rather than industry. Geographically, most winners are from the United States.

    This immediately aroused my curiosity. Does this mean that computer scientists from other countries are less capable in the field of computer science than those in the United States? Why are there no winners from countries such as Brazil and Japan? And why are there so few female winners? Although we are seeking more diversity in winners, one should never compromise or lower the standards required to win the award.

    Good.

  105. Kronos says:
    @Tyrade

    More like steel wool. How about some lemon juice to help wash my eyes out afterwords?

  106. @Jack D

    The more Wokeness we get in the next two years, the bigger the Democrat losses will be in the 2022 election.

    I absolutely love your optimism, but there’s one thing I learned in the time I spent in the investments business.

    There’s a ‘reversion to the mean” and then there’s the setting of “the new mean.”

    And “the new mean” can be very very good, but often it is very very bad.

    The left in this country has been inexorably shifting ever more leftward. And Conquest’s second law of politics still applies so all the momentum is with them. Even liberals who espouse “liberal” quasi sensible values are going to be swept along in the tide and they will rationalize the transformation all the way down.

    The cultural institutions are totally converged. And businesses that aren’t explicitly left win already, like the social media behemoths, will go along with the convergence because, well, they don’t want to alienate ANY customers.

    And the demographics are all with the left.

    There will never be another Harry Truman or Skip Jackson or even Bill Clinton Democratic leader again. Biden’s the stalking horse. He’s simply a useful anachronism for the revolution they all have in mind. The totaliariatan impulse — whether soft, hard, or somewhere in between — is simply too delicious for their sensibility.

    The major consideration for a lot of people will be, “How do I avoid being cancelled?”

    The left will laud the new “vibrant” society, but like most leftist, the irony of how “non-vibrant” the social and body politic has become will be totally lost on them.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @bomag
  107. @bjdubbs

    Steve is obviously pro-SAT but there’s reason to believe that massing all of the smart people in a few universities has had a lot of bad effects, including a supreme court that draws from two universities and an increasingly remote elite. Maybe America needs more elite talent emerging from places like UVA and Ohio State instead.

    Agree – if Affirmative Action dumbs down the Ivies that is a beneficial side-effect of the poison.
    Smart students rejected by the Ivies going to State U is also good. The smart students will still end up running the productive machinery of society after graduation, and it is good if they rub shoulders with Deplorables at State U during their formative years.
    It’s a sad comment when our best hope for the future is that our current leaders are too stupid to succeed in their intentions.

    • Replies: @Alice
  108. Travis says:
    @Jack D

    we will be fortunate to end up like California. The US would be a much better place if we were just 6% Black. Current CA demographics are better than than the Average state, which is 14% Black.

    The census projects that our Black population will climb to 50 million over the next decade, as the white population declines to 192 million. The ratio of whites to blacks is the most important demographic.

    Year — whites -Blacks- ratio
    1970 – 177 M – 22 M – 8 to 1
    2000- 192 M – 34 M – 6 to 1
    2030 – 191 M – 50 M – 4 to 1

    Currently there are 5 whites for every Black American. But in California the ratio is 7 to 1. The Black population has doubled in 50 years, as the white population grew just 12% over this time period.

    • Thanks: Mark G.
  109. @Ben tillman

    “It is beyond belief that anyone actually thinks there’s something wrong with pronouncing the word.”

    Beyond a reasonable person’s understanding, yes, but not beyond belief. In fact, it’s all about belief — it’s not just taboo, it’s blasphemy in the new religion of Wokeness and the true believers are always watching.

  110. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    Note that the risk does not jump from nothing to serious when you get to 55 – it starts out low for under 25’s but then roughly doubles every decade after that. Also having a comorbidity (asthma, obesity, etc.) increases your risk above the average. Just because 35 year old superfit athlete Ronaldo had Covid and nothing happened to him does not mean that Covid will not affect your 35 year old fat wheezy ass.

    Also, based on the excess mortality #’s, it’s not “just the flu”. Even in a bad flu year (at least any one since 1918) we don’t see 300,000 excess deaths in the US. And because deaths in the 25-44 group from ANY cause are pretty rare, even a small numerical increase in that group results in a large PERCENTAGE increase. On a percentage basis, that is the group with the largest % increase in excess deaths.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6942e2.htm

    You can slice and dice statistics any way you want, but it’s really not “just the flu”, at least not any normal flu.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  111. @Anonymous

    Must be viral PR for the Chuck E. Cheese relaunch

  112. Anonymous[183] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    White people are your people. Not your family but your extended family in a sense. You have a genetic connection to them.

    But of course you’re right, white people have not really thought of themselves that way. I think most whites would prefer to be around other whites, and think of them as different from brown people. But at the same time, they love fighting wars over things we can’t even remember now. Like Protestantism versus Catholicism, or the north invading the south, or whatever it was that cause World War I. Stupid things really.

    If white people start thinking that way, it will only be because they have themselves become a beleaguered minority.

    Yeah sadly it will come to that. All the white snobs who thought of themselves as something apart from the “proles” will realize their necks are on the line too.

  113. anon[311] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco

    Some really sick have been kept alive via extraordinary surgeries, such as lung transplants. Here is an example, note that the afflicted woman is pretty obviously in her 40’s.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/coronavirus/ct-northwestern-covid-lung-transplants-20201116-hyt5zs4bgrd5vo5koyd67ufj7i-story.html

    SARS-2 is a vascular disease spread via respiratory vectors. In some cases it can cause serious organ damage. These are low probability events, but they are not zero probability.

    It’s not just the flu.

  114. @Steve Sailer

    What does not kill you makes you stronger.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  115. @AndrewR

    You beat me to it. It’s quite good in a surrealistic way.

  116. Forbes says:
    @Henry's Cat

    A report by Universities UK shows that white undergraduate students are awarded higher grades in comparison to their black, Asian and minority ethnic peers.

    When you write paragraphs and paragraphs of copy pursuing the narrative of “white privilege,” you can bury the reality of white merit under the readers nose. Like a needle in a haystack, you have to search closely to find the truth.

  117. @utu

    “And in the end a made up fictitious conspiracy can turn out to be quite real like in the Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum.”

    It may upset Ivory Tower types concerned with “truth” but there is little or no effective difference btw a “real” conspiracy and “made up” one. To paraphrase Susan Sontag, someone reading The Protocols of the Elders of Zion would have a better grasp of world events than a reader of the NYT.

  118. Anon[331] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    It’s mostly politics.

    Early on back in March and April, it was mainly the right and online dissident right that were taking the virus seriously while the left tended to downplay it. The right thought that the virus would be a good opportunity to help Trump and promote his agenda on immigration and manufacturing, and that it would promote greater nationalism and a right wing flavor of authoritarianism to a degree. You can go back and read jingoistic articles from the pro-Trump right wing outlets like The American Mind from early on in the pandemic and some of the authors sound positively ecstatic and giddy about the prospect of the virus promoting their favored political agenda.

    Then after a few months, it began to look like the virus and its attendant lockdowns would hurt the economy and imperil Trump’s hitherto certain reelection. Moreover, it began to look like the more authoritarian measures and greater authoritarianism generally in response to the virus would be directed or influenced by Democrats and left-wingers as well, and not just be some Trumpian, nationalistic right wing version of authoritarianism. At that point, many on the right and dissident right began to become skeptical of the virus and the lockdowns and other measures in response. They also began to rediscover their libertarianism.

  119. @Art Deco

    “The hospitals are overwhelmed with the dead and dying of coof” is the “crops rotting in the fields” of the Sailerites.

  120. JimB says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Much in America is yet to be ruined, especially in fields where the Woke aren’t looking for sinecures, such as sewer systems.

    I’m surprised nobody mentioned the electrical grid. H1B morons seem to have found plenty of sinecures here. In the less diverse Midwest the occasional severe lightning storm takes down a local grid because it is a giant induction loop, but what’s Northern California’s excuse for having regular blackouts in the Bay Area where there seems to be a lightning storm no more than once every decade. Likely because the sensible grid built back in the 50’s is now powered by a Jerry-rigged mess of windmills, bird-roasting solar power arrays, and ancient nuclear power plants ready to blow.

  121. “inanity to insanity” — another nice one!

    Meanwhile your writing goes from sanity to sanctity. Something like that! Thank you.

  122. Steve Sailer says:

    The idea that elder statesmen like Henry Kissinger and Helmut Schmidt were getting together every summer for some quiet conspiring was almost kind of reassuring…until Elizabeth Holmes recruited a lot of Bilderberg-level old bulls for the board of her Theranos start-up. This ought to have reminded us that there is no such thing as an inner party who know what they are doing. Like Holmes, everybody is just trying to fake it until they make it.

    Mickey Kaus says:

    Yikes.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  123. guest007 says:
    @unit472

    NYU, USC, Georgetown. Penn, Rice, Columbia would disagree with the amalysis. All have had the local neighborhoods become unsafe. The students did not care. The universities have ways to keep crime off campus. The real question is what happens to universities that give up their own police. Not only does such policies make it harder to comply with a bunch of federal regulations on protecting material on campus that can be used for WMD but the university will have little interest to go on campus and deal with college kid problems.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  124. jb says:

    I’m wondering how Time chose the contributors for The Great Reset. I mean, Lily Cole? Lily Cole the former fashion model and small time actress? If you do a quick Google search you can see her boobs, but other than that, why?

  125. Art Deco says:
    @Jack D

    Again, the ratio listed is that of COVID to non-COVID deaths. That’s the increment over the ordinary pattern of mortality. The young aren’t dying of much of anything. Neither are those people between 40 and 50; it’s just that the increment over the low base rate is higher than it is for those under 25. Only about 5% of those who’ve died of this aliment were under 50.

    See a commonsensical remark by Neo-Neocon on the ‘co-morbities’. She noted that she is 71 and she’s having a hard time thinking of anyone in her social circle who doesn’t have one of the listed co-morbidities. She also notes that the share of elderly COVID patients with diabetes isn’t much larger than the share of elderly people in general with diabetes. Here’s a hypothesis: the ‘co-morbidities’ are all correlates of (1) being old and (2) being fat and it’s being old and being fat that’s the agent.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  126. @IHTG

    Do they speak English in your country? Specifically, do they speak it better than you do?

    Mr. Taylor’s comment deploys genuine insight. Yours deploys jealousy and anti-white noise.

    • Thanks: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Gary in Gramercy
  127. @J.Ross

    It’s true the second wave is a lot more evident in Europe than in the US, where it’s more of a continuing flood.

    https://91-divoc.com/pages/covid-visualization/?chart=countries&highlight=European%20Union&show=25&y=both&scale=linear&data=deaths-daily-7&data-source=jhu&xaxis=right&extra=United%20States#countries

    But… “highly unlikely”, really? It’s all a big conspiracy? O-kayyy.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @By-tor
  128. @Jack D

    People are really really lousy about assessing risks, especially relatively small risks.

    Jack, i don’t think the issue for the “just the flu, bro” guys is fundamentally a risk assessment problem.

    Some of them really are immovable blobs about the actual numbers. I said back in late Feb, early March when the Diamond Princess data came back that we’re looking at something between 0.2-o.7% IFR, something like 10-50X “the flu”. That continues to hold up. (My guess would be we’ve had something like–SWAG–50m people infected in the US and 200k deaths.) Some of these guys do say that’s nonsense.

    But i think the driver is two other things:

    1) Their risk assessment is very reasonable–for them. If you’re a young healthy person, the risk really is absolutely trivial. You may have the worse flu of your life that really kicks your ass, but unless you get in a cytokine storm–and that can be avoided now–you’re just not going to die. (A car accident is much more likely to kill you.) On the other hand, a bunch of the stuff that young people like to do has been rather arbitrarily pulled away from them.

    2) The–very feminine–hysteria around this thing is just off putting to lots of young men. It’s like being trapped in school with the schoolmarm in charge … and never getting recess or hearing the bell to go home, much less reaching summer vacation.

    Young men do not like the domination of the feminine, risk-averse, stay-within-the-lines mentality and that’s increasingly the mentality of all of American life. The Xi virus has put it in overdrive and that just pisses a fair number of guys off.

    ~~

    In short, while some people are disputing the numbers one way or another–again, i think once we had the Diamond Princess data we had a good take on the numbers which has held up well–the real division is over values: tolerance for risk, tolerance for the nanny state and being bossed around by Big Sister.

    • Agree: Mark G.
  129. @ganderson

    The war on fossil fuels is absolutely insane. You are right. These people believe in magic.

  130. @bomag

    They are cult leaders. Watch all of the documentaries on NXIVM. Keith’s Raniere’s psychobabble doesn’t sound that different from the rhetoric of experts who conduct TED talks and come up with grand new ideas. Only his sex cult/blackmailing operations were actually discovered.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  131. @guest007

    why have those on the right began to worry about the rules after four yeas of an administration that basically ignored to rules.

    Congrats on being the first name on page 2 of my “commenters to ignore” list. Say hello to Corvirus, Tiny Dick, Nick “mexican tiny duck” Diaz, etc.

    • Thanks: Coemgen
    • Replies: @guest007
  132. @El Dato

    “We don’t have a shovel big enough to dig out of [the deficit]. It’s the biggest number in history. We need help from Washington,” the governor said on Tuesday.

    He made some progress by sending all those infected into nursing homes. Murdering all those elderly will help plug some of the gap.

    He could start by spending less money elsewhere? Crazy idea I know.

  133. @AnotherDad

    It’s odd that women are more worried about it than men, because women are far less likely to die of it. The death rates of women under 40 appear to be less than that of the flu. Young women are more likely to die from complications of their birth control (30 yr old woman here so this isn’t some kind of anti birth control statement, just facts. I’ve known several who have passed away from birth control related strokes in their 20s).

  134. Rob McX says:
    @Mr. Anon

    I wish I could say you were paranoid.

    • Thanks: Mr. Anon
  135. Jtgw says:
    @Travis

    Makes sense they want to profit and outdo the competition but that suggests that they’re not simply controlled by a single conspiracy. I guess I agree with Steve that I don’t see a master pln, just stupid groupthink.

  136. utu says:
    @Anon

    “…to quash Christianity in Mexico..” – Catholicism to be more specific. Protestants were supporting Mexican government and KKK was even sending money to help to suppress Cristeros rebellion.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cristero_War#Ku_Klux_Klan
    “In the mid-1920s, high-ranking members of the anti-Catholic Ku Klux Klan offered Calles $10,000,000 to help fight the Catholic Church. The offer came after the Knights of Columbus in the US secretly offered a group of Cristero rebels $1,000,000 in financial assistance to be used to purchase guns and ammunition.”

  137. @AnotherDad

    I

    I think you underestimate the age of the Diamond Princess passengers and thus overestimate the IFR of CO-19. From what I see in D, A, CH, excess deaths are not significantly higher than they were in the last four years. Plus – what about the flu – the flu has not disappeared, so – it’s just not very likely that all excess deaths were caused by CO-19 – some of them might well have been caused by the flu, which – has not been killed off by CO-19, I’d hold (I can’t see a good reason to deny this claim).

    II

    And I think your schoolmarm point is valid and – big (=important).

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  138. @Gordo

    In Chicago the number of fires have fallen dramatically in the past 20 years or so. I’ve heard numbers of fires have dropped by as much as 90%. You would never know this by all the fire houses that still for city neighborhoods and the fire trucks that race arou

  139. @Gordo

    They say the number of fires in Chicago have fallen dramatically in the past few decades. You’d never know this by all the Firehouses that still dot the city neighborhoods and the fire trucks that constantly race up and down the streets.

    A few years ago I called an ambulance for a homeless woman who passed out in the middle of an alley. Not only did an ambulance respond, but so did a police cruiser and a fire truck.

  140. Muggles says:
    @James O'Meara

    What does not kill you makes you stronger.

    I don’t know if this was posted as a facetious remark or not.

    It is widely quoted but seems to be mainly an ignorant boast.

    Ask anyone in any medical field about it. Nursing homes, long term care facilities and ICUs are full of living refutations of this horribly wrong statement. Or ask anyone over 80.

  141. Muggles says:
    @guest007

    NYU, USC, Georgetown. Penn, Rice, Columbia would disagree with the amalysis. All have had the local neighborhoods become unsafe.

    Can’t speak for the others, but the neighborhoods around Rice were never sketchy and have only gotten more expensive and probably safer.

    On the north side, very expensive large Tutor style McMansions. To the south, the huge Texas Medical Center (no homes, etc.) Far to the west, after a quaint commercial shopping “village” (called The Village) on land largely owned by Rice U, there is West University, a very high dollar large neighborhood full of doctors and lawyers and upper Middle Class.

    To the SE, past a large park and zoo, the older once Jewish neighborhood, which was starting to gentrify 50 years back when I lived there (but pretty “vibrant”) is now getting very costly.

    Houston’s lack of zoning seems to have worked well there.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @guest007
  142. Anonymous[353] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    You are on the wrong wave-length. Bottom line is, the only way to maintain white societies (which is what everyone wants wether they admit it or not), is to keep them white. White people need to work together to achieve this goal. Anything-else is BS.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  143. @Dieter Kief

    I think you underestimate the age of the Diamond Princess passengers and thus overestimate the IFR of CO-19.

    I may have it wrong, but i’m aware cruising is “the newly wed and the nearly dead”.

    The data is:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COVID-19_pandemic_on_Diamond_Princess

    3711 on board
    2666 passengers — median age 69
    1054 crew — median age 36

    714 cases –
    567 passengers
    147 crew

    Half were asymptomatic
    80ish hospitalizations
    14 deaths — all passengers all 60+. (2% IFR)
    Or 3% IFR of infected median age 69 passengers and 0% IFR in younger crew.

    Probably a lot more crew members were exposed, but simply shrugged the thing off.

    Taking this at face value. You’d age adjust this for a US age profile population and come up with something 0.5%.

    What i took from this was
    — it’s way nastier than any recent flu on the elderly
    — younger people skate through this ok

    I had been quite worried about the Xi virus … back in January, when the Democrats were doing their “we have nothing to fear but xenophobia” and “go hug a Chinaman” routine. (What lying sacks of shit they are. And how poor are Trump’s communication skills to not skewer them over this.)

    But after getting the Diamond Princess data i concluded the Xi virus was not any kind of threat to civilization. I emailed my kids: quite likely could kill G-Dad if he gets it; low, but outside chance it could kill me … you guys will be fine.

    I was actually happyy with this, given what we’d been seeing in Wuhan. My kids–the future–is what matters. I’d like to do another 30, but it’s not the end of the world if i don’t. I know, i’m going to die sometime. But i want my children, my race, my culture, my civilization to survive. And the Xi virus is not what’s killing them.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  144. Anon87 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    At the same time, most athletes just aren’t that smart and prefer to focus on their craft versus politics or the news. So if they are bombared on all sides that this is big and scary, well they get scared.

  145. utu says:
    @Anon

    Freemasons were the NGO’s of 18th and 19th century. Who was their Soros? The British. They never acted against the British interests with the exception of American Revolution which at that time was rather a minor affair for Britain. While in the long run the creation of the United States of American turned out to be their greatest achievement the most important accomplishment from their ideological point was their contribution to dismantling of Catholic monarchies in Europe and replacing them with anti-Catholic liberal democracies.

    • Thanks: Yevardian
    • Replies: @Anon
  146. Marat says:
    @Old Prude

    About Trump’s driving past his own appreciation party … Think of it this way. It’s always Riverdale High School for Trump, who views his base in the way Archie viewed Betty in the “Archie” comic book series.

    Trump’s base is in a love triangle with Archie and Veronica. Archie settles for Betty to get to the prom, all the while pining about Veronica. It’s not that Trump has no interest in his base – rather, it’s that his overriding desire has always been to get “high society”’s respect. Unfortunately for him, they love taunting him, unlike Veronica, who at least appreciated Archie’s attentions.

    It really showed on Saturday. If Trump were even a quarter the ideologue or dictator the left fears him to be, he would never have missed the opportunity to get out of the car and give a rousing speech.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  147. But I want my children, my race, my culture, my civilization to survive.

    That’s racist and not allowed because you’re white.

  148. J.Ross says:
    @European-American

    >all a big conspiracy
    The thing you would need for the scale isn’t freemasonry, it’s simply pressure for the results to always go one way. Between censorship, free government money for positive results, the numerous problems with testing, and medical conformism, I don’t see how you can deny such pressure. The doctors criticizing the lockdown get shut down. The guy I cited wasn’t a UFO watcher or a freemason or a bircher. I don’t understand why you people think that respectability means anything. As I write Jack Dorsey is whining on the radio about how they are censoring people but not really censoring people. How is monolithic control of major dinosaur and social media with aggressive censorship not a conspiracy? Should they have special handshakes? What in any of this was done that satisfied you? Did you enjoy the changes in reasoning?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  149. J.Ross says:
    @S. Anonyia

    I don’t have it but there’s a shot from a TED talk type symposium with a banner talking about turning brands into religions and consumers into fanatics. The megacorps successfully disenfranchised religion and now are trying to replace it. One of the many reasons I never want to work white collar are these para-Maoist slogan banners festooning an officepelago where I installed furniture. Midcentury alcoholism (the drinks cart making its rounds for those still in the office at 4pm) was a massively more human and civilized practice than the present requirement that you be mentally in the office 24 hours a day.

    • Replies: @The Craw
  150. Anon[168] • Disclaimer says:
    @utu

    Agree, but add the 20th Century, since they were active in Mexico, France, Spain after WWI.

    Once neither rival empires nor catholic/orthodox/ottoman monarchies remain, does freemasonry dissolve? Was freemasonry just the British Empire’s CIA, or do they have a vision of human society that they want to bring about?

    Is the arc of freemasonry as follows: secret, discreet, public? Lodge-Bilderberg-WEF?

    Thing is, man is a symbolic animal. Money and pleasure are not everything.

    If David Rockefeller was a believing Freemason, did he cease to be one when he founded the Trilateral? Is Soros a frontman for a larger group with a specific ideology? Which ideological groups, if any, are contending for control of this beautiful world of ours?

  151. anon[542] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Regarding risk: We just had the results of two large phase 3 tests. One of the interesting results was that there were no deaths. Either treatment group or placebo group. That means 30,000 people were walking around for a couple of months without a vaccine and none of them died.

    So, whatever covid is, it isn’t Ebola like or Yellow Fever like. I am actively avoiding it. But if people aren’t afraid…I wouldn’t call them innumerate.

    As far as your larger point, common sense isn’t too useful when evaluating low probability events. Like airline safety.

  152. @Pierre de Craon

    IHTG’s comment was almost certainly a punning reference to one of Samuel L. Jackson’s great lines in 1994’s Pulp Fiction. (Very early in the movie, when Jules and Vincent have to teach three youngsters how not to do business with Marcellus Wallace.)

    While he can speak for himself as to his intentions, I doubt they were the ones you attributed to him.

    • Replies: @Pierre de Craon
    , @IHTG
  153. @res

    Yes, it was nice seeing my multiple posts cleaned up.

    The disappearing first comment problem is still ongoing, as of yesterday. A first comment will eventually appear, but it seems not until the second comment is posted.

  154. anon[542] • Disclaimer says:

    Regarding the Chicago Plan, it is a thing. Interestingly documented in the lightly fictionalized Mini Series, Boss. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boss_(TV_series)

    But the larger plan, or unplanned outcome, has been the Mexicanization of Chicago. During the election of Herald Washington, Chicago’s black population was large enough it could have grown to a majority under a decade or two of Coleman Young(Detroit) style leadership. Instead the city is now roughly evenly divided between black, white and Hispanic populations. With black neighborhoods shrinking, and Mexican in ascendancy.

    The idea that the lake side neighborhoods be developed to their highest and best use is so sensible, the only conspiracy needed was to decide who specifically did the redevelopment (and got the immediate payoff). The Obama Library is the final piece of the process. Blacks are fighting among themselves and this piece may well turn out to be a bridge too far.

    But meanwhile, the Mexican influx? Planned or just fortuitous? Mexicans stood up for themselves in the Floyd rioting. So they are dug in and won’t simply head for the suburbs.

  155. @PhysicistDave

    I don’t think the inward was originally a slur, but rather the way “negro” was pronounced in tidewater colonies.

    Some people claim the surname Crenshaw was how Virginians pronounced “Granger”. But there are places called Crankshaw and Crawshaw in Lancashire, which are also surnames, and perhaps the Crenshaws came from one of those.

    And both may indeed be true.

  156. @RichardTaylor

    The HBD world gets that there is an anti-White religion afoot (actually been around a long time).

    The entirety of American history, to be precise. What reason can there be for hiring inferior primates– their loser class, no less– from the jungle, instead of white men who could actually do the job?

    Nothing shows hatred for the white race more than hiring someone of another. There is a reason white immigrants avoided entire states where the colored lived.

    Wait– there is something worse. Allowing evolution to be taught to our children in the schools, which was once illegal in a number of states. What that does to a people’s birthrate constitutes genocide by the UN’s definition:

    In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

    a. Killing members of the group;
    b. Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
    c. Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
    d. Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
    e. Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

    https://www.un.org/en/genocideprevention/genocide.shtml

    South Carolinians knew what they were doing when their 1778 constitution required voters to affirm belief in “the being of a God” and reward and punishment in the afterlife. That along with a gun license would clean up the electorate faster than anything.

    • Troll: RichardTaylor
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @PhysicistDave
  157. @Jack D

    This was such an empty and meaningless and zero calorie comment, and yet somehow it simultaneously manages to be offensive to both rationality and good taste. A fine example of the phenomenon known as Jack D Amnesia.

  158. @Gary in Gramercy

    Thank you for your gloss. Unless told otherwise, I shall take your interpretation to be correct, though I still cannot see what useful dimension the comment adds to Mr. Taylor’s remarks. Specifically, while it is certainly true that there is no place called White, at least not yet, more’s the pity.

    Anent Pulp Fiction, as I know virtually nothing of that movie (and for better or worse have no desire to learn more about it), I hope I might be excused for reading the gentleman’s comment as I did.

  159. Anonymous[106] • Disclaimer says:

    This will prove disappointing to many elites, who have enthusiastically latched onto the idea that the virus justifies “The Great Reset”: policies hyped to, as Joe Biden would say, “Build Back Better,” which, coincidentally, happen to be whatever they had already felt like doing to us beforehand.

    All this shows is that one side is far more intelligent and competent than the other, able to use new, unexpected situations to its advantage while the other flails around incoherently. The liberals have an agenda, and will fight to achieve it. The conservatives just want to take the money from whites angry about the changes liberals are making while not doing anything meaningful to halt or reverse those changes. Whether it’s NRO and Lowry or VDARE and Sailer makes no difference. It’s all about the Benjamins.

  160. Anonymous[372] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The average person doesn’t even understand evolution, or any scientific concept for that matter. It’s thottery that’s the problem. The rage against atheism is a way for reactionaries to avoid addressing the real elephant in the room.

  161. @James Speaks

    James Speaks wrote to me:

    I don’t think the inward was originally a slur, but rather the way “negro” was pronounced in tidewater colonies.

    Yeah, that may well be true. However, by the early 1960s, it was clearly understood all across the country that the “N-word” was only used to denigrate people. I remember my parents — who were pretty conservative and more than a little bigoted — telling us very sternly not to use that word: it was only used to hurt people. On the other hand, well-intentioned people could and did pronounce the word when discussing its use and history, when reading a historical document, etc.

    I first saw the change in the late 1980s, when a group of us were discussing racism at lunch in the company cafeteria. I mentioned the word, for the purpose of discussing its use, and one of the guys looked around in fright and told me not to pronounce it. None of us were criticizing black folks: we were just discussing the use and history of a word, pretty much as you and I are doing here.

    By the way, the issue at my daughter’s college, as I said, involved reading MLK’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” If you read the letter, MLK mentioned the word to criticize bigoted whites who used that word to hurt black folks, a perfectly sensible and, of course, non-bigoted discussion about the word that would have offended no one at the time.

    The funny thing is that back then you could not “in polite company” pronounce the “f-word” even to discuss its use: to be sure, the f-word was used in presumptively male-only company — the military, manufacturing, etc. — for as long as I know of.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
  162. @Reg Cæsar

    Reg Cæsar wrote:

    The entirety of American history, to be precise. What reason can there be for hiring inferior primates– their loser class, no less– from the jungle, instead of white men who could actually do the job?

    Y’know, there really are black folks — e.g., the economist Thomas Sowell or the brilliant linguist John McWhorter — who are much, much brighter than most white folks.

    I have met Tom Sowell, a truly pleasant person, and I hear the same from those who knew him much better than I did. And I have read some of his work: he is very bright.

    And if you have not read any of McWhorter’s books (I particularly recommend his Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold History of English ) or listened to his lectures for the Teaching Company’s Great Courses… well, if you have any interest in languages, it’s all a lot of fun. And he tosses in asides about classic films and musical theater, quantum theory, etc. — and he even gets the stuff on quantum theory right.

    Now, I realize your main gripe is with Affirmative Action, and, of course, Sowell and McWhorter would have “made it” without Affirmative Action. But in noting racial differences in average IQ, let’s not ignore the fact that there are brilliant people of all races who are way beyond the avreage IQ of every other race.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Anonymous
  163. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Mr. Anon

    You misunderstand the global overclass

    Is there a single global overclass? Are the elites a single monolithic bloc or a coalition of interest groups each with its own slightly different agenda? Do the elites have a single coherent plan, or do various factions within the elites each have their own agendas? Is the global elite really like the Borg? Or just a miscellaneous collection of selfish foolish incompetents?

    Do they possess great power and a great desire to exercise power without any clear idea of where it will eventually lead?

    Historically elites have often proven to be remarkably foolish and short-sighted which they combine (dangerously) with arrogance.

    If there were major fault lines within the elites how aware would be of that fact? Are they simply giving the impression of being united and organised and with a master plan?

    Historically elites have often been divided. That’s why old elites lose power and new elites gain power.

    And do the elites of today think in exactly the same way the elites thought in the 1960s? Or even the 1990s? Did they have one grand plan which they formulated decades ago or are they just improvising?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  164. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    the only way to maintain white societies (which is what everyone wants wether they admit it or not), is to keep them white. White people need to work together to achieve this goal.

    You will never get white people to work together to achieve that goal. You will never get white people to work together to achieve any goal. White people just don’t work that way.

    For starters, for white people class hatreds are stronger than race hatreds.

    • Agree: Jack D
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anonymous
  165. By-tor says:
    @European-American

    The conspiracy theorists are the Covid cultists with their erroneous belief in dust masks as medical devices and the expensive, yet faulty, ‘test kits’ that give conflicting results when given to the same person a short time later. In April, it became apparent that coronahoax was a much larger, multi-purpose psy-op. These obscenely wealthy wine and cheese pedophiles and high-finance weekend Satanists of the bi-coastal ruling class would also use the Covid-19 ruse to pilfer $6 trillion in Congressional bailouts into their pockets, manufacture phony mail-in votes and use rigged software to prevent the re-election of Trump.

    The Governor of the State Calif. ( pop. 40 million ) has made it quite clear that the Public has been played for fools.

  166. @PhysicistDave

    I have a shelfful of Sowell’s books. My favorites are the “Vision” ones which don’t touch on race at all. Few things (other than dysphoria) explain Antifa better.

    Yes, I’ve read Bastard Tongue, and found it to be the first book in which the “black American experience” actually made a positive contribution. McWhorter used it to put himself in the shoes of the Celtic underclass during the long, unwritten transmogrification of our language.

    That these people added almost no words to our tongue, but managed to warp its grammar significantly is fascinating. Makes one wonder if it’s still going on over here, via McWhorter’s people. I refuse to wait “on” a bus, unless I’m actually on the bus. My northern neighbors aren’t as fussy about this.

    Now, I realize your main gripe is with Affirmative Action…

    I’ve never mentioned affirmative action, except to point out that the plantation system appears to have been an early version of it. I’m reading the Genoveses’ Fatal Deception, and if you think I’m hard on the planters and their pets, you should take a look at this. The authors are quite sympathetic to Southerners, but the planters damn themselves. They come off like a bunch of soft-hearted fools being taken for a ride by their crafty servants. Visitors from the north, England, and elsewhere are left wondering, “Can’t they get these people to work?”

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  167. Mr. Anon says:
    @dfordoom

    You bring up a lot of good questions, so here are my attempt at good answers:

    Is there a single global overclass? Are the elites a single monolithic bloc or a coalition of interest groups each with its own slightly different agenda? Do the elites have a single coherent plan, or do various factions within the elites each have their own agendas? Is the global elite really like the Borg? Or just a miscellaneous collection of selfish foolish incompetents?

    I think there is something that can meaningfully be called a “global overclass”. It includes the executive class of large banks, insurance companies, media, technology, defense, pharmaceutical, and industrial corporations, high government officials, elite academics, and the kind of people who circulate between those groups (Henry Kissinger being a classic example). At the top of the heap are the very wealthy – billionaire oligarchs – some of them are new money, some of them are old money. And they surround themselves with a lesser class of managers and technocrats who serve their interests

    Are they monolithic? No. But they can probably all agree that they are better than you or me and deserve to rule over us.

    If you want a model to picture them by, think of the European aristocracy of the high-middle ages. They often fought amongst themselves. Often chivalrously, meaning it was all fun and games for them as their serfs and gentry murdered each other. Sometimes they were vicious to one another when they really felt threatened. But they would almost always close ranks when there was a peasant revolt. They could all agree on this: that aristocrats should rule, and commoners should be ruled. You could call the system that our modern global elite are working toward neo-feudalism.

    Most people watch James Bond movies and think: “You know, it would be cool to be James Bond”. But Bond is just a tool – a hired hand. You can buy him with a Walther PPK, a Martini, and some tail. I think there are probably a few people who watch those movies and think: “You know, it would really be cool to be Largo or Blofeld.” In the movies, they always get killed by Bond, but in reality, Bond works for them, and they do just fine.

    And do the elites of today think in exactly the same way the elites thought in the 1960s? Or even the 1990s? Did they have one grand plan which they formulated decades ago or are they just improvising?

    The elite of today probaby think differently than they did in the past. I don’t imagine too many people who attended the first Bilderberg meeting back in the 50s thought “This year, we will push transgenderism!”. But there is continuity in their most salient characteristic: they desire power – the power to impose thier will on humanity and the World.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave, JackOH
    • Replies: @dfordoom
  168. @Muggles

    Right, Rice U. is in a very nice part of Houston. Most of Houston is sprawl-ville, I am told, but I’m most familiar with the part around Rice, which is very genteel and filled with amenities. Our main complaint about the neighborhood was the lack of nearby fast-food restaurants.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Muggles
  169. @Art Deco

    There aren’t many fat celebrities, but it would have been helpful for some to announce they were losing weight to lower their risks.

  170. @Jack D

    Jaack D wrote:

    People also tend to overestimate their own skills/strength – EVERYONE thinks that they are “above average drivers”.

    Not me. I have a congenital vision defect that causes DMV to limit me to daytime driving only. I restrict myself further — e.g. limiting myself to local streets, routes I know well, etc.

    Now I do think I may be as safe as the average driver — I have never had a moving violation, for example — but only because I am much more cautious since I know that intrinsically I am a very poor driver.

    For much the same reasons, I have always known that I was a poorer athlete than most guys.

    Is my situation exceptional?

    Well, just as there are objective facts about my vision that lead me to certain conclusions, so also there are objective facts about other people’s success or failure in school or on standardized tests or whatever that could allow them to have an objective view of themselves. Surely, some people do.

    To be sure, I really am a physicist turned engineer, so I am a bit fixated on objective, quantitative evidence. I wonder if STEM people are more objective about judging their own abilities than most people are?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    , @Dieter Kief
  171. @AnotherDad

    The right-wing German AfD politician Alice Weidel spoke in March in the Bundestag pretty much against the liberal way to understand the Wu-Flu and was confronted with a wave of hostile feelings because she proposed social distancing and – that’s what caused the real uproar against her: The closing of the German borders and the control of incoming passengers at the airports.

    The most bizarre thing was: She was laughed at in great numbers by the other members of parliament.

    The median age of those dying from CO-19 in Switzerland is above the life expectancy threshold. Estimated weeks lost by those dying of CO-19 so far: 12 (or maybe nine). percentages of those dying from CO-19 as the only reason (=people with no comorbidities) – hardly undecipherably small.

    Klaus Püschel – by now: rather famously – dissected one hundred Co-19 deaths in springtime in Hamburg and did find no one who had died from CO-19 alone.

    • Replies: @utu
  172. @Reg Cæsar

    Reg Cæsar wrote:

    I’m reading the Genoveses’ Fatal Deception…

    We should add that Eugene Genovese considered himself a Marxist, but was known for being friendly with conservatives and libertarians, I think because he was a decent human being who aspired to honesty.

    Wikipedia claims that at the end of his life he was a traditionalist conservative (“Southern Agrarian” variety), which I had not heard before. Do you know if that is true?

    I’d classify him as one of the “righteous leftists,” along with Glenn Greenwald, and the recently deceased Stephen F. Cohen and Dave Graeber. Dave Graeber died way too young. I strongly recommend Graeber’s The Utopia of Rules: On Technology, Stupidity, and the Secret Joys of Bureaucracy and his Bullshit Jobs. I think Graeber’s solutions are mistaken, but he had a very keen eye for noticing what has gone wrong. And he knew how to write.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Pierre de Craon
  173. Old Prude says:
    @Stan Adams

    There are a few actions possible between waving and incitement to riot. Duh.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  174. @Steve Sailer

    We’ll take his word that it was 104.5f. We’re using the honor system. Gun thermometers to the forehead are so accurate.

  175. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Mr. Anon

    Are they monolithic? No. But they can probably all agree that they are better than you or me and deserve to rule over us.

    Agreed.

    If you want a model to picture them by, think of the European aristocracy of the high-middle ages. They often fought amongst themselves. Often chivalrously, meaning it was all fun and games for them as their serfs and gentry murdered each other. Sometimes they were vicious to one another when they really felt threatened. But they would almost always close ranks when there was a peasant revolt. They could all agree on this: that aristocrats should rule, and commoners should be ruled.

    When the French Revolution occurred it had the support of parts of the aristocracy. That was true of most revolutions (such as the Chinese Revolution of 1911). If a revolution succeeded it almost certainly had some elite support. Revolutions occur when part of the elite turns against the rest of the elite.

    Members of the elites tend to view themselves as being naturally fitted to rule but sometimes they see themselves as leaders of revolutions intended to overthrow the very elite class to which they themselves belong.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  176. utu says:
    @Dieter Kief

    percentages of those dying from CO-19 as the only reason (=people with no comorbidities) – hardly undecipherably small

    Klaus Püschel did find no one who had died from CO-19 alone

    Irrelevant . This does not make any difference. Society is what it is. Composed of people. All of them are your neighbors in Christian sense. If you focus on cancer fatalities you can also find many comorbidities contributing to death. You could even find many Auschwitz inmates would would have been alive if it was not for their comorbidities like being too skinny on the arrival. Klaus Püschel has just a right name for doing some Auschwitz revisionism.

    What he and you are engaging in is blaming people for their disease. There are psychological and political reasons for it. Susan Sontag wrote about it. What is the most annoying is the idiotic the “It’s just flu” crowd who also picks it up. Just round up all fat and diabetic people and send them to Dachau and the Covid-19 problem will be solved. I am sure there is some old know how left for it in Germany.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  177. Just round up all fat and diabetic people and send them to Dachau and the Covid-19 problem will be solved. I am sure there is some old know-how left for it in Germany.

    Of course! – That’s how things still go in Germany. Every glimpse we catch of the Covid-Worldometer tells us so!

    Btw. – what in the loving God’s whole wide world is wrong with the name Prof. Klaus Püschel, head of the University Hospital of Hamburg?

  178. @Steve Sailer

    Yes. Losing weight and – taking a daily walk – best around noon time. Since there is a hysterical mood prevailing, such simple things tend to be overlooked – and underestimated.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  179. dfordoom says: • Website
    @PhysicistDave

    People also tend to overestimate their own skills/strength – EVERYONE thinks that they are “above average drivers”.

    Not me.

    Nor me. I’m a lousy driver but a fairly safe one because I’m hyper-cautious.

    But if you conducted a survey I’d guess that at least 95% of respondents would describe themselves as “above average drivers”.

    I suspect there’d be a huge sex difference though, with women much more willing to admit to being “below average drivers” while about 99% of men would describe themselves as “above average drivers”.

    I wonder if STEM people are more objective about judging their own abilities than most people are?

    It would be great to test that with a survey. How many physicists would describe themselves as “below average physicists”? How many engineers would describe themselves as “below average engineers”?

    I’d also love to see how many cardiac surgeons would describe themselves as being “below average cardiac surgeons”.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  180. @PhysicistDave

    The energy such states of collective confusion are driven by is a hysterical (=sexaul/ bodily) one. And just like sexual tension, it doesn’t hold up too long. It’s nature is to swell – and peter out.

    Jonathan Haidt has explained that best as far as I can see. It’s clear though that because of the very – nature – of our current hysteries, they can’t be approached solely on a rational basis. – Explosive – handle with care!

    The daughter of friends – ahhh – she has a very telling first name, btw. (I wonder how our friends came to choose this name – I’ll have to ask them since when they did, things did not look that grim at all) – – – well this kid, 13 years old, nice and all, blonde, sane and bright, is cultivating laughter, humor and irony as her weapons od choice in her daily school-martyrdoms of the boring peace we all from all races which don’t exist are equally peaceful loving humans kind.

    Her main problem is – the many boring hours she has to sit through. Once you have understood the structure of the narrative, lots and lots of what you hear you can detect right away as variations/repetitions of the well-meaning same old same old.

    – Next time I see her, I’ll recommend to her Civilizaiton and it’s Dicontents. Her parents I talked into reading Haidt/Lukianoff’s The Coddling of the American Mind.

  181. Anon[275] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Seriously?

    I’ve always thought the sky is falling people are the irrational people with COVID-19.

    Closing schools even though something like 50 people under 18 in the whole country have died of COVID-19? What’s the rationale for that again? Oh, that it’s all worth it if it only saves one life, and you never know if the 51st kid to die of COVID-19 will be your kid.

    Well, that’s the stated rationale for closing schools anyway, although I think the real reason is that teachers unions are full of a bunch of lazy teachers who don’t want to teach, and school boards are too cowardly to fire teachers who don’t show up for work.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  182. bomag says:
    @kpkinsunnyphiladelphia

    Agree.

    The left will laud the new “vibrant” society, but like most leftist, the irony of how “non-vibrant” the social and body politic has become will be totally lost on them.

    Well, half the time they laud “vibrancy” for its own sake, and half the time they chortle about “vibrancy” being an excellent punishment for YT.

    And leftists harbor the belief that they will personally escape the fruits of “vibrancy”.

  183. Old Prude says:
    @utu

    Speaking as a “Just the flu” guy, my proposed solution to Covid is to react to it like it was just the flu. Not exactly shipping the sick to the furnaces.

    On the other hand the solution actually implemented is to burn down the economy and lock the elderly away from their loved ones as they die. Nice. BTW, how’s that working?

    • Replies: @utu
  184. @Travis

    We encourage every ethnic group to be proud of their heritage while indoctrinating whites that all the problems in the world are caused by whites.

    We have to do that. Otherwise people might get the wrong idea and consider that many of the world’s problems are caused by others.

  185. guest007 says:
    @Muggles

    AT about the time that STeve was a Rice University, the neighborhoods to the East were not very nice such as along Old Spanish Trail. Not a place the student went but a place that residents could easily drive or walk to Rice University. People have forgotten the crime rate that Houston had in the 1970’s and 1980’s.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  186. guest007 says:
    @William Badwhite

    Once again, someone reinforces the idea that shoot the messenger is a pathway to success.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  187. Escher says:

    Much in America is yet to be ruined, especially in fields where the Woke aren’t looking for sinecures, such as sewer systems.

    Lol. That’s a gem.

  188. anon[330] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I’m most familiar with the part around Rice, which is very genteel and filled with amenities. Our main complaint about the neighborhood was the lack of nearby fast-food restaurants.

    However, there are upscale wine & liquor stores in that area that deliver to one’s front door, or so I’ve been told. Apparently they delivered long before the Plague, too. So the Rice area has that going for them.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  189. Rob says:
    @res

    Res, it’s the UK. Their Asians aren’t our yellow supermen. Their Asians are mere Pakistanis.

  190. Anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    But in noting racial differences in average IQ, let’s not ignore the fact that there are brilliant people of all races who are way beyond the average IQ of every other race.

    OK, so we keep that in mind. Your assertion is a consequence of the Normal distribution, which applies to intelligence since so it is the sum of so many different genes (as is temperament), so your assertion can hardly be ignored.

    I’m going to quote from Wolfe’s “Radical Chic”, because it is accessible and shows that the current (2020) situation has pertained since at least 1970. The objective is to show that the world is faced with a real moral dilemma, a choice in this case between two undesirable alternatives.

    Take another look at Tom Wolfe’s _Radical Chic_, copyright 1970. It does a fair job of presenting Black feelings, and the Black Panther’s positions at the time. For example, here is a quote from a letter:

    . . . But I think the despair is far deeper now. You just can’t go on seeing how white men live, the opportunity they have, listening to all the promises they make, and realizing how little they have delivered, without having to fight an almost ungovernable rage within yourself.

    Roger Wilkins to Secretary Finch, who would have been Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, about 50 years ago.

    A quote closely following it:

    ” . . . The other day, an old friend of mine, a black man who has spent his live trying to work things out for his people within the system, said to me’ . . . ‘Roger, I’m going to get a gun. I can’t help it‘ “

    This is still the Black position, now (2020) called “Social Justice” [0]. It is entirely justified by reality. To tell with a mean IQ of 85 and an extremely high time preference ( Search domain en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_preference] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_preference) that its members can almost all succeed in a competitive free enterprise system is, in the most favorable light possible, unspeakably cruel. Half the population has an IQ below 85, and so could not do any work of economic value after about 1940 (although it was quite productive in hand growing cotton). The half with an IQ above 85 and a high time preference would almost all value the “benefits” of industrial life as very small, since they tend to come towards the end of a career rather than the beginning. Of course, they would feel “ungovernable rage” and “get a gun” because “I can’t help it”. Force yields immediate results (good or bad), and is thus readily understandable and embraced by those with high time preference.

    Note that the Black Panther program, as described by Wolfe in “Radical Chic”, has been adapted by the Democrats and is being, in 2020, aggressively enforced. It is justified legally by the 1960s Civil Rights Act (CRA), which was largely passed by Republican support, and substantially interpreted by the Supreme Court. I note that Jewish interests supported the CRA, but the Republicans pushed the CRA into law. The CRA represented an attempt to respond to the Black feelings that Wolfe describes above.

    The 2020 problem, unanticipated in 1970, is that responding to the Black feelings that Wolfe describes above has meant the fall of the cities [1]. It has also meant an end to the prosperity of industrial society as both labor skills and stock of capital goods have been forced to degrade by diversion of funds from productive investments to immediate consumption in the pursuit of CRA objectives [2]. It has led to the White Death [3], and, perhaps worst of all, has substantially impoverished the Blacks it was supposed to help and eliminated the Black middle class, who have now become intelligentsia (government employed) rather than self-supporting.

    OK, say “there are brilliant people of all races who are way beyond the average IQ of every other race.”. OK, stipulated. Now, presumably people who use their “beyond the average IQ” of another racial group to, say, live off the labor of that “other race” would not recommend that person to the “other race”. I am here pointing out that “high intelligence” does not mean “goals compatible with the existence of any particular race”.

    So here is the dilemma, two problems arising from the context established by this post, both requiring action and the assertion that”. . . there are brilliant people of all races who are way beyond the average IQ of every other race”. Three examples of this would be Washington Cleaver, W. E. B. Dubois, and of course Thomas Sowell.

    Lemma 1: What should be done if the assertion is adequate justification for the end of productive industrial society and the White Death?

    Lemma 2: What should be done if the assertion is not adequate justification for the end of productive industrial society and the White Death?

    ————————–Footnotes —————————-

    0] The basic justification, inability to participate in industrial society, was stated by W.E.B. DuBois, https://www.thoughtco.com/w-e-b-du-bois-innovative-activist-45312, c.a. 1900, when he rejected B. T. Washington’s advocacy of integration and stated that Blacks could never assimilate, and must rely on political influence — precisely what the Black Panthers did in “Radical Chic”. Note that W.E.B DuBois was “way beyond the average IQ of every other race”, but this did not stop him from advising Blacks to live from the labor of Whites.

    1] Just today, from just one source, note:
    https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/mta-fire-9000-slash-subway-service-40-without-12bn-federal-bailout
    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/shocking-reversal-wayne-county-election-board-republicans-rescind-certifications-claim
    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/deutsche-there-increasing-demand-use-bitcoin-where-gold-was-used-hedge-dollar-risk-and which marks the end of inflation funding of urban areas.)

    2] C. Caldwell, _The Age of Entitlement: America Since the Sixties_, 2020/01

    3] https://www.amren.com/features/2020/05/the-white-death/

  191. Mr. Anon says:
    @Dieter Kief

    Yes. Losing weight and – taking a daily walk – best around noon time. Since there is a hysterical mood prevailing, such simple things tend to be overlooked – and underestimated.

    Vitamin D levels seem to be very important in fighting off the ‘Rona and in the outcomes of those who contract the virus. The media and public health establishment seems to talk about this not at all.

  192. @Hippopotamusdrome

    No offense, but your ignorance of the subject is off the scale. There can be NO vaccine for an unidentified pathogen. NONE.

    #1.
    “COVID-19: Vaccine ‘Not Possible’ For A Virus Not Yet Quantifiable” by Saeed Qureshi
    https://principia-scientific.com/covid-19-vaccine-not-possible-for-a-virus-not-yet-identified/

    Moreover, there can be no “test” for the presence of a virus absent a definitively conclusive test for the presence of the virus.

    #2.
    “The COVID-19 RT-PCR Test: How To Mislead All Humanity Into Accepting Societal Lock-Downs”
    Available at GlobalResearch.ca
    https://www.globalresearch.ca/covid-19-rt-pcr-how-to-mislead-all-humanity-using-a-test-to-lock-down-society/5728483

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
  193. @Old Prude

    You didn’t answer the question, though. What would you have had him say?

    “We shall fight them in the counting rooms, we shall fight them in the courts, we shall fight them in the legislatures, we shall fight them on Twitter; we shall never concede!”

  194. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Their risk assessment is very reasonable–for them.

    First of all, I’m not so sure about this – see my remarks about everyone thinking that they are a better driver than they really are. A lot of people also think that they are healthier/fitter than they really are. “It’s just the flu bros” are not all gym rats. Plenty of fatter/older guys too.

    2nd this is an exceptionally selfish way of looking at a contagious disease (not surprising because we have an exceptionally selfish society). Even if you think you are invulnerable (and you probably ain’t as invulnerable as you think you are) then the nature of this disease is that many people become asymptomatic/presymptomatic carriers. It might be nothing to you, but you are going to bring it home to your grandpa and maybe kill him.

    We can already see that the “it’s just the flu bros” are going to seamlessly transition into “I’m not getting that shot” bros and because of that this pandemic is going to be prolonged for much longer than necessary. The sooner everyone mans up and gets their jab the sooner we can have our lives back. If “just the flu” bros are comfortable with the risk of getting Covid they should be SUPER comfortable with getting jabbed. ANY vaccine is going to have a FR that is a tiny, tiny fraction of the IFR for covid even among the healthiest individuals. Any vaccine that had a FR of .1% or even .01% or .001% would never make it thru the FDA approval process. So man up all you macho guys and get your shot so we can all have our lives back.

    • Replies: @danand
    , @Old Prude
  195. Jack D says:
    @PhysicistDave

    I think Graeber’s solutions are mistaken, but he had a very keen eye for noticing what has gone wrong.

    This goes all the way back to Marx. Marxists can be excellent diagnosticians but they always write really lousy prescriptions. It’s better to make a wrong diagnosis but prescribe the correct (or at least a harmless) medicine than it is to make a spot on diagnosis but then write a scrip that will kill the patient.

    In another thread, someone mentioned that doctors (who are by definition high IQ individuals) sometime overestimate the ability of their much lower IQ patients to comply with a complicated treatment regimen. On paper, what they are prescribing should work but it real life it doesn’t because the patients have a hard time understanding and following the instructions. A very typical goodwhite mistake is to assume that all humans are really just like themselves.

    Marxist prescriptions are like that too – if the world was made up only of other hard working, honest PhD’s like the author then maybe you could construct a working Marxist regime. But real societies are made up with a high % of stupid selfish people with a sprinkling of sociopaths to boot so it all breaks down with free rider effects, corruption, greed, etc.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Mark G.
  196. @Steve Sailer

    I’m not a celebrity, but I am fat.

    Sheltering in place is not conducive to losing weight. Being stuck at home in a stressful situation tends to lead to overeating.

    Food is the cheapest legal drug. Addiction to food is no different from any other addiction. It’s more socially acceptable to be an alcoholic or even an addict than it is to be a fatty, but the underlying psychological issues that lead to all three conditions are basically the same.

    Fat people are accustomed to receiving unsolicited advice. It goes with the territory.

    Most of my relatives are drunks and addicts. I’m neither. I always find it amusing that the same people who lecture me about my failings refuse to tolerate even the slightest bit of criticism about their own flaws.

    When I was growing up, my grandmother would routinely make humiliating comments about my weight in front of everyone. But she never allowed anyone to utter one even word about my aunt – a high-school dropout, a hopeless drunk, and a cocaine addict – as she racked up multiple DUIs (smashing up a couple of cars in the process) and slogged through a succession of failed rehabs.

    Grandma nearly disowned one of my uncles when she overheard him making an offhand remark about the amount of money that my aunt had snorted up her nose. (The number was in the six figures.) She giggled when the same uncle made a vicious comment about me in front of everyone at the dinner table.

    No one ever defended me, and I never expected anyone to do so. I wasn’t allowed to defend myself.

    But all of that is water under the bridge. I’m not angry anymore. In retrospect, my grandmother did me a favor. She helped me develop a thick skin.

    My relatives are who they are; I am who I am. To the extent that they’re good for me, I’m glad to have them in my life; to the extent that they’re not, they can all go fuck themselves.

    I’m not a proponent of “fat acceptance”; I don’t think “fat is fabulous”; I am aware that fat is unhealthy and unattractive; I have tried to lose weight; I have not enjoyed much success in that regard; I have learned to live with it. I was a fat kid; I was a fat teenager; I was a fat young adult; now I’m a fat thirtysomething. In all likelihood, I will be fat until the day I die.

    What can I say? “I am a fatty, unworthy of life; I must hurl myself in front of a freight train!” Forget it.

    If you like me, that’s great; if you don’t, too bad. I make no apologies.

    • Thanks: Inquiring Mind
    • Replies: @dfordoom
  197. Stogumber says:

    Just followed your link to the Bilderberg commemoration of Retinger and found the strange sentences:
    “His many friends, meanwhile, loved and respected him. They sometimes gave him affectionate nicknames, such as: ‘Father Joseph’ (in memory of his stay at the seminary, when he was 16 years old); the ‘Lame Devil’ (because of the walking problem that affected him since an unfortunate parachute jump he undertook in 1944, which left him needing to use a walking stick); or the Éminence Grise (because of his behavior, as well as his close ties with the two Popes, the White one and the Black one).”
    These people are ignorant enough to not see the allusion to Richelieu’s well-known counselor Father Joseph (named “éminence grise” after the colour of his habit)? Or have they drawn the parallel, but deem it unappropriate for the public?

  198. Muggles says:
    @guest007

    About the time Steve started at Rice I was living over there for two years in that neighborhood you describe.

    At Binz and Jackson St., just a few blocks NW of Old Spanish Trail. In a commune type group house (The Waterhole) with a varying cast of residents. Cheap and walkable to Rice, nearby Hermann Park.

    We were burglarized once but usually had people there and/or large dogs. Now the area is becoming much more expensive. The house I lived in is now gone, along with the next door “woman’s clinic” i.e. abortion clinic. Townhomes there now.

    I never met any other Rice students who lived over there, though it was low rent and walkable. Of course I was poorer than anyone else I knew there. You learn to live frugally when you have to. Though I wouldn’t have lived there if I were female. I heard a lot of gunfire from my upstairs bedroom, but rarely heard any police sirens. We felt safe enough, but firearms were on hand.

  199. @Mr. Anon

    Vitamin D is the reason I recommended taking a walk at noontime because sunlight then (even on a clouded day!) is most effective in triggering the Vitamin A mechanism in our body.

  200. Muggles says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Re: lack of fast food near Rice U. campus.

    Yes, very true, though there are a few places now within walking distance just outside the west side of campus. Still a long walk from the dorms (“colleges”) there.

    The Jewish deli Alfreds was a about a mile and a half walk, good food but not cheap. This now gone for several years.

    The fast food was a particular problem on Sunday, when the student food service didn’t serve dinner. If you didn’t have a car or bike and lived on campus like I did as a freshman you had to bum a ride or go hungry.

  201. utu says:
    @Old Prude

    Speaking as a “Just the flu” guy, my proposed solution to Covid is to react to it like it was just the flu.

    You should be congratulated for logic and consistency. Just one thing: a false premise makes the implication always true. You should go back to the premise and replace it with “It’s worse than a flu” and begin to work from there. I count on your logic and constancy to arrive at correct solution.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  202. @Jack D

    Marxist prescriptions are like that too – if the world was made up only of other hard working, honest PhD’s like the author then maybe you could construct a working Marxist regime.

    Steve made this point about libertarian, or at least capitalist, prescriptions in places like post-Soviet Russia. The idealists are criminally naive about how venal and corrupt the real world is. Not that regulation itself would be any less so. You need to jack up the cynicism: Even the cops will be crooks.

    But real societies are made up with a high % of stupid selfish people with a sprinkling of sociopaths to boot so it all breaks down with free rider effects, corruption, greed, etc.

    Are you implying that academia is in any way different? If anything, it’s even worse because, as they often say, the stakes are so small.

    Thomas Sowell was a Marxist in his youth. He even wrote a book about it. He tells the story of how he’d walk three miles daily through proletarian Irish Boston on the way to Harvard, always careful to dress down. Being a working-class black was deemed alright; a Harvard man, no way.

  203. Mark G. says:
    @Jack D

    Marxist prescriptions are like that too – if the world was made up only of other hard working, honest PhD’s like the author then maybe you could construct a working Marxist regime. But real societies are made up with a high % of stupid selfish people with a sprinkling of sociopaths to boot so it all breaks down with free rider effects, corruption, greed, etc.

    This kind of “people aren’t good enough for Marxism” argument is mistaken. Every Marxist regime fails and when it fails the leaders say it’s a noble idea but failed because of the people implementing it. If you could just find the right people it would work, they’ll say. In reality, it doesn’t work because it’s unworkable. You need a price system to allocate scarce resources and having government bureaucrats set prices doesn’t work. Equalizing incomes doesn’t work because there is little incentive to work harder when you make the same amount whether you work hard or not. It’s an evil system that appeals to envy and the desire of people with primitive mentalities to just whack anyone over the head with a club who has more than them and take it away from them.

  204. J.Ross says:
    @J.Ross

    Follow-up: another UFO chaser says the lockdown is a fraud. Oh wait, it’s a highly respected virologist who took his degree at Cambridge.

    https://www.westernstandardonline.com/2020/11/senior-doc-says-alberta-politicians-playing-medicine-media-driving-hysteria/

  205. @PhysicistDave

    Words mean what they want them to mean. We should fix that. I suggest using humor.

  206. Jack D says:

    he’d walk three miles daily through proletarian Irish Boston on the way to Harvard

    Was it uphill both ways? Was the T broken during those years? Boston has excellent mass transit left over from the days when we still had a functioning society – all sorts of subways, trolleys running underground, trackless trolleys, etc. Could he not afford the bus fare?

  207. @guest007

    Once again, someone reinforces the idea that shoot the messenger is a pathway to success.

    You meant messengers…plural.

    Saying the same thing, over and over.

  208. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Stan Adams

    Food is the cheapest legal drug. Addiction to food is no different from any other addiction.

    You mean it’s driven by self-indulgence and self-pity? And that the concept of addiction has been invented to excuse self-indulgence and self-pity?

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  209. @Mr. Anon

    Vitamin D is very important for good health in general. However, if you live in a northern state, it’s pretty hard to get enough sunshine.

    Vitamin supplements can help to some extent, but there’s evidence that they can’t fully substitute for the health benefits associated with sun exposure.

    Zinc is pretty helpful too.

  210. Anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @dfordoom

    You will never get white people to work together to achieve that goal.

    The USA Solid South’s White inhabitants did work together to achieve that goal until about 1960, when force majure defeated them.

  211. Mr. Anon says:
    @dfordoom

    Quite so. A lot of revolutions are themselves just battles between various elite factions, with the masses, in whose name the revolution is stage, just being a tool in that struggle.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  212. Alice says:
    @anon

    that future is here.

    community colleges are now staffed with almost all AA hires even in STEM. They are deans in charge who know little and teach even less. the courses during lockdown are the absolute worst garbage. my 4th grader can earn an A in college chem–it is set up with multiple choice and cartoons and all answers are googleable. but no one can learn and retain any knowledge in this course. there’s no content to retain. The profs i know admit less than 1/4 of their enrolled students are watching the canned lectures, and over 80% are cheating. They have to give As anyway. no one is learning anything. it will be at least 3 terms of this. what makes you think it will ever improve again?

    blue chip companies have hired so many AA and diversity hires that no one is left who can make anything, and no one is left in mgt who can tell good work from bad. The competent are leaving, quitting, retiring. the young are being made incompetent by design. what few bright ones remain can’t learn in college, and can’t even avoid woke college and go into the trades because literally the trade classes are ONLINE too. it’s all garbage. and children? children are now on year 2 of anti-learning. they have lost ground every day since March. They are not learning enough to maintain anything, let alone, pick up what they have missed.

    it is a disaster. but historians tell us that when Rome Fell, it didn’t really, you know,
    fall. life didn’t change much for normal people, they swear. uh huh. sure. That’s why roads weren’t safe for people to travel again across Europe for well over 1,000 years.

    • Thanks: Old Prude
  213. Alice says:
    @rebel yell

    thus is not happening. thr smart white kids cant even get into these schools and succeed, because there is no one left at them to teach them anything. state schools are more woke than the Ivies. They also have less reason to curate an undergrad population that includes the smart and the non woke.

    smart people are no longer running the productive machinery of society. they were kicked out for not being Woke.

  214. MEH 0910 says:
    @anon

    So the Rice area has that going for them.

  215. @Charles Pewitt

    Elizabeth Holmes let Biden sniff her hair in exchange for a ringing endorsement. I hope someone reminds him not to give her a cabinet position.

    On second thought, if Biden really had any faith in the company Hunter would have been on its board.

  216. @dfordoom

    dfordoom wrote to me:

    I suspect there’d be a huge sex difference though, with women much more willing to admit to being “below average drivers” while about 99% of men would describe themselves as “above average drivers”.

    Yeah, I suspect you’re right.

    dfordoom also wrote:

    It would be great to test that with a survey. How many physicists would describe themselves as “below average physicists”?

    Ahhhh… well, I suspect that most of us secretly think we are an Einstein, who just did not get the lucky breaks he had (lucky breaks like working in the Swiss patent office?). Of course, pretty much all of us know that our actual achievements do not rival Einstein’s, and the norms of the field are that you pretend to believe that you are just an average guy even when everyone actually does acknowledge you to be a leader in the field.

    So, probably few would say that they are below average, but a lot would say they are just average.

    You’re right to narrow in on physicists’ soft spot when it comes to vanity: I’d guess that most of us are pretty objective about our physical looks, our athletic ability, etc. But to admit that we really are below average as physicists? That would hurt.

    My own guess is that engineers have less of that sort of vanity, mainly because many engineers “have a life” outside of engineering and just do not care all that much about whether they are a “great” engineer.

    It would be an interesting study for some psych guy, and I’d guess the response rate would be okay, since ti is the kind of thing that would intrigue physicists and engineers.

  217. Old Prude says:
    @utu

    “It’s worse than the flu”. At no point do I arrive at face-mask theater and cancel Girl’s Cross-country, much less Make Grandma spend Thanksgiving and Christmas alone, and all the other inanity.

  218. danand says:
    @Jack D

    “…not surprising because we have an exceptionally selfish society…”

    I couldn’t let that just slip by. While demonstrably many are exceptionally selfish, on the whole, that just is not the case. Many “shirt off the back” citizens are still to be found, I know plenty of them. But then again, I guess there’s a sucker born every minute or so.

    8DD3CF65-BC45-400C-A856-4F9D79EA213F

    49950889-DCCA-454A-BC45-A355B3BA408B

    • Thanks: bomag
  219. The Craw says:
    @J.Ross

    Saw this myself upon visiting the Kellogg HQ in Battle Creek, Michigan.
    In the cubicle farm portion of the operation there were several banners hung from the ceiling depicting various company trademarked characters exhorting the worker bees to achieve corporate goals or promote company policies.
    So, for example, Tony the Tiger appeared along with a statement promoting inclusivity. In another, Snap, one of the Rice Krispies elves, was depicted along with a statement that “Accountability is a Kellogg value.”
    Meanwhile in the executive suite the walls were wood panelled and decorated with original modern art. Not a single picture of Toucan Sam or Dig ‘Em Frog anywhere.

  220. IHTG says:
    @Gary in Gramercy

    Consider it a bitter observation, if you want.

  221. J.Ross says:
    @Steve Sailer

    There are a ton of fat women who are semi-celebrities of our confused moment (they’re essentially talk show co-hosts), their fat is protected as a kind of minority status badge, and as far as I know none have followed your advice. Meanwhile the departed John Candy was the funniest man Canada could produce and nobody cared about his weight because he was actually funny.

  222. Old Prude says:
    @Jack D

    “It’s just the Flu” isn’t about macho. It’s about disgust at the wild and destructive over reaction to what this bug reaps (570 dead octogenarians in Maine! Lock up the kids! Poo).

    Compared to real damage wrought by the Pandemic Peddlers the IJTFlu boys have nothing to be guilty of. I got my flu shot. Since covidcooties are just the flu, I reckon I’ll get that shot, too. Now can we cut it with face-mask theatre?

  223. BB753 says:
    @The Alarmist

    I still can’t believe that our esteemed guest, Steve Sailer, bought the whole Wu-Flu scam hook, line and sinker. It’s probably a generational thing: the older you are, the more you dread new diseases. I also understand Steve overcame cancer 20 years ago, but still…
    Myself, even if I were 85 years old, I’d rather die than spend the rest of my days in home confinement or forced to wear a ridiculous mask which does virtually nothing to prevent infection. To me, the very idea of insanity is watching people wearing masks in the open air. I’d understand it in a crowded and moist Hong Kong alleyway. But not in suburban America, with its wide lanes and open spaces and scarcely any pedestrian in sight.
    This madness has got to stop!

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  224. @TheTrumanShow

    None taken, I should have added /s tag. I meant they will just say “we have the vaccine, but we still can’t get back to normal because not everyone’s getting it.” Then it’s compulsory. Then it’s “we still can’t get back to normal because of antivaxxers, so I guess its lockdowns forever”

  225. @BB753

    I’m a bit older than iSteve and had cancer a few years back, so I might only have a 94% chance of successful recovery from COVID (which I may very well have had in January), but it galls me to see the folks who have a >99.97% chance of surviving COVID with no noticeable lasting effects being locked down and driven into penury and despair in the name of not “killing granny” (funny how they rarely mention gramps). I feel sad seeing people walking around in fresh air wearing masks, but annoyed and amused at the panicked stares I get when I don’t wear one in the open. I’ve surprised colleagues and actually lightened things at the office by telling visitors to my office they don’t need to wear the mask if they don’t want to, and despite company policy, none have opted to keep the mask on. I still hug friends and family and shake hands unless these gestures are not welcome (they rarely aren’t welcome), and I’ve even dined a few times buffet style in the past months. In any case, a small, frequent viral-load exposure to the bug might actually be better for your immune system than getting no exposure at all until you do.

    We are all going to die, but most likely not today or in the coming weeks. I’ve cheated death a few times, but what was the point of that if I am now expected to voluntarily dehumanise myself?

    Biological existence is not the same as living.

    • Thanks: BB753
    • Replies: @BB753
  226. BB753 says:
    @The Alarmist

    You, sir, are a real man! If only there were more brave and sensible men of all ages like you today, we wouldn’t be facing a dire future of penury, martial law and oligarchic tyranny!

  227. Anonymous[138] • Disclaimer says:
    @dfordoom

    For starters, you are an idiot. Soon Whites will have no choice..

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  228. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    For starters, you are an idiot. Soon Whites will have no choice..

    Nonsense. You will never get Whites in any numbers to adopt any kind of White Identitarianism or to work together as a racial group. Lots of Whites are doing very very well indeed at the moment and will continue to do well. Whites will remain bitterly divided along class and ideological lines. In fact those divides will grow steadily more extreme. Inter-White class and ideological hatreds are more likely to increase than decrease.

    The idea that soon Whites will unite is pure wishful thinking. As the overall situation of society gets worse Whites will turn against each other more and more.

    And for the foreseeable future most Whites will continue not to care because they still have everything they want – shiny consumer goods, TV, social media, unlimited porn, celebrity gossip, etc.

    Advocates for White Identitarianism take a rather hysterical view of things. For most White people life is just going on and they don’t care. Most White people could not care less about things like freedom of speech. Most White people could not care less about the supposed coming race war. Just because you’re hysterical about the future doesn’t mean that the majority of Whites share your hysteria.

    Things are going to get worse in the sense that the rich are going to get richer and the poor are going to get poorer but White people who are doing OK don’t care about that. Things are also going to get worse in the sense that society is going to become more totalitarian but most White people couldn’t care less about that either.

  229. @PhysicistDave

    Wikipedia claims that at the end of his life [Eugene Genovese] was a traditionalist conservative (“Southern Agrarian” variety), which I had not heard before. Do you know if that is true?

    It’s true. He and his wife also returned to the Catholic faith and indeed became very devout, as well as ever more traditionalist in religious orientation.

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