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From the New York Times:

University of California Will No Longer Consider SAT and ACT Scores

The university system has reached a settlement with students to scrap even optional testing from admissions and scholarship decisions.

By Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio

For some reason, that strikes me as the funniest Conquistador-American name yet that I’ve seen among diversity hires. I’m waiting for José Antonio Primo de Rivera y Sáenz de Heredia IV, Duke of Primo Rivera to show up on the New York Times list of its new vibrantly diverse employees, but until then Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio will have to do.

May 15, 2021

The University of California will not take SAT and ACT scores into account in admissions or scholarship decisions for its system of 10 schools, which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses, in accordance with a settlement in a lawsuit brought by students.

Lawsuit settlements are one of the most corrupt ways for liberal institutions to do what they wanted to to.

The settlement announced on Friday signals the end of a lengthy legal debate over whether the University of California system should use the standardized tests, which students of color and those with disabilities have said put them at a disadvantage. Opponents of the tests called the settlement “historic,” and said that it would broaden access to campuses for students across the state.

“Today’s settlement ensures that the university will not revert to its planned use of the SAT and ACT — which its own regents have admitted are racist metrics,” said Amanda Mangaser Savage, a lawyer representing the students.

Some 225,000 undergraduate students attend University of California schools, and the settlement this week makes the system the largest and best-known American institution of higher education to distance itself from the use of the two major standardized tests.

You are no longer allowed to even optionally submit your test scores to the University of California.

The settlement resolves a 2019 lawsuit brought by a coalition of students, advocacy groups and the Compton Unified School District, a largely Black and Hispanic district in Los Angeles County.

In other words, the University of California was simply overwhelmed in court by the intellectual superiority of the students of the Compton Unified School District. The University of California tried its hardest, but it was simply cognitively outgunned by Compton high school students.

The plaintiffs said that the college entrance tests are biased against poor and mainly Black and Hispanic students — and that by basing admissions decisions on those tests, the system illegally discriminates against applicants on the basis of their race, wealth and disability.

Seriously, the UC Regents commissioned a study by the Academic Senate of UC faculty of the utility of the SAT college admissions test only a couple of years ago. The UC faculty reported back that the SAT was even more valuable than high school grade point average, with GPA only explaining 16% of freshman grades while SAT accounted for 21%.

Together, SAT and GPA predicted 26% of freshman grades. So eliminating the SAT (and ACT) will reduce predictability by 3/8ths from 26% to 16%.

Interestingly, the SAT is a better predictor than HSGPA for nonwhites, but not as good for whites. My guess is that this is because whites tend to attend schools with less grade inflation than nonwhites. For example, most public schools like to add 1.0 points to GPA for taking Advanced Placement classes, so the highest possible GPA on a 0.0 to 4.0 scale is 5.0, but the very good old line private school my son won a scholarship to refused to offer AP classes (on the grounds that they preferred their teachers to design the courses they preferred to teach), so the highest GPA possible was only 4.0. Despite not taking any officially Advanced Placement classes, my son wound up passing some huge number of AP tests such as 8 or 10, because it was an extravagantly good school. But his GPA would have been a lot higher if he’d attended a public school.

Charles Murray’s view is that colleges should use instead of the SAT the SAT Subject tests. My theory is that the SAT should be turned back into an IQ test (the SAT Verbal test might have been the best high end IQ test in the world up until it was made drastically easier in 1995) and should be combined with Advanced Placement tests.

The idea of having a standardized test for intelligence is so that kids who are smart but not totally into high school can be distinguished from kids who aren’t smart. For example, a friend of mine from first through twelfth grade was always obviously brilliant, but he was kind of bored by school and his home life was difficult because his father had died when he was young, leaving his widowed mother with four orphans. But he aced the SAT back in the 70s when it was a serious test and was admitted to Berkeley where he earned a Master’s in chemical engineering, a serious subject. He then got into programming and made small fortune in the World Wide Web era. Since then he’s played golf and been an important contributor (for free) to Linux, which the whole world depends upon.

So, the SAT should be restored to its past glory as a really good test of raw intelligence.

To complement it, colleges should pay more attention in the admissions process to Advanced Placement tests. If students are going to test prep as much as they have since the Asian Invasion began, they might as well learn American History and Chemistry while they are doing it.

Also, the Advanced Placement tests’ scoring should be extended from 1 to 5 to 1 to 7 to make it more relevant for elite colleges (e.g., Caltech doesn’t listen to AP test scores because it assumes that all of its admits are advanced on STEM subjects). For example, last I heard, to get a 5 on AP Chemistry, a brute of a test requiring both mathematical theory and memorization of weird facts, you only had to get 56% right. I totally agree that people who get 56% right on AP Chemistry should get a 5, but kids who get 70+% right should get a 6 and 85+% right a 7.

 
• Category: Race/Ethnicity • Tags: Academia, California, Meritocracy, SAT 
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  1. There are math contests such as the AMC 10 and AMC 12 that are harder and more g-loaded than the SAT. Maybe applicants to UC schools that want to showcase math prowess will mention these scores on their applications.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Pittsburgh Thatcherite
    @Beliavsky

    Admission to Singaporean universities is determined by performance on subject-specific standardized tests: the Singaporean A-levels.

    There are A-level examinations for Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, and many other subjects.

    Singapore originally used the British A-level examinations for university admissions, but when Britain made their A-levels easier, Singapore abandoned the British A-levels.

    Singapore then created the Singaporean A-levels, which are even more difficult than the original undiluted British A-levels.

    .

    Why reinvent the wheel?

    Other nations should simply use the best existing subject-specific standardized tests to determine who is admitted to the best universities: The Singaporean A-levels.

    .

    When Singapore became independent in 1965, Singapore was a third-world nation with a 40% illiteracy rate.

    Today, Singapore, a 278 square mile island, has 11 universities, including two internationally-ranked universities.

    Singapore is the most meritocratic society in the world, where advancement in the educational system, private-sector employment, and even government employment is determined by the quality of a citizen’s work.

    Singapore has the best government in the world.

    , @Seneca44
    @Beliavsky

    Yeah, there have to be several IQ variant tests which can allow outstanding students to shine without the gaming and test prep courses for the wealthy that the SAT evolved into.

    , @Anon
    @Beliavsky

    They already do, especially prominent students receive the Regents Scholarship which is $80k over four years.

    , @res
    @Beliavsky

    Right. That is the kind of thing which will happen in response to eliminating SAT/ACT in admissions. The interesting thing (intentional?) is measures like that will only tilt things further towards the already advantaged.

    It seems likely the reason for eliminating SAT/ACT is to prevent inconvenient facts appearing as the colleges go about admitting whomever they want. Look how test scores were used in the Harvard admissions controversy.

    The interesting question is how the balance of admissions criteria will change.

    , @Wency
    @Beliavsky

    The real IQ test is figuring out how to showcase IQ in spite of rules designed to prevent the showcasing of IQ.

  2. Trying to fight educational inequality by getting rid of the SAT is like trying to fight climate change by getting rid of thermometers.

    Attribution here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/black-share-of-known-murder-offenders-1980-2019/#comment-4662488

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    @Charon

    Who cares? What's the worst that could happen?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdPmNM0IF7Y

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  3. “…which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses…”

    Not anymore.

    My decision to leave California last year is looking better every day.

    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter, Escher
    • Replies: @Anon
    @Spud Boy


    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.
     
    His Zestimate is about $1,470,000, net proceeds after closing costs of $1,350,000. That will buy a lot of home in Fort Worth, where most of my family lives.

    I'm not sure how the taxes and capital gains work.

    Replies: @Spud Boy, @International Jew

    , @TWS
    @Spud Boy

    He'll never leave. If he does that means being a civic nationalist is dead. America is dead as he believes it to be. I don't think he can do that

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Spud Boy


    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.

     

    His education was in Houston, much of his career in Chicago. His international travels, at least those of which he describes here, seem limited to touring favelas.


    Studio City looks tame in comparison.
    , @AnotherDad
    @Spud Boy


    “…which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses…”

    Not anymore.
     
    Brought this up before, but bears repeating:

    One of the items nationalists/conservatives/traditionalists must do is use some sort of competency exams to deflate college credentialism, the college bubble.

    Truth is there is more access to information than ever. There is absolutely no need for the typical undergrad student to even be on a campus excepting hard science, engineering and some arts students who need cycles in the lab/studio/stage. The few people who are actually interested in academic knowledge/learning, actually learn by reading. Videos of lectures, animations of maps, techniques, phenomena, etc. etc. may help too. Not required is paying $$$ to sit in a lecture hall.

    But in any case, most of what we have is people just collecting a credential to say "college grad". Simple tests of reading comprehension, some writing, math, ability to interpret graphs and tables are more than sufficient for white collar credentialism. And the opportunity to "just do it" on their own--and get on with adult life--rather than some tedious expensive slog, will actually be motivating to a lot of young adults.

    Radically reducing the need for college has a bunch of positive effects:
    -- reducing a deadweight costs on the economy
    -- middle class parents not having to worry about college costs can have more children
    -- young people enter adult life sooner and without college debt, ergo can marry, buy houses and have children faster ... leading to higher fertility
    -- chopping back a huge chunk of left-minoritarian indoctrination
    -- destroying huge numbers of jobs that are comfy sinecures for our minoritarian enemies!

    Replies: @anon, @Paul Mendez

    , @AnotherDad
    @Spud Boy

    BTW, a second point here:

    This decision isn't really very odd. And really does not require "wokeism".

    The utterly confused people are these people--ex. neocon Jews--who are "soft"-minoritarians or proponents of immigration or a multi-ethnic tapestry or a "universal nation" ... blah, blah, blah, who think that that is compatible with "meritocracy".

    Ridiculous.

    You can have meritocracy in a one-people nation, or at least a nation with a self-confident majority people.

    In any sort of multi-ethnic democracy you will have political allocation.

    Forget our particular set of problems, look at India. Everyone knows who the smart people are there--the people who have been literate for a couple thousand years. But all the other Indians don't think they should have to listen to Brahmins sucking up all the good gigs and telling 'em what to do. So they don't.

    Mexicans (plus other CA) are 40% of California. They are half the kids hitting 18. Why in the hell should they not get their share of slots at the state flagship? It's their state now. (Should never have been ... but it is now.)

    Jews wanted to destroy the white gentile America to prevent the Nazis from marching or something and immigrate in a bunch of people so they could feel more comfortable middle manning a multi-ethnic America. Well this is what it looks like. Ethnic politics--every ethnic group grasping for their slice of the pie. It's crappy. One people nations are more natural, more sane, more pleasant place--just better. But some people just don't want to admit that.

  4. “Lawsuit settlements are one of the most corrupt ways for liberal institutions to do what they wanted to to.”

    This sort of settlement agreement is also how Stacey Abrams stole Georgia from Trump and delivered it to Biden/Obama. They sued Georgia to relax the rules on absentee voting. Georgia secretary of state Brad Raffensperger delegated the issue to his deputy Jordie Fuchs. Then Fuchs and Abrams put their heads together and got the job done!

    • Replies: @bomag
    @Guest29048

    Also Pennsylvania, with the help of packing the state supreme court.

    And our alleged conservative SCOTUS did nothing.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  5. My theory is that the SAT should be turned back into an IQ test (the SAT Verbal test might have been the best high end IQ test in the world up until it was made drastically easier in 1995)

    That title belonged to the Analytical Section of the GRE.

    • Replies: @res
    @Charon


    That title belonged to the Analytical Section of the GRE.
     
    Do you have numbers supporting that?

    It is hard to compare the SAT and GRE since the test taking pools are different, but a decent first cut is to look at qualifying scores for high IQ societies.

    For Mensa the qualifying scores for the pre-1994 SAT and GRE were the same--1250.
    https://www.us.mensa.org/join/testscores/qualifying-test-scores/

    For the Triple Nine Society the pre-1995 SAT threshold was 1450 and the pre-2001 GRE threshold was 1460.
    http://www.triplenine.org/HowtoJoin/TestScores.aspx

    The pre-1995 SAT was valuable both because of its relatively high ceiling and the large pool of students taking it.

    P.S. Note that Mensa is top 2% of the general population (about 2 SD) and Triple Nine is top 0.1% (about 3 SD) so the score differences should correspond to about an SD for the general population.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    , @International Jew
    @Charon

    Yeah, that was a great test, and pretty hard. If I hadn't put a few solid hours preparing for it, I would have really bombed. But that points to a problem with using it as an IQ test: preparation makes too much of a difference.

    So I'm with Steve; the old verbal SAT is it. And this isn't a very scientific thing to say, but when I think of what makes me think of someone as intelligent, high up there are (1) his ability to grasp what I'm saying (ie reading comprehension), and (2) ability to think abstractly (ie analogies).

    Replies: @J.Ross, @James Forrestal

  6. If the court found that Compton Unified was correct in stating the SAT etc. are racist, the court should task them with approving a non-racist exam. Win-win-win.

    To go along with the paradigm that anything declared racist must be removed is a terrible step. Compton Unified declared today that Whites are racist. The court agreed and ruled that all White people must be removed.

    Pretty much where we are headed.

    _______________________________________________________

    I wonder what the work around will be. Voluntary submission of SAT score?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @bomag


    the court should task them with approving a non-racist exam.
     
    They've tried this before. It's impossible because reality is racist. The only way you can make an SAT on which blacks will score equal to Asians is to test for trivial knowledge more known by blacks like the names of rappers and even then the Asians will memorize them better.

    The settlement says that you CAN'T submit SAT scores even voluntarily.

    I really wonder what will happen to, for example Berkeley which was, until recently, a very competitive school?

    Replies: @Guest007, @bomag

  7. Alternatively you could just buy subscriptions to various internet courses. Let the kiddos try their luck. You will know which ones are ‘worthy’ just by the fact they are doing the course work.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  8. Anon[100] • Disclaimer says:

    How about:

    Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar

    First first name: Juana
    Second first name: Enriqueta
    Third first name: Josefina
    Compound second name: de los Sagrados Corazones
    Paternal name: Fernández
    Maternal name: del Solar

    Wikipedia:

    Colonial Hispanic America

    In the colonial period and nineteenth century, it was common to have between one and three given names followed by a second name with a “de” (from) in front. For example, the Saint Teresa de Los Andes whose real name is Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar. Where “Juana”, “Enriqueta” and “Josefina” are her first names, followed by the second name “de los Sagrados Corazones”. Her paternal surname is “Fernández” and her maternal surname is “del Solar”.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    I knew a girl from South America who reeled off a sequence of about a dozen family names of hers one time, quickly in a row, rolling the r's and all that. I don't remember the names, but I remember that it was pretty sexy

    Replies: @Old Prude

    , @Svevlad
    @Anon

    More multicultural:

    Jieshi Demarcus Gomez von Ungern-Sternberg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Hibernian
    @Anon

    The compound second name means "of the Sacred Hearts." I wonder if this is a reference to both the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

    Replies: @Anon

    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Anon

    Consuelo Maria del Carmen de la Santa Reputisima Madre de Hernán Cortés de Monroy y Pizarro Altamirano

    Replies: @Cortes

    , @James J O'Meara
    @Anon

    Nice, but while they were fiddling around with names they pissed an empire down their leg.

    Stick with Paul, Peter, and Marie

    https://youtu.be/umEvN4YaViI

    , @Macumazahn
    @Anon

    Francisco Domingo Carlos Andres Sebastián d'Anconia

  9. Anon[215] • Disclaimer says:
    @Spud Boy
    "...which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses..."

    Not anymore.

    My decision to leave California last year is looking better every day.

    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.

    Replies: @Anon, @TWS, @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.

    His Zestimate is about $1,470,000, net proceeds after closing costs of $1,350,000. That will buy a lot of home in Fort Worth, where most of my family lives.

    I’m not sure how the taxes and capital gains work.

    • Troll: houston 1992
    • Replies: @Spud Boy
    @Anon

    "I’m not sure how the taxes and capital gains work."

    I sold my house in CA for $2.26M last year; bought a ~$1M home in Georgia with cash (twice the size; twice the land BTW). My federal+CA tax liability on the $910K profit I made over 7 years on the house was about $75K.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    , @International Jew
    @Anon


    I’m not sure how the taxes and capital gains work.
     
    If LA County is like my county 400 miles north, then as long as he buys a new house in the same county, his new house's tax basis doesn't get adjusted to market value. Steve's gameplan then can be to move to Lancaster and hope that it'll secede and join up with Arizona or Nevada.

    Replies: @Anon

  10. anon[346] • Disclaimer says:

    From Wikipedia Article on City College New York

    “In the years when top-flight private schools were restricted to the children of the Protestant establishment, thousands of brilliant individuals (including Jewish students) attended City College because they had no other option. CCNY’s academic excellence and status as a working-class school earned it the titles “Harvard of the Proletariat”, the “poor man’s Harvard”, and “Harvard-on-the-Hudson”

    …….

    “CCNY during a 1969 protest takeover of the South campus,[45] under threat of a riot, African American and Puerto Rican activists and their white allies demanded, among other policy changes, that the City College implement an aggressive affirmative action program to increase minority enrollment and provide academic support.[18] At some point, campus protesters began referring to CCNY as “Harlem University.” The administration of the City University at first balked at the demands, but instead, came up with an open admissions or open-access program under which any graduate of a New York City high school would be able to matriculate either at City College or another college in the CUNY system. Beginning in 1970, the program opened doors to college to many who would not otherwise have been able to attend college. The increased enrollment of students, regardless of college preparedness, however, challenged City College’s and the University’s academic reputation and strained New York City’s financial resources.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @anon

    Of course City College is not the "poor man's Harvard" anymore (far from it) but what happened when some semblance of order was restored is that there ended up being a gradation between the different CUNY schools with the least able students channeled to some of the other campuses. I suspect that after things shake out, that's how it's going to be in California also. But first, ugga bugga!

  11. Lawsuit settlements are one of the most corrupt ways for liberal institutions to do what they wanted to [d]o.

    Why do you limit this to “liberal”?

    The ultra vires doctrine of Supreme Court Sez has, since Marbury but increasingly in the post-WWII era, helped to suck power and all that comes with into Washington and, as here, away from the people of the sovereign states. The invertebrate Congress (and, as here, California legislators) has gladly ceded its authority, allowing the President free reign {used intentionally} beyond the national borders and the Court to issue decrees on domestic issues that might imperil re-election. The “branches” are better understood as three hands washing each other.

    Please tell your readers when the “conservative” politicians in California do anything but fume and throw up their hands about this. Or, on second thought, even so much as that.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Greta Handel

    Correct and thank you. The courts, not elected legislatures make our laws. And often overturn laws jews communists and liberals don’t like.

    As for the SATs and ACTs, being eliminated, teens all over California are celebrating. Professional sob story admissions essay writers are raising their prices.

  12. Given the lack of kids, the schools just need warm bodies to fill their rosters. SAT is an antiquated impediment to schools and their tuition schemes.

    • Agree: J.Ross
    • Replies: @Guest007
    @Old and Grumpy

    UC-Riverside has an acceptance rate of 63% and is the lowest tier of the UC system. UC does not run out of students.
    http://collegeresults.org/collegeprofile.aspx?institutionid=110671


    UCLA and UC-Berkley have separate admissions for their Colleges of Engineering. From the UC-Berkley website For the 2020–21 academic year, there were 15,881 freshman applicants to the College of Engineering and 12.2% were admitted. https://engineering.berkeley.edu/admissions/undergraduate-admissions/prospective-freshman-faqs/

    So a question for many students is whether they are better off majoring in sociology at UC-Berkley or majoring in Engineering or Business at some other university.

  13. There are 2 highly conflicting points in this post.

    The first, made with some of my favorite humor of yours, is that the institutions in this nation (Higher Ed, in particular here) are a complete shitshow, run by people who will use whatever legal or other intimidation to get their way. Their way is simply to destroy the traditional White society and to get their people in power.

    Then, your second point is a quantitative argument from the data (your table from the UC Regents study) and your personal well thought-out plan for the best, fairest way to admit high school students into colleges.

    Is this 2nd point just a hobby of yours, like golf course architecture, because that’s about a far as it’s going to get? It’s dreamland, and I think you know that, just from my reading of your 1st point. There is NOBODY in a position to use your suggestions would ever even consider your ideas on testing/admission. They are either completely against it, for tribal or societal destruction reasons, or they are cowards, much more concerned about their careers than any kind of decent future for the rest of us.

    Your suggestions from the 2nd part would be good ones, I’m sure, but for a nation rebuilt after the coming turmoil that your 1st part describes just the non-violent first phases of. Perhaps the discussion should lean more toward how can we get through this turmoil as a nation without ending up in the state of 1970s Red China, the 7 decade-long USSR, or current South Africa. I keep suggesting this: We need a prepper forum on here.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Perhaps the discussion should lean more toward how can we get through this turmoil as a nation without ending up in the state of 1970s Red China, the 7 decade-long USSR, or current South Africa. I keep suggesting this: We need a prepper forum on here.
     
    What sort of forum would you envision? Are there any forums out there that are similar to what you seek?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    , @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Look at S. Africa. You don't need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open. What we need is discussions on home defense - how to build walls with broken glass on top, what is the best home defense weapon, the best concealed carry weapon, the best times to leave your home without getting robbed and so on.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Adam Smith, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    , @Paul Mendez
    @Achmed E. Newman

    The last thing the world needs is another prepper forum. The internet is choking on them. Especially the dorky home-defense forums for Rick Grimes wannabes that fascinate too many commentators here.

    What would be interesting is a forum to debate practical policies to implement after we come out the other side of the Coming Unpleasantries. Start trying to create a roadmap for future generations.

    Call it, “A Final Solution to the [fill in the blank] Problem”

  14. @Anon
    How about:

    Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar

    First first name: Juana
    Second first name: Enriqueta
    Third first name: Josefina
    Compound second name: de los Sagrados Corazones
    Paternal name: Fernández
    Maternal name: del Solar

    Wikipedia:

    Colonial Hispanic America

    In the colonial period and nineteenth century, it was common to have between one and three given names followed by a second name with a "de" (from) in front. For example, the Saint Teresa de Los Andes whose real name is Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar. Where "Juana", "Enriqueta" and "Josefina" are her first names, followed by the second name "de los Sagrados Corazones". Her paternal surname is "Fernández" and her maternal surname is "del Solar".
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Svevlad, @Hibernian, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara, @Macumazahn

    I knew a girl from South America who reeled off a sequence of about a dozen family names of hers one time, quickly in a row, rolling the r’s and all that. I don’t remember the names, but I remember that it was pretty sexy

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    @Achmed E. Newman

    My Maltese was named: Her Royal Highness, Princess, Ambassador Olivia Jubilee Goobenstein de la Poopy di La La.

    The cat was named: Blue.

  15. Anon[148] • Disclaimer says:

    I think that a major hidden problem in testing are the special “disabilities” allowances. This allows for big-time cheating. Nobody knows who is disabled and who got extra time on the test. With all the fake disabilities out there now, most of the student body could claim to be disabled. The testing companies are prohibited from asterisking these test results.

    Speed against a time limit is something a test designer really wants to be able to use as a component of a test. It tests raw intelligence, and it tests planning (“Three sections of four short multiple choice questions each, a long essay to read with eight questions, and two medium essays with five questions each, and I want to be able to guess the first time through and have time for a quick second pass, so how much time for each section, quick?”).

    There are alternatives to time limit testing, like making ridiculously hard tests that nobody could do in 24 hours, but then the genuinely smart students would have to stick around the test center for longer than they really need to to make up for the advantage of the extra time the duller students are getting.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  16. Anon[148] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    There are 2 highly conflicting points in this post.

    The first, made with some of my favorite humor of yours, is that the institutions in this nation (Higher Ed, in particular here) are a complete shitshow, run by people who will use whatever legal or other intimidation to get their way. Their way is simply to destroy the traditional White society and to get their people in power.

    Then, your second point is a quantitative argument from the data (your table from the UC Regents study) and your personal well thought-out plan for the best, fairest way to admit high school students into colleges.

    Is this 2nd point just a hobby of yours, like golf course architecture, because that's about a far as it's going to get? It's dreamland, and I think you know that, just from my reading of your 1st point. There is NOBODY in a position to use your suggestions would ever even consider your ideas on testing/admission. They are either completely against it, for tribal or societal destruction reasons, or they are cowards, much more concerned about their careers than any kind of decent future for the rest of us.

    Your suggestions from the 2nd part would be good ones, I'm sure, but for a nation rebuilt after the coming turmoil that your 1st part describes just the non-violent first phases of. Perhaps the discussion should lean more toward how can we get through this turmoil as a nation without ending up in the state of 1970s Red China, the 7 decade-long USSR, or current South Africa. I keep suggesting this: We need a prepper forum on here.

    Replies: @Anon, @Jack D, @Paul Mendez

    Perhaps the discussion should lean more toward how can we get through this turmoil as a nation without ending up in the state of 1970s Red China, the 7 decade-long USSR, or current South Africa. I keep suggesting this: We need a prepper forum on here.

    What sort of forum would you envision? Are there any forums out there that are similar to what you seek?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    I used to read the prepper sites about 10 years ago. I don't want to steer you wrong, but that survival blog is still up, and Mr. Ross mentioned Ferfal. I also recall a SHTFPlan - the guy has experience from having lived in the Balkins during the mid-1990s war - he used to write like an Eastern European (I think purely to sound authentic), but last I read he went full good grammar.

    I'm sure there are some sites that lean more toward financial management prepping, others about gardening, others about DIY power generation, and so on. Then there are those that get into the homeschooling and other off-the-grid Libertarian ideas, such as Ron Paul.

    What I mean is that, not to kiss Ron Unz's ass here, but I really like the functionality of the commenting system here. Therefore, if he'd get a prepper writer or two, instead of some of the anti-all-things-American writers and the pure Commies, it would be great.

    Replies: @Alden

  17. You are no longer allowed to even optionally submit your test scores to the University of California.

    Put them in your pronouns.

  18. “The education system in Portland is the “Devil in the White City”

    The Child Soldiers of Portland

    There are only a few places on earth where radicals and their children ritualistically burn the American flag and chant “Death to America”: Tehran, Baghdad, Beirut, Kabul, Ramallah—and Portland, Oregon.

    https://www.city-journal.org/critical-race-theory-portland-public-schools

  19. By admitting many students with lesser intelligence, curriculum will need to be dumbed down sufficiently so they don’t wash out after two semesters. If their career choices are simply to become diversity coordinators, fine, because that only requires aggression. In the next couple of decades, choose your medical professionals carefully.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Dan Smith

    You don’t get a choice.

    My transplant surgeon introduced himself the morning of the surgery. His resident handled the follow-ons to deal with the complications.

    , @XYa
    @Dan Smith

    The MCAT is racist, it will soon go.

    https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/fulltext/2020/03000/the_consequences_of_structural_racism_on_mcat.18.aspx

    Grades will be meaningless once universities are dumbed down and there will be no MCAT score.
    Who will be admitted?

    And if you say, “oh there are still the post graduate medical board certifications”, not so fast: https://news.weill.cornell.edu/news/2020/01/study-finds-racial-and-other-demographic-disparities-in-american-board-of-surgery-exam

    The entire post war system physician selection and training is being dismantled. This only produced the greatest medical care for the widest segment of the population in the history of humanity, so it had to go. It already has been gutted to a great degree, but the future looks very bleak.

  20. like trying to fight climate change by getting rid of thermometers

    There is a parallel. Both man made global warming and the systemic racism assertion stem from appeal to ignorance fallacies. Argumentum ad ignorantiam.

    Climate scientists (sic) have often said, “We don’t know what caused the warming, therefore, it must be Man.”

    Same with failure of blacks. Kendi et al don’t know what causes low performance of blacks, therefore, it must be systemic racism.

    • Agree: bomag
  21. Anon[124] • Disclaimer says:

    Sounds like Klaus Schwab and the RESET
    “In this New World Order the children of Israel will furnish all the leaders without encountering opposition. The Governments of the different peoples forming the world republic will fall without difficulty into the hands of the Jews. It will then be possible for the Jewish rulers to abolish private property and everywhere to make use of the resources of the state. Thus will the promise of the Talmud be fulfilled, in which is said that when the Messianic time is come, the Jews will have all the property of the whole world in their hands.” — Baruch Levy, Letter to Karl Marx, ‘La Revue de Paris’, p.574, June 1,1928

  22. No universe, galaxy, solar system, planet, continent, territory, island, nation, state, county, city, parish, town, village, neighborhood, block, kollij, high school or any school was ever improved by an influx of blacks.

    kommie kollijes must be raking in fedbux to accept them.

  23. @bomag
    If the court found that Compton Unified was correct in stating the SAT etc. are racist, the court should task them with approving a non-racist exam. Win-win-win.

    To go along with the paradigm that anything declared racist must be removed is a terrible step. Compton Unified declared today that Whites are racist. The court agreed and ruled that all White people must be removed.

    Pretty much where we are headed.

    _______________________________________________________

    I wonder what the work around will be. Voluntary submission of SAT score?

    Replies: @Jack D

    the court should task them with approving a non-racist exam.

    They’ve tried this before. It’s impossible because reality is racist. The only way you can make an SAT on which blacks will score equal to Asians is to test for trivial knowledge more known by blacks like the names of rappers and even then the Asians will memorize them better.

    The settlement says that you CAN’T submit SAT scores even voluntarily.

    I really wonder what will happen to, for example Berkeley which was, until recently, a very competitive school?

    • Replies: @Guest007
    @Jack D

    It will remain competitive, maybe even more competitive, due to students having to resume build and various programs looking at AP/IB exam scores. In other words, UC-Berkley may admit one using high school GPA but the college of engineering or the college of chemistry will use tighter criteria.

    , @bomag
    @Jack D


    The settlement says that you CAN’T submit SAT scores even voluntarily.
     
    I'm wondering about this. The article says that if a student submits scores, the admissions people are barred from viewing the scores. Sounds rather draconian. As noted elsewhere, there are plenty of other test scores students can submit in the "other achievements" category. If some enterprising test company becomes a de facto SAT test, will we have another round of litigation?

    Replies: @Desiderius

  24. the SAT should be restored

    Passive voice never restored anything.

    It’s the missing subject that is the problem. We aren’t missing because we chose to be.

  25. @Achmed E. Newman
    There are 2 highly conflicting points in this post.

    The first, made with some of my favorite humor of yours, is that the institutions in this nation (Higher Ed, in particular here) are a complete shitshow, run by people who will use whatever legal or other intimidation to get their way. Their way is simply to destroy the traditional White society and to get their people in power.

    Then, your second point is a quantitative argument from the data (your table from the UC Regents study) and your personal well thought-out plan for the best, fairest way to admit high school students into colleges.

    Is this 2nd point just a hobby of yours, like golf course architecture, because that's about a far as it's going to get? It's dreamland, and I think you know that, just from my reading of your 1st point. There is NOBODY in a position to use your suggestions would ever even consider your ideas on testing/admission. They are either completely against it, for tribal or societal destruction reasons, or they are cowards, much more concerned about their careers than any kind of decent future for the rest of us.

    Your suggestions from the 2nd part would be good ones, I'm sure, but for a nation rebuilt after the coming turmoil that your 1st part describes just the non-violent first phases of. Perhaps the discussion should lean more toward how can we get through this turmoil as a nation without ending up in the state of 1970s Red China, the 7 decade-long USSR, or current South Africa. I keep suggesting this: We need a prepper forum on here.

    Replies: @Anon, @Jack D, @Paul Mendez

    Look at S. Africa. You don’t need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open. What we need is discussions on home defense – how to build walls with broken glass on top, what is the best home defense weapon, the best concealed carry weapon, the best times to leave your home without getting robbed and so on.

    • Agree: Charon
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    No, we need to prep in order to AVOID being a part of it. Not all of us are willing to go down this road.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JohnnyWalker123

    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jack D

    Pardon me, but fuck that shit. What you are describing is abject, utter defeat. We are Americans, not Brazilians or South Africans.

    My advice: move to the red area of a red state and make it redder. Big cities are hellscapes if you don't make a healthy six figures; stay out of them. Homeschool your kids and grandkids. Stay out of debt. Stay healthy. Arm up. Get to know your neighbors. When the shit goes down, we will all be fine.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    , @Adam Smith
    @Jack D

    Home defense? How about a DP-12?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bOVOqccmw0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoFikuoIwLw

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    Look at S. Africa. You don’t need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open.
     
    The United States isn’t SA. Part of “prepping”, something you and your disappeared recent ancestors you occasionally lament on this forum also don’t/didn’t understand, is the massive capability for death and destruction if things go south: i.e. total social and political breakdown. All it would take is a few high-level assassinations/attempts to get it all rolling. Or a high-def massacre of whatever woke group happens to be rioting, er, ‘protesting’ one fateful day.

    The domestic offensive capability of currently armed civilians in the US is tremendous. Add armed services mutinies to the mix, and we got ourselves a potential donnybrook with millions dead before someone cries uncle. And maybe millions more dead/expelled depending on the disposition of the victors.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Alden

  26. “The idea of having a standardized test for intelligence is so that kids who are smart but not totally into high school can be distinguished from kids who aren’t smart.”

    I knew a guy my freshman year who was valedictorian of his high school class, but barely broke 1000 on his SATs. He ended up dropping out of engineering after one semester due to poor grades (and outright failing at least one class), and ended up getting a BS in psychology after 5 years.

  27. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Look at S. Africa. You don't need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open. What we need is discussions on home defense - how to build walls with broken glass on top, what is the best home defense weapon, the best concealed carry weapon, the best times to leave your home without getting robbed and so on.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Adam Smith, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    No, we need to prep in order to AVOID being a part of it. Not all of us are willing to go down this road.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    As I understand "prepping" (which is admittedly not that well) it involves getting READY for an inevitable breakdown. That we are coming to the end of the road one way or another is already assumed and prepping does nothing to forestall the outcome, it just means that you are "prepared" when it happens and won't starve to death like your neighbors.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    @Achmed E. Newman

    We need President Tucker Carlson.

  28. @Beliavsky
    There are math contests such as the AMC 10 and AMC 12 that are harder and more g-loaded than the SAT. Maybe applicants to UC schools that want to showcase math prowess will mention these scores on their applications.

    Replies: @Pittsburgh Thatcherite, @Seneca44, @Anon, @res, @Wency

    Admission to Singaporean universities is determined by performance on subject-specific standardized tests: the Singaporean A-levels.

    There are A-level examinations for Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, and many other subjects.

    Singapore originally used the British A-level examinations for university admissions, but when Britain made their A-levels easier, Singapore abandoned the British A-levels.

    Singapore then created the Singaporean A-levels, which are even more difficult than the original undiluted British A-levels.

    .

    Why reinvent the wheel?

    Other nations should simply use the best existing subject-specific standardized tests to determine who is admitted to the best universities: The Singaporean A-levels.

    .

    When Singapore became independent in 1965, Singapore was a third-world nation with a 40% illiteracy rate.

    Today, Singapore, a 278 square mile island, has 11 universities, including two internationally-ranked universities.

    Singapore is the most meritocratic society in the world, where advancement in the educational system, private-sector employment, and even government employment is determined by the quality of a citizen’s work.

    Singapore has the best government in the world.

  29. @Anon
    How about:

    Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar

    First first name: Juana
    Second first name: Enriqueta
    Third first name: Josefina
    Compound second name: de los Sagrados Corazones
    Paternal name: Fernández
    Maternal name: del Solar

    Wikipedia:

    Colonial Hispanic America

    In the colonial period and nineteenth century, it was common to have between one and three given names followed by a second name with a "de" (from) in front. For example, the Saint Teresa de Los Andes whose real name is Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar. Where "Juana", "Enriqueta" and "Josefina" are her first names, followed by the second name "de los Sagrados Corazones". Her paternal surname is "Fernández" and her maternal surname is "del Solar".
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Svevlad, @Hibernian, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara, @Macumazahn

    More multicultural:

    Jieshi Demarcus Gomez von Ungern-Sternberg

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Svevlad


    More multicultural:

    Jieshi Demarcus Gomez von Ungern-Sternberg
     
    If that's what you want, try Paramaribo:

    Varina Tjon-A-Ten (born 29 November 1952 in Paramaribo, Suriname) is a Dutch politician who was a member of the House of Representatives for the Dutch Labour Party (PvdA) from 2003 to 2006.

    Her paternal grandfather came from mainland China to Suriname, but she refers herself to as moksi watra (mixed blood): one of her great-grandmothers was a Brahmin Indian from British Guiana who married a Scot, and she also has Dutch and Jewish ancestry. Her family arrived in Rotterdam in 1964.

    Angelic del Castilho (born 4 April 1967), also known as Angelic Alihusain-del Castilho, is a Surinamese politician of Democratic Alternative '91, and a former ambassador.

    Liakat Ali Errol Alibux (born 30 November 1948 in Paramaribo) is a Surinamese politician historically associated to the PALU [Progressive Workers' and Farmers' Union]. From 1967 to 1973 he studied sociology at the Erasmus University Rotterdam.

    Ivan Patrick Tai-Apin (23 February 1977) is a Surinamese actor, director, screenplay writer and producer. He is mostly known for his out of the box theater shows & plays. In 2016 he started a camera acting school in Suriname and is the managing director of It Goes Productions & Casting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:People_from_Paramaribo

     

    And that doesn't include the talented Wong Loi-Sing clan, now based in Europe.

    "I am a mixture of many cultures, Caribbean Indian, African, Caucasian, Jewish, Indian, Portuguese, and Chinese." --Michael Wong Loi Sing

    Julius Wong Loi Sing is Professor in the Graduate School at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, IL.

    Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing goes to LA to pursue an acting career.

    Note the varied use of hyphens.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Escher

  30. @anon
    From Wikipedia Article on City College New York


    "In the years when top-flight private schools were restricted to the children of the Protestant establishment, thousands of brilliant individuals (including Jewish students) attended City College because they had no other option. CCNY's academic excellence and status as a working-class school earned it the titles "Harvard of the Proletariat", the "poor man's Harvard", and "Harvard-on-the-Hudson"

    .......

    "CCNY during a 1969 protest takeover of the South campus,[45] under threat of a riot, African American and Puerto Rican activists and their white allies demanded, among other policy changes, that the City College implement an aggressive affirmative action program to increase minority enrollment and provide academic support.[18] At some point, campus protesters began referring to CCNY as "Harlem University." The administration of the City University at first balked at the demands, but instead, came up with an open admissions or open-access program under which any graduate of a New York City high school would be able to matriculate either at City College or another college in the CUNY system. Beginning in 1970, the program opened doors to college to many who would not otherwise have been able to attend college. The increased enrollment of students, regardless of college preparedness, however, challenged City College's and the University's academic reputation and strained New York City's financial resources."

    Replies: @Jack D

    Of course City College is not the “poor man’s Harvard” anymore (far from it) but what happened when some semblance of order was restored is that there ended up being a gradation between the different CUNY schools with the least able students channeled to some of the other campuses. I suspect that after things shake out, that’s how it’s going to be in California also. But first, ugga bugga!

  31. @Anon
    @Spud Boy


    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.
     
    His Zestimate is about $1,470,000, net proceeds after closing costs of $1,350,000. That will buy a lot of home in Fort Worth, where most of my family lives.

    I'm not sure how the taxes and capital gains work.

    Replies: @Spud Boy, @International Jew

    “I’m not sure how the taxes and capital gains work.”

    I sold my house in CA for $2.26M last year; bought a ~$1M home in Georgia with cash (twice the size; twice the land BTW). My federal+CA tax liability on the $910K profit I made over 7 years on the house was about $75K.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Spud Boy


    I sold my house in CA for $2.26M last year; bought a ~$1M home in Georgia with cash (twice the size; twice the land BTW). My federal+CA tax liability on the $910K profit I made over 7 years on the house was about $75K.
     
    You made a nice little packet, but ...

    now you live in Georgia, where you pay a still onerous 6% and are going to have Stacey's big ass bossing you--or just sitting on you--for years to come. Georgia's the blackest state (1/3) in the nation after Mississippi.

    If you wanted the South, you should have moved to Tennessee.
  32. It’ll be interesting to see how Asians find a way to game the new, SAT-less, system. I’m confident they’ll find a way. I’m also confident that the Berkeley faculty will find a way to keep their classes from really “looking like California”.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @International Jew

    See my earlier comment about CUNY and City College. It's going to be a complete mess at first with totally unqualified minorities getting into Berkeley which will have to have classes in Remedial Basic Math, etc.

    Then after a few years, they will come up with various partial fixes - they'll have unified admissions for all of the UC Campuses and they will channel you to one campus or another based upon "placement tests" or something like that. They will consolidate all the "Studies" programs on one or two campuses and declare that Berkeley is going to concentrate on other specialties such as math and science. Or else they will have a school within the school. Inside of Berkeley you will have the Jack Ma Honors College as a separate program. Etc.


    It's never going to be perfect or optimal again but neither is it going to be a free-for-all where Tyquan is going to be put in the Multivariable Calculus class with Min Jun and Arjun.

  33. Murray’s idea about the Subject Tests is no longer an option because they were permanently terminated earlier this year.

  34. At this point, we could all benefit from reviewing old Saturday Night Live “Black Jeopardy” skits.

  35. Say what you want, but:

    1. this is funny

    2. Giulia is talented, but probably, deluded …

  36. anon[226] • Disclaimer says:

    The professors will be able to whip the slower students up into quite the indignant frenzy in California. This might equal more BLM and more antifa near campuses. More rapes and false accusations, petty crime and drugs in college towns also. More brokenhearted dads of daughters who are with thugs (“but dad, he tried to go to college! Racist professors failed him!).

    Is also look for more silly new classes and majors.

    • Replies: @Reverend Goody
    @anon

    That would be fantastic. The scarlet letter (the "R" word) slapped on UCLA professors.

  37. I did great on the 1970’s era SAT’s — especially verbal — but was a crappy student, as was shown in my grades. In college, I remained a crappy student, barely getting my B.A. But I had fun and learned a lot. And it wasn’t expensive like today, my extended adolescence was only a few thousand dollars a year.

    finding the diamond in the rough story:
    Rick “Pawn Stars” Harrison was a juvenile delinquent and it was only when he was locked up that his teachers figured out he was a math savant. Because he was such a little snot, his “normal” teachers assumed he was cheating when he got A’s in arithmetic — especially suspicious was he never “showed his work,” but simply penciled in the correct answer. But for Rick there was no work to show, he simply knew the answer, complicated algebra being as no-think as 2+2. But jailhouse teachers were used to tough kids and Rick’s brilliance was not missed by them. Coda: Bringing a rotten 16-year old kid’s parents in to tell them their child is a type of genius does absolutely nothing to reform said child. Harrison wrote it only made him bolder and more full of himself.

  38. @Anon
    How about:

    Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar

    First first name: Juana
    Second first name: Enriqueta
    Third first name: Josefina
    Compound second name: de los Sagrados Corazones
    Paternal name: Fernández
    Maternal name: del Solar

    Wikipedia:

    Colonial Hispanic America

    In the colonial period and nineteenth century, it was common to have between one and three given names followed by a second name with a "de" (from) in front. For example, the Saint Teresa de Los Andes whose real name is Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar. Where "Juana", "Enriqueta" and "Josefina" are her first names, followed by the second name "de los Sagrados Corazones". Her paternal surname is "Fernández" and her maternal surname is "del Solar".
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Svevlad, @Hibernian, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara, @Macumazahn

    The compound second name means “of the Sacred Hearts.” I wonder if this is a reference to both the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Hibernian

    Yes it does. A child could receive their given name, other names from relatives or the name of the saint whose feast day it was and maybe, if a girl, a reference to a particular Marian advocation. To cite a living example, “Maria Celina Elena del Carmen”, known as Celina in everyday life, was named Maria because girls often received a “combo” name that included Maria (for the Virgin) or Ana (for the Virgin’s mother). Thus you get Ana Laura, María Rosa, Maria Amalia, etc. “Elena” was the given name of the woman’s baptismal godmother. “Del Carmen” in this case refers to the Virgen del Carmen, a very old, very spanish Marian advocation. (Though the actual apparition happened in the Holy Land).

  39. @Old and Grumpy
    Given the lack of kids, the schools just need warm bodies to fill their rosters. SAT is an antiquated impediment to schools and their tuition schemes.

    Replies: @Guest007

    UC-Riverside has an acceptance rate of 63% and is the lowest tier of the UC system. UC does not run out of students.
    http://collegeresults.org/collegeprofile.aspx?institutionid=110671

    UCLA and UC-Berkley have separate admissions for their Colleges of Engineering. From the UC-Berkley website For the 2020–21 academic year, there were 15,881 freshman applicants to the College of Engineering and 12.2% were admitted. https://engineering.berkeley.edu/admissions/undergraduate-admissions/prospective-freshman-faqs/

    So a question for many students is whether they are better off majoring in sociology at UC-Berkley or majoring in Engineering or Business at some other university.

  40. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    No, we need to prep in order to AVOID being a part of it. Not all of us are willing to go down this road.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JohnnyWalker123

    As I understand “prepping” (which is admittedly not that well) it involves getting READY for an inevitable breakdown. That we are coming to the end of the road one way or another is already assumed and prepping does nothing to forestall the outcome, it just means that you are “prepared” when it happens and won’t starve to death like your neighbors.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    No doubt that's part of it, Jack, getting ready for the big trouble, which I am certain will start as big economic trouble but lead to political trouble too. A real prepper is not just in the mindset of how to survive to the other side, of which there will be. He also has in mind the idea of a community of like-minded people who will not end up in the same situation on the other side as those who don't prepare.

    I don't claim to be a big prepper like John Wesley Rawles of the Survival Blog, as much as I SHOULD be reading him/it more. However, time is really getting short as one can see from the big increase in land/residential prices as of late and the government admission of higher inflation. (You can double the numbers to get something resembling reality.) Even people to whom the Federal Reserve is no more familiar than The Federalist Papers are just getting a feeling about it and wising up.

    Replies: @JMcG

    , @J.Ross
    @Jack D

    This is reasonably accurate but prepping normally means a few others things; the go-to one volume introduction is Ferfal's Surviving The Collapse, which describes his experience through Argentina's economic crisis. A major piece of advice relevant to both your points is don't be an individual, be in a neighborhood. Rambo has to sleep some time, but a neighborhood will have somebody who can be watching at any given hour, as well as ecompassing a variety of skills and preferences. A lot of the farm murders in South Africa could probably be prevented if the victim had like seven other people with them.

  41. @Jack D
    @bomag


    the court should task them with approving a non-racist exam.
     
    They've tried this before. It's impossible because reality is racist. The only way you can make an SAT on which blacks will score equal to Asians is to test for trivial knowledge more known by blacks like the names of rappers and even then the Asians will memorize them better.

    The settlement says that you CAN'T submit SAT scores even voluntarily.

    I really wonder what will happen to, for example Berkeley which was, until recently, a very competitive school?

    Replies: @Guest007, @bomag

    It will remain competitive, maybe even more competitive, due to students having to resume build and various programs looking at AP/IB exam scores. In other words, UC-Berkley may admit one using high school GPA but the college of engineering or the college of chemistry will use tighter criteria.

  42. Charles Murray’s view is that colleges should use instead of the SAT the SAT Subject tests.

    The College Board retired them forever in the year of COVID. APs are supposed to sub in for them.

    https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat-subject-tests

  43. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Look at S. Africa. You don't need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open. What we need is discussions on home defense - how to build walls with broken glass on top, what is the best home defense weapon, the best concealed carry weapon, the best times to leave your home without getting robbed and so on.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Adam Smith, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Pardon me, but fuck that shit. What you are describing is abject, utter defeat. We are Americans, not Brazilians or South Africans.

    My advice: move to the red area of a red state and make it redder. Big cities are hellscapes if you don’t make a healthy six figures; stay out of them. Homeschool your kids and grandkids. Stay out of debt. Stay healthy. Arm up. Get to know your neighbors. When the shit goes down, we will all be fine.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    Indeed, we are Americans. Cities are fine to live in for some, others, not really. More or less a personal choice. Homeschooling is fine, but it can lead to sermonizing and pandering and propagandizing.

    Arm up for what? You mean to prepare for the "shit" that will go down, as in our civilizational collapse? LOL, I've heard this "advice" for the past 50 years. The bottom line is that there are a number of armchair warriors out there, not this waiting in tow Bruce Banner cum Hulk-a-mania crowd just itching to thrown liberals, darkies, Jews, and anyone deemed the "enemy" out of helicopters Pinochot style.

    See, the Orcs have already crashed the gate to the Shire. They are everywhere, so I've been repeatedly told. While you demand that your fellow whites "prep", you're being overrun. So, are you going to do something about it now, or just wait until the "moment is right"...whenever that is.

  44. Is the solution to the Asian problem?

    • Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Kaz

    Yes indeed it's the solution to the Asian problem, the prestigious universities don't want to look like Peking university and I don't blame them. Asians have zero charisma and are grinders.

  45. Dmon says:

    “…José Antonio Primo de Rivera y Sáenz de Heredia IV, Duke of Primo Rivera ”

    It’s Southern California, Steve. He would be the Duke of Pico Rivera, the Van Nuys of the southeast county. Nothing spectacularly Baltimore-level toxic, just generally dirty, depressing and downscale. Lots of blue collar jobs supporting the area’s thriving food service, transportation and stolen auto recycling industries.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pico_Rivera,_California#:~:text=The%20Racial%20makeup%20of%20Pico,is%2091.2%25%20of%20the%20population.

    “The Racial makeup of Pico Rivera was 5.2% Non-Hispanic White, 1.0% Black or African American, 1.4% Native American, 2.6% Asian, and 0.1% Pacific Islander. Hispanic or Latino of any race is 91.2% of the population.”

    https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/ca/pico-rivera/crime

    “The chance of becoming a victim of either violent or property crime in Pico Rivera is 1 in 48. Based on FBI crime data, Pico Rivera is not one of the safest communities in America. Relative to California, Pico Rivera has a crime rate that is higher than 55% of the state’s cities and towns of all sizes.”

  46. So, the SAT should be restored to its past glory as a really good test of raw intelligence.

  47. @Beliavsky
    There are math contests such as the AMC 10 and AMC 12 that are harder and more g-loaded than the SAT. Maybe applicants to UC schools that want to showcase math prowess will mention these scores on their applications.

    Replies: @Pittsburgh Thatcherite, @Seneca44, @Anon, @res, @Wency

    Yeah, there have to be several IQ variant tests which can allow outstanding students to shine without the gaming and test prep courses for the wealthy that the SAT evolved into.

  48. They steal more bases than Rickey Henderson. Can’t even make it one sentence into his response. Another casualty of the anti-bullying craze. Uncalledout bullshit.

    Are they used to arguing with idiots or the terrified? Both? Not arguing at all?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Man, you can't argue with "science". "Science" shows that race differences don't exist and even if they did exist, it's wrong to take any action based on their existence other than actions which favor minorities. It's wrong to afford people different rights for being brighter, but affording people different rights for being dumber is A-OK. That's what "science" tells us so shut up cracker.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    , @res
    @Desiderius


    Are they used to arguing with idiots or the terrified? Both? Not arguing at all?
     
    Some of each. But above all they seem used to the idea that they can win by shouting "racist" or deplatforming people. Or they can just call the police. See discussion here.
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/who-is-the-most-accurate-media-source-on-intelligence/#comment-4489011

    Replies: @J.Ross

  49. anon[423] • Disclaimer says:

    Colleges will do what they want to do. And argue that they Have to do what they want to do. Longer term, the mega trend is that online education will reduce the power of colleges. Not that anyone really wants to an “on line educational experience”, but because cheap always erodes expensive and free always beats cheap.

    twenty or 30 years ago, auto insurers gladly reduced use of demographic variables for FICO scores. And now they are ditching those for telemetrics ie cell phone aps.

    And with equity replacing equality, blacks are admitting the last thing they want is more schooling to earn more money. They just want the money directly.

    The cognitive elite have never had it so good.

  50. Interestingly, the SAT is a better predictor than HSGPA for nonwhites, but not as good for whites. My guess is that this is because whites tend to attend schools with less grade inflation than nonwhites. For example, most public schools like to add 1.0 points to GPA for taking Advanced Placement classes, so the highest possible GPA on a 0.0 to 4.0 scale is 5.0, but the very good old line private school my son won a scholarship to refused to offer AP classes (on the grounds that they preferred their teachers to design the courses they preferred to teach), so the highest GPA possible was only 4.0. Despite not taking any officially Advanced Placement classes, my son wound up passing some huge number of AP tests such as 8 or 10, because it was an extravagantly good school. But his GPA would have been a lot higher if he’d attended a public school.

    Our worst, maximally “diverse” urban high schools seemingly add 3.0+ points to a GPA for students who show up to school, don’t disrupt, and don’t physically threaten the teachers (which are a relative few).

  51. Sounds like your friend would have made all his dough and contributions to society without UC Berkeley

  52. Don’t those international students with high test scores pay like top out of state tuition to these colleges? Where are the colleges going to make up all that lost revenue?

  53. Since then he’s played golf and been an important contributor (for free) to Linux, which the whole world depends upon.

    Living the Good Life!

    Although the “writing in C” part would make me unwell. Can we have it in Rust?

    The plaintiffs said that the college entrance tests are biased against poor and mainly Black and Hispanic students — and that by basing admissions decisions on those tests, the system illegally discriminates against applicants on the basis of their race, wealth and disability.

    When 18 I thought I could certainly ace any of the technologies on the family living room shelf in about a semester or so of college. Then I found out that the more I learned, the larger the weight of knowing enough to create a minimally viable product became.

    Some people must believe this all their live and imagine that these tech jobs are allocated by pure nepotism because, how hard can it be? Just take some plastic and electronic crap and slap it together. Happens all the time in movies.

  54. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    As I understand "prepping" (which is admittedly not that well) it involves getting READY for an inevitable breakdown. That we are coming to the end of the road one way or another is already assumed and prepping does nothing to forestall the outcome, it just means that you are "prepared" when it happens and won't starve to death like your neighbors.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross

    No doubt that’s part of it, Jack, getting ready for the big trouble, which I am certain will start as big economic trouble but lead to political trouble too. A real prepper is not just in the mindset of how to survive to the other side, of which there will be. He also has in mind the idea of a community of like-minded people who will not end up in the same situation on the other side as those who don’t prepare.

    I don’t claim to be a big prepper like John Wesley Rawles of the Survival Blog, as much as I SHOULD be reading him/it more. However, time is really getting short as one can see from the big increase in land/residential prices as of late and the government admission of higher inflation. (You can double the numbers to get something resembling reality.) Even people to whom the Federal Reserve is no more familiar than The Federalist Papers are just getting a feeling about it and wising up.

    • Agree: Adam Smith
    • Replies: @JMcG
    @Achmed E. Newman

    If folks didn’t learn a lesson from last spring’s run on supermarkets and gun stores, God help them, ‘cause I won’t.

  55. The push to abolish standardized IQ tests from college admissions will further benefit women in general over men. Like your Linux crushing, golf buddy, smart guys tend to be a lot more likely to be bored on average with high school classes than are women. Soon, it will be considered “racist” to hire employees using interviews. All jobs will be handed out based on your GPA and intersectional pokemon points. All of society will be feminine in the name of anti-racism. At some point, there will be a holocaust over fat shaming and the whole matriarch coup will be complete. The future is a sensible heel crushing your face forever.

  56. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    As I understand "prepping" (which is admittedly not that well) it involves getting READY for an inevitable breakdown. That we are coming to the end of the road one way or another is already assumed and prepping does nothing to forestall the outcome, it just means that you are "prepared" when it happens and won't starve to death like your neighbors.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @J.Ross

    This is reasonably accurate but prepping normally means a few others things; the go-to one volume introduction is Ferfal’s Surviving The Collapse, which describes his experience through Argentina’s economic crisis. A major piece of advice relevant to both your points is don’t be an individual, be in a neighborhood. Rambo has to sleep some time, but a neighborhood will have somebody who can be watching at any given hour, as well as ecompassing a variety of skills and preferences. A lot of the farm murders in South Africa could probably be prevented if the victim had like seven other people with them.

  57. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/AdamRutherford/status/1395272629758709764?s=20

    They steal more bases than Rickey Henderson. Can't even make it one sentence into his response. Another casualty of the anti-bullying craze. Uncalledout bullshit.

    Are they used to arguing with idiots or the terrified? Both? Not arguing at all?

    Replies: @Jack D, @res

    Man, you can’t argue with “science”. “Science” shows that race differences don’t exist and even if they did exist, it’s wrong to take any action based on their existence other than actions which favor minorities. It’s wrong to afford people different rights for being brighter, but affording people different rights for being dumber is A-OK. That’s what “science” tells us so shut up cracker.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Engagement will only work when they’re forced by circumstance to seek it. They interpret any willingness on our part as desperate weakness signaling an opening to further press their advantage and demoralize their enemies.

    Let them sue for peace. Then we can talk as equals.

    Replies: @Jack D

  58. Andy says:

    Nieto del Rio is itself a compound name, Nieto (Grandson) was probably her mother’s father and Del Rio (of the River) her mother’s mother. Trotsky’s assassin’s (Ramon Mercader) mother (who itself participated in the assassination)’s family name was Del Rio, which is a somewhat unusual name in Spanish countries. Perhaps distantly related?

  59. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Man, you can't argue with "science". "Science" shows that race differences don't exist and even if they did exist, it's wrong to take any action based on their existence other than actions which favor minorities. It's wrong to afford people different rights for being brighter, but affording people different rights for being dumber is A-OK. That's what "science" tells us so shut up cracker.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Engagement will only work when they’re forced by circumstance to seek it. They interpret any willingness on our part as desperate weakness signaling an opening to further press their advantage and demoralize their enemies.

    Let them sue for peace. Then we can talk as equals.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Having power makes you intellectually lazy. The Chinese Communist Party doesn't have to have intellectually compelling and coherent arguments about why it should stay in power forever because if you try to argue the other side they will take all of your assets and put you in jail, as people in Hong Kong are now finding out. Maybe a bullet to the back of the head if they have to. "Shut up" is a compelling intellectual argument if the person saying "shut up" is holding a gun to you. Mao said that a revolution is not a dinner party. Revolutionaries don't want to have a polite debate and may the best man win. Darymple says that they purposely spout obvious lies and force you to agree with them in order to humiliate you further.

    Many parts of the US are far gone. "Anti-racists" don't have to make good arguments on campus because they have absolute control of those institutions. Likewise, big blue cities and states. Increasingly big corporations. Etc. " So don't hold your breath for them to be forced by circumstance to seek accommodation. The CCP has run China for 70+ years and they are only getting stronger.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Whiskey

  60. @Beliavsky
    There are math contests such as the AMC 10 and AMC 12 that are harder and more g-loaded than the SAT. Maybe applicants to UC schools that want to showcase math prowess will mention these scores on their applications.

    Replies: @Pittsburgh Thatcherite, @Seneca44, @Anon, @res, @Wency

    They already do, especially prominent students receive the Regents Scholarship which is $80k over four years.

  61. Not completely on topic, but check this out:

    1619 Project purple haired tattooed Black hussy is denied tenure at UNC-CH.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/video/peopleandplaces/unc-denies-professor-tenure-sparking-backlash/vi-AAKeI40?ocid=msedgntp

    Let’s see how this shit storm plays out.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    1619 Project purple haired tattooed Black hussy is denied tenure at UNC-CH.

    Denied tenure this year, but given a 5-year contract. This is basic academia 101 level gaming; she and her patron(s) are playing on the "easy" setting. It's likely she'll quietly receive tenure sometime after 3 years but before the contract expires. Obviousness...

  62. @International Jew
    It'll be interesting to see how Asians find a way to game the new, SAT-less, system. I'm confident they'll find a way. I'm also confident that the Berkeley faculty will find a way to keep their classes from really "looking like California".

    Replies: @Jack D

    See my earlier comment about CUNY and City College. It’s going to be a complete mess at first with totally unqualified minorities getting into Berkeley which will have to have classes in Remedial Basic Math, etc.

    Then after a few years, they will come up with various partial fixes – they’ll have unified admissions for all of the UC Campuses and they will channel you to one campus or another based upon “placement tests” or something like that. They will consolidate all the “Studies” programs on one or two campuses and declare that Berkeley is going to concentrate on other specialties such as math and science. Or else they will have a school within the school. Inside of Berkeley you will have the Jack Ma Honors College as a separate program. Etc.

    It’s never going to be perfect or optimal again but neither is it going to be a free-for-all where Tyquan is going to be put in the Multivariable Calculus class with Min Jun and Arjun.

  63. wasn’t this the legal case where it was law firms back east, in Baltimore in particular, who were doing most of the fighting to force the UC system to permanently drop the SAT and ACT?

  64. @Anon
    How about:

    Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar

    First first name: Juana
    Second first name: Enriqueta
    Third first name: Josefina
    Compound second name: de los Sagrados Corazones
    Paternal name: Fernández
    Maternal name: del Solar

    Wikipedia:

    Colonial Hispanic America

    In the colonial period and nineteenth century, it was common to have between one and three given names followed by a second name with a "de" (from) in front. For example, the Saint Teresa de Los Andes whose real name is Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar. Where "Juana", "Enriqueta" and "Josefina" are her first names, followed by the second name "de los Sagrados Corazones". Her paternal surname is "Fernández" and her maternal surname is "del Solar".
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Svevlad, @Hibernian, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara, @Macumazahn

    Consuelo Maria del Carmen de la Santa Reputisima Madre de Hernán Cortés de Monroy y Pizarro Altamirano

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Now that’s a Conquistadors full house surname.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

  65. @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Engagement will only work when they’re forced by circumstance to seek it. They interpret any willingness on our part as desperate weakness signaling an opening to further press their advantage and demoralize their enemies.

    Let them sue for peace. Then we can talk as equals.

    Replies: @Jack D

    Having power makes you intellectually lazy. The Chinese Communist Party doesn’t have to have intellectually compelling and coherent arguments about why it should stay in power forever because if you try to argue the other side they will take all of your assets and put you in jail, as people in Hong Kong are now finding out. Maybe a bullet to the back of the head if they have to. “Shut up” is a compelling intellectual argument if the person saying “shut up” is holding a gun to you. Mao said that a revolution is not a dinner party. Revolutionaries don’t want to have a polite debate and may the best man win. Darymple says that they purposely spout obvious lies and force you to agree with them in order to humiliate you further.

    Many parts of the US are far gone. “Anti-racists” don’t have to make good arguments on campus because they have absolute control of those institutions. Likewise, big blue cities and states. Increasingly big corporations. Etc. ” So don’t hold your breath for them to be forced by circumstance to seek accommodation. The CCP has run China for 70+ years and they are only getting stronger.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Rutherfords eventually tire of being mere Gletkins. The glamor is in playing Rubashov and eventually we all hit an age where play alone is not enough. Plus they’ve always got to be looking over their shoulders for the next crop of Gletkins, which is enough to exhaust anyone.

    Lying is hard when the lies are pretty. When they turn ugly all sorts of people find the burden suddenly too heavy.

    Jews aren’t Han.

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D

    , @Whiskey
    @Jack D

    Jack, that is not true about the Chinese Communist Party. They have a very explicit reason and philosophy behind their rule as outlined by Xi in the "Chinese Dream" which has these parts:

    A. China becomes the most powerful and dominant nation on the planet.
    B. Chinese people have a continually rising standard of living.
    C. Big shots get restrained and cut down to size (see Jack Ma).

    That's simple, direct, and the Mandate of Heaven. The Chinese Communist Party is frankly terrified of another series of peasant revolts which have a 200+ year history in China. Generally they start with both the rulers being corrupt and cruel, and the living standards of peasants declining, often combined with foreign domination. Thus you get the Taipeng Rebellion (60 million dead), the Boxer Rebellion, and the Cultural Revolution.

    Like the Taipeng and Boxer Rebellion, China was rife with various factions and "secret societies" that peasants belonged to, and while Mao set it off he soon lost control. He had to flee Shanghai after visiting there to settle some dispute between factions, and fled when threatened. The Cultural Revolution only ended after Mao's death and the PLA being tired of being a regional joke due to the weakness of the infighting put an end to it. In the meantime the upper classes were shoveling pig manure, Xi lived in a cave for 8 years doing just that.

    But there is no, none, NADA example of a Communist government working within a multicultural environment particularly the gap between Rapper Americans and Whites. While sports ball enthusiasts might enjoy watching their Rapper Americans beat another town's Rapper Americans, thats as far as it goes. When it comes to serious decisions about who gets what in an environment of declining living quality its back to blood as Tom Wolfe noted.

    China's leaders at least have a plan that addresses their fundamental weakness -- mass peasant action when their lives turn radically downward in conjunction with foreign dominance: 1. Make sure they pump nationalism at every opportunity and actually achieve something (landing on Mars, building new bases, running Africa). 2. Increase living standards. 3. Cut down big shots to cut down social resentment.

    Our leaders have a plan: total race based civil war. Coming to a neighborhood near you this summer.

  66. original version of SAT devised about 100 years ago, before it was called SAT, was probably the best intelligence test ever devised. it was created by geniuses and it really was something special. even up to 1994, it was extremely good at what it was meant to do. it had a broader range of results than wechsler and a higher ceiling, too. by 1995 diversicrats had nerfed it enough that it started to lose it’s magic.

    SAT verbal test in particular was the best test of raw intelligence. i’ve cogitated for years on why SAT verbal appears to be more difficult than SAT math, and whether that only appeared to be the case or whether it really was the case. a few years ago i concluded that it wasn’t an illusion, it really was harder at the higher end, because i realized why. test construction.

    back around 1994 and earlier, every year about 700 teenagers were able to answer every question correctly on SAT math, whereas only 70 of them were doing that on SAT verbal. why? time. to get to the higher level, more difficult math questions, takes too much time, and the test is only 3 hours. serious math questions might take 30 minutes or even 60 minutes for a really good math student to work thru. the test doesn’t allow for that. so the ceiling for the math has to be lower. at the university level it can take hours to work thru one math problem, before getting into the very serious stuff that takes a lot longer than that.

    the math questions are like obstacle courses that take a long time to get thru. on the other hand, the verbal questions are like a bench press gauntlet. laid out in front of you, in 50 pound increments. can you bench 50 pounds? ok, how about 100 pounds. 150 pounds? now 200 pounds. and up, all the way to 700 pounds. that doesn’t take long. every question takes a few seconds. you can either bench it or you can’t. it’s not a 10,000 meter run, where even the fastest guy still takes 30 minutes to finish. this one is over in 10 seconds max. in fact, they should just let you go directly to the hardest 2 or 3 analogy questions, and if you answer those correctly, they should score you at the ceiling on the test and let you go on to the SAT math section immediately.

  67. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Having power makes you intellectually lazy. The Chinese Communist Party doesn't have to have intellectually compelling and coherent arguments about why it should stay in power forever because if you try to argue the other side they will take all of your assets and put you in jail, as people in Hong Kong are now finding out. Maybe a bullet to the back of the head if they have to. "Shut up" is a compelling intellectual argument if the person saying "shut up" is holding a gun to you. Mao said that a revolution is not a dinner party. Revolutionaries don't want to have a polite debate and may the best man win. Darymple says that they purposely spout obvious lies and force you to agree with them in order to humiliate you further.

    Many parts of the US are far gone. "Anti-racists" don't have to make good arguments on campus because they have absolute control of those institutions. Likewise, big blue cities and states. Increasingly big corporations. Etc. " So don't hold your breath for them to be forced by circumstance to seek accommodation. The CCP has run China for 70+ years and they are only getting stronger.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Whiskey

    Rutherfords eventually tire of being mere Gletkins. The glamor is in playing Rubashov and eventually we all hit an age where play alone is not enough. Plus they’ve always got to be looking over their shoulders for the next crop of Gletkins, which is enough to exhaust anyone.

    Lying is hard when the lies are pretty. When they turn ugly all sorts of people find the burden suddenly too heavy.

    Jews aren’t Han.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Desiderius

    https://media.giphy.com/media/u5Mv3ikaGHdbq/giphy.gif

    , @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Jews are not going to end up in control of the Revolution, even if there are still some Jews around at the beginning. They will get pushed aside in favor of blacks. Blacks don't particularly like Jews, even Leftist ones. Jewish intellectual power intimidates them and they get rid of Jews in their organizations at the earliest opportunity. Nor are blacks afraid of using violence to accomplish their goals. They are less organized than the Han but their cruelty is boundless.

    Replies: @peterike, @J.Ross, @Desiderius, @JimDandy

  68. @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Rutherfords eventually tire of being mere Gletkins. The glamor is in playing Rubashov and eventually we all hit an age where play alone is not enough. Plus they’ve always got to be looking over their shoulders for the next crop of Gletkins, which is enough to exhaust anyone.

    Lying is hard when the lies are pretty. When they turn ugly all sorts of people find the burden suddenly too heavy.

    Jews aren’t Han.

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D

  69. @Anon
    How about:

    Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar

    First first name: Juana
    Second first name: Enriqueta
    Third first name: Josefina
    Compound second name: de los Sagrados Corazones
    Paternal name: Fernández
    Maternal name: del Solar

    Wikipedia:

    Colonial Hispanic America

    In the colonial period and nineteenth century, it was common to have between one and three given names followed by a second name with a "de" (from) in front. For example, the Saint Teresa de Los Andes whose real name is Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar. Where "Juana", "Enriqueta" and "Josefina" are her first names, followed by the second name "de los Sagrados Corazones". Her paternal surname is "Fernández" and her maternal surname is "del Solar".
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Svevlad, @Hibernian, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara, @Macumazahn

    Nice, but while they were fiddling around with names they pissed an empire down their leg.

    Stick with Paul, Peter, and Marie

  70. While there has been grade inflation, there might have been some reluctance to give very high GPAs to cognitively challenged students as measured by SAT and ACT. As long as applicants submit ACT or SAT together with GPAs, Admission offices are able to assess the average in a given high school and put the GPAs in context. If this is information is no longer available, one should expect accelerated grade inflation and the informational value of GPAs will further decline.
    I guess there will be much more emphasis on AP classes.

  71. @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Rutherfords eventually tire of being mere Gletkins. The glamor is in playing Rubashov and eventually we all hit an age where play alone is not enough. Plus they’ve always got to be looking over their shoulders for the next crop of Gletkins, which is enough to exhaust anyone.

    Lying is hard when the lies are pretty. When they turn ugly all sorts of people find the burden suddenly too heavy.

    Jews aren’t Han.

    Replies: @anon, @Jack D

    Jews are not going to end up in control of the Revolution, even if there are still some Jews around at the beginning. They will get pushed aside in favor of blacks. Blacks don’t particularly like Jews, even Leftist ones. Jewish intellectual power intimidates them and they get rid of Jews in their organizations at the earliest opportunity. Nor are blacks afraid of using violence to accomplish their goals. They are less organized than the Han but their cruelty is boundless.

    • Replies: @peterike
    @Jack D


    Nor are blacks afraid of using violence to accomplish their goals. They are less organized than the Han but their cruelty is boundless.
     
    No argument about blacks, but look at how the Chinese treat animals. They are capable of cruelty at any level.
    , @J.Ross
    @Jack D

    Indians. The blacks will either be harmless decorations like Harris or confined to enclaves at a lower level like Harris. But Indians can replace Jews at every level and probably want to.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    , @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Don’t really care whether they’re in control or on the outside looking in. Only concern is whether they’re on my team or not. Not isn’t good enough for either one of us.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    , @JimDandy
    @Jack D

    Just like how Jews got totally pushed out once the Russian revolution started, right?

  72. Yet another problem caused by too much gov, e.g. public education.

    I’m laughing at all those CA parents who, for the past ten years, have been paying for their future Bears’ test prep services, robotics camps, etc.

    Layoffs at the College Board are long overdue.

    And the Singer group did nothing actually criminal, despite what those opportunistic, political hack, lawyer-USA’s allege.

    [MORE]

    The land grant colleges (the flagship, state u’s) were established, or so it was said, for the practical, political purpose of providing Bachelor’s level training to the next generation of in-state, applied scientists — the smart workers of that time — at little or no charge to the student.

    Professors were hands-on teachers; department chairs took on a few additional, administrative duties.

    Students were a rarified bunch who had the smarts and perseverance to complete those rigorous disciplines.

    The ascendant, busybody progressives soon became outraged about the unfairness (the racism smear of that time) of having only left-brain types go to college.

    And here we are.

    • State U’s are gigantic bureaucracies.

    • Profsters are focused on their own job security (“tenure”), i.e. research, so they limit their teaching (“burden”) to small, handpicked groups of graduate students. Sorry, reading from notes before a group of 400 undergraduates in a cavernous lecture hall doesn’t count.

    • Science students pay some of the highest tuition rates in the university (e.g. lab fees).

    • Free rides accrue to jocks who major in football science. To be fair, the $3M/yr, professor of football actually teaches.

    • Admissions/Faculty committees scheme how to recruit more “underrepresenteds” into science majors/departments.

    • Replies: @dvorak
    @Abolish_public_education


    And the Singer group did nothing actually criminal
     
    This is actually true, because at least one Admissions Office knew there were unqualified athletes on teams, even if they didn't know/care which students or which teams. There's a smoking gun email where the Head of Admissions jokes about it.

    The entire federal case hinged on the admissions offices being as pure as driven snow, utterly innocent to the existence of faux athletes. At least one of the admissions offices was not innocent. If admissions knew and didn't care, then the university as a corporation knew about it; and that means that it wasn't fraud, wire or otherwise.

    It's too bad Lori/Massimo didn't go to trial. Can't blame them for capitulating, though.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  73. Opportunity for China or Russia to set up an English language university, non-woke, tight admissions, and attract some top Anglosphere students.

    Would be a great long term investment for them.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    @Gordo

    Good idea. The cost of living could be lower which would be a further attraction, and the best students might very likely stay in country and increase the hosts’ level of technological expertise. There would even be an incentive to stay because the graduates would probably not be well received back home by the SJWs who staff Western corporations Human Resources department and would regard with suspicions their motivations in choosing un-diverse schools.

  74. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Jews are not going to end up in control of the Revolution, even if there are still some Jews around at the beginning. They will get pushed aside in favor of blacks. Blacks don't particularly like Jews, even Leftist ones. Jewish intellectual power intimidates them and they get rid of Jews in their organizations at the earliest opportunity. Nor are blacks afraid of using violence to accomplish their goals. They are less organized than the Han but their cruelty is boundless.

    Replies: @peterike, @J.Ross, @Desiderius, @JimDandy

    Nor are blacks afraid of using violence to accomplish their goals. They are less organized than the Han but their cruelty is boundless.

    No argument about blacks, but look at how the Chinese treat animals. They are capable of cruelty at any level.

  75. Good point about not compressing an AP-smart student and an AP-genius student. Murray made similar point in his original Bell Curve, about how using percentile compresses outcomes at the top — look at standard deviation instead to appreciate the difference. I can’t recall the exact numbers, but it goes something like this. A verbal-SAT student with a 700 and one with an 800 will both be in the 99th percentile. But just ask an English teacher if they are the remotely the same in performance.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Jack D
    @SafeNow

    One thing that has been found to work well (by the Johns Hopkins sponsored Study of Exceptional Talent) is to give the SAT at an early age (before age 13). Getting 700 on the math SAT is not impressive for a high school senior but it is for a 6th grader (and an 800 even more impressive) because you don't get those ceiling effects. They have been running SET for long enough to know what the lifetime outcomes of these kids are and for the most part they are what you would expect. If you want to know which 12 year olds are going to be on the math and physics faculties of MIT, CalTech, Stanford, etc. in the year 2040 (putting aside blacks who will be there for AA reasons), they could pretty much tell you right now.

  76. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Jews are not going to end up in control of the Revolution, even if there are still some Jews around at the beginning. They will get pushed aside in favor of blacks. Blacks don't particularly like Jews, even Leftist ones. Jewish intellectual power intimidates them and they get rid of Jews in their organizations at the earliest opportunity. Nor are blacks afraid of using violence to accomplish their goals. They are less organized than the Han but their cruelty is boundless.

    Replies: @peterike, @J.Ross, @Desiderius, @JimDandy

    Indians. The blacks will either be harmless decorations like Harris or confined to enclaves at a lower level like Harris. But Indians can replace Jews at every level and probably want to.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @J.Ross

    Indians look too physically different to be accepted by the masses.

    Unlike Jews, they can't pass as "fellow Whites" or claim to be "God's people" or deploy a global ethnic network against you.

    Unlike Blacks, they can't do street intimidation or generate a convincing victim narrative or use their entertainment industry clout (musicians, sports ballers, celebs).

    If Indians ascend to the top, support for the revolution will collapse quickly. Liberals won't follow them, Conservatives won't be scared by them.

    Without Jews and Blacks, there is no revolution.

    As for Hispanics and Asians, they're too apolitical to care.

    Middle Easterners fill the same niche as Indians. Like Linda Sarsour.

    White liberals are followers, not leaders. Also, White Conservatives aren't scared of them.

    Replies: @J.Ross

  77. Next can they get rid of music tryouts for Julliard and Berklee? How about the symphony?

  78. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Having power makes you intellectually lazy. The Chinese Communist Party doesn't have to have intellectually compelling and coherent arguments about why it should stay in power forever because if you try to argue the other side they will take all of your assets and put you in jail, as people in Hong Kong are now finding out. Maybe a bullet to the back of the head if they have to. "Shut up" is a compelling intellectual argument if the person saying "shut up" is holding a gun to you. Mao said that a revolution is not a dinner party. Revolutionaries don't want to have a polite debate and may the best man win. Darymple says that they purposely spout obvious lies and force you to agree with them in order to humiliate you further.

    Many parts of the US are far gone. "Anti-racists" don't have to make good arguments on campus because they have absolute control of those institutions. Likewise, big blue cities and states. Increasingly big corporations. Etc. " So don't hold your breath for them to be forced by circumstance to seek accommodation. The CCP has run China for 70+ years and they are only getting stronger.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @Whiskey

    Jack, that is not true about the Chinese Communist Party. They have a very explicit reason and philosophy behind their rule as outlined by Xi in the “Chinese Dream” which has these parts:

    A. China becomes the most powerful and dominant nation on the planet.
    B. Chinese people have a continually rising standard of living.
    C. Big shots get restrained and cut down to size (see Jack Ma).

    That’s simple, direct, and the Mandate of Heaven. The Chinese Communist Party is frankly terrified of another series of peasant revolts which have a 200+ year history in China. Generally they start with both the rulers being corrupt and cruel, and the living standards of peasants declining, often combined with foreign domination. Thus you get the Taipeng Rebellion (60 million dead), the Boxer Rebellion, and the Cultural Revolution.

    Like the Taipeng and Boxer Rebellion, China was rife with various factions and “secret societies” that peasants belonged to, and while Mao set it off he soon lost control. He had to flee Shanghai after visiting there to settle some dispute between factions, and fled when threatened. The Cultural Revolution only ended after Mao’s death and the PLA being tired of being a regional joke due to the weakness of the infighting put an end to it. In the meantime the upper classes were shoveling pig manure, Xi lived in a cave for 8 years doing just that.

    But there is no, none, NADA example of a Communist government working within a multicultural environment particularly the gap between Rapper Americans and Whites. While sports ball enthusiasts might enjoy watching their Rapper Americans beat another town’s Rapper Americans, thats as far as it goes. When it comes to serious decisions about who gets what in an environment of declining living quality its back to blood as Tom Wolfe noted.

    China’s leaders at least have a plan that addresses their fundamental weakness — mass peasant action when their lives turn radically downward in conjunction with foreign dominance: 1. Make sure they pump nationalism at every opportunity and actually achieve something (landing on Mars, building new bases, running Africa). 2. Increase living standards. 3. Cut down big shots to cut down social resentment.

    Our leaders have a plan: total race based civil war. Coming to a neighborhood near you this summer.

  79. What is the net of this?

    No Whites need apply. That is the main purpose of this and everything else — the purging of Whites from their own country. Lloyd Austin is ongoing with this in purging Whites from the military, prompting Jack Carr the ex Seal and “author” of a series of thrillers to write an open letter warning of the danger.

    And as UC goes so too do all other schools. Whites and particularly White men will be denied college. That’s the plan. Colleges and Universities will be filled to the brim with Rapper Americans, foreign weirdos, and of course White coeds for the Rapper Americans. The plan for White men is D.I.E. or Die Whitey Die!

    Those of high wealth will still be able to get into Harvard or such, but we can see the effect ALREADY with the Full House lady and the one married to William H. Macy. Both those families have money, just not Bill Gates money, and they had to cheat like crazy to get their dumb daughters into USC or whatever. A generation ago being kids from well known Hollywood parents would have been enough.

    There is no reason for White people to invest in defending or retaining these institutions, ALL of them: Colleges and Universities, Media, the Military, Law Enforcement, the Justice System, Representative Government, Corporations, and more. They are all CORRUPTED BEYOND REPAIR AND REFORM. They are all explicitly anti-White. They are all committed as a matter of religious morality to worshiping Rapper Americans as the holy racial redeemers from the sin of Whiteness. And they are all committed to putting this into action by eliminating Whites completely. They have stated this many times. Supporting these institutions, wanting to reform them, trying to save them is folly.

    • Agree: Bernie, Ben tillman
  80. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Jews are not going to end up in control of the Revolution, even if there are still some Jews around at the beginning. They will get pushed aside in favor of blacks. Blacks don't particularly like Jews, even Leftist ones. Jewish intellectual power intimidates them and they get rid of Jews in their organizations at the earliest opportunity. Nor are blacks afraid of using violence to accomplish their goals. They are less organized than the Han but their cruelty is boundless.

    Replies: @peterike, @J.Ross, @Desiderius, @JimDandy

    Don’t really care whether they’re in control or on the outside looking in. Only concern is whether they’re on my team or not. Not isn’t good enough for either one of us.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @Desiderius

    Good luck with that.

    Replies: @Desiderius

  81. Anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    Behind Substack paywall:

    We Should Get Rid Of College Admissions Essays, Not The SATs
    https://www.inquiremore.com/p/we-should-get-rid-of-college-admissions
    The drive to eliminate standardized tests is a symptom of elitism, not a solution to it.
    Shant Mesrobian
    May 17

    The essay spiel culture really is worthless; the pretext of the Don McNeil brouhaha was to give kids something to blab about in a self-statement. If Steve or Ron haven’t recently fired any shots in that direction, unless I missed it (and if so, my apologies).

    If there is an argument to be made for the proliferation of the essays — definitely probative authentic material being composed by the applicant xhis/xherself — is somehow more… what? g-loaded? than the other metrics, I don’t recall it. It’s indisputably a tool of DIE commissars, exploiting misguided Me-Generation nostalgia. Anthony Daniels sliced it up decently here:
    https://www.takimag.com/article/in_defense_of_mediocrity_theodore_dalrymple/

  82. Well, the only solution to all of this wrangling over tests is to simply get rid of all nonWhite students. They and their parents need to be summarily deported; dumped on Mexico if their hellish native countries won’t take them. Then the U.S. can go back to NOT being a third-world garbage dump.
    This is going to happen sooner or later. Then we can go back to simply educating White kids who are educable instead of pretending that nonWhites are anything better than functionally illiterate.

    • Replies: @Charon
    @Fisk Ellington Rutledge IV


    This is going to happen sooner or later.
     
    Never, ever going to happen. Much more likely that white people will be exiled.
  83. OK, so Berkeley has decided to destroy itself. Or at least hobble itself. Liberal cities like Portland, San Francisco, have done the same. Feminists are being muscled out of their own organizations by trannies. This is the easiest revolution ever. Sometimes the correct move is to do nothing.

  84. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Look at S. Africa. You don't need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open. What we need is discussions on home defense - how to build walls with broken glass on top, what is the best home defense weapon, the best concealed carry weapon, the best times to leave your home without getting robbed and so on.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Adam Smith, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Home defense? How about a DP-12?

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  85. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    No, we need to prep in order to AVOID being a part of it. Not all of us are willing to go down this road.

    Replies: @Jack D, @JohnnyWalker123

    We need President Tucker Carlson.

  86. “…..Tuco Benedicto Pacifico Juan Maria Ramirez“, ……more commonly known as “The Rat”

    C’mon, man….that was a lay-up.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Good,_the_Bad_and_the_Ugly

    • LOL: Cortes
  87. Eliminating standardized testing is the obvious response to Proposition 209 and, more saliently, the pressure put on colleges by Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard. It’s a lot harder to prove racial discrimination against Asians, Jews, and gentile whites if there are no objective metrics to test your hypothesis against. It’s not like college admissions officers really need the IQ testing. They’re very good at figuring out who’s smart and who isn’t from application package.

  88. There are always unintended consequences of decisions like this. One wonders what they will be.

    Schools that still require the SAT for admission will become more prestigious (if they are allowed to continue doing so).

    In the meantime, how are entrepreneurs going to make money from this new UC policy?

  89. Meh, it’s time for The Greater Reset…

    https://thegreaterreset.org

  90. res says:
    @Beliavsky
    There are math contests such as the AMC 10 and AMC 12 that are harder and more g-loaded than the SAT. Maybe applicants to UC schools that want to showcase math prowess will mention these scores on their applications.

    Replies: @Pittsburgh Thatcherite, @Seneca44, @Anon, @res, @Wency

    Right. That is the kind of thing which will happen in response to eliminating SAT/ACT in admissions. The interesting thing (intentional?) is measures like that will only tilt things further towards the already advantaged.

    It seems likely the reason for eliminating SAT/ACT is to prevent inconvenient facts appearing as the colleges go about admitting whomever they want. Look how test scores were used in the Harvard admissions controversy.

    The interesting question is how the balance of admissions criteria will change.

  91. Universidad del Estado Libre y Soberano de California Norte

  92. res says:
    @Charon

    My theory is that the SAT should be turned back into an IQ test (the SAT Verbal test might have been the best high end IQ test in the world up until it was made drastically easier in 1995)
     
    That title belonged to the Analytical Section of the GRE.

    Replies: @res, @International Jew

    That title belonged to the Analytical Section of the GRE.

    Do you have numbers supporting that?

    It is hard to compare the SAT and GRE since the test taking pools are different, but a decent first cut is to look at qualifying scores for high IQ societies.

    For Mensa the qualifying scores for the pre-1994 SAT and GRE were the same–1250.
    https://www.us.mensa.org/join/testscores/qualifying-test-scores/

    For the Triple Nine Society the pre-1995 SAT threshold was 1450 and the pre-2001 GRE threshold was 1460.
    http://www.triplenine.org/HowtoJoin/TestScores.aspx

    The pre-1995 SAT was valuable both because of its relatively high ceiling and the large pool of students taking it.

    P.S. Note that Mensa is top 2% of the general population (about 2 SD) and Triple Nine is top 0.1% (about 3 SD) so the score differences should correspond to about an SD for the general population.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @res

    Any fool can qualify for admission to Mensa, but you need to be a complete fool to join.

  93. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    I knew a girl from South America who reeled off a sequence of about a dozen family names of hers one time, quickly in a row, rolling the r's and all that. I don't remember the names, but I remember that it was pretty sexy

    Replies: @Old Prude

    My Maltese was named: Her Royal Highness, Princess, Ambassador Olivia Jubilee Goobenstein de la Poopy di La La.

    The cat was named: Blue.

  94. res says:
    @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/AdamRutherford/status/1395272629758709764?s=20

    They steal more bases than Rickey Henderson. Can't even make it one sentence into his response. Another casualty of the anti-bullying craze. Uncalledout bullshit.

    Are they used to arguing with idiots or the terrified? Both? Not arguing at all?

    Replies: @Jack D, @res

    Are they used to arguing with idiots or the terrified? Both? Not arguing at all?

    Some of each. But above all they seem used to the idea that they can win by shouting “racist” or deplatforming people. Or they can just call the police. See discussion here.
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/who-is-the-most-accurate-media-source-on-intelligence/#comment-4489011

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @res

    Apparently the big thing on TikTok (besides the women who figured out a way to take the money out of striptease) is fey wokecels angrily berating their audience for insufficient conformity (eg, "Not getting the vaccine? Then die").

  95. Just two months after her well-received escape-from-L.A. opus “Chemtrails Over the Country Club,” Lana Del Rey has released a batch of singles to build expectations for her second album of 2021, “Blue Banisters.”

    The singer dropped a trio of new songs Thursday in anticipation of the July 4 release of “Blue Banisters.” They largely continue the misty, bucolic vibes of “Chemtrails,” which reached No. 2 on the Billboard 200. That album followed up her Grammy-nominated 2019 LP “Norman F— Rockwell,” one largely considered a career highlight, and a July 2020 spoken-word album, “Violet Bent Backwards Over the Grass.”

    The three new tracks (“Blue Banisters,” “Text Book” and “Wildflower Wildfire”) are each heavy on piano and melancholy atmosphere, pulling from her beloved ‘70s L.A. soft-rock. She worked with writers and producers Gabriel Edward Simon, Zachary Dawes and longtime Kanye West collaborator Mike Dean on the three tracks.

    One of the songs, “Text Book,” is already drawing a bit ire for a lyric that references the racial justice protests of 2020. “And there we were / screamin’ ‘Black Lives Matter’ in a crowd.” In May 2020, Del Rey was criticized for posting video from protests where stores were broken into, and for statements she made on social media which posited that Doja Cat, Cardi B and Nicki Minaj (all women of color) were given more leeway than her to sing transgressive lyrics and dress provocatively.

    “I’m not the enemy, and I’m definitely not racist, so don’t get it twisted,” she later said.

    Lana Del Rey – Blue Banisters (Official Audio)

    Lana Del Rey – Text Book (Official Audio)

    Lana Del Rey – Wildflower Wildfire (Official Audio)

  96. @Charon

    My theory is that the SAT should be turned back into an IQ test (the SAT Verbal test might have been the best high end IQ test in the world up until it was made drastically easier in 1995)
     
    That title belonged to the Analytical Section of the GRE.

    Replies: @res, @International Jew

    Yeah, that was a great test, and pretty hard. If I hadn’t put a few solid hours preparing for it, I would have really bombed. But that points to a problem with using it as an IQ test: preparation makes too much of a difference.

    So I’m with Steve; the old verbal SAT is it. And this isn’t a very scientific thing to say, but when I think of what makes me think of someone as intelligent, high up there are (1) his ability to grasp what I’m saying (ie reading comprehension), and (2) ability to think abstractly (ie analogies).

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @International Jew

    Yes. In a way it's useless to test a person's retention of something they recently specifically studied, it is a kind of Potemkin effort (like the student who studies for tests instead of for life, and after he graduates he can't remember anything). One of the reasons I make dumb comments is I am sincerely interested in testing myself: I could easily and quickly look everything up before commenting and line my opinions up with respected experts, but I see it as a useful internet behavior to be constantly snap-inspecting your actual current knowledge.

    , @James Forrestal
    @International Jew


    (2) ability to think abstractly (ie analogies).
     
    Exactly. Removing analogies from the verbal section was idiotic.

    Replies: @anon

  97. @Spud Boy
    "...which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses..."

    Not anymore.

    My decision to leave California last year is looking better every day.

    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.

    Replies: @Anon, @TWS, @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    He’ll never leave. If he does that means being a civic nationalist is dead. America is dead as he believes it to be. I don’t think he can do that

  98. @Anon
    @Spud Boy


    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.
     
    His Zestimate is about $1,470,000, net proceeds after closing costs of $1,350,000. That will buy a lot of home in Fort Worth, where most of my family lives.

    I'm not sure how the taxes and capital gains work.

    Replies: @Spud Boy, @International Jew

    I’m not sure how the taxes and capital gains work.

    If LA County is like my county 400 miles north, then as long as he buys a new house in the same county, his new house’s tax basis doesn’t get adjusted to market value. Steve’s gameplan then can be to move to Lancaster and hope that it’ll secede and join up with Arizona or Nevada.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @International Jew


    Steve’s gameplan then can be to move to Lancaster and hope that it’ll secede and join up with Arizona or Nevada.
     
    Funny, I just read about the Greaater Idaho movement to have the sparsely populated red counties of Oregon and, in phase 2, Northern California become part of Idaho, giving Idaho an outlet to the sea (and a navy?).

    The is apparently possible, but the list of legal hurdles is pretty long. States have routinely adjusted borders, but the legislatures, governors, and finally Congress have to sign off on it. Most of the examples have involved borders that were originally defined as river courses, and unless they are in a deep, hard rock gorge, rivers change course sooner or later when silt builds up. That is, unless the Corps of Civil Engineers stops them from changing course, but even they cannot prevent it forever.

    Replies: @Foreign Expert

  99. @Beliavsky
    There are math contests such as the AMC 10 and AMC 12 that are harder and more g-loaded than the SAT. Maybe applicants to UC schools that want to showcase math prowess will mention these scores on their applications.

    Replies: @Pittsburgh Thatcherite, @Seneca44, @Anon, @res, @Wency

    The real IQ test is figuring out how to showcase IQ in spite of rules designed to prevent the showcasing of IQ.

  100. @Charon

    Trying to fight educational inequality by getting rid of the SAT is like trying to fight climate change by getting rid of thermometers.
     
    Attribution here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/black-share-of-known-murder-offenders-1980-2019/#comment-4662488

    Replies: @JimDandy

    Who cares? What’s the worst that could happen?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @JimDandy

    "Why come you don't have a tattoo?"

    This scene is one of my favorites of all time. Just because I posted it on Peak Stupidity today, I'll paste in another favorite scene, this one from The Office:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vmb1tqYqyII

  101. My understanding is that the state universities here in Ecuador have an open admissions policy, but fees still have to be paid and exams still have to be passed.

    For example it is free to go to medical school, but then you need post graduate training and you have to pay for that.

    The danger is that universities that have an open admissions policy may end up awarding degrees that are not worth it, or that are not recognized internationally or professionally. If nurses get a BSN but they cannot pass the national licensing examination the NCLEX, or lawyers get their JD, but they cannot pass the state boards, then their degrees are of little value to them.

    But ultimately the aim of universities is to educate people so as to meet the needs of their societies.

    If, for example the overall health care system in the United States deteriorates because practitioners in various medical disciplines are not sufficiently intelligent and not sufficiently educated, then what is the solution?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @Jonathan Mason

    If, for example the overall health care system in the United States deteriorates because practitioners in various medical disciplines are not sufficiently intelligent and not sufficiently educated, then what is the solution?

    This is already happening and nobody cares; the resolution is the same as with law enforcement and education, that is, those who can afford it pay nasally for acceptable service.

  102. @res
    @Charon


    That title belonged to the Analytical Section of the GRE.
     
    Do you have numbers supporting that?

    It is hard to compare the SAT and GRE since the test taking pools are different, but a decent first cut is to look at qualifying scores for high IQ societies.

    For Mensa the qualifying scores for the pre-1994 SAT and GRE were the same--1250.
    https://www.us.mensa.org/join/testscores/qualifying-test-scores/

    For the Triple Nine Society the pre-1995 SAT threshold was 1450 and the pre-2001 GRE threshold was 1460.
    http://www.triplenine.org/HowtoJoin/TestScores.aspx

    The pre-1995 SAT was valuable both because of its relatively high ceiling and the large pool of students taking it.

    P.S. Note that Mensa is top 2% of the general population (about 2 SD) and Triple Nine is top 0.1% (about 3 SD) so the score differences should correspond to about an SD for the general population.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Any fool can qualify for admission to Mensa, but you need to be a complete fool to join.

  103. Nice, but I don’t get what any of this has to do with the “Great Reset”.

    (In any case, the dumbing down of universities might as well be part of the “Great Reset”)

    Sooner or later, the education bubble will burst. People are paying too much for too little.

    Not everyone should go to college, and college should not be a requirement for a lot of professions. For many, it might even be a waste of time (it’s more a status thing, and credentials or “becoming a member” in the case of the Ivies).

    As for tests, it doesn’t matter what they do, there’ll never be an “equitative” test. Or it wouldn’t be a test. Perhaps the easiest way would be make people run 100 yards, the three who arrive first get in. Only this way Africans would have more chance than Asians.

    The best tests are the ones that measure more intelligence than memorization (even if both are related); SAT and GRE were good in this sense. Other countries have more complicated tests that measure a lot of memorization of content.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Dumbo


    The best tests are the ones that measure more intelligence than memorization (even if both are related); SAT and GRE were good in this sense.
     
    But a test of memorization is a good test of whether someone has developed good study habits and an ability to absorb knowledge. If this has not occurred by the age of 17, then it probably will not occur later.

    Probably selective universities should test first in subject matter and then reserve a number of places for people whose intelligence tests show that they have an unusual level of innate ability combined with low educational achievement that might be developed by special coaching and bring them up to scratch.

    So you take the top 10% or top 20% of affirmative action applicants via IQ testing, but have no prohibition whatsoever on them also qualifying by subject matter testing if they don't make it on IQ testing.

    If you have a selective school such as a medical school, you might want to admit minorities, which is fine as long as they have sufficient IQ that experience has shown that they will be able to pass professional qualifying tests and function as medical professionals--whatever that is--but you should also reserve places for those who have already scored high marks in premed, biochemistry, and biological sciences.

    It seems to me that a lot of the purpose of having standard qualifying tests, like the LSAT for law school, is to eliminate subjective judgments in the first place, but if racial minorities cannot qualify to take up enough places by objective testing--which could be 100% managed by computers with no human input--then you should have quotas for African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and so on and assign them special tutors if necessary.
  104. @SafeNow
    Good point about not compressing an AP-smart student and an AP-genius student. Murray made similar point in his original Bell Curve, about how using percentile compresses outcomes at the top — look at standard deviation instead to appreciate the difference. I can’t recall the exact numbers, but it goes something like this. A verbal-SAT student with a 700 and one with an 800 will both be in the 99th percentile. But just ask an English teacher if they are the remotely the same in performance.

    Replies: @Jack D

    One thing that has been found to work well (by the Johns Hopkins sponsored Study of Exceptional Talent) is to give the SAT at an early age (before age 13). Getting 700 on the math SAT is not impressive for a high school senior but it is for a 6th grader (and an 800 even more impressive) because you don’t get those ceiling effects. They have been running SET for long enough to know what the lifetime outcomes of these kids are and for the most part they are what you would expect. If you want to know which 12 year olds are going to be on the math and physics faculties of MIT, CalTech, Stanford, etc. in the year 2040 (putting aside blacks who will be there for AA reasons), they could pretty much tell you right now.

  105. @Jonathan Mason
    My understanding is that the state universities here in Ecuador have an open admissions policy, but fees still have to be paid and exams still have to be passed.

    For example it is free to go to medical school, but then you need post graduate training and you have to pay for that.

    The danger is that universities that have an open admissions policy may end up awarding degrees that are not worth it, or that are not recognized internationally or professionally. If nurses get a BSN but they cannot pass the national licensing examination the NCLEX, or lawyers get their JD, but they cannot pass the state boards, then their degrees are of little value to them.

    But ultimately the aim of universities is to educate people so as to meet the needs of their societies.

    If, for example the overall health care system in the United States deteriorates because practitioners in various medical disciplines are not sufficiently intelligent and not sufficiently educated, then what is the solution?

    Replies: @J.Ross

    If, for example the overall health care system in the United States deteriorates because practitioners in various medical disciplines are not sufficiently intelligent and not sufficiently educated, then what is the solution?

    This is already happening and nobody cares; the resolution is the same as with law enforcement and education, that is, those who can afford it pay nasally for acceptable service.

  106. @Guest29048
    "Lawsuit settlements are one of the most corrupt ways for liberal institutions to do what they wanted to to."

    This sort of settlement agreement is also how Stacey Abrams stole Georgia from Trump and delivered it to Biden/Obama. They sued Georgia to relax the rules on absentee voting. Georgia secretary of state Brad Raffensperger delegated the issue to his deputy Jordie Fuchs. Then Fuchs and Abrams put their heads together and got the job done!

    Replies: @bomag

    Also Pennsylvania, with the help of packing the state supreme court.

    And our alleged conservative SCOTUS did nothing.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @bomag

    What did you expect from a guy who specialized in getting drunk at Nationals games instead of spending time with his family or leading his community or profession and showed every sign of being already beaten into submission by AWFLs?

    Seriously.

  107. @International Jew
    @Charon

    Yeah, that was a great test, and pretty hard. If I hadn't put a few solid hours preparing for it, I would have really bombed. But that points to a problem with using it as an IQ test: preparation makes too much of a difference.

    So I'm with Steve; the old verbal SAT is it. And this isn't a very scientific thing to say, but when I think of what makes me think of someone as intelligent, high up there are (1) his ability to grasp what I'm saying (ie reading comprehension), and (2) ability to think abstractly (ie analogies).

    Replies: @J.Ross, @James Forrestal

    Yes. In a way it’s useless to test a person’s retention of something they recently specifically studied, it is a kind of Potemkin effort (like the student who studies for tests instead of for life, and after he graduates he can’t remember anything). One of the reasons I make dumb comments is I am sincerely interested in testing myself: I could easily and quickly look everything up before commenting and line my opinions up with respected experts, but I see it as a useful internet behavior to be constantly snap-inspecting your actual current knowledge.

  108. @res
    @Desiderius


    Are they used to arguing with idiots or the terrified? Both? Not arguing at all?
     
    Some of each. But above all they seem used to the idea that they can win by shouting "racist" or deplatforming people. Or they can just call the police. See discussion here.
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/who-is-the-most-accurate-media-source-on-intelligence/#comment-4489011

    Replies: @J.Ross

    Apparently the big thing on TikTok (besides the women who figured out a way to take the money out of striptease) is fey wokecels angrily berating their audience for insufficient conformity (eg, “Not getting the vaccine? Then die”).

  109. @Jack D
    @bomag


    the court should task them with approving a non-racist exam.
     
    They've tried this before. It's impossible because reality is racist. The only way you can make an SAT on which blacks will score equal to Asians is to test for trivial knowledge more known by blacks like the names of rappers and even then the Asians will memorize them better.

    The settlement says that you CAN'T submit SAT scores even voluntarily.

    I really wonder what will happen to, for example Berkeley which was, until recently, a very competitive school?

    Replies: @Guest007, @bomag

    The settlement says that you CAN’T submit SAT scores even voluntarily.

    I’m wondering about this. The article says that if a student submits scores, the admissions people are barred from viewing the scores. Sounds rather draconian. As noted elsewhere, there are plenty of other test scores students can submit in the “other achievements” category. If some enterprising test company becomes a de facto SAT test, will we have another round of litigation?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @bomag

    The litigation will continue until equity improves.

  110. Jon says:

    The University of California will not take SAT and ACT scores into account in admissions or scholarship decisions for its system of 10 schools,

    It’s a start, but now we need to get rid of the discriminatoryGRE, LSAT, GMAT, and perhaps most importantly, MCAT. Let’s drive the whole UC system straight off a cliff, and take California with it.

  111. anon[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Not completely on topic, but check this out:

    1619 Project purple haired tattooed Black hussy is denied tenure at UNC-CH.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/video/peopleandplaces/unc-denies-professor-tenure-sparking-backlash/vi-AAKeI40?ocid=msedgntp


    Let's see how this shit storm plays out.

    Replies: @anon

    1619 Project purple haired tattooed Black hussy is denied tenure at UNC-CH.

    Denied tenure this year, but given a 5-year contract. This is basic academia 101 level gaming; she and her patron(s) are playing on the “easy” setting. It’s likely she’ll quietly receive tenure sometime after 3 years but before the contract expires. Obviousness…

  112. I’m tired of this pathetic, laughable destruction and of feeling bad. Noticing this stuff is important, but it’s taking up our time and attention. Watching the rot is good, scary entertainment, but it’s time to be doing something positive. People are ready.
    I think a connected network of people is the way to go. We cannot form breakaway geographical units, but rather must live within the disintegrating United States and abide by its laws.
    That’s the way to build positivity and work toward a community of people with a solid middle class as well as a best and brightest component, all with an incentive to be their best selves.
    Let the bad and the brainwashed go down their mistaken path with what America has become – they may well self destruct some day. Meanwhile, we have better things to do than waste our energies on them.
    When their system completely falls apart, we can be a functioning core for building something.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @john cronk

    I'm game.

  113. It’s their university now. There will be some collateral damage visited upon innocents, but this action mainly hurts our enemies. Rejoice.

    Next on the agenda, abolish the charter schools and selective schools in New York city.

  114. @Dan Smith
    By admitting many students with lesser intelligence, curriculum will need to be dumbed down sufficiently so they don’t wash out after two semesters. If their career choices are simply to become diversity coordinators, fine, because that only requires aggression. In the next couple of decades, choose your medical professionals carefully.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @XYa

    You don’t get a choice.

    My transplant surgeon introduced himself the morning of the surgery. His resident handled the follow-ons to deal with the complications.

  115. @bomag
    @Jack D


    The settlement says that you CAN’T submit SAT scores even voluntarily.
     
    I'm wondering about this. The article says that if a student submits scores, the admissions people are barred from viewing the scores. Sounds rather draconian. As noted elsewhere, there are plenty of other test scores students can submit in the "other achievements" category. If some enterprising test company becomes a de facto SAT test, will we have another round of litigation?

    Replies: @Desiderius

    The litigation will continue until equity improves.

  116. @bomag
    @Guest29048

    Also Pennsylvania, with the help of packing the state supreme court.

    And our alleged conservative SCOTUS did nothing.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    What did you expect from a guy who specialized in getting drunk at Nationals games instead of spending time with his family or leading his community or profession and showed every sign of being already beaten into submission by AWFLs?

    Seriously.

  117. Anonymous[240] • Disclaimer says:

    I guess this sign outside an inner-city L.A. jail high school was prophetic:

  118. @Jack D
    @Desiderius

    Jews are not going to end up in control of the Revolution, even if there are still some Jews around at the beginning. They will get pushed aside in favor of blacks. Blacks don't particularly like Jews, even Leftist ones. Jewish intellectual power intimidates them and they get rid of Jews in their organizations at the earliest opportunity. Nor are blacks afraid of using violence to accomplish their goals. They are less organized than the Han but their cruelty is boundless.

    Replies: @peterike, @J.Ross, @Desiderius, @JimDandy

    Just like how Jews got totally pushed out once the Russian revolution started, right?

  119. Anonymous[299] • Disclaimer says:

    Interestingly, the SAT is a better predictor than HSGPA for nonwhites, but not as good for whites. My guess is that this is because whites tend to attend schools with less grade inflation than nonwhites. For example, most public schools like to add 1.0 points to GPA for taking Advanced Placement classes, so the highest possible GPA on a 0.0 to 4.0 scale is 5.0, but the very good old line private school my son won a scholarship to refused to offer AP classes (on the grounds that they preferred their teachers to design the courses they preferred to teach), so the highest GPA possible was only 4.0. Despite not taking any officially Advanced Placement classes, my son wound up passing some huge number of AP tests such as 8 or 10, because it was an extravagantly good school. But his GPA would have been a lot higher if he’d attended a public school.

    I went to a virtually all white boys Jesuit high school where the only nonwhites were a few blacks who were recruited for the basketball and football teams, and this is how grades were inflated there. AP classes were inflated by 1 whole point, while “Honors” classes were inflated by 0.5. So an “A” in an AP class was inflated up to 5.0, an “A” in an “Honors” class was inflated up to 4.5, etc.

  120. Anonymous[299] • Disclaimer says:

    So, the SAT should be restored to its past glory as a really good test of raw intelligence.

    To complement it, colleges should pay more attention in the admissions process to Advanced Placement tests. If students are going to test prep as much as they have since the Asian Invasion began, they might as well learn American History and Chemistry while they are doing it.

    This is sort of like what the current LSAT and MCAT tests do.

    The LSAT tests logical reasoning ability and reading comprehension. Background content knowledge in a particular area isn’t tested.

    The MCAT tests background content knowledge in the main science subjects of Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, and Physics. The prerequisites for the test are the college level, year long introductory courses in these science subjects. And the MCAT doesn’t just test knowledge in these areas but reasoning about the content and applied problems.

  121. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Anon

    Consuelo Maria del Carmen de la Santa Reputisima Madre de Hernán Cortés de Monroy y Pizarro Altamirano

    Replies: @Cortes

    Now that’s a Conquistadors full house surname.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    @Cortes

    Indeed. Imagine being a struggling custom printer of fine social stationery and cocktail napkins and getting the order when Consuelo finally marries some cabrón. You could retire on that order.

  122. Anonymous[317] • Disclaimer says:

    The idea of having a standardized test for intelligence is so that kids who are smart but not totally into high school can be distinguished from kids who aren’t smart.

    This is true, but the function of universities is to furnish the managerial and professional class of the country, not necessarily to identify smart kids and place them into the managerial/professional class.

    Back when the professional and managerial class was the preserve of elite, connected WASPs, elite universities were not particularly academically rigorous and focused on populating its student body with the kind of elite WASPs from prep schools and so forth that would be destined for the professional/managerial class. Social background was the chief consideration.

    So we’re sort of going back to this older arrangement of recruiting by social background, but of course the social background being promoted has changed from elite WASP to blacks and other non-Asians and non-whites. There has been increasing social pressure to turn the managerial and professional class of the US more black demographically and more pro-black in terms of its outlook and interests, and secondarily more non-white generally. Elite universities are responding to this pressure by altering their student demographic profiles in a more black and non-asian non-white direction, since their position and status are ultimately based on being a pipeline to the managerial/professional elite. A university could focus on recruiting high IQ whites or asians, but if those whites and asians are increasingly shut out from the professional/managerial elite, then the university will not be a pipeline to the elite and will not be an elite school.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Anonymous


    So we’re sort of going back to this older arrangement of recruiting by social background, but of course the social background being promoted has changed from elite WASP to blacks and other non-Asians and non-whites. There has been increasing social pressure to turn the managerial and professional class of the US more black demographically and more pro-black in terms of its outlook and interests, and secondarily more non-white generally. Elite universities are responding to this pressure by altering their student demographic profiles in a more black and non-asian non-white direction, since their position and status are ultimately based on being a pipeline to the managerial/professional elite.

     

    This is very good analysis; I think you're right on the mark.
  123. @Svevlad
    @Anon

    More multicultural:

    Jieshi Demarcus Gomez von Ungern-Sternberg

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    More multicultural:

    Jieshi Demarcus Gomez von Ungern-Sternberg

    If that’s what you want, try Paramaribo:

    Varina Tjon-A-Ten (born 29 November 1952 in Paramaribo, Suriname) is a Dutch politician who was a member of the House of Representatives for the Dutch Labour Party (PvdA) from 2003 to 2006.

    Her paternal grandfather came from mainland China to Suriname, but she refers herself to as moksi watra (mixed blood): one of her great-grandmothers was a Brahmin Indian from British Guiana who married a Scot, and she also has Dutch and Jewish ancestry. Her family arrived in Rotterdam in 1964.

    Angelic del Castilho (born 4 April 1967), also known as Angelic Alihusain-del Castilho, is a Surinamese politician of Democratic Alternative ’91, and a former ambassador.

    Liakat Ali Errol Alibux (born 30 November 1948 in Paramaribo) is a Surinamese politician historically associated to the PALU [Progressive Workers’ and Farmers’ Union]. From 1967 to 1973 he studied sociology at the Erasmus University Rotterdam.

    Ivan Patrick Tai-Apin (23 February 1977) is a Surinamese actor, director, screenplay writer and producer. He is mostly known for his out of the box theater shows & plays. In 2016 he started a camera acting school in Suriname and is the managing director of It Goes Productions & Casting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:People_from_Paramaribo

    And that doesn’t include the talented Wong Loi-Sing clan, now based in Europe.

    “I am a mixture of many cultures, Caribbean Indian, African, Caucasian, Jewish, Indian, Portuguese, and Chinese.” —Michael Wong Loi Sing

    Julius Wong Loi Sing is Professor in the Graduate School at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, IL.

    Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing goes to LA to pursue an acting career.

    Note the varied use of hyphens.

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    @Reg Cæsar


    And that doesn’t include the talented Wong Loi-Sing clan, now based in Europe.

    “I am a mixture of many cultures, Caribbean Indian, African, Caucasian, Jewish, Indian, Portuguese, and Chinese.” —Michael Wong Loi Sing
     
    Suriname is the most African country in the Americas on one measure: in 1980 a successful coup d'etat was carried off by a band of sergeants.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @Escher
    @Reg Cæsar

    Julius Wong Loi Sing reminds me of this Chinese restaurant I’ve been to in San Francisco’s Chinatown. The name has stuck in my head for more than 20 years.

    http://www.woeyloygoey.com/

  124. @Spud Boy
    "...which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses..."

    Not anymore.

    My decision to leave California last year is looking better every day.

    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.

    Replies: @Anon, @TWS, @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.

    His education was in Houston, much of his career in Chicago. His international travels, at least those of which he describes here, seem limited to touring favelas.

    Studio City looks tame in comparison.

  125. @International Jew
    @Charon

    Yeah, that was a great test, and pretty hard. If I hadn't put a few solid hours preparing for it, I would have really bombed. But that points to a problem with using it as an IQ test: preparation makes too much of a difference.

    So I'm with Steve; the old verbal SAT is it. And this isn't a very scientific thing to say, but when I think of what makes me think of someone as intelligent, high up there are (1) his ability to grasp what I'm saying (ie reading comprehension), and (2) ability to think abstractly (ie analogies).

    Replies: @J.Ross, @James Forrestal

    (2) ability to think abstractly (ie analogies).

    Exactly. Removing analogies from the verbal section was idiotic.

    • Replies: @anon
    @James Forrestal

    Removing analogies from the verbal section was idiotic.

    Sure, it was just an unfortunate accident...

  126. @Reg Cæsar
    @Svevlad


    More multicultural:

    Jieshi Demarcus Gomez von Ungern-Sternberg
     
    If that's what you want, try Paramaribo:

    Varina Tjon-A-Ten (born 29 November 1952 in Paramaribo, Suriname) is a Dutch politician who was a member of the House of Representatives for the Dutch Labour Party (PvdA) from 2003 to 2006.

    Her paternal grandfather came from mainland China to Suriname, but she refers herself to as moksi watra (mixed blood): one of her great-grandmothers was a Brahmin Indian from British Guiana who married a Scot, and she also has Dutch and Jewish ancestry. Her family arrived in Rotterdam in 1964.

    Angelic del Castilho (born 4 April 1967), also known as Angelic Alihusain-del Castilho, is a Surinamese politician of Democratic Alternative '91, and a former ambassador.

    Liakat Ali Errol Alibux (born 30 November 1948 in Paramaribo) is a Surinamese politician historically associated to the PALU [Progressive Workers' and Farmers' Union]. From 1967 to 1973 he studied sociology at the Erasmus University Rotterdam.

    Ivan Patrick Tai-Apin (23 February 1977) is a Surinamese actor, director, screenplay writer and producer. He is mostly known for his out of the box theater shows & plays. In 2016 he started a camera acting school in Suriname and is the managing director of It Goes Productions & Casting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:People_from_Paramaribo

     

    And that doesn't include the talented Wong Loi-Sing clan, now based in Europe.

    "I am a mixture of many cultures, Caribbean Indian, African, Caucasian, Jewish, Indian, Portuguese, and Chinese." --Michael Wong Loi Sing

    Julius Wong Loi Sing is Professor in the Graduate School at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, IL.

    Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing goes to LA to pursue an acting career.

    Note the varied use of hyphens.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Escher

    And that doesn’t include the talented Wong Loi-Sing clan, now based in Europe.

    “I am a mixture of many cultures, Caribbean Indian, African, Caucasian, Jewish, Indian, Portuguese, and Chinese.” —Michael Wong Loi Sing

    Suriname is the most African country in the Americas on one measure: in 1980 a successful coup d’etat was carried off by a band of sergeants.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Daniel H


    ...in 1980 a successful coup d’etat was carried off by a band of sergeants.
     
    Batista did the same thing in Cuba.
  127. Wasn’t Amanda Mangaser Savage a P.G. Wodehouse character? I think she was a conniving American gold-digger trying to trick Augustus Fink-Nottle into a financially advantageous marriage, until she found out that, although Gussie was from a wealthy family, he was himself a penniless sponger living off his uncle.

  128. @J.Ross
    @Jack D

    Indians. The blacks will either be harmless decorations like Harris or confined to enclaves at a lower level like Harris. But Indians can replace Jews at every level and probably want to.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Indians look too physically different to be accepted by the masses.

    Unlike Jews, they can’t pass as “fellow Whites” or claim to be “God’s people” or deploy a global ethnic network against you.

    Unlike Blacks, they can’t do street intimidation or generate a convincing victim narrative or use their entertainment industry clout (musicians, sports ballers, celebs).

    If Indians ascend to the top, support for the revolution will collapse quickly. Liberals won’t follow them, Conservatives won’t be scared by them.

    Without Jews and Blacks, there is no revolution.

    As for Hispanics and Asians, they’re too apolitical to care.

    Middle Easterners fill the same niche as Indians. Like Linda Sarsour.

    White liberals are followers, not leaders. Also, White Conservatives aren’t scared of them.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @JohnnyWalker123

    >to be accepted by the masses

    Uhhhhhhh ... dude ... what? What, are we talking about a Victorian queer riding in which DemoCrazy still ... exists? "To be accepted by the masses"? Dude, they're already EVERY manager. They're a couple of years from being EVERY academic.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  129. @Gordo
    Opportunity for China or Russia to set up an English language university, non-woke, tight admissions, and attract some top Anglosphere students.

    Would be a great long term investment for them.

    Replies: @Alfa158

    Good idea. The cost of living could be lower which would be a further attraction, and the best students might very likely stay in country and increase the hosts’ level of technological expertise. There would even be an incentive to stay because the graduates would probably not be well received back home by the SJWs who staff Western corporations Human Resources department and would regard with suspicions their motivations in choosing un-diverse schools.

  130. @Achmed E. Newman
    There are 2 highly conflicting points in this post.

    The first, made with some of my favorite humor of yours, is that the institutions in this nation (Higher Ed, in particular here) are a complete shitshow, run by people who will use whatever legal or other intimidation to get their way. Their way is simply to destroy the traditional White society and to get their people in power.

    Then, your second point is a quantitative argument from the data (your table from the UC Regents study) and your personal well thought-out plan for the best, fairest way to admit high school students into colleges.

    Is this 2nd point just a hobby of yours, like golf course architecture, because that's about a far as it's going to get? It's dreamland, and I think you know that, just from my reading of your 1st point. There is NOBODY in a position to use your suggestions would ever even consider your ideas on testing/admission. They are either completely against it, for tribal or societal destruction reasons, or they are cowards, much more concerned about their careers than any kind of decent future for the rest of us.

    Your suggestions from the 2nd part would be good ones, I'm sure, but for a nation rebuilt after the coming turmoil that your 1st part describes just the non-violent first phases of. Perhaps the discussion should lean more toward how can we get through this turmoil as a nation without ending up in the state of 1970s Red China, the 7 decade-long USSR, or current South Africa. I keep suggesting this: We need a prepper forum on here.

    Replies: @Anon, @Jack D, @Paul Mendez

    The last thing the world needs is another prepper forum. The internet is choking on them. Especially the dorky home-defense forums for Rick Grimes wannabes that fascinate too many commentators here.

    What would be interesting is a forum to debate practical policies to implement after we come out the other side of the Coming Unpleasantries. Start trying to create a roadmap for future generations.

    Call it, “A Final Solution to the [fill in the blank] Problem”

  131. @Desiderius
    @Jack D

    Don’t really care whether they’re in control or on the outside looking in. Only concern is whether they’re on my team or not. Not isn’t good enough for either one of us.

    Replies: @Ben tillman

    Good luck with that.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    @Ben tillman

    Good luck taking on Mossad genius. We get the sub-Saharan/Brahmin issue under control then maybe things can be adjusted, but these times call for a Disraeli.

    Replies: @ben tillman

  132. @Spud Boy
    "...which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses..."

    Not anymore.

    My decision to leave California last year is looking better every day.

    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.

    Replies: @Anon, @TWS, @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    “…which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses…”

    Not anymore.

    Brought this up before, but bears repeating:

    One of the items nationalists/conservatives/traditionalists must do is use some sort of competency exams to deflate college credentialism, the college bubble.

    Truth is there is more access to information than ever. There is absolutely no need for the typical undergrad student to even be on a campus excepting hard science, engineering and some arts students who need cycles in the lab/studio/stage. The few people who are actually interested in academic knowledge/learning, actually learn by reading. Videos of lectures, animations of maps, techniques, phenomena, etc. etc. may help too. Not required is paying $$$ to sit in a lecture hall.

    But in any case, most of what we have is people just collecting a credential to say “college grad”. Simple tests of reading comprehension, some writing, math, ability to interpret graphs and tables are more than sufficient for white collar credentialism. And the opportunity to “just do it” on their own–and get on with adult life–rather than some tedious expensive slog, will actually be motivating to a lot of young adults.

    Radically reducing the need for college has a bunch of positive effects:
    — reducing a deadweight costs on the economy
    — middle class parents not having to worry about college costs can have more children
    — young people enter adult life sooner and without college debt, ergo can marry, buy houses and have children faster … leading to higher fertility
    — chopping back a huge chunk of left-minoritarian indoctrination
    — destroying huge numbers of jobs that are comfy sinecures for our minoritarian enemies!

    • Replies: @anon
    @AnotherDad

    One of the items nationalists/conservatives/traditionalists must do is use some sort of competency exams to deflate college credentialism, the college bubble.

    Lay out your plan. You've been asked before. Are you up to the challenge this time?

    , @Paul Mendez
    @AnotherDad


    But in any case, most of what we have is people just collecting a credential to say “college grad.”


    Yes, but being a college grad connotes a lot more than just knowledge. It shows you had the ambition to want to be a college grad, the organization to apply, the resume to get accepted and the persistence, aptitude and people skills to graduate. It shows you are able to delay gratification to pay tuition. (Once, it was also a marker for social class in what was theoretically a class-less society.)

    Of course, the current trend is to water down college degrees so that they are less useful at judging a potential employee’ s worth.

  133. @AnotherDad
    @Spud Boy


    “…which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses…”

    Not anymore.
     
    Brought this up before, but bears repeating:

    One of the items nationalists/conservatives/traditionalists must do is use some sort of competency exams to deflate college credentialism, the college bubble.

    Truth is there is more access to information than ever. There is absolutely no need for the typical undergrad student to even be on a campus excepting hard science, engineering and some arts students who need cycles in the lab/studio/stage. The few people who are actually interested in academic knowledge/learning, actually learn by reading. Videos of lectures, animations of maps, techniques, phenomena, etc. etc. may help too. Not required is paying $$$ to sit in a lecture hall.

    But in any case, most of what we have is people just collecting a credential to say "college grad". Simple tests of reading comprehension, some writing, math, ability to interpret graphs and tables are more than sufficient for white collar credentialism. And the opportunity to "just do it" on their own--and get on with adult life--rather than some tedious expensive slog, will actually be motivating to a lot of young adults.

    Radically reducing the need for college has a bunch of positive effects:
    -- reducing a deadweight costs on the economy
    -- middle class parents not having to worry about college costs can have more children
    -- young people enter adult life sooner and without college debt, ergo can marry, buy houses and have children faster ... leading to higher fertility
    -- chopping back a huge chunk of left-minoritarian indoctrination
    -- destroying huge numbers of jobs that are comfy sinecures for our minoritarian enemies!

    Replies: @anon, @Paul Mendez

    One of the items nationalists/conservatives/traditionalists must do is use some sort of competency exams to deflate college credentialism, the college bubble.

    Lay out your plan. You’ve been asked before. Are you up to the challenge this time?

  134. @AnotherDad
    @Spud Boy


    “…which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses…”

    Not anymore.
     
    Brought this up before, but bears repeating:

    One of the items nationalists/conservatives/traditionalists must do is use some sort of competency exams to deflate college credentialism, the college bubble.

    Truth is there is more access to information than ever. There is absolutely no need for the typical undergrad student to even be on a campus excepting hard science, engineering and some arts students who need cycles in the lab/studio/stage. The few people who are actually interested in academic knowledge/learning, actually learn by reading. Videos of lectures, animations of maps, techniques, phenomena, etc. etc. may help too. Not required is paying $$$ to sit in a lecture hall.

    But in any case, most of what we have is people just collecting a credential to say "college grad". Simple tests of reading comprehension, some writing, math, ability to interpret graphs and tables are more than sufficient for white collar credentialism. And the opportunity to "just do it" on their own--and get on with adult life--rather than some tedious expensive slog, will actually be motivating to a lot of young adults.

    Radically reducing the need for college has a bunch of positive effects:
    -- reducing a deadweight costs on the economy
    -- middle class parents not having to worry about college costs can have more children
    -- young people enter adult life sooner and without college debt, ergo can marry, buy houses and have children faster ... leading to higher fertility
    -- chopping back a huge chunk of left-minoritarian indoctrination
    -- destroying huge numbers of jobs that are comfy sinecures for our minoritarian enemies!

    Replies: @anon, @Paul Mendez

    But in any case, most of what we have is people just collecting a credential to say “college grad.”

    Yes, but being a college grad connotes a lot more than just knowledge. It shows you had the ambition to want to be a college grad, the organization to apply, the resume to get accepted and the persistence, aptitude and people skills to graduate. It shows you are able to delay gratification to pay tuition. (Once, it was also a marker for social class in what was theoretically a class-less society.)

    Of course, the current trend is to water down college degrees so that they are less useful at judging a potential employee’ s worth.

  135. @Ben tillman
    @Desiderius

    Good luck with that.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    Good luck taking on Mossad genius. We get the sub-Saharan/Brahmin issue under control then maybe things can be adjusted, but these times call for a Disraeli.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Desiderius

    Neither you nor I have any say in the matter. And Mossad is not the problem.

  136. Taking standardized tests is the only thing I’m really good at. It never was a very useful skill, and now it’s absolutely worthless if it doesn’t get considered in college admissions. Are they going to scrap GRE’s too? How will the testing companies stay in business?

  137. Anonymous[172] • Disclaimer says:

    Years ago I read of a black student complaining about the SAT. The example that he gave of the test being racist was the word “regatta.” Blacks do not attend regattas, therefore they would not know the word. My hair hurts just thinking of the reasoning behind that statement. Try reading a book. Maybe studying. Whenever something requires a correct answer, it’s deemed racist.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Anonymous

    Yes, that is stupid and solipsistic. Whites and Hispanics do not attend regattas either, though they might possibly see rowing or sailing events televised from the Olympic games.

    It is not like students are asked to know that the derivation of the word comes from the Venetian dialect and means a boat race.

    By this standard most people do not play chess, so they could not know what stalemate or checkmate means.

    The list of English words that people may not know is almost infinite. Therefore testing for verbal IQ is racist, because it is really a test of how much you read, and how much you use dictionaries if you don't know what words mean.

    However, it is true that if you come from an ignorant, uneducated family that does not have a single book in the house, you probably do have a more limited vocabulary, on average, than the person whose parents are journalists, writers, teachers, or preachers, and I believe it can be shown that educational tests of all kinds are biased in favor of children whose parents are educators.

    So perhaps tests of vocabulary are unfair to everyone. If left unchecked colleges and universities could end up being filled with people who are articulate. Who would want that?

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Anonymous

    This student was making reference to the infamous 'oarsman is to regatta . . .' SAT question that was supposed to be evidence of widespread cultural bias in the test's analogies section.

    This question was used back in the 1970s; in the intervening years the testmakers have scoured the exam's language to remove any word that could be even remotely construed as 'culturally-bound'.

    Also, the whole analogies section was dumped in 2005, so it's all been a moot point for years.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Foreign Expert
    @Anonymous

    When I told the “regatta story” to my non-English-speaking wife, she nearly died laughing. Everybody knows that word.

    , @AceDeuce
    @Anonymous

    I've heard that one too--they wound up taking it out.

    Of course, a coal miner's kid in West Virginia, or a farmer's offspring in western Nebraska, or a kid in rural Utah probably never attended any regattas, but somehow managed to do well on the test.

    And of course, knigrows could just concentrate on the math portion, but they can't do squat with that either, and are now claiming math be racist.

  138. Anon[882] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew
    @Anon


    I’m not sure how the taxes and capital gains work.
     
    If LA County is like my county 400 miles north, then as long as he buys a new house in the same county, his new house's tax basis doesn't get adjusted to market value. Steve's gameplan then can be to move to Lancaster and hope that it'll secede and join up with Arizona or Nevada.

    Replies: @Anon

    Steve’s gameplan then can be to move to Lancaster and hope that it’ll secede and join up with Arizona or Nevada.

    Funny, I just read about the Greaater Idaho movement to have the sparsely populated red counties of Oregon and, in phase 2, Northern California become part of Idaho, giving Idaho an outlet to the sea (and a navy?).

    The is apparently possible, but the list of legal hurdles is pretty long. States have routinely adjusted borders, but the legislatures, governors, and finally Congress have to sign off on it. Most of the examples have involved borders that were originally defined as river courses, and unless they are in a deep, hard rock gorge, rivers change course sooner or later when silt builds up. That is, unless the Corps of Civil Engineers stops them from changing course, but even they cannot prevent it forever.

    • Replies: @Foreign Expert
    @Anon

    I believe there’s a clause in the constitution that forbids combining states. They can be split but not combined.

  139. @Spud Boy
    @Anon

    "I’m not sure how the taxes and capital gains work."

    I sold my house in CA for $2.26M last year; bought a ~$1M home in Georgia with cash (twice the size; twice the land BTW). My federal+CA tax liability on the $910K profit I made over 7 years on the house was about $75K.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    I sold my house in CA for $2.26M last year; bought a ~$1M home in Georgia with cash (twice the size; twice the land BTW). My federal+CA tax liability on the $910K profit I made over 7 years on the house was about $75K.

    You made a nice little packet, but …

    now you live in Georgia, where you pay a still onerous 6% and are going to have Stacey’s big ass bossing you–or just sitting on you–for years to come. Georgia’s the blackest state (1/3) in the nation after Mississippi.

    If you wanted the South, you should have moved to Tennessee.

  140. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Jack D

    No doubt that's part of it, Jack, getting ready for the big trouble, which I am certain will start as big economic trouble but lead to political trouble too. A real prepper is not just in the mindset of how to survive to the other side, of which there will be. He also has in mind the idea of a community of like-minded people who will not end up in the same situation on the other side as those who don't prepare.

    I don't claim to be a big prepper like John Wesley Rawles of the Survival Blog, as much as I SHOULD be reading him/it more. However, time is really getting short as one can see from the big increase in land/residential prices as of late and the government admission of higher inflation. (You can double the numbers to get something resembling reality.) Even people to whom the Federal Reserve is no more familiar than The Federalist Papers are just getting a feeling about it and wising up.

    Replies: @JMcG

    If folks didn’t learn a lesson from last spring’s run on supermarkets and gun stores, God help them, ‘cause I won’t.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  141. XYa says:
    @Dan Smith
    By admitting many students with lesser intelligence, curriculum will need to be dumbed down sufficiently so they don’t wash out after two semesters. If their career choices are simply to become diversity coordinators, fine, because that only requires aggression. In the next couple of decades, choose your medical professionals carefully.

    Replies: @Desiderius, @XYa

    The MCAT is racist, it will soon go.

    https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/fulltext/2020/03000/the_consequences_of_structural_racism_on_mcat.18.aspx

    Grades will be meaningless once universities are dumbed down and there will be no MCAT score.
    Who will be admitted?

    And if you say, “oh there are still the post graduate medical board certifications”, not so fast: https://news.weill.cornell.edu/news/2020/01/study-finds-racial-and-other-demographic-disparities-in-american-board-of-surgery-exam

    The entire post war system physician selection and training is being dismantled. This only produced the greatest medical care for the widest segment of the population in the history of humanity, so it had to go. It already has been gutted to a great degree, but the future looks very bleak.

    • Thanks: Charon
  142. @Spud Boy
    "...which include some of the nation’s most sought-after campuses..."

    Not anymore.

    My decision to leave California last year is looking better every day.

    Which makes me wonder, when is iSteve going to bug out? Better cash out that equity while you still have it.

    Replies: @Anon, @TWS, @Reg Cæsar, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    BTW, a second point here:

    This decision isn’t really very odd. And really does not require “wokeism”.

    The utterly confused people are these people–ex. neocon Jews–who are “soft”-minoritarians or proponents of immigration or a multi-ethnic tapestry or a “universal nation” … blah, blah, blah, who think that that is compatible with “meritocracy”.

    Ridiculous.

    You can have meritocracy in a one-people nation, or at least a nation with a self-confident majority people.

    In any sort of multi-ethnic democracy you will have political allocation.

    Forget our particular set of problems, look at India. Everyone knows who the smart people are there–the people who have been literate for a couple thousand years. But all the other Indians don’t think they should have to listen to Brahmins sucking up all the good gigs and telling ’em what to do. So they don’t.

    Mexicans (plus other CA) are 40% of California. They are half the kids hitting 18. Why in the hell should they not get their share of slots at the state flagship? It’s their state now. (Should never have been … but it is now.)

    Jews wanted to destroy the white gentile America to prevent the Nazis from marching or something and immigrate in a bunch of people so they could feel more comfortable middle manning a multi-ethnic America. Well this is what it looks like. Ethnic politics–every ethnic group grasping for their slice of the pie. It’s crappy. One people nations are more natural, more sane, more pleasant place–just better. But some people just don’t want to admit that.

  143. @JohnnyWalker123
    @J.Ross

    Indians look too physically different to be accepted by the masses.

    Unlike Jews, they can't pass as "fellow Whites" or claim to be "God's people" or deploy a global ethnic network against you.

    Unlike Blacks, they can't do street intimidation or generate a convincing victim narrative or use their entertainment industry clout (musicians, sports ballers, celebs).

    If Indians ascend to the top, support for the revolution will collapse quickly. Liberals won't follow them, Conservatives won't be scared by them.

    Without Jews and Blacks, there is no revolution.

    As for Hispanics and Asians, they're too apolitical to care.

    Middle Easterners fill the same niche as Indians. Like Linda Sarsour.

    White liberals are followers, not leaders. Also, White Conservatives aren't scared of them.

    Replies: @J.Ross

    >to be accepted by the masses

    Uhhhhhhh … dude … what? What, are we talking about a Victorian queer riding in which DemoCrazy still … exists? “To be accepted by the masses”? Dude, they’re already EVERY manager. They’re a couple of years from being EVERY academic.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @J.Ross

    Every manager?

    This is a list of the top CEOs in America. What percent are Indian?

    https://aflcio.org/paywatch/highest-paid-ceos

    Here are the Biden Whitehouse appointees.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/interactive/2020/biden-appointee-tracker/

    40 under 40 Forbes.

    https://fortune.com/40-under-40/

    CNN anchors.

    https://www.cnn.com/specials/tv/anchors-and-reporters

    Indians are ~5% of the above lists.

    They're 0% of the Senate, 0% of the Supreme Court, 1% of the House. Though if you count half-Black Kamala as Indian, they have the VP slot.

    The reality is that a ruling class has to enjoy some degree of support from the general population. For a variety of reasons (which I elaborated on in my previous post), Jews and Blacks are the acknowledged ruling class of America. Jews are popular with the right, while Blacks are dominant within the left. Indians are now being allowed into their coalition.

    However, if Indians were to supplant Blacks and Jews, they wouldn't enjoy support from the right or the left. It'd be a vulnerable ruling class. Indians don't captivate the White imagination like Jews and Blacks.

    Indians are heavily dependent on leveraging these relationships, especially with Jews.

    The danger with Indians isn't so much that they'll be the new ruling class. The danger is that they'll provide further support to our current Jewish-Black ruling class. Also, Indian ethnic nepotism is stealing lots of high-paying IT/software jobs, which is pushing a ton of young Americans out of the upper middle class.

    In the immediate future, the #1 threat from Indians isn't that they'll take over the ruling class. The #1 threat is that pro-immigration Jewish lobbyists will push through a bill to give a MASSIVE number of green cards to Indian H1bs, which could lead to permanent Indian dominance of the highly lucrative software industry. If you're worried about Indians, then get involved with anti-H1b activism. The H1b visa (and the eventual possibility of permanent residence/citizenship for H1b visa holders) is the main vector of Indian colonialization of America (and eventually the rest of the West).

    Replies: @J.Ross

  144. @Dumbo
    Nice, but I don't get what any of this has to do with the "Great Reset".

    (In any case, the dumbing down of universities might as well be part of the "Great Reset")

    Sooner or later, the education bubble will burst. People are paying too much for too little.

    Not everyone should go to college, and college should not be a requirement for a lot of professions. For many, it might even be a waste of time (it's more a status thing, and credentials or "becoming a member" in the case of the Ivies).

    As for tests, it doesn't matter what they do, there'll never be an "equitative" test. Or it wouldn't be a test. Perhaps the easiest way would be make people run 100 yards, the three who arrive first get in. Only this way Africans would have more chance than Asians.

    The best tests are the ones that measure more intelligence than memorization (even if both are related); SAT and GRE were good in this sense. Other countries have more complicated tests that measure a lot of memorization of content.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    The best tests are the ones that measure more intelligence than memorization (even if both are related); SAT and GRE were good in this sense.

    But a test of memorization is a good test of whether someone has developed good study habits and an ability to absorb knowledge. If this has not occurred by the age of 17, then it probably will not occur later.

    Probably selective universities should test first in subject matter and then reserve a number of places for people whose intelligence tests show that they have an unusual level of innate ability combined with low educational achievement that might be developed by special coaching and bring them up to scratch.

    So you take the top 10% or top 20% of affirmative action applicants via IQ testing, but have no prohibition whatsoever on them also qualifying by subject matter testing if they don’t make it on IQ testing.

    If you have a selective school such as a medical school, you might want to admit minorities, which is fine as long as they have sufficient IQ that experience has shown that they will be able to pass professional qualifying tests and function as medical professionals–whatever that is–but you should also reserve places for those who have already scored high marks in premed, biochemistry, and biological sciences.

    It seems to me that a lot of the purpose of having standard qualifying tests, like the LSAT for law school, is to eliminate subjective judgments in the first place, but if racial minorities cannot qualify to take up enough places by objective testing–which could be 100% managed by computers with no human input–then you should have quotas for African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and so on and assign them special tutors if necessary.

  145. @Anon
    How about:

    Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar

    First first name: Juana
    Second first name: Enriqueta
    Third first name: Josefina
    Compound second name: de los Sagrados Corazones
    Paternal name: Fernández
    Maternal name: del Solar

    Wikipedia:

    Colonial Hispanic America

    In the colonial period and nineteenth century, it was common to have between one and three given names followed by a second name with a "de" (from) in front. For example, the Saint Teresa de Los Andes whose real name is Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar. Where "Juana", "Enriqueta" and "Josefina" are her first names, followed by the second name "de los Sagrados Corazones". Her paternal surname is "Fernández" and her maternal surname is "del Solar".
     

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @Svevlad, @Hibernian, @Jim Bob Lassiter, @James J O'Meara, @Macumazahn

    Francisco Domingo Carlos Andres Sebastián d’Anconia

  146. @Anonymous

    The idea of having a standardized test for intelligence is so that kids who are smart but not totally into high school can be distinguished from kids who aren’t smart.
     
    This is true, but the function of universities is to furnish the managerial and professional class of the country, not necessarily to identify smart kids and place them into the managerial/professional class.

    Back when the professional and managerial class was the preserve of elite, connected WASPs, elite universities were not particularly academically rigorous and focused on populating its student body with the kind of elite WASPs from prep schools and so forth that would be destined for the professional/managerial class. Social background was the chief consideration.

    So we're sort of going back to this older arrangement of recruiting by social background, but of course the social background being promoted has changed from elite WASP to blacks and other non-Asians and non-whites. There has been increasing social pressure to turn the managerial and professional class of the US more black demographically and more pro-black in terms of its outlook and interests, and secondarily more non-white generally. Elite universities are responding to this pressure by altering their student demographic profiles in a more black and non-asian non-white direction, since their position and status are ultimately based on being a pipeline to the managerial/professional elite. A university could focus on recruiting high IQ whites or asians, but if those whites and asians are increasingly shut out from the professional/managerial elite, then the university will not be a pipeline to the elite and will not be an elite school.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    So we’re sort of going back to this older arrangement of recruiting by social background, but of course the social background being promoted has changed from elite WASP to blacks and other non-Asians and non-whites. There has been increasing social pressure to turn the managerial and professional class of the US more black demographically and more pro-black in terms of its outlook and interests, and secondarily more non-white generally. Elite universities are responding to this pressure by altering their student demographic profiles in a more black and non-asian non-white direction, since their position and status are ultimately based on being a pipeline to the managerial/professional elite.

    This is very good analysis; I think you’re right on the mark.

  147. @Abolish_public_education
    Yet another problem caused by too much gov, e.g. public education.

    I’m laughing at all those CA parents who, for the past ten years, have been paying for their future Bears’ test prep services, robotics camps, etc.

    Layoffs at the College Board are long overdue.

    And the Singer group did nothing actually criminal, despite what those opportunistic, political hack, lawyer-USA’s allege.

    The land grant colleges (the flagship, state u’s) were established, or so it was said, for the practical, political purpose of providing Bachelor’s level training to the next generation of in-state, applied scientists — the smart workers of that time — at little or no charge to the student.

    Professors were hands-on teachers; department chairs took on a few additional, administrative duties.

    Students were a rarified bunch who had the smarts and perseverance to complete those rigorous disciplines.

    The ascendant, busybody progressives soon became outraged about the unfairness (the racism smear of that time) of having only left-brain types go to college.

    And here we are.

    • State U’s are gigantic bureaucracies.

    • Profsters are focused on their own job security (“tenure”), i.e. research, so they limit their teaching (“burden”) to small, handpicked groups of graduate students. Sorry, reading from notes before a group of 400 undergraduates in a cavernous lecture hall doesn’t count.

    • Science students pay some of the highest tuition rates in the university (e.g. lab fees).

    • Free rides accrue to jocks who major in football science. To be fair, the $3M/yr, professor of football actually teaches.

    • Admissions/Faculty committees scheme how to recruit more “underrepresenteds” into science majors/departments.

    Replies: @dvorak

    And the Singer group did nothing actually criminal

    This is actually true, because at least one Admissions Office knew there were unqualified athletes on teams, even if they didn’t know/care which students or which teams. There’s a smoking gun email where the Head of Admissions jokes about it.

    The entire federal case hinged on the admissions offices being as pure as driven snow, utterly innocent to the existence of faux athletes. At least one of the admissions offices was not innocent. If admissions knew and didn’t care, then the university as a corporation knew about it; and that means that it wasn’t fraud, wire or otherwise.

    It’s too bad Lori/Massimo didn’t go to trial. Can’t blame them for capitulating, though.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @dvorak

    So if the coach who is selling an admission to a college splits his bribe with somebody in the Admissions Office, it's okay?

    Replies: @dvorak

  148. @James Forrestal
    @International Jew


    (2) ability to think abstractly (ie analogies).
     
    Exactly. Removing analogies from the verbal section was idiotic.

    Replies: @anon

    Removing analogies from the verbal section was idiotic.

    Sure, it was just an unfortunate accident…

  149. @Anonymous
    Years ago I read of a black student complaining about the SAT. The example that he gave of the test being racist was the word “regatta.” Blacks do not attend regattas, therefore they would not know the word. My hair hurts just thinking of the reasoning behind that statement. Try reading a book. Maybe studying. Whenever something requires a correct answer, it’s deemed racist.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Foreign Expert, @AceDeuce

    Yes, that is stupid and solipsistic. Whites and Hispanics do not attend regattas either, though they might possibly see rowing or sailing events televised from the Olympic games.

    It is not like students are asked to know that the derivation of the word comes from the Venetian dialect and means a boat race.

    By this standard most people do not play chess, so they could not know what stalemate or checkmate means.

    The list of English words that people may not know is almost infinite. Therefore testing for verbal IQ is racist, because it is really a test of how much you read, and how much you use dictionaries if you don’t know what words mean.

    However, it is true that if you come from an ignorant, uneducated family that does not have a single book in the house, you probably do have a more limited vocabulary, on average, than the person whose parents are journalists, writers, teachers, or preachers, and I believe it can be shown that educational tests of all kinds are biased in favor of children whose parents are educators.

    So perhaps tests of vocabulary are unfair to everyone. If left unchecked colleges and universities could end up being filled with people who are articulate. Who would want that?

  150. @dvorak
    @Abolish_public_education


    And the Singer group did nothing actually criminal
     
    This is actually true, because at least one Admissions Office knew there were unqualified athletes on teams, even if they didn't know/care which students or which teams. There's a smoking gun email where the Head of Admissions jokes about it.

    The entire federal case hinged on the admissions offices being as pure as driven snow, utterly innocent to the existence of faux athletes. At least one of the admissions offices was not innocent. If admissions knew and didn't care, then the university as a corporation knew about it; and that means that it wasn't fraud, wire or otherwise.

    It's too bad Lori/Massimo didn't go to trial. Can't blame them for capitulating, though.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    So if the coach who is selling an admission to a college splits his bribe with somebody in the Admissions Office, it’s okay?

    • Replies: @dvorak
    @Steve Sailer


    So if the coach who is selling an admission to a college splits his bribe with somebody in the Admissions Office, it’s okay?
     
    I wish I could find the reference, but the smoking gun email that I remember was not about a rogue employee. It implied that the admissions office as an institution knew about unqualified athletes.

    My takeaway was that it was not like it is at Harvard, where pay-to-play is centralized and explicitly decided in every case by admissions dean William Fitzsimmons. "Mr. Jared Kushner is admitted," e.g.

    Instead, at this university that I'm not naming, the smoking gun email was evidence of a decentralized process where rich and connected people got their kids admitted through routes that were tacitly sanctioned by the admissions office. If Athletics was one, the drama school was likely another source of tacitly sanctioned pay-to-play.

    My contention is that this tacit sanction from the admissions office as an institution, blows up the federal case pertaining to that university.

  151. @JimDandy
    @Charon

    Who cares? What's the worst that could happen?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdPmNM0IF7Y

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    “Why come you don’t have a tattoo?”

    This scene is one of my favorites of all time. Just because I posted it on Peak Stupidity today, I’ll paste in another favorite scene, this one from The Office:

    • Thanks: JimDandy
  152. @Jack D
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Look at S. Africa. You don't need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open. What we need is discussions on home defense - how to build walls with broken glass on top, what is the best home defense weapon, the best concealed carry weapon, the best times to leave your home without getting robbed and so on.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman, @The Anti-Gnostic, @Adam Smith, @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Look at S. Africa. You don’t need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open.

    The United States isn’t SA. Part of “prepping”, something you and your disappeared recent ancestors you occasionally lament on this forum also don’t/didn’t understand, is the massive capability for death and destruction if things go south: i.e. total social and political breakdown. All it would take is a few high-level assassinations/attempts to get it all rolling. Or a high-def massacre of whatever woke group happens to be rioting, er, ‘protesting’ one fateful day.

    The domestic offensive capability of currently armed civilians in the US is tremendous. Add armed services mutinies to the mix, and we got ourselves a potential donnybrook with millions dead before someone cries uncle. And maybe millions more dead/expelled depending on the disposition of the victors.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    with millions dead before someone cries uncle. And maybe millions more dead/expelled depending on the disposition of the victors.
     
    Something to look forward to, then? Living in a country ruled by a bunch of DIEversicrats sounds like the preferable alternative - at least it involves living.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    , @Alden
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    It will never happen because the gun owners are spread out in rural suburban areas and have no leadership, no organizations and no plans.

    The few gun owners who actually have the incentive and courage to do something usually get recruited by a FBI ATF ACLU SPLC ADL AJC front group and end up killed or imprisoned.

    Successful revolutions like the reformation, American, French, Vendee, French 1830 European 1848 Russian, attempted German Hungarian revolutions of 1917, communist revolution and triumph in China 1920-1948
    Had nothing to do with angry peasants and frontiersmen storming the castle. Or leaders like Washington Jefferson Phillipe d’Orleans Renee Bourdeau and the Bulkleys , Lenin Stalin and Mao just rising out of nowhere.

    To learn about a successful revolution and how it’s created by the powerful you might try to find a book about the American Revolution that begins in 1759 and mentions: masons Green Dragon tavern looming anti slavery laws in Britain, what Americans call the French and Indian War and the conflict between the British government and the land hungry colonials regarding the settlement of the upper Midwest from western Pennsylvania to the Rocky Mountains.

    Never in human history have the proles peasants and deplorables made a revolution without leadership money planning and organization by the elite. Revolutions are elite sector B against elite sector A. Always have been and probably always will be.

    Look at American blacks. They are one of America’s most successful groups. But they are just grunts led by Whites. From the first farmers who used them against White workers to the present George Floyd insanity.

    For a couple years after the civil war, freed blacks, permitted by the Freedmen’s Bureau and the Union Army occupation did run amuck with crime including violence and murder in the south.

    That was ended by the KKK. KKK was extremely successful. But only because it was led and organized by the wealthiest prestigious Confederate veterans. Not malnourished White sharecroppers lumberjacks and miners so poor they owed their souls to the company store.

    But at this time, I can’t think of any leadership cadre that can help Whites. The conservatives have 3 causes, anti abortion, anti living wages and anti taxes for the wealthiest and large corporations. The conservatives are also pro legal immigration of skilled non White immigrants because they work for low wages and are happy to live 20 people in a 2,000 sq ft house.



    There are a few White Nationalists like me. The rest are idiots whose main interest is discussing which European ethnic group is really White. Consensus seems to be only the blue eyed are really White. But not if the blue eyed person has a French or Slavic name.
    People like you have fantasies about a BLM mob invading your little town and your little militia driving them away. A successful revolution doesn’t happen in small towns. It happens in the Capitol and the big important cities.

    If, January 6 had had the backing of money powerful elites, propaganda and president Trump it could have succeeded as many coups have. But the demonstrators were ordinary people. So it failed and those who are arrested are suffering horribly in the DC jail at the hands of sadistic jail guards. The FBI is still arresting any White person who traveled to DC that day.

    Enjoy prepping and playing with your guns. But you better assume that any person who approaches you about any kind of armed resistance is from the FBI to set you up for murder like Randy Weaver or confiscatory fines and legal expenses and imprisonments under black guards and fellow prisoners.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

  153. @Anonymous
    Years ago I read of a black student complaining about the SAT. The example that he gave of the test being racist was the word “regatta.” Blacks do not attend regattas, therefore they would not know the word. My hair hurts just thinking of the reasoning behind that statement. Try reading a book. Maybe studying. Whenever something requires a correct answer, it’s deemed racist.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Foreign Expert, @AceDeuce

    This student was making reference to the infamous ‘oarsman is to regatta . . .’ SAT question that was supposed to be evidence of widespread cultural bias in the test’s analogies section.

    This question was used back in the 1970s; in the intervening years the testmakers have scoured the exam’s language to remove any word that could be even remotely construed as ‘culturally-bound’.

    Also, the whole analogies section was dumped in 2005, so it’s all been a moot point for years.

    • Replies: @anon
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    This question was used back in the 1970s;

    Yet as recently as 2016 I heard an Anthropology professor at a state uni citing it as an example of why IQ testing is invalid and bad and stuff. 5 years ago, citing a 40+ year old question, in public as "evidence" of something...something...reasons.

    Sadly tiresome.

  154. @Anon
    @Achmed E. Newman


    Perhaps the discussion should lean more toward how can we get through this turmoil as a nation without ending up in the state of 1970s Red China, the 7 decade-long USSR, or current South Africa. I keep suggesting this: We need a prepper forum on here.
     
    What sort of forum would you envision? Are there any forums out there that are similar to what you seek?

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I used to read the prepper sites about 10 years ago. I don’t want to steer you wrong, but that survival blog is still up, and Mr. Ross mentioned Ferfal. I also recall a SHTFPlan – the guy has experience from having lived in the Balkins during the mid-1990s war – he used to write like an Eastern European (I think purely to sound authentic), but last I read he went full good grammar.

    I’m sure there are some sites that lean more toward financial management prepping, others about gardening, others about DIY power generation, and so on. Then there are those that get into the homeschooling and other off-the-grid Libertarian ideas, such as Ron Paul.

    What I mean is that, not to kiss Ron Unz’s ass here, but I really like the functionality of the commenting system here. Therefore, if he’d get a prepper writer or two, instead of some of the anti-all-things-American writers and the pure Commies, it would be great.

    • Replies: @Alden
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Problem with prepping is the assumption that you’ll always have a building and the land it’s on to keep your supplies in. And plant fruit trees and an income to pay the property taxes and keep a vehicle to get to the nearest town for things you can’t grow like salt and medicine.

    What happens when a platoon of soldiers comes and orders you and your family to clear out or be killed. And a government clerk has already removed all records that you own the property?

    It happened 100 years ago in Russia, Hungary and even Munich Germany. Happened 70 years ago in China. Happened 70 years ago in Palestine. . The man who killed JFK, Sirhan Sirhan. That’s what happened to his family when he was 4. Israeli soldiers just burst in and ordered them to leave with just what they could carry. Nothing they could do. From a 10 room house to a hostel in a monastery with 7 kids mostly boys from 4 to older teens.

    Every single sector of the elite wants us Whites dead and gone. Revolutions are squabbles among the elite, who’ll be King of the Mountain for a while. But now it’s every sector of the elite against Whites.

    When the elites make their move they’ll take our real property away as easily as Henry 8 and Thomas Cromwell confiscated monasteries.

    Or a platoon of Israeli soldiers took the home the Sirhan’s inherited . A home that had been in the family for generations. Sirhans were Christians not descendants of 650AD Arab Muslims. More pure Jewish Mizrahi DNA than the Germans and Russians that drove them from their home.

  155. That chart was very racist using the word slope. No asian protests about that?

    • LOL: Grahamsno(G64)
  156. anon[819] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Anonymous

    This student was making reference to the infamous 'oarsman is to regatta . . .' SAT question that was supposed to be evidence of widespread cultural bias in the test's analogies section.

    This question was used back in the 1970s; in the intervening years the testmakers have scoured the exam's language to remove any word that could be even remotely construed as 'culturally-bound'.

    Also, the whole analogies section was dumped in 2005, so it's all been a moot point for years.

    Replies: @anon

    This question was used back in the 1970s;

    Yet as recently as 2016 I heard an Anthropology professor at a state uni citing it as an example of why IQ testing is invalid and bad and stuff. 5 years ago, citing a 40+ year old question, in public as “evidence” of something…something…reasons.

    Sadly tiresome.

  157. Straight white male here. This is a sad day for me. In the 1960s I was an unsupervised, undisciplined, bored high school student from an uneducated family who ignored homework and read five books a week in my spare time. And also lived a chaotic life in the 1970s. My SATs and GREs are nearly perfect, and that allowed me later to pursue successfully higher studies and to create new human knowledge.

    Who will lose? Footloose young men. White proles like me. So-called hispanics and blacks like me (stupid upper class hispanics and blacks can an afford a profile to get the positions). The East Asians, many of whom work hard, are smart, organized, and sometimes creative. What is most exciting about an advanced university? To see bright students of lucky or unlucky background master tough material, take it further on their own, becoming people who will make good lives for themselves and add to society.

    Admissions were being relaxed at UC’s lead campuses right before the pandemic, and it was already disrupting the pace in standard but intrinsically difficult courses. People of all ethnicities will succeed under the new regime, but those who are not capable of the work will become embittered, blame it on systemic racism, and up the activism and demands. Creating a spiral of increased protest, increased systemic racism, increased protest…collapsing somehow in a way only Philip K. Dick could imagine.

    For those who want to abolish college credentials, I tried that. The few times before 1971 (Griggs v. Duke Power) I applied for a job with an intelligence test I was aggressively recruited. After that I tried a hundred applications without a bachelor’s degree for white-collar jobs . Finally, a state official let me know that, whatever my demonstrable talents, if I were hired over any person from a protected class with a bachelor’s degree, the employer would automatically lose the costly discrimination lawsuit. A person from a protected class without a bachelor’s degree, however, can be hired over a credentialed SWM without fear of penalty. Until I upped my credentials in mid-life, I was creative in the margins of society, but lacked health insurance and middle-class pay.

  158. @john cronk
    I'm tired of this pathetic, laughable destruction and of feeling bad. Noticing this stuff is important, but it's taking up our time and attention. Watching the rot is good, scary entertainment, but it's time to be doing something positive. People are ready.
    I think a connected network of people is the way to go. We cannot form breakaway geographical units, but rather must live within the disintegrating United States and abide by its laws.
    That's the way to build positivity and work toward a community of people with a solid middle class as well as a best and brightest component, all with an incentive to be their best selves.
    Let the bad and the brainwashed go down their mistaken path with what America has become - they may well self destruct some day. Meanwhile, we have better things to do than waste our energies on them.
    When their system completely falls apart, we can be a functioning core for building something.

    Replies: @Desiderius

    I’m game.

  159. @J.Ross
    @JohnnyWalker123

    >to be accepted by the masses

    Uhhhhhhh ... dude ... what? What, are we talking about a Victorian queer riding in which DemoCrazy still ... exists? "To be accepted by the masses"? Dude, they're already EVERY manager. They're a couple of years from being EVERY academic.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    Every manager?

    This is a list of the top CEOs in America. What percent are Indian?

    https://aflcio.org/paywatch/highest-paid-ceos

    Here are the Biden Whitehouse appointees.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/interactive/2020/biden-appointee-tracker/

    40 under 40 Forbes.

    https://fortune.com/40-under-40/

    CNN anchors.

    https://www.cnn.com/specials/tv/anchors-and-reporters

    Indians are ~5% of the above lists.

    They’re 0% of the Senate, 0% of the Supreme Court, 1% of the House. Though if you count half-Black Kamala as Indian, they have the VP slot.

    The reality is that a ruling class has to enjoy some degree of support from the general population. For a variety of reasons (which I elaborated on in my previous post), Jews and Blacks are the acknowledged ruling class of America. Jews are popular with the right, while Blacks are dominant within the left. Indians are now being allowed into their coalition.

    However, if Indians were to supplant Blacks and Jews, they wouldn’t enjoy support from the right or the left. It’d be a vulnerable ruling class. Indians don’t captivate the White imagination like Jews and Blacks.

    Indians are heavily dependent on leveraging these relationships, especially with Jews.

    The danger with Indians isn’t so much that they’ll be the new ruling class. The danger is that they’ll provide further support to our current Jewish-Black ruling class. Also, Indian ethnic nepotism is stealing lots of high-paying IT/software jobs, which is pushing a ton of young Americans out of the upper middle class.

    In the immediate future, the #1 threat from Indians isn’t that they’ll take over the ruling class. The #1 threat is that pro-immigration Jewish lobbyists will push through a bill to give a MASSIVE number of green cards to Indian H1bs, which could lead to permanent Indian dominance of the highly lucrative software industry. If you’re worried about Indians, then get involved with anti-H1b activism. The H1b visa (and the eventual possibility of permanent residence/citizenship for H1b visa holders) is the main vector of Indian colonialization of America (and eventually the rest of the West).

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    @JohnnyWalker123

    A CEO is a manager? A congressman is a manager? It's clearly the trend and there is nothing pushing against it and nobody is allowed to criticize it, so I see it as inevitable. Maybe it'll take longer. Who does the ruling elite hire from? They'll eventually be Indians and there will be no popular acceptance involved. Talk about the elite caring what anyone thinks after the last election, ha.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

  160. @Greta Handel

    Lawsuit settlements are one of the most corrupt ways for liberal institutions to do what they wanted to [d]o.
     
    Why do you limit this to “liberal”?

    The ultra vires doctrine of Supreme Court Sez has, since Marbury but increasingly in the post-WWII era, helped to suck power and all that comes with into Washington and, as here, away from the people of the sovereign states. The invertebrate Congress (and, as here, California legislators) has gladly ceded its authority, allowing the President free reign {used intentionally} beyond the national borders and the Court to issue decrees on domestic issues that might imperil re-election. The “branches” are better understood as three hands washing each other.

    Please tell your readers when the “conservative” politicians in California do anything but fume and throw up their hands about this. Or, on second thought, even so much as that.

    Replies: @Alden

    Correct and thank you. The courts, not elected legislatures make our laws. And often overturn laws jews communists and liberals don’t like.

    As for the SATs and ACTs, being eliminated, teens all over California are celebrating. Professional sob story admissions essay writers are raising their prices.

  161. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    Look at S. Africa. You don’t need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open.
     
    The United States isn’t SA. Part of “prepping”, something you and your disappeared recent ancestors you occasionally lament on this forum also don’t/didn’t understand, is the massive capability for death and destruction if things go south: i.e. total social and political breakdown. All it would take is a few high-level assassinations/attempts to get it all rolling. Or a high-def massacre of whatever woke group happens to be rioting, er, ‘protesting’ one fateful day.

    The domestic offensive capability of currently armed civilians in the US is tremendous. Add armed services mutinies to the mix, and we got ourselves a potential donnybrook with millions dead before someone cries uncle. And maybe millions more dead/expelled depending on the disposition of the victors.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Alden

    with millions dead before someone cries uncle. And maybe millions more dead/expelled depending on the disposition of the victors.

    Something to look forward to, then? Living in a country ruled by a bunch of DIEversicrats sounds like the preferable alternative – at least it involves living.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    Living in a country ruled by a bunch of DIEversicrats sounds like the preferable alternative – at least it involves living. [emphasis added]
     
    Well, if one follows future rules of the emerging regime, I’m sure all will be okay, LOL

    Please show up on time for your scheduled status review, Mr. D :

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9570845/Unseen-pictures-Frances-role-rounding-Jews-luring-fake-forms.html
  162. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Jack D


    Look at S. Africa. You don’t need to be a prepper to live in S. Africa. The grocery stores and the gas stations are still open.
     
    The United States isn’t SA. Part of “prepping”, something you and your disappeared recent ancestors you occasionally lament on this forum also don’t/didn’t understand, is the massive capability for death and destruction if things go south: i.e. total social and political breakdown. All it would take is a few high-level assassinations/attempts to get it all rolling. Or a high-def massacre of whatever woke group happens to be rioting, er, ‘protesting’ one fateful day.

    The domestic offensive capability of currently armed civilians in the US is tremendous. Add armed services mutinies to the mix, and we got ourselves a potential donnybrook with millions dead before someone cries uncle. And maybe millions more dead/expelled depending on the disposition of the victors.

    Replies: @Jack D, @Alden

    It will never happen because the gun owners are spread out in rural suburban areas and have no leadership, no organizations and no plans.

    The few gun owners who actually have the incentive and courage to do something usually get recruited by a FBI ATF ACLU SPLC ADL AJC front group and end up killed or imprisoned.

    Successful revolutions like the reformation, American, French, Vendee, French 1830 European 1848 Russian, attempted German Hungarian revolutions of 1917, communist revolution and triumph in China 1920-1948
    Had nothing to do with angry peasants and frontiersmen storming the castle. Or leaders like Washington Jefferson Phillipe d’Orleans Renee Bourdeau and the Bulkleys , Lenin Stalin and Mao just rising out of nowhere.

    To learn about a successful revolution and how it’s created by the powerful you might try to find a book about the American Revolution that begins in 1759 and mentions: masons Green Dragon tavern looming anti slavery laws in Britain, what Americans call the French and Indian War and the conflict between the British government and the land hungry colonials regarding the settlement of the upper Midwest from western Pennsylvania to the Rocky Mountains.

    Never in human history have the proles peasants and deplorables made a revolution without leadership money planning and organization by the elite. Revolutions are elite sector B against elite sector A. Always have been and probably always will be.

    Look at American blacks. They are one of America’s most successful groups. But they are just grunts led by Whites. From the first farmers who used them against White workers to the present George Floyd insanity.

    For a couple years after the civil war, freed blacks, permitted by the Freedmen’s Bureau and the Union Army occupation did run amuck with crime including violence and murder in the south.

    That was ended by the KKK. KKK was extremely successful. But only because it was led and organized by the wealthiest prestigious Confederate veterans. Not malnourished White sharecroppers lumberjacks and miners so poor they owed their souls to the company store.

    But at this time, I can’t think of any leadership cadre that can help Whites. The conservatives have 3 causes, anti abortion, anti living wages and anti taxes for the wealthiest and large corporations. The conservatives are also pro legal immigration of skilled non White immigrants because they work for low wages and are happy to live 20 people in a 2,000 sq ft house.

    There are a few White Nationalists like me. The rest are idiots whose main interest is discussing which European ethnic group is really White. Consensus seems to be only the blue eyed are really White. But not if the blue eyed person has a French or Slavic name.
    People like you have fantasies about a BLM mob invading your little town and your little militia driving them away. A successful revolution doesn’t happen in small towns. It happens in the Capitol and the big important cities.

    If, January 6 had had the backing of money powerful elites, propaganda and president Trump it could have succeeded as many coups have. But the demonstrators were ordinary people. So it failed and those who are arrested are suffering horribly in the DC jail at the hands of sadistic jail guards. The FBI is still arresting any White person who traveled to DC that day.

    Enjoy prepping and playing with your guns. But you better assume that any person who approaches you about any kind of armed resistance is from the FBI to set you up for murder like Randy Weaver or confiscatory fines and legal expenses and imprisonments under black guards and fellow prisoners.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    @Alden


    It will never happen because the gun owners are spread out in rural suburban areas ...
     
    Gun owners are everywhere. Legal ones, with real hardware (i.e. what the police have).

    ... and have no leadership, no organizations and no plans.
     
    Alden, you’re thinking of organized armed plotting. I’m describing a presently primed environment that can explode automatically—no need for coordination or grand strategic schemes of any kind—e.g. multiple ‘lone wolves’ (of whatever political persuasion) can change the security situation overnight, including in heavily ‘controlled’ areas. The polarization is there, and the steadily increasing pile of weapons in self-directed (civilian) hands is there. BOOM
  163. @Fisk Ellington Rutledge IV
    Well, the only solution to all of this wrangling over tests is to simply get rid of all nonWhite students. They and their parents need to be summarily deported; dumped on Mexico if their hellish native countries won't take them. Then the U.S. can go back to NOT being a third-world garbage dump.
    This is going to happen sooner or later. Then we can go back to simply educating White kids who are educable instead of pretending that nonWhites are anything better than functionally illiterate.

    Replies: @Charon

    This is going to happen sooner or later.

    Never, ever going to happen. Much more likely that white people will be exiled.

  164. It has been known since the ’80s that, among standardized tests, AP exams are the strongest predictors of college grades. Additionally, in 2009, the College Board (which administers these exams) released a study which showed that, even after controlling for SAT scores and HSGPA, AP exam scores were still accurate predictors of subsequent performance in college, with students scoring 3 or higher outperforming those who had scored 1 or 2, as well as those with no AP exam scores. So, it might not be a bad idea to put AP scores front and center in college admissions, since they do a better job in predicting college performance than SATs and high school grades. And, along the lines of the rationale for using SAT subject tests, prepping for APs wouldn’t be such a waste: AP curricula is, by definition, college material (or pretty close), so at the very least, students would actually be learning something. Problem is, the same patterns in scores over the population are observed for APs, which would likely then become the next target for litigation. And in this case, the opposition might have a point: poorer schools are less likely to offer AP courses. Still, it would be harder to argue that the tests simply measure test-taking ability or divert time and effort from actually learning stuff. And APs just might be the most practical way to preserve a modicum of objectivity in the college admissions process. (The UC system is toying with the idea of creating its own standardized test, but they will probably end up wasting millions trying to develop a test that will satisfy everyone, that will actually satisfy no one.)

    https://www.highereddatastories.com/2018/02/college-board-ap-data.html

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Cappy

    Right. Advanced Placement tests possess prima facie validity: here's this big serious-looking test full of in-depth multiple choice questions and essay questions that you'd expect in a college freshman level intro course. AP tests look hard. They look like you definitely have to study hard for them.

    Now, there are a lot of logistical issues involved with expanding the use of AP scores in college admissions, but improvements can be made. For example, because AP tests are only given in May, after college admissions letters go out in April, no AP tests from after Junior year can be used in admissions.

    But it would be possible to add one semester AP tests in December that could be graded by the end of January, in plenty of time to be evaluated for admissions.

    We could add summer school AP classes with tests in August. You want to impress colleges: take three AP tests in August before your senior year.

    And scoring should be extended from 1 to 5 up to 1 to 7. "Oh, you are one of the 500 kids in the country who got a 7 on AP Chemistry? Yes, we at MIT are very interested in you."

    Replies: @JimB, @anon, @res

    , @AnonAnon
    @Cappy

    Last time I looked at it four years ago the University of California application asked you to self report your AP scores. Based on the observation of where kids got admitted from our local public high school, to have a shot at getting into a top-five UC kids had to take at least ten or more APs. At our high school you can start as early as ninth grade, with AP Human Geography and there is no limit on the number in the last two years, with the top kids often taking a full load of 6/7 APs the last two years. I know other states gate their APs tighter but it’s a wide open nuclear arms race in the good California public schools, with the truly elite kids gunning for MIT racking up dual-enrollment credits at the local CC when they’re done with AP Calc BC in 10th grade. My oldest ended up with 14, taking 7 his senior year (freshman year of college was “easy” with only 4 courses), and my youngest is on track to finish with 12.

    I think this whole system is just going to end up with states trading their best students to each other and parents paying more. It’s often much easier to get into an out of state flagship university. For example, Cal Poly SLO’s out of state admittance rate is 58% but the overall in-state rate is 29%. For the toughest majors, like CS, the overall admit rate is down to 5% so being out of state is a significant advantage. It’s easier to get your kid into top-5 Purdue engineering than UCSB’s engineering school.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  165. @Cappy
    It has been known since the '80s that, among standardized tests, AP exams are the strongest predictors of college grades. Additionally, in 2009, the College Board (which administers these exams) released a study which showed that, even after controlling for SAT scores and HSGPA, AP exam scores were still accurate predictors of subsequent performance in college, with students scoring 3 or higher outperforming those who had scored 1 or 2, as well as those with no AP exam scores. So, it might not be a bad idea to put AP scores front and center in college admissions, since they do a better job in predicting college performance than SATs and high school grades. And, along the lines of the rationale for using SAT subject tests, prepping for APs wouldn't be such a waste: AP curricula is, by definition, college material (or pretty close), so at the very least, students would actually be learning something. Problem is, the same patterns in scores over the population are observed for APs, which would likely then become the next target for litigation. And in this case, the opposition might have a point: poorer schools are less likely to offer AP courses. Still, it would be harder to argue that the tests simply measure test-taking ability or divert time and effort from actually learning stuff. And APs just might be the most practical way to preserve a modicum of objectivity in the college admissions process. (The UC system is toying with the idea of creating its own standardized test, but they will probably end up wasting millions trying to develop a test that will satisfy everyone, that will actually satisfy no one.)

    https://www.highereddatastories.com/2018/02/college-board-ap-data.html

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnonAnon

    Right. Advanced Placement tests possess prima facie validity: here’s this big serious-looking test full of in-depth multiple choice questions and essay questions that you’d expect in a college freshman level intro course. AP tests look hard. They look like you definitely have to study hard for them.

    Now, there are a lot of logistical issues involved with expanding the use of AP scores in college admissions, but improvements can be made. For example, because AP tests are only given in May, after college admissions letters go out in April, no AP tests from after Junior year can be used in admissions.

    But it would be possible to add one semester AP tests in December that could be graded by the end of January, in plenty of time to be evaluated for admissions.

    We could add summer school AP classes with tests in August. You want to impress colleges: take three AP tests in August before your senior year.

    And scoring should be extended from 1 to 5 up to 1 to 7. “Oh, you are one of the 500 kids in the country who got a 7 on AP Chemistry? Yes, we at MIT are very interested in you.”

    • Replies: @JimB
    @Steve Sailer

    In effect, students who take AP tests are applying to be admitted to their sophomore year of college. And if nearly all admitted students at some college have taken at least four AP tests, which is typical at Harvard or MIT, why not just graduate them in three years? Why waste a smart kid's time by making him take the equivalent of five years of undergraduate education?

    I say give college applicants the Wunderlich test in place of the SAT. Or ask them to snatch the pebble out of Master Po's hand. Either test is as predictive of undergraduate GPA as anything else.

    , @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Yes, we at MIT are would be very interested in you...but you are too white.

    FIFY.

    , @res
    @Steve Sailer

    And of course AP tests will have less disparate impact then SATs. It will be interesting to see how that plays out.

    Where the AP tests idea falls down is in replicating the ability of the SAT to find diamonds in the rough who were not good students.

  166. @Achmed E. Newman
    @Anon

    I used to read the prepper sites about 10 years ago. I don't want to steer you wrong, but that survival blog is still up, and Mr. Ross mentioned Ferfal. I also recall a SHTFPlan - the guy has experience from having lived in the Balkins during the mid-1990s war - he used to write like an Eastern European (I think purely to sound authentic), but last I read he went full good grammar.

    I'm sure there are some sites that lean more toward financial management prepping, others about gardening, others about DIY power generation, and so on. Then there are those that get into the homeschooling and other off-the-grid Libertarian ideas, such as Ron Paul.

    What I mean is that, not to kiss Ron Unz's ass here, but I really like the functionality of the commenting system here. Therefore, if he'd get a prepper writer or two, instead of some of the anti-all-things-American writers and the pure Commies, it would be great.

    Replies: @Alden

    Problem with prepping is the assumption that you’ll always have a building and the land it’s on to keep your supplies in. And plant fruit trees and an income to pay the property taxes and keep a vehicle to get to the nearest town for things you can’t grow like salt and medicine.

    What happens when a platoon of soldiers comes and orders you and your family to clear out or be killed. And a government clerk has already removed all records that you own the property?

    It happened 100 years ago in Russia, Hungary and even Munich Germany. Happened 70 years ago in China. Happened 70 years ago in Palestine. . The man who killed JFK, Sirhan Sirhan. That’s what happened to his family when he was 4. Israeli soldiers just burst in and ordered them to leave with just what they could carry. Nothing they could do. From a 10 room house to a hostel in a monastery with 7 kids mostly boys from 4 to older teens.

    Every single sector of the elite wants us Whites dead and gone. Revolutions are squabbles among the elite, who’ll be King of the Mountain for a while. But now it’s every sector of the elite against Whites.

    When the elites make their move they’ll take our real property away as easily as Henry 8 and Thomas Cromwell confiscated monasteries.

    Or a platoon of Israeli soldiers took the home the Sirhan’s inherited . A home that had been in the family for generations. Sirhans were Christians not descendants of 650AD Arab Muslims. More pure Jewish Mizrahi DNA than the Germans and Russians that drove them from their home.

  167. JimB says:
    @Steve Sailer
    @Cappy

    Right. Advanced Placement tests possess prima facie validity: here's this big serious-looking test full of in-depth multiple choice questions and essay questions that you'd expect in a college freshman level intro course. AP tests look hard. They look like you definitely have to study hard for them.

    Now, there are a lot of logistical issues involved with expanding the use of AP scores in college admissions, but improvements can be made. For example, because AP tests are only given in May, after college admissions letters go out in April, no AP tests from after Junior year can be used in admissions.

    But it would be possible to add one semester AP tests in December that could be graded by the end of January, in plenty of time to be evaluated for admissions.

    We could add summer school AP classes with tests in August. You want to impress colleges: take three AP tests in August before your senior year.

    And scoring should be extended from 1 to 5 up to 1 to 7. "Oh, you are one of the 500 kids in the country who got a 7 on AP Chemistry? Yes, we at MIT are very interested in you."

    Replies: @JimB, @anon, @res

    In effect, students who take AP tests are applying to be admitted to their sophomore year of college. And if nearly all admitted students at some college have taken at least four AP tests, which is typical at Harvard or MIT, why not just graduate them in three years? Why waste a smart kid’s time by making him take the equivalent of five years of undergraduate education?

    I say give college applicants the Wunderlich test in place of the SAT. Or ask them to snatch the pebble out of Master Po’s hand. Either test is as predictive of undergraduate GPA as anything else.

  168. Whites don’t go to schools with less grade inflation. Whites care about grades far less than Asians do, and thus get lower average than Asians. Exception: private schools, where parents send their kids so they have some control over grades. In other words, whites are by far the most likely “diamonds in the rough”, with Hispanics next. Related: some schools limit access to AP classes, with GPA and teacher rec being the biggest factor. This only happens in white/Asian schools and guess who is likely to be recommended?

    The College Board has been working overtime on convincing (read bribing) states to adopt the SAT as its HS graduation test, along with its 9-10 and PSAT sequence. I’m assuming that’s where they think the money is, getting the states to pick up the tab for testing of all its students.

    There’s not much money in AP for the College Board, as the vast majority of students don’t take the test. Colleges don’t use AP test scores at.all admissions. The whole purpose of AP for admissions is to weight the GPA.

    Colleges have long since accommodated the schools that don’t offer AP–most universities that allow weighted GPAs have a database where schools submit courses as eligible for honors weighting. Other colleges remove the weighting. So Steve’s son wasn’t at a disadvantage.

    The APs suffer from the same scoring issues that the now-defunct Subject tests do. You could miss every single question on the Physics test and still get a 300. Some 30-40% of the Math 2c scores were 800, once someone figured out how to write TI84 (hey, there’s a dead product) routines where you just plugged in the numbers for all the standard questions–which, of course, mostly came from Asian prep schools. Meanwhile, the English Lit test had an absurdly ruthless grading system, as did the US History test.

    Same is true in the APs. This article uses 2013 data, but there was a clear pattern: whites are utility players with no strong test preference, Asians are more likely pick tests with little writing and an easy scoring system. Then when the scoring changes to be tougher (as it did with Bio), they move away from it.

    The other big problem with the APs and Subjects are the joke of a language test, which have been completely overtaken by native speakers.

    “(the SAT Verbal test might have been the best high end IQ test in the world up until it was made drastically easier in 1995) ”

    It wasn’t made drastically easier in 1995. It was made a bit easier. Then it was made easier again in 2005, although it still required good reading skills and some vocabulary. It became a joke in 2015. The passages were easier, very little literature, and grammar was rolled into it. It’s now possible for someone who can barely read English and can’t write a complete sentence to prep their way to an 800.

    I’ve been writing about the corruption of college for years. Steve appears to me to be far too cavalier about it. There’s no fix, because this is a specific decision on the part of colleges to invalidate not just admissions but the bachelor’s degree. All talk about “what predicts first year college GPA” is bullshit, since kids don’t take the same first year. The illiterate kids are put into what used to be remedial courses, but most public unis have done away with remediation, so you can now get credit for middle school math and writing in most colleges.

    My only speculation is that colleges are trying to make a Master’s degree completely necessary by turning the college diploma into a high school diploma–completely worthless.

  169. @Kaz
    Is the solution to the Asian problem?

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    Yes indeed it’s the solution to the Asian problem, the prestigious universities don’t want to look like Peking university and I don’t blame them. Asians have zero charisma and are grinders.

  170. @Anonymous
    Years ago I read of a black student complaining about the SAT. The example that he gave of the test being racist was the word “regatta.” Blacks do not attend regattas, therefore they would not know the word. My hair hurts just thinking of the reasoning behind that statement. Try reading a book. Maybe studying. Whenever something requires a correct answer, it’s deemed racist.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Foreign Expert, @AceDeuce

    When I told the “regatta story” to my non-English-speaking wife, she nearly died laughing. Everybody knows that word.

  171. @Anon
    @International Jew


    Steve’s gameplan then can be to move to Lancaster and hope that it’ll secede and join up with Arizona or Nevada.
     
    Funny, I just read about the Greaater Idaho movement to have the sparsely populated red counties of Oregon and, in phase 2, Northern California become part of Idaho, giving Idaho an outlet to the sea (and a navy?).

    The is apparently possible, but the list of legal hurdles is pretty long. States have routinely adjusted borders, but the legislatures, governors, and finally Congress have to sign off on it. Most of the examples have involved borders that were originally defined as river courses, and unless they are in a deep, hard rock gorge, rivers change course sooner or later when silt builds up. That is, unless the Corps of Civil Engineers stops them from changing course, but even they cannot prevent it forever.

    Replies: @Foreign Expert

    I believe there’s a clause in the constitution that forbids combining states. They can be split but not combined.

  172. @Cappy
    It has been known since the '80s that, among standardized tests, AP exams are the strongest predictors of college grades. Additionally, in 2009, the College Board (which administers these exams) released a study which showed that, even after controlling for SAT scores and HSGPA, AP exam scores were still accurate predictors of subsequent performance in college, with students scoring 3 or higher outperforming those who had scored 1 or 2, as well as those with no AP exam scores. So, it might not be a bad idea to put AP scores front and center in college admissions, since they do a better job in predicting college performance than SATs and high school grades. And, along the lines of the rationale for using SAT subject tests, prepping for APs wouldn't be such a waste: AP curricula is, by definition, college material (or pretty close), so at the very least, students would actually be learning something. Problem is, the same patterns in scores over the population are observed for APs, which would likely then become the next target for litigation. And in this case, the opposition might have a point: poorer schools are less likely to offer AP courses. Still, it would be harder to argue that the tests simply measure test-taking ability or divert time and effort from actually learning stuff. And APs just might be the most practical way to preserve a modicum of objectivity in the college admissions process. (The UC system is toying with the idea of creating its own standardized test, but they will probably end up wasting millions trying to develop a test that will satisfy everyone, that will actually satisfy no one.)

    https://www.highereddatastories.com/2018/02/college-board-ap-data.html

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @AnonAnon

    Last time I looked at it four years ago the University of California application asked you to self report your AP scores. Based on the observation of where kids got admitted from our local public high school, to have a shot at getting into a top-five UC kids had to take at least ten or more APs. At our high school you can start as early as ninth grade, with AP Human Geography and there is no limit on the number in the last two years, with the top kids often taking a full load of 6/7 APs the last two years. I know other states gate their APs tighter but it’s a wide open nuclear arms race in the good California public schools, with the truly elite kids gunning for MIT racking up dual-enrollment credits at the local CC when they’re done with AP Calc BC in 10th grade. My oldest ended up with 14, taking 7 his senior year (freshman year of college was “easy” with only 4 courses), and my youngest is on track to finish with 12.

    I think this whole system is just going to end up with states trading their best students to each other and parents paying more. It’s often much easier to get into an out of state flagship university. For example, Cal Poly SLO’s out of state admittance rate is 58% but the overall in-state rate is 29%. For the toughest majors, like CS, the overall admit rate is down to 5% so being out of state is a significant advantage. It’s easier to get your kid into top-5 Purdue engineering than UCSB’s engineering school.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @AnonAnon

    Out of state pays full tuition?

  173. @Jack D
    @Jenner Ickham Errican


    with millions dead before someone cries uncle. And maybe millions more dead/expelled depending on the disposition of the victors.
     
    Something to look forward to, then? Living in a country ruled by a bunch of DIEversicrats sounds like the preferable alternative - at least it involves living.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Living in a country ruled by a bunch of DIEversicrats sounds like the preferable alternative – at least it involves living. [emphasis added]

    Well, if one follows future rules of the emerging regime, I’m sure all will be okay, LOL

    Please show up on time for your scheduled status review, Mr. D :

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9570845/Unseen-pictures-Frances-role-rounding-Jews-luring-fake-forms.html

  174. @Alden
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    It will never happen because the gun owners are spread out in rural suburban areas and have no leadership, no organizations and no plans.

    The few gun owners who actually have the incentive and courage to do something usually get recruited by a FBI ATF ACLU SPLC ADL AJC front group and end up killed or imprisoned.

    Successful revolutions like the reformation, American, French, Vendee, French 1830 European 1848 Russian, attempted German Hungarian revolutions of 1917, communist revolution and triumph in China 1920-1948
    Had nothing to do with angry peasants and frontiersmen storming the castle. Or leaders like Washington Jefferson Phillipe d’Orleans Renee Bourdeau and the Bulkleys , Lenin Stalin and Mao just rising out of nowhere.

    To learn about a successful revolution and how it’s created by the powerful you might try to find a book about the American Revolution that begins in 1759 and mentions: masons Green Dragon tavern looming anti slavery laws in Britain, what Americans call the French and Indian War and the conflict between the British government and the land hungry colonials regarding the settlement of the upper Midwest from western Pennsylvania to the Rocky Mountains.

    Never in human history have the proles peasants and deplorables made a revolution without leadership money planning and organization by the elite. Revolutions are elite sector B against elite sector A. Always have been and probably always will be.

    Look at American blacks. They are one of America’s most successful groups. But they are just grunts led by Whites. From the first farmers who used them against White workers to the present George Floyd insanity.

    For a couple years after the civil war, freed blacks, permitted by the Freedmen’s Bureau and the Union Army occupation did run amuck with crime including violence and murder in the south.

    That was ended by the KKK. KKK was extremely successful. But only because it was led and organized by the wealthiest prestigious Confederate veterans. Not malnourished White sharecroppers lumberjacks and miners so poor they owed their souls to the company store.

    But at this time, I can’t think of any leadership cadre that can help Whites. The conservatives have 3 causes, anti abortion, anti living wages and anti taxes for the wealthiest and large corporations. The conservatives are also pro legal immigration of skilled non White immigrants because they work for low wages and are happy to live 20 people in a 2,000 sq ft house.



    There are a few White Nationalists like me. The rest are idiots whose main interest is discussing which European ethnic group is really White. Consensus seems to be only the blue eyed are really White. But not if the blue eyed person has a French or Slavic name.
    People like you have fantasies about a BLM mob invading your little town and your little militia driving them away. A successful revolution doesn’t happen in small towns. It happens in the Capitol and the big important cities.

    If, January 6 had had the backing of money powerful elites, propaganda and president Trump it could have succeeded as many coups have. But the demonstrators were ordinary people. So it failed and those who are arrested are suffering horribly in the DC jail at the hands of sadistic jail guards. The FBI is still arresting any White person who traveled to DC that day.

    Enjoy prepping and playing with your guns. But you better assume that any person who approaches you about any kind of armed resistance is from the FBI to set you up for murder like Randy Weaver or confiscatory fines and legal expenses and imprisonments under black guards and fellow prisoners.

    Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    It will never happen because the gun owners are spread out in rural suburban areas …

    Gun owners are everywhere. Legal ones, with real hardware (i.e. what the police have).

    … and have no leadership, no organizations and no plans.

    Alden, you’re thinking of organized armed plotting. I’m describing a presently primed environment that can explode automatically—no need for coordination or grand strategic schemes of any kind—e.g. multiple ‘lone wolves’ (of whatever political persuasion) can change the security situation overnight, including in heavily ‘controlled’ areas. The polarization is there, and the steadily increasing pile of weapons in self-directed (civilian) hands is there. BOOM

  175. @AnonAnon
    @Cappy

    Last time I looked at it four years ago the University of California application asked you to self report your AP scores. Based on the observation of where kids got admitted from our local public high school, to have a shot at getting into a top-five UC kids had to take at least ten or more APs. At our high school you can start as early as ninth grade, with AP Human Geography and there is no limit on the number in the last two years, with the top kids often taking a full load of 6/7 APs the last two years. I know other states gate their APs tighter but it’s a wide open nuclear arms race in the good California public schools, with the truly elite kids gunning for MIT racking up dual-enrollment credits at the local CC when they’re done with AP Calc BC in 10th grade. My oldest ended up with 14, taking 7 his senior year (freshman year of college was “easy” with only 4 courses), and my youngest is on track to finish with 12.

    I think this whole system is just going to end up with states trading their best students to each other and parents paying more. It’s often much easier to get into an out of state flagship university. For example, Cal Poly SLO’s out of state admittance rate is 58% but the overall in-state rate is 29%. For the toughest majors, like CS, the overall admit rate is down to 5% so being out of state is a significant advantage. It’s easier to get your kid into top-5 Purdue engineering than UCSB’s engineering school.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Out of state pays full tuition?

  176. @Desiderius
    @Ben tillman

    Good luck taking on Mossad genius. We get the sub-Saharan/Brahmin issue under control then maybe things can be adjusted, but these times call for a Disraeli.

    Replies: @ben tillman

    Neither you nor I have any say in the matter. And Mossad is not the problem.

  177. @Steve Sailer
    @Cappy

    Right. Advanced Placement tests possess prima facie validity: here's this big serious-looking test full of in-depth multiple choice questions and essay questions that you'd expect in a college freshman level intro course. AP tests look hard. They look like you definitely have to study hard for them.

    Now, there are a lot of logistical issues involved with expanding the use of AP scores in college admissions, but improvements can be made. For example, because AP tests are only given in May, after college admissions letters go out in April, no AP tests from after Junior year can be used in admissions.

    But it would be possible to add one semester AP tests in December that could be graded by the end of January, in plenty of time to be evaluated for admissions.

    We could add summer school AP classes with tests in August. You want to impress colleges: take three AP tests in August before your senior year.

    And scoring should be extended from 1 to 5 up to 1 to 7. "Oh, you are one of the 500 kids in the country who got a 7 on AP Chemistry? Yes, we at MIT are very interested in you."

    Replies: @JimB, @anon, @res

    Yes, we at MIT are would be very interested in you…but you are too white.

    FIFY.

  178. @JohnnyWalker123
    @J.Ross

    Every manager?

    This is a list of the top CEOs in America. What percent are Indian?

    https://aflcio.org/paywatch/highest-paid-ceos

    Here are the Biden Whitehouse appointees.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/interactive/2020/biden-appointee-tracker/

    40 under 40 Forbes.

    https://fortune.com/40-under-40/

    CNN anchors.

    https://www.cnn.com/specials/tv/anchors-and-reporters

    Indians are ~5% of the above lists.

    They're 0% of the Senate, 0% of the Supreme Court, 1% of the House. Though if you count half-Black Kamala as Indian, they have the VP slot.

    The reality is that a ruling class has to enjoy some degree of support from the general population. For a variety of reasons (which I elaborated on in my previous post), Jews and Blacks are the acknowledged ruling class of America. Jews are popular with the right, while Blacks are dominant within the left. Indians are now being allowed into their coalition.

    However, if Indians were to supplant Blacks and Jews, they wouldn't enjoy support from the right or the left. It'd be a vulnerable ruling class. Indians don't captivate the White imagination like Jews and Blacks.

    Indians are heavily dependent on leveraging these relationships, especially with Jews.

    The danger with Indians isn't so much that they'll be the new ruling class. The danger is that they'll provide further support to our current Jewish-Black ruling class. Also, Indian ethnic nepotism is stealing lots of high-paying IT/software jobs, which is pushing a ton of young Americans out of the upper middle class.

    In the immediate future, the #1 threat from Indians isn't that they'll take over the ruling class. The #1 threat is that pro-immigration Jewish lobbyists will push through a bill to give a MASSIVE number of green cards to Indian H1bs, which could lead to permanent Indian dominance of the highly lucrative software industry. If you're worried about Indians, then get involved with anti-H1b activism. The H1b visa (and the eventual possibility of permanent residence/citizenship for H1b visa holders) is the main vector of Indian colonialization of America (and eventually the rest of the West).

    Replies: @J.Ross

    A CEO is a manager? A congressman is a manager? It’s clearly the trend and there is nothing pushing against it and nobody is allowed to criticize it, so I see it as inevitable. Maybe it’ll take longer. Who does the ruling elite hire from? They’ll eventually be Indians and there will be no popular acceptance involved. Talk about the elite caring what anyone thinks after the last election, ha.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @J.Ross

    They had about half the country voting for their candidate.

    The 40 under 40 list are the equivalent of rapidly rising managers. Many are real-life managers. The Biden WH appointees and the CNN anchors are also generally pretty young, indicating who's on the rise in the political sphere and national media respectively.

  179. Anon[259] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hibernian
    @Anon

    The compound second name means "of the Sacred Hearts." I wonder if this is a reference to both the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

    Replies: @Anon

    Yes it does. A child could receive their given name, other names from relatives or the name of the saint whose feast day it was and maybe, if a girl, a reference to a particular Marian advocation. To cite a living example, “Maria Celina Elena del Carmen”, known as Celina in everyday life, was named Maria because girls often received a “combo” name that included Maria (for the Virgin) or Ana (for the Virgin’s mother). Thus you get Ana Laura, María Rosa, Maria Amalia, etc. “Elena” was the given name of the woman’s baptismal godmother. “Del Carmen” in this case refers to the Virgen del Carmen, a very old, very spanish Marian advocation. (Though the actual apparition happened in the Holy Land).

  180. @J.Ross
    @JohnnyWalker123

    A CEO is a manager? A congressman is a manager? It's clearly the trend and there is nothing pushing against it and nobody is allowed to criticize it, so I see it as inevitable. Maybe it'll take longer. Who does the ruling elite hire from? They'll eventually be Indians and there will be no popular acceptance involved. Talk about the elite caring what anyone thinks after the last election, ha.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    They had about half the country voting for their candidate.

    The 40 under 40 list are the equivalent of rapidly rising managers. Many are real-life managers. The Biden WH appointees and the CNN anchors are also generally pretty young, indicating who’s on the rise in the political sphere and national media respectively.

  181. @Cortes
    @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Now that’s a Conquistadors full house surname.

    Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter

    Indeed. Imagine being a struggling custom printer of fine social stationery and cocktail napkins and getting the order when Consuelo finally marries some cabrón. You could retire on that order.

  182. @The Anti-Gnostic
    @Jack D

    Pardon me, but fuck that shit. What you are describing is abject, utter defeat. We are Americans, not Brazilians or South Africans.

    My advice: move to the red area of a red state and make it redder. Big cities are hellscapes if you don't make a healthy six figures; stay out of them. Homeschool your kids and grandkids. Stay out of debt. Stay healthy. Arm up. Get to know your neighbors. When the shit goes down, we will all be fine.

    Replies: @Corvinus

    Indeed, we are Americans. Cities are fine to live in for some, others, not really. More or less a personal choice. Homeschooling is fine, but it can lead to sermonizing and pandering and propagandizing.

    Arm up for what? You mean to prepare for the “shit” that will go down, as in our civilizational collapse? LOL, I’ve heard this “advice” for the past 50 years. The bottom line is that there are a number of armchair warriors out there, not this waiting in tow Bruce Banner cum Hulk-a-mania crowd just itching to thrown liberals, darkies, Jews, and anyone deemed the “enemy” out of helicopters Pinochot style.

    See, the Orcs have already crashed the gate to the Shire. They are everywhere, so I’ve been repeatedly told. While you demand that your fellow whites “prep”, you’re being overrun. So, are you going to do something about it now, or just wait until the “moment is right”…whenever that is.

    • Agree: Spud Boy
  183. @Daniel H
    @Reg Cæsar


    And that doesn’t include the talented Wong Loi-Sing clan, now based in Europe.

    “I am a mixture of many cultures, Caribbean Indian, African, Caucasian, Jewish, Indian, Portuguese, and Chinese.” —Michael Wong Loi Sing
     
    Suriname is the most African country in the Americas on one measure: in 1980 a successful coup d'etat was carried off by a band of sergeants.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    …in 1980 a successful coup d’etat was carried off by a band of sergeants.

    Batista did the same thing in Cuba.

  184. @Steve Sailer
    @Cappy

    Right. Advanced Placement tests possess prima facie validity: here's this big serious-looking test full of in-depth multiple choice questions and essay questions that you'd expect in a college freshman level intro course. AP tests look hard. They look like you definitely have to study hard for them.

    Now, there are a lot of logistical issues involved with expanding the use of AP scores in college admissions, but improvements can be made. For example, because AP tests are only given in May, after college admissions letters go out in April, no AP tests from after Junior year can be used in admissions.

    But it would be possible to add one semester AP tests in December that could be graded by the end of January, in plenty of time to be evaluated for admissions.

    We could add summer school AP classes with tests in August. You want to impress colleges: take three AP tests in August before your senior year.

    And scoring should be extended from 1 to 5 up to 1 to 7. "Oh, you are one of the 500 kids in the country who got a 7 on AP Chemistry? Yes, we at MIT are very interested in you."

    Replies: @JimB, @anon, @res

    And of course AP tests will have less disparate impact then SATs. It will be interesting to see how that plays out.

    Where the AP tests idea falls down is in replicating the ability of the SAT to find diamonds in the rough who were not good students.

  185. anon[689] • Disclaimer says:

    Where the AP tests idea falls down is in replicating the ability of the SAT to find diamonds in the rough who were not good students.

    Feature, not bug. US elites do not want to find those diamond-guys, they want to suppress them.

    The US has an excess of elites, not a shortage.

  186. @Anonymous
    Years ago I read of a black student complaining about the SAT. The example that he gave of the test being racist was the word “regatta.” Blacks do not attend regattas, therefore they would not know the word. My hair hurts just thinking of the reasoning behind that statement. Try reading a book. Maybe studying. Whenever something requires a correct answer, it’s deemed racist.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Foreign Expert, @AceDeuce

    I’ve heard that one too–they wound up taking it out.

    Of course, a coal miner’s kid in West Virginia, or a farmer’s offspring in western Nebraska, or a kid in rural Utah probably never attended any regattas, but somehow managed to do well on the test.

    And of course, knigrows could just concentrate on the math portion, but they can’t do squat with that either, and are now claiming math be racist.

  187. @Steve Sailer
    @dvorak

    So if the coach who is selling an admission to a college splits his bribe with somebody in the Admissions Office, it's okay?

    Replies: @dvorak

    So if the coach who is selling an admission to a college splits his bribe with somebody in the Admissions Office, it’s okay?

    I wish I could find the reference, but the smoking gun email that I remember was not about a rogue employee. It implied that the admissions office as an institution knew about unqualified athletes.

    My takeaway was that it was not like it is at Harvard, where pay-to-play is centralized and explicitly decided in every case by admissions dean William Fitzsimmons. “Mr. Jared Kushner is admitted,” e.g.

    Instead, at this university that I’m not naming, the smoking gun email was evidence of a decentralized process where rich and connected people got their kids admitted through routes that were tacitly sanctioned by the admissions office. If Athletics was one, the drama school was likely another source of tacitly sanctioned pay-to-play.

    My contention is that this tacit sanction from the admissions office as an institution, blows up the federal case pertaining to that university.

  188. @anon
    The professors will be able to whip the slower students up into quite the indignant frenzy in California. This might equal more BLM and more antifa near campuses. More rapes and false accusations, petty crime and drugs in college towns also. More brokenhearted dads of daughters who are with thugs ("but dad, he tried to go to college! Racist professors failed him!).

    Is also look for more silly new classes and majors.

    Replies: @Reverend Goody

    That would be fantastic. The scarlet letter (the “R” word) slapped on UCLA professors.

  189. @Reg Cæsar
    @Svevlad


    More multicultural:

    Jieshi Demarcus Gomez von Ungern-Sternberg
     
    If that's what you want, try Paramaribo:

    Varina Tjon-A-Ten (born 29 November 1952 in Paramaribo, Suriname) is a Dutch politician who was a member of the House of Representatives for the Dutch Labour Party (PvdA) from 2003 to 2006.

    Her paternal grandfather came from mainland China to Suriname, but she refers herself to as moksi watra (mixed blood): one of her great-grandmothers was a Brahmin Indian from British Guiana who married a Scot, and she also has Dutch and Jewish ancestry. Her family arrived in Rotterdam in 1964.

    Angelic del Castilho (born 4 April 1967), also known as Angelic Alihusain-del Castilho, is a Surinamese politician of Democratic Alternative '91, and a former ambassador.

    Liakat Ali Errol Alibux (born 30 November 1948 in Paramaribo) is a Surinamese politician historically associated to the PALU [Progressive Workers' and Farmers' Union]. From 1967 to 1973 he studied sociology at the Erasmus University Rotterdam.

    Ivan Patrick Tai-Apin (23 February 1977) is a Surinamese actor, director, screenplay writer and producer. He is mostly known for his out of the box theater shows & plays. In 2016 he started a camera acting school in Suriname and is the managing director of It Goes Productions & Casting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:People_from_Paramaribo

     

    And that doesn't include the talented Wong Loi-Sing clan, now based in Europe.

    "I am a mixture of many cultures, Caribbean Indian, African, Caucasian, Jewish, Indian, Portuguese, and Chinese." --Michael Wong Loi Sing

    Julius Wong Loi Sing is Professor in the Graduate School at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, IL.

    Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing goes to LA to pursue an acting career.

    Note the varied use of hyphens.

    Replies: @Daniel H, @Escher

    Julius Wong Loi Sing reminds me of this Chinese restaurant I’ve been to in San Francisco’s Chinatown. The name has stuck in my head for more than 20 years.

    http://www.woeyloygoey.com/

  190. “The plaintiffs said that the college entrance tests are biased against poor and mainly Black and Hispanic students — …”

    “Biased,” yes. As well they should be, since these tests discriminate between the wheat and the chaff. But biased “against” is nonsense, just as much as stating that 2 + 2 = 4 is “biased against” 3 and 5.

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