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Back in the 1990s, the proto-Woke, such as Nobel literature laureate Toni Morrison, had this habit of injecting hyphens and parentheses into words, especially gerunds (which were the glamour part of speech in the 1990s, kind of like pronouns are today), as a sort of secret handshake to signify (a major 1990s word) that they had studied French literary theory of the Foucault and Derrida varietals.

We didn’t have the word back then, but this anthology edited by Morrison must have the cringiest title of any book since Gutenberg.

Time magazine gave Morrison a column for awhile back then, but she was one of the worst nonfiction writers I’ve ever read. So I was surprised when I finally read one of her novels (Song of Solomon) and it was fine.

 
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  1. Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.
     
    The shame is not that she was required to read a third-rate piece of fiction but that this third-rate piece of fiction replaced some first-rate piece of literature that was once part of the curriculum, e.g. a play by Shakespeare or a novel by Austen or Hardy. The steady degradation of public high school curricula over the past half century has been appalling. Unfortunately very few are aware of how bad things are now compared with back then.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    , @AnotherDad
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.
     
    Some people's--and i think much more common among women--sensibility and way of seeing the world is entirely narrative. And if they are half decent writer they can then churn out passable stories--full of characters, descriptive detail and emotions.

    But they just aren't very strong at making any sort of logic argument. (Basically it never gets beyond "i feel bad" and "this is unfair".) So they suck at any sort of actual journalism--straight reportage or opinion.

    If you don't let such people run your oil refinery or impact your politics ... it's fine. Unfortunately the later is no longer true and the former is now in danger.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @James Forrestal

    , @Paperback Writer
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    The rap was that Beloved was Toni Morrison's "take that!" to William Styron's Sophie's Choice.

  2. Hordification of Afro->Euro Immigration intensifying

    20 Civil Guards injured thwarting attempt by over 150 migrants to enter Spain’s Melilla enclave

    A total of 20 guards were injured in clashes after a crowd of more than 150 migrants tried to storm the border to Spain’s Melilla enclave without success.

    Scores of migrants attempted to cross over to Melilla on Tuesday, facing off with members of Spain’s Civil Guard that blocked the entrance. Footage of the altercation shows migrants advancing along a border fence toward the officers. The migrants can then be seen hurling stones, prompting the officers to respond with pepper spray.

    While the authorities were vastly outnumbered by the migrants, none of the unwanted arrivals managed to sneak to the other side of the border, a spokesman for the central government’s delegation in Melilla reported, noting “active collaboration” from Moroccan security forces, as cited by El Mundo.

  3. Anon[318] • Disclaimer says:

    Freddie deBoer today on Toni Morrison:

    Toni Morrison’s Sula, the Great Underrated American Novel
    Can a masterwork from one of our most celebrated authors be neglected? I think so.

    https://freddiedeboer.substack.com/p/toni-morrisons-sula-the-great-underrated

    Perhaps the most irrational of the many irrational feelings we hold towards books is being offended that one we love is not more celebrated while simultaneously fearing that it will be discovered and thus cease to be our special thing, our perfect secret. For me that book is Sula, Toni Morrison’s gorgeous and challenging story of adolescent and adult rebellion, conformity, family, race, mental illness, and friendship….

    I … don’t quite understand the relative reputations of Morrison’s books, with Sula’s respected but marginal status chief among my complaints. Look, these perceptions of relative stature are always limited by our own peculiar apprehension of what other people think. My impression could be way out of line with reality. It’s a certainty that some people will read this piece and say, “of course Sula’s great, everybody knows that.” Maybe they’ll be right. But I see Song of Solomon on best-of lists, and I see Beloved, and sometimes I see The Bluest Eye…. I don’t see Sula much on those lists, nor do I find that it’s typically invoked when someone defines Morrison’s reputation….

  4. A lot of fiction writers tend to be lousy non-fiction writers because you can’t make up too much of your facts, unlike fiction.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @Redneck farmer


    A lot of fiction writers tend to be lousy non-fiction writers because you can’t make up too much of your facts, unlike fiction.
     
    I dunno ... the NY Times has over the years found a number of people quite skilled at making up all sorts of facts.
    , @Art Deco
    @Redneck farmer

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He'd have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it's a reasonable inference he'd already moved north by that date. An outfit called 'the Lynching Project' has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he'd migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Bill Jones, @Desiderius, @Dissident, @Seneca44, @AndrewR, @Muggles, @anonymous

  5. Song of Solomon is a good book; probably because the central conflict isn’t about justice or “racism”, it’s about the urban-rural conflict. (Little known secret: most black American writers are actually far more preoccupied with the urban-rural conflict than with the “racism” hustle.)

  6. @Redneck farmer
    A lot of fiction writers tend to be lousy non-fiction writers because you can't make up too much of your facts, unlike fiction.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Art Deco

    A lot of fiction writers tend to be lousy non-fiction writers because you can’t make up too much of your facts, unlike fiction.

    I dunno … the NY Times has over the years found a number of people quite skilled at making up all sorts of facts.

    • Agree: Bill Jones
    • Thanks: Redneck farmer
  7. As with a lot of minority celebrated artists, Morrison was decent at her craft, but she was pushed to the moon because she ticked the right boxes all out of proportion to her work. She did three quarters as well as straight white artists in her niche but got double the fame and “cultural impact” (and money, don’t forget money).

    I could say the Soft Bigotry of Low Expectations (retch), but its more apt to say Morrison was just a favored pet.

    Her work is best experienced after the hype has died down, in isolation, like Spike Lee or Jordan Peele’s massively overrated work.

  8. Ok, I’ll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer? Sounds like a tall order.

    • Replies: @Etruscan Film Star
    @DuanDiRen


    Ok, I’ll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer?

     

    Tom Wolfe?

    Replies: @Ganderson

    , @Ancient Briton
    @DuanDiRen

    George Orwell

    , @James J O'Meara
    @DuanDiRen

    Hemingway?

    Tom Wolfe, if you go along with his "New Journalism" style work, which I guess was an attempt to square that circle, pursuing nonfiction topics with fictional techniques (dialogue, intrusive narrators, etc.).

    Joan Didion?

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @DuanDiRen


    Ok, I’ll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer? Sounds like a tall order.

     

    Tom Wolfe is the obvious reply, at least around these parts.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    , @anon
    @DuanDiRen

    Ok, I’ll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer?

    Alexander Solzhenitsyn was both.

  9. I wrote this once:

    There are many words adored by practitioners of current cultural theory, but I offer here only two simple tricks to postmodernize your prose: make all singular nouns plural, and put parentheses around prefixes. “(Re)membering the (Re)formations: Borders, Bodies, and (Con)texts in the Early Modern Englands” would make a great po-mo title. If you want to confer instant cachet on yourself, employ these tricks liberally. If you want people to read your prose twenty years from now without snickering, however, avoid them.

    • Thanks: MBlanc46
  10. she was one of the worst nonfiction writers I’ve ever read. So I was surprised when I finally read one of her novels (Song of Solomon) and it was fine.

    Informational Texts is an oxymoron. Our minds were built by and for fiction. At least when it comes to language.

    Poetic > prosaic

  11. Steve, do you have a sense of your book consumption rate? One a week, a month, etc…? How has that fluctuated over time? Is your consumption structured or more random? Just curious.

  12. The early Clinton era seems to have had the germ of our current predicament in it. During the campaign, the Press which was then populated by college educated Baby Boomers started really cutting corners because it identified with the ascendant college educated, Vietnam-opposing Baby Boomer Clintons. Clinton of course sought early in his Presidency to queer the military but was rebuffed. The emergent Democratic party ruling class pretended to like Maya Angelou’s poetry unironically. Political correctness was rather new and crept from college campuses into other institutions of American life.

    The cultural insurgency ended by Clinton’s first midterm in 1994 and the on-boarding of consultant Dick Morris who steered Clinton away from sure electoral defeat and towards softened versions of GOP priorities like Law and Order and reforming welfare. But you can see so much of what is happening now in its nascent form, receding for some time only to reemerge much stronger in the late Obama era.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Had Clinton been able to queer the military in the early to middle 90s, by 2009 the military would have been too fractured and weak for Obama to have ordered the Afghan surge in 2010-2012. The sooner the military fractures, the sooner American military operations of an aggressive nature become impossible. Since the military won't protect our borders and is only used to protect the ruling class that hates us all, the sooner it breaks the better.

    Yeah I said it. Gay it up even faster for all I care, recruit only queers and trannies and wreck it forever. Without manpower you can't sail ships nor fix the piece of shit planes they ripped us all off for. It proceeds apace, the ruin and rot. China can grab Taiwan this very day and all the corrupt and cowardly generals and admirals could do is watch.

    , @res
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    It is almost like they floated a trial balloon, realized the time was not right yet, and waited.

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    The early Clinton era seems to have had the germ of our current predicament in it.

     

    It started even earlier, in the late 1980s. Looking back, there was a span in the late 80s/early 90s that seems now like a trailer for today's Wokism. Pomo/deconstructivist theory was hot hot hot in academia, there really were unironic devotees of PC, and the early-to-mid-1980s smothering of the leftist urge to remake the world was starting to break down.

    What's interesting to me is why much of this utopian troublemaking then ebbed again for a while. Was it just that the proto-Woke, in their typical overconfidence, overreached and were pushed back/decided to wait? That seems to be the consensus view, as res suggests, but I wonder.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

  13. @Redneck farmer
    A lot of fiction writers tend to be lousy non-fiction writers because you can't make up too much of your facts, unlike fiction.

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @Art Deco

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He’d have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it’s a reasonable inference he’d already moved north by that date. An outfit called ‘the Lynching Project’ has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he’d migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    • LOL: Morton's toes
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Art Deco

    Art Deco, i don't particularly care about Toni Morrison or debunking her particular family oppression fantasy. (Or anyone else's for that matter. Hey, my great-grandfather's hovel has been rebuilt in Manhattan ... i'm so oppressed!)

    But i appreciate your ability/willingness to spend some cycles and ferret out facts. While i don't always agree with the thrust of the point you're trying to make with them, this is a valuable service. Appreciate it.

    , @Bill Jones
    @Art Deco

    One thing the blacks have picked up from their Jewish handlers is how to invent history.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    , @Desiderius
    @Art Deco

    Tall tales beat no tales.

    , @Dissident
    @Art Deco

    Who are you to question a person-of-color's personal, lived truth? Don't you know that concepts such as that of objective facts are implicitly racist and white supremacist? Haven't you read any Robin Di Angelo or Ibrahim X Kendi?

    , @Seneca44
    @Art Deco

    What?! You dare question her woke woman of color (never to be referred to as colored woman) lived experience once removed with facts?

    , @AndrewR
    @Art Deco

    It happened. I was there. The mayo monsters were screaming HEIL HITLER as they lynched the innocent men of color.

    , @Muggles
    @Art Deco

    Once again another made-up lie about non existent "racist incidents" in someone's childhood, as reported second hand by their children. Anti white racist lies told to children to make them fear whites. Who knew?

    In a few more years black writers will be authoring tales of their father's in Chicago witnessing Jussie Smollet's brutal beat down by MAGA hatsters.

    In a small western town where I grew up, there was an annual parade celebrating the wild days of the Old West. High school students competed with floats pulled by tractors showing actual historic hangings of "road agents" being strung up by celebrated vigilantes.

    No one had nightmares, though we did wonder how some of our classmates could apparently dangle by their necks from a tree limb unharmed. Hollywood magic, I guess.

    Of course everyone hanged in those days, in that area, was white. Other than one unlucky Mexican known only as "the Mexican" who rode with the road agents.

    Those so hanged were done so after miner's courts tried and found them guilty. "Lynching" was very rare, as that only refers to those in police custody who are sprung from jail and strung up by an angry public.

    , @anonymous
    @Art Deco


    Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”
     
    That would be an unusual reaction. Judging by videos on Worldstar, Twitter, and YouTube, blacks seem to get a thrill from watching other bodies be knocked out, stomped, or killed.
  14. • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @kaganovitch


    OT: The Jeffrey Epstein of black bears
     
    Was he pimping underage sows and cubs? Is Lower New York Bay the ursine Caribbean?

    Wikipedia says this about Upper New York Bay: "The Upper Bay supports a very diverse population of marine species, allowing for recreational fishing, most commonly for striped bass and bluefish."

    Diversity is its strength!

    Also OT: Hooray for India!

    Twitter may now be held directly responsible for every single tweet in India
  15. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @AnotherDad, @Paperback Writer

    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.

    The shame is not that she was required to read a third-rate piece of fiction but that this third-rate piece of fiction replaced some first-rate piece of literature that was once part of the curriculum, e.g. a play by Shakespeare or a novel by Austen or Hardy. The steady degradation of public high school curricula over the past half century has been appalling. Unfortunately very few are aware of how bad things are now compared with back then.

    • Replies: @Paperback Writer
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Get over it.

  16. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @AnotherDad, @Paperback Writer

    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.

    Some people’s–and i think much more common among women–sensibility and way of seeing the world is entirely narrative. And if they are half decent writer they can then churn out passable stories–full of characters, descriptive detail and emotions.

    But they just aren’t very strong at making any sort of logic argument. (Basically it never gets beyond “i feel bad” and “this is unfair”.) So they suck at any sort of actual journalism–straight reportage or opinion.

    If you don’t let such people run your oil refinery or impact your politics … it’s fine. Unfortunately the later is no longer true and the former is now in danger.

    • Replies: @Triteleia Laxa
    @AnotherDad

    Good luck with your politics that sees people as machines. Hopefully it will turn out better than Stalinism did, this time.

    , @James Forrestal
    @AnotherDad

    And many of the people reading -- or watching -- those narratives perceive the world in much the same way, so that narrative-style "nonfiction" works very well as propaganda targeting them.

    For example:

    "This child is dead on a beach because of mean White goyim, and it's your fault too... unless you allow unlimited non-White "refugees" into your country."

  17. @Art Deco
    @Redneck farmer

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He'd have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it's a reasonable inference he'd already moved north by that date. An outfit called 'the Lynching Project' has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he'd migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Bill Jones, @Desiderius, @Dissident, @Seneca44, @AndrewR, @Muggles, @anonymous

    Art Deco, i don’t particularly care about Toni Morrison or debunking her particular family oppression fantasy. (Or anyone else’s for that matter. Hey, my great-grandfather’s hovel has been rebuilt in Manhattan … i’m so oppressed!)

    But i appreciate your ability/willingness to spend some cycles and ferret out facts. While i don’t always agree with the thrust of the point you’re trying to make with them, this is a valuable service. Appreciate it.

    • Agree: fish, Gabe Ruth, JMcG
  18. They make up non-fiction all the time. Check out all the acceptable books at your local library on WWII or even some on the American Civil War. Hell, I’m guessing half the shit you read on guys like Teddy Roosevelt, the Kennedys, FDR, LBJ, Ronald Reagan, Bushes, Clinton and company are all total horseshit, especially the Roosevelt clan. And Hitler? Good gawd, how much of that is total horseshit.

    Even sports biographies are fairy tales quite often. They paint Rocky Marciano as some kind of boy scout. An Italian mobster’s son, Frankie Farrell was on board the plane that crashed that killed Marciano. Farrell was the son of notorious mob guy, Louis Fratto aka “Cock-eyed Lou.” These mobsters nicknames sound remarkably like porn stars. haha. Joe Louis? Another boy scout? Don’t make me laugh. Dude hung out with Sonny Liston, did cocaine and almost went bat shit crazy in the process.

    The 1990s? Hell, compared to 2020’s and even 2000s, those were the good ole days. I could actually go into a convenience store SOMETIMES and see a White person behind the counter, rarely saw a Mexican on road crews, only saw them picking fruit in a town called Plant City, Florida for the most part. Clinton compared to Biden actually seemed damn good. And at least we still had music worth listening to in the 1990s.

  19. @Art Deco
    @Redneck farmer

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He'd have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it's a reasonable inference he'd already moved north by that date. An outfit called 'the Lynching Project' has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he'd migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Bill Jones, @Desiderius, @Dissident, @Seneca44, @AndrewR, @Muggles, @anonymous

    One thing the blacks have picked up from their Jewish handlers is how to invent history.

    • Agree: Trinity
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Bill Jones


    One thing the blacks have picked up from their Jewish handlers is how to invent history.
     
    Stephen Jay Gould?


    https://quotefancy.com/media/wallpaper/3840x2160/5444518-Stephen-Jay-Gould-Quote-Humans-are-not-the-end-result-of.jpg
  20. @AnotherDad
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.
     
    Some people's--and i think much more common among women--sensibility and way of seeing the world is entirely narrative. And if they are half decent writer they can then churn out passable stories--full of characters, descriptive detail and emotions.

    But they just aren't very strong at making any sort of logic argument. (Basically it never gets beyond "i feel bad" and "this is unfair".) So they suck at any sort of actual journalism--straight reportage or opinion.

    If you don't let such people run your oil refinery or impact your politics ... it's fine. Unfortunately the later is no longer true and the former is now in danger.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @James Forrestal

    Good luck with your politics that sees people as machines. Hopefully it will turn out better than Stalinism did, this time.

  21. anonymous[346] • Disclaimer says:

    Between 1994-2013, liberals in America were not woke. They had calmed down a lot from the brief woke period of the early 1990s. Can anyone explain what this 20 year period was about in relation to the Great Awokening that started in 2014?

    • Replies: @Ralph L
    @anonymous

    The election of 1994 scared them into hiding the worst of their instincts. There wasn't anyone like early Newt or Trump during Obama's reign that could or would use the crap against them, so after he was safely re-elected, they could get their full freak on.

  22. This is your party on contempt for your voters.

    Do not do this.

    • LOL: Gabe Ruth
    • Replies: @James Forrestal
    @Desiderius

    "Dems are the REAL Russia colluders!"

    Just another variant on DR3 [Dems R da REAL "racists"].

    "Opposing" the other side -- by reinforcing the assumptions of their narrative.

    GOP attacks on libs often take this form. Dems are never:

    -Anti-White enough
    -Pro-sodomy enough
    -Anti-Russian enough
    etc.

    The only time they consistently attack Dems for not being "conservative" enough is when Israel is involved. To the GOP leadership, Israel Firstism is the only true "conservative" value.

    Just as a side note, the sort of "Russians" and "Ukrainians" that both parties are close to don't wear that style of hat, but a much smaller one. They do sometimes wear fur hats, but a different type.

  23. “What had happened was…”

    They are always better at making up stories than describing reality.

  24. @DuanDiRen
    Ok, I'll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer? Sounds like a tall order.

    Replies: @Etruscan Film Star, @Ancient Briton, @James J O'Meara, @The Last Real Calvinist, @anon

    Ok, I’ll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer?

    Tom Wolfe?

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    @Etruscan Film Star

    Yup

  25. @Art Deco
    @Redneck farmer

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He'd have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it's a reasonable inference he'd already moved north by that date. An outfit called 'the Lynching Project' has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he'd migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Bill Jones, @Desiderius, @Dissident, @Seneca44, @AndrewR, @Muggles, @anonymous

    Tall tales beat no tales.

  26. @Art Deco
    @Redneck farmer

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He'd have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it's a reasonable inference he'd already moved north by that date. An outfit called 'the Lynching Project' has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he'd migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Bill Jones, @Desiderius, @Dissident, @Seneca44, @AndrewR, @Muggles, @anonymous

    Who are you to question a person-of-color’s personal, lived truth? Don’t you know that concepts such as that of objective facts are implicitly racist and white supremacist? Haven’t you read any Robin Di Angelo or Ibrahim X Kendi?

  27. @Art Deco
    @Redneck farmer

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He'd have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it's a reasonable inference he'd already moved north by that date. An outfit called 'the Lynching Project' has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he'd migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Bill Jones, @Desiderius, @Dissident, @Seneca44, @AndrewR, @Muggles, @anonymous

    What?! You dare question her woke woman of color (never to be referred to as colored woman) lived experience once removed with facts?

  28. @Art Deco
    @Redneck farmer

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He'd have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it's a reasonable inference he'd already moved north by that date. An outfit called 'the Lynching Project' has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he'd migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Bill Jones, @Desiderius, @Dissident, @Seneca44, @AndrewR, @Muggles, @anonymous

    It happened. I was there. The mayo monsters were screaming HEIL HITLER as they lynched the innocent men of color.

  29. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @AnotherDad, @Paperback Writer

    The rap was that Beloved was Toni Morrison’s “take that!” to William Styron’s Sophie’s Choice.

  30. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.
     
    The shame is not that she was required to read a third-rate piece of fiction but that this third-rate piece of fiction replaced some first-rate piece of literature that was once part of the curriculum, e.g. a play by Shakespeare or a novel by Austen or Hardy. The steady degradation of public high school curricula over the past half century has been appalling. Unfortunately very few are aware of how bad things are now compared with back then.

    Replies: @Paperback Writer

    Get over it.

  31. @AnotherDad
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    Daughter C was required to read Beloved this year as part of her coursework, and also reported that it was better than she had expected.
     
    Some people's--and i think much more common among women--sensibility and way of seeing the world is entirely narrative. And if they are half decent writer they can then churn out passable stories--full of characters, descriptive detail and emotions.

    But they just aren't very strong at making any sort of logic argument. (Basically it never gets beyond "i feel bad" and "this is unfair".) So they suck at any sort of actual journalism--straight reportage or opinion.

    If you don't let such people run your oil refinery or impact your politics ... it's fine. Unfortunately the later is no longer true and the former is now in danger.

    Replies: @Triteleia Laxa, @James Forrestal

    And many of the people reading — or watching — those narratives perceive the world in much the same way, so that narrative-style “nonfiction” works very well as propaganda targeting them.

    For example:

    “This child is dead on a beach because of mean White goyim, and it’s your fault too… unless you allow unlimited non-White “refugees” into your country.”

  32. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    The early Clinton era seems to have had the germ of our current predicament in it. During the campaign, the Press which was then populated by college educated Baby Boomers started really cutting corners because it identified with the ascendant college educated, Vietnam-opposing Baby Boomer Clintons. Clinton of course sought early in his Presidency to queer the military but was rebuffed. The emergent Democratic party ruling class pretended to like Maya Angelou's poetry unironically. Political correctness was rather new and crept from college campuses into other institutions of American life.

    The cultural insurgency ended by Clinton's first midterm in 1994 and the on-boarding of consultant Dick Morris who steered Clinton away from sure electoral defeat and towards softened versions of GOP priorities like Law and Order and reforming welfare. But you can see so much of what is happening now in its nascent form, receding for some time only to reemerge much stronger in the late Obama era.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @res, @The Last Real Calvinist

    Had Clinton been able to queer the military in the early to middle 90s, by 2009 the military would have been too fractured and weak for Obama to have ordered the Afghan surge in 2010-2012. The sooner the military fractures, the sooner American military operations of an aggressive nature become impossible. Since the military won’t protect our borders and is only used to protect the ruling class that hates us all, the sooner it breaks the better.

    Yeah I said it. Gay it up even faster for all I care, recruit only queers and trannies and wreck it forever. Without manpower you can’t sail ships nor fix the piece of shit planes they ripped us all off for. It proceeds apace, the ruin and rot. China can grab Taiwan this very day and all the corrupt and cowardly generals and admirals could do is watch.

  33. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/GenBobSacRet/status/1405203130489393156?s=20

    This is your party on contempt for your voters.

    Do not do this.

    Replies: @James Forrestal

    “Dems are the REAL Russia colluders!”

    Just another variant on DR3 [Dems R da REAL “racists”].

    “Opposing” the other side — by reinforcing the assumptions of their narrative.

    GOP attacks on libs often take this form. Dems are never:

    -Anti-White enough
    -Pro-sodomy enough
    -Anti-Russian enough
    etc.

    The only time they consistently attack Dems for not being “conservative” enough is when Israel is involved. To the GOP leadership, Israel Firstism is the only true “conservative” value.

    Just as a side note, the sort of “Russians” and “Ukrainians” that both parties are close to don’t wear that style of hat, but a much smaller one. They do sometimes wear fur hats, but a different type.

  34. @Art Deco
    @Redneck farmer

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He'd have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it's a reasonable inference he'd already moved north by that date. An outfit called 'the Lynching Project' has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he'd migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Bill Jones, @Desiderius, @Dissident, @Seneca44, @AndrewR, @Muggles, @anonymous

    Once again another made-up lie about non existent “racist incidents” in someone’s childhood, as reported second hand by their children. Anti white racist lies told to children to make them fear whites. Who knew?

    In a few more years black writers will be authoring tales of their father’s in Chicago witnessing Jussie Smollet’s brutal beat down by MAGA hatsters.

    In a small western town where I grew up, there was an annual parade celebrating the wild days of the Old West. High school students competed with floats pulled by tractors showing actual historic hangings of “road agents” being strung up by celebrated vigilantes.

    No one had nightmares, though we did wonder how some of our classmates could apparently dangle by their necks from a tree limb unharmed. Hollywood magic, I guess.

    Of course everyone hanged in those days, in that area, was white. Other than one unlucky Mexican known only as “the Mexican” who rode with the road agents.

    Those so hanged were done so after miner’s courts tried and found them guilty. “Lynching” was very rare, as that only refers to those in police custody who are sprung from jail and strung up by an angry public.

  35. Great writers seldom make great thinkers. Those are opposing qualities of the mind. And (plastic) artists usually are very mid-brow, if not moronic.

  36. Anonymous[209] • Disclaimer says:

    as a sort of secret handshake to signify (a major 1990s word) that they had studied French literary theory of the Foucault and Derrida varietals.

    The French theorists were mainly copying Heidegger’s thought and style. Heidegger famously argued “Das Nichts nichtet” or “The Nothing nothings” in English in his 1929 lecture “What is Metaphysics?”, wrote about the “thingness” of things, etc.

  37. OT: And then they came for the Audubon Society.

    “The racist legacy many birds carry. The birding community faces a difficult debate about the names of species connected to enslavers, supremacists and grave robbers.”

    WaPo

  38. @DuanDiRen
    Ok, I'll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer? Sounds like a tall order.

    Replies: @Etruscan Film Star, @Ancient Briton, @James J O'Meara, @The Last Real Calvinist, @anon

    George Orwell

  39. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    The early Clinton era seems to have had the germ of our current predicament in it. During the campaign, the Press which was then populated by college educated Baby Boomers started really cutting corners because it identified with the ascendant college educated, Vietnam-opposing Baby Boomer Clintons. Clinton of course sought early in his Presidency to queer the military but was rebuffed. The emergent Democratic party ruling class pretended to like Maya Angelou's poetry unironically. Political correctness was rather new and crept from college campuses into other institutions of American life.

    The cultural insurgency ended by Clinton's first midterm in 1994 and the on-boarding of consultant Dick Morris who steered Clinton away from sure electoral defeat and towards softened versions of GOP priorities like Law and Order and reforming welfare. But you can see so much of what is happening now in its nascent form, receding for some time only to reemerge much stronger in the late Obama era.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @res, @The Last Real Calvinist

    It is almost like they floated a trial balloon, realized the time was not right yet, and waited.

  40. @DuanDiRen
    Ok, I'll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer? Sounds like a tall order.

    Replies: @Etruscan Film Star, @Ancient Briton, @James J O'Meara, @The Last Real Calvinist, @anon

    Hemingway?

    Tom Wolfe, if you go along with his “New Journalism” style work, which I guess was an attempt to square that circle, pursuing nonfiction topics with fictional techniques (dialogue, intrusive narrators, etc.).

    Joan Didion?

  41. @DuanDiRen
    Ok, I'll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer? Sounds like a tall order.

    Replies: @Etruscan Film Star, @Ancient Briton, @James J O'Meara, @The Last Real Calvinist, @anon

    Ok, I’ll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer? Sounds like a tall order.

    Tom Wolfe is the obvious reply, at least around these parts.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    One could make an argument for Orwell as well as Wodehouse.

  42. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    The early Clinton era seems to have had the germ of our current predicament in it. During the campaign, the Press which was then populated by college educated Baby Boomers started really cutting corners because it identified with the ascendant college educated, Vietnam-opposing Baby Boomer Clintons. Clinton of course sought early in his Presidency to queer the military but was rebuffed. The emergent Democratic party ruling class pretended to like Maya Angelou's poetry unironically. Political correctness was rather new and crept from college campuses into other institutions of American life.

    The cultural insurgency ended by Clinton's first midterm in 1994 and the on-boarding of consultant Dick Morris who steered Clinton away from sure electoral defeat and towards softened versions of GOP priorities like Law and Order and reforming welfare. But you can see so much of what is happening now in its nascent form, receding for some time only to reemerge much stronger in the late Obama era.

    Replies: @Jim Christian, @res, @The Last Real Calvinist

    The early Clinton era seems to have had the germ of our current predicament in it.

    It started even earlier, in the late 1980s. Looking back, there was a span in the late 80s/early 90s that seems now like a trailer for today’s Wokism. Pomo/deconstructivist theory was hot hot hot in academia, there really were unironic devotees of PC, and the early-to-mid-1980s smothering of the leftist urge to remake the world was starting to break down.

    What’s interesting to me is why much of this utopian troublemaking then ebbed again for a while. Was it just that the proto-Woke, in their typical overconfidence, overreached and were pushed back/decided to wait? That seems to be the consensus view, as res suggests, but I wonder.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    What’s interesting to me is why much of this utopian troublemaking then ebbed again for a while. Was it just that the proto-Woke, in their typical overconfidence, overreached and were pushed back/decided to wait? That seems to be the consensus view, as res suggests, but I wonder.
     
    Yes - they push too far, the Democrats get associated with it and suffer electoral attrition for it, and the borg pushes them back to their well-funded redoubts in the Academy, Non-Profit sector and Think Tanks. Recall the late eighties to early aughts when the Democrats all had to pinky swear that "marriage is between a man and a woman," and substituted DOMA for a Constitutional Amendment? Then they all synchronically "changed their minds" a decade and a half later?
  43. @DuanDiRen
    Ok, I'll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer? Sounds like a tall order.

    Replies: @Etruscan Film Star, @Ancient Briton, @James J O'Meara, @The Last Real Calvinist, @anon

    Ok, I’ll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer?

    Alexander Solzhenitsyn was both.

  44. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @DuanDiRen


    Ok, I’ll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer? Sounds like a tall order.

     

    Tom Wolfe is the obvious reply, at least around these parts.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    One could make an argument for Orwell as well as Wodehouse.

  45. this habit of injecting hyphens and parentheses into words, especially gerunds

    Does anyone have an example of a transgerund in the wild.

    • Replies: @Etruscan Film Star
    @Reg Cæsar


    ... this habit of injecting hyphens and parentheses into words, especially gerunds
     
    They are the vax for standard English. Had your jab yet?
  46. @anonymous
    Between 1994-2013, liberals in America were not woke. They had calmed down a lot from the brief woke period of the early 1990s. Can anyone explain what this 20 year period was about in relation to the Great Awokening that started in 2014?

    Replies: @Ralph L

    The election of 1994 scared them into hiding the worst of their instincts. There wasn’t anyone like early Newt or Trump during Obama’s reign that could or would use the crap against them, so after he was safely re-elected, they could get their full freak on.

  47. @kaganovitch
    OT: The Jeffrey Epstein of black bears
    https://www.audacy.com/1010wins/news/local/video-black-bear-found-dead-in-staten-island-parking-lot

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    OT: The Jeffrey Epstein of black bears

    Was he pimping underage sows and cubs? Is Lower New York Bay the ursine Caribbean?

    Wikipedia says this about Upper New York Bay: “The Upper Bay supports a very diverse population of marine species, allowing for recreational fishing, most commonly for striped bass and bluefish.”

    Diversity is its strength!

    Also OT: Hooray for India!

    Twitter may now be held directly responsible for every single tweet in India

  48. @Bill Jones
    @Art Deco

    One thing the blacks have picked up from their Jewish handlers is how to invent history.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    One thing the blacks have picked up from their Jewish handlers is how to invent history.

    Stephen Jay Gould?

  49. anonymous[316] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco
    @Redneck farmer

    Did you catch this?

    https://www.literaryladiesguide.com/literary-musings/10-fascinating-facts-about-toni-morrison-nobel-prize-winner/

    Morrison’s father grew up in Cartersville, Georgia. At the age of 15, he witnessed white people lynching two Black businessmen who lived on his street. Soon after the lynching, her father moved to Lorain, Ohio, a racially integrated town, in hopes of escaping racism and gain better employment in Ohio’s industrial economy rather than sharecropping. Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    George Wofford was born in 1908. He'd have been 15 years old in 1923 / 24. His oldest daughter was born in Pittsburgh in September 1929, so it's a reasonable inference he'd already moved north by that date. An outfit called 'the Lynching Project' has identified three instances of lynching in Bartow County, Georgia (where Cartersville is located) between 1880 and 1940. On occurred in 1904, before George Wofford was born. One occurred in 1930, after he'd migrated north. One occurred in 1916, when he was about 7. In none of these incidents was more than one person lynched, and none of the deceased were businessmen (one appears to have been a wagon driver, another a casual laborer).

    Replies: @AnotherDad, @Bill Jones, @Desiderius, @Dissident, @Seneca44, @AndrewR, @Muggles, @anonymous

    Speaking of her father’s experience with the lynching, Morrison said “He never told us that he’d seen bodies. But he had seen them. And that was too traumatic, I think, for him.”

    That would be an unusual reaction. Judging by videos on Worldstar, Twitter, and YouTube, blacks seem to get a thrill from watching other bodies be knocked out, stomped, or killed.

  50. @Etruscan Film Star
    @DuanDiRen


    Ok, I’ll bite: who is both a great novelist and an outstanding non-fiction writer?

     

    Tom Wolfe?

    Replies: @Ganderson

    Yup

  51. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)


    The early Clinton era seems to have had the germ of our current predicament in it.

     

    It started even earlier, in the late 1980s. Looking back, there was a span in the late 80s/early 90s that seems now like a trailer for today's Wokism. Pomo/deconstructivist theory was hot hot hot in academia, there really were unironic devotees of PC, and the early-to-mid-1980s smothering of the leftist urge to remake the world was starting to break down.

    What's interesting to me is why much of this utopian troublemaking then ebbed again for a while. Was it just that the proto-Woke, in their typical overconfidence, overreached and were pushed back/decided to wait? That seems to be the consensus view, as res suggests, but I wonder.

    Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    What’s interesting to me is why much of this utopian troublemaking then ebbed again for a while. Was it just that the proto-Woke, in their typical overconfidence, overreached and were pushed back/decided to wait? That seems to be the consensus view, as res suggests, but I wonder.

    Yes – they push too far, the Democrats get associated with it and suffer electoral attrition for it, and the borg pushes them back to their well-funded redoubts in the Academy, Non-Profit sector and Think Tanks. Recall the late eighties to early aughts when the Democrats all had to pinky swear that “marriage is between a man and a woman,” and substituted DOMA for a Constitutional Amendment? Then they all synchronically “changed their minds” a decade and a half later?

  52. @Reg Cæsar

    this habit of injecting hyphens and parentheses into words, especially gerunds
     
    Does anyone have an example of a transgerund in the wild.

    Replies: @Etruscan Film Star

    … this habit of injecting hyphens and parentheses into words, especially gerunds

    They are the vax for standard English. Had your jab yet?

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