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The 2022 movie The Northman is a formidable Viking action film in which young Prince Amleth loses his kingdom when his uncle murders his father the king and then marries his mother the queen, so he vows vengeance. It’s like Hamlet, but with fewer soliloquies and more beheadings.

American director Robert Eggers engages in zero diversity casting: Alexander Skarsgård of the leading Swedish acting dynasty is the hero. And the non-Scandinavians in the cast include Nicole Kidman in the Queen Gertrude role as a kidnapped Breton, Ethan Hawke as Amleth’s dad the Raven King, Willem Dafoe as a jester/he-witch, and wide-eyed blonde Anya Taylor-Joy as Olga of the Birch Forest, a slave from Rus.

I don’t know all that much about the Vikings, but the movie strikes me as something the Vikings would have liked. It takes the Vikings’ extraordinarily bloodthirsty moral code seriously and, so far as I can tell, makes no attempt to adapt it to modern sensibilities, woke or Christian.

As I may have mentioned once or twice, the job of directing films tends to go to those who by nature and training are extremely non-woke. Directors believe in hierarchy, responsibility, authority, skill, and talent, and those attitudes seep through into the movies the best directors make.

I have to say after watching The Northman: Thank God for Christianity. The Northman is set around the year 900 AD, a century before Christianity reached Iceland, where much of the film is set.

The Vikings and their Christian/semi-French offshoots the Normans, despite being few in number, held territory as widely dispersed as Canada, Greenland, Iceland, the Normandy peninsula, England, Sicily, and the Holy Land during the Crusades. Watching The Northman, the thought that, if they’d stayed pagan, they might have conquered the world seems not implausible.

As a non-Scandinavian, their conversion to Christianity strikes me as a good thing.

 
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  1. Time to step away from MSM propaganda and TURN TOWARD SCIENCE!

    The original Danes or Vikings were Blacks.(11) This is made clear in the Oseberg 8th Century Vikings on the Norway Sledge carving of the Black seafarers that populated the region at this time. It is clear from this carving that the 8th Century Vikings were different from the Blond, big bodied folk of Vikingchildren’s!

    https://www.africaresource.com/rasta/articles/the-ancient-celts-and-vikings-were-black-people-by-dr-clyde-winters/

    [MORE]

    “The evidence indicates that Blacks in ancient times came to Britian from Spain, Felix Arabia, Egypt, Ethiopia, West Africa, India, Persia and what is today named Denmark. These Negroes were builders, scientists, masters of ocean travel and inventors of letters, according to Higgins, they built Stonehende, Gerald Massey agrees pg 11 Book of The Beginnings.” See Ancient and Modern Britons- MacRitchie pg 2

    “The Danes, then were like the ‘MOORS’ –black.

    https://www.africaresource.com/rasta/sesostris-the-great-the-egyptian-hercules/the-bla-maors-the-black-vikings-and-the-black-danes-compiled-by-invasion2012/

    Laugh? This will be taught to yo chidrens!

  2. The Northman is set… a century before Christianity reached Iceland,

    Steve needs to stop multitasking while watching Netflix, or maybe stop drinking wine, like he used to do at the opera. The farm that Amleth terrorizes has Christians on it. Not clear if they are slaves or just peasants, but they’re significant enough to be accused of Amleth’s crimes at first.

  3. Watching The Northman, the thought that, if they’d stayed pagan, they might have conquered the world seems not implausible.

    The creation and centralization of the Scandinavian kingdoms tended to go hand in hand with Christianization. There’s probably a tradeoff between contentious, opportunistic warlord societies with superb martial skills, and mass organization, so I think the Norse pagans may have achieved their maximum reach.

  4. @Chrisnonymous

    The “Christian swine” are slaves of the Vikings, mostly Irish-Scottish-Gaelic captives. The movie begins in 895 A.D. Iceland converted to Christianity in 1000 A.D.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianization_of_Iceland

    • Thanks: Not Raul
  5. @blockedfireexit

    Well said.

    “Fighting between adherents of the rival religions seemed likely until mediators intervened and the matter was submitted to arbitration. The law speaker of the Althing, Thorgeir Thorkelsson, the gothi of Ljósavatn, was acceptable to both sides as mediator, being known as a moderate and reasonable man. Thorgeir accepted responsibility for deciding whether Iceland should become Christian, with the condition that both parties abide by his decision. When this was agreed, he spent a day and a night resting under a fur blanket, contemplating.

    “The following day he announced that Iceland was to become Christian, with the condition that old laws concerning the exposure of infants and the eating of horseflesh would remain, and that private pagan worship be permitted. …

    “Thorgeir, who was himself a pagan priest… The problem of changing religions was thus solved, as people abided by Thorgeir’s decision and were baptized. Civil war was averted via arbitration. Iceland’s peaceful adoption is in many ways remarkable, given the decades of civil strife before Norway became fully Christian.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianization_of_Iceland

  6. How many people of color in the cast of actors?

  7. Thoughts says:
    @Steve Sailer

    So in other words…

    If Zelensky had been Thorgeir he would have sat under a fur blanket for a day and decided…

    “It does not matter what passport the Ukrainian people have. What matters is their lives and their safety”

    And worked out a deal with Russia

    But Zelensky is not a Viking, he’s a Jew so…

    “Therefore Jew, though justice be thy plea…consider this…”

    [P.S. – We all know this is about Russian/Iranian supporting Syria as Syria is the next country scheduled for extermination and territorial annexation to create Greater Israel]

  8. quewin says:

    Alexander Skarsgård of the leading Swedish acting dynasty is the hero. And the non-Scandinavians in the cast include Nicole Kidman in the Queen Gertrude role as a kidnapped Breton, Ethan Hawke as Amleth’s dad the Raven King, Willem Dafoe as a jester/he-witch, and wide-eyed blonde Anya Taylor-Joy as Olga of the Birch Forest, a slave from Rus.

    Special Bonus:

    Björk.

    (Mmm, Björk.)

  9. do any of the pretty girls get naked? just asking for a friend.

    • Thanks: JimDandy
  10. The Icelandic sagas were written by Christian Icelanders looking back on paganism. They give the impression of extreme realism – even the supernatural aspects, which were used to tie together the rather sprawling stories. The authors’ feelings were mixed. Their ancestors were admirable in their way, but their outlook and way of life was pointless, destructive, and ultimately unsatisfying.

    They’re great books and should be read.

    • Agree: Tex
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    , @TelfoedJohn
  11. conatus says:

    The North of Europe was converted by terror, not by belief. They were converted around the same time the Muslims were turning the Mediterranean basin from a Roman civilization into a civilizational desert, also by terror and blood.

    Charlemagne beheaded 4500 Saxons, in 782 at Verden, in the Holy name of the Prince of Peace. “Don’t believe in Jesus?” “Chop off his head.” Back then Christianity as practiced by Charlemagne the butcher, was a different religion indeed, but nowadays the Marcion heresy has won. Marcion did not believe in the Old Testament. The Old Tribal Testament is no more, it is only legitimate for one Tribe and one Tribe only(rhymes with ‘who’)who shall remain nameless like their God. The Old Testament with its commonsense solutions to life is gone, it no longer may be used by modern Europeans. We are left with the emphasis on the New Testament as the only way to be a true Christian. So the dewy, damp and limp pages of the New Testament are the religious code by which modern Europeans are living and it causes us no end of problems.

    Charlemage beheaded 4500 Saxons in 782 because they would not convert to Christianity. That was a lot of valuable Saxon men, back in those days. About 180,000 men in today’s numbers.
    Charlemagne also practiced ethnic cleansing at the same time, bringing every third Saxon family south to de-paganize and show them the Way, The Truth, and The Light(under pain of death).

    Rodney Stark, who has written a boatload of books on the idea that ‘Christianity is good’ (relatively speaking) wrote a book titled ‘How the West Won.’2014 discussing these forced conversions of the North. It is revisionist history, saying for example the Muslim religion is bankrupt, all their ostensive scientific advancements were due to the dhimmi cultures they had conquered.Also the idea that people don’t convert for the peaceful doctrine, they convert because their leaders and their friends did. People could give a shit about doctrine. “Conversion is primarily an act of conformity” p.114

    He also talks about Verden, and how the North was converted by head chopping. In this view (just a suggestion in the book) Christianity was imposed in the most brutal fashion on the people of the North, it was a religion they did not want, it was not the doctrine that attracted them, it was the simple idea of living another day that forced them to pay lip service to the bearded woman, Jesus. It was a forcible conversion of fear for the people of the North, not a conversion of belief. On p. 97 Stark discusses the idea that the Vikings, took revenge and a hundred years later, targeted British Monasteries and Monks, not necessarily because they were defenseless but “because they were angry about efforts to Christianize the North. Especially provocative would have been the atrocities committed by Charlemagne, who, for example, had about 4,500 unarmed Saxon captives forcibly baptized and then executed. The Vikings seem to have known that Charlemagne had issued an edict imposing the death sentence on all who tried to resist Christianization.”

    Stark cites a 2009 book by Robert Ferguson for this idea about the Vikes, ‘The Vikings, a History,’ p 54.

  12. J.Ross says:

    OT — Another mass shooting (Denver gay bar with service industry appreciation Tuesdays). I still think this whole phenomenon is federal in origin and overwhelmingly federal in execution (ask Armand). However, I think all of the recent events (UVA, Moscow, Denver, the other one) are “real,” that is, totally non-federal. First off, fed glowie ops have screamingly obvious problems nobody is allowed to ask questions about or get answers to, like the mold on the walls. Secondly fed glowie ops exist to actualize a fed narrative. What’s been happening doesn’t have any obvious problems and certainly does not serve any fed narrative.
    Two things:
    The leadership decided it would be a good idea to end policing and made sure all the scum heard about it.
    Trannies are no longer rare or relegated to a subculture. They are in some people’s faces as unqualified supervisors, they are screwing with people’s children.
    That event in Moscow, Idaho sounds just like one of the old 70s California serial killer events that aren’t supposed to be possible any more.
    Maybe it’s a really really stupid idea to “defund the police.”

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    , @Jack Boniface
  13. J.Ross says:

    Four reasons Vikings never conquered the world:
    No overarching ideology or charismatic leader despite a common culture.
    Constant “infighting,” which was really just “fighting” because their communities were all foreign to each other.
    Mercenary willingness to serve other empires, like the Varangian guard at Constantinople, or the practice of serving as objective outsider rulers like at Novgorod.
    They never had a big enough population in one place at one time (if they had some big Viking religion or nationalism, they could’ve effected this by concentrating what they had, but they never had a non-mercenary motive).
    Technologically and militarily they could’ve done it.

  14. JimDandy says:

    So, was this movie automatically out of the running for the Best Picture Oscar due to its lack of any redeeming DEI value?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @JimDandy
  15. Twinkie says:
    @blockedfireexit

    There’s probably a tradeoff between contentious, opportunistic warlord societies with superb martial skills, and mass organization, so I think the Norse pagans may have achieved their maximum reach.

    Mass media tends to valorize “the Vikings” as invincible warriors, horned helmets and all, but this is historically inaccurate. Much of the terror ascribed to them came from the fact that they were highly mobile at sea and on rivers and thus opportunistically struck undefended towns and abbeys by surprise, which they brutally and extremely cruelly sacked (and then quickly departed before the opposing armies could mobilize).

    When the Christian Franks and the Iberian Muslims were able to catch up to them with their main armies, the Vikings often suffered defeat after defeat. The exceptions were England and Normandy, where they could settle in large numbers and quickly adopted the local modes of political and military organizations.

    There is one group of “contentious, opportunistic warlord” type raiders who did scale up massively and effectively – the Mongols. But then horses and the steppe presented a different dynamic than longships and the sea.

  16. @Chrisnonymous

    Virtually all of the women in Iceland in the first 3 generations were Celtic Christians stolen in Viking raids. Also, when Vikings reached Iceland, they found Irish monks using the island as a retreat, which had been going on for at least a century. It was not bloodlust driving improved Viking shipmaking and sailing that ‘discovered’ Iceland.’ It was Irish Catholic drive to purify the world of the kinds of evil that Vikings practiced all day every day that led to the discovery of Iceland. And it was Irish Catholic, and in smaller number Welsh Catholic, women captured to be sexual slaves who made certain that eventually Iceland would be Christianized and civilized. Almost male slaves taken to Iceland also were Celtic Catholics.

    The result, after a couple of centuries was the Gemamanic barbarians in Iceland were Christianized, Latinized and in culturtal terms largely Celticized, which meanest they produced what per caipota was the best literature in the world during the High Middle Ages.

    The Sales taming some Varangians (Vikings) in the East is also how the Russian nation was born,

    Taming, and Christianizing Germans is necessary to have civilization. Otherwise, Germanics act like smarter Bantus.

    • Agree: Alden
  17. Clyde says:

    I must be Viking out. I watched all 6 seasons of The Vikings as soon as they were issued. This is currently free at Amazon for Prime members. I found The Northman mostly boring. Though the cinematography and the rural backgrounds were A+. As in A+ production values.

    The vikings were the Wim Hofs of our world’s past. They also invaded/ founded Kiev.

  18. Wilkey says:

    American director Robert Eggers engages in zero diversity casting:

    In 2022 it’s considered noteworthy when a movie set in 9th Century Scandinavia doesn’t have any black people in it.

    Incredible.

  19. @blockedfireexit

    The creation and centralization of the Scandinavian kingdoms tended to go hand in hand with Christianization. There’s probably a tradeoff between contentious, opportunistic warlord societies with superb martial skills, and mass organization, so I think the Norse pagans may have achieved their maximum reach.

    Excellent paragraph of sociology, bfe. Well done.

    AFAICT, detribalization–pretty much everyone except the Jews–under Christianity, including bans on cousin marriage and a marry-the-girl-next-door ethos seems to have built in the West the ability to do “trust at scale” that created the cohesive, capable Western nations who did actually “conquer the world”.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  20. astrolabe says:

    Raiders for slaves and treasure often have the advantage of surprise over their victims who are busy trying to make a living, but their ability to hold land I think suggests that the Vikings and Normans had higher intelligence than those they dispossessed. They scattered Motte and Bailey castles across the countries they invaded. These were a new invention which allowed them to control the surrounding area.
    Here in England, old churches frequently contain carvings of ‘Green men’: faces with leaves emerging from their orifices. These might originally have represented the Silvatici: the men of the woods, who resisted the Norman takeover. The story of Robin Hood might have the same origin.
    Once they had taken over here, they had a sufficient surfeit of whatever combination of strategic ability and belligerence is required to re-invade and rule parts of France for a few centuries until presumably it got diluted away or fat off the land.

  21. anonymous[322] • Disclaimer says:

    Sad that Steve thinks it’s positive that a white culture weakened itself, by coming under control of a Jewish-created, Jewish-‘saviour’-worshipping cult … at that time in the West, under ideological control of a bunch of largely gay men posing as ‘celibate Catholic priests’

    When the ‘Christian’ Europeans of course continued to engage in rampaging wars for centuries after their conversion, but now spreading the pro-Jewish cultism wherever they went … spreading the ‘gospel’ that would in the end undermine Europe and European heritage

    And now it may be a question of European culture survival, to wholly jettison the Jewish cult religions, and recover a reincarnation-believing, no-animal-sacrifice ‘paganism’ under which Europeans can thrive, have confidence in eternal life, but also defend themselves from cultural onslaughts

    • Replies: @Kinky Friedman
  22. AceDeuce says:
    @propagandist hacker

    How many people of color in the cast of actors?

    All of them.

    White IS a fking color.

    • Replies: @Nachum
  23. @Twinkie

    Mass media tends to valorize “the Vikings” as invincible warriors, horned helmets and all, but this is historically inaccurate. Much of the terror ascribed to them came from the fact that they were highly mobile at sea and on rivers and thus opportunistically struck undefended towns and abbeys by surprise, which they brutally and extremely cruelly sacked (and then quickly departed before the opposing armies could mobilize).

    Agree.

    Mobility is a huge component in conflict. And civilized societies have always had difficulty defending themselves from barbarians. They basically could no continuously do–were always subject to the raiders from the steppe, or the sea–until firearms.

    British pirates were doing the same sort of sleazing crap–burning, looting, raping, killing–on the Spanish Main for a century. Mobility matters, hard to make every settlement a garrison capable of withstanding a well armed attack.

    Parasitism–in all its forms–is always a problem for organisms, including civilized people.

    Parasites basically find some game-theory solution that allows them to loot the host. It could be having a spike protein, it could be being a pirate, it could be propagandizing “diversity!” ideology, it could be running FTX. Parasites find a way. Productive people are inherently at war with them.

    • Troll: Je Suis Omar Mateen
    • Replies: @Anon
  24. @AnotherDad

    AFAICT, detribalization–pretty much everyone except the Jews–under Christianity, including bans on cousin marriage and a marry-the-girl-next-door ethos seems to have built in the West the ability to do “trust at scale” that created the cohesive, capable Western nations who did actually “conquer the world”.

    This is what Joseph Henrich writes in his very insightful book The WEIRDEST Poeple in the World: How the West Became Psychologically Peculiar and Particularly Prosperous.
    – – That Christianity – from the 7th century on, did cut back tribalism via the ban of cousin marriage etc. and thus civilized Europe.

    Here is Razib Khans review:

    https://www.nationalreview.com/books/

  25. @Twinkie

    As a ” Norman” I can confirm.
    Many archaeological and genetic studies have been conducted in Normandy, the descendants of the Vikings were small, their health often precarious (deficiencies?) But there were still some individuals of exceptional size (the high nobility with better food? )

    And to Hammerjack : thanks for your Links,
    a lot of fun for me

    • Replies: @Kinky Friedman
  26. S says:

    American director Robert Eggers engages in zero diversity casting:

    Well, much unlike The Norseman directed by Charles B Pierce in 1978, at least it has that touch of authenticity going for it.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Norseman

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_B._Pierce

    • LOL: The Anti-Gnostic
    • Replies: @Philbert Desanex
  27. SafeNow says:
    @HammerJack

    Thanks, I didn’t know that. But now I am wondering about percentages. Was it almost all black; somewhat black? What about intermarriage? I would imagine that apologists for Viking ferociousness will say, Sure, there were a few blacks, but not enough to influence societal norms.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
  28. MM says:
    @Twinkie

    Horse archers (the Mongols) are also overrated in the popular literature. They require terrain quite similar to tanks in modern warfare, namely open terrain with sight lines. They are useless in siege warfare for instance.
    Their success relates to the ability to incorporate other elements into combined armies, for when they ran out of steppe.

    • Replies: @Elli
  29. dearieme says:

    My father’s family came from a village with a fine Norse name. Maybe that’s why he used to declare “We are Vikings really.” (His frame and colouring were consistent with that.)

    It’s only in middle age that I thought to add “or Vikings’ slaves”.

  30. Ian Smith says:

    I loved the Northman. It was Alexander Skarsgard’s idea to have part of the film be set in Rus. Given that the Swedes went East, it makes sense.

  31. Rowing Soon says: • Website

    Richard Hanania and Rob Henderson made a low quality review of the movie where they just talked out of their asses, speculating that it was a feminist film!! That required a response: https://ashallowalcove.substack.com/p/the-northman

    Dead by iron, we will meet again! This is the key line of the movie, coming at the end.

    • Thanks: Gandydancer
  32. tyrone says:
    @HammerJack

    original Danes or Vikings were Blacks.

    …….WOW !!could they FLY as well….maybe they were WAKANDANS!……..maybe this explains why Scandinavians look just like Puerto Ricans today!……..so much fun, we can all play the “I’m so full of shit game”!

  33. ᚢᛁ ᚢᛅᚱ ᚴᚬᚾᚴᛁᛦ!

  34. As a German-Scandinavian, I believe we should have stayed pagan.

  35. @Twinkie

    The Varangian Guard (SP?) were the perfect balance– leveraging the individual prowess of the Vikingr and combining it with the organizational abilities of the ERE.

  36. LGTH says:

    I don’t know how anyone could look at the way things turned out… all Western nations working to turn White people into minorities in their own nations.. and conclude that a viking led world would be worse.

    It is literally not possible to have had a worse outcome than what the West faces today.

  37. pyrrhus says:

    This movie, available on cable, is quite enjoyable precisely because of the up front bloodthirstyness of even the sporting contests…Reminds me a bit of the classic The Man Who Would Be King..

  38. tyrone says:
    @Twinkie

    horned helmets and all, but this is historically inaccurate.

    ………sadly you are correct…but horned helmets are very cool so we will keep thinking of them in that way……some of the sea people on the other hand did wear horned helmets.

  39. anon[282] • Disclaimer says:

    Varg Vikernes HATES Steve Sailer!

  40. Bill P says:
    @Steve Sailer

    What’s really amazing about Iceland is the level of literacy it achieved after Christianity was adopted.

    A great deal of what we know about mainland Scandinavia and Norse paganism comes from Icelandic authors.

    Pretty remarkable given that Iceland was essentially a sparsely populated frontier society. Some have speculated that it was due to Irish influence, which is plausible given that Iceland is about a third Irish genetically, there were Irish present on the island when the Norse discovered it and the sagas speak highly of Irish kings.

    • Thanks: Not Raul
  41. LP5 says:
    @HammerJack

    HammerJack writes:

    Time to step away from MSM propaganda and TURN TOWARD SCIENCE!

    Haplogroups morph into hapless groups.

  42. From Oedipus to Hamlet to Prince Harry, the plot hardly ever changes, just the names of the characters.

  43. Paul Rise says:

    The Northman is so far the best movie released in 2022. (I have not seen NOPE yet which is likely to be nominated if not win Best Picture.)

    Fans of the old Conan the Barbarian movie should check it out – the film is an obvious homage.

    I think I would rather have Conan after me than Amleth.

    Egger’s The Witch is also exceptional and to me did not seem to be the antiChristian message that most film critics assumed it to be.

    • Agree: Tex
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Peter Akuleyev
  44. Rooster16 says:
    @HammerJack

    Wait, so Martin in the movie “Black Knight” was actually historically accurate??!

    … God I long for the days again when blacks in Medieval movies were for pure comedy only.

  45. @Twinkie

    Much of the terror ascribed to them came from the fact that they were highly mobile at sea and on rivers and thus opportunistically struck undefended towns and abbeys by surprise, which they brutally and extremely cruelly sacked (and then quickly departed before the opposing armies could mobilize).

    Uh, sounds damn pretty terrifying to me — and FWIW this depicted in one of the now numerous Viking dramas on streaming — the Vikings show up on the coast and start marching inland, looting and killing along the way, only thing these little agricultural towns could do is hole up in some sort of wooden fortification and wait them out until the local ruler put together a professional army to drive out the invaders.

    There is one group of “contentious, opportunistic warlord” type raiders who did scale up massively and effectively – the Mongols. But then horses and the steppe presented a different dynamic than longships and the se

    Before the Mongols, came the Magyar*.

    We arrived in the Carpathian Basin and proceeded to harry all four corners of Europe for fun and profit with arrows drawn on the back of our steppe ponies — until Lechfeld.

    Like the Vikings, the Hungarians were savage pagans — up to 1000 AD when Vajk/St. Stephen catholicized us and established the Kingdom of Hungary in one fell swoop.

    Looking back at that — not sure that was such a great move, Pistike.

    *To be fair, before the Magyar, came the Hun.

  46. @Wilkey

    But apparently, it’s a blood thirsty movie, that puts whites in a bad light, needing the supervision of a Christian religion. It’s like the wild west, so blood thirsty it’s amazing we ever survived at all. I’m still in awe that we ever made it this far in time. I personally don’t think Jesus would have killed or pushed into war so many all over Europe. Christianity merely opened Europe to invite in the world. Christian religion brought forth the burden. Parden me if I feel a little something for the early indigenous, pagan Europeans who were not much different than their brothers, the American Indians.
    Early Christians tended to be brutal, and not quite Christ like at all. Christians, a religious group that loved to kill anything they couldn’t wrap their brain around; don’t understand it kill it. They were and are the perfect peoples to do the lords will as the government sees it. They lie, steal, cheat and carry on and to say otherwise is to be lying. Christians merely do their dirty deeds, and cover each other’s dirt, under the protection of a book which they claim gives them the right to do what they do. No one changes, no one is forgiven, and each one of them is some sort of reincarnation of Jesus the bad. None of them ever admit their own short-comings and none apologize. They don’t open their hearts to Jesus they want to be Jesus, in their own personal way. Just an opinionated observation.
    So, if you feel bad about what Christians did in the America’s, then why not feel bad for the Indigenous Europeans?

  47. @Bill P

    What’s really amazing about Iceland is the level of literacy it achieved after Christianity was adopted…

    Pretty remarkable given that Iceland was essentially a sparsely populated frontier society.

    Not at all. Alaska, not Hawaii, regularly tops the list of most well-read states. What else is there to do but read?

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Dutch Boy
  48. Wokechoke says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The game of proto Hurley (or Hurling) that the Oirish slaves play to the death was fascinating. Knattleikr is the name given by the Norse here. They got killed in a ball game by the look of it. Seems like a waste of tough useful men. No wonder the half-Danish Harold Godwinson took the Norwegian Harald Hadrada apart at Stamford Bridge in 1066 if they lost men in such “sports”.

    My sense of the Northman’s adherence to the Berzerker Creed is that it was, doomed. It reached it’s furthest extent at the fringe of the North and could go no further in it’s limitations.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    , @Dube
  49. Wokechoke says:
    @Wilkey

    The Russian girl was also the most sensible person in the plot and story. What a fool Amleth was to pass up Ms Taylor-Joy.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  50. @propagandist hacker

    There’s lots and lots of color amongst the cast. To wit, red hair, blonde hair, blue eyes.

  51. mc23 says:
    @Bill P

    I saw somewhere that at one point Icelandic women who couldn’t read were not permitted to marry.

  52. It’s kind of like Hamlet because it is Hamlet.

    The play is Hamlet Prince of Denmark, and Shakespeare knew of Amleth.

    Can’t stand Hamlet though — Macbeth’s where it’s at.

    Agree with respect to Christianity being an improvement over Norse gods though.

    Many years ago I read my kids some Norse legends (children’s version). I remember commenting to my parents afterwards that I could see why Christianity took over because, if these stories were anything to go by, the Norse gods were actually quite stupid.

  53. Lol the Normans did a little Conquering after their conversion as well. 1066 and all that.

    Some would argue they still are. Skull and Bones flies the Jolly Roger for a reason.

  54. Shakespeare borrowed heavily from the legend of Amleth for Hamlet.
    Even the name – he moved the “h” from the end of Amleth to the front of Hamlet.

  55. @Twinkie

    The Mongols excelled at psychological warfare. Besides spreading terror through massacres, in the 1449 Tumu Crisis, the Oirat Mongols captured the Ming Chinese emperor Yingzong in battle.

    The Ming scholar-officials led by Yu Qian refused to pay ransom to the Mongols for Yingzong, and instead selected Yingzong’s younger brother take his place on the throne. Then managed to successfully repel a Mongol invasion–

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defense_of_Beijing

    The Mongols then decided on the most mischievous action– they returned Yingzong alive to the Chinese.

    This demonstrated their understanding of Ming politics. Two bureaucratic factions formed immediately behind the new and old emperor. Resulting in a coup where Yingzong was reinstalled to the throne, his brother deposed, and even the execution of the hero who led the Defense of Beijing, Yu Qian.

    * Yīngzōng 英宗 “Heroic Ancestor” was his posthumous title granted by the scholar-officials and was not meant to be complimentary

  56. mc23 says:
    @blockedfireexit

    The Vikings were huge successes as raiders but colonization was their greatest success like the ancient Greeks. Two examples, Russia is named after Kievan Russ and their descendants , the Normans, were phenomenally successful warriors even though their numbers were never large. Perhaps if the orginal Vikings used horses instead of ships they would have been just as unstoppable

    The Vikings lost a lot of set battles against prepared opponents. They suffered decisive defeats in large battles versus the Irish at Clontarf and the Anglo-Saxons at Stamford Bridge. Close fought battles where victories in either one could have changed the course of history.

  57. Anon[679] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie

    There is one group of “contentious, opportunistic warlord” type raiders who did scale up massively and effectively – the Mongols.

    If by “scale up massively” you mean recruited huge numbers of non-Mongol ethnic groups for their military, yes.

    Plenty of other groups on the steppe did the same thing for thousands of years.

  58. Corvinus says:
    @blockedfireexit

    https://norse-mythology.org/the-vikings-conversion-to-christianity

    —All of this is to say that, in the words of historian Anders Winroth, “Most Scandinavians of the conversion era did not accept Christianity as a readymade package of beliefs and practices; instead, they accepted a few ideas at a time.” Conversion was a slow process that unfolded over the course of several centuries and many, many generations. The Norse were partially Christian before the formal conversion began, and they remained partially pagan long after it had been officially completed…Generally speaking, rulers were the first to be officially converted, and then Christianity “trickled down” to their subjects…Why did the Vikings convert to Christianity? What motivated them to give up much of their traditional religion in favor of a new one? Of course, it’s impossible for us to know what was in the hearts and minds of the specific individuals involved. Surely some cases involved genuine religious convictions; it would be superficial and reductionistic to assume otherwise. However, it seems that the majority of conversions occurred largely, and perhaps entirely, for the sake of the tangible, practical advantages that the new religion brought with it.—

    • Replies: @Muggles
    , @Dutch Boy
  59. “Globalists” are the modern-day Normans.

    We’re nearing the end of the second Hundred Years War.

  60. Dutch Boy says:

    The Northmen had some interesting means for Christianization, e.g., King Olaf II Haraldsson would arrive in a village, set up a baptismal font with a priest and also set up a block with an executioner and invite the assembled to make their choice. Such methods were not popular and eventually got Olaf killed but he had the last laugh. When his body was disinterred a year after his death, it was found incorrupt and he was named St. Olaf and became the patron saint of Norway.

  61. Anon[233] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    The Vikings represent a low point in modern Western civilization. They were a step backwards into a bronze age mindset. There is little to be learned from them.

    The Vikings’ mobility mattered because they were attacking subsistence farming villages in Western Europe, which lacked any real defense or logistics for fielding a professional army.

    Had the Vikings tried this in the Easter Mediterranean, they would have been killed. Had the Vikings tried under the earlier Roman Empire, they would have ended up on crosses, with their villages torched.

    But they happened to come along at a time when central Mediterranean civilization had entered into a perpetual decline and Western European civilization was still ascendent. Timing is everything.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    , @Anon
  62. mc23 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Njal’s Saga, covers in part, the coming of Christianity to Iceland. Christianity wasn’t imposed by the force but the Viking Christians were not slow to reach for their swords. In one instance as a test of the new faith people watch to see if a berserker would cross a fire blessed by Christians. The berserker fails the test and gets violent. The missionary knocks the sword from his hand with a crucifix and his companions hew him to pieces. 200 souls saved that day.

  63. Mike Tre says:

    So odds that Anderson Lee Albrecht is a descendant of Vikings?

  64. @Steve Sailer

    The movie begins in 895 A.D. Iceland converted to Christianity in 1000 A.D.

    AD 895 and AD 1000. The AD comes before the year. Dots are optional.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anno_Domini

    You can use CE if you want it after the year: 895 CE and 1000 CE.

    • Agree: Dutch Boy, Right_On
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    , @R.G. Camara
  65. Inverness says:

    Kickoff conclave for the 2024 GOP

    ………

    LAS VEGAS—A roster of potential candidates effectively opened the race for the Republican Party’s 2024 presidential nomination over the weekend, testing campaign themes and seeking to distinguish themselves from former President Donald Trump.

    The Republican Jewish Coalition gathering here concluded a weighty week for the GOP, after underwhelming midterm election results secured a narrow House majority, but also triggered friction over Mr. Trump’s role.

    https://www.wsj.com/amp/articles/desantis-others-draw-distinctions-with-trump-in-2024-gop-nomination-race-11668945144

  66. Genius as the Vikings were they became more formidable when they entered Normandy, mixed with the local Alpine and Med populations and went on to conquer Britain and setting up northern France as one of the leading areas of northern Europe culturally. Scandinavia has generally taken the back seat in northern Europe over history with most of the innovation and creativity taking place in the Benelux, France, England, Scotland and Germany. Vikings tended to be tamed and civilised when they mixed with elements to their south but of course those elements were also White.

  67. @Dieter Kief

    Keep this in mind the next time some libtard starts spouting off about the evils of the Catholic Church. It has done the most to civilize Europe and create that little thing everybody enjoys called Western Civilization.

  68. I believe David Reich said that the Norwegians had the most Yamnaya ancestry, about half, with the rest being Anatolian farmer and West European HG.

    In that context, it’s easy to understand the Vikings as essentially being a Yamnaya continuation, exchanging their horses for boats. They had a clan based society and continued to worship the Sky Father. The eldest viking sons inherited the lands and animals and maybe even had 2 wives. The younger sons were destined “losers” and they banded together to build boats and raid foreign lands for wealth and women, which was socially acceptable because that’s what their ancestors had been doing since Yamnaya times thousands of years ago.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  69. @Twinkie

    Yes, as you point out. Certainly the Franks caught up to them in Normandy. But the Northmen remained in Normandy. Opportunistic or not, blaring contradiction to your thesis.

  70. Does anyone remember the Vikings also carved out a huge Empire to the east of them? And that the very word slav comes from their word for slave?

  71. Northman was good but came out in April.

    How about reviewing all quiet on the western front?

    On a semi-related note Stellan Skarsgård is really good in Andor. The Skarsgards really have some acting genes.

  72. @Bill P

    “Irish influence, which is plausible given that Iceland is about a third Irish genetically, there were Irish present on the island when the Norse discovered it ”

    I’m pretty sure the Irish monks and anchorites “inhabiting” the south coast of Iceland were given short shrift by the Vikings when they arrived. The Westmann Islands are so named because of Irish slaves there (“Not long after Ingólfur Arnarson arrived in Iceland, his blood brother Hjörleifur was murdered by the slaves he had brought with him. Ingólfur tracked them down to the Vestmannaeyjar and killed them all in retribution, hence the name Vestmannaeyjar (the islands of the west men). This is speculated to have occurred in AD 875.“).

    There was a long Celtic tradition of monks living in wild and isolated places.

    “Many of the islands of the west coast of Ireland contain early Christian monasteries, which were favoured because of their isolation and the abundance of rock for construction. ”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skellig_Michael#Monastic

    AFAIK the genetic Irish/Scots contribution to Icelandic genes is almost 100% female – Ireland, the Hebrides and the Scottish West Coast were well stocked with pretty redheads.

  73. @blockedfireexit

    Climate change helps explain the decline of the Viking age. The end of Norse expansion and the beginning of Norse retreat coincide almost perfectly with the end of the Medieval Climactic Optimum. When the Norse settled Greenland and then moved on to establish colonies in North America, wheat farming and cow and sheep herding was possible in Greenland and wild grapes were growing–according to Norse accounts–in Labrador. A cooling climate made traditional Norse farming, seafaring and warfare unsustainable. The Norse settlements in Labrador and Greenland died out and even Iceland became an almost forgotten and ignored outpost of Norse culture.

    BTW, Jane Smiley’s novel, “The Greenlanders”, does a nice job describing the latter days of the Norse in Greenland. My impression was that Smiley was attempting to recreate the conventions of Icelandic sagas, e.g. she attempts to use external action to entirely depict her characters’ thoughts, emotions and motivations. Smiley’s attempt is admirable but ultimately fails.

    • Thanks: Muggles
  74. Stogumber says:

    I would not describe Normandy as a peninsula. It rather seems as if Vikings, being above all seafarers, preferred to settle at the coast instead of taking seize of the inland.

  75. @SafeNow

    I think you missed Hammerjack’s implied /sarc/.

  76. jb says:
    @Twinkie

    Mass media tends to valorize “the Vikings” as invincible warriors, horned helmets and all, but this is historically inaccurate.

    The movie Pathfinder involved precisely that sort of invincible Viking warriors — who spoke only Norse, and wore scary helmets so you rarely saw their faces — attacking peaceable and helpless North American Indian tribes. This of course slanders the “Skrælings”, who despite their inferior military technology had no difficulty repelling Norse attempts at colonization. The real problem here may be that the Norse, coming from the farthest fringe of Europe (Greenland via Iceland via Scandinavia) just weren’t sufficiently diseased. (Also, they had not really solved the problem of trans-Atlantic navigation, and their boats weren’t especially suited to mass colonization).

  77. Mr. Anon says:
    @HammerJack

    It isn’t only Afrocentric sources that are historically illiterate. Many regular journalists in the mainstream media now are so ignorant of history that they can not spot obvious anachronisms. Take this story for example from a Canadian paper, the Windsor Star. It’s a pretty standard screed against “anti-vaxxers”, decrying any opposition to vaccine mandates or vaccine passports as being the result of “conspiracy theories”. But buried deep in the story is this nugget:

    Although the basis for modern day vaccination is largely credited to the work of English physician and scientist Edward Jenner — particularly in 1796, when he was seeking a solution to smallpox — he was pre-dated by Cotton Mather, a Puritan minister in Boston, who studied inoculation methods as early as 1721.

    According to Muldoon, Cotton Mather learned about a crude way of inoculating people from his African slave: a Black man named Onesimus.

    Onesimus taught Mather that a person could be protected from smallpox by deliberate infection. Material from the pustules of a smallpox patient would be inserted into a small cut on the arm of the inoculation subject.

    The resulting infection would be less severe than naturally acquired smallpox, and would still induce immunity in the subject.

    New England Puritan minister Cotton Mather (left) and his slave Onesimus (right) in portraits.

    I have no idea if a slave named Onesimus gave Cotton Mather the idea of inoculation. It’s possible. Wikipedia retails this story, but that doesn’t mean anything. That’s not the point here. The point is this – check out those two portraits, one of Cotton Mather (who lived from 1668 to 1723) and one ostensibly of Onesimus. Is there any possible way that the man in the portrait on the right could have known the man in the portrait on the left?

  78. @propagandist hacker

    There’s your bean-counter opening, right there.

  79. Anonymous[332] • Disclaimer says:
    @HammerJack

    Ben Franklin told us about this centuries ago.

  80. jb says:

    I don’t know all that much about the Vikings, but the movie strikes me as something the Vikings would have liked.

    I read in an interview somewhere that this was in fact one of the director’s conscious goals: to make the sort of Viking movie that the Vikings themselves might have made.

    Sadly, the movie under-performed expectations and lost money, at least in theaters. Hopefully, like Idiocracy, it will have a more successful afterlife.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  81. Anon[661] • Disclaimer says:

    The life of the party, so on and so forth.

  82. Muggles says:
    @HammerJack

    Fun but stupid.

    With recent and extensive DNA testing of modern populations and numerous human remains of buried Vikings now found, there is zero evidence for these claims.

    DNA don’t lie.

    Of course actual science (believe the science!) is rarely if ever cited by crazies.

  83. Muggles says:
    @Corvinus

    Surprising from this commentator, but this is pretty accurate.

    But he and others here have omitted much of the basis for this conversion to Christianity.

    By about 1000 AD (AD 1000) Vikings had already done extensive conquest and settlements abroad.

    I believe the Pope and the “Holy Roman Emperor” had some kind of agreement that the Vikings should be opposed by one and all (Christians) or else convert. Infidels were fair game for one and all.

    By this time the Viking superiority in sailing had been copied and reduced. With population dispersal the main Danish kingdom (which controlled most of Scandinavia, including Norway, where most Icelandic Vikings were from) had to face either all out war or conversion.

    Various delegations of monks, religious figures, etc. visited Denmark and gave the king the ultimatum.

    So the king converted and demanded or required his subjects to become Christian. Of course many ignored this for a long time, but such demands were policy and could not be openly defied without violence.

    The main push for this conversion was that as in most religions, you were not supposed to enslave fellow co-religionists. Though this has often be ignored. So if Danes became Christian they would be under the Pope’s authority (and possible excommunication) and could not enslave other Christians. Also, the European Christians would not attack Denmark, etc.

    There is a lot of information about this in books, Wikipedia, etc.

    Iceland was more or less an outpost of Norway and its Danish overlords, so conversion was not optional, though implementation of that wasn’t easy.

    • Replies: @Anon
  84. Wilkey says:
    @HammerJack

    The original Danes or Vikings were Blacks.

    Well that solves the mystery of why 9th Century Scandinavia was violent and warlike, and then rapidly morphed into the most peaceful, prosperous civilization on earth: they neutered or deported all the blacks.

    • Replies: @Anon
  85. Wilkey says:
    @(((Owen)))

    You can use CE if you want it after the year: 895 CE and 1000 CE.

    “CE” is the language of our fascist oppressors. Why would we use that?

    • Agree: Farenheit
  86. @Twinkie

    The Franks (post Charlemagne) had considerable difficulty with the Vikings, this failure resulted in the creation of Normandy after 900 AD as a more or less independent state on French territory. The Christian kingdoms which prevailed against the Northmen included, most famously, Wessex (and Mercia) under King Alfred (the Great) and Ottonian Germany.

  87. Ralph L says:

    The Norman English stayed aggressive, but why hasn’t the world heard from the other Scandis in the last two centuries or more? Lead pipes? Climate change?

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  88. Anon[980] • Disclaimer says:
    @Muggles

    Yeah there’s literally nothing of anything here written in a book or Wikipedia, it’s just a fairytale you’ve concocted for your own consumption.

    I haven’t seen any evidence in books or on Peeweepeepia that Christianity was anything other than an import from foreign slave women that spread in parallel with the STDs they also harbored.

    • Disagree: Rich
  89. Anon[980] • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey

    Scandinavia isn’t the most peaceful or prosperous civilization on Earth. East Asia had a far lower crime rate even before the migrants came, and Scandinavia was up until the 1970s one of the poorest regions west of the Iron Curtain. It’s still less prosperous than the 50% nonwhite USA.

    • Replies: @Inverness
    , @Wilkey
    , @anon
  90. neutral says:
    @HammerJack

    Laugh? This will be taught to yo chidrens!

    I am not laughing, I have long ago stop seeing this as just a joke. For that think this is still a joke, is there anything that indicates that any of this will not become the mainstream thought society will adopt?

  91. @Jim Don Bob

    Yeah – and understand that Protestantism did chime right in (this is a bit on the less obvious side, but it did – a hint: About half of the European universities 1600 ff. would have looked completely different without proestantism!
    Jospeh Henrichs work will survive our times. – It might even survive – Christian religions as the religions of the majority (it already has in some European cities).

  92. Steve Sailer:

    “As I may have mentioned once or twice, the job of directing films tends to go to those who by nature and training are extremely non-woke. Directors believe in hierarchy, responsibility, authority, skill, and talent, and those attitudes seep through into the movies the best directors make”

    The vast, vast majority of movie directors are openly liberal. The only one that is clearly conservative is Clint Eastwood.

    Regarding The Northman, an interesting fact is that Aleksander Skarsgard is a genuine Swedish Special Forces guy. For once, Hollywood actually cast a warrior to play the role of a warrior.

  93. Nachum says:
    @AceDeuce

    All of the colors, in fact.

    • Agree: AceDeuce
  94. Nachum says:

    “The Vikings and their Christian/semi-French offshoots the Normans, despite being few in number, held territory as widely dispersed as Canada, Greenland, Iceland, the Normandy peninsula, England, Sicily, and the Holy Land during the Crusades.”

    Essentially, the Norman Invasion of England was one group of Vikings fighting another. Actually *three* groups, Anglo-Saxons, Danes, and Normans- all Vikings.

    You left out Kiev/Russia, by the way.

  95. Their marvelous ships couldn’t sail to windward very well so Vikings rowed nearly as much as they sailed. They would have been strong, burly, well-conditioned guys.

    Modern reconstructions just can’t be right as the angle of the shafts to the water is too great for effective rowing. Scandinavians wouldn’t have tolerated this inefficiency. They give descriptions of distance to destinations in terms of days. Modern replicas can’t duplicate these times. Unless the Viking boats were really, really efficiently rowed, such speeds are impossible.

    Also, the tent frames found in the burial ships must have been used onboard as well as on land. There must have been some protection from the elements on long ocean voyages. This was not such a problem with the Greeks of the Odyssey because their crews pulled the boats ashore every night and made camp. Open boats would have been intolerable in the open ocean. In some ingenious manner, the tent frames must have been pegged to the structure of the boat. This would have provided shelter while allowing room for the sail to swing from port to starboard and for the crew to tend the halyards and sheets. Who knows? Much seems to be lost. All we have are the bones.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  96. JimDandy says:
    @J.Ross

    You hear about the “Nazis” from Long Island (one of them was wearing a “Nazi armband”) who took the train to NYC to do bad things to Jews, but were immediately pounced on by Feds? One of the Nazis is a 22 year old schizophrenic.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  97. @conatus

    Charlemagne executed Saxons, and other ‘vikings’, because they raided and robbed and raped and murdered. Charlemagne was correct that the only thing that would tame all Germanic tribes was that they convert and then be ruled by long time Christians.

    Charlemagne was correct. Germans without historic Christianity are white Bantus with higher IQs and thus even more dangerous to decent people.

  98. @anonymous

    You probably are another Jew paid to wrote such garbage. The only thing that has ever halfway controlled Jews is historic Christendom. The Jewish rise over all of Western Europe began with the Reformation.

  99. Inverness says:
    @Anon

    It’s still less prosperous than the 50% nonwhite USA.

    Norway is more prosperous; Denmark is similar. Mainly it’s Sweden that wants so much to race the USA to the bottom. A couple of generations ago, the USA was an undisputed leader.

  100. Anonymous[207] • Disclaimer says:

    Pagan Vikings conquering the world. LOL. They were too busy bashing each other over the head. Greenland was hardly a conquest as it was mostly ice. And Vikings got clobbered in the New World.

    If anything, Christianity prepared the West for more conquests by uniting larger population under a shared faith and by stabilizing the domain with moral institutions and laws. By creating inner peace, outer conquest became easier. If Britain were full of pagan tribes bashing one another, they never would have united to conquer so much of the world.

    American Indian tribes were also fierce, but they got rubbed out by the Christian Whites, not the other way around. Cowboys could be just as ruthless and murderous as the Vikings. The difference with Christianity was the conquered territory quickly became stabilized with churches and the prestige of the clergy and the rule of law(based partly in God).
    In contrast, pagan barbarian conquest didn’t establish inner stability even within the conquered domain, which meant the warrior way defined the behavior within the cultural core.
    Christian West could certainly conquer like ruthless barbarians and destroy other peoples, but what soon followed the bloodthirsty aggressions was the rise of stable communities guided by the church and law. Fewer wars inward, more wars outward.

  101. @HammerJack

    Wow … well that explains how so much of Scandinavia is blonde … as is/was much of Ukraine (the Vikings were there more than 1000 years ago) … 

    Who’d have ever imagined that blacks could — change color?

  102. Dutch Boy says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    My Dutch grandfather had two wives (consecutively) and 19 children (eleven survived to adulthood). When people ask why they had so many children, I remind them that, in the Dutch Reformed Church of those days, just about very leisure activity was considered sinful (theater, dancing, drinking, reading novels) and some leisure activities did not yet exist (radio, TV and movies). That leaves Bible and devotional reading and sex and sex is more fun.

  103. Anonymous[207] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimDandy

    Maybe, but it wasn’t exactly fun. The approach was rather like Revenant by Innarritu. Essentially a head-bashing story done as ‘art’. But some nice pictorial touches, like in the Revenant, good to look at. But emotionally, part of manic depressive cinema.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  104. Cato says:

    Christianity did tame the Scandinavians. But so did emigration — the wildest ones left, to Normandy or the Danelaw. Along the Scottish-English border, the descendants of Danish settlers continued to fight for centuries, despite Christianity. Many of these settled in Northern Ireland and large numbers came to the 13 colonies in the last decades before independence, where we know them as “Borderers” or “Scotch-Irish”. These were the people who pushed the American frontier to the West — the last of the Viking expansions.

    • Thanks: Captain Tripps
    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  105. Dutch Boy says:
    @Corvinus

    The Norwegian novelist Sigrid Undset describes this process in her novels about medieval Norway.

  106. Wilkey says:
    @Anon

    Scandinavia isn’t the most peaceful or prosperous civilization on Earth. East Asia had a far lower crime rate even before the migrants came, and Scandinavia was up until the 1970s one of the poorest regions west of the Iron Curtain. It’s still less prosperous than the 50% nonwhite USA.

    Per capita income, by country:
    1) Norway – $92,646
    2) USA – $75,180
    3) Iceland – $73,981
    4) Denmark – $65,713
    5) Sweden – $56,361
    6) Finland – $50,818

    All five Scandinavian countries are in the global Top 20 in per capita income, with last place Finland coming in at #16.

    The Scandinavian countries have national debts around 40% of GDP (Norway, Sweden, Denmark), and about 60% in Finland. In the the US per capita income is heavily inflated by government deficits, averaging about $1 trillion for the last 22 years, and our national debt is now over 130% of GDP.

    Tiny Norway (population only 5.4 million) also has a sovereign wealth fund of $1.2 trillion – that’s what a high amount of natural resources per capita will do for you.

    America has advantages (size, economies of scale, reserve currency, etc.) which most of the Scandinavian countries don’t have. Our small wealth advantage over them has nothing to do with the qualities of most American people.

  107. Anonymous[934] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kinky Friedman

    Virtually all of the women in Iceland in the first 3 generations were Celtic Christians stolen in Viking raids.

    This explains why the Irish men got so unpleasant. Ireland had the most beautiful women, and all these marauders came to steal the women. So, the Irish fathers made their sons punch anything in sight.

  108. Generally I tell people that the nasty things they say about The Jews are really true of Christianity. Abrahamic religions are monotheistic, yes, but worse they are dualistic and therefore universalistic, which makes them into moralizing nags that neuter us. Even worse, they are foreign. I will never support anti-Semitism, but I oppose diversity in all forms, and recognize that The Jew that Whites fear is actually simply living in our head whenever we endorse universalist ideas like equality.

  109. Anonymous[934] • Disclaimer says:
    @Fidelios Automata

    As a German-Scandinavian, I believe we should have stayed pagan.

    They now seem to be fagan.

  110. Anonymous[207] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paul Rise

    Egger’s The Witch is also exceptional and to me did not seem to be the antiChristian message that most film critics assumed it to be.

    It certainly isn’t pro-Christian but it shows the brute utility of the faith. It was repressive, claustrophobic, and against nature, but surrendering to nature opens the pandora’s box of hedonism, nihilism, and animalism, the witchcraft.

  111. @YetAnotherAnon

    “AFAIK the genetic Irish/Scots contribution to Icelandic genes is almost 100% female …”

    The Nordic sea-raiders were prolific rapists. Anyone with Irish/Scots ancestry also carry the blood of Vikings in their veins. This was the second genetic onslaught suffered by the Celtic enclaves in Gaul and the British Isles. The first came with the boot of the Roman Legions. But Celtic culture and cosmology, incredibly resilient, continues to leave its imprint on creativity and imagination.

    “There was a long Celtic tradition of monks living in wild and isolated places”

    Even though I’m approaching old man territory this seems the most likely way I’ll spend my retirement nut.

    • Agree: Captain Tripps
  112. @Mr. Anon

    Is there any possible way that the man in the portrait on the right could have known the man in the portrait on the left?

    If another save had taught them photography!

  113. Rob says:
    @HammerJack

    Modern Scandinavians are much blonder (and lighter skinned?) than 8th century (or whenever) medieval Scandies.

    ETA they were not black, but they were not nearly so light.

  114. @Paul Rise

    The Witch is not anti Christian at all. Eggers is simply telling a story about 17th century America from a 17th century Puritan point of view, and using the assumptions about how the world works that a 17th century Puritan might have. That’s Eggers „gimmick“ — make period pieces that feel like the period. Especially valuable today when most period pieces are supposed to be moral stories about how evil European men were and how much wiser and more woke we are now.

  115. @Twinkie

    Imagine if the Mongols had teamed up with the Norse Varangians. Land and sea supremacy. The might have conquered the Old World and the New. It would make a good alternate history fiction.

    A similar idea is the plot for the book Civilizations (Binet) which details Europe’s conquest by the Inca (who learned shipbuilding from off-course Vikings).

  116. @jb

    “Sadly, the movie under-performed expectations and lost money.”

    All three of Robert Eggers’s feature films are considered underperformers. But that’s according to Hollywood bookkeeping methods, which remains sketchy. I still have yet to see The Lighthouse (2019) but can say The Northman (2022) and The Witch (2015) are masterpieces of folk horror. Eggers’s talent is prodigious, undeniable, and I think he’s smart enough to weather Hollywood. Which remains a nest vipers.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  117. @HammerJack

    The image actually illustrates Varangian justice:

    There was a high sense of justice in the Byzantine Ages that was unusual enough for the age to be recorded for posterity. In this illustration from the Skylitzes Chronicles, a Thracian woman kills a Varangian who had tried to rape her (left). Afterward, his fellow soldiers praised her and allowed her to have his possessions.

    Perhaps ironic given the situation in Sweden.

    • Thanks: Ian Smith, HammerJack
  118. martin_2 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    In any case, Jenner used Cowpox to prevent Smallpox. That was his innovation. Using Smallpox to prevent Smallpox was already a well established prophylactic but very dangerous.

    • Replies: @HA
  119. @Anon

    “The Vikings represent a low point in modern civilization. They were a step backwards into a bronze age mindset.”

    The Viking contribution to Western Civilization rests primarily on their Sagas; their lore. This is why the Vikings continue to stimulate the story engines in modern day heads.

    “There is little to be learned from them.”

    All wisdom is ancient. Digital culture is an erasure of wisdom. It is the triumph of the intellect. Intellect without wisdom breeds totalitarian mindsets and death cults.

    • Replies: @Anon
  120. @Fidelios Automata

    Historical counter-factuals and prognostications in their turn are impossible. The ruthless pagan Mongols ended up with their arses handed to them in their historical homelands in the back end of nowhere. The genteel, refined, Christian Anglo-Europeans then conquered half the planet before voluntarily giving it up and ceding their own homelands after genociding each other in two world wars. They are now engaged in collective racial suicide.

    But pagan Eurasian adventurer-conquerors haven’t re-emerged and the darker, stupider Global South isn’t capable of conquest per se. Rather, they just show up in their ridiculous boats or walkabouts, and are adopted by competing elites and awarded voting privileges to perpetuate the illusion of “democratic” rule. Secular globalist/materialist democracies are the global majority going forward.

    What comes after this (and there will be an “after this”), impossible to say.

  121. @YetAnotherAnon

    Somehow the Vikings managed to raid even this small isolated monastery.

    Not the easiest place to get to, Skellig Michael, a UNESCO site, is well worth the trip. Grizzled, no nonsense Irish fishermen take you to the island on precarious converted fishing boats. The North Atlantic is terrifying in a small boat. Americans on my boat changed into their Star Wars cosplay outfits as if they were going to the Anaheim Comi-Con. I was rather annoyed at this and had to lend my shoulder to help one overweight Skywalker up the hundreds of steps to the Dark Ages monastery. He clearly did not have access to The Force. It is an amazing place to visit and I eventually made my peace and got along with all the Star Wars cosplayers.

  122. Not Raul says:
    @Steve Sailer

    When this was agreed, he spent a day and a night resting under a fur blanket, contemplating.

    “The following day he announced that Iceland was to become Christian, with the condition that old laws concerning the exposure of infants and the eating of horseflesh would remain, and that private pagan worship be permitted. …

    It sounds like he rested under a fur blanket with a Christian woman.

  123. Not Raul says:
    @Desiderius

    Please give a brief summary.

    Some of us are borderline dyslexic.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  124. njguy73 says:
    @propagandist hacker

    Anya Taylor-Joy has a grandmother from Barcelona, so she’s 1/4 Latina.

    Close enough.

  125. Elli says:
    @MM

    And yet the Mongols captured cities, or destroyed them.

    You don’t have to knock walls down if you can terrorize people to surrender, or starve them.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Gandydancer
  126. Muggles says:

    For all of the mostly dunderhead Christian critics here, and especially those who seem to hate the Jewish inspired ones which include that, but also Islam, there is one interesting fact often overlooked.

    Nearly all non Jewish based faiths for millennia practiced human sacrifice.

    This is documented in Jewish literature as well as other ancient sources like the Romans and Greeks.

    The Greeks ended that very early and the Romans eventually did too, though there is an account of a female slave being sacrificed during an early Gothic attack on Rome. Romans were embarrassed by this as they later generally regarded this practice as barbaric.

    Carthaginians were famously accused of sacrificing children, and there is some recent evidence for that found. Of course the Carthaginians left no written records so we have to rely on hostile Roman accounts.

    But the Celtics of varied types in western/northern Europe were also said to practice this. Often done to captive slaves or defeated warriors. Seems to be a very ancient and common religious practice done widely (i.e. Aztecs, Incas, etc.). Am not sure about far Eastern religions.

    Later the Jewish derived faiths along with the Greeks and Romans substituted animal sacrifice for humans. Many later Christian “feast days” were based the some notion of animal sacrifice to “God” (not gods) to celebrate festivals and religious holidays. Meat was scarce but shared in these events.

    Always a great idea to feed your parishioners, even in churches today. Jews, Christians and Muslims do this in varied ritual forms.

    Vikings also did human sacrifice. Plenty of captive enemies to use.

    So those longing for the “good old time religions” should think twice. Ending human sacrifice is a great step forward.

    Now only done by nation states in pointless wars. Male draftees and volunteers. Of course it is called patriotism for the fatherland, homeland, motherland, etc. And your enemies do the killing, so really, it only looks like “sacrifice.” Those killed are honored as heroes, special graveyards, etc.

  127. Here’s the real question of the day. Why do blacks, and even women, want to be Vikings?

  128. @Kinky Friedman

    ‘…Taming, and Christianizing Germans is necessary to have civilization. Otherwise, Germanics act like smarter Bantus.’

    I ran out of ‘troll’ responses.

  129. Christian Sweden gave us IKEA and ABBA: Thank God for Christianity?

    In any case, the Christian Vikings of Sweden gave way to the Muslims and multiple no-go zones in Christian Sweden, so so much for Christianity.

  130. @Wilkey

    Sorry, I just do not think the United States is a wealthy country. Certainly not anywhere on par with Nordic nations. I guess hedge funds make trillions manipulating things out of thin air and there are certainly global tech monopolies that basically print money, but on a day to day basis, a fair percentage of Americans have basically nothing.

    I mean this, you do not see shit like this in many so-called third world nations. Open your eyes. The Federal Reserve and The Media are lying to you.

    • Agree: Daniel H
  131. Lurker says:
    @propagandist hacker

    Really only two options:

    #1 None.

    #2 Too many.

  132. @Cato

    Good points. Also overlooked is that 1/3 of Norway’s population emigrated to the U.S in the 1800s. I’d assume this further stratified the residual population into less adventurous and less mercenary types.

  133. Thea says:

    If you are of English descent then you have Scandinavia ancestors. Even if you don’t count the Angles, Saxons and Jute’s homeland of Denmark/NW Germany as Scandinavia, they had plenty of Dane and Viking admixture after setting up kingdoms across Britain.

  134. JimDandy says:
    @Anonymous

    Yeah, I saw it. I was a bit underwhelmed.

  135. Ardvarj says:
    @clifford brown

    Have you seen what has been done to Malmo Sweden? The rioters are all 3rd world imports from Africa and the Middle East.

    What’s going on in the US is going on in nearly every western nation at this point. The European nations that are resisting being replaced by migration hordes have the Jewish Globalists banging on their doors to change, Hungary and Poland especially.

    Drugs are being flooded into the West by the same Globalists, open borders with Mexico for replacement hordes + Fentanyl and open borders in Southern Europe for the same reason.

    • Replies: @S
  136. jamie b. says:

    Watching The Northman, the thought that, if they’d stayed pagan, they might have conquered the world seems not implausible.

    Don’t know why that would be a bad thing. They’re an exceedingly attractive people, and in the end, came to be the most civilized of people. And I love the sound of Swedish. If I had a time machine…

  137. @Anonymous

    It certainly isn’t pro-Christian but it shows the brute utility of the faith. It was repressive, claustrophobic, and against nature, but surrendering to nature opens the pandora’s box of hedonism, nihilism, and animalism, the witchcraft.

    The times of crude barbarism ended and the spread of Christianity led to the enduring centuries of peace where tales of war are only a distant memory.

    Ahhhhhhhhhmmaaaaaaaaaannnnn.

  138. @Chrisnonymous

    The Christianization of the Scandinavians was gradual. The Normans of Sicily, England and the Crusades were Christian (and culturally Very French) for centuries by the time of their 12th century peak.

  139. @Wokechoke

    The rise of Christianity in other European countries made the Vikings’ long expansion possible. The peaceful, thoughtful, rich monasteries and nunneries, with their sworn-to-pacifism religious folk, were huge easy targets. Plus the nunneries offered women to pillage, and we can’t forget that the main reason the Vikings were so ruthless and bloodthirsty and insane in their attacks was because there was a lack of marriageable women back home and lack of way of getting wealth to get the remaining few women, so their raids were designed to give them booty, both literal and figurative.

    • Agree: Rich
    • Replies: @Daniel H
  140. Anonymous[529] • Disclaimer says:
    @Muggles

    The Greeks ended that very early and the Romans eventually did too, though there is an account of a female slave being sacrificed during an early Gothic attack on Rome. Romans were embarrassed by this as they later generally regarded this practice as barbaric.

    Actually it was quite common among the Roman’s well into the 4th c. AD. We call them gladiatorial games.” If you read the gladiators’ longer pledges (much more than “we who are about to die salute you”), you will see they were religious, not merely legally enforceable, contracts. Pagan Romans were incredibly legalistic about their religion and literally believed whatever “the prayers” said.

  141. Rob says:

    For those of you who are not terminally online, here is a story:

    Once upon a time (a couple weeks ago) blue tick journolists on Twit… decided Musk offended the multicultural pantheon of woke Gods, so they were going to smite Twit… in their wroth. So, a bunch of journolists decided to jump ship to a thing called Mastadon, which I think is some sort of open source(?) Twitter clone.

    Then. We get this:

    I encourage you to read the thread. Mastodons are great, lumbering beasts, capable of crushing journolists beneath their transphobic feet.

  142. @blockedfireexit

    “…the thought that, if they’d stayed pagan, they might have conquered the world seems not implausible.”

    Perhaps. However, as great a threat to Christendom as the Vikes might have been, the threat posed by the Mongols might have been even greater. The spawn of Genghis Khan (the greatest military tactician/strategist who ever lived according to Douglas MacArthur) at one point had control of more territory than either the Vikes or Alexander the Great combined.

  143. Bill P says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Actually about a quarter of the male line is from the British Isles, which suggests there was a lot more to it than just Vikings with slave wives.

    Both the Norse and British Celts had a tradition of exchanging hostages. The term “hostage” had a different meaning back then — it wasn’t bank robbers holding people under a gun so much as it was a means to ensure an alliance.

    So say you had some Viking who had come to an agreement with an Ulster chieftain. It would include an exchange of children in many cases: e.g. “you take care of my son Olaf and I’ll take care of your son Duncan, and when my bastard half brother comes with a claim to my estate you’ll have him cut to pieces and fed to the swine. In return I’ll make sure Duncan marries a hot blonde with a rich father and his kids can be educated by the best monks in Reykjavik.”

  144. Anonymous[243] • Disclaimer says:

    As a non-Scandinavian, their conversion to Christianity strikes me as a good thing.

    If you are not Scandinavian, what do you identify as?

  145. … wide-eyed blonde Anya Taylor-Joy …

    People with wide set eyes must have better depth perception than the rest of us. I wonder if that translates to any practical advantage in real life. Are they better at ping pong, for instance?

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  146. @Not Raul

    You can skip the inside baseball throat-clearing that was customary in those days, but I seriously doubt any summary could do the great man justice, especially when he’s practicing his own discipline (philology) as he is here.

    Suffice it to say that Sailer’s Glibbonesque take is on the facile side.

  147. JimDandy says:
    @PiltdownMan

    She is so extremely striking AND so pretty (kind of a rare mix of extremes in my opinion)… She’s going to be famous someday, mark my words/

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  148. Mr. Anon says:
    @Muggles

    Now only done by nation states in pointless wars. Male draftees and volunteers. Of course it is called patriotism for the fatherland, homeland, motherland, etc. And your enemies do the killing, so really, it only looks like “sacrifice.” Those killed are honored as heroes, special graveyards, etc.

    Another kind of human sacrifice has also recently become fashionable: so-called “gender affirming surgery”.

  149. Anon[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @conatus

    I heard Christianity spread to the Goths from slave women captured in the Mediterranean.

  150. Anon[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    The Vikings’ mobility mattered because they were attacking subsistence farming villages in Western Europe, which lacked any real defense or logistics for fielding a professional army.

    Had the Vikings tried this in the Easter Mediterranean, they would have been killed.

    Wrong, Med cope.

    https://www.asncvikingage.com/vikings-east

    Relations with Byzantium were not always as harmonious as these events imply. Throughout the ninth century, bands of Scandinavians had attacked Constantinople (most notable in 860) and other Greek sites around the Black Sea. At some point between 907 and 912, Oleg Riurikid carried out an attack on the Byzantine capital that forced the Byzantines to agree to giving Rus’ traders preferential treatment in Constantinople. This seems to have opened diplomatic correspondence between the two powers, as Byzantine seals from the tenth century have been found at Kiev.

    By 950, there large flotillas of merchant ships were sailing from Kiev to Constantinople every year. Yet Rus’ attacks on Byzantine towns around the Black Sea continued (most notably between 941–945). This produced another treaty in which Byzantine officials attempted to strictly control the conduct of Rus’ trade within Constantinople (such as forbidding the carrying of weapons).

    Relations improved towards the end of the century. Olga, the wife of the Rus’ king Igor, visited Constantinople in 957 and converted to Christianity, although she was unable to persuade her son Sviatoslav (Vladimir’s father) to do the same. Nevertheless, Sviatoslav remained on good terms with the Byzantines, paving the way for Vladimir’s own positive interactions with empire.

    • Replies: @Anon
  151. Daniel H says:
    @R.G. Camara

    and we can’t forget that the main reason the Vikings were so ruthless and bloodthirsty and insane in their attacks was because there was a lack of marriageable women back home

    I saw a statistic on the net years ago that the entire population of Iceland is descended from about 5,000 norse men and 10,000 English/Irish women. Two concubines for each adventurer/warrior. But today the Icelanders are about the most pussy-whipped men on earth. Women totally dominate Icelandic society. Icelandic society is like hyena society, the women rule, the men slink off into the corner. Funny how that worked out, these rough and cruel Norseman had no idea that they more than met their match by carrying off these English/Irish women. Ha, ha, ha.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  152. HA says:
    @martin_2

    “Using Smallpox to prevent Smallpox was already a well established prophylactic but very dangerous.”

    The death rate for smallpox/smallpox vaccination (i.e., “variolation”) was around 2-3% whereas death rates from smallpox itself ranged from around 14% to as high as 30% depending on the circumstances (presumably at least some people in rural areas managed to acquire a cowpox-based smallpox vaccine by accident, long before Jenner cam along).

    Variolation was a requirement for Wshington’s soldiers during the Revolutionary War.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Ralph L
  153. @JimDandy

    Striking, definitely. Also vaguely terrifying. Freakish.

    Though I will admit her eyes are Jackie Kennedy-esque.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
  154. @Kinky Friedman

    Virtually all of the women in Iceland in the first 3 generations were Celtic Christians stolen in Viking raids.

    I used to meet Icelandair and KLM flights, often simultaneously, and got to compare their flight crews. The Icelanders looked like muted Nordics, clearly with other strains. KLM’s, in contrast, looked like a Bob Hope parody skit set in Sweden, or perhaps a Mexican telenovela.

    Of course, the Netherlands offer a hiring pool sixty times that of Iceland’s. Cherry-picking for Nordicism is easier. Again of course, they had the token Spice Islander or Surinamese.

  155. As far as I know, everything we know about the Vikings was written by Christians. The same pretty much goes for the continental Germanic tribes, except for the little that comes from Roman, Greek and a few Islamic writers.

  156. Alden says:
    @conatus

    The Vikings attacked the monastery at Lindsdarne. In 700 AD 82 years before Charlemagne slaughtered the Saxons. And Saxons are Germans. Same ethnicity as Charlemagne Saxons are not Scandinavians.

    The Franks and Burgundians conquered their territory in what’s now France and Belgium in the 400s. 300 years later the Saxons attacked France. The king of France, Charlemagne resisted the Saxon invasion. Chased them back to their homeland And killed 4,500 of the Saxon army.

    • Replies: @conatus
  157. Dube says:
    @Wokechoke

    No wonder the half-Danish Harold Godwinson took the Norwegian Harald Hadrada apart at Stamford Bridge in 1066 if they lost men in such [violent] “sports”.

    Hardrada was a sensitive and cultivated chap who knew how to break a line with elegance while engaged in extermination and plunder.

    https://thehistorianshut.com/2019/08/20/harald-hardrada/
    King Harald II “Hardrada” Sigurdsson (c. 1015-1066)

    “We never kneel in battle
    Before the storm of weapons
    And crouch behind our shields;
    So the noble lady told me.
    She told me once to carry
    My head always high in battle
    Where swords seek to shatter
    The skulls of doomed warriors.”

    A poem reportedly written by Harald Hardrada shortly before his death in 1066 at Stamford Bridge, and later recorded in King Harald’s Saga by Snorri Sturluson, translated by Magnus Magnusson and Hermann Pálsson (Penguin Classics, 1966, 2005).

    Of course he’s inspired here in full battle against Godwinson. But who knows whether he bothered to write verse during ordinary grocery runs.

  158. Rich says:
    @conatus

    I don’t like you or your tone. It’s not just the historical inaccuracies of what you write, but your ignorance and priggish style. How can you comment on the New Testament when you’ve never read it? How can you mention Marcion’s philosophy when you have zero understanding of what he wrote? How can you completely misread the history and reasons behind Charlemagne the Great’s wars with the Aryan Christian Saxons? But your insult of the Son of God, the Risen Christ, the King of Kings, is going on your permanent record. I’m going to make sure St Peter gets a copy of what you wrote and I’m personally going to see to it that your time in hell is uncomfortable.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @HammerJack
  159. @S

    The black character pictured is David ‘Deacon’ Jones, of LA Rams ‘Fearsome Foursome’ fame

    • Thanks: S
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  160. @Philbert Desanex

    Being a football player for the L.A. Rams, USC Trojans, or UCLA Bruins back then was a pretty smooth path to getting cast in a movie or TV show.

    • Replies: @Wokechoke
  161. @Rich

    Charlemagne the Great

    That’s redundant. Other than that quibble, thanks for putting him in his place.

    How can you comment on the New Testament when you’ve never read it? How can you mention Marcion’s philosophy when you have zero understanding of what he wrote?

    Conatus, which means “effort”, is reluctant to live up to his name!

    • Thanks: Rich
  162. “The Vikings chose Christianity during the 900s, partly because of the extensive trade networks with Christian areas of Europe, but also particularly as a result of increasing political and religious pressure from the German empire to the south. By the end of the Viking period, around 1050, most Vikings were Christians.”

    Thank you, Google! And also,

    “The Vikings came into contact with Christianity through their raids, and when they settled in lands with a Christian population, they adopted Christianity quite quickly. This was true in Normandy, Ireland, and throughout the British Isles”

    By 1000 AD, Iceland was basically the outlier, or the final pre-Christian pagan land.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  163. Mr. Anon says:
    @HA

    Variolation was a requirement for Wshington’s soldiers during the Revolutionary War.

    So was starving and freezing.

    I’ve heard people throw that vaccination factoid at me as if it somehow justifies broad vaccine mandates.

    It doesn’t.

    • Replies: @HA
  164. @Muggles

    Vikings also did human sacrifice. Plenty of captive enemies to use.

    It’s not sacrifice unless you use your own!

    Magnus Magnusson holds a teenager’s skull while discussing her sacrifice in his BBC documentary Vikings! He is creepily sentimental about it.

    I couldn’t find that clip, but here’s another about a notable battle with two names:

    Also, if you are resistant to worm infestation, prone to emphysema, or have Dupuytren’s contracture, you just might be a redneck Viking:

  165. Anon[415] • Disclaimer says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Sorry, but the Vikings were the civilizational equivalent of the Assyrians + Comanche Indians + Long Boats. They were the dumber, more violent bumpkin cousins of the Germanic tribes. Basically, a Sea Peoples who went after peasants, as opposed to a major power.

    The reason why “Viking lore” has passed down is because the Vikings had no meaningful written history — another hallmark of dumb, primitive cultures. Basically, other Europeans had to document it for them. At least the Assyrians actually documented their own culture — 2000 years before the Vikings. Bwut, bwut, bwut, the Vikings had rune stones!

    The Vikings are remembered precisely because of Christian Europe’s tolerance and political fragmentation at the time. Had the Vikings pulled their antics a few hundred years earlier, people would have been less understanding. The Vikings would have been slaughtered, their women sold as a blonde-haired sexual novelty in brothels, and their genetic lineage erased. It happened to a countless number of other peoples. The Vikings would have been no different.

    Sorry, Viking simps.

  166. Anon[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    The Vikings were viewed as useful, ferocious idiots by the Byzantine empire. Similar to say, how the French viewed the Huron Indians.

    The supposed Viking siege of Constantinople in 860 never actually happened. That being said, the Byzantine court realized the Vikings could fight and they would be apolitical, as long as they were paid. Hence, the Varangian Guard.

    That’s about as close as Vikings ever got to being a noteworthy power.

  167. @Anon

    Now this is the best comment and most accurate on the entire post–Because the Vikes were white, they’re given slack in the alternative right. If the Vikings were brown, black, or any shade between, they’d be considered subhuman vermin not fit to be remembered. They could fight, and…the end.

    No written alphabet (and remember, same folks who idolize Vikings like to point out that Sub-Saharans had no alphabet either) and so traditions were all orally transmitted.

    Not much in the way of art above, say, the level of five year old thinking.

    No body of law, like the Romans and later the English.

    The 19th century Romanticism seemed to bail them out, a la “Weren’t those primitive tribes from during the Dark Ages seem so way cool and all.” And then Tolkein sort of kinda took aspects of Viking lore (and from other sources of course) and kinda helped give them a certain look. And Marvel Comics Thor, can’t forget him.

    • Troll: TWS
    • Replies: @Samuel.
    , @Tex
  168. @J.Ross

    Why should we be surprised such things happen?

  169. JimDandy says:

    Wow, the hasbara coffers are so full of my tax dollars that they even have teams devoted to pissing on the Vikings. Jesus, it’s not like the Vikings ever asked for a fanboy like Hitler. Get off it, you maniacs.

  170. Alfa158 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    You need to stop multitasking while watching Netflix. In Northman the Christians were slaves captured elsewhere and brought to Iceland. The movie was clear about that.

  171. Anon[617] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I was traveling in Ireland in the late 60s. While at a relative’s farm there were university students excavating a Viking fort across the field. Vikings left their mark just about everywhere in Europe.

  172. @Rich

    FWIW, I was amused by his contention that the Marcion “heresy” has now won out. First I’ve heard of it.

    Mind you, it should win out — should have a long time ago — but the Tribe will never permit Christians to have their own Book.

    Who rules?

  173. Samuel. says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    There is so much BS in your post that it borders on being a troll post. The Vikings had a written language, it was the Runic Alphabet and Scandinavians used that from 300ad up until the 1500s. They also kicked out the Arab Muslim invaders from Southern Italy and Sicily, the locals were content to be dhimmis and pay tribute on the other hand. That effected history right there alone. Not to mention their contribution to both Byzantine defenses and to the Crusades as a counter attack to Islamic attacks on Europe, they contributed to removing [again] Arab Muslim encroachment in Europe – in Spain.

    They were legendary ship builders and FAR ahead of their time. They discovered the New World on their ships about 600 years before Columbus. You compare them to browns, blacks, and yellows [orientals]? So if those other groups were so much on par with the Vikings, then why didn’t they discover the Americas, the black Africans never even discovered Madagascar which is off the eastern coast of Africa and didn’t even know how to smelt iron until Europeans showed them how to. The Chinese and Japanese were more advanced than that but they made very small technology advancements on their own, as is often the case, they improved on what came from Europe — the horse itself was domesticated by ancient white people in Eastern Europe, same with smelting bronze which started the bronze age, and it moved east from there. The Vikings at about 900ad were on par technology wise with the Japanese of the early 1800s ad.

    • Agree: AceDeuce, BosTex
    • Replies: @BosTex
  174. @Anonymous

    “The Witch” is actually an allegory of the Reformation. It is set in the Plymouth Colony of the Pilgrims, who were not Puritans as is commonly assumed, but, rather, a breakaway sect thought to be so oddball by even the Puritans in England (from whom they derived their Calvinist beliefs) that they had to flee to the Netherlands before coming to America. The Puritans themselves were a breakaway sect of the Church of England (although they never formally cut ties), and the Church of England itself had broken from Rome. The Puritans arrived in Massachusetts about a decade after the Pilgrims sometime after the Pilgrims and settled around Boston, not the South Shore. The Pilgrims, lionized on Thanksgiving, were actually quite weird.

    In “The Witch” the colony expels the father, William, for some unspecified dissent, and he goes into the woods with his family to form his own church, so to speak, with his wife and children as his congregation. The family then expels the older daughter, Thomasin, thinking her a witch responsible for all the troubles that follow: failing crops, the disappearance of the youngest child, the death of another. Thomasin, abandoned and all alone, turns herself over to Satan and writes her name in his book. The ending is literal and frightening: in return for a bit of ecstasy and carnal hedonism, she damns her soul. “The Witch” is not “The Crucible.” Satan, his minions, and the temptations they dangle before hapless mortals are all too real.

    Most reviewers–egged on to some extent by Eggers himself in interviews–think “The Witch” is all about feminism, a drama about a young woman who finally frees herself from the constraints of an oppressive society. It is not. It takes Satan, witchcraft and damnation literally in their murderous destruction of body and soul. It also about the inherent problem of religious dissent: that the end of the process is atomization. It is a Christian drama.

    As is “The Viking” in a somewhat different way. The presence of the Christian slaves and the blame they endure for some of the carnage is significant. “The Viking” is the first movie since the swords-and-sandals epics of the 1950s (“Quo Vadis,” “The Robe”) to portray Christians wholly sympathetically, as innocent slave-victims of a bloodthirsty pagan society. It’s like the old posters for “Fellini’s Roma,” his adaptation of Petronius’ “Satyricon,” that read: “Rome before Christ, after Fellini.” Amleth, avenging his father’s death, pursues a murderous career that results in the destruction of nearly his whole family–but he wins the glory and glamour of being carried to Valhalla by a Valkyrie. Like Steve, you feel relief that Christianity will come to Scandinavia and the cycles of bloody vengeance-seeking will come, it is to be hoped, to an end.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
  175. Sorry–I meant to say “The Northman,” not “The Viking.” I tried to edit in the fix, but I was too late.

  176. J.Ross says:
    @JimDandy

    Yeah, full-blown uniformed Nazi usually means harmless one way or another.

    • Agree: JimDandy
  177. @conatus

    So Charlemagne was an early progenitor of Elon the Musk whose “heads will roll” e-dict constituted one of the greatest massacres of infidels in modern times.

    I don’t know what you’re saying about the Old Testament though. The OT is still part of the Christian religion and has been a major contributor to the English language.

    It is almost impossible to go a day without some politician making reference to God’s Creation, letting there be light, the Garden of Eden, the Tower of Babel, Biblical Deluges, Tablets Carved in Stone, the Ten Commandments, the Parting of the Red Sea, the Promised Land, Daniel in the Lion’s Den, or being a Jeremiah.

    And people get up in the morning and open their Rupert Murdoch tabloid newspaper and say:”There is nothing new in The Sun.”

  178. @Charlotte Allen

    The family then expels the older daughter, Thomasin, thinking her a witch responsible for all the troubles that follow: failing crops, the disappearance of the youngest child, the death of another.

    Seems like a logical conclusion, given the state of knowledge at the time.

    South American residents had long come to the conclusion that sacrificing children was a cheap and effective alternative to putting down fertilizer.

    Here we have another argument in favor of legal abortion–that witches can be nipped in the bud, thus preventing crop failures.

  179. Anonymous[774] • Disclaimer says:
    @clifford brown

    Americans take civil liberties, and freedom in general, very seriously. In most countries, men in blue uniforms would hit people like this with sticks until they disappeared from sight.

  180. @ThreeCranes

    Interesting.

    The same is likely true about modern reconstructions of Ancient Greek triremes. Olympic rowers rowed in modern reconstructions of triremes the last time the Olympics were in Greece. They were no faster than common Ancient Greek slaves. Which tends to suggest the ancient triremes were more efficient.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    , @mc23
  181. Anonymous[295] • Disclaimer says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    By 1000 AD, Iceland was basically the outlier, or the final pre-Christian pagan land.

    Except for all the Baltic tribes, and Finland. As of 1000, even Hungary, Rus and Poland were not fully Christian, maybe not even 50%+1.

  182. JR Ewing says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    This is true in general about all of the causes of the liberals and progressives:

    For all of the shit you proclaim to hate, without it you wouldn’t be here to complain in the first place.

  183. @HammerJack

    She looks like a wax statue of Judy Garland that’s started to melt.

  184. @James Kalb

    An interesting angle to look at these Icelandic sagas!

  185. @Mr. Anon

    A small note on the fate of the Mathers. The graves of Cotton, Summer, and Increase are in an overgrown, neglected plot in a corner of Boston’s Copps Hill Cemetery which is quite popular with dog walkers, judging by the evidence left there. What a fitting epitaph for intolerant Puritans, their last resting place a bathroom for the pets of Italian Papists, at least those few oldtime North Enders who haven’t yet sold their homes to condo developers.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  186. @Anon

    First, the constant misuse of the word “Viking” in this comment stream is a sign of at best carelessness or at worst ignorance. “Vikings” are not a race or ethnic group. The word “Viking” is derived from a Norse word used to describe those who went seafaring, seeking profit from trading and/or raiding. “Vikings” are a select group of Norsemen — and a number of Norse women companions — who at some point in their lives temporarily decide to adventure at sea, trading, pirating, and raiding.

    Second, your assertion that

    The reason why “Viking lore” has passed down is because the Vikings had no meaningful written history

    is ignorant nonsense.

    The Norse and Icelandic Eddas and sagas are universally regarded as masterpieces of world literature and comprise a very large of work. Many of the sagas were intended as history and contain significant historical lore, e.g. “The Vineland Saga”, “Harald’s Saga”, “Njal’s Saga” et al.

  187. @clifford brown

    I mean this, you do not see shit like this in many so-called third world nations. Open your eyes. The Federal Reserve and The Media are lying to you.

    What does the Fed have to do with liberals turning Kensington into a legal drug zone?

    That is why it looks like the third world. Has nothing to do with monetary policy.

    The genius liberals in PA bought into the idea that the war on drugs should be abandoned and we should just have a designated area for addicts. This is what libertarians have been advocating for years.

    Well those videos show the grand success of the idea.

    Hamsterdam in The Wire is based on Kensington. It’s the theory that you can isolate the drugs to a single area and have a better outcome than enforcement.

  188. S says:
    @Ardvarj

    Have you seen what has been done to Malmo Sweden? The rioters are all 3rd world imports from Africa and the Middle East….What’s going on in the US is going on in nearly every western nation at this point.

    Yes, and whether they be Celt, Latin, or Scandi, none of these peoples are quite as rambunctious as they once were. As for the Scandis in particular, up until fifty years ago, or so, one could say they had grown as people(s) by leaving some of their more violent ways behind.

    Does anyone really want a neighbor which is forever beserking and doing to your cities what had once been done to Lindisfarne?

  189. Paul Rise says:
    @Anonymous

    Yes – I think you nailed exactly what the Witch was saying.

    Also that Christianity is a communion of like minded believers. The farmer separates his family from a community and they encounters alone the horror of nature.

  190. BosTex says:
    @Samuel.

    Yojimbo’s post is way off. The Vikings were great seafarers and explorers, as you note: their great strength.

    Also: they had systems of governance and law-

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_Scandinavian_law

    Not sure what the point of his post is, but would be way off to compare the Vikings to a bunch of savages. They weren’t.

    • Replies: @Kinky Friedman
  191. S says:

    The History channel’s Vikings series was generally alright if a person has never seen it. Below is it’s 2015 opening sequence.

  192. Wokechoke says:
    @Daniel H

    Bars in Iceland stink of abortion.

  193. @Lady Strange

    The Vikings who stayed in that part of old Gaul intermarried with the locals, who were the vast majority. The locals were largely Old Gaulish Celt, but with a dose of Italic (which is double first cousin to Celtic) from Roman Empire days.

    William the Bastard/Conqueror saw himself and his people as civilized Romano-Celtic French and the Anglo-Saxons as half barbarians ever ripe to start acting full Viking once again.

    He was correct.

    • Replies: @Bill P
  194. @BosTex

    The Crips and the Bloods have organization. They use modern weapons and tools. What makes them savages is what made Vikings savages: their entire way of life, their way of making a living, their morality was based on assaulting, robbing, raping, and murdering.

  195. @Wokechoke

    Speaking of Anya Taylor-Joy, just saw her in The Menu with Ralph Fiennes. It is billed as a dark comedy. Dark it was, but comedic not so much. A very strange movie, but worth $5.49 on a cold afternoon. I will watch it again when it hits Redbox.

  196. Tex says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    No written alphabet (and remember, same folks who idolize Vikings like to point out that Sub-Saharans had no alphabet either) and so traditions were all orally transmitted.

    They carved massive runestones commemorating voyages and adventures. Runes are an inscribed alphabet (as opposed to ‘written’), definitely an impressive one.

    Regardless, the Latin alphabet caught on and the sagas of the Icelanders are an extensive testament to the literary skills of Scandinavians. The sagas range from realistic treatments of family life (and feuds) to fantastic adventures of mythical heroes. Snorri Sturleson’s sagas of legendary and historic Nordic kings is both a mythic history and a deep meditation on power and politics among warrior folk just beginning to adopt Christianity. You may be certain that the sagas are very deeply rooted in the Viking era of the Icelanders’ forebearers (ie, a couple of generations back). The oral transmission of the family tales and heroic sagas doesn’t seem to have impaired the output.

    Don’t forget Beowulf and Saxo Grammaticus (the source for Amleth) were also rooted in the Viking era. To thee Christian monks of England were fascinated by the tales of the Scylding kings of Denmark. Bishop Alcuin had to remind them, What has Ingjald to do with Christ? (ie, leave off the pagan soap opera and get back to work). Anglo-Saxon literature is full of allusions to the heroic era of the Angles, Danes and others. Beowulf in particular holds a memory of a massive “Viking” raid in the 6th century: Hygelac’s defeat by the Hetware Franks in 516.

    Saxo’s material is firmly about the legendary heroes of Denmark, who may be too early to be “Vikings” in name, but are surely so in deed. The Christian Saxo preserved a great deal for us and is underrated as a contributor to European culture.

    For a bunch of barbaric yahoos on the edge of Europe, they inspired quite a bit of literature that is read and deeply admired to this day.

    Not much in the way of art above, say, the level of five year old thinking.

    Give me a runestone over any modern art.

    No body of law, like the Romans and later the English.

    The sagas emphasize the practical application of customary law in an assembly of the people in Iceland as a living process. So much so that being a lawyer was almost a profession among them (see Njal’s Saga, or Snorri Sturleson’s life). English law, the source for American law, began in pretty much the same way.

  197. @Paleo Liberal

    Totally agree. I’m a rower and a row boat builder. There’s a very limited geometric range through which pulling an oar is effective. You can’t pull with any oomph towards your head, so oars set at too steep an angle to the water are useless. At the other extreme, if the oar is situated at too low an angle to the water, it may not clear the waves on the recovery. To complicate matters, the proportion of the oar outboard to that inboard affects the lever arm and hence strength needed to pull. But a long oar with a short inner lever arm is difficult to recover through the air as too much of its weight is outboard. Lengthen the inner portion of the lever and you may not have adequate clearance over your thighs on the recovery. It’s tricky.

    Probably, the banks were tiered, terraced outwards, not situated one atop the other. Then the oars would have had clear air for their recovery.

    The models I’ve seen look impossibly clumsy. If one oarsman missed the beat, the entire side would be thrown into chaos.

    The best renderings are from bas reliefs and it’s notoriously difficult to render three dimensions on a flat carving. But obviously, the added complication was worth doing because they did it.

    Color me perplexed.

    • Thanks: Dube
  198. @Wilkey

    As Steve noted in an education post, you have to race-norm. Eg, in education the USA is actually at the top when you compare Koreans, Mexicans and even Germans et al to their home populations. What’s the per capita GDP of a Swede in Sweden v the USA?

    Agree about the US advantages (reserve currency et al) but the cultural advantage might be considered too. I was literally just talking to a White British engineer complaining about the American work ethic: “my boss sends me work requests on Friday afternoon!” And then he complained about our guns, but that’s another story.

  199. @SunBakedSuburb

    The Lighthouse is a very strange movie but worth watching.

  200. HA says:
    @Mr. Anon

    “I’ve heard people throw that vaccination factoid at me as if it somehow justifies broad vaccine mandates.”

    What it (and Washington’s subsequent quarantine of Boston) shows is that laws and mandates far harsher than being told to strap on a mask at WalMart have been with us since the days of leprosy, and did not substantially change even all that high-faluting speechifying regarding life, liberty, and the kitchen sink (not to mention your own windbaggery about what is and isn’t justified in life).

    • Replies: @JimDandy
    , @Mr. Anon
  201. anon[375] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Japan has a non-existent crime rate. South Korea and Taiwan have a lot of corruption and organized crime. China is a gangster state. The organized crime is the government

  202. JimDandy says:
    @HA

    You’re talking about back when the laws protected slavery, right? Good point, retard.

    • Replies: @HA
  203. Mr. Anon says:
    @HA

    What it (and Washington’s subsequent quarantine of Boston) shows is that laws and mandates far harsher than being told to strap on a mask at WalMart have been with us since the days of leprosy, and did not substantially change even all that high-faluting speechifying regarding life, liberty, and the kitchen sink (not to mention your own windbaggery about what is and isn’t justified in life).

    Yeah, the founding fathers could be hypocrites too.

    To people of an ovine spirit – like you – anything that governments wish to impose seems to be okay. Why would governments ever lie to us or seek to oppress us? You have the trust of a child. And the mind to match.

    And as far as windbaggery goes, I noticed a great deal of it from you in the service of the casual tyranny which got trial-runned over the last few years. I really don’t give a damn about any opinion you hold. You have proved your judgment to be entirely worthless.

    • Thanks: Mark G.
    • Replies: @HA
  204. anon[137] • Disclaimer says:
    @Elli

    Monguls pf…. wait….

  205. Bill P says:
    @Kinky Friedman

    William was descended from Breton nobility (his paternal grandmother was Duke Conan of Brittany’s daughter). The Bretons are a Brythonic people, closely related to the Cornish, who settled Armorica following the Saxon invasion.

    I doubt he had warm feelings toward the Saxons who drove his ancestors out of their homeland. As I’ve mentioned here before, a significant number (about a third of the invading army) of the “Normans” who invaded Britain were actually Bretons of British ancestry, led by William’s Breton nephew Alan the Red.

    So despite the idea that the Normans were foreign invaders, they were actually more British than the Angles, Jutes and Saxons, and that doubtless gave them a sense of legitimacy in their conquest of England.

  206. HA says:
    @JimDandy

    “You’re talking about back when the laws protected slavery, right?”

    No, not just then. Typhoid Mary got to know what a real lockdown meant long after the Civil War. People now and then recognized — however reluctantly — that your right to infect others isn’t gonna get the 14th amendment treatment. Whatever you had to endure was a cakewalk compared to what others had to deal with back then, so good luck pretending history is on your side.

    • Replies: @JimDandy
  207. HA says:
    @Mr. Anon

    “To people of an ovine spirit – like you…”

    Yeah, that’s what they’ve always about me on this site and everywhere else — totally willing to meekly conform to the expectations of others, governmental or otherwise. That’s why I read Sailer in the first place — it was all that conformity that hooked me in.

    Really, it’s like you’re not even trying at this point.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  208. Ralph L says:
    @HA

    (presumably at least some people in rural areas managed to acquire a cowpox-based smallpox vaccine by accident, long before Jenner came along).

    Yes, this is where the deceased expression, [flawless] “complexion like a milkmaid’s” came from. Why they didn’t distribute cows to the general population (or vice versa) after people noticed milkmaids weren’t getting smallpox and its scars is anyone’s guess. Likewise, why didn’t they quarantine TB patients sooner?
    It’s a small comfort that public health administration was a disaster long before AIDS and Covid.

    • Thanks: HA
  209. @Observator

    What a fitting epitaph for intolerant Puritans

    Are you some kind of swarthy goblino or something? Sounds like you suffer from ethnic/racial resentment. 🙁

  210. Anon[256] • Disclaimer says:

    Then they became liberal Christians and weak and pathetic and feminized, and surrendered their country to third world barbarians.

  211. JimDandy says:
    @HA

    You don’t even try to make sense.

  212. Mr. Anon says:
    @HA

    And yet you are sheep-like.

  213. Thrallman says:
    @Steve Sailer

    There’s a passage from the Kristni Saga about the struggle between heathens and Christians of very broad significance:

    And the next day, Thorgeirr got up and sent word to the booths that people should go to the Law-Rock. And when people had come to the Law-Rock, he said that he thought matters had come to a bad pass in the land, ‘if people are not to have the same law in this country’, and asked that they should not do so, and said that battles and warfare would arise from it, and that would clear the way for the laying waste of the land…. ‘And it seems advisable to me not to let those who oppose each other here with most vehemence prevail, and let us arbitrate between them, so that each side has its own way in something, but we all have the same law and the same religion, because this will prove true: if we tear apart the law, then we tear apart the peace.’

  214. @James Kalb

    No one wants to live in a world where your neighbouring villager might kill you. Is there a more effective positive civilisational influence than Christianity? It’s ironic that western atheists like Dawkins deride Christianity, when it might be the best example of cultural evolution, the ‘fittest’ way to advance a society.

  215. @Elli

    “You don’t have to knock walls down if you can terrorize people to surrender, or starve them.”
    The Mongols acquired and used very effective siege engines.

  216. mc23 says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Ancient Greek rowers were free men and professional rowers. It’s not until you get to the Renaissance that slaves were used by Moslems and Christians. Modern heavy weight rowers would be probably be bigger but they may not be as fit or as skilled at trireme rowing. Different equipment, different style.

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