The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
The New Antiquarianism Tries to Explain Baltimore
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

A few days ago I wrote about “Progressives’ Increasing Infatuation with Antiquarianism:”

There’s been a real upsurge in antiquarianism among liberals / progressives who are embarrassed to admit that they’ve held the whip hand on race for the last half century. So we see all these articles these days dredging up obscure 20th Century history to generate (contradictory, but who is checking?) rationalizations for why, say, Baltimore or Ferguson or wherever has high rates of black criminality, although they seldom seem to come up with counter-examples of areas where enlightened policies led to low rates of black criminality.

Today, the New York Times Editorial Board illustrates my theme for me at great length:

How Racism Doomed Baltimore
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD MAY 9, 2015

The Baltimore riots threw a spotlight on the poverty and isolation of the African-American community where the unrest began last month. The problems were underscored on Friday when the Justice Department, in response to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s request, started an investigation of the Police Department, which has an egregious history of brutality and misconduct.

Other cities are plagued by the same difficulties, but they have proved especially intractable in Baltimore. A new study from Harvard

I.e., Professor Chetty’s dubious data trove.

offers evidence that Baltimore is perhaps the worst large city in the country when measured by a child’s chances of escaping poverty. …

As shocking as they are, these facts make perfect sense in the context of the century-long assault that Baltimore’s blacks have endured at the hands of local, state and federal policy makers, all of whom worked to quarantine black residents in ghettos, making it difficult even for people of means to move into integrated areas that offered better jobs, schools and lives for their children. This happened in cities all over the country, but the segregationist impulse in Maryland generally was particularly virulent and well-documented in Baltimore, which is now 63 percent black.

Americans might think of Maryland as a Northern state, but it was distinctly Southern in its attitudes toward race.

Those evil Southerners …

Of course, an undeniably Southern city, Atlanta, has been a magnet for well-educated blacks for several decades now, but that’s not the point, the point is that Baltimore is kind of Southern, and we all know everything has to be the fault of white Southerners.

In the first decade of the 20th century

I.e., over 100 years ago

, for example, the Legislature approved amendments to the State Constitution to deny the vote to black citizens. Voters rejected these amendments, not out of sympathy for civil rights, but because of suspicion that the political machine would use disenfranchisement to gain a stranglehold over state politics.

The segregationist effort in Baltimore gained momentum in 1910

105 years ago

, shortly after a Yale-educated black lawyer bought a house in the well-heeled Mount Royal section of the city. The uproar among whites led to an ordinance that partitioned the city into black blocks and white blocks: No black person could occupy a home on a block where more than half the people were white; no white person could move into a block where more than half the residents were black. In 1910

105 years ago

, The New York Times described this as “the most pronounced ‘Jim Crow’ measure on record.”

When the courts overturned the ordinance, the city adopted a strategy, already successful in Chicago, under which building and health department inspectors lodged code violations against owners who ignored the apartheid rule. Civic leaders then imposed restrictive covenants that barred black residents.

‘House Not For Sale’

The Federal Housing Administration, created in 1934

81 years ago

by Congress to promote homeownership by insuring private mortgages, could have staved off housing segregation by enforcing a nondiscrimination policy. Instead, as the historian Kenneth Jackson explained in “Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of the United States,” the agency reflected “the racist tradition of the United States.” It insisted on a rigid, white-black separation in housing. It openly supported racist covenants that largely excluded African-Americans — even the middle class and well-to-do — from the homeownership boom that took place between the 1930s

80 years ago

and the 1960s.

50 years ago

And it typically denied mortgages to black residents wherever they lived.

1968, the year of the Fair Housing Act that helped destroy less privileged white neighborhoods across the country, was 47 years ago.

As Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote last year in The Atlantic, this policy meant that the federal government had endorsed a system of financial apartheid under which “whites looking to achieve the American dream could rely on a legitimate credit system backed by the government. Blacks were herded into the sights of unscrupulous lenders who took them for money and for sport.”

… Writing of Baltimore just last month, Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, argued that “the distressed condition of African-American working- and lower-middle-class families” in Maryland’s largest city and elsewhere “is almost entirely attributable to federal policy that prohibited black families from accumulating housing equity during the suburban boom that moved white families into single-family homes from the mid-1930s

80 years ago

to the mid-1960s

50 years ago

— and thus from bequeathing that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done.”

And so forth and so on.

Now if you think hard, you can recall that a lot of stuff has also happened since then in the last half century, but who can remember any of that?

 
Hide 70 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. “The Editorial Board” really is a great name for the author of an article.

    • Replies: @secede
    @H2

    @“The Editorial Board” really is a great name for the author of an article.

    thank you ferguson! we're editorial board! it's a long drive to baltimore. goodnight!

  2. Writing of Baltimore just last month, Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, argued that “the distressed condition of African-American working- and lower-middle-class families” in Maryland’s largest city and elsewhere “is almost entirely attributable to federal policy that prohibited black families from accumulating housing equity during the suburban boom that moved white families into single-family homes from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s — and thus from bequeathing that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done.

    Does this strike anybody as a remotely plausible explanation?

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @FredR

    I am calling BS on this right now.

    In the first place, just two years ago the Washington Post ran a series of articles about how large numbers of black residents (and homeowners) in DC were being dehoused. What happens is that the homeowner, who is usually old, senile, and inattentive, receives a minor property tax bill. If it is not paid promptly, then the penalties escalate into the thousands in short order, and if it is not paid at that point -- and usually at that point it cannot be paid -- the house is put on the auction block by the City and is snapped up -- one of the stories profiled the Florida based attorney who was involved in these activities -- by lawyers who are scavenging for these properties. The end result is that nobody gets nothin'.

    Part of Ta Nehisi Coates' problem is that he knows about these things, and he knows that black homeowners in Chicago and elsewhere were effectively ripped off on their housing loans, if not their houses themselves. But if you "blame the victim" that doesn't solve the problem of the black poor. Unfortunately our economy, while it has numerous safety nets, cannot protect people from making their own stupid decisions.

    The second point I would make is that this idea that white folks are passing all kinds of equity down to their children is nonsense. There are lots of white people who inherited nothing from their grandparents and parents, except the random keepsakes and genealogical materials which are themselves worth more than a house or an inheritance. By the same token there are a lot of white people who did inherit a house or some money from their grandparents and parents, but who blew through it in a few years. The idea that white folks as a group are constantly building on the wealth of previous generations is just false, at least in terms of material wealth: in terms of intellectual or cultural wealth, well, that's another story, and there's nothing stopping black folks from doing that, as well. All it requires is a focus on self-discipline and family continuity.

    , @Days of Broken Arrows
    @FredR

    I don't think the issue is here is whether it's plausible. I think the issue is that the writer has deliberately framed this argument in such a way that he's lying by omission.

    He's conveniently leaving out the entire immigrant experience and making like all white people descend from the Mayflower and were being passed down wealth. That's not true for a large segment of the population.

    Large swaths of immigrant families also didn't own property and were not able to "bequeath that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done."

    I come from Italian-American stock. Out of the big extended family, almost no one owned homes before 1970. We'd been over here (both sides of the family) since around 1900. There was no wealth being "bequeathed." Most of the men worked as peddlers or in low-level manufacturing jobs 1900-1960.

    It was only the second generation that came of age in the '60s who bought property later on -- and they were the first ones to do so. I can't speak for the Irish and Germans who came over just before the Italians but I saw Jews doing much the same thing.

    By the 1980s, I knew Korean and Vietnamese kids whose parents came to the US. None of them were passing down houses from the get-go.

    Writers from the New York Times should know that viewing the American experience as black vs. white isn't really accurate. It's not that simple, and this writer is being dishonest in pretending that it is.

    , @HHSIII
    @FredR

    Yeah, this was on NPR the other day. It used Levittown as an example. Whites could build cheap equity in the 'burbs and blacks couldn't in the inner city. And now that there is integration all housing is too expensive (an isteve talking point, but so is the easy credit housing boom-bust).

    Of course this ignores the fact white hipsters aren't driving up the prices of houses in Levittown, but in Harlem and Spike Lee's old 'hood, Ft. Greene.

    Nope, the problem must be that we haven't done enough to help minorities build up some equity in housing the last 100 years. Or last 15 years. Oh, that and predatory lenders. Damn easy credit.

    Replies: @Big Bill

    , @HHSIII
    @FredR

    No, it isn't plausible.

    , @Merema
    @FredR

    Yes, it is plausible. i have white friends in long island who have inherited property from their parents and grand parents that is no prime property. To be fair, they did loose some of the property when the parents got very ill to pay for medical bills that medicare would not cover. If Blacks were not able to easily obtain credit to buy property during the 50s and 60s, sure it is a major disadvantage for the present generation.

    On the other hand, I see a lot of homes that used to be owned by the black middle or working class such as in places like Teneack, NJ, Mount Vernon, NY, now being transferred to Hispanics. Sadly, what is typical is an old Black lady living in a house she bought in the 50s and 60s with money she earned cleaning White peoples homes and such. Living with her are her alcoholic and/or pot smoking unemployable loser sons, who upon her death, loose the house for non tax payment, and the home is sold to an energetic handy Hispanic who renovates it and moves his family in, while renting the upper floor out.

    Replies: @Kylie

  3. P says:

    It openly supported racist covenants that largely excluded African-Americans — even the middle class and well-to-do — from the homeownership boom that took place between the 1930s and the 1960s. And it typically denied mortgages to black residents wherever they lived.

    As the Those Who Can See blog has pointed out, there was a homeownership boom among blacks, too, over that very same period. While white homeownership increased from 45.6% in 1940 to 66.8% in 1970 to 74.4% in 2010, the black rate was 22.8% in 1940, increased to 42.6% in 1970, and was 44.5% in 2010 (graph). The black catch-up took place almost entirely during that terrible era when blacks were supposedly barred from homeownership, and blacks have seen essentially no gains since the 1968 passage of the Fair Housing Act — in fact, black homeownership may be slightly less common today than in 1970.

  4. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    We white men are here because of blood, and mostly that of others; here because of our insatiable and rapacious desire to take by force the land and labor of those others. We are the last people on Earth with a right to ruminate upon the superior morality of peaceful protest. We have never believed in it and rarely practiced it. Rather, we have always taken what we desire, and when denied it we have turned to means utterly genocidal to make it so

    When you have the power you can take out your hatreds and frustrations directly upon the bodies of others. This is what we have done, not only in the above mentioned examples but right here at home. The so-called ghetto was created and not accidentally. It was designed as a virtual holding pen—a concentration camp were we to insist upon honest language—within which impoverished persons of color would be contained. It was created by generations of housing discrimination, which limited where its residents could live. It was created by decade after decade of white riots against black people whenever they would move into white neighborhoods. It was created by deindustrialization and the flight of good-paying manufacturing jobs overseas.

    By the second half of this century white America is going to begin to understand what it is to be a minority in America. This, I think, above all else has the current status quo scared beyond measure. they see this coming but have no answer or remedy. The only course they have settle on is to suppress minority voting for as long as they can. To retain their power ever as a minority. South Africa has come to America in a very formal and permanent way.

    • Replies: @meh
    @Anonymous

    Nice troll.

    , @bomag
    @Anonymous

    By the second half of this century white America is going to begin to understand what it is to be a minority in America.

    Let the good times roll.

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Anonymous

    Hilarious! You're not up there with Swift yet. Your diction is strained and overweighted with strung together, "erudite" words. This makes you sound like a parody of the Kingfish in the old Amos 'n Andy show. But otherwise a masterful satire of this kind of thinking.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @keypusher
    @Anonymous

    Tim Wise, of course.

    http://www.episcopalcafe.com/tim-wise-on-anti-racism-they-do-not-know-it-and-they-do-not-want-to-know-it/

    Google is the great enemy of plagiarism.

  5. @FredR

    Writing of Baltimore just last month, Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, argued that “the distressed condition of African-American working- and lower-middle-class families” in Maryland’s largest city and elsewhere “is almost entirely attributable to federal policy that prohibited black families from accumulating housing equity during the suburban boom that moved white families into single-family homes from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s — and thus from bequeathing that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done.
     
    Does this strike anybody as a remotely plausible explanation?

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @Days of Broken Arrows, @HHSIII, @HHSIII, @Merema

    I am calling BS on this right now.

    In the first place, just two years ago the Washington Post ran a series of articles about how large numbers of black residents (and homeowners) in DC were being dehoused. What happens is that the homeowner, who is usually old, senile, and inattentive, receives a minor property tax bill. If it is not paid promptly, then the penalties escalate into the thousands in short order, and if it is not paid at that point — and usually at that point it cannot be paid — the house is put on the auction block by the City and is snapped up — one of the stories profiled the Florida based attorney who was involved in these activities — by lawyers who are scavenging for these properties. The end result is that nobody gets nothin’.

    Part of Ta Nehisi Coates’ problem is that he knows about these things, and he knows that black homeowners in Chicago and elsewhere were effectively ripped off on their housing loans, if not their houses themselves. But if you “blame the victim” that doesn’t solve the problem of the black poor. Unfortunately our economy, while it has numerous safety nets, cannot protect people from making their own stupid decisions.

    The second point I would make is that this idea that white folks are passing all kinds of equity down to their children is nonsense. There are lots of white people who inherited nothing from their grandparents and parents, except the random keepsakes and genealogical materials which are themselves worth more than a house or an inheritance. By the same token there are a lot of white people who did inherit a house or some money from their grandparents and parents, but who blew through it in a few years. The idea that white folks as a group are constantly building on the wealth of previous generations is just false, at least in terms of material wealth: in terms of intellectual or cultural wealth, well, that’s another story, and there’s nothing stopping black folks from doing that, as well. All it requires is a focus on self-discipline and family continuity.

  6. @H2
    "The Editorial Board" really is a great name for the author of an article.

    Replies: @secede

    @“The Editorial Board” really is a great name for the author of an article.

    thank you ferguson! we’re editorial board! it’s a long drive to baltimore. goodnight!

  7. In those days, about 105 years ago, the good people, the right kind of white people, had just gotten off the boat at Ellis Island. Sadly when they surveyed their new surroundings, they found that the land was full of Amalekites.

    The Ellis Island people were warm, kind, intelligent, and loving, just as their descendants are today. The Amalekites were cruel racists, however, whose main goals were to suppress, oppress and exploit the Other. Amalekites have historically oppressed anyone who was not a member of their country club, but women and minorities have been hardest hit.

    That is why the Amalekites must be destroyed, and the New York Times will continue to do its part to hasten that destruction by attacking them every day.

  8. Isn’t Baltimore a city the libs are in the process of gentrifying? You’d think the NYT would be careful in trying to provoke the black undertow.

  9. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “We white men are here because of blood, and mostly that of others; here because of our insatiable and rapacious desire to take by force the land and labor of those others.”

    Do you have any proof, evidence, or facts that any of group of men has been any less insatiable and rapacious then white men? I simply don’t believe so. I think you are factually wrong here, in a big-way, at the git-go. One in 200 men descend from Genghis Khan. That almost certainly didn’t happen because Genghis was dreaming of peace.

    “The so-called ghetto was… a concentration camp were we to insist upon honest language…”

    No, honestly reflecting on your language makes words like callow, jejune, puerile, denigration, deprecation, disparage, whining, and vapid come to mind.

    “By the second half of this century white America is going to begin to understand what it is to be a minority in America.”

    So you are not a white american but an adversarial minority on a mission. South Africa, eh? Be careful what you wish for.

  10. @Anonymous
    We white men are here because of blood, and mostly that of others; here because of our insatiable and rapacious desire to take by force the land and labor of those others. We are the last people on Earth with a right to ruminate upon the superior morality of peaceful protest. We have never believed in it and rarely practiced it. Rather, we have always taken what we desire, and when denied it we have turned to means utterly genocidal to make it so

    When you have the power you can take out your hatreds and frustrations directly upon the bodies of others. This is what we have done, not only in the above mentioned examples but right here at home. The so-called ghetto was created and not accidentally. It was designed as a virtual holding pen—a concentration camp were we to insist upon honest language—within which impoverished persons of color would be contained. It was created by generations of housing discrimination, which limited where its residents could live. It was created by decade after decade of white riots against black people whenever they would move into white neighborhoods. It was created by deindustrialization and the flight of good-paying manufacturing jobs overseas.

    By the second half of this century white America is going to begin to understand what it is to be a minority in America. This, I think, above all else has the current status quo scared beyond measure. they see this coming but have no answer or remedy. The only course they have settle on is to suppress minority voting for as long as they can. To retain their power ever as a minority. South Africa has come to America in a very formal and permanent way.

    Replies: @meh, @bomag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @keypusher

    Nice troll.

  11. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “As shocking as they are, these facts make perfect sense in the context of the century-long assault that Baltimore’s blacks have endured at the hands of local, state and federal policy makers, all of whom worked to quarantine black residents in ghettos, making it difficult even for people of means to move into integrated areas that offered better jobs, schools and lives for their children.”

    Progressives seem very committed to the idea of having people live as close to work as possible. As such, I am sensing that they seem to believe that the suburbs are best for people, such as retirees and the poor, who do not have work commutes. I wonder if statements about the history of blacks being quarantined in ghettos, such as the one quoted above, are partly intended to increase public support on moral grounds for Section 8 housing in suburbs and to justify the movement of poor blacks from the cities to the suburbs, in turn facilitating the gentrification of the urban areas the blacks leave behind for those who work in the cities.

  12. Drew says:

    My favorite recent example is a black author bringing up a newspaper article from 1893 to show why we shouldn’t celebrate the black mom who hit her son after she caught him participating in the riots. Even when black women beat black babies bodies it’s still apparently the white man’s fault.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/04/29/why-is-america-celebrating-the-beating-of-a-black-child/

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    @Drew

    The reason we're not supposed to celebrate the black mom who hit her son is that it implies that the son was wrong to participate in a riot. We're supposed to believe that the rioters are heroically opposing oppression, and to have his mother express shame and outrage over his behavior undercuts the Narrative. She should be directing her outrage at the wrong kind of white people, like those who write the news always do.

    Also, the wrong sort of white people approved of the mother's behavior, and it's important to find fault with everything the wrong sort of white people do.

  13. @FredR

    Writing of Baltimore just last month, Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, argued that “the distressed condition of African-American working- and lower-middle-class families” in Maryland’s largest city and elsewhere “is almost entirely attributable to federal policy that prohibited black families from accumulating housing equity during the suburban boom that moved white families into single-family homes from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s — and thus from bequeathing that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done.
     
    Does this strike anybody as a remotely plausible explanation?

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @Days of Broken Arrows, @HHSIII, @HHSIII, @Merema

    I don’t think the issue is here is whether it’s plausible. I think the issue is that the writer has deliberately framed this argument in such a way that he’s lying by omission.

    He’s conveniently leaving out the entire immigrant experience and making like all white people descend from the Mayflower and were being passed down wealth. That’s not true for a large segment of the population.

    Large swaths of immigrant families also didn’t own property and were not able to “bequeath that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done.”

    I come from Italian-American stock. Out of the big extended family, almost no one owned homes before 1970. We’d been over here (both sides of the family) since around 1900. There was no wealth being “bequeathed.” Most of the men worked as peddlers or in low-level manufacturing jobs 1900-1960.

    It was only the second generation that came of age in the ’60s who bought property later on — and they were the first ones to do so. I can’t speak for the Irish and Germans who came over just before the Italians but I saw Jews doing much the same thing.

    By the 1980s, I knew Korean and Vietnamese kids whose parents came to the US. None of them were passing down houses from the get-go.

    Writers from the New York Times should know that viewing the American experience as black vs. white isn’t really accurate. It’s not that simple, and this writer is being dishonest in pretending that it is.

  14. Would make for a good Paul Shanklin song parody: The Age of Antiquarias.

  15. @Drew
    My favorite recent example is a black author bringing up a newspaper article from 1893 to show why we shouldn't celebrate the black mom who hit her son after she caught him participating in the riots. Even when black women beat black babies bodies it's still apparently the white man's fault.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/04/29/why-is-america-celebrating-the-beating-of-a-black-child/

    Replies: @Harry Baldwin

    The reason we’re not supposed to celebrate the black mom who hit her son is that it implies that the son was wrong to participate in a riot. We’re supposed to believe that the rioters are heroically opposing oppression, and to have his mother express shame and outrage over his behavior undercuts the Narrative. She should be directing her outrage at the wrong kind of white people, like those who write the news always do.

    Also, the wrong sort of white people approved of the mother’s behavior, and it’s important to find fault with everything the wrong sort of white people do.

  16. @FredR

    Writing of Baltimore just last month, Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, argued that “the distressed condition of African-American working- and lower-middle-class families” in Maryland’s largest city and elsewhere “is almost entirely attributable to federal policy that prohibited black families from accumulating housing equity during the suburban boom that moved white families into single-family homes from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s — and thus from bequeathing that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done.
     
    Does this strike anybody as a remotely plausible explanation?

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @Days of Broken Arrows, @HHSIII, @HHSIII, @Merema

    Yeah, this was on NPR the other day. It used Levittown as an example. Whites could build cheap equity in the ‘burbs and blacks couldn’t in the inner city. And now that there is integration all housing is too expensive (an isteve talking point, but so is the easy credit housing boom-bust).

    Of course this ignores the fact white hipsters aren’t driving up the prices of houses in Levittown, but in Harlem and Spike Lee’s old ‘hood, Ft. Greene.

    Nope, the problem must be that we haven’t done enough to help minorities build up some equity in housing the last 100 years. Or last 15 years. Oh, that and predatory lenders. Damn easy credit.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    @HHSIII


    Yeah, this was on NPR the other day. It used Levittown as an example. Whites could build cheap equity in the ‘burbs and blacks couldn’t in the inner city. And now that there is integration all housing is too expensive (an isteve talking point, but so is the easy credit housing boom-bust).
     
    The weird part is that those post-WWII "suburbanizing" whites abandoned the inner city to move out to Levittown. Consequently the price of urban houses dropped, and black folks snatched them up, cheap. But cheap housing for black folks is a bad thing if it is caused by White Flight, anyway.
  17. mts1 says:

    “It openly supported racist covenants that largely excluded African-Americans — even the middle class and well-to-do — from the homeownership boom that took place between the 1930s and the 1960s.”

    Why no comment on the housing boom that happened when whites left their ethnic enclaves in the cities for the suburbs, and the African-Americans bought those properties for cut rate, bargain basement, way below market value prices, or in some cases at tax sale? Why no comparison of photos contrasting the condition of those areas before flight and a couple of decades after it? Why no question why leveled Nagasaki was rebuilt into a modern city in the exact time frame Detroit went from being the wealthiest blue collar city to post-bomb Nagasaki and is considered unrecoverable? Why, when the Germans bought blocks of housing and commercial strips from the Wasps, they kept them up, then when the Irish bought them out, they kept them up, then when the Italians bought them out, they kept them up, then when the Poles bought out the Italians, they kept it up, but once you get to the you-hoos, it all gets destroyed and it’s like they salted the earth to make sure nothing came back? What motivates a people to purposely destroy the fruits of a deal of a millennium, the Af-Am version of the Louisiana Purchase, Manhattan for $24 worth of beads, or Seward’s Folly, obtaining the prime lands of American cities for a song, left to them in fine condition and working order as per FHA/VA rules?

    C’mon, Editorial Board, it’s your job to ask the questions. Let the answers finger-point.

    • Replies: @Ted
    @mts1

    For about 15 years, I had USC football season tickets. It's commonly known as the University of South Central, because, well, that's where it is. What surpried me most the first time I went there? There are no housing projects. There are no Latin America style shantytowns. The city is largely filled with victorian era mansions. The area surrounding the mansions is full of very typical California tract housing, typically in the 1,200 square foot range, on standard sized city lots. Housing isn't particularly densely packed, and the only apartments are the student housing, owned by the university. It's a ghetto, full of houses that would start at $400,000 in any white or asian neighborhood in LA, with plenty of mansions that would go for several million. I've yet to see a house in South Central that WASN'T better than anyplace I've ever lived, and I've spent my entire life in SANTA BARBARA.

    Today it's a ghetto, in one of the better parts of town, (temperture wise) filled with poor black people living in houses that most white people could never hope to afford, if those black people weren't there. Here's what I think is the real reason behind gentrification. The inner cities are where they are because that was the best place to build a city. Remove whatever is making it a bad neighborhood, and it will once again be the best place in town.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  18. “Those evil Southerners …

    Of course, an undeniably Southern city, Atlanta, has been a magnet for well-educated blacks for several decades now, but that’s not the point, the point is that Baltimore is kind of Southern, and we all know everything has to be the fault of white Southerners.”

    None of the White people on “The Wire” had a Southern accent. Nancy Pelosi was born in Baltimore, does that make her a White Southerner like Jeff Foxworthy?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Jefferson

    Maryland, unlike other border states, was kept in the Union by force. A lot of Southern whites were drawn to Baltimore. It had a lot of industry including a steel mill, an auto plant, and a shipyard.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    , @IHTG
    @Jefferson

    Not a classic Southern accent, but some of the older white characters (like one of the teachers in the school in Season 4) had a "Bawlmer" accent.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    , @Anon
    @Jefferson

    30 Rock mocks the Maryland accent: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HKaHuLMg9tY

    Replies: @NorthOfTheOneOhOne

  19. More posts on the New Antiquarianism, please. This is an important theme to pound.

  20. @Jefferson
    "Those evil Southerners …

    Of course, an undeniably Southern city, Atlanta, has been a magnet for well-educated blacks for several decades now, but that’s not the point, the point is that Baltimore is kind of Southern, and we all know everything has to be the fault of white Southerners."

    None of the White people on "The Wire" had a Southern accent. Nancy Pelosi was born in Baltimore, does that make her a White Southerner like Jeff Foxworthy?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @IHTG, @Anon

    Maryland, unlike other border states, was kept in the Union by force. A lot of Southern whites were drawn to Baltimore. It had a lot of industry including a steel mill, an auto plant, and a shipyard.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @Hibernian

    Why is there no Southern accent among most of the White residents of Baltimore? Baltimore is not very culturally Southern. Baltimore Whites on average are culturally closer to SWPL than they are to confederate flag loving good o'boys from sweet home Alabama.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @D. K.

  21. It’s perfect that TNC was mentioned in this piece because one of his favorite devices in writing is citing some discriminatory incident from the 19th or early 20th century to explain the present day condition of lower income blacks.

    Anyway, the subtext of all these left-wing pieces about low income minority neighborhoods is that they believe that large concentrations of poor urban blacks is bad news for all concerned, that a very high percentage of these folks are essentially beyond redemption, and that the only real answer is to get those members of the black community with potential as far away from urban black culture as possible. This belief is usually cloaked in a busload of SJW nonsense, but it’s there all the same.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Arclight

    And once all the inner city blacks have been dispatched for their own good to the Ferguson-style suburbs, nice white liberals will just have to move in and restore all those superb old row houses where they can walk to work. It's a tough job, but nice white liberals can do it!

    , @Arclight
    @Arclight

    You have that right. For most of the lefties poor minorities are like exotic zoo animals - interesting, potentially dangerous and in need of benevolent care, so they keep them housed and fed but penned in far away from where the progressives actually live or want to live. They get to stoke their moral vanity but don't actually have to deal with the facts on the ground.

  22. @FredR

    Writing of Baltimore just last month, Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, argued that “the distressed condition of African-American working- and lower-middle-class families” in Maryland’s largest city and elsewhere “is almost entirely attributable to federal policy that prohibited black families from accumulating housing equity during the suburban boom that moved white families into single-family homes from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s — and thus from bequeathing that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done.
     
    Does this strike anybody as a remotely plausible explanation?

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @Days of Broken Arrows, @HHSIII, @HHSIII, @Merema

    No, it isn’t plausible.

  23. bomag [AKA "doombuggy"] says:
    @Anonymous
    We white men are here because of blood, and mostly that of others; here because of our insatiable and rapacious desire to take by force the land and labor of those others. We are the last people on Earth with a right to ruminate upon the superior morality of peaceful protest. We have never believed in it and rarely practiced it. Rather, we have always taken what we desire, and when denied it we have turned to means utterly genocidal to make it so

    When you have the power you can take out your hatreds and frustrations directly upon the bodies of others. This is what we have done, not only in the above mentioned examples but right here at home. The so-called ghetto was created and not accidentally. It was designed as a virtual holding pen—a concentration camp were we to insist upon honest language—within which impoverished persons of color would be contained. It was created by generations of housing discrimination, which limited where its residents could live. It was created by decade after decade of white riots against black people whenever they would move into white neighborhoods. It was created by deindustrialization and the flight of good-paying manufacturing jobs overseas.

    By the second half of this century white America is going to begin to understand what it is to be a minority in America. This, I think, above all else has the current status quo scared beyond measure. they see this coming but have no answer or remedy. The only course they have settle on is to suppress minority voting for as long as they can. To retain their power ever as a minority. South Africa has come to America in a very formal and permanent way.

    Replies: @meh, @bomag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @keypusher

    By the second half of this century white America is going to begin to understand what it is to be a minority in America.

    Let the good times roll.

  24. @Jefferson
    "Those evil Southerners …

    Of course, an undeniably Southern city, Atlanta, has been a magnet for well-educated blacks for several decades now, but that’s not the point, the point is that Baltimore is kind of Southern, and we all know everything has to be the fault of white Southerners."

    None of the White people on "The Wire" had a Southern accent. Nancy Pelosi was born in Baltimore, does that make her a White Southerner like Jeff Foxworthy?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @IHTG, @Anon

    Not a classic Southern accent, but some of the older white characters (like one of the teachers in the school in Season 4) had a “Bawlmer” accent.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @IHTG

    Some transplanted southerners in the Midwest have very mild southern accents, because they've been up north a long time and/or their original homes weren't that far south to begin with.

  25. The day after Officer Wilson was exonerated Salon and other rags were not publishing essays on the exoneration but on the early 20th century phenomenon of lynchings.

    • Replies: @Big Bill
    @elmer

    Make that "the Twenty-FIRST Century phenomenon of lynching". The NAACP established THE official definition of lynching a century ago when they first started gathering and publishing their e.g. "3500 lynchings since 1850" statistics:

    1. an extrajudicial killing,
    2. by 3 or more people,
    3. for violating community mores/traditions/values (e.g. "acting uppity", having a "smart mouth", "dissing", etc.)

    That's it. That is the entire definition. No race. No noose. No burning crosses. No barbed wire. Nothing.

    Every single year, hundreds (if not thousands) of black men are lynched -- for "dissing", for "acting uppity", for "hitting on my baby-mama", for bumping into someone and not saying "sorry", etc.

    Whenever you see a WorldStarHipHop.com video of a bunch of black kids stomping on some guy's head, laughing and joking, you just watched a 21st Century lynching.

    The MSM and the NAACP, however, refuse to use the official NAACP name.

  26. @Jefferson
    "Those evil Southerners …

    Of course, an undeniably Southern city, Atlanta, has been a magnet for well-educated blacks for several decades now, but that’s not the point, the point is that Baltimore is kind of Southern, and we all know everything has to be the fault of white Southerners."

    None of the White people on "The Wire" had a Southern accent. Nancy Pelosi was born in Baltimore, does that make her a White Southerner like Jeff Foxworthy?

    Replies: @Hibernian, @IHTG, @Anon

    30 Rock mocks the Maryland accent:

    • Replies: @NorthOfTheOneOhOne
    @Anon

    No, that was Boston. Julianne Moore played one of Jack Donaghy's high school sweethearts, he was (like Alec Baldwin) a Bostonian.

  27. @Anonymous
    We white men are here because of blood, and mostly that of others; here because of our insatiable and rapacious desire to take by force the land and labor of those others. We are the last people on Earth with a right to ruminate upon the superior morality of peaceful protest. We have never believed in it and rarely practiced it. Rather, we have always taken what we desire, and when denied it we have turned to means utterly genocidal to make it so

    When you have the power you can take out your hatreds and frustrations directly upon the bodies of others. This is what we have done, not only in the above mentioned examples but right here at home. The so-called ghetto was created and not accidentally. It was designed as a virtual holding pen—a concentration camp were we to insist upon honest language—within which impoverished persons of color would be contained. It was created by generations of housing discrimination, which limited where its residents could live. It was created by decade after decade of white riots against black people whenever they would move into white neighborhoods. It was created by deindustrialization and the flight of good-paying manufacturing jobs overseas.

    By the second half of this century white America is going to begin to understand what it is to be a minority in America. This, I think, above all else has the current status quo scared beyond measure. they see this coming but have no answer or remedy. The only course they have settle on is to suppress minority voting for as long as they can. To retain their power ever as a minority. South Africa has come to America in a very formal and permanent way.

    Replies: @meh, @bomag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @keypusher

    Hilarious! You’re not up there with Swift yet. Your diction is strained and overweighted with strung together, “erudite” words. This makes you sound like a parody of the Kingfish in the old Amos ‘n Andy show. But otherwise a masterful satire of this kind of thinking.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I thought he was channeling Eldridge Cleaver. Very "Soul on Ice".

    Edit - My info from Marginal Revolution stuck. Here, I'm Romanian... can't fix it now.

  28. Let’s give credit where credit is due. It was Steven Jay Gould who first utilized this particular technique, although that masterful charlatan energized it with dissimulation and lying in his masterpiece of slimy, progressive vituperation, “The Mismeasure of Man”. Gould claimed he was going to attack current research on intelligence head-on but the primary focus of the book was the misrepresentation of three pieces of research done between one and two centuries earlier. In an amusing coda it was later determined that Gould lied about this resurrected research and that the findings he attacked were for the most part supported by later research. Finally, I’d add that at least two of the men Gould chose to attack were far more prominent and better scientists than he. And, in light of the later repudiation of Gould’s rewriting of history, a similar case can now be made for the third. By these standards the NYT efforts seem piddling.

  29. @FredR

    Writing of Baltimore just last month, Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, argued that “the distressed condition of African-American working- and lower-middle-class families” in Maryland’s largest city and elsewhere “is almost entirely attributable to federal policy that prohibited black families from accumulating housing equity during the suburban boom that moved white families into single-family homes from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s — and thus from bequeathing that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done.
     
    Does this strike anybody as a remotely plausible explanation?

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @Days of Broken Arrows, @HHSIII, @HHSIII, @Merema

    Yes, it is plausible. i have white friends in long island who have inherited property from their parents and grand parents that is no prime property. To be fair, they did loose some of the property when the parents got very ill to pay for medical bills that medicare would not cover. If Blacks were not able to easily obtain credit to buy property during the 50s and 60s, sure it is a major disadvantage for the present generation.

    On the other hand, I see a lot of homes that used to be owned by the black middle or working class such as in places like Teneack, NJ, Mount Vernon, NY, now being transferred to Hispanics. Sadly, what is typical is an old Black lady living in a house she bought in the 50s and 60s with money she earned cleaning White peoples homes and such. Living with her are her alcoholic and/or pot smoking unemployable loser sons, who upon her death, loose the house for non tax payment, and the home is sold to an energetic handy Hispanic who renovates it and moves his family in, while renting the upper floor out.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    @Merema


    Sadly, what is typical is an old Black lady living in a house she bought in the 50s and 60s with money she earned cleaning White peoples homes and such. Living with her are her alcoholic and/or pot smoking unemployable loser sons, who upon her death, loose the house for non tax payment, and the home is sold to an energetic handy Hispanic who renovates it and moves his family in, while renting the upper floor out.
     
    What's sad about that situation? Why should loser adult sons who don't appreciate their mom's hard work and sacrifice get to keep her house? Better it should go to an energetic Hispanic who renovates it.

    Or would it be okay if the new energetic home-owner was black?

    Replies: @Merema

  30. http://fox2now.com/2015/05/09/150th-anniversary-of-the-abolition-of-slavery-observed/

    Slavery has been gone for 150 years? That’s news to me. To read the NYT, you would think it was still legal.

    • Replies: @HHSIII
    @countenance

    It's been argued that western wealth in general was jump-started by the whole economics of the slave trade, not just from uncompensated labor. There's no end to it. Behind every working class white living beyond mere subsistence existence is a great crime.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

  31. You take some of those brick row houses in Baltimore and put them in Washington, D.C and you could sell them for more than a million dollars.

    And Baltimore

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @unit472

    Just like the old brownstones along the Massachusetts Avenue corridor in Boston, hard by Roxbury. Back in the 70s we'd ride the school bus up Mass Ave. on the way to track meets at the old Commonwealth Armory, and these places were boarded-up, burned-out slum properties available for a song, or even a short medley. Now, they're multi-million dollar homes.

  32. @countenance
    http://fox2now.com/2015/05/09/150th-anniversary-of-the-abolition-of-slavery-observed/

    Slavery has been gone for 150 years? That's news to me. To read the NYT, you would think it was still legal.

    Replies: @HHSIII

    It’s been argued that western wealth in general was jump-started by the whole economics of the slave trade, not just from uncompensated labor. There’s no end to it. Behind every working class white living beyond mere subsistence existence is a great crime.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @HHSIII

    "Behind every working class white living beyond mere subsistence existence is a great crime."

    Good line.

    Replies: @HHSIII

  33. The title of this post made me chuckle. I was thinking the other day about the pretentious descriptor “The New ______” (capitalized, of course, because this thing, whatever it is, is A Thing now) that has become so common in liberal publications.

    I guess The New Whatever was popularized when people started talking about Dawkins’s and Dennett’s stuff as the New Atheism, harkening back to The New Science (as if “neer-neer religion is dumb” is a thought revolution). But the formulation is just annoying and ostentatious. Not to mention, rarely is the New Thing ever actually new.

    The New Antisemitism, The New Racism, The New Sexism. bleh.

  34. the context of the century-long assault that Baltimore’s blacks have endured at the hands of local, state and federal policy makers, all of whom worked to quarantine black residents in ghettos, making it difficult even for people of means to move into integrated areas that offered better jobs, schools and lives for their children.

    What utter nonsense. I guess the 100,000+ blacks who escaped the quarantine by moving out of the city the last two generations required the miracle of divine intervention to overcome these obstacles.

  35. @Hibernian
    @Jefferson

    Maryland, unlike other border states, was kept in the Union by force. A lot of Southern whites were drawn to Baltimore. It had a lot of industry including a steel mill, an auto plant, and a shipyard.

    Replies: @Jefferson

    Why is there no Southern accent among most of the White residents of Baltimore? Baltimore is not very culturally Southern. Baltimore Whites on average are culturally closer to SWPL than they are to confederate flag loving good o’boys from sweet home Alabama.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    @Jefferson

    A lot of Irish, Italian, and German people, and some Polish people, went there too. Also there's a fair size Jewish community. During a brief period of active duty in the Army in 1989-1990 (I was in the Illinois Army National Guard for 21 years.) a white NCO from Baltimore and a fellow recruit from DC, also white, both had distinctive Southern accents. The guy from DC said his family was originally from North Carolina. Senator Ben Cardin who is Jewish and from NW Baltimore seems to have a trace of a Southern accent. I visited Baltimore once and the only Southern accent I heard was from an excursion boat captain.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @PV van der Byl

    , @D. K.
    @Jefferson

    I am originally from Chicagoland-- specifically, Gary, Indiana (part of "The Region")-- and, as an adult, I have lived in a large number of metropolitan areas, throughout the United States. During my sixteen months living in downtown Baltimore (2009-2010), I never felt as if I were living in the South. During my nine months living in New Orleans (1981-1982), on the other hand, I felt as if I had been transported to an alien galaxy!

    Replies: @Jefferson

  36. @HHSIII
    @countenance

    It's been argued that western wealth in general was jump-started by the whole economics of the slave trade, not just from uncompensated labor. There's no end to it. Behind every working class white living beyond mere subsistence existence is a great crime.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “Behind every working class white living beyond mere subsistence existence is a great crime.”

    Good line.

    • Replies: @HHSIII
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks. You know, 3rd generation firefighter, pharmacist or florist with a decent house? Check your privilege. Maybe they can bring back sumptuary laws for non-elites. No capital formation home-owning for you lot, only renting.

  37. @Arclight
    It's perfect that TNC was mentioned in this piece because one of his favorite devices in writing is citing some discriminatory incident from the 19th or early 20th century to explain the present day condition of lower income blacks.

    Anyway, the subtext of all these left-wing pieces about low income minority neighborhoods is that they believe that large concentrations of poor urban blacks is bad news for all concerned, that a very high percentage of these folks are essentially beyond redemption, and that the only real answer is to get those members of the black community with potential as far away from urban black culture as possible. This belief is usually cloaked in a busload of SJW nonsense, but it's there all the same.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Arclight

    And once all the inner city blacks have been dispatched for their own good to the Ferguson-style suburbs, nice white liberals will just have to move in and restore all those superb old row houses where they can walk to work. It’s a tough job, but nice white liberals can do it!

  38. @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Anonymous

    Hilarious! You're not up there with Swift yet. Your diction is strained and overweighted with strung together, "erudite" words. This makes you sound like a parody of the Kingfish in the old Amos 'n Andy show. But otherwise a masterful satire of this kind of thinking.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I thought he was channeling Eldridge Cleaver. Very “Soul on Ice”.

    Edit – My info from Marginal Revolution stuck. Here, I’m Romanian… can’t fix it now.

  39. @Anon
    @Jefferson

    30 Rock mocks the Maryland accent: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HKaHuLMg9tY

    Replies: @NorthOfTheOneOhOne

    No, that was Boston. Julianne Moore played one of Jack Donaghy’s high school sweethearts, he was (like Alec Baldwin) a Bostonian.

  40. @Merema
    @FredR

    Yes, it is plausible. i have white friends in long island who have inherited property from their parents and grand parents that is no prime property. To be fair, they did loose some of the property when the parents got very ill to pay for medical bills that medicare would not cover. If Blacks were not able to easily obtain credit to buy property during the 50s and 60s, sure it is a major disadvantage for the present generation.

    On the other hand, I see a lot of homes that used to be owned by the black middle or working class such as in places like Teneack, NJ, Mount Vernon, NY, now being transferred to Hispanics. Sadly, what is typical is an old Black lady living in a house she bought in the 50s and 60s with money she earned cleaning White peoples homes and such. Living with her are her alcoholic and/or pot smoking unemployable loser sons, who upon her death, loose the house for non tax payment, and the home is sold to an energetic handy Hispanic who renovates it and moves his family in, while renting the upper floor out.

    Replies: @Kylie

    Sadly, what is typical is an old Black lady living in a house she bought in the 50s and 60s with money she earned cleaning White peoples homes and such. Living with her are her alcoholic and/or pot smoking unemployable loser sons, who upon her death, loose the house for non tax payment, and the home is sold to an energetic handy Hispanic who renovates it and moves his family in, while renting the upper floor out.

    What’s sad about that situation? Why should loser adult sons who don’t appreciate their mom’s hard work and sacrifice get to keep her house? Better it should go to an energetic Hispanic who renovates it.

    Or would it be okay if the new energetic home-owner was black?

    • Replies: @Merema
    @Kylie

    Its sad that the sons are looser adults, and that black americans are loosing their assets.

  41. @Arclight
    It's perfect that TNC was mentioned in this piece because one of his favorite devices in writing is citing some discriminatory incident from the 19th or early 20th century to explain the present day condition of lower income blacks.

    Anyway, the subtext of all these left-wing pieces about low income minority neighborhoods is that they believe that large concentrations of poor urban blacks is bad news for all concerned, that a very high percentage of these folks are essentially beyond redemption, and that the only real answer is to get those members of the black community with potential as far away from urban black culture as possible. This belief is usually cloaked in a busload of SJW nonsense, but it's there all the same.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Arclight

    You have that right. For most of the lefties poor minorities are like exotic zoo animals – interesting, potentially dangerous and in need of benevolent care, so they keep them housed and fed but penned in far away from where the progressives actually live or want to live. They get to stoke their moral vanity but don’t actually have to deal with the facts on the ground.

  42. @IHTG
    @Jefferson

    Not a classic Southern accent, but some of the older white characters (like one of the teachers in the school in Season 4) had a "Bawlmer" accent.

    Replies: @Hibernian

    Some transplanted southerners in the Midwest have very mild southern accents, because they’ve been up north a long time and/or their original homes weren’t that far south to begin with.

  43. Ted says:
    @mts1
    "It openly supported racist covenants that largely excluded African-Americans — even the middle class and well-to-do — from the homeownership boom that took place between the 1930s and the 1960s."

    Why no comment on the housing boom that happened when whites left their ethnic enclaves in the cities for the suburbs, and the African-Americans bought those properties for cut rate, bargain basement, way below market value prices, or in some cases at tax sale? Why no comparison of photos contrasting the condition of those areas before flight and a couple of decades after it? Why no question why leveled Nagasaki was rebuilt into a modern city in the exact time frame Detroit went from being the wealthiest blue collar city to post-bomb Nagasaki and is considered unrecoverable? Why, when the Germans bought blocks of housing and commercial strips from the Wasps, they kept them up, then when the Irish bought them out, they kept them up, then when the Italians bought them out, they kept them up, then when the Poles bought out the Italians, they kept it up, but once you get to the you-hoos, it all gets destroyed and it's like they salted the earth to make sure nothing came back? What motivates a people to purposely destroy the fruits of a deal of a millennium, the Af-Am version of the Louisiana Purchase, Manhattan for $24 worth of beads, or Seward's Folly, obtaining the prime lands of American cities for a song, left to them in fine condition and working order as per FHA/VA rules?

    C'mon, Editorial Board, it's your job to ask the questions. Let the answers finger-point.

    Replies: @Ted

    For about 15 years, I had USC football season tickets. It’s commonly known as the University of South Central, because, well, that’s where it is. What surpried me most the first time I went there? There are no housing projects. There are no Latin America style shantytowns. The city is largely filled with victorian era mansions. The area surrounding the mansions is full of very typical California tract housing, typically in the 1,200 square foot range, on standard sized city lots. Housing isn’t particularly densely packed, and the only apartments are the student housing, owned by the university. It’s a ghetto, full of houses that would start at $400,000 in any white or asian neighborhood in LA, with plenty of mansions that would go for several million. I’ve yet to see a house in South Central that WASN’T better than anyplace I’ve ever lived, and I’ve spent my entire life in SANTA BARBARA.

    Today it’s a ghetto, in one of the better parts of town, (temperture wise) filled with poor black people living in houses that most white people could never hope to afford, if those black people weren’t there. Here’s what I think is the real reason behind gentrification. The inner cities are where they are because that was the best place to build a city. Remove whatever is making it a bad neighborhood, and it will once again be the best place in town.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Ted

    In 2002, I went to the corner of Florence and Normandie where the Rodney King riot started in 1992. The neighborhood looked rather like Boys Town in West Hollywood in the 1970s before the remodeling really got going: lots of small, cute houses. Los Angeles is full of white gay men with a talent for renovating who could really go to town gentrifying South-Central if the crime rate comes down far enough.

    Replies: @BayAreaBill, @Mr. Blank

  44. @Jefferson
    @Hibernian

    Why is there no Southern accent among most of the White residents of Baltimore? Baltimore is not very culturally Southern. Baltimore Whites on average are culturally closer to SWPL than they are to confederate flag loving good o'boys from sweet home Alabama.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @D. K.

    A lot of Irish, Italian, and German people, and some Polish people, went there too. Also there’s a fair size Jewish community. During a brief period of active duty in the Army in 1989-1990 (I was in the Illinois Army National Guard for 21 years.) a white NCO from Baltimore and a fellow recruit from DC, also white, both had distinctive Southern accents. The guy from DC said his family was originally from North Carolina. Senator Ben Cardin who is Jewish and from NW Baltimore seems to have a trace of a Southern accent. I visited Baltimore once and the only Southern accent I heard was from an excursion boat captain.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    @Hibernian

    If I recall correctly Baltimore was a Catholic city, in the sense that Maryland itself was chartered that way, as a refuge, I mean, not as state religion. Therefore it was a mecca for Catholics, which would include Irish, Italians, and South Germans (and Poles, of course). I think Baltimore's most famous sons -- Mencken and Babe Ruth -- were both of German Catholic background.

    , @PV van der Byl
    @Hibernian

    If you've never seen it, watch Barry Levinson's movie "Diner." Although it appeared in 1982, it was set in 1959 Baltimore. What appears on the screen is a vanished world. All sorts of white ethnics including many Jews, often speaking in authentic Baltimore accents.

    The cast was also all-star, but long before any of them were recognized as stars.

  45. @Jefferson
    @Hibernian

    Why is there no Southern accent among most of the White residents of Baltimore? Baltimore is not very culturally Southern. Baltimore Whites on average are culturally closer to SWPL than they are to confederate flag loving good o'boys from sweet home Alabama.

    Replies: @Hibernian, @D. K.

    I am originally from Chicagoland– specifically, Gary, Indiana (part of “The Region”)– and, as an adult, I have lived in a large number of metropolitan areas, throughout the United States. During my sixteen months living in downtown Baltimore (2009-2010), I never felt as if I were living in the South. During my nine months living in New Orleans (1981-1982), on the other hand, I felt as if I had been transported to an alien galaxy!

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    @D. K.

    "I am originally from Chicagoland– specifically, Gary, Indiana (part of “The Region”)– and, as an adult, I have lived in a large number of metropolitan areas, throughout the United States. During my sixteen months living in downtown Baltimore (2009-2010), I never felt as if I were living in the South. During my nine months living in New Orleans (1981-1982), on the other hand, I felt as if I had been transported to an alien galaxy"

    I have also seen some people on the internet say that Virginia no longer culturally feels like the South due to immigration of cheap Latino labor as well as high tech jobs drawing in Asians and SWPL Yankee types. Virginia is becoming more like Massachusetts than Mississippi.

    Replies: @D. K., @Art Deco

  46. @Hibernian
    @Jefferson

    A lot of Irish, Italian, and German people, and some Polish people, went there too. Also there's a fair size Jewish community. During a brief period of active duty in the Army in 1989-1990 (I was in the Illinois Army National Guard for 21 years.) a white NCO from Baltimore and a fellow recruit from DC, also white, both had distinctive Southern accents. The guy from DC said his family was originally from North Carolina. Senator Ben Cardin who is Jewish and from NW Baltimore seems to have a trace of a Southern accent. I visited Baltimore once and the only Southern accent I heard was from an excursion boat captain.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @PV van der Byl

    If I recall correctly Baltimore was a Catholic city, in the sense that Maryland itself was chartered that way, as a refuge, I mean, not as state religion. Therefore it was a mecca for Catholics, which would include Irish, Italians, and South Germans (and Poles, of course). I think Baltimore’s most famous sons — Mencken and Babe Ruth — were both of German Catholic background.

  47. @Ted
    @mts1

    For about 15 years, I had USC football season tickets. It's commonly known as the University of South Central, because, well, that's where it is. What surpried me most the first time I went there? There are no housing projects. There are no Latin America style shantytowns. The city is largely filled with victorian era mansions. The area surrounding the mansions is full of very typical California tract housing, typically in the 1,200 square foot range, on standard sized city lots. Housing isn't particularly densely packed, and the only apartments are the student housing, owned by the university. It's a ghetto, full of houses that would start at $400,000 in any white or asian neighborhood in LA, with plenty of mansions that would go for several million. I've yet to see a house in South Central that WASN'T better than anyplace I've ever lived, and I've spent my entire life in SANTA BARBARA.

    Today it's a ghetto, in one of the better parts of town, (temperture wise) filled with poor black people living in houses that most white people could never hope to afford, if those black people weren't there. Here's what I think is the real reason behind gentrification. The inner cities are where they are because that was the best place to build a city. Remove whatever is making it a bad neighborhood, and it will once again be the best place in town.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    In 2002, I went to the corner of Florence and Normandie where the Rodney King riot started in 1992. The neighborhood looked rather like Boys Town in West Hollywood in the 1970s before the remodeling really got going: lots of small, cute houses. Los Angeles is full of white gay men with a talent for renovating who could really go to town gentrifying South-Central if the crime rate comes down far enough.

    • Replies: @BayAreaBill
    @Steve Sailer

    Note to self: Buy a house in south central for investment. I've got to remember to get this going at some point.

    , @Mr. Blank
    @Steve Sailer

    When I lived in L.A., I can remember being a little taken aback the first time I traveled through South Central. I'd grown up hearing about the region in rap songs, and they all made it sound like it was a nightmarish urban wasteland like -- well, like New York in all those movies from the 1970s.

    Imagine my surprise when I discovered that, on the whole, it wasn't all that bad. I mean, most of the houses and buildings were severely lacking in maintenance, but the physical stock was pretty nice — in some cases, outstanding. Throw a swarm of upwardly mobile young gay couples in there and in ten years you'd have a West Coast version of hipster Brooklyn.

    Maybe I shouldn't have been so surprised — I remember "Boyz N The Hood" and "Menace II Society" were supposed to be set in "tough" parts of South Central, but I remember thinking when I watched them, "that place doesn't look so bad." I just mentally dismissed it though, telling myself the filmmakers probably couldn't bring a crew into the "real" South Central.

    Every time I pointed out to L.A. natives that what I'd seen of South Central was actually not terrible, I was always told that there were were other parts that were much, much worse, where things were REALLY bad, really falling apart, and it was dangerous for white people to go to those places. THOSE were the fabled parts of South Central that I'd heard about in all the rap songs, they said. But I never actually saw those places, or any evidence they existed. Now I wonder if it was all a big tale folks told to justify the fact that the real South Central didn't live up to the hype.

  48. “the distressed condition of African-American working- and lower-middle-class families” in Maryland’s largest city and elsewhere “is almost entirely attributable to federal policy that prohibited black families from accumulating housing equity during the suburban boom that moved white families into single-family homes from the mid-1930s— and thus from bequeathing that wealth to their children and grandchildren, as white suburbanites have done.”

    I almost fell over laughing at that one. I gotta say, that’s one I haven’t heard before. Only a Northeast urban liberal could say that with a straight face. That’s it — they’ve finally cracked the code! The reason us white folks are so much better off than blacks is because of all the “wealth” left to us by our parents and grandparents. You got us.

    Good grief. We buried my grandmother a few weeks ago; she was 91. The sum total of the “wealth” she passed on to me was a collection of Hummels. The entire collection might fetch $75 on eBay, if I’m lucky. Her kids got more, of course, but I doubt their cut of the “wealth” was anything to write home about, either. She was in a nursing home, so there was no house equity for everyone to cash in on.

    That situation is fairly common, by the way. I’m not a stat guy, but I’m confident that, at least for non-rich people, a big chunk of all this “accumulated wealth” white folks have ends up getting gobbled up by end-of-life care.

    But yeah — a $75 collection of Hummels, that’s why my kids and grandkids are going to be so much better off than the kids and grandkids of those Baltimore rioters. Sheesh. If that’s all it takes, I’ll just ship the collection to Al Sharpton and he can give it to some deserving black family. If enough white people would do that, I bet the race problems in America would be largely solved in a few more generations. Right? Or am I missing something?

  49. @Steve Sailer
    @Ted

    In 2002, I went to the corner of Florence and Normandie where the Rodney King riot started in 1992. The neighborhood looked rather like Boys Town in West Hollywood in the 1970s before the remodeling really got going: lots of small, cute houses. Los Angeles is full of white gay men with a talent for renovating who could really go to town gentrifying South-Central if the crime rate comes down far enough.

    Replies: @BayAreaBill, @Mr. Blank

    Note to self: Buy a house in south central for investment. I’ve got to remember to get this going at some point.

  50. The papers are doomed and trying to take everybody down. The few papers still making payroll are doing it because of the 1%. Now we have the Deadgrass Frontier. Advertising is shot to hell and Texas is getting prepared for an American invasion. Maybe we can invade Mexico to gin up news. Get old bathtubs and start gin mills.

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gin%20mill
    Merriam‑Webster
    . First Known Use of GIN MILL. 1865.

    Fewer DUI’s!

  51. If you’ve read Greg Clark, where your great-grantparents were on the economic ladder has a lot to do with where you are now. But Baltimore’s segregation ordinances don’t explain anything. If blacks had been allowed to “integrate” a neighborhood, the whites would have left and the houses there would be swiftly rendered near-worthless. We know this because we can compare Baltimore to other northern cities that did not enact comprehensive segregation, and see that they wound up in the same place, or worse.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @keypusher

    Baltimore is really bad, although Milwaukee is probably even worse.

  52. @keypusher
    If you've read Greg Clark, where your great-grantparents were on the economic ladder has a lot to do with where you are now. But Baltimore's segregation ordinances don't explain anything. If blacks had been allowed to "integrate" a neighborhood, the whites would have left and the houses there would be swiftly rendered near-worthless. We know this because we can compare Baltimore to other northern cities that did not enact comprehensive segregation, and see that they wound up in the same place, or worse.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Baltimore is really bad, although Milwaukee is probably even worse.

  53. Taking a broader view…I think people in this thread are being insufficiently grateful to their ancestors. Interesting to consider my own family history in light of Clark’s book. My maternal grandparents immigrated here from Norway, but their families were middle class. My grandfather worked all manner of jobs, went to night school, then medical school and became a doctor. Considered in isolation he’s a great immigrant rags-to-riches story, but considered in the context of his family he was just getting back to the same social level (maybe a tad higher) his father occupied in Norway.

    My mother and father had four children, and then my father decamped. So we grew up rather poor. But we retained middle class values and expectations, and my grandfather was there to make sure things never got too desperate. Our most important inheritance, though, was genetic. All four of my grandparents were above average in intelligence; three of them were extremely bright, and at least two were very hard-working.

    My siblings and I were not, alas, as smart as our grandparents, but we, too, are all above average, and we all graduated from college. Two of us obtained graduate degrees, and the three of us still alive are all middle-class.

    The point is, we did no more to earn our brains than we would have earned a fat inheritance. They were just given to us. The people in Baltimore didn’t get brains like that, and they didn’t get much else, either.

    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    @keypusher

    Oh, believe me, I'm not ungrateful. I'm just saying that the "wealth" I got from my forebears wasn't anything physical. My ancestors bequeathed a lot to me, but it didn't come in the form of money or property.

  54. @Steve Sailer
    @HHSIII

    "Behind every working class white living beyond mere subsistence existence is a great crime."

    Good line.

    Replies: @HHSIII

    Thanks. You know, 3rd generation firefighter, pharmacist or florist with a decent house? Check your privilege. Maybe they can bring back sumptuary laws for non-elites. No capital formation home-owning for you lot, only renting.

  55. @Anonymous
    We white men are here because of blood, and mostly that of others; here because of our insatiable and rapacious desire to take by force the land and labor of those others. We are the last people on Earth with a right to ruminate upon the superior morality of peaceful protest. We have never believed in it and rarely practiced it. Rather, we have always taken what we desire, and when denied it we have turned to means utterly genocidal to make it so

    When you have the power you can take out your hatreds and frustrations directly upon the bodies of others. This is what we have done, not only in the above mentioned examples but right here at home. The so-called ghetto was created and not accidentally. It was designed as a virtual holding pen—a concentration camp were we to insist upon honest language—within which impoverished persons of color would be contained. It was created by generations of housing discrimination, which limited where its residents could live. It was created by decade after decade of white riots against black people whenever they would move into white neighborhoods. It was created by deindustrialization and the flight of good-paying manufacturing jobs overseas.

    By the second half of this century white America is going to begin to understand what it is to be a minority in America. This, I think, above all else has the current status quo scared beyond measure. they see this coming but have no answer or remedy. The only course they have settle on is to suppress minority voting for as long as they can. To retain their power ever as a minority. South Africa has come to America in a very formal and permanent way.

    Replies: @meh, @bomag, @Jus' Sayin'..., @keypusher

  56. @D. K.
    @Jefferson

    I am originally from Chicagoland-- specifically, Gary, Indiana (part of "The Region")-- and, as an adult, I have lived in a large number of metropolitan areas, throughout the United States. During my sixteen months living in downtown Baltimore (2009-2010), I never felt as if I were living in the South. During my nine months living in New Orleans (1981-1982), on the other hand, I felt as if I had been transported to an alien galaxy!

    Replies: @Jefferson

    “I am originally from Chicagoland– specifically, Gary, Indiana (part of “The Region”)– and, as an adult, I have lived in a large number of metropolitan areas, throughout the United States. During my sixteen months living in downtown Baltimore (2009-2010), I never felt as if I were living in the South. During my nine months living in New Orleans (1981-1982), on the other hand, I felt as if I had been transported to an alien galaxy”

    I have also seen some people on the internet say that Virginia no longer culturally feels like the South due to immigration of cheap Latino labor as well as high tech jobs drawing in Asians and SWPL Yankee types. Virginia is becoming more like Massachusetts than Mississippi.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    @Jefferson

    I spent several months living in suburban Alexandia, during the presidential year of 1992. My host was an old college buddy, from Purdue. By 1992, he was an Air Force lieutenant colonel, stationed at the Pentagon. Across the street from his housing development, there was another such housing development, in which lived the recently confirmed associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Clarence Thomas. No, I did not particularly feel, during those several months in Virginia, that I was living in Dixie, either.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    , @Art Deco
    @Jefferson

    I have also seen some people on the internet say that Virginia no longer culturally feels like the South due to immigration of cheap Latino labor as well as high tech jobs drawing in Asians and SWPL Yankee types. Virginia is becoming more like Massachusetts than Mississippi.

    --

    About 25% of the population of the state now lives in Northern Virginia, i.e. a component of the federal capital. The share in question would have been less than 10% in 1950 (when the capital itself had more of a Southern character). NoVa is definitely not Southern.

    As for the hispanic population, it is less than 4% of the total outside of NoVa.

    Virginia was never Mississippi to begin with. You get out into the Shenandoah Valley, racial questions were never taking up much space in people's heads.

  57. @HHSIII
    @FredR

    Yeah, this was on NPR the other day. It used Levittown as an example. Whites could build cheap equity in the 'burbs and blacks couldn't in the inner city. And now that there is integration all housing is too expensive (an isteve talking point, but so is the easy credit housing boom-bust).

    Of course this ignores the fact white hipsters aren't driving up the prices of houses in Levittown, but in Harlem and Spike Lee's old 'hood, Ft. Greene.

    Nope, the problem must be that we haven't done enough to help minorities build up some equity in housing the last 100 years. Or last 15 years. Oh, that and predatory lenders. Damn easy credit.

    Replies: @Big Bill

    Yeah, this was on NPR the other day. It used Levittown as an example. Whites could build cheap equity in the ‘burbs and blacks couldn’t in the inner city. And now that there is integration all housing is too expensive (an isteve talking point, but so is the easy credit housing boom-bust).

    The weird part is that those post-WWII “suburbanizing” whites abandoned the inner city to move out to Levittown. Consequently the price of urban houses dropped, and black folks snatched them up, cheap. But cheap housing for black folks is a bad thing if it is caused by White Flight, anyway.

  58. @elmer
    The day after Officer Wilson was exonerated Salon and other rags were not publishing essays on the exoneration but on the early 20th century phenomenon of lynchings.

    Replies: @Big Bill

    Make that “the Twenty-FIRST Century phenomenon of lynching”. The NAACP established THE official definition of lynching a century ago when they first started gathering and publishing their e.g. “3500 lynchings since 1850” statistics:

    1. an extrajudicial killing,
    2. by 3 or more people,
    3. for violating community mores/traditions/values (e.g. “acting uppity”, having a “smart mouth”, “dissing”, etc.)

    That’s it. That is the entire definition. No race. No noose. No burning crosses. No barbed wire. Nothing.

    Every single year, hundreds (if not thousands) of black men are lynched — for “dissing”, for “acting uppity”, for “hitting on my baby-mama”, for bumping into someone and not saying “sorry”, etc.

    Whenever you see a WorldStarHipHop.com video of a bunch of black kids stomping on some guy’s head, laughing and joking, you just watched a 21st Century lynching.

    The MSM and the NAACP, however, refuse to use the official NAACP name.

  59. @Jefferson
    @D. K.

    "I am originally from Chicagoland– specifically, Gary, Indiana (part of “The Region”)– and, as an adult, I have lived in a large number of metropolitan areas, throughout the United States. During my sixteen months living in downtown Baltimore (2009-2010), I never felt as if I were living in the South. During my nine months living in New Orleans (1981-1982), on the other hand, I felt as if I had been transported to an alien galaxy"

    I have also seen some people on the internet say that Virginia no longer culturally feels like the South due to immigration of cheap Latino labor as well as high tech jobs drawing in Asians and SWPL Yankee types. Virginia is becoming more like Massachusetts than Mississippi.

    Replies: @D. K., @Art Deco

    I spent several months living in suburban Alexandia, during the presidential year of 1992. My host was an old college buddy, from Purdue. By 1992, he was an Air Force lieutenant colonel, stationed at the Pentagon. Across the street from his housing development, there was another such housing development, in which lived the recently confirmed associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Clarence Thomas. No, I did not particularly feel, during those several months in Virginia, that I was living in Dixie, either.

    • Replies: @Paul Mendez
    @D. K.

    The same can be said of the Research Triangle area of NC. My nieces and nephews, born and raised outside of Raleigh, speak without the slightest trace of a Southern accent, and are all SWPL hipsters to the core.

  60. @Jefferson
    @D. K.

    "I am originally from Chicagoland– specifically, Gary, Indiana (part of “The Region”)– and, as an adult, I have lived in a large number of metropolitan areas, throughout the United States. During my sixteen months living in downtown Baltimore (2009-2010), I never felt as if I were living in the South. During my nine months living in New Orleans (1981-1982), on the other hand, I felt as if I had been transported to an alien galaxy"

    I have also seen some people on the internet say that Virginia no longer culturally feels like the South due to immigration of cheap Latino labor as well as high tech jobs drawing in Asians and SWPL Yankee types. Virginia is becoming more like Massachusetts than Mississippi.

    Replies: @D. K., @Art Deco

    I have also seen some people on the internet say that Virginia no longer culturally feels like the South due to immigration of cheap Latino labor as well as high tech jobs drawing in Asians and SWPL Yankee types. Virginia is becoming more like Massachusetts than Mississippi.

    About 25% of the population of the state now lives in Northern Virginia, i.e. a component of the federal capital. The share in question would have been less than 10% in 1950 (when the capital itself had more of a Southern character). NoVa is definitely not Southern.

    As for the hispanic population, it is less than 4% of the total outside of NoVa.

    Virginia was never Mississippi to begin with. You get out into the Shenandoah Valley, racial questions were never taking up much space in people’s heads.

  61. @D. K.
    @Jefferson

    I spent several months living in suburban Alexandia, during the presidential year of 1992. My host was an old college buddy, from Purdue. By 1992, he was an Air Force lieutenant colonel, stationed at the Pentagon. Across the street from his housing development, there was another such housing development, in which lived the recently confirmed associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Clarence Thomas. No, I did not particularly feel, during those several months in Virginia, that I was living in Dixie, either.

    Replies: @Paul Mendez

    The same can be said of the Research Triangle area of NC. My nieces and nephews, born and raised outside of Raleigh, speak without the slightest trace of a Southern accent, and are all SWPL hipsters to the core.

  62. @Steve Sailer
    @Ted

    In 2002, I went to the corner of Florence and Normandie where the Rodney King riot started in 1992. The neighborhood looked rather like Boys Town in West Hollywood in the 1970s before the remodeling really got going: lots of small, cute houses. Los Angeles is full of white gay men with a talent for renovating who could really go to town gentrifying South-Central if the crime rate comes down far enough.

    Replies: @BayAreaBill, @Mr. Blank

    When I lived in L.A., I can remember being a little taken aback the first time I traveled through South Central. I’d grown up hearing about the region in rap songs, and they all made it sound like it was a nightmarish urban wasteland like — well, like New York in all those movies from the 1970s.

    Imagine my surprise when I discovered that, on the whole, it wasn’t all that bad. I mean, most of the houses and buildings were severely lacking in maintenance, but the physical stock was pretty nice — in some cases, outstanding. Throw a swarm of upwardly mobile young gay couples in there and in ten years you’d have a West Coast version of hipster Brooklyn.

    Maybe I shouldn’t have been so surprised — I remember “Boyz N The Hood” and “Menace II Society” were supposed to be set in “tough” parts of South Central, but I remember thinking when I watched them, “that place doesn’t look so bad.” I just mentally dismissed it though, telling myself the filmmakers probably couldn’t bring a crew into the “real” South Central.

    Every time I pointed out to L.A. natives that what I’d seen of South Central was actually not terrible, I was always told that there were were other parts that were much, much worse, where things were REALLY bad, really falling apart, and it was dangerous for white people to go to those places. THOSE were the fabled parts of South Central that I’d heard about in all the rap songs, they said. But I never actually saw those places, or any evidence they existed. Now I wonder if it was all a big tale folks told to justify the fact that the real South Central didn’t live up to the hype.

  63. @keypusher
    Taking a broader view...I think people in this thread are being insufficiently grateful to their ancestors. Interesting to consider my own family history in light of Clark's book. My maternal grandparents immigrated here from Norway, but their families were middle class. My grandfather worked all manner of jobs, went to night school, then medical school and became a doctor. Considered in isolation he's a great immigrant rags-to-riches story, but considered in the context of his family he was just getting back to the same social level (maybe a tad higher) his father occupied in Norway.

    My mother and father had four children, and then my father decamped. So we grew up rather poor. But we retained middle class values and expectations, and my grandfather was there to make sure things never got too desperate. Our most important inheritance, though, was genetic. All four of my grandparents were above average in intelligence; three of them were extremely bright, and at least two were very hard-working.

    My siblings and I were not, alas, as smart as our grandparents, but we, too, are all above average, and we all graduated from college. Two of us obtained graduate degrees, and the three of us still alive are all middle-class.

    The point is, we did no more to earn our brains than we would have earned a fat inheritance. They were just given to us. The people in Baltimore didn't get brains like that, and they didn't get much else, either.

    Replies: @Mr. Blank

    Oh, believe me, I’m not ungrateful. I’m just saying that the “wealth” I got from my forebears wasn’t anything physical. My ancestors bequeathed a lot to me, but it didn’t come in the form of money or property.

  64. @Hibernian
    @Jefferson

    A lot of Irish, Italian, and German people, and some Polish people, went there too. Also there's a fair size Jewish community. During a brief period of active duty in the Army in 1989-1990 (I was in the Illinois Army National Guard for 21 years.) a white NCO from Baltimore and a fellow recruit from DC, also white, both had distinctive Southern accents. The guy from DC said his family was originally from North Carolina. Senator Ben Cardin who is Jewish and from NW Baltimore seems to have a trace of a Southern accent. I visited Baltimore once and the only Southern accent I heard was from an excursion boat captain.

    Replies: @SPMoore8, @PV van der Byl

    If you’ve never seen it, watch Barry Levinson’s movie “Diner.” Although it appeared in 1982, it was set in 1959 Baltimore. What appears on the screen is a vanished world. All sorts of white ethnics including many Jews, often speaking in authentic Baltimore accents.

    The cast was also all-star, but long before any of them were recognized as stars.

  65. @unit472
    You take some of those brick row houses in Baltimore and put them in Washington, D.C and you could sell them for more than a million dollars.

    http://living-in-washingtondc.com/images/georgetown/georgetownpicture25.jpg

    And Baltimore

    https://kleshasandtanhas.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/baltimore-slum2.jpg

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Just like the old brownstones along the Massachusetts Avenue corridor in Boston, hard by Roxbury. Back in the 70s we’d ride the school bus up Mass Ave. on the way to track meets at the old Commonwealth Armory, and these places were boarded-up, burned-out slum properties available for a song, or even a short medley. Now, they’re multi-million dollar homes.

  66. I’m very sad that in SteveSpeak, “antiquarian” has become a bad word. I used to tell people, “I’m less a conservative than an antiquarian,” but now that line is ruined.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Chrisnonymous

    Just the New Antiquarianism.

  67. @Chrisnonymous
    I'm very sad that in SteveSpeak, "antiquarian" has become a bad word. I used to tell people, "I'm less a conservative than an antiquarian," but now that line is ruined.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Just the New Antiquarianism.

  68. The penchant of the current left wing to dredge up instances historical naughtiness in order to make some kind of overarching point about privilege and injustice today might aptly be called “Progressive Antiquarianism”, which is, of course, a contradiction in terms, but that’s part of why I think it is apt.

    Next up: Neanderthal skulls over-represented in Europe. How dare they.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @SPMoore8

    "Progressive Antiquarianism" -- that's good.

  69. @SPMoore8
    The penchant of the current left wing to dredge up instances historical naughtiness in order to make some kind of overarching point about privilege and injustice today might aptly be called "Progressive Antiquarianism", which is, of course, a contradiction in terms, but that's part of why I think it is apt.

    Next up: Neanderthal skulls over-represented in Europe. How dare they.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    “Progressive Antiquarianism” — that’s good.

  70. @Kylie
    @Merema


    Sadly, what is typical is an old Black lady living in a house she bought in the 50s and 60s with money she earned cleaning White peoples homes and such. Living with her are her alcoholic and/or pot smoking unemployable loser sons, who upon her death, loose the house for non tax payment, and the home is sold to an energetic handy Hispanic who renovates it and moves his family in, while renting the upper floor out.
     
    What's sad about that situation? Why should loser adult sons who don't appreciate their mom's hard work and sacrifice get to keep her house? Better it should go to an energetic Hispanic who renovates it.

    Or would it be okay if the new energetic home-owner was black?

    Replies: @Merema

    Its sad that the sons are looser adults, and that black americans are loosing their assets.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS