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The More Money Goes Into Women's College Basketball, the More Men Are Coaches
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From the NYT:

Number of Women Coaching in College Has Plummeted in Title IX Era
By JERÉ LONGMAN MARCH 30, 2017

DALLAS — … In 1972, when the gender equity law known as Title IX was enacted, women were head coaches of more than 90 percent of the N.C.A.A.’s women’s teams across two dozen sports. Now that number has decreased to about 40 percent.

“I want to think sexism is too simple of an answer, but what is it if it’s not that?” said VanDerveer, the only woman beside Pat Summitt to have won 1,000 career games in Division I. “Anytime someone hires a male coach and says, ‘Coaching is coaching,’ well, why aren’t more women in men’s basketball?”

Perhaps because 99% of sports were invented and developed by males as a test of masculinity?

The most successful coach in women’s college basketball is of Connecticut, which has won 111 consecutive games and is seeking its fifth consecutive national title — and 12th over all. In the second semifinal of the N.C.A.A. tournament on Friday, UConn will face Mississippi State, also coached by a man, Vic Schaefer.

… As more money and higher salaries came into college sports, men became increasingly interested in coaching women’s teams. (In October, Auriemma signed a five-year contract extension that will pay him at least $13 million).

 
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  1. Where does UConn get the money to pay its women’s coach $2.5 million a year?

    • Replies: @guest
    @Anonymous

    From men's basketball?

    , @markflag
    @Anonymous

    From football generated revenue?

    Replies: @Marty T

    , @EriK
    @Anonymous

    The UCONN women have a huge following. I don't understand it but it's true.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous


    Where does UConn get the money to pay its women’s coach $2.5 million a year?
     
    From men.

    Large tranches of the super-state are scams for shovelling money from men to women, without women having to do what they've traditional done to earn a claim on a man's productivity--sex, companionship, homemaking, bearing and raising children.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous

    In fairness, I should say that basketball is a pretty cheap sport--building aside--to put on, and generally a money maker.

    And the U Conn's women's team no doubt is hugely popular--people love a winner, and there's enough of a sadistic streak in many folks, that many folks will come out to see them rub their next opponent in the dirt. So i'd assume that in this relatively unique case the women's team actually generates substantial revenue and can pay a fat coach's salary. For most women's programs this is decidedly *not* the case, and they exist--and coaches have fat comfy sinecures--based entirely on state mandated re-distribution from men.

    ~~
    Like everyone else who's given it any thought ... the whole college athletics apparatus is appalling. The women's side perhaps less appalling then the blacks-on-campus men's football\basketball side.

    No scholarships, no recruiting, no lowered standards, no ridiculously paid coaches--something more like HS programs for kids interested in sport. Let football and basketball have minor leagues for average and below IQ, not-really-college-material, boys interested in sport.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous

    In fairness, I should say that basketball is a pretty cheap sport--building aside--to put on, and generally a money maker.

    And the U Conn's women's team no doubt is hugely popular--people love a winner, and there's enough of a sadistic streak in many folks, that many folks will come out to see them rub their next opponent in the dirt. So i'd assume that in this relatively unique case the women's team actually generates substantial revenue and can pay a fat coach's salary. For most women's programs this is decidedly *not* the case, and they exist--and coaches have fat comfy sinecures--based entirely on state mandated re-distribution from men.

    ~~
    Like everyone else who's given it any thought ... the whole college athletics apparatus is appalling. The women's side perhaps less appalling then the blacks-on-campus men's football\basketball side.

    No scholarships, no recruiting, no lowered standards, no ridiculously paid coaches--something more like HS programs for kids interested in sport. Let football and basketball have minor leagues for average and below IQ, not-really-college-material, boys interested in sport.

    Replies: @marty, @Njguy73

  2. It would be interesting to ask how many women involved in college sports believe that men and women have an equal level of interest in participating in sports.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    @Barnard

    That difference in participation would parallel the interest in watching sports.

    Replies: @Abe

  3. We need more transgender coaches. Paging Caitlyn Jenner, paging Caitlyn Jenner.

    • Replies: @TheJester
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Caitlyn Jenner as a coach for a woman's basketball team? That wouldn't work.

    As with most MTF transgendered men, Jenner wouldn't be able to concentrate on basketball. (S)he would spend too much time looking in the mirror to reassure herself regarding her success in impersonating the visual countenance of a woman. Really, this is a full-time job: the hormones, the operations, the fashions, the makeup, and learning complex feminine gestures, voice inflections, and gaits that never seem quite right. Back to the mirror for reassurance.

  4. The obvious next step is encouraging tall male to female transgender athletes by offering them scholarships.

    The average height of a female NCAA basketball center is just 6’2″; only one woman in 7,400 is that tall. On the other hand, one male in twenty is 6’2″, it should be easy to find tall m-to-f trans players.

    Taking hormones, the bane of m-to-f athletes in other sports, shouldn’t be a problem, since they wouldn’t lose any height.

    Colleges are being forced to accept trans athletes:

    Campus Pride, a coalition of more than 80 homosexual and transgender advocacy groups wrote a letter to the NCAA March 9 “requesting that the NCAA take action to divest from all religious based campuses who have requested discriminatory Title IX waivers toward LGBTQ youth.”

    Eventually, m-to-f trans centers and forwards will dominate NCAA women’s basketball; after all, one male in 200 is 6’5″; only one woman in 150,000 is that tall.

    Game over, girls.

    • Replies: @unpc downunder
    @Anon7

    If most males with gender dysphoria starts taking hormones during puberty (as they increasingly seem to be doing) then they are going to have the same strengths and limitations of biological women. Hence, a biological male who starts hormones in puberty will have a similar height to a normal female.

    An anti-transsexual feminist Germaine Greer recognised several decades ago, hormonal therapy for trannies will probably make little difference to the existing gender binary.

  5. “what is it if it’s not that?”

    Men are better coaches? Naw,that can’t be, because…

    “why aren’t more women in men’s basketball?”

    Because the only conceivable reason I can think of to hire female coaches is if the players are also female and you think for whatever reason females are naturally better at coaching females. Which I doubt.

    I love the logic she uses. If “coaching is coaching,” then there should be women coaching men’s basketball. Because…equality?

  6. @Anonymous
    Where does UConn get the money to pay its women's coach $2.5 million a year?

    Replies: @guest, @markflag, @EriK, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    From men’s basketball?

  7. Did you hear about the transgender — i.e. man pretending to be woman — weightlifter who recently won a women’s weightlifting title?

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2017/03/22/transgender-woman-wins-international-weightlifting-title-amid-controversy-over-fairness/?utm_term=.315da66ef917

    In light of present-day insanity and Steve’s point that sports are mostly male-invented contests of male traits, wouldn’t it make sense to combine men and women into one league? Women should have to compete with men in all sports. After all, that’s what those female weightlifters were doing.

    This would of course result in the elimination of virtually all females from competitive sports. Maybe there’s something to be said for that. It would leave things like figure skating and the balance beam.

    I dare any man who values his family jewels to try the balance beam.

    • Replies: @CK
    @Buzz Mohawk

    He who invents the iron jock shall have the first bounce on the beam.

  8. @Barnard
    It would be interesting to ask how many women involved in college sports believe that men and women have an equal level of interest in participating in sports.

    Replies: @Ivy

    That difference in participation would parallel the interest in watching sports.

    • Replies: @Abe
    @Ivy


    That difference in participation would parallel the interest in watching sports.
     
    Which parallels the amount of money they waste on sports (tickets, merchandise, otherwise-free time wasted watching commercials), and yet that never seems to come up in discussions of the compensation differentials between male and female professional athletes. Just an apples to a$$h0l3s comparison of games won and points scored in leagues that might as well exist in parallel universes for all they interact with each other.

    I'm sure that bright boy who just premiered his Michael Brown documentary (STRANGER FRUIT) will turn his searing gaze, now that he's squeezed all the juice he can out of that corpse, to the problem of how the UConn women's basketball program is barely recognized despite being the MOST SUCCESSFUL SPORTS DYNASTY IN THE HISTORY/HERSTORY OF THE UNIVERSE!
  9. the only woman beside Pat Summitt to have won 1,000 career games in Division I

    Pat Summit became head coach of the University of Tennessee’s women’s basketball team in 1974 at the age of 22. She had been a graduate assistant and took over after the previous coach abruptly quit. She earned $25o a month, washed the players’ uniforms, and drove the team van. She married in 1980 and had her only child in 1990.

    Her son Tyler became head coach of the Louisiana Tech women’s basketball team at the age of 23. He was let go two years later when it was revealed that he had impregnated one of his players.

  10. “(And almost all the rest are lesbians)” should be your sub-header for this post.

    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    @SonOfStrom

    Female soccer players are just like the boys in some respects.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4363414/Female-footballers-Arsenal-Millwall-brawled.html


    "Top female footballers were caught up in a brawl in the street after one flirted with another's girlfriend during a Gay Pride drinking session, a court heard.

    Millwall Lionesses player Frankie Strugnell was apparently making advances on teammate Leah Jones in the Montagu Pyke pub, central London.

    Arsenal player Jemma Rose, 25, Miss Jones' girlfriend, then allegedly became angry and a fight broke out, which then spilled out into the street, Southwark Crown Court heard."
     
  11. It’s okay because Ballmer’s going to hire a woman as next Clippers coach.

  12. • Replies: @eah
    @eah

    Yes indeed.

    https://twitter.com/nontolerantman/status/847752800226254848

    Replies: @guest

    , @AnotherDad
    @eah

    Given the level of leftist insanity in World War T, I can't really see what's stopping a decent male college golfer or tennis player from declaring "i always felt like a girl inside", going pro and collecting some loot. If you know you aren't good enough to make $$$ on the pro-tour ... why not?

    In line with the leftist worldview thata feelings trump all, you don't have to get clipped. You don't even have to give up your girlfriend--you simply feel like a girl who is a lesbian. All you have to do is say that your "gender"--whatever the hell that is--is female.

  13. Last year’s Reveal article on female college coaches made it seem like there was an all out war on women, but the New York Times article explains that many women don’t want to meet the demands of the job, preferring work-life balance, and probably aren’t applying for coaching jobs as often as men.

    Both articles do agree that there is a reluctance to hire homosexuals. I wonder if there is a wide-spread problem with coaches having relationships with their players that no one is willing to talk about. The female track coach at the University of Texas was fired after having a relationship with one of her female athletes. I think she had been head coach for about 20 years.

  14. Not wishing to cast too many aspersions, it is a well known route for paedophiles and other sex offenders to take up coaching or refereeing of kids’ sporting activities.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Anonymous

    I don't reckon paedophilia is motivating anyone to coach collegiate athletes.

    , @anon
    @Anonymous

    it is a well known route for paedophiles and other sex offenders to take up coaching or refereeing of kids’ sporting activities.

    I'm not sure how well known or true this is, but I'd like to coach or referee or otherwise mentor kids, but won't because of the specter of suspicion or a false allegation.

    I can clearly and fondly remember my little league coaches. They were all married and never acted inappropriately; other than occasionally showing up drunk to a game or practice.

    On the other hand, I once was the assistant coach of a womens' softball team.

    , @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous


    Not wishing to cast too many aspersions, it is a well known route for paedophiles and other sex offenders to take up coaching or refereeing of kids’ sporting activities.
     
    Probably true. But how many actual "pedophiles" are out there?

    Most of the supposed "pedophilia" I've heard about--that's actually real, not Wenatchee type hysteria--is not actually "pedophilia" but standard issue homosexual grooming.

    Pretty much the entire Catholic Church "pedophilia" scandal--at least every single case I read about--was simply homosexuals grooming 14+ boys\young men. The media called it "pedophilia" to bash the Catholic Church while studiously never saying the word "homosexual". The problem is somehow those sinister hidebound conservative Catholics, not wonderful homosexuals. Pure propaganda.

    Same crap in Boy Scouts. There were a few cases the trial lawyers cooked up to get paid. (Actually choosing, observing and dismissing youth leaders is up to individual units--the boys parents effectively, legally the charting organizations.) All of the cases, I read about were homosexuals trying to groom young men. But of course, BSA trying to keep out homosexuals--the eminently logical approach for any youth program--that was evil and the left was busy suing, harassing, getting companies to defund, etc. etc. So the queers are now in and will, of course, do what queers do. Then the same lawyers will be back to sue for damages.
  15. “VanDerveer”
    As a dutchman, the capital letters in this name confuse me. Every single one of them is wrong. How can you go from “van der Veer” to this?

    • Replies: @markflag
    @Unzerker

    The same way Brett Favre's name got changed to Farv without changing the order of letters.

  16. @Anonymous
    Where does UConn get the money to pay its women's coach $2.5 million a year?

    Replies: @guest, @markflag, @EriK, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    From football generated revenue?

    • Replies: @Marty T
    @markflag

    I'm guessing UConn womens basketball makes a lot of money. Their stands always look full.

  17. @Unzerker
    "VanDerveer"
    As a dutchman, the capital letters in this name confuse me. Every single one of them is wrong. How can you go from "van der Veer" to this?

    Replies: @markflag

    The same way Brett Favre’s name got changed to Farv without changing the order of letters.

  18. @markflag
    @Anonymous

    From football generated revenue?

    Replies: @Marty T

    I’m guessing UConn womens basketball makes a lot of money. Their stands always look full.

  19. Shocked that there are lots of men who are interested in hanging out with athletic college girls and getting paid well for it.

    • Agree: CK
  20. @Anonymous
    Not wishing to cast too many aspersions, it is a well known route for paedophiles and other sex offenders to take up coaching or refereeing of kids' sporting activities.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @anon, @AnotherDad

    I don’t reckon paedophilia is motivating anyone to coach collegiate athletes.

  21. @SonOfStrom
    "(And almost all the rest are lesbians)" should be your sub-header for this post.

    Replies: @Anonymous Nephew

    Female soccer players are just like the boys in some respects.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4363414/Female-footballers-Arsenal-Millwall-brawled.html

    “Top female footballers were caught up in a brawl in the street after one flirted with another’s girlfriend during a Gay Pride drinking session, a court heard.

    Millwall Lionesses player Frankie Strugnell was apparently making advances on teammate Leah Jones in the Montagu Pyke pub, central London.

    Arsenal player Jemma Rose, 25, Miss Jones’ girlfriend, then allegedly became angry and a fight broke out, which then spilled out into the street, Southwark Crown Court heard.”

  22. Male coaches? Maybe they are still transitioning? Didn’t think of that, did you?

  23. This goes all the way down too. Having seen hundreds of girls’ soccer and softball games in travel and rec leagues, I have seen only a handful of women coaches. There are two types: moms forced into service involuntarily and women who look like gym teachers when I was younger.

    The stereotyping machine in my head would have predicted many more female softball coaches than actually exist.

    • Replies: @Marty T
    @william munny

    Softball coach types might be unlikely to have kids due to that whole sex with a man thing.

  24. @eah
    https://twitter.com/thepeterdsouza/status/844148654038507520

    Replies: @eah, @AnotherDad

    • Replies: @guest
    @eah

    He was the intergender champion, with no pretense of being a lady. I was going to say as can be discerned from his appearance in that picture, but of course our progressive overlords won't have it that we can assume men who look and act like men are men. That's a "wow, just wow" assumption.

  25. @Anonymous
    Where does UConn get the money to pay its women's coach $2.5 million a year?

    Replies: @guest, @markflag, @EriK, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    The UCONN women have a huge following. I don’t understand it but it’s true.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @EriK

    It's easy to understand: they are incredibly good, so much so that the programme has become storied (I don't even follow rhe sport but I know this). The women's basketball team at the University of Tennessee have a similar record of success and large following, as do the University of Georgia's ladies' gymnastics team, albeit to a lesser extent owing to gymnastics' being less popular than basketball. (They used to be the "Lady Dogs" or "Lady Gymdogs" but it seems they are now the "Gymdogs," doubtless because of Newspeak.)



    Success has a thousand fathers, and all that sort of thing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Barnard, @guest, @ben tillman

  26. @EriK
    @Anonymous

    The UCONN women have a huge following. I don't understand it but it's true.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    It’s easy to understand: they are incredibly good, so much so that the programme has become storied (I don’t even follow rhe sport but I know this). The women’s basketball team at the University of Tennessee have a similar record of success and large following, as do the University of Georgia’s ladies’ gymnastics team, albeit to a lesser extent owing to gymnastics’ being less popular than basketball. (They used to be the “Lady Dogs” or “Lady Gymdogs” but it seems they are now the “Gymdogs,” doubtless because of Newspeak.)

    Success has a thousand fathers, and all that sort of thing.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Autochthon

    The U. of Utah has figured out how to make women's gymnastics into a good show and gets 5 figure crowds for their dual meets.

    The problem with college women's gymnastics is the melancholy one that the young ladies are over the hill age-wise, but Utah just powers through this and makes it excellent live theater.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Marty T

    , @Barnard
    @Autochthon

    UConn women's basketball is popular, but still isn't generating enough revenue to pay Auriemma that kind of money. The money in college sports comes from the TV contracts, they get some money from ESPN but their program is still getting subsidized from the football and men's basketball TV revenue. You can't pay the coach over $2 million off ticket revenue from 20 games.

    Replies: @EriK, @Discordiax

    , @guest
    @Autochthon

    That's not easy to understand. What is it worth to be good at something no one cares about? I wouldn't pay to see humanity's greatest balloon juggler.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    , @ben tillman
    @Autochthon


    It’s easy to understand: they are incredibly good, so much so that the programme has become storied (I don’t even follow rhe sport but I know this). The women’s basketball team at the University of Tennessee have a similar record of success and large following, as do the University of Georgia’s ladies’ gymnastics team, albeit to a lesser extent owing to gymnastics’ being less popular than basketball. (They used to be the “Lady Dogs” or “Lady Gymdogs” but it seems they are now the “Gymdogs,” doubtless because of Newspeak.)
     
    Well, I always thought that the best nickname for UGA's women's teams shares the first five letters of "Bulldogs".

    Replies: @Autochthon

  27. Whatever Auriemma gets paid, he’s worth it. To convince the top players in the country to attend a rinky-dink school in unglamorous Storrs, CT can’t be easy, but here he is in the middle of a 5-year winning streak and playing for his 12th NCAA title.

    I respect John Wooden, too, but how hard was it to convince a kid to go to school in LA?

  28. @Autochthon
    @EriK

    It's easy to understand: they are incredibly good, so much so that the programme has become storied (I don't even follow rhe sport but I know this). The women's basketball team at the University of Tennessee have a similar record of success and large following, as do the University of Georgia's ladies' gymnastics team, albeit to a lesser extent owing to gymnastics' being less popular than basketball. (They used to be the "Lady Dogs" or "Lady Gymdogs" but it seems they are now the "Gymdogs," doubtless because of Newspeak.)



    Success has a thousand fathers, and all that sort of thing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Barnard, @guest, @ben tillman

    The U. of Utah has figured out how to make women’s gymnastics into a good show and gets 5 figure crowds for their dual meets.

    The problem with college women’s gymnastics is the melancholy one that the young ladies are over the hill age-wise, but Utah just powers through this and makes it excellent live theater.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @Steve Sailer

    You are a hound for both empirical data and sports: Are there any other sports besides women's gymnastics wherein the athletes peak so young? Is it the antipodes of professional golf in that regard? (Men's gymnastics is more about strength, so even it isn't so much about youth.)

    Before 1981 the girls had to be fourteen for (senior) Olympic competitions, and the minimum age has since been raised to sixteen. Even that requirement seems to have as much or more to do with concerns about children's welfare and avoiding injury to growing bodies than with anything else. Junior events not requiring the imprimatur of the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique still allow juniors even younger to compete, and I'm curious how those girls' performance compare to the seniors'....

    Caling the Olympians and similar athletes the "women's" team is a bit odd: they are as much the girls' team, but of course calling females girls in these contexts – even when, as here, it's simply being accurate about their ages – is disallowed by Newspeak.

    Absent the requirement, would all the female champions be a bunch of twelve-year-olds and thirteen-year-olds? That's wild when compared to any other sport, where being light and flexible isn't so hypervalued.

    Fun fact: The Red Rocks and the Lady Dogs are tied; each holding ten national championships. Must be something about red, white, and black uniforms. (And being over the hill is relative: Man did I admire those ladies when I was but a callow undergraduate. Go dawgs!)

    , @Marty T
    @Steve Sailer

    Big 10 volleyball games often draw big crowds. Women's sports can if the players are attractive and relatively feminine looking. Even Geno's Uconn players are relatively attractive by bball standards.

    Replies: @Buck Turgidson

  29. @Anonymous
    Where does UConn get the money to pay its women's coach $2.5 million a year?

    Replies: @guest, @markflag, @EriK, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    Where does UConn get the money to pay its women’s coach $2.5 million a year?

    From men.

    Large tranches of the super-state are scams for shovelling money from men to women, without women having to do what they’ve traditional done to earn a claim on a man’s productivity–sex, companionship, homemaking, bearing and raising children.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @AnotherDad


    "Large tranches of the super-state are scams for shovelling money from men to women"
     
    Also from whites to non-whites.

    If you happen to be male and white, it is hard to see what the benefit of the state is anymore...

    Replies: @Coemgen

  30. @Steve Sailer
    @Autochthon

    The U. of Utah has figured out how to make women's gymnastics into a good show and gets 5 figure crowds for their dual meets.

    The problem with college women's gymnastics is the melancholy one that the young ladies are over the hill age-wise, but Utah just powers through this and makes it excellent live theater.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Marty T

    You are a hound for both empirical data and sports: Are there any other sports besides women’s gymnastics wherein the athletes peak so young? Is it the antipodes of professional golf in that regard? (Men’s gymnastics is more about strength, so even it isn’t so much about youth.)

    Before 1981 the girls had to be fourteen for (senior) Olympic competitions, and the minimum age has since been raised to sixteen. Even that requirement seems to have as much or more to do with concerns about children’s welfare and avoiding injury to growing bodies than with anything else. Junior events not requiring the imprimatur of the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique still allow juniors even younger to compete, and I’m curious how those girls’ performance compare to the seniors’….

    Caling the Olympians and similar athletes the “women’s” team is a bit odd: they are as much the girls’ team, but of course calling females girls in these contexts – even when, as here, it’s simply being accurate about their ages – is disallowed by Newspeak.

    Absent the requirement, would all the female champions be a bunch of twelve-year-olds and thirteen-year-olds? That’s wild when compared to any other sport, where being light and flexible isn’t so hypervalued.

    Fun fact: The Red Rocks and the Lady Dogs are tied; each holding ten national championships. Must be something about red, white, and black uniforms. (And being over the hill is relative: Man did I admire those ladies when I was but a callow undergraduate. Go dawgs!)

  31. @Anonymous
    Where does UConn get the money to pay its women's coach $2.5 million a year?

    Replies: @guest, @markflag, @EriK, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    In fairness, I should say that basketball is a pretty cheap sport–building aside–to put on, and generally a money maker.

    And the U Conn’s women’s team no doubt is hugely popular–people love a winner, and there’s enough of a sadistic streak in many folks, that many folks will come out to see them rub their next opponent in the dirt. So i’d assume that in this relatively unique case the women’s team actually generates substantial revenue and can pay a fat coach’s salary. For most women’s programs this is decidedly *not* the case, and they exist–and coaches have fat comfy sinecures–based entirely on state mandated re-distribution from men.

    ~~
    Like everyone else who’s given it any thought … the whole college athletics apparatus is appalling. The women’s side perhaps less appalling then the blacks-on-campus men’s football\basketball side.

    No scholarships, no recruiting, no lowered standards, no ridiculously paid coaches–something more like HS programs for kids interested in sport. Let football and basketball have minor leagues for average and below IQ, not-really-college-material, boys interested in sport.

  32. @Anonymous
    Where does UConn get the money to pay its women's coach $2.5 million a year?

    Replies: @guest, @markflag, @EriK, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad, @AnotherDad

    In fairness, I should say that basketball is a pretty cheap sport–building aside–to put on, and generally a money maker.

    And the U Conn’s women’s team no doubt is hugely popular–people love a winner, and there’s enough of a sadistic streak in many folks, that many folks will come out to see them rub their next opponent in the dirt. So i’d assume that in this relatively unique case the women’s team actually generates substantial revenue and can pay a fat coach’s salary. For most women’s programs this is decidedly *not* the case, and they exist–and coaches have fat comfy sinecures–based entirely on state mandated re-distribution from men.

    ~~
    Like everyone else who’s given it any thought … the whole college athletics apparatus is appalling. The women’s side perhaps less appalling then the blacks-on-campus men’s football\basketball side.

    No scholarships, no recruiting, no lowered standards, no ridiculously paid coaches–something more like HS programs for kids interested in sport. Let football and basketball have minor leagues for average and below IQ, not-really-college-material, boys interested in sport.

    • Replies: @marty
    @AnotherDad

    "No scholarships, no recruiting, no lowered standards, ..."

    Interesting to see you say this. Not arguing - it's just that whenever I see these women giants on the Berkeley campus, they have that same thug swagger, and vacant, heavy-lidded look in the eyes that you see on the football players.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    , @Njguy73
    @AnotherDad

    You should read The Hundred Yard Lie by Rick Telander.

  33. @Autochthon
    @EriK

    It's easy to understand: they are incredibly good, so much so that the programme has become storied (I don't even follow rhe sport but I know this). The women's basketball team at the University of Tennessee have a similar record of success and large following, as do the University of Georgia's ladies' gymnastics team, albeit to a lesser extent owing to gymnastics' being less popular than basketball. (They used to be the "Lady Dogs" or "Lady Gymdogs" but it seems they are now the "Gymdogs," doubtless because of Newspeak.)



    Success has a thousand fathers, and all that sort of thing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Barnard, @guest, @ben tillman

    UConn women’s basketball is popular, but still isn’t generating enough revenue to pay Auriemma that kind of money. The money in college sports comes from the TV contracts, they get some money from ESPN but their program is still getting subsidized from the football and men’s basketball TV revenue. You can’t pay the coach over $2 million off ticket revenue from 20 games.

    • Replies: @EriK
    @Barnard

    Agree, but not that many college sports programs make money, it's not just the girl huskies. To be clear, some may make a ton of money, but they spend even more.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    , @Discordiax
    @Barnard

    The revenues and expenses of college athletics are highly opaque, but UConn women's basketball gets about $1M a year for their local TV broadcasts, first from Connecticut public TV and then from SNY. Ticket revenue is something, and so is donation revenue.

    UConn women's basketball is fairly popular among northeastern women--you get the rah-rah go-girls feels, and you get to back a winner, without being as openly lesbian-dominated as the WNBA is. The conference women's basketball tournament seems to have settled in permanently at the Mohegan Sun casino arena, and it's safe to assume that the casino tribe wouldn't be hosting it if there weren't money to be made.

    All that said, UConn women's hoops probably doesn't quite cover its bills, but university presidents will accept a money-losing program that wins national titles and gets attention. IT's losing a lot less money than their losing Division IA football program.

    Replies: @Triumph104

  34. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Not wishing to cast too many aspersions, it is a well known route for paedophiles and other sex offenders to take up coaching or refereeing of kids' sporting activities.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @anon, @AnotherDad

    it is a well known route for paedophiles and other sex offenders to take up coaching or refereeing of kids’ sporting activities.

    I’m not sure how well known or true this is, but I’d like to coach or referee or otherwise mentor kids, but won’t because of the specter of suspicion or a false allegation.

    I can clearly and fondly remember my little league coaches. They were all married and never acted inappropriately; other than occasionally showing up drunk to a game or practice.

    On the other hand, I once was the assistant coach of a womens’ softball team.

  35. @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous

    In fairness, I should say that basketball is a pretty cheap sport--building aside--to put on, and generally a money maker.

    And the U Conn's women's team no doubt is hugely popular--people love a winner, and there's enough of a sadistic streak in many folks, that many folks will come out to see them rub their next opponent in the dirt. So i'd assume that in this relatively unique case the women's team actually generates substantial revenue and can pay a fat coach's salary. For most women's programs this is decidedly *not* the case, and they exist--and coaches have fat comfy sinecures--based entirely on state mandated re-distribution from men.

    ~~
    Like everyone else who's given it any thought ... the whole college athletics apparatus is appalling. The women's side perhaps less appalling then the blacks-on-campus men's football\basketball side.

    No scholarships, no recruiting, no lowered standards, no ridiculously paid coaches--something more like HS programs for kids interested in sport. Let football and basketball have minor leagues for average and below IQ, not-really-college-material, boys interested in sport.

    Replies: @marty, @Njguy73

    “No scholarships, no recruiting, no lowered standards, …”

    Interesting to see you say this. Not arguing – it’s just that whenever I see these women giants on the Berkeley campus, they have that same thug swagger, and vacant, heavy-lidded look in the eyes that you see on the football players.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @marty

    UC Berkeley just instituted a rule that 80 percent of freshmen athletes, on each team, have to have a high school GPA of at least 3.0. On the other hand, the NCAA only requires a total SAT score of 620 out of 1600 or less if the GPA is 3.0 or higher. LINK


    BERKELEY — By the 2017-18 school year, Cal football’s incoming freshman class will include no more than five players who achieved lower than a 3.0 grade-point average in high school, according to a new student-athlete admissions policy.

    The policy, approved Oct. 17 by the UC Berkeley Academic Senate, will go into effect for the 2015-16 school year and will gradually bring athlete admissions into closer alignment with those of the general student body.

    For 2017-18, at least 80 percent of all incoming athletes at Cal will have the minimum 3.0 GPA in high school that is required of all other students applying to the university. No more than 20 percent will be admitted through a separate process involving scrutiny by the UC Director of Admissions and the Student-Athlete Admissions Committee (SAAC).

    Panos Papadopoulos, chair of the Academic Senate, confirmed that a typical freshman football recruiting class of 25 in 2017-18 would have no more than five members who arrived with below a 3.0 GPA.

    Currently, he said, between 50 and 62 percent of football players are admitted despite having a GPA below 3.0. Papadopoulos did not have similar figures for men’s basketball.

    He stressed that each sport must meet the requirements on its own, and that all of the “exceptions” cannot be lumped into football or basketball.
     

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2014/10/29/80-percent-of-cal-recruits-must-have-3-0-gpa-by-2017-18/

    Replies: @Lagertha

  36. @eah
    @eah

    Yes indeed.

    https://twitter.com/nontolerantman/status/847752800226254848

    Replies: @guest

    He was the intergender champion, with no pretense of being a lady. I was going to say as can be discerned from his appearance in that picture, but of course our progressive overlords won’t have it that we can assume men who look and act like men are men. That’s a “wow, just wow” assumption.

  37. @Autochthon
    @EriK

    It's easy to understand: they are incredibly good, so much so that the programme has become storied (I don't even follow rhe sport but I know this). The women's basketball team at the University of Tennessee have a similar record of success and large following, as do the University of Georgia's ladies' gymnastics team, albeit to a lesser extent owing to gymnastics' being less popular than basketball. (They used to be the "Lady Dogs" or "Lady Gymdogs" but it seems they are now the "Gymdogs," doubtless because of Newspeak.)



    Success has a thousand fathers, and all that sort of thing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Barnard, @guest, @ben tillman

    That’s not easy to understand. What is it worth to be good at something no one cares about? I wouldn’t pay to see humanity’s greatest balloon juggler.

  38. Abe says: • Website
    @Ivy
    @Barnard

    That difference in participation would parallel the interest in watching sports.

    Replies: @Abe

    That difference in participation would parallel the interest in watching sports.

    Which parallels the amount of money they waste on sports (tickets, merchandise, otherwise-free time wasted watching commercials), and yet that never seems to come up in discussions of the compensation differentials between male and female professional athletes. Just an apples to a$$h0l3s comparison of games won and points scored in leagues that might as well exist in parallel universes for all they interact with each other.

    I’m sure that bright boy who just premiered his Michael Brown documentary (STRANGER FRUIT) will turn his searing gaze, now that he’s squeezed all the juice he can out of that corpse, to the problem of how the UConn women’s basketball program is barely recognized despite being the MOST SUCCESSFUL SPORTS DYNASTY IN THE HISTORY/HERSTORY OF THE UNIVERSE!

  39. @Anonymous
    Not wishing to cast too many aspersions, it is a well known route for paedophiles and other sex offenders to take up coaching or refereeing of kids' sporting activities.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @anon, @AnotherDad

    Not wishing to cast too many aspersions, it is a well known route for paedophiles and other sex offenders to take up coaching or refereeing of kids’ sporting activities.

    Probably true. But how many actual “pedophiles” are out there?

    Most of the supposed “pedophilia” I’ve heard about–that’s actually real, not Wenatchee type hysteria–is not actually “pedophilia” but standard issue homosexual grooming.

    Pretty much the entire Catholic Church “pedophilia” scandal–at least every single case I read about–was simply homosexuals grooming 14+ boys\young men. The media called it “pedophilia” to bash the Catholic Church while studiously never saying the word “homosexual”. The problem is somehow those sinister hidebound conservative Catholics, not wonderful homosexuals. Pure propaganda.

    Same crap in Boy Scouts. There were a few cases the trial lawyers cooked up to get paid. (Actually choosing, observing and dismissing youth leaders is up to individual units–the boys parents effectively, legally the charting organizations.) All of the cases, I read about were homosexuals trying to groom young men. But of course, BSA trying to keep out homosexuals–the eminently logical approach for any youth program–that was evil and the left was busy suing, harassing, getting companies to defund, etc. etc. So the queers are now in and will, of course, do what queers do. Then the same lawyers will be back to sue for damages.

    • Agree: Autochthon
  40. “Anytime someone hires a male coach and says, ‘Coaching is coaching,’ well, why aren’t more women in men’s basketball?”

    Because men’s basketball is dominated by blacks, who aren’t going to pay attention a woman coach, just like they don’t pay attention to women teachers.

    Of coursr, another answer would be “who cares? It just a game”

    • Agree: Abe, Triumph104
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    @William Badwhite

    Are you sure they pay attention to male coaches?

    My niece's experience in women's college bball was that the star players, all black, did whatever they wanted. Practice? Meh. Running the play the way the coach called it? Meh. She was totally disgusted with them and decided to abandon any dreams of playing at a higher level.

    Replies: @Triumph104, @Marty T

  41. @guest
    @Autochthon

    That's not easy to understand. What is it worth to be good at something no one cares about? I wouldn't pay to see humanity's greatest balloon juggler.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Forgive me; I assumed some reasoning ability on the part of a reader. The programme turned a profit in 2011, and presumably has thereafter (I cannot be bothered to dig up revenues do each year).

    When a team consistently plays incredibly well, popularity increases because spectators enjoy watching talented athletes, thus increasig the sales of tickets and merchandise, donations from boosters, and so forth.

    (Related, useful logic: Your lack of care and interest for a thing does not necessarily mean others are uninterested in it.)

    • Replies: @guest
    @Autochthon

    No, no, forgive me. I assumed some ability to appreciate humor on the part of the reader.

    , @guest
    @Autochthon

    Life isn't worth living when one has to explain jokes, but just let me tell you how you missed the point. It is easy to understand the abstract concept of people wanting to watch other people who are good at something. But that something has to be interesting in itself. It can't, for instance, be balloon juggling. (At least for me. It could be the national pastime of a race of people somewhere for all I know.)

    Now, ponder this: someone informs you that a certain balloon juggling competition has become a hot ticket. Armed with Logic and Reason, you know that your personal distaste for the idea of competitive balloon juggling doesn't preclude others from enjoying it.

    Nevertheless, would you consider it *easy* to understand why a certain master balloon juggler might have a huge following? I wouldn't. Basketball is intrinsically more interesting than balloon juggling. But in comparing women's basketball to balloon juggling, you see, I'm implying the former is as uninteresting as the latter. That's the joke.

    Replies: @Autochthon

  42. @eah
    https://twitter.com/thepeterdsouza/status/844148654038507520

    Replies: @eah, @AnotherDad

    Given the level of leftist insanity in World War T, I can’t really see what’s stopping a decent male college golfer or tennis player from declaring “i always felt like a girl inside”, going pro and collecting some loot. If you know you aren’t good enough to make $$$ on the pro-tour … why not?

    In line with the leftist worldview thata feelings trump all, you don’t have to get clipped. You don’t even have to give up your girlfriend–you simply feel like a girl who is a lesbian. All you have to do is say that your “gender”–whatever the hell that is–is female.

  43. @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous

    In fairness, I should say that basketball is a pretty cheap sport--building aside--to put on, and generally a money maker.

    And the U Conn's women's team no doubt is hugely popular--people love a winner, and there's enough of a sadistic streak in many folks, that many folks will come out to see them rub their next opponent in the dirt. So i'd assume that in this relatively unique case the women's team actually generates substantial revenue and can pay a fat coach's salary. For most women's programs this is decidedly *not* the case, and they exist--and coaches have fat comfy sinecures--based entirely on state mandated re-distribution from men.

    ~~
    Like everyone else who's given it any thought ... the whole college athletics apparatus is appalling. The women's side perhaps less appalling then the blacks-on-campus men's football\basketball side.

    No scholarships, no recruiting, no lowered standards, no ridiculously paid coaches--something more like HS programs for kids interested in sport. Let football and basketball have minor leagues for average and below IQ, not-really-college-material, boys interested in sport.

    Replies: @marty, @Njguy73

    You should read The Hundred Yard Lie by Rick Telander.

  44. @William Badwhite
    “Anytime someone hires a male coach and says, ‘Coaching is coaching,’ well, why aren’t more women in men’s basketball?"

    Because men's basketball is dominated by blacks, who aren't going to pay attention a woman coach, just like they don't pay attention to women teachers.

    Of coursr, another answer would be "who cares? It just a game"

    Replies: @stillCARealist

    Are you sure they pay attention to male coaches?

    My niece’s experience in women’s college bball was that the star players, all black, did whatever they wanted. Practice? Meh. Running the play the way the coach called it? Meh. She was totally disgusted with them and decided to abandon any dreams of playing at a higher level.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @stillCARealist

    Are you saying that your niece had a male coach? I'm sure male coaches are easier on female players than male players, not realizing that most black female homosexuals behave like black men and should be treated as such.

    I doubt Bobby Knight had many problems with his black players skipping practices or ignoring his play calls.

    , @Marty T
    @stillCARealist

    Higher level? All there is is the WNBA, with mediocre salaries and rampant lesbianism. No reasonably normal girl would want that environment.

    Replies: @Triumph104

  45. @Buzz Mohawk
    Did you hear about the transgender -- i.e. man pretending to be woman -- weightlifter who recently won a women's weightlifting title?

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2017/03/22/transgender-woman-wins-international-weightlifting-title-amid-controversy-over-fairness/?utm_term=.315da66ef917

    In light of present-day insanity and Steve's point that sports are mostly male-invented contests of male traits, wouldn't it make sense to combine men and women into one league? Women should have to compete with men in all sports. After all, that's what those female weightlifters were doing.

    This would of course result in the elimination of virtually all females from competitive sports. Maybe there's something to be said for that. It would leave things like figure skating and the balance beam.

    I dare any man who values his family jewels to try the balance beam.

    Replies: @CK

    He who invents the iron jock shall have the first bounce on the beam.

  46. @AnotherDad
    @Anonymous


    Where does UConn get the money to pay its women’s coach $2.5 million a year?
     
    From men.

    Large tranches of the super-state are scams for shovelling money from men to women, without women having to do what they've traditional done to earn a claim on a man's productivity--sex, companionship, homemaking, bearing and raising children.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    “Large tranches of the super-state are scams for shovelling money from men to women”

    Also from whites to non-whites.

    If you happen to be male and white, it is hard to see what the benefit of the state is anymore…

    • Replies: @Coemgen
    @Almost Missouri

    After "the state" takes away your way of making a living "it" will feed you (provided you sufficiently prostrate yourself before "it").

  47. In the same way women dominate public relations because of the big surplus of female communication studies graduates, men tend to dominate sports coaching because of the big oversupply of male sports management and physical education graduates.

    It’s partly an HBD issue, and partly an oversupply issue caused by the education industrial complex.

  48. @Anon7
    The obvious next step is encouraging tall male to female transgender athletes by offering them scholarships.

    The average height of a female NCAA basketball center is just 6'2"; only one woman in 7,400 is that tall. On the other hand, one male in twenty is 6'2", it should be easy to find tall m-to-f trans players.

    Taking hormones, the bane of m-to-f athletes in other sports, shouldn't be a problem, since they wouldn't lose any height.

    Colleges are being forced to accept trans athletes:

    Campus Pride, a coalition of more than 80 homosexual and transgender advocacy groups wrote a letter to the NCAA March 9 "requesting that the NCAA take action to divest from all religious based campuses who have requested discriminatory Title IX waivers toward LGBTQ youth."
     
    Eventually, m-to-f trans centers and forwards will dominate NCAA women's basketball; after all, one male in 200 is 6'5"; only one woman in 150,000 is that tall.

    Game over, girls.

    Replies: @unpc downunder

    If most males with gender dysphoria starts taking hormones during puberty (as they increasingly seem to be doing) then they are going to have the same strengths and limitations of biological women. Hence, a biological male who starts hormones in puberty will have a similar height to a normal female.

    An anti-transsexual feminist Germaine Greer recognised several decades ago, hormonal therapy for trannies will probably make little difference to the existing gender binary.

  49. @Barnard
    @Autochthon

    UConn women's basketball is popular, but still isn't generating enough revenue to pay Auriemma that kind of money. The money in college sports comes from the TV contracts, they get some money from ESPN but their program is still getting subsidized from the football and men's basketball TV revenue. You can't pay the coach over $2 million off ticket revenue from 20 games.

    Replies: @EriK, @Discordiax

    Agree, but not that many college sports programs make money, it’s not just the girl huskies. To be clear, some may make a ton of money, but they spend even more.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    @EriK

    Only 3% of NCAA men's basketball programs show a surplus, while none of the women's do.

    http://www.ncaapublications.com/productdownloads/D1REVEXP2013.pdf

    FY 2015-2016, UConn women's basketball spent $6.7 million and earned $4 million.

  50. @Barnard
    @Autochthon

    UConn women's basketball is popular, but still isn't generating enough revenue to pay Auriemma that kind of money. The money in college sports comes from the TV contracts, they get some money from ESPN but their program is still getting subsidized from the football and men's basketball TV revenue. You can't pay the coach over $2 million off ticket revenue from 20 games.

    Replies: @EriK, @Discordiax

    The revenues and expenses of college athletics are highly opaque, but UConn women’s basketball gets about $1M a year for their local TV broadcasts, first from Connecticut public TV and then from SNY. Ticket revenue is something, and so is donation revenue.

    UConn women’s basketball is fairly popular among northeastern women–you get the rah-rah go-girls feels, and you get to back a winner, without being as openly lesbian-dominated as the WNBA is. The conference women’s basketball tournament seems to have settled in permanently at the Mohegan Sun casino arena, and it’s safe to assume that the casino tribe wouldn’t be hosting it if there weren’t money to be made.

    All that said, UConn women’s hoops probably doesn’t quite cover its bills, but university presidents will accept a money-losing program that wins national titles and gets attention. IT’s losing a lot less money than their losing Division IA football program.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @Discordiax

    Geno Auriemma understood that his then nine titles were worth less than one men's title.


    Kevin Ollie won one national championship for the University of Connecticut in the NCAA men's basketball tournament, and his compensation immediately surpassed Geno Auriemma and his nine national titles on the women's side. Ollie is making $3million this season to Auriemma's $2million. ...

    ... "On the women's side, there isn't the same kind of revenue," Auriemma says. "We aren't getting a part of the CBS contract that March Madness brings. We're at a different level. I don't ever use that Title IX crap about how I should get paid what Kevin gets paid because we do the same job. I've never bought into that or believed that for one moment since I started coaching."
     
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/ncaaw/2015/04/01/geno-auriemma-uconn-university-of-connecticut-compensation-salary/70736726/
  51. Women’s sport is a joke. Most are just niche fields for fugly bulldykes. They are vastly inferior to men and often wear the frumpiest clothea that reveal nothung of the figure.

    The good feminine sports for women are ones which give them the opportunity to show ofc their sexy bodies and move gracefully. The sexy attire of gymnastics and volleyball,also filters out the sort of dumplings and disfigured trannies you see in other paralympic disabled sports that are juat crappy copies of manly sports (bball, soccer, boxing). I mean what man would want to marry some ugly ‘feme’ boxer with bruises all over its body. Yuck!

  52. @Discordiax
    @Barnard

    The revenues and expenses of college athletics are highly opaque, but UConn women's basketball gets about $1M a year for their local TV broadcasts, first from Connecticut public TV and then from SNY. Ticket revenue is something, and so is donation revenue.

    UConn women's basketball is fairly popular among northeastern women--you get the rah-rah go-girls feels, and you get to back a winner, without being as openly lesbian-dominated as the WNBA is. The conference women's basketball tournament seems to have settled in permanently at the Mohegan Sun casino arena, and it's safe to assume that the casino tribe wouldn't be hosting it if there weren't money to be made.

    All that said, UConn women's hoops probably doesn't quite cover its bills, but university presidents will accept a money-losing program that wins national titles and gets attention. IT's losing a lot less money than their losing Division IA football program.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    Geno Auriemma understood that his then nine titles were worth less than one men’s title.

    Kevin Ollie won one national championship for the University of Connecticut in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament, and his compensation immediately surpassed Geno Auriemma and his nine national titles on the women’s side. Ollie is making $3million this season to Auriemma’s $2million. …

    … “On the women’s side, there isn’t the same kind of revenue,” Auriemma says. “We aren’t getting a part of the CBS contract that March Madness brings. We’re at a different level. I don’t ever use that Title IX crap about how I should get paid what Kevin gets paid because we do the same job. I’ve never bought into that or believed that for one moment since I started coaching.”

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/ncaaw/2015/04/01/geno-auriemma-uconn-university-of-connecticut-compensation-salary/70736726/

  53. @stillCARealist
    @William Badwhite

    Are you sure they pay attention to male coaches?

    My niece's experience in women's college bball was that the star players, all black, did whatever they wanted. Practice? Meh. Running the play the way the coach called it? Meh. She was totally disgusted with them and decided to abandon any dreams of playing at a higher level.

    Replies: @Triumph104, @Marty T

    Are you saying that your niece had a male coach? I’m sure male coaches are easier on female players than male players, not realizing that most black female homosexuals behave like black men and should be treated as such.

    I doubt Bobby Knight had many problems with his black players skipping practices or ignoring his play calls.

  54. @marty
    @AnotherDad

    "No scholarships, no recruiting, no lowered standards, ..."

    Interesting to see you say this. Not arguing - it's just that whenever I see these women giants on the Berkeley campus, they have that same thug swagger, and vacant, heavy-lidded look in the eyes that you see on the football players.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    UC Berkeley just instituted a rule that 80 percent of freshmen athletes, on each team, have to have a high school GPA of at least 3.0. On the other hand, the NCAA only requires a total SAT score of 620 out of 1600 or less if the GPA is 3.0 or higher. LINK

    BERKELEY — By the 2017-18 school year, Cal football’s incoming freshman class will include no more than five players who achieved lower than a 3.0 grade-point average in high school, according to a new student-athlete admissions policy.

    The policy, approved Oct. 17 by the UC Berkeley Academic Senate, will go into effect for the 2015-16 school year and will gradually bring athlete admissions into closer alignment with those of the general student body.

    For 2017-18, at least 80 percent of all incoming athletes at Cal will have the minimum 3.0 GPA in high school that is required of all other students applying to the university. No more than 20 percent will be admitted through a separate process involving scrutiny by the UC Director of Admissions and the Student-Athlete Admissions Committee (SAAC).

    Panos Papadopoulos, chair of the Academic Senate, confirmed that a typical freshman football recruiting class of 25 in 2017-18 would have no more than five members who arrived with below a 3.0 GPA.

    Currently, he said, between 50 and 62 percent of football players are admitted despite having a GPA below 3.0. Papadopoulos did not have similar figures for men’s basketball.

    He stressed that each sport must meet the requirements on its own, and that all of the “exceptions” cannot be lumped into football or basketball.

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2014/10/29/80-percent-of-cal-recruits-must-have-3-0-gpa-by-2017-18/

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Triumph104

    love you bro, .....how many years for OURS and the connected to OURS?? Shit...and, I don't like to...yeah. American U's are bullshit - so is Cambridge and Oxford for FS. For girls/women/they will accept the best ones/the smartest math ones ...same for all sports, slightly.

    Boy/Mens sport: test results.

  55. Steve: I want to punch you in the mouth.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    @Lagertha

    double vision; :-) No. the media will not allow for male control.

    , @Lagertha
    @Lagertha

    love you bro, .....how many years for OURS and the connected to OURS??

  56. @Lagertha
    Steve: I want to punch you in the mouth.

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Lagertha

    double vision; 🙂 No. the media will not allow for male control.

  57. @Lagertha
    Steve: I want to punch you in the mouth.

    Replies: @Lagertha, @Lagertha

    love you bro, …..how many years for OURS and the connected to OURS??

  58. @Triumph104
    @marty

    UC Berkeley just instituted a rule that 80 percent of freshmen athletes, on each team, have to have a high school GPA of at least 3.0. On the other hand, the NCAA only requires a total SAT score of 620 out of 1600 or less if the GPA is 3.0 or higher. LINK


    BERKELEY — By the 2017-18 school year, Cal football’s incoming freshman class will include no more than five players who achieved lower than a 3.0 grade-point average in high school, according to a new student-athlete admissions policy.

    The policy, approved Oct. 17 by the UC Berkeley Academic Senate, will go into effect for the 2015-16 school year and will gradually bring athlete admissions into closer alignment with those of the general student body.

    For 2017-18, at least 80 percent of all incoming athletes at Cal will have the minimum 3.0 GPA in high school that is required of all other students applying to the university. No more than 20 percent will be admitted through a separate process involving scrutiny by the UC Director of Admissions and the Student-Athlete Admissions Committee (SAAC).

    Panos Papadopoulos, chair of the Academic Senate, confirmed that a typical freshman football recruiting class of 25 in 2017-18 would have no more than five members who arrived with below a 3.0 GPA.

    Currently, he said, between 50 and 62 percent of football players are admitted despite having a GPA below 3.0. Papadopoulos did not have similar figures for men’s basketball.

    He stressed that each sport must meet the requirements on its own, and that all of the “exceptions” cannot be lumped into football or basketball.
     

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2014/10/29/80-percent-of-cal-recruits-must-have-3-0-gpa-by-2017-18/

    Replies: @Lagertha

    love you bro, …..how many years for OURS and the connected to OURS?? Shit…and, I don’t like to…yeah. American U’s are bullshit – so is Cambridge and Oxford for FS. For girls/women/they will accept the best ones/the smartest math ones …same for all sports, slightly.

    Boy/Mens sport: test results.

  59. @william munny
    This goes all the way down too. Having seen hundreds of girls' soccer and softball games in travel and rec leagues, I have seen only a handful of women coaches. There are two types: moms forced into service involuntarily and women who look like gym teachers when I was younger.

    The stereotyping machine in my head would have predicted many more female softball coaches than actually exist.

    Replies: @Marty T

    Softball coach types might be unlikely to have kids due to that whole sex with a man thing.

  60. @stillCARealist
    @William Badwhite

    Are you sure they pay attention to male coaches?

    My niece's experience in women's college bball was that the star players, all black, did whatever they wanted. Practice? Meh. Running the play the way the coach called it? Meh. She was totally disgusted with them and decided to abandon any dreams of playing at a higher level.

    Replies: @Triumph104, @Marty T

    Higher level? All there is is the WNBA, with mediocre salaries and rampant lesbianism. No reasonably normal girl would want that environment.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @Marty T

    Overseas women's basketball is pretty lucrative for marquee players. China pays about $600,000 a season. In Russia, Brittany Griner earns just under $1 million and Diana Taurasi earns $1.5 million- tax free. Taurasi's Russian team paid her extra to skip the 2015 WNBA season. South Korea even pays about $25,000 a month. A middling female player could earn at least $200,000 player year round, which is more than what they would earn doing most anything else.

    Replies: @Buck Turgidson, @ScarletNumber

  61. @Steve Sailer
    @Autochthon

    The U. of Utah has figured out how to make women's gymnastics into a good show and gets 5 figure crowds for their dual meets.

    The problem with college women's gymnastics is the melancholy one that the young ladies are over the hill age-wise, but Utah just powers through this and makes it excellent live theater.

    Replies: @Autochthon, @Marty T

    Big 10 volleyball games often draw big crowds. Women’s sports can if the players are attractive and relatively feminine looking. Even Geno’s Uconn players are relatively attractive by bball standards.

    • Replies: @Buck Turgidson
    @Marty T

    Volleyball seems like a good sport for the gals. Basketball, no, women's basketball is boring, they don't have the strength and speed and agility. Women's softball seems pretty good. Tennis OK. It is pretty obvious, check out the empty seats at 99% of womens/girls basketball games. I played hs b'ball. We played the girls game, then the boys game. My dad *never* would show up early and watch the girls game. I think mom worked on this a few times -- she didn't get far.

  62. Steve, if you do not “erase/dissapear+) # 55-59, or 60, comments..then, that is SO it. As a Finn, I will know you are a money-grubbing/not-to-be-trusted, typical American…. like so many others…as a friend, erase.

  63. I’m sliding down. As some kind of friend, Steve, please erase my posts. You did take a risk with me, 2+years ago, now, I am asking you to let me disappear. I have no value for your audience anymore. And, I am now, old enough, that I “get” that I am a joke.

  64. @Autochthon

    Life isn’t worth living when one has to explain jokes, but just let me tell you how you missed the point. It is easy to understand the abstract concept of people wanting to watch other people who are good at something. But that something has to be interesting in itself. It can’t, for instance, be balloon juggling. (At least for me. It could be the national pastime of a race of people somewhere for all I know.)

    Now, ponder this: someone informs you that a certain balloon juggling competition has become a hot ticket. Armed with Logic and Reason, you know that your personal distaste for the idea of competitive balloon juggling doesn’t preclude others from enjoying it.

    Nevertheless, would you consider it *easy* to understand why a certain master balloon juggler might have a huge following? I wouldn’t. Basketball is intrinsically more interesting than balloon juggling. But in comparing women’s basketball to balloon juggling, you see, I’m implying the former is as uninteresting as the latter. That’s the joke.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @guest

    Forgive me. I only recently decided to try this business of online interaction (I dabbled with gopher and usenet in the days of the cavemen, but that may as well have been a different lifetime for me...).

    It's a terrible medium for communication, not least because a good eighty or ninety per cent of any optimal communication occurs nonverbally (it's haptic, proxemic, vocalic, etc.)

    I still decided to give it a shot because being a sensible man with conventional morals is a very hard, lonely row to hoe anyplace within about one hundred moles of the San Francisco Bay.

    I've encountered many interlocutors who indeed fail to undertake basic reasoning of the sort of I reckoned did not merit mention, hence my earlier note, hence my assumption of the phenomenon's recurrence.

    The irony of our entire exchange is that I myself could not possibly care less about basketball of any sort: I've watched one game in my life (my school was playing another in the final game of the NCAA tournament).

  65. @Marty T
    @stillCARealist

    Higher level? All there is is the WNBA, with mediocre salaries and rampant lesbianism. No reasonably normal girl would want that environment.

    Replies: @Triumph104

    Overseas women’s basketball is pretty lucrative for marquee players. China pays about $600,000 a season. In Russia, Brittany Griner earns just under $1 million and Diana Taurasi earns $1.5 million- tax free. Taurasi’s Russian team paid her extra to skip the 2015 WNBA season. South Korea even pays about $25,000 a month. A middling female player could earn at least $200,000 player year round, which is more than what they would earn doing most anything else.

    • Replies: @Buck Turgidson
    @Triumph104

    No taxes? UGH. Just what I need to hear as I am putting the finishing touches on my 2016 1040. It is so fulfilling to know that the non-constitutional IRS extracts this huge % of my extremely hard-earned money so they, in turn, can give it to Evelyn Fargas and Lois Lerner and others to support their 6-figure salaries, benefits, and pensions. Where is my torch, pitchfork, and 2 x 4. We need to cut this bloated federal behemoth in at least half. How about we get rid of the IRS and make everybody send in 10% of their wages taxes every year -- honor system. Gov't runs some spot checks, if you get caught you pay a year's wages and 30 days in jail. Sorry to go on the tangent, the size of this gov't, the nonsense it spends $$ on, corruption, soldiers in every country in the world (do we send military resources to China to help protect them? it would not surprise me), and the amount of $$ they take from me makes me want to use cuss words.

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Triumph104

    They still have to pay US taxes

    Replies: @Triumph104

  66. UConn womens’ basketball team’s 111-win streak comes to an end after 66 – 64 loss to Mississippi State. Mississippi State moves on to play Stanford for the womens’ NCAA championship.

  67. @Almost Missouri
    @AnotherDad


    "Large tranches of the super-state are scams for shovelling money from men to women"
     
    Also from whites to non-whites.

    If you happen to be male and white, it is hard to see what the benefit of the state is anymore...

    Replies: @Coemgen

    After “the state” takes away your way of making a living “it” will feed you (provided you sufficiently prostrate yourself before “it”).

  68. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    We need more transgender coaches. Paging Caitlyn Jenner, paging Caitlyn Jenner.

    Replies: @TheJester

    Caitlyn Jenner as a coach for a woman’s basketball team? That wouldn’t work.

    As with most MTF transgendered men, Jenner wouldn’t be able to concentrate on basketball. (S)he would spend too much time looking in the mirror to reassure herself regarding her success in impersonating the visual countenance of a woman. Really, this is a full-time job: the hormones, the operations, the fashions, the makeup, and learning complex feminine gestures, voice inflections, and gaits that never seem quite right. Back to the mirror for reassurance.

  69. @guest
    @Autochthon

    Life isn't worth living when one has to explain jokes, but just let me tell you how you missed the point. It is easy to understand the abstract concept of people wanting to watch other people who are good at something. But that something has to be interesting in itself. It can't, for instance, be balloon juggling. (At least for me. It could be the national pastime of a race of people somewhere for all I know.)

    Now, ponder this: someone informs you that a certain balloon juggling competition has become a hot ticket. Armed with Logic and Reason, you know that your personal distaste for the idea of competitive balloon juggling doesn't preclude others from enjoying it.

    Nevertheless, would you consider it *easy* to understand why a certain master balloon juggler might have a huge following? I wouldn't. Basketball is intrinsically more interesting than balloon juggling. But in comparing women's basketball to balloon juggling, you see, I'm implying the former is as uninteresting as the latter. That's the joke.

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Forgive me. I only recently decided to try this business of online interaction (I dabbled with gopher and usenet in the days of the cavemen, but that may as well have been a different lifetime for me…).

    It’s a terrible medium for communication, not least because a good eighty or ninety per cent of any optimal communication occurs nonverbally (it’s haptic, proxemic, vocalic, etc.)

    I still decided to give it a shot because being a sensible man with conventional morals is a very hard, lonely row to hoe anyplace within about one hundred moles of the San Francisco Bay.

    I’ve encountered many interlocutors who indeed fail to undertake basic reasoning of the sort of I reckoned did not merit mention, hence my earlier note, hence my assumption of the phenomenon’s recurrence.

    The irony of our entire exchange is that I myself could not possibly care less about basketball of any sort: I’ve watched one game in my life (my school was playing another in the final game of the NCAA tournament).

  70. Steven Goldberg predicted this 45 years ago.

  71. Just wondering… do triumphant women’s teams carry their fully dressed male coach into the shower like men’s teams do?

    Maybe I should have looked into this as a career.

  72. @Marty T
    @Steve Sailer

    Big 10 volleyball games often draw big crowds. Women's sports can if the players are attractive and relatively feminine looking. Even Geno's Uconn players are relatively attractive by bball standards.

    Replies: @Buck Turgidson

    Volleyball seems like a good sport for the gals. Basketball, no, women’s basketball is boring, they don’t have the strength and speed and agility. Women’s softball seems pretty good. Tennis OK. It is pretty obvious, check out the empty seats at 99% of womens/girls basketball games. I played hs b’ball. We played the girls game, then the boys game. My dad *never* would show up early and watch the girls game. I think mom worked on this a few times — she didn’t get far.

  73. Tara VanDerveer: Anytime someone hires a male coach and says, ‘Coaching is coaching,’ well, why aren’t more women in men’s basketball?

    Because men aren’t going to respect a woman coach. Coaching is more than x’s and o’s.

    Lest anyone mention Becky Hammon, the players know they will have to deal with Greg Popovich if they get out of line.

  74. @Triumph104
    @Marty T

    Overseas women's basketball is pretty lucrative for marquee players. China pays about $600,000 a season. In Russia, Brittany Griner earns just under $1 million and Diana Taurasi earns $1.5 million- tax free. Taurasi's Russian team paid her extra to skip the 2015 WNBA season. South Korea even pays about $25,000 a month. A middling female player could earn at least $200,000 player year round, which is more than what they would earn doing most anything else.

    Replies: @Buck Turgidson, @ScarletNumber

    No taxes? UGH. Just what I need to hear as I am putting the finishing touches on my 2016 1040. It is so fulfilling to know that the non-constitutional IRS extracts this huge % of my extremely hard-earned money so they, in turn, can give it to Evelyn Fargas and Lois Lerner and others to support their 6-figure salaries, benefits, and pensions. Where is my torch, pitchfork, and 2 x 4. We need to cut this bloated federal behemoth in at least half. How about we get rid of the IRS and make everybody send in 10% of their wages taxes every year — honor system. Gov’t runs some spot checks, if you get caught you pay a year’s wages and 30 days in jail. Sorry to go on the tangent, the size of this gov’t, the nonsense it spends $$ on, corruption, soldiers in every country in the world (do we send military resources to China to help protect them? it would not surprise me), and the amount of $$ they take from me makes me want to use cuss words.

  75. @Triumph104
    @Marty T

    Overseas women's basketball is pretty lucrative for marquee players. China pays about $600,000 a season. In Russia, Brittany Griner earns just under $1 million and Diana Taurasi earns $1.5 million- tax free. Taurasi's Russian team paid her extra to skip the 2015 WNBA season. South Korea even pays about $25,000 a month. A middling female player could earn at least $200,000 player year round, which is more than what they would earn doing most anything else.

    Replies: @Buck Turgidson, @ScarletNumber

    They still have to pay US taxes

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    @ScarletNumber

    Only Diana Taurasi earns a Russian salary "tax-free", not Brittney Griner or any other American. I only mentioned it because every article about Taurasi's salary said that it was tax-free. Yes, she has to pay US taxes, therefore the Russians pay her an amount over $1.5 million that will cover her taxes and she nets $1.5 million.

  76. @ScarletNumber
    @Triumph104

    They still have to pay US taxes

    Replies: @Triumph104

    Only Diana Taurasi earns a Russian salary “tax-free”, not Brittney Griner or any other American. I only mentioned it because every article about Taurasi’s salary said that it was tax-free. Yes, she has to pay US taxes, therefore the Russians pay her an amount over $1.5 million that will cover her taxes and she nets $1.5 million.

  77. @EriK
    @Barnard

    Agree, but not that many college sports programs make money, it's not just the girl huskies. To be clear, some may make a ton of money, but they spend even more.

    Replies: @Brutusale

    Only 3% of NCAA men’s basketball programs show a surplus, while none of the women’s do.

    http://www.ncaapublications.com/productdownloads/D1REVEXP2013.pdf

    FY 2015-2016, UConn women’s basketball spent $6.7 million and earned $4 million.

  78. @Autochthon
    @EriK

    It's easy to understand: they are incredibly good, so much so that the programme has become storied (I don't even follow rhe sport but I know this). The women's basketball team at the University of Tennessee have a similar record of success and large following, as do the University of Georgia's ladies' gymnastics team, albeit to a lesser extent owing to gymnastics' being less popular than basketball. (They used to be the "Lady Dogs" or "Lady Gymdogs" but it seems they are now the "Gymdogs," doubtless because of Newspeak.)



    Success has a thousand fathers, and all that sort of thing.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @Barnard, @guest, @ben tillman

    It’s easy to understand: they are incredibly good, so much so that the programme has become storied (I don’t even follow rhe sport but I know this). The women’s basketball team at the University of Tennessee have a similar record of success and large following, as do the University of Georgia’s ladies’ gymnastics team, albeit to a lesser extent owing to gymnastics’ being less popular than basketball. (They used to be the “Lady Dogs” or “Lady Gymdogs” but it seems they are now the “Gymdogs,” doubtless because of Newspeak.)

    Well, I always thought that the best nickname for UGA’s women’s teams shares the first five letters of “Bulldogs”.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    @ben tillman

    Except female gymnasts, like figure skaters (perhaps, along with cheerleading, the two most traditionally feminine sports) are overwhelmingly well-adjusted heterosexuals.

    Steve wrote a piece about that difference once – how feminine women continue to thive in feminine sports but freakish, masculine women dominate the female versions of traditionally masculine sports, and also how the one can shift to the other by being overrun, as happened dramatically with the Williams creatures' destruction of ladies' tennis, which used to involve lithe, graceful women showcasing speed and agility as much as strength, but is increasingly competition amongst brutish he-women....

    Clever joke, though; and doubtless applicable enough to, say, the basketball and soccer teams!

  79. @ben tillman
    @Autochthon


    It’s easy to understand: they are incredibly good, so much so that the programme has become storied (I don’t even follow rhe sport but I know this). The women’s basketball team at the University of Tennessee have a similar record of success and large following, as do the University of Georgia’s ladies’ gymnastics team, albeit to a lesser extent owing to gymnastics’ being less popular than basketball. (They used to be the “Lady Dogs” or “Lady Gymdogs” but it seems they are now the “Gymdogs,” doubtless because of Newspeak.)
     
    Well, I always thought that the best nickname for UGA's women's teams shares the first five letters of "Bulldogs".

    Replies: @Autochthon

    Except female gymnasts, like figure skaters (perhaps, along with cheerleading, the two most traditionally feminine sports) are overwhelmingly well-adjusted heterosexuals.

    Steve wrote a piece about that difference once – how feminine women continue to thive in feminine sports but freakish, masculine women dominate the female versions of traditionally masculine sports, and also how the one can shift to the other by being overrun, as happened dramatically with the Williams creatures’ destruction of ladies’ tennis, which used to involve lithe, graceful women showcasing speed and agility as much as strength, but is increasingly competition amongst brutish he-women….

    Clever joke, though; and doubtless applicable enough to, say, the basketball and soccer teams!

  80. Perhaps having male coaches of female teams is being done to reduce fraternization?

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