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Do people these days really talk like in a Vincent Price horror movie: “I’m mad, mad I tell you! Ma-a-a-a-a-a-ad!”

In 1980 I visited the Museum of Art Brut in Lausanne, Switzerland, which was built around Jean Dubuffet’s collection of art from insane asylums and the like. But the artworks weren’t particularly ma-a-a-a-ad, they were more autistic (a word that I don’t believe I had in my vocabulary yet), made by people with a lot of time on their hands: e.g., a 5-foot tall model of the Eiffel Tower made out of 10,000 toothpicks.

 
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  1. To paraphrase Tolstoy, “every happy society is happy in the same way; every unhappy society is unhappy in its own way.”

    What a world.

    • Agree: mc23, neutral
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    To paraphrase Tolstoy, “every happy society is happy in the same way; every unhappy society is unhappy in its own way.”
     
    For us it is all just minoritarianism.

    Minoritarianism is why there's some new looney tunes nonsense popping up like weeds. We have an official ideology of privileging the abnormal/non-normal over the normal.

    Either a nation has a positive sense of itself, its people, culture, accomplishments and future and hence wants to reproduce itself (and ergo will have normal sex roles and some sort of patriarchy) ... or it loses its spirit and collapses, dies. (The rest is commentary.)

    This is why you absolutely, positively can not let a minority--people who do not value the nation, i.e. its people, culture, history--come to political or cultural power.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  2. But the artworks weren’t particularly ma-a-a-a-ad, they were more autistic (a word that I don’t believe I had in my vocabulary yet): e.g., a 5-foot tall model of the Eiffel Tower made out of 10,000 toothpicks.

    There will always be an England.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Eiffel Tower is actually only about 5 feet tall; The rest is camera angles.

    Replies: @mmack, @Reg Cæsar

    , @Cortes
    @Reg Cæsar

    That’s just amateur nonsense compared to the Majesty of the Brick Testament for full-spectrum bonkers use of Lego.
    A sample:

    https://thebricktestament.com/the_law/when_to_stone_your_children/dt21_18a.html

    What’s that chanting I can hear?

    USA! USA! USA! 🇺🇸

    Goya’s “Disparates” or “Follies” are well worth seeing at El Prado. Produced during a period of isolation and melancholia/depression when going deaf.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  3. “Sanism” and “mentalism” are terms used to describe the privileging of those deemed “sane.”

    This is not a joke.

    • Replies: @mc23
    @black sea

    This will lead to Bedlam.

    Replies: @Cortes

    , @stillCARealist
    @black sea

    Audism is the oppression of the deaf. Again, no jokes.

  4. Let us hope that the Mad Pride movement grows exponentially and becomes a prominent presence at LGTBX, BLM and BIPOC marches and events over coming years. The Mad Pride movement could contribute some great dress-ups and floats to the festivities and raise these events to a wonderful new level of absurdity.

    • Agree: Stan D Mute
    • Replies: @njguy73
    @Peter Johnson

    If I had kids, I'd rather have stories read to them by someone dressed like Napoleon than by a drag queen. At least they'd learn who Napoleon was.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Peter Johnson

    The fly in the Mad Pride ointment:

    Whereas LGBTP, BIPOC, et al. know that they are LGBTP, BIPOC etc. and embrace it, crazy people often do not. And the crazy people who are aware that they are crazy are usually a) the less crazy ones, and b) trying not to be crazy. The most crazy people think that a) they are right and it is everyone else who has it wrong, and b) they have no desire to change.

    "Mad Pride" may still be able to get off the ground with a cadre of borderline disordered people who grasp the political possibilities of a new victim-privilege identity, but their narrative will always be undermined by the most obvious exponents rejecting the label.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

  5. Are we now going to have the seriously mentally ill tell us the voices they hear are real, their dysfunction is just a different way of being and that they are superior to the rest of us?

    Are they going to take the medications they need and that actually makes them better? (I know some don’t get better with medication but many do yet they persist in not taking it consistently.)

    Let us see if the Met regrets encouraging this.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @notsaying

    I wonder what their policy is for letting crazy homeless people wander around the exhibits -- have they totally surrendered the space like some public libraries and transit facilities? The Mad Movement seems to just be cover for caving to the homeless and their so-called "advocates" as much like trannies they demand we applaud their warped worldview

    Replies: @notsaying

    , @Dissident
    @notsaying


    Are we now going to have the seriously mentally ill tell us the voices they hear are real, their dysfunction is just a different way of being and that they are superior to the rest of us?
     
    Is not essentially what you have described already, in large part, the case?

    Such as when we indulge the delusions of an individual who insists that he is the opposite of the sex that he manifestly, objectively is?

    At the same time, more generally, perhaps we ought to also bear in mind that psychiatry, for the most part, is perhaps the most dubious field of medicine. For at least most psychiatric diagnoses, the criteria are highly subjective. The claim has even been made (credibly, as far as it sounded to me but alas, I lack the resources at the moment to provide citation) that whatever objective evidence there for (at least most) psychiatric drugs being any more effective than a placebo is at best quite thin. Perhaps someone else will care to elaborate and provide citations.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    , @anon
    @notsaying

    Are we now going to have the seriously mentally ill tell us the voices they hear are real, their dysfunction is just a different way of being and that they are superior to the rest of us?

    Has anyone asked Joe "salute the Marines" Biden?

  6. The SPK (Socialist Patients Kollective) were German group aligned with the Baader Meinhof terror group. They were made up of mentally ill former patients. Lots of parallels with modern Antifa.

    https://erenow.net/common/the-most-evil-secret-societies-in-history/13.php

    • Thanks: Peter Johnson, El Dato
  7. Not everyone with psychiatric disabilities identifies as Mad.

    What, me mad?

    • LOL: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @Shel100
    @PiltdownMan

    Now he's the transportation secretary.

  8. @Reg Cæsar

    But the artworks weren’t particularly ma-a-a-a-ad, they were more autistic (a word that I don’t believe I had in my vocabulary yet): e.g., a 5-foot tall model of the Eiffel Tower made out of 10,000 toothpicks.
     
    There will always be an England.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Cortes

    The Eiffel Tower is actually only about 5 feet tall; The rest is camera angles.

    • Replies: @mmack
    @James Speaks

    I KNEW IT! Lousy Paris Department of Tourism and their tourist traps. 😡

    Next you'll tell me L' Arc de Triomphe is a meter high, and the Champs-Élysées is an alleyway in Marseille. 😒

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @James Speaks

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @James Speaks


    The Eiffel Tower is actually only about 5 feet tall; The rest is camera angles.
     
    Um, that's the Golden Gate Bridge. I'm going to the eye doctor tomorrow, and perhaps you should, too.

    https://s.hdnux.com/photos/73/33/21/15578205/4/rawImage.png

    Replies: @Ray P, @James Speaks

  9. Meanwhile, file under “Well, that didn’t take long!”

    Space Force commander sacked after claiming US military is under assault from ‘neo-Marxist’ critical race theory

    The commander of a US Space Force unit has been removed from his leadership role following a podcast appearance in which he claimed that ‘Marxist’ ideologies like critical race theory were undermining the military.

    Lt. Col. Matthew Lohmeier made the provocative comments while speaking on ‘Information Operation’, a podcast hosted by conservative commentator and military veteran L. Todd Wood.

    Stressing that he was only sharing his “personal view,” Lohmeier said that he believed China was exploiting America’s obsession with critical race theory in the hopes that it could win a “war” with Washington without firing a shot. He claimed that Beijing was fueling internal division on social media and that Chinese President Xi Jinping would love to see the United States “rot like this from the inside.”

    The US, rotting in the fields.

    But is paranoia a good trait in the military occupation? It might be. Could be directed at the wrong country though.

    Then again, what if it turns out our galactic brothers are really Marxist?

    From Charles Stross’ “Missile Gap”:

    “Hah.”

    Gagarin begins to sweep the northern coast when Major Suvurov stands up. “Sir! Over there!”

    “Where?” Gagarin glances at him. Suvurov is quivering with anger, or shock, or something else. He, too, has his binoculars out.

    “Over there! On the southern hillside.”

    “Where–” He brings his binoculars to bear as the dawn light spills across the shattered stump of an immense skyscraper.

    There is a hillside behind it, a jagged rift where the land has risen up a hundred meters. It reeks of antiquity, emphasized by the carvings in the headland. Here is what the expedition has been looking for all along, the evidence that they are not alone.

    “My God.” Misha swears, shocked into politically incorrect language.

    “Marx,” says Gagarin, studying the craggy features of the nearest head. “I’ve seen this before, this sort of thing. The Americans have a memorial like it. Mount Rushmore, they call it.”

    “Don’t you mean Easter Island?” asks Misha. “Sculptures left by a vanished people…”

    “Nonsense! Look there, isn’t that Lenin? And Stalin, of course.” Even though the famous moustache is cracked and half of it has fallen away from the cliff. “But who’s that next to them?”

    Gagarin brings his binoculars to focus on the fourth head. Somehow it looks far less weathered than the others, as if added as an afterthought, perhaps some kind of insane statement about the mental health of its vanished builders. Both antennae have long since broken off, and one of the mandibles is damaged, but the eyeless face is still recognizably unhuman. The insectile head stares eyelessly out across the frozen ocean, an enigma on the edge of a devastated island continent. “I think we’ve found the brother socialists,” he mutters to Misha, his voice pitched low so that it won’t carry over the background noise on the flight deck.

    “And you know what? Something tells me we didn’t want to.”

    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
    @El Dato


    Stressing that he was only sharing his “personal view,” Lohmeier said that he believed China was exploiting America’s obsession with critical race theory in the hopes that it could win a “war” with Washington without firing a shot.
     
    Famous Chinese thinkers such as Noel Ignatiev, Adorno, Marcuse
    , @AndrewR
    @El Dato

    Lohmeier is 100% right. Everyone, specifically white people, need to treat the US military like the evil and rotten terrorist group it is. It has long been involved in wickedness, but in the last year we have seen it go absolutely mad, attacking the people who make up its very backbone. Perhaps I was naïve to think the military would never become openly anti-white (or, more accurately, openly anti-non-black), but here we are. Any non-black person joining - or re-upping in - the military today is a fool, regardless of their reasons for joining. That is especially true for white people

    Replies: @Anonymouse

    , @notsaying
    @El Dato

    Two disturbing things here:

    1. That he could be right about China

    2. That he got put in charge in the first place. It is hard to think he didn't shoot his mouth off like this before.

  10. Thanks for clearing this up; I thought this was about remembering “Mad” Anthony Wayne.

  11. @El Dato
    Meanwhile, file under "Well, that didn't take long!"

    Space Force commander sacked after claiming US military is under assault from ‘neo-Marxist’ critical race theory


    The commander of a US Space Force unit has been removed from his leadership role following a podcast appearance in which he claimed that ‘Marxist’ ideologies like critical race theory were undermining the military.

    Lt. Col. Matthew Lohmeier made the provocative comments while speaking on ‘Information Operation’, a podcast hosted by conservative commentator and military veteran L. Todd Wood.
     

    https://i.postimg.cc/h4ZdRRgd/kirk-being-court-martialed.jpg

    Stressing that he was only sharing his “personal view,” Lohmeier said that he believed China was exploiting America’s obsession with critical race theory in the hopes that it could win a “war” with Washington without firing a shot. He claimed that Beijing was fueling internal division on social media and that Chinese President Xi Jinping would love to see the United States “rot like this from the inside.”
     
    The US, rotting in the fields.

    But is paranoia a good trait in the military occupation? It might be. Could be directed at the wrong country though.

    Then again, what if it turns out our galactic brothers are really Marxist?

    From Charles Stross' "Missile Gap":


    “Hah.”

    Gagarin begins to sweep the northern coast when Major Suvurov stands up. “Sir! Over there!”

    “Where?” Gagarin glances at him. Suvurov is quivering with anger, or shock, or something else. He, too, has his binoculars out.

    “Over there! On the southern hillside.”

    “Where–” He brings his binoculars to bear as the dawn light spills across the shattered stump of an immense skyscraper.

    There is a hillside behind it, a jagged rift where the land has risen up a hundred meters. It reeks of antiquity, emphasized by the carvings in the headland. Here is what the expedition has been looking for all along, the evidence that they are not alone.

    “My God.” Misha swears, shocked into politically incorrect language.

    “Marx,” says Gagarin, studying the craggy features of the nearest head. “I’ve seen this before, this sort of thing. The Americans have a memorial like it. Mount Rushmore, they call it.”

    “Don’t you mean Easter Island?” asks Misha. “Sculptures left by a vanished people…”

    “Nonsense! Look there, isn’t that Lenin? And Stalin, of course.” Even though the famous moustache is cracked and half of it has fallen away from the cliff. “But who’s that next to them?”

    Gagarin brings his binoculars to focus on the fourth head. Somehow it looks far less weathered than the others, as if added as an afterthought, perhaps some kind of insane statement about the mental health of its vanished builders. Both antennae have long since broken off, and one of the mandibles is damaged, but the eyeless face is still recognizably unhuman. The insectile head stares eyelessly out across the frozen ocean, an enigma on the edge of a devastated island continent. “I think we’ve found the brother socialists,” he mutters to Misha, his voice pitched low so that it won’t carry over the background noise on the flight deck.

    “And you know what? Something tells me we didn’t want to.”
     

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @AndrewR, @notsaying

    Stressing that he was only sharing his “personal view,” Lohmeier said that he believed China was exploiting America’s obsession with critical race theory in the hopes that it could win a “war” with Washington without firing a shot.

    Famous Chinese thinkers such as Noel Ignatiev, Adorno, Marcuse

  12. @El Dato
    Meanwhile, file under "Well, that didn't take long!"

    Space Force commander sacked after claiming US military is under assault from ‘neo-Marxist’ critical race theory


    The commander of a US Space Force unit has been removed from his leadership role following a podcast appearance in which he claimed that ‘Marxist’ ideologies like critical race theory were undermining the military.

    Lt. Col. Matthew Lohmeier made the provocative comments while speaking on ‘Information Operation’, a podcast hosted by conservative commentator and military veteran L. Todd Wood.
     

    https://i.postimg.cc/h4ZdRRgd/kirk-being-court-martialed.jpg

    Stressing that he was only sharing his “personal view,” Lohmeier said that he believed China was exploiting America’s obsession with critical race theory in the hopes that it could win a “war” with Washington without firing a shot. He claimed that Beijing was fueling internal division on social media and that Chinese President Xi Jinping would love to see the United States “rot like this from the inside.”
     
    The US, rotting in the fields.

    But is paranoia a good trait in the military occupation? It might be. Could be directed at the wrong country though.

    Then again, what if it turns out our galactic brothers are really Marxist?

    From Charles Stross' "Missile Gap":


    “Hah.”

    Gagarin begins to sweep the northern coast when Major Suvurov stands up. “Sir! Over there!”

    “Where?” Gagarin glances at him. Suvurov is quivering with anger, or shock, or something else. He, too, has his binoculars out.

    “Over there! On the southern hillside.”

    “Where–” He brings his binoculars to bear as the dawn light spills across the shattered stump of an immense skyscraper.

    There is a hillside behind it, a jagged rift where the land has risen up a hundred meters. It reeks of antiquity, emphasized by the carvings in the headland. Here is what the expedition has been looking for all along, the evidence that they are not alone.

    “My God.” Misha swears, shocked into politically incorrect language.

    “Marx,” says Gagarin, studying the craggy features of the nearest head. “I’ve seen this before, this sort of thing. The Americans have a memorial like it. Mount Rushmore, they call it.”

    “Don’t you mean Easter Island?” asks Misha. “Sculptures left by a vanished people…”

    “Nonsense! Look there, isn’t that Lenin? And Stalin, of course.” Even though the famous moustache is cracked and half of it has fallen away from the cliff. “But who’s that next to them?”

    Gagarin brings his binoculars to focus on the fourth head. Somehow it looks far less weathered than the others, as if added as an afterthought, perhaps some kind of insane statement about the mental health of its vanished builders. Both antennae have long since broken off, and one of the mandibles is damaged, but the eyeless face is still recognizably unhuman. The insectile head stares eyelessly out across the frozen ocean, an enigma on the edge of a devastated island continent. “I think we’ve found the brother socialists,” he mutters to Misha, his voice pitched low so that it won’t carry over the background noise on the flight deck.

    “And you know what? Something tells me we didn’t want to.”
     

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @AndrewR, @notsaying

    Lohmeier is 100% right. Everyone, specifically white people, need to treat the US military like the evil and rotten terrorist group it is. It has long been involved in wickedness, but in the last year we have seen it go absolutely mad, attacking the people who make up its very backbone. Perhaps I was naïve to think the military would never become openly anti-white (or, more accurately, openly anti-non-black), but here we are. Any non-black person joining – or re-upping in – the military today is a fool, regardless of their reasons for joining. That is especially true for white people

    • Replies: @Anonymouse
    @AndrewR

    Lohmeier is absolutely wrong. It is of long standing that the military not involve themselfs in political issus, the idea being that an army separated from partisan politics would be the safer course for a secular government.

    It is perfectly apporpriated that he be remove from military service.

    Replies: @AndrewR

  13. A Mad Pride movement? I think we can safely say it’s lead by Visionaries.

  14. @black sea
    "Sanism" and "mentalism" are terms used to describe the privileging of those deemed "sane."

    This is not a joke.

    Replies: @mc23, @stillCARealist

    This will lead to Bedlam.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @mc23

    Excellent!

  15. Vincent Price and cross-country car race movies aside, wasn’t it British people who used that word for “crazy” a lot, or still do? I just remember some woman in a movie with an English accent going “you’re quite mad, you know” in a nice way when the hero (I think) told her his plan to save the day.

    Then there’s this guy:

    ****
    Wait a minute, did youtube screw me over? Is this the original Bridge on the River Kwai, or is it from the sequel in which the US Army doctor disappears into the Bermuda Triangle in 1944, with this scene in which he reappears at Harvard University in the year 2021?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In Britain the word mad usually means crazy, where is in America it usually means angry, hence the confusion.

    In Alice in Wonderland we have the Mad Hatter, he is crazy not angry.

    In British English a madman is a lunatic.

    If you say somebody is mad about the Beatles, that means that they are crazy about the Beatles, or in other words that they like them insanely.

    I would think that pressure groups for angry Americans would be mad at crazy people full cultural misappropriation.

    As a person who has lived on both sides of the Atlantic, all I can say is that I am mad as hell and I am not going to take it anymore.

    If crazy people want a good word to reclaim, they ought to go for lunatic, which is associated with Luna, the Moon, and is a lovely word. The whole idea of giving asylum to Moon people is very beautiful, and should be supported by those well-known 'loonies' Prince Harry &Wife.

    Replies: @Clyde

  16. Regarding the toothpick Eiffel Tower, I did buy a leather change thingy for 2 bucks from a crazy guy locked up in the State Hospital when I was working in there for a few days, back when they still had ’em (Crazy Houses, not just Tandy leather kits). It made him feel worth something, I’m sure, and it’s better than his spending the days ranting on the streets of San Francisco, or, worse yet, as Chair of the Department of Wymyn’s studies at Harvard.

    When my boy was 7 y/o, he guessed the number of candy corns in 2 different jars right on the money at a Halloween party. I had told him how to estimate first. I was off by 10 to 20 both times out of 100-125 or so, but people were amazed at this.* As we left, I told the hosts that we were headed straight to Las Vega, baby!

    “I”ll show you. OK, drop some toothpicks on the floor.” “Oh, I dunno a coupla’ hundred, maybe 3?” “Not bad, right?” “No, you pick ’em up – you’re the one that thinks my boy is the Rain Man. I just said his name is Raymond.”

    .

    * To figure out the odds of this happening with someone not Rain-man-esque, you have to know the guessing skills of the average person first. Still, it was TWO jars with TWO guesses.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Achmed E. Newman

    He probably picked up the thoughts the hosts. Guessing exact number is impossible.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

  17. @Reg Cæsar

    But the artworks weren’t particularly ma-a-a-a-ad, they were more autistic (a word that I don’t believe I had in my vocabulary yet): e.g., a 5-foot tall model of the Eiffel Tower made out of 10,000 toothpicks.
     
    There will always be an England.

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Cortes

    That’s just amateur nonsense compared to the Majesty of the Brick Testament for full-spectrum bonkers use of Lego.
    A sample:

    https://thebricktestament.com/the_law/when_to_stone_your_children/dt21_18a.html

    What’s that chanting I can hear?

    USA! USA! USA! 🇺🇸

    Goya’s “Disparates” or “Follies” are well worth seeing at El Prado. Produced during a period of isolation and melancholia/depression when going deaf.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Cortes


    That’s just amateur nonsense compared to...
     
    I want to know how he did the trick with the TV screen.

    Replies: @Cortes

  18. @notsaying
    Are we now going to have the seriously mentally ill tell us the voices they hear are real, their dysfunction is just a different way of being and that they are superior to the rest of us?

    Are they going to take the medications they need and that actually makes them better? (I know some don't get better with medication but many do yet they persist in not taking it consistently.)

    Let us see if the Met regrets encouraging this.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Dissident, @anon

    I wonder what their policy is for letting crazy homeless people wander around the exhibits — have they totally surrendered the space like some public libraries and transit facilities? The Mad Movement seems to just be cover for caving to the homeless and their so-called “advocates” as much like trannies they demand we applaud their warped worldview

    • Agree: notsaying
    • Replies: @notsaying
    @Known Fact

    Good question.

    My recollection was that they had a suggested donation policy that allowed people to get in for free.

    I looked it up and that policy was modified in 2018; now you have to be a New York State resident or New Jersey or Connecticut student to get that. The out of state people have to pay the full price of $25. I assume a lot of homeless and/or seriously mental I'll don't keep their IDs on then. So what does the Met do when people don't have ID? They require you to check items so maybe that keeps the people they don't want out.

    By the way, CNN pointed out this change in policy was caused by an utter collapse in people paying the full donation. It makes me wonder if other cultural groups experienced a similar change in paying or attendance:

    "But the Met said, only 17% of the people who visited the museum last year [2017] paid the full $25. And that percentage has been in a steep decline. Back in 2004, for example, 63% of visitors were willing to fork over the full suggested donation."

    People love that Museum. Was 2010 or so the point that middle class people became so financially stressed that they stopped paying the full donation at the Met? Or did they think the $25 was too much; it seems a bit high to me but the article says that is what other New York museums charge.

    https://money.cnn.com/2018/01/04/news/met-museum-of-art-price-change/index.html

  19. the Eiffel Tower made out of 10,000 toothpicks

    There’s a nice bit in the otherwise disappointing Lilo and Stitch where the weird little space alien deftly whips up a detailed replica of San Francisco

  20. About 30 years ago, outsider art became a thing.

    An example would be the 2005 movie Junebug:

    It’s the convergence of postmodernism and entrepreneurialism. I haven’t heard much about it lately, but its reemergence is not surprising.

    I thought the internet and Etsy made this more or less irrelevant, but I suppose not. I’m surprised that Junebug starred Amy Adams.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @anon


    About 30 years ago, outsider art became a thing.
     
    Outsider art (and literature) has been a thing for 200 years. Byron and Shelley. Baudelaire. The Decadents of the 1890s. Poe. Camus. Kerouac. Outsider literature first became mainstream with Byron.

    As for movies, there were outsider movies way further back than 30 years ago. Easy Rider (1969). Godard's Breathless (1960).

    A lot of the film noir of the 1940s could be considered outsider cinema. In some cases, intentionally and consciously so.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @dfordoom

    , @Almost Missouri
    @anon

    About 30 years ago, I went to an "outsider art" or art-made-by-certified-crazy-people exhibition. The background text cited Carl Jung a lot and drew connections between present-day psychotics and ancient religions. As Steve says though, the actual art wasn't so much "ma-a-a-a-ad" (i.e., startling and original genius), it was more "autistic" (i.e., the highly repetitive patterns of an obsessive person with a lot of time and few distractions). Still, it wasn't a bad afternoon.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  21. @black sea
    "Sanism" and "mentalism" are terms used to describe the privileging of those deemed "sane."

    This is not a joke.

    Replies: @mc23, @stillCARealist

    Audism is the oppression of the deaf. Again, no jokes.

  22. @James Speaks
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Eiffel Tower is actually only about 5 feet tall; The rest is camera angles.

    Replies: @mmack, @Reg Cæsar

    I KNEW IT! Lousy Paris Department of Tourism and their tourist traps. 😡

    Next you’ll tell me L’ Arc de Triomphe is a meter high, and the Champs-Élysées is an alleyway in Marseille. 😒

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @mmack


    I KNEW IT! Lousy Paris Department of Tourism and their tourist traps.
     
    Check out the Tim Traveller channel. Tim has been locked down in Paris of late and forced to confine his subjects to the city's fake façades, abandoned Metro lines, the "ghost town" of Goussainville adjacent to CDG, and an intersection with four "No Entry" signs. (One way in; no way out.)

    I can't wait till this is all over and he can go back to things like the highest point in Flevoland, an 1888 monorail in Listowel, Ireland, and the hotel on the French-Swiss border (literally) where Algeria's independence was negotiated.
    , @James Speaks
    @mmack


    Next you’ll tell me L’ Arc de Triomphe is a meter high,
     
    It is and it's cardboard.

    and the Champs-Élysées is an alleyway in Marseille. 😒
     
    Matte

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

  23. I gather they want insanity to be recognized as a life choice to be celebrated.

    On the minus side, it’ll be even harder to stop crazy bums from crapping in your kid’s lunch bag at the bus stop.

    But on the plus side, it’ll be harder for the Junior KGB to deploy their customary weapon of declaring unorthodox political opinions to be evidence of mental illness that demands confinement.

  24. @notsaying
    Are we now going to have the seriously mentally ill tell us the voices they hear are real, their dysfunction is just a different way of being and that they are superior to the rest of us?

    Are they going to take the medications they need and that actually makes them better? (I know some don't get better with medication but many do yet they persist in not taking it consistently.)

    Let us see if the Met regrets encouraging this.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Dissident, @anon

    Are we now going to have the seriously mentally ill tell us the voices they hear are real, their dysfunction is just a different way of being and that they are superior to the rest of us?

    Is not essentially what you have described already, in large part, the case?

    Such as when we indulge the delusions of an individual who insists that he is the opposite of the sex that he manifestly, objectively is?

    At the same time, more generally, perhaps we ought to also bear in mind that psychiatry, for the most part, is perhaps the most dubious field of medicine. For at least most psychiatric diagnoses, the criteria are highly subjective. The claim has even been made (credibly, as far as it sounded to me but alas, I lack the resources at the moment to provide citation) that whatever objective evidence there for (at least most) psychiatric drugs being any more effective than a placebo is at best quite thin. Perhaps someone else will care to elaborate and provide citations.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Dissident


    At the same time, more generally, perhaps we ought to also bear in mind that psychiatry, for the most part, is perhaps the most dubious field of medicine. For at least most psychiatric diagnoses, the criteria are highly subjective.
     
    Psychiatry is scientific in the same way that astrology is scientific. Arguably astrology is more scientific. If you were born on November 12th you're a Scorpio. That's an objective fact.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  25. @Cortes
    @Reg Cæsar

    That’s just amateur nonsense compared to the Majesty of the Brick Testament for full-spectrum bonkers use of Lego.
    A sample:

    https://thebricktestament.com/the_law/when_to_stone_your_children/dt21_18a.html

    What’s that chanting I can hear?

    USA! USA! USA! 🇺🇸

    Goya’s “Disparates” or “Follies” are well worth seeing at El Prado. Produced during a period of isolation and melancholia/depression when going deaf.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    That’s just amateur nonsense compared to…

    I want to know how he did the trick with the TV screen.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yes, the red loco was very cool. Perhaps my description of the project was ungenerous.

  26. The Latest Mad Pride, or perhaps better-put, the Latest Pride Madness, via New York Times:

    N.Y.C. Pride Will Take Steps to Keep Police Out of Parade and Events

    L.G.B.T.Q. police officers will not be allowed to participate as a group in the annual march, and organizers said they will rely on private security for their events.

    ~ ~ ~
    Incidentally/tangentially, in the recent Cancel Culture Is Caste Culture thread, one of the astute comments posted by the redoubtable dfordoom included his pointing-out that,

    All you need to do is to announce that you’re bisexual (or polysexual or whatever) and immediately you’re in a much more favoured category.

    No doubt that at least some of the readership here will understand my friendly rejoinder to that of, Not always…

  27. @mmack
    @James Speaks

    I KNEW IT! Lousy Paris Department of Tourism and their tourist traps. 😡

    Next you'll tell me L' Arc de Triomphe is a meter high, and the Champs-Élysées is an alleyway in Marseille. 😒

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @James Speaks

    I KNEW IT! Lousy Paris Department of Tourism and their tourist traps.

    Check out the Tim Traveller channel. Tim has been locked down in Paris of late and forced to confine his subjects to the city’s fake façades, abandoned Metro lines, the “ghost town” of Goussainville adjacent to CDG, and an intersection with four “No Entry” signs. (One way in; no way out.)

    I can’t wait till this is all over and he can go back to things like the highest point in Flevoland, an 1888 monorail in Listowel, Ireland, and the hotel on the French-Swiss border (literally) where Algeria’s independence was negotiated.

  28. @mmack
    @James Speaks

    I KNEW IT! Lousy Paris Department of Tourism and their tourist traps. 😡

    Next you'll tell me L' Arc de Triomphe is a meter high, and the Champs-Élysées is an alleyway in Marseille. 😒

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @James Speaks

    Next you’ll tell me L’ Arc de Triomphe is a meter high,

    It is and it’s cardboard.

    and the Champs-Élysées is an alleyway in Marseille. 😒

    Matte

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @James Speaks

    Stonehenge is a bit of a disappointment as well.

    https://youtu.be/qAXzzHM8zLw

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Cortes

  29. @mc23
    @black sea

    This will lead to Bedlam.

    Replies: @Cortes

    Excellent!

  30. let’s take this all the way.

    Dead Pride. who are the living to say there is a difference between alive and dead? Undead people are people too.

    down with the tyranny of the living. a man is a woman, and a corpse is a PERSON, bursting with hopes and dreams.

    oh, is that going too far? do even leftists say wait a minute, now that’s crazy. there’s definitely a difference between alive and dead?

    well, that’s just a matter of opinion. you’re just not far enough to the left yet.

    • Replies: @anon
    @prime noticer

    Dead Pride. who are the living to say there is a difference between alive and dead? Undead people are people too.

    The Democrats are way ahead of you on this...

  31. @James Speaks
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Eiffel Tower is actually only about 5 feet tall; The rest is camera angles.

    Replies: @mmack, @Reg Cæsar

    The Eiffel Tower is actually only about 5 feet tall; The rest is camera angles.

    Um, that’s the Golden Gate Bridge. I’m going to the eye doctor tomorrow, and perhaps you should, too.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Post Office Tower in London is just a cheap BBC special effect department effort:

    https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5169/5313049606_0678448e6f_b.jpg

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    , @James Speaks
    @Reg Cæsar

    Megapus lives!

  32. @PiltdownMan

    Not everyone with psychiatric disabilities identifies as Mad.
     
    What, me mad?

    https://i.imgur.com/WPivBP7.jpg?1

    Replies: @Shel100

    Now he’s the transportation secretary.

  33. @Reg Cæsar
    @James Speaks


    The Eiffel Tower is actually only about 5 feet tall; The rest is camera angles.
     
    Um, that's the Golden Gate Bridge. I'm going to the eye doctor tomorrow, and perhaps you should, too.

    https://s.hdnux.com/photos/73/33/21/15578205/4/rawImage.png

    Replies: @Ray P, @James Speaks

    The Post Office Tower in London is just a cheap BBC special effect department effort:

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Ray P

    The Goodies are the ultimate trusted source. It's right there in the name.

    Replies: @Ray P

  34. @Known Fact
    @notsaying

    I wonder what their policy is for letting crazy homeless people wander around the exhibits -- have they totally surrendered the space like some public libraries and transit facilities? The Mad Movement seems to just be cover for caving to the homeless and their so-called "advocates" as much like trannies they demand we applaud their warped worldview

    Replies: @notsaying

    Good question.

    My recollection was that they had a suggested donation policy that allowed people to get in for free.

    I looked it up and that policy was modified in 2018; now you have to be a New York State resident or New Jersey or Connecticut student to get that. The out of state people have to pay the full price of $25. I assume a lot of homeless and/or seriously mental I’ll don’t keep their IDs on then. So what does the Met do when people don’t have ID? They require you to check items so maybe that keeps the people they don’t want out.

    By the way, CNN pointed out this change in policy was caused by an utter collapse in people paying the full donation. It makes me wonder if other cultural groups experienced a similar change in paying or attendance:

    “But the Met said, only 17% of the people who visited the museum last year [2017] paid the full $25. And that percentage has been in a steep decline. Back in 2004, for example, 63% of visitors were willing to fork over the full suggested donation.”

    People love that Museum. Was 2010 or so the point that middle class people became so financially stressed that they stopped paying the full donation at the Met? Or did they think the $25 was too much; it seems a bit high to me but the article says that is what other New York museums charge.

    https://money.cnn.com/2018/01/04/news/met-museum-of-art-price-change/index.html

  35. @El Dato
    Meanwhile, file under "Well, that didn't take long!"

    Space Force commander sacked after claiming US military is under assault from ‘neo-Marxist’ critical race theory


    The commander of a US Space Force unit has been removed from his leadership role following a podcast appearance in which he claimed that ‘Marxist’ ideologies like critical race theory were undermining the military.

    Lt. Col. Matthew Lohmeier made the provocative comments while speaking on ‘Information Operation’, a podcast hosted by conservative commentator and military veteran L. Todd Wood.
     

    https://i.postimg.cc/h4ZdRRgd/kirk-being-court-martialed.jpg

    Stressing that he was only sharing his “personal view,” Lohmeier said that he believed China was exploiting America’s obsession with critical race theory in the hopes that it could win a “war” with Washington without firing a shot. He claimed that Beijing was fueling internal division on social media and that Chinese President Xi Jinping would love to see the United States “rot like this from the inside.”
     
    The US, rotting in the fields.

    But is paranoia a good trait in the military occupation? It might be. Could be directed at the wrong country though.

    Then again, what if it turns out our galactic brothers are really Marxist?

    From Charles Stross' "Missile Gap":


    “Hah.”

    Gagarin begins to sweep the northern coast when Major Suvurov stands up. “Sir! Over there!”

    “Where?” Gagarin glances at him. Suvurov is quivering with anger, or shock, or something else. He, too, has his binoculars out.

    “Over there! On the southern hillside.”

    “Where–” He brings his binoculars to bear as the dawn light spills across the shattered stump of an immense skyscraper.

    There is a hillside behind it, a jagged rift where the land has risen up a hundred meters. It reeks of antiquity, emphasized by the carvings in the headland. Here is what the expedition has been looking for all along, the evidence that they are not alone.

    “My God.” Misha swears, shocked into politically incorrect language.

    “Marx,” says Gagarin, studying the craggy features of the nearest head. “I’ve seen this before, this sort of thing. The Americans have a memorial like it. Mount Rushmore, they call it.”

    “Don’t you mean Easter Island?” asks Misha. “Sculptures left by a vanished people…”

    “Nonsense! Look there, isn’t that Lenin? And Stalin, of course.” Even though the famous moustache is cracked and half of it has fallen away from the cliff. “But who’s that next to them?”

    Gagarin brings his binoculars to focus on the fourth head. Somehow it looks far less weathered than the others, as if added as an afterthought, perhaps some kind of insane statement about the mental health of its vanished builders. Both antennae have long since broken off, and one of the mandibles is damaged, but the eyeless face is still recognizably unhuman. The insectile head stares eyelessly out across the frozen ocean, an enigma on the edge of a devastated island continent. “I think we’ve found the brother socialists,” he mutters to Misha, his voice pitched low so that it won’t carry over the background noise on the flight deck.

    “And you know what? Something tells me we didn’t want to.”
     

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @AndrewR, @notsaying

    Two disturbing things here:

    1. That he could be right about China

    2. That he got put in charge in the first place. It is hard to think he didn’t shoot his mouth off like this before.

  36. @AndrewR
    @El Dato

    Lohmeier is 100% right. Everyone, specifically white people, need to treat the US military like the evil and rotten terrorist group it is. It has long been involved in wickedness, but in the last year we have seen it go absolutely mad, attacking the people who make up its very backbone. Perhaps I was naïve to think the military would never become openly anti-white (or, more accurately, openly anti-non-black), but here we are. Any non-black person joining - or re-upping in - the military today is a fool, regardless of their reasons for joining. That is especially true for white people

    Replies: @Anonymouse

    Lohmeier is absolutely wrong. It is of long standing that the military not involve themselfs in political issus, the idea being that an army separated from partisan politics would be the safer course for a secular government.

    It is perfectly apporpriated that he be remove from military service.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    @Anonymouse

    Lmao you must be trolling.

    CRT is extremely partisan, and it wasn't Lohmeier who made it the official DoD policy.

    We are way past due for a field grade officer like Lohmeier to lead a coup against our evil elites, not unlike Chavez and Ghaddafi did.

    Replies: @Polistra

  37. Definitions change. Bobby Fischer was thought to be mad because, in part, he had bad-mouthed the U.S. By today’s Biden standards, Fischer would have been made ambassador to the U.N.

    • Replies: @James J O'Meara
    @SafeNow

    If you think that, then I'd say you're the nut.

    https://www.darkmoon.me/2019/bobby-fischer-the-chess-genius-who-hated-jews/

  38. @Reg Cæsar
    @Cortes


    That’s just amateur nonsense compared to...
     
    I want to know how he did the trick with the TV screen.

    Replies: @Cortes

    Yes, the red loco was very cool. Perhaps my description of the project was ungenerous.

  39. @Reg Cæsar
    @James Speaks


    The Eiffel Tower is actually only about 5 feet tall; The rest is camera angles.
     
    Um, that's the Golden Gate Bridge. I'm going to the eye doctor tomorrow, and perhaps you should, too.

    https://s.hdnux.com/photos/73/33/21/15578205/4/rawImage.png

    Replies: @Ray P, @James Speaks

    Megapus lives!

  40. • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Melinda Gates could probably prove that Bill slept with her when she was a Microsoft staffer.

    Replies: @anon, @Polistra

  41. @notsaying
    Are we now going to have the seriously mentally ill tell us the voices they hear are real, their dysfunction is just a different way of being and that they are superior to the rest of us?

    Are they going to take the medications they need and that actually makes them better? (I know some don't get better with medication but many do yet they persist in not taking it consistently.)

    Let us see if the Met regrets encouraging this.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @Dissident, @anon

    Are we now going to have the seriously mentally ill tell us the voices they hear are real, their dysfunction is just a different way of being and that they are superior to the rest of us?

    Has anyone asked Joe “salute the Marines” Biden?

  42. @prime noticer
    let's take this all the way.

    Dead Pride. who are the living to say there is a difference between alive and dead? Undead people are people too.

    down with the tyranny of the living. a man is a woman, and a corpse is a PERSON, bursting with hopes and dreams.

    oh, is that going too far? do even leftists say wait a minute, now that's crazy. there's definitely a difference between alive and dead?

    well, that's just a matter of opinion. you're just not far enough to the left yet.

    Replies: @anon

    Dead Pride. who are the living to say there is a difference between alive and dead? Undead people are people too.

    The Democrats are way ahead of you on this…

  43. @Anonymouse
    @AndrewR

    Lohmeier is absolutely wrong. It is of long standing that the military not involve themselfs in political issus, the idea being that an army separated from partisan politics would be the safer course for a secular government.

    It is perfectly apporpriated that he be remove from military service.

    Replies: @AndrewR

    Lmao you must be trolling.

    CRT is extremely partisan, and it wasn’t Lohmeier who made it the official DoD policy.

    We are way past due for a field grade officer like Lohmeier to lead a coup against our evil elites, not unlike Chavez and Ghaddafi did.

    • Replies: @Polistra
    @AndrewR


    Lmao you must be trolling.
     
    I think his careful (mis)use of the language might have been a tip-off..
  44. Megapus lives!

    They did Tiny’s theme song:

    Talking about Duck People, Duck Man
    Do you know what Duck People look like?
    You can notice us because we wear dark hoods
    Don’t tell us we look like ducks, that’s a stereotype
    We cross bridges; that’s a stereotype that’s true…

  45. @anon
    Another shoe drops. Right on Bill Gates head.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/microsoft-directors-decided-bill-gates-needed-to-leave-board-due-to-prior-relationship-with-staffer-11621205803

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Melinda Gates could probably prove that Bill slept with her when she was a Microsoft staffer.

    • Replies: @anon
    @Steve Sailer

    Yeah, but that thing would be, uh, different from this other thing.
    Or something.

    , @Polistra
    @Steve Sailer

    Who are billionaires supposed to sleep with, anyway?

    A: Anyone they effin want

  46. So, we’re back to the days of R.D. Laing, eh?

  47. The American Visionary Art Museum (AVAM) in Baltimore frequently has exhibits that include (or coincide) with “mad art,” and their standing collection is full of works by people with troubled biographies. I highly recommend it, by the way. Very, very interesting.

  48. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Melinda Gates could probably prove that Bill slept with her when she was a Microsoft staffer.

    Replies: @anon, @Polistra

    Yeah, but that thing would be, uh, different from this other thing.
    Or something.

  49. @Peter Johnson
    Let us hope that the Mad Pride movement grows exponentially and becomes a prominent presence at LGTBX, BLM and BIPOC marches and events over coming years. The Mad Pride movement could contribute some great dress-ups and floats to the festivities and raise these events to a wonderful new level of absurdity.

    Replies: @njguy73, @Almost Missouri

    If I had kids, I’d rather have stories read to them by someone dressed like Napoleon than by a drag queen. At least they’d learn who Napoleon was.

  50. @James Speaks
    @mmack


    Next you’ll tell me L’ Arc de Triomphe is a meter high,
     
    It is and it's cardboard.

    and the Champs-Élysées is an alleyway in Marseille. 😒
     
    Matte

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    Stonehenge is a bit of a disappointment as well.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @James J O'Meara

    Doorhenge
    https://live.staticflickr.com/1390/1245649656_ab4a310d86_n.jpg

    , @Cortes
    @James J O'Meara

    A modern Irish place for reflection:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achill-henge

  51. @SafeNow
    Definitions change. Bobby Fischer was thought to be mad because, in part, he had bad-mouthed the U.S. By today’s Biden standards, Fischer would have been made ambassador to the U.N.

    Replies: @James J O'Meara

    If you think that, then I’d say you’re the nut.

    https://www.darkmoon.me/2019/bobby-fischer-the-chess-genius-who-hated-jews/

  52. @anon
    About 30 years ago, outsider art became a thing.

    An example would be the 2005 movie Junebug:


    https://youtu.be/mUj7k7Ypb60

    It's the convergence of postmodernism and entrepreneurialism. I haven't heard much about it lately, but its reemergence is not surprising.

    I thought the internet and Etsy made this more or less irrelevant, but I suppose not. I'm surprised that Junebug starred Amy Adams.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Almost Missouri

    About 30 years ago, outsider art became a thing.

    Outsider art (and literature) has been a thing for 200 years. Byron and Shelley. Baudelaire. The Decadents of the 1890s. Poe. Camus. Kerouac. Outsider literature first became mainstream with Byron.

    As for movies, there were outsider movies way further back than 30 years ago. Easy Rider (1969). Godard’s Breathless (1960).

    A lot of the film noir of the 1940s could be considered outsider cinema. In some cases, intentionally and consciously so.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @dfordoom

    Wasn't Lord Byron, a member of the House of Lords, an insider?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Jonathan Mason

    , @dfordoom
    @dfordoom

    Further to the subject of outsider art, it needs to be pointed out that the roots of all the social and cultural revolutions that have swept over western society in recent decades have their roots in the 19th century.

  53. @James J O'Meara
    @James Speaks

    Stonehenge is a bit of a disappointment as well.

    https://youtu.be/qAXzzHM8zLw

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Cortes

    Doorhenge

  54. @dfordoom
    @anon


    About 30 years ago, outsider art became a thing.
     
    Outsider art (and literature) has been a thing for 200 years. Byron and Shelley. Baudelaire. The Decadents of the 1890s. Poe. Camus. Kerouac. Outsider literature first became mainstream with Byron.

    As for movies, there were outsider movies way further back than 30 years ago. Easy Rider (1969). Godard's Breathless (1960).

    A lot of the film noir of the 1940s could be considered outsider cinema. In some cases, intentionally and consciously so.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @dfordoom

    Wasn’t Lord Byron, a member of the House of Lords, an insider?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Steve Sailer


    Wasn’t Lord Byron, a member of the House of Lords, an insider?
     
    Not in his view, and (especially) not in the view of so many writers and artists who were influenced by him.

    If you see yourself as rejecting the existing political, social and moral order then you're an outsider.
    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Steve Sailer

    Lord Bertrand Russell was an inside-outsider.

    The best revolutionaries have always come from inside the ruling class.

  55. @dfordoom
    @anon


    About 30 years ago, outsider art became a thing.
     
    Outsider art (and literature) has been a thing for 200 years. Byron and Shelley. Baudelaire. The Decadents of the 1890s. Poe. Camus. Kerouac. Outsider literature first became mainstream with Byron.

    As for movies, there were outsider movies way further back than 30 years ago. Easy Rider (1969). Godard's Breathless (1960).

    A lot of the film noir of the 1940s could be considered outsider cinema. In some cases, intentionally and consciously so.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer, @dfordoom

    Further to the subject of outsider art, it needs to be pointed out that the roots of all the social and cultural revolutions that have swept over western society in recent decades have their roots in the 19th century.

  56. @Steve Sailer
    @dfordoom

    Wasn't Lord Byron, a member of the House of Lords, an insider?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Jonathan Mason

    Wasn’t Lord Byron, a member of the House of Lords, an insider?

    Not in his view, and (especially) not in the view of so many writers and artists who were influenced by him.

    If you see yourself as rejecting the existing political, social and moral order then you’re an outsider.

  57. @AndrewR
    @Anonymouse

    Lmao you must be trolling.

    CRT is extremely partisan, and it wasn't Lohmeier who made it the official DoD policy.

    We are way past due for a field grade officer like Lohmeier to lead a coup against our evil elites, not unlike Chavez and Ghaddafi did.

    Replies: @Polistra

    Lmao you must be trolling.

    I think his careful (mis)use of the language might have been a tip-off..

  58. @Steve Sailer
    @anon

    Melinda Gates could probably prove that Bill slept with her when she was a Microsoft staffer.

    Replies: @anon, @Polistra

    Who are billionaires supposed to sleep with, anyway?

    A: Anyone they effin want

  59. When Corbyn was Labour leader, I did a bit of anthropology field work and went to one of their meetings in west London. It’s not true that socialists are against competition – everyone was competitively claiming to be the most mentally ill and oppressed.

  60. @Peter Johnson
    Let us hope that the Mad Pride movement grows exponentially and becomes a prominent presence at LGTBX, BLM and BIPOC marches and events over coming years. The Mad Pride movement could contribute some great dress-ups and floats to the festivities and raise these events to a wonderful new level of absurdity.

    Replies: @njguy73, @Almost Missouri

    The fly in the Mad Pride ointment:

    Whereas LGBTP, BIPOC, et al. know that they are LGBTP, BIPOC etc. and embrace it, crazy people often do not. And the crazy people who are aware that they are crazy are usually a) the less crazy ones, and b) trying not to be crazy. The most crazy people think that a) they are right and it is everyone else who has it wrong, and b) they have no desire to change.

    “Mad Pride” may still be able to get off the ground with a cadre of borderline disordered people who grasp the political possibilities of a new victim-privilege identity, but their narrative will always be undermined by the most obvious exponents rejecting the label.

    • Agree: sayless
    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    @Almost Missouri

    There are some good lyrics about craziness -


    Once I was crazy
    and my ace in the hole
    was that I knew that I was crazy
    so I never lost my self control

     

    And

    Two men think they're Jesus - one of them must be wrong.
     
    And


    He wrote me a prescription and said
    "You are depressed.
    I'm glad you came to see me
    to get this off your chest.
    Come back and see me later.
    NEXT PATIENT PLEASE...
    Send in another victim of Industrial Disease
    ."
     
  61. @Dissident
    @notsaying


    Are we now going to have the seriously mentally ill tell us the voices they hear are real, their dysfunction is just a different way of being and that they are superior to the rest of us?
     
    Is not essentially what you have described already, in large part, the case?

    Such as when we indulge the delusions of an individual who insists that he is the opposite of the sex that he manifestly, objectively is?

    At the same time, more generally, perhaps we ought to also bear in mind that psychiatry, for the most part, is perhaps the most dubious field of medicine. For at least most psychiatric diagnoses, the criteria are highly subjective. The claim has even been made (credibly, as far as it sounded to me but alas, I lack the resources at the moment to provide citation) that whatever objective evidence there for (at least most) psychiatric drugs being any more effective than a placebo is at best quite thin. Perhaps someone else will care to elaborate and provide citations.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    At the same time, more generally, perhaps we ought to also bear in mind that psychiatry, for the most part, is perhaps the most dubious field of medicine. For at least most psychiatric diagnoses, the criteria are highly subjective.

    Psychiatry is scientific in the same way that astrology is scientific. Arguably astrology is more scientific. If you were born on November 12th you’re a Scorpio. That’s an objective fact.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @dfordoom

    Psychiatric diagnosis is often arguable, but what is not arguable is that people with psychiatric diagnosis have difficulty functioning correctly in society, and that they need to be carefully evaluated when they get into trouble with the court system.

    Psychiatrists and psychologists are better equipped than judges and lawyers to determine how responsible a person is for their actions.

    Also being able to prescribe psychoactive drugs requires a good medical background to determine what drugs may be contraindicated, what side effects they might have, and to order and interpret lab tests, EKGs and such like.

    So it is true that psychiatry is not much like surgery, but then being a corporate lawyer is not like much like being a public defender.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  62. @Anon
    To paraphrase Tolstoy, “every happy society is happy in the same way; every unhappy society is unhappy in its own way.”

    What a world.

    Replies: @AnotherDad

    To paraphrase Tolstoy, “every happy society is happy in the same way; every unhappy society is unhappy in its own way.”

    For us it is all just minoritarianism.

    Minoritarianism is why there’s some new looney tunes nonsense popping up like weeds. We have an official ideology of privileging the abnormal/non-normal over the normal.

    Either a nation has a positive sense of itself, its people, culture, accomplishments and future and hence wants to reproduce itself (and ergo will have normal sex roles and some sort of patriarchy) … or it loses its spirit and collapses, dies. (The rest is commentary.)

    This is why you absolutely, positively can not let a minority–people who do not value the nation, i.e. its people, culture, history–come to political or cultural power.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @AnotherDad


    Either a nation has a positive sense of itself, its people, culture, accomplishments and future and hence wants to reproduce itself (and ergo will have normal sex roles and some sort of patriarchy) … or it loses its spirit and collapses, dies. (The rest is commentary.)
     
    Societies (or nations) do not want to reproduce themselves. Individual people (and couples) within a society either want to reproduce themselves or they don't.

    There's also the problem that the fall in birth rates began a long time ago. It began at a time when we did have normal sex roles and some sort of patriarchy. So it seems unlikely that the blurring of normal sex roles and the collapse of patriarchy are the causes of demographic collapse.

    I'd say that the modern United States has an enormous (in fact ludicrously inflated) pride in its culture and accomplishments. It's just that increasingly that culture and those accomplishments are not things that you or I would feel pride in. The United States has a steadily increasing sense of mission, of its destiny to spread the glories of its culture (such as twerking and rap) and to share its accomplishments (homosexual marriage, transsexual bathroom rights) to every corner of the globe.

    In other words, the US has too much pride and confidence in itself.
  63. @anon
    About 30 years ago, outsider art became a thing.

    An example would be the 2005 movie Junebug:


    https://youtu.be/mUj7k7Ypb60

    It's the convergence of postmodernism and entrepreneurialism. I haven't heard much about it lately, but its reemergence is not surprising.

    I thought the internet and Etsy made this more or less irrelevant, but I suppose not. I'm surprised that Junebug starred Amy Adams.

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Almost Missouri

    About 30 years ago, I went to an “outsider art” or art-made-by-certified-crazy-people exhibition. The background text cited Carl Jung a lot and drew connections between present-day psychotics and ancient religions. As Steve says though, the actual art wasn’t so much “ma-a-a-a-ad” (i.e., startling and original genius), it was more “autistic” (i.e., the highly repetitive patterns of an obsessive person with a lot of time and few distractions). Still, it wasn’t a bad afternoon.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Almost Missouri


    About 30 years ago, I went to an “outsider art” or art-made-by-certified-crazy-people exhibition.
     
    It's possible that (in the West over the past couple of centuries at least) art and literature are things that are mostly created by crazy people. Most writers and artists seem to be, at the very least, a bit odd.

    How many great writers and artists have been the sorts of people you'd want your daughter to marry?

    If your kid comes to you and says that when he grows up he wants to be an engineer or a doctor he's probably normal. If he says he wants to be a novelist or a sculptor he's probably nuts. He might become a novelist or a sculptor, but he might become a homosexual, an alcoholic, a suicide, a drug addict or a homeless person.

    It may be a universal thing, or it may be a flaw in our civilisation. It could even be a feature rather than a bug. Perhaps it's only possible to create great art or literature if you have an off-kilter way of looking at the world, of if you're introspective to a pathological degree, or if you have an ego so inflated that it's pathological.
  64. @AnotherDad
    @Anon


    To paraphrase Tolstoy, “every happy society is happy in the same way; every unhappy society is unhappy in its own way.”
     
    For us it is all just minoritarianism.

    Minoritarianism is why there's some new looney tunes nonsense popping up like weeds. We have an official ideology of privileging the abnormal/non-normal over the normal.

    Either a nation has a positive sense of itself, its people, culture, accomplishments and future and hence wants to reproduce itself (and ergo will have normal sex roles and some sort of patriarchy) ... or it loses its spirit and collapses, dies. (The rest is commentary.)

    This is why you absolutely, positively can not let a minority--people who do not value the nation, i.e. its people, culture, history--come to political or cultural power.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Either a nation has a positive sense of itself, its people, culture, accomplishments and future and hence wants to reproduce itself (and ergo will have normal sex roles and some sort of patriarchy) … or it loses its spirit and collapses, dies. (The rest is commentary.)

    Societies (or nations) do not want to reproduce themselves. Individual people (and couples) within a society either want to reproduce themselves or they don’t.

    There’s also the problem that the fall in birth rates began a long time ago. It began at a time when we did have normal sex roles and some sort of patriarchy. So it seems unlikely that the blurring of normal sex roles and the collapse of patriarchy are the causes of demographic collapse.

    I’d say that the modern United States has an enormous (in fact ludicrously inflated) pride in its culture and accomplishments. It’s just that increasingly that culture and those accomplishments are not things that you or I would feel pride in. The United States has a steadily increasing sense of mission, of its destiny to spread the glories of its culture (such as twerking and rap) and to share its accomplishments (homosexual marriage, transsexual bathroom rights) to every corner of the globe.

    In other words, the US has too much pride and confidence in itself.

    • LOL: Jonathan Mason
  65. @Almost Missouri
    @anon

    About 30 years ago, I went to an "outsider art" or art-made-by-certified-crazy-people exhibition. The background text cited Carl Jung a lot and drew connections between present-day psychotics and ancient religions. As Steve says though, the actual art wasn't so much "ma-a-a-a-ad" (i.e., startling and original genius), it was more "autistic" (i.e., the highly repetitive patterns of an obsessive person with a lot of time and few distractions). Still, it wasn't a bad afternoon.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    About 30 years ago, I went to an “outsider art” or art-made-by-certified-crazy-people exhibition.

    It’s possible that (in the West over the past couple of centuries at least) art and literature are things that are mostly created by crazy people. Most writers and artists seem to be, at the very least, a bit odd.

    How many great writers and artists have been the sorts of people you’d want your daughter to marry?

    If your kid comes to you and says that when he grows up he wants to be an engineer or a doctor he’s probably normal. If he says he wants to be a novelist or a sculptor he’s probably nuts. He might become a novelist or a sculptor, but he might become a homosexual, an alcoholic, a suicide, a drug addict or a homeless person.

    It may be a universal thing, or it may be a flaw in our civilisation. It could even be a feature rather than a bug. Perhaps it’s only possible to create great art or literature if you have an off-kilter way of looking at the world, of if you’re introspective to a pathological degree, or if you have an ego so inflated that it’s pathological.

  66. @James J O'Meara
    @James Speaks

    Stonehenge is a bit of a disappointment as well.

    https://youtu.be/qAXzzHM8zLw

    Replies: @James Speaks, @Cortes

    A modern Irish place for reflection:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achill-henge

  67. @Achmed E. Newman
    Vincent Price and cross-country car race movies aside, wasn't it British people who used that word for "crazy" a lot, or still do? I just remember some woman in a movie with an English accent going "you're quite mad, you know" in a nice way when the hero (I think) told her his plan to save the day.

    Then there's this guy:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAoBW3yjlvA

    ****
    Wait a minute, did youtube screw me over? Is this the original Bridge on the River Kwai, or is it from the sequel in which the US Army doctor disappears into the Bermuda Triangle in 1944, with this scene in which he reappears at Harvard University in the year 2021?

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    In Britain the word mad usually means crazy, where is in America it usually means angry, hence the confusion.

    In Alice in Wonderland we have the Mad Hatter, he is crazy not angry.

    In British English a madman is a lunatic.

    If you say somebody is mad about the Beatles, that means that they are crazy about the Beatles, or in other words that they like them insanely.

    I would think that pressure groups for angry Americans would be mad at crazy people full cultural misappropriation.

    As a person who has lived on both sides of the Atlantic, all I can say is that I am mad as hell and I am not going to take it anymore.

    If crazy people want a good word to reclaim, they ought to go for lunatic, which is associated with Luna, the Moon, and is a lovely word. The whole idea of giving asylum to Moon people is very beautiful, and should be supported by those well-known ‘loonies’ Prince Harry &Wife.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    @Jonathan Mason


    In Britain the word mad usually means crazy, where is in America it usually means angry, hence the confusion.
     
    Any American with decent education knows that "mad" can easily mean either one. Depending on the context. "Mad" meaning "crazy" is well known here. This said, I like and respect the British version of the English language over what we have here. At least twice per month I come across a British-ism, a British (UK too) expression that is never used in America. They are usually clever and get the point across.
  68. @dfordoom
    @Dissident


    At the same time, more generally, perhaps we ought to also bear in mind that psychiatry, for the most part, is perhaps the most dubious field of medicine. For at least most psychiatric diagnoses, the criteria are highly subjective.
     
    Psychiatry is scientific in the same way that astrology is scientific. Arguably astrology is more scientific. If you were born on November 12th you're a Scorpio. That's an objective fact.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Psychiatric diagnosis is often arguable, but what is not arguable is that people with psychiatric diagnosis have difficulty functioning correctly in society, and that they need to be carefully evaluated when they get into trouble with the court system.

    Psychiatrists and psychologists are better equipped than judges and lawyers to determine how responsible a person is for their actions.

    Also being able to prescribe psychoactive drugs requires a good medical background to determine what drugs may be contraindicated, what side effects they might have, and to order and interpret lab tests, EKGs and such like.

    So it is true that psychiatry is not much like surgery, but then being a corporate lawyer is not like much like being a public defender.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Jonathan Mason


    Psychiatric diagnosis is often arguable, but what is not arguable is that people with psychiatric diagnosis have difficulty functioning correctly in society
     
    A lot of people have difficulty functioning correctly in society. In some cases it's because they lack sufficient intelligence. In some cases it's because they didn't learn the basic rules of behaviour in childhood. In some cases it's because they have some organic brain abnormality or abnormality with their bio-chemistry - schizophrenics seem to fall into that category. In some cases it's because of destructive learned behaviours.

    In many cases it's because human personality and human behaviour vary wildly and some personality types have difficulty functioning correctly in society. This is not necessarily an "illness" or a "disorder" - it's just variability in personality with people at the extremes of the variability spectrum often running into trouble. (or sometimes merely upsetting other people).

    I don't think psychiatry is capable of distinguishing very well between actual illnesses/disorders, poor socialisation and plain old variability in personality types. They've invented hundreds of disorders. Some of those disorders (such as schizophrenia) undoubtedly exist. The existence of many of those disorders is debatable.

    I'm not arguing that there's no such thing as crazy people. I'm not arguing that we don't need a way of recognising, categorising and treating such people. I'm not arguing that the law doesn't need to distinguish between crazy people and ordinary criminals.

    I just think that psychiatry is roughly at the stage astronomy was at in the early 16th century. Copernicus had figured out that the Earth goes around the Sun but he could not come up with a viable description of this this worked.

    Psychiatry is dangerous if you take it too seriously and if you think that all those diagnoses in the DSM correspond with the realities of human behaviour. Psychiatry may be moderately useful if you accept that psychiatrists have not yet advanced anywhere near a sound scientific understanding of human behaviour.
  69. Psychiatrist interpreting EKG’s?!
    That’s really funny

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @pepperinmono

    Not really. Tricyclic antidepressants can have some cardiac effects and some other psychotropic drugs may cause arrhythmias in certain individuals.

    In any case these days ECG machines usually give a computerized readout of the type of rhythm found, and if anything looks bad in the report the psychiatrist will usually make a referral to a cardiologist for further testing before continuing with a medication of this type.

    It is always good to avoid malpractice suits.

  70. We’re supposed to believe men are women and vice versa, that race doesn’t exist except when it does. Children are being encouraged to submit to permanent sexual mutilation. Dead black criminals are raised to godlike status. A careless word that might have been acceptable a year ago can now permanently ruin a person.

    Apparently sane white people accept this sort of treatment that even a chronic schizophrenic would know to be crazy.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Rob McX


    Dead black criminals are raised to godlike status...
     
    That's what the Romans used to say about the Jews when the Roman Empire was in decline and even the fun and games at the Coliseum and human sacrifice was deemed to be politically incorrect.
  71. @pepperinmono
    Psychiatrist interpreting EKG’s?!
    That’s really funny

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Not really. Tricyclic antidepressants can have some cardiac effects and some other psychotropic drugs may cause arrhythmias in certain individuals.

    In any case these days ECG machines usually give a computerized readout of the type of rhythm found, and if anything looks bad in the report the psychiatrist will usually make a referral to a cardiologist for further testing before continuing with a medication of this type.

    It is always good to avoid malpractice suits.

  72. @Rob McX
    We're supposed to believe men are women and vice versa, that race doesn't exist except when it does. Children are being encouraged to submit to permanent sexual mutilation. Dead black criminals are raised to godlike status. A careless word that might have been acceptable a year ago can now permanently ruin a person.

    Apparently sane white people accept this sort of treatment that even a chronic schizophrenic would know to be crazy.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Dead black criminals are raised to godlike status…

    That’s what the Romans used to say about the Jews when the Roman Empire was in decline and even the fun and games at the Coliseum and human sacrifice was deemed to be politically incorrect.

  73. @Steve Sailer
    @dfordoom

    Wasn't Lord Byron, a member of the House of Lords, an insider?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @Jonathan Mason

    Lord Bertrand Russell was an inside-outsider.

    The best revolutionaries have always come from inside the ruling class.

  74. @Ray P
    @Reg Cæsar

    The Post Office Tower in London is just a cheap BBC special effect department effort:

    https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5169/5313049606_0678448e6f_b.jpg

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    The Goodies are the ultimate trusted source. It’s right there in the name.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Kratoklastes

    I'd never trust Graeme Garden with anything and Bill Oddie wasn't much better.

  75. @Almost Missouri
    @Peter Johnson

    The fly in the Mad Pride ointment:

    Whereas LGBTP, BIPOC, et al. know that they are LGBTP, BIPOC etc. and embrace it, crazy people often do not. And the crazy people who are aware that they are crazy are usually a) the less crazy ones, and b) trying not to be crazy. The most crazy people think that a) they are right and it is everyone else who has it wrong, and b) they have no desire to change.

    "Mad Pride" may still be able to get off the ground with a cadre of borderline disordered people who grasp the political possibilities of a new victim-privilege identity, but their narrative will always be undermined by the most obvious exponents rejecting the label.

    Replies: @Kratoklastes

    There are some good lyrics about craziness –

    Once I was crazy
    and my ace in the hole
    was that I knew that I was crazy
    so I never lost my self control

    And

    Two men think they’re Jesus – one of them must be wrong.

    And

    He wrote me a prescription and said
    You are depressed.
    I’m glad you came to see me
    to get this off your chest.
    Come back and see me later.
    NEXT PATIENT PLEASE…
    Send in another victim of Industrial Disease
    .”

  76. @Jonathan Mason
    @dfordoom

    Psychiatric diagnosis is often arguable, but what is not arguable is that people with psychiatric diagnosis have difficulty functioning correctly in society, and that they need to be carefully evaluated when they get into trouble with the court system.

    Psychiatrists and psychologists are better equipped than judges and lawyers to determine how responsible a person is for their actions.

    Also being able to prescribe psychoactive drugs requires a good medical background to determine what drugs may be contraindicated, what side effects they might have, and to order and interpret lab tests, EKGs and such like.

    So it is true that psychiatry is not much like surgery, but then being a corporate lawyer is not like much like being a public defender.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Psychiatric diagnosis is often arguable, but what is not arguable is that people with psychiatric diagnosis have difficulty functioning correctly in society

    A lot of people have difficulty functioning correctly in society. In some cases it’s because they lack sufficient intelligence. In some cases it’s because they didn’t learn the basic rules of behaviour in childhood. In some cases it’s because they have some organic brain abnormality or abnormality with their bio-chemistry – schizophrenics seem to fall into that category. In some cases it’s because of destructive learned behaviours.

    In many cases it’s because human personality and human behaviour vary wildly and some personality types have difficulty functioning correctly in society. This is not necessarily an “illness” or a “disorder” – it’s just variability in personality with people at the extremes of the variability spectrum often running into trouble. (or sometimes merely upsetting other people).

    I don’t think psychiatry is capable of distinguishing very well between actual illnesses/disorders, poor socialisation and plain old variability in personality types. They’ve invented hundreds of disorders. Some of those disorders (such as schizophrenia) undoubtedly exist. The existence of many of those disorders is debatable.

    I’m not arguing that there’s no such thing as crazy people. I’m not arguing that we don’t need a way of recognising, categorising and treating such people. I’m not arguing that the law doesn’t need to distinguish between crazy people and ordinary criminals.

    I just think that psychiatry is roughly at the stage astronomy was at in the early 16th century. Copernicus had figured out that the Earth goes around the Sun but he could not come up with a viable description of this this worked.

    Psychiatry is dangerous if you take it too seriously and if you think that all those diagnoses in the DSM correspond with the realities of human behaviour. Psychiatry may be moderately useful if you accept that psychiatrists have not yet advanced anywhere near a sound scientific understanding of human behaviour.

    • Agree: black sea
  77. @Achmed E. Newman
    Regarding the toothpick Eiffel Tower, I did buy a leather change thingy for 2 bucks from a crazy guy locked up in the State Hospital when I was working in there for a few days, back when they still had 'em (Crazy Houses, not just Tandy leather kits). It made him feel worth something, I'm sure, and it's better than his spending the days ranting on the streets of San Francisco, or, worse yet, as Chair of the Department of Wymyn's studies at Harvard.

    When my boy was 7 y/o, he guessed the number of candy corns in 2 different jars right on the money at a Halloween party. I had told him how to estimate first. I was off by 10 to 20 both times out of 100-125 or so, but people were amazed at this.* As we left, I told the hosts that we were headed straight to Las Vega, baby!

    "I"ll show you. OK, drop some toothpicks on the floor." "Oh, I dunno a coupla' hundred, maybe 3?" "Not bad, right?" "No, you pick 'em up - you're the one that thinks my boy is the Rain Man. I just said his name is Raymond."


    .

    * To figure out the odds of this happening with someone not Rain-man-esque, you have to know the guessing skills of the average person first. Still, it was TWO jars with TWO guesses.

    Replies: @Clyde

    He probably picked up the thoughts the hosts. Guessing exact number is impossible.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @Clyde

    My boy is telepathic? Even better - Vegas will be just the first stop!

  78. @Clyde
    @Achmed E. Newman

    He probably picked up the thoughts the hosts. Guessing exact number is impossible.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    My boy is telepathic? Even better – Vegas will be just the first stop!

  79. You’d think a majority of Americans would have figured by now that there’s something wrong with their country. I guess not until the USA goes full Clown World, with Kaitlyn Jenner as POTUS, the majority will realize how bad the situation is.

    • Replies: @danand
    @BB753

    “...the USA goes full Clown World, with Kaitlyn Jenner...”

    Of golf, clowns, the USA, and such:

    https://flic.kr/p/2kZcKWj

    https://golfweek.usatoday.com/2021/05/14/lgbtq-lpga-transgender-woman-wins-florida-mini-tour-event/?swinguclubhouseNL

  80. @Kratoklastes
    @Ray P

    The Goodies are the ultimate trusted source. It's right there in the name.

    Replies: @Ray P

    I’d never trust Graeme Garden with anything and Bill Oddie wasn’t much better.

  81. My boy is telepathic? Even better – Vegas will be just the first stop!

    I have had 5 telepathic incidents in my life, one involved guessing a number. One was reading someone’s thoughts. Anticipating a phone call from someone, and then you get it 10 seconds later, this is old hat. Turning around to see someone staring at you, very common. Rupert Sheldrake wrote books on this. Also a book on dogs getting excited when their master is coming home. While their master is still 20 minutes away — https://www.sheldrake.org/

    Telepathy is a very on off thing unless you are a natural or get some training with the best. Probably more info on training on youtube, or at least more bragging about abilities. All you Unz 100% materialists can have a laugh. As if I give a shyte.

    I was at the gas station the other day. I waited on line inside, as the black man ahead of me spent on lottery tickets. After he exited I asked the cashier who I know, how much he spent. It was 40$. This bettor obviously thinks he can see into the future. But as I said, this ability is very hit and miss for just about everyone.

  82. @Jonathan Mason
    @Achmed E. Newman

    In Britain the word mad usually means crazy, where is in America it usually means angry, hence the confusion.

    In Alice in Wonderland we have the Mad Hatter, he is crazy not angry.

    In British English a madman is a lunatic.

    If you say somebody is mad about the Beatles, that means that they are crazy about the Beatles, or in other words that they like them insanely.

    I would think that pressure groups for angry Americans would be mad at crazy people full cultural misappropriation.

    As a person who has lived on both sides of the Atlantic, all I can say is that I am mad as hell and I am not going to take it anymore.

    If crazy people want a good word to reclaim, they ought to go for lunatic, which is associated with Luna, the Moon, and is a lovely word. The whole idea of giving asylum to Moon people is very beautiful, and should be supported by those well-known 'loonies' Prince Harry &Wife.

    Replies: @Clyde

    In Britain the word mad usually means crazy, where is in America it usually means angry, hence the confusion.

    Any American with decent education knows that “mad” can easily mean either one. Depending on the context. “Mad” meaning “crazy” is well known here. This said, I like and respect the British version of the English language over what we have here. At least twice per month I come across a British-ism, a British (UK too) expression that is never used in America. They are usually clever and get the point across.

  83. @BB753
    You'd think a majority of Americans would have figured by now that there's something wrong with their country. I guess not until the USA goes full Clown World, with Kaitlyn Jenner as POTUS, the majority will realize how bad the situation is.

    Replies: @danand

    “…the USA goes full Clown World, with Kaitlyn Jenner…”

    Of golf, clowns, the USA, and such:

    8EF7C0D8-28AA-467A-9913-7178000F0E13

    https://golfweek.usatoday.com/2021/05/14/lgbtq-lpga-transgender-woman-wins-florida-mini-tour-event/?swinguclubhouseNL

    • LOL: BB753

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