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The lamest looters have to be the mob looting the Starbucks on Sixth Street in downtown Los Angeles. They’ve broken the windows and are now coming back out to show off their to the TV cameras their ill-gotten gains, such as a quart of milk.

C’mon, people, don’t you get it? Starbucks charges you a lot of money for ambiance, not for the cost of goods sold.

 
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  1. Anon[299] • Disclaimer says:

    The medical examiner found no indication of death by strangulation or asphyxiation.

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2020/may/29/george-floyd-died-police-restraint-combined-health/

    “Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease,” said the complaint from the Hennepin County Attorney. “The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.”

    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn’t killed with “restraint.”

    I’ll predict that the cop will be acquitted unless the findings of this medical examination are withdrawn, or the officer is “Leo Franked.” (Of course, Leo Frank wasn’t Leo Frankded, but you get the idea).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anon

    Shortness of breath, difficulty breathing are one of the symptoms of a heart attack. Trauma or force on the body can cause internal blood clots that then trigger heart attacks.

    The police officer looked to be 175 to 200 lbs. That weight concentrated on the knees can be enough force to trigger cardiac arrest.

    Replies: @BigTony

    , @TheMassageIsTheMedium
    @Anon

    Very interesting. I expect to see zero mention of this in the mainstream media, along with the fact that Floyd was a convicted criminal who had held a woman at gunpoint as they robbed her house.

    Also, wasn't this similar to the case with the fat Antifa girl who died after that guy ran her over with his car after he was attacked by a mob? But he was still sent away to prison.

    Replies: @anon

    , @Twinkie
    @Anon


    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn’t killed with “restraint.”
     
    That's not what it says. It says "The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police" and the other listed factors contributed to his death - the restraint is explicitly stated as a contributing cause by the coroner.

    I am known to be pretty pro-police around these parts. But from the video footage (which of course is rarely the whole picture), what that officer did was completely contrary to normal police procedure for apprehension of suspects. You DON'T put a knee, a shin, a baton, or a forearm or any kind of a hard object and press on the throat or the neck that long (8+ minutes), especially on a non-responsive person (2+ minutes) - precisely because even when there is no strangulation (blood choke) or asphyxiation, there could be strokes or heart attacks. And that goes double for those with preexisting health issues or on medications.

    That's why martial arts practitioners and competitors (Judo, BJJ, catch-wrestling, etc.) are required to immediately release any neck/carotid artery-compressing strangulation technique upon the opponent going limp or the referee intervening. Competitors age 12 and under in Judo are not allowed to do strangulations in competitions, because they lack the sensitivity to realize their opponents are out and also because children are particularly vulnerable to neck injuries and disruption of blood to the brain. Similarly, in youth BJJ competitions, referees typically intervene and call the match before a contestant loses consciousness in the event of a choke/strangulation.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Hippopotamusdrome, @International Jew, @Neuday

    , @Jonathan Mason
    @Anon

    I don't see how the medical examiner could possibly have ruled out positional asphyxiation.

    Is he really saying that he thinks the guy would have died even if he had not been arrested?

    It looks like this report is a whitewash.

    Replies: @Muggles

  2. And the ambience now is so raw, so real, so Mau Mau.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    @James Speaks

    "so Mau Mau"

    Having lived and traveled in Europe for a few years, I was smug in my belief that the most supine white people in the world lived in the western European countries. No. American whites cannot be accused of being too civilized or cultured; so the reason why their country has been taken from them and turned into a sociological petri-dish for totalitarian technocrats and billionaires is because they have become addicted to leisure, sports-consumerism, and dog-love. The genetic lines that produced the builders, statesmen, frontiersmen, and Indian-killers have long been tapped-out. Congratulations white America: you live in a cesspool.

    Replies: @James Speaks

  3. Over under when they head Westside? Lots of stuff there to loot.

  4. Meanwhile Taylor Swift has said Trump is ‘fanning the flames of white supremacy’. What decade do these people think they we live in? What century?

    I know this because Taylor Swift saying this is the top thing trending on Twitter and Twitters new trending bar that attempts to give context to those who may not understand a hashtag ironically creates it’s own context that makes it sound like Taylor Swift is a major political figure.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Altai_2

    TayTay has been forced to double-down on SJWism after she was memed into an Aryan princess during 2016 and she didn't disavow. Her silence was construed as violence.

    From 2016:

    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/ae5x8a/cant-shake-it-off-how-taylor-swift-became-a-nazi-idol

  5. What’s the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store? But how would you use one of the products without Apple knowing and tracking you down?

    • Replies: @snorlax
    @Dave Pinsen


    What’s the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store?
     
    Probably jewelers and pawn shops.

    Replies: @Altai_2, @Twinkie

    , @Kronos
    @Dave Pinsen

    How about a gun store? But that can be risky...

    https://youtu.be/B_ecoPDuc-8

    (I couldn’t find the English version, but guy robs a gun store instead of the next door jewelry store by mistake...) “1000 Ways to Die” was a great TV show.

    , @Wilkey
    @Dave Pinsen


    What’s the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store? But how would you use one of the products without Apple knowing and tracking you down?
     
    Does Apple build stores anywhere close to where these people live?
  6. Starbucks charges you a lot of money for ambiance, not for the cost of goods sold.

    You’ve got a funny idea of ambience.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Nah, he used the French spelling to be sarcastic
    https://www.grammarly.com/blog/ambience-ambiance/

    , @International Jew
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I go there for the ambiance. Meaning, mostly for the smell of coffee. McDonald's coffee is almost as good IMO but only if you get it takeout because inside you're smelling fried food smells. And as you know, taste is in part smell.

    One Starbucks near me got ruined when a fried chicken joint opened next door and their ventilation systems were somehow connected.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @fish

    , @Known Fact
    @Buzz Mohawk

    If they go after Dunkins there's gonna be trouble

    , @Barnard
    @Buzz Mohawk


    C’mon, people, don’t you get it? Starbucks charges you a lot of money for ambiance, not for the cost of goods sold.
     
    Yes, I have read that nationally Starbucks does 65% of their business through the drive up window. The people who walk in and take it to go are also not experiencing the ambiance. I am not a coffee drinker so I have no dog in this argument, but it is hard for a lot of coffee snobs to believe that a lot of people like the coffee at Starbucks. Maybe they are just falling for the marketing a herd mentality takes over, but it is true.
    , @Mr. Anon
    @Buzz Mohawk


    You’ve got a funny idea of ambience.
     
    Yeah, the ambience of corporate-sourced "world music" and tattooed, greasy-looking hipsters making your latte. Not to mention the piss-bums and needle-junkies who are there to use the lavatories.

    Ambience.
  7. @Dave Pinsen
    What's the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store? But how would you use one of the products without Apple knowing and tracking you down?

    Replies: @snorlax, @Kronos, @Wilkey

    What’s the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store?

    Probably jewelers and pawn shops.

    • Replies: @Altai_2
    @snorlax

    Too bad they burned down the local Pawn Shop. (I mean for the looters. The kind of person who runs a Pawn Shop in the ghetto is the kind of person I want to have crippling losses) Most likely if they or anyone they know doesn't want it, they'll try and get rid of it through a local fench or sell it online.

    I saw a few videos where some guys had brought out the cash box from a cash register (Or cash strong boxes from elsewhere) and were attempting to smash them open on the pavement. They seemed to take a real beating without being deformed.

    Replies: @Neuday

    , @Twinkie
    @snorlax


    Probably jewelers and pawn shops.
     
    Actual cash value of jewelry is very low (compared to the retail value) and jewelers rarely have high price items in the displays (the good stuff is in vaults/safes/RSCs).

    Pawn shops, maybe, only because they tend to keep cash. But most urban pawn shops are pretty well defended/fortified precisely for that reason.
  8. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    The medical examiner found no indication of death by strangulation or asphyxiation.

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2020/may/29/george-floyd-died-police-restraint-combined-health/


    “Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease,” said the complaint from the Hennepin County Attorney. “The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.”

     

    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn't killed with "restraint."

    I'll predict that the cop will be acquitted unless the findings of this medical examination are withdrawn, or the officer is "Leo Franked." (Of course, Leo Frank wasn't Leo Frankded, but you get the idea).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @TheMassageIsTheMedium, @Twinkie, @Jonathan Mason

    Shortness of breath, difficulty breathing are one of the symptoms of a heart attack. Trauma or force on the body can cause internal blood clots that then trigger heart attacks.

    The police officer looked to be 175 to 200 lbs. That weight concentrated on the knees can be enough force to trigger cardiac arrest.

    • Replies: @BigTony
    @Anonymous

    Stress of conflict can cause a heart attack, but cops can't give on the spot cardiovascular exams, so there'sno way of knowing that. Chocking is apparent and intentional after a short time.

    The video looks like a chocking to me, but I understand things can be different from my original perception.

    The hardest is job is making sure this cop gets a fair trial.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

  9. I wonder if the MPD will spend 10,000+ hours combing over CCTV footage to track down and charge rioters like the VPD after the 2011 Vancouver hockey riot. I won’t hold my breath (I can still breathe :p)

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/majority-of-cases-resolved-after-2011-stanley-cup-riot-in-vancouver-1.2416684

    • Replies: @Anon
    @BenKenobi

    @ I won’t hold my breath (I can still breathe :p)

    What’s wrong with you Americans?!? That was a horrible way to die. The whole scene of the three policemen kneeling on top of the man was shocking. The whole world can believe their lyin’ eyes, and you can’t? Whatever the “dindu” was or did, two wrongs don’t make a right.

    100 looters won’t justify that policeman putting his weight on the black fellow’s neck, either.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @HammerJack, @Federalist

  10. @Altai_2
    Meanwhile Taylor Swift has said Trump is 'fanning the flames of white supremacy'. What decade do these people think they we live in? What century?

    I know this because Taylor Swift saying this is the top thing trending on Twitter and Twitters new trending bar that attempts to give context to those who may not understand a hashtag ironically creates it's own context that makes it sound like Taylor Swift is a major political figure.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    TayTay has been forced to double-down on SJWism after she was memed into an Aryan princess during 2016 and she didn’t disavow. Her silence was construed as violence.

    From 2016:

    https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/ae5x8a/cant-shake-it-off-how-taylor-swift-became-a-nazi-idol

    • Agree: HammerJack, fish
  11. Rioters breaking into a Starbucks, is that even illegal? How long before Starbucks apologizes and begs the rioters for forgiveness?

    • LOL: Bubba
    • Replies: @fish
    @Angular momentum

    I imagine Howard Schultz is having Starbucks One warmed up as this is being typed in preparation for the flight down!

  12. @Anon
    The medical examiner found no indication of death by strangulation or asphyxiation.

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2020/may/29/george-floyd-died-police-restraint-combined-health/


    “Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease,” said the complaint from the Hennepin County Attorney. “The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.”

     

    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn't killed with "restraint."

    I'll predict that the cop will be acquitted unless the findings of this medical examination are withdrawn, or the officer is "Leo Franked." (Of course, Leo Frank wasn't Leo Frankded, but you get the idea).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @TheMassageIsTheMedium, @Twinkie, @Jonathan Mason

    Very interesting. I expect to see zero mention of this in the mainstream media, along with the fact that Floyd was a convicted criminal who had held a woman at gunpoint as they robbed her house.

    Also, wasn’t this similar to the case with the fat Antifa girl who died after that guy ran her over with his car after he was attacked by a mob? But he was still sent away to prison.

    • Replies: @anon
    @TheMassageIsTheMedium

    >Also, wasn’t this similar to the case with the fat Antifa girl who died after that guy ran her over with his car after he was attacked by a mob? But he was still sent away to prison.


    You've been participating in too many forums in which the way to gain social cred is to situate oneself near the top of a runaway feedback loop based on who can pose as the most hardcore.

  13. I saw over at the Daily Mail that Derek Chauvin’s wife decided to file for divorce on Friday.

    In addition, “Soldiers in North Carolina and in New York have been ordered to be ready to move in within four hours while troops in Colorado and Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours after the president asked Defense Secretary Mark Esper for military options in tackling the escalating civil unrest spreading across America, according to sources.”

    It can’t have been pleasant to be on lockdown inside the White House on Friday night as protesters tried to get over the walls.

    I wonder how much longer this will last — and to how many more places it will spread.

    • Replies: @Lot
    @notsaying

    Derek Chauvin should have fled to the Canadian wilderness when he had a chance. It is not a good sign when angry mobs and the mayor both demand your prosecution. I don’t think would have even been illegal before he was charged. A beard plus a corona mask is a good disguise.

    It’s surprising more people facing a likely life sentence don’t do this.

    Lion gave this unheeded advice to Weinstein:

    https://lionoftheblogosphere.wordpress.com/2020/02/24/harvey-weinstein-should-have-read-my-blog-3/

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Almost Missouri, @notsaying

  14. I saw over at the Daily Mail that Derek Chauvin’s wife decided to file for divorce on Friday.

    In addition, “Soldiers in North Carolina and in New York have been ordered to be ready to move in within four hours while troops in Colorado and Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours after the president asked Defense Secretary Mark Esper for military options in tackling the escalating civil unrest spreading across America, according to sources.”

    It can’t have been pleasant to be on lockdown inside the White House on Friday night as protesters tried to get over the walls.

    I wonder how much longer this will last — and to how many more places it will spread.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @notsaying


    I wonder how much longer this will last — and to how many more places it will spread.
     
    I wonder how effective COVID-19 transmission will be amongst these mobs of blue citizens?

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Known Fact, @notsaying

  15. I saw over at the Daily Mail that Derek Chauvin’s wife decided to file for divorce on Friday.

    In addition, “Soldiers in North Carolina and in New York have been ordered to be ready to move in within four hours while troops in Colorado and Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours after the president asked Defense Secretary Mark Esper for military options in tackling the escalating civil unrest spreading across America, according to sources.”

    It can’t have been pleasant to be on lockdown inside the White House on Friday night as protesters tried to get over the walls.

    I wonder how much longer this will last — and to how many more places it will spread.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @notsaying

    I'm surprised he didn't flee the country before charges could be laid. I would be on a beach in Thailand by now.

    Replies: @notsaying

  16. @snorlax
    @Dave Pinsen


    What’s the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store?
     
    Probably jewelers and pawn shops.

    Replies: @Altai_2, @Twinkie

    Too bad they burned down the local Pawn Shop. (I mean for the looters. The kind of person who runs a Pawn Shop in the ghetto is the kind of person I want to have crippling losses) Most likely if they or anyone they know doesn’t want it, they’ll try and get rid of it through a local fench or sell it online.

    I saw a few videos where some guys had brought out the cash box from a cash register (Or cash strong boxes from elsewhere) and were attempting to smash them open on the pavement. They seemed to take a real beating without being deformed.

    • Replies: @Neuday
    @Altai_2


    I saw a few videos where some guys had brought out the cash box from a cash register (Or cash strong boxes from elsewhere) and were attempting to smash them open on the pavement. They seemed to take a real beating without being deformed.
     
    Using a tool is White Supremacy.
  17. @Anon
    The medical examiner found no indication of death by strangulation or asphyxiation.

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2020/may/29/george-floyd-died-police-restraint-combined-health/


    “Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease,” said the complaint from the Hennepin County Attorney. “The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.”

     

    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn't killed with "restraint."

    I'll predict that the cop will be acquitted unless the findings of this medical examination are withdrawn, or the officer is "Leo Franked." (Of course, Leo Frank wasn't Leo Frankded, but you get the idea).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @TheMassageIsTheMedium, @Twinkie, @Jonathan Mason

    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn’t killed with “restraint.”

    That’s not what it says. It says “The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police” and the other listed factors contributed to his death – the restraint is explicitly stated as a contributing cause by the coroner.

    I am known to be pretty pro-police around these parts. But from the video footage (which of course is rarely the whole picture), what that officer did was completely contrary to normal police procedure for apprehension of suspects. You DON’T put a knee, a shin, a baton, or a forearm or any kind of a hard object and press on the throat or the neck that long (8+ minutes), especially on a non-responsive person (2+ minutes) – precisely because even when there is no strangulation (blood choke) or asphyxiation, there could be strokes or heart attacks. And that goes double for those with preexisting health issues or on medications.

    That’s why martial arts practitioners and competitors (Judo, BJJ, catch-wrestling, etc.) are required to immediately release any neck/carotid artery-compressing strangulation technique upon the opponent going limp or the referee intervening. Competitors age 12 and under in Judo are not allowed to do strangulations in competitions, because they lack the sensitivity to realize their opponents are out and also because children are particularly vulnerable to neck injuries and disruption of blood to the brain. Similarly, in youth BJJ competitions, referees typically intervene and call the match before a contestant loses consciousness in the event of a choke/strangulation.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    @Twinkie

    Have to agree. The cop should have known better, particularly since knowing better in this specific instance was an explicit part of his training.

    This doesn't mean there aren't extenuating circumstances--there usually are--nor does it mean this cop will be treated fairly. Especially with half the nation braying for his blood.

    But even as someone concerned with the rights of white people (all people, as 'wrong' as that is to say), I don't think I'll be dying on this particular hill.

    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Twinkie

    LOL. What was he supposed to do?

    Cop: Your under arrest.

    Perp: No, I'm not. *walks away"

    Cop: Well, OK. Bye. Have a nice day.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @International Jew
    @Twinkie


    But from the video footage (which of course is rarely the whole picture), what that officer did was completely contrary to normal police procedure
     
    If it was contrary to procedure, why didn't his three colleagues say anything? Why would he do it, for that matter, knowing he was being filmed?

    I'll grant you it looks pretty brutal, but before I believe it was contrary to procedure, I'd want to hear that from a real policeman (and one who didn't have to worry about getting doxxed and fired).

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @Neuday
    @Twinkie

    Repost from a commenter at Vox Day:

    The BBC has a little section “How did George Floyd die?” that they’ve put in multiple stories (e.g., https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52857334 ). The last paragraph is, “The Minnesota police handbook states that officers trained on how to compress a detainee's neck without applying direct pressure to the airway can use a knee under its use-of-force policy. This is regarded as a non-deadly-force option.”

    That is, the officer involved had training from the state and had been told it was a safe technique. Personally, I can’t figure out when it would be a useful technique; it pretty much requires the target to be restrained. But given that George Floyd wasn’t strangled, Chauvin apparently performed it correctly.

    I don’t know how long the technique will remain approved in Minnesota, and I’m really not sure how legally relevant the extra training and handbook are, but I don’t see any American jury convicting a cop for third degree murder (“without intent to effect the death of any person, causes the death of another by perpetrating an act eminently dangerous to others and evincing a depraved mind, without regard for human life”) by using an explicitly approved technique that the state actually provided for.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  18. @snorlax
    @Dave Pinsen


    What’s the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store?
     
    Probably jewelers and pawn shops.

    Replies: @Altai_2, @Twinkie

    Probably jewelers and pawn shops.

    Actual cash value of jewelry is very low (compared to the retail value) and jewelers rarely have high price items in the displays (the good stuff is in vaults/safes/RSCs).

    Pawn shops, maybe, only because they tend to keep cash. But most urban pawn shops are pretty well defended/fortified precisely for that reason.

  19. @notsaying
    I saw over at the Daily Mail that Derek Chauvin's wife decided to file for divorce on Friday.

    In addition, "Soldiers in North Carolina and in New York have been ordered to be ready to move in within four hours while troops in Colorado and Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours after the president asked Defense Secretary Mark Esper for military options in tackling the escalating civil unrest spreading across America, according to sources."

    It can't have been pleasant to be on lockdown inside the White House on Friday night as protesters tried to get over the walls.

    I wonder how much longer this will last -- and to how many more places it will spread.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    I wonder how much longer this will last — and to how many more places it will spread.

    I wonder how effective COVID-19 transmission will be amongst these mobs of blue citizens?

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @James Speaks

    Zero, of course. Didn't see any octogenarians smashing windows open with their oxygen tanks.

    , @Known Fact
    @James Speaks

    At least it's going to be much harder for public officials to keep a straight face as they plead with law-abiding residents to limit the number of participants at social events

    , @notsaying
    @James Speaks

    That's a good question. Being outside is in their favor. Being close together, breathing hard and shouting works against them.

    It would be funny in a nonfunny way if an outbreak did happen because of any of the protests.

  20. Maybe they just dropped in to use the restroom.

  21. @notsaying
    I saw over at the Daily Mail that Derek Chauvin's wife decided to file for divorce on Friday.

    In addition, "Soldiers in North Carolina and in New York have been ordered to be ready to move in within four hours while troops in Colorado and Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours after the president asked Defense Secretary Mark Esper for military options in tackling the escalating civil unrest spreading across America, according to sources."

    It can't have been pleasant to be on lockdown inside the White House on Friday night as protesters tried to get over the walls.

    I wonder how much longer this will last -- and to how many more places it will spread.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    I’m surprised he didn’t flee the country before charges could be laid. I would be on a beach in Thailand by now.

    • Replies: @notsaying
    @BenKenobi

    Do you really think he had a chance to get away? Don't you think his house was watched?

  22. It’s kind of sad, imagine that you had a small business going bust due to corona lockdown, then when you are finally allowed to reopen, it is looted then burned… 🙁 Welcome to America 2020, land of the free.

    Anyway, it seems to be that both the death and the protests have been at least partly manufactured.

  23. The lamest looters have to be the mob looting the Starbucks on Sixth Street in downtown Los Angeles.

    All the Starbucks baristas in the Twin Cities are Somali girls. Caribou balances them with stereotypical Minnesota kids.

    For ambience, there’s Dunn Brothers. Not because it’s better, but because every one is different. As opposed to the cookie-cutter policy of the two big chains.

  24. Lot says:
    @notsaying
    I saw over at the Daily Mail that Derek Chauvin's wife decided to file for divorce on Friday.

    In addition, "Soldiers in North Carolina and in New York have been ordered to be ready to move in within four hours while troops in Colorado and Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours after the president asked Defense Secretary Mark Esper for military options in tackling the escalating civil unrest spreading across America, according to sources."

    It can't have been pleasant to be on lockdown inside the White House on Friday night as protesters tried to get over the walls.

    I wonder how much longer this will last -- and to how many more places it will spread.

    Replies: @Lot

    Derek Chauvin should have fled to the Canadian wilderness when he had a chance. It is not a good sign when angry mobs and the mayor both demand your prosecution. I don’t think would have even been illegal before he was charged. A beard plus a corona mask is a good disguise.

    It’s surprising more people facing a likely life sentence don’t do this.

    Lion gave this unheeded advice to Weinstein:

    https://lionoftheblogosphere.wordpress.com/2020/02/24/harvey-weinstein-should-have-read-my-blog-3/

    • Replies: @Rob McX
    @Lot

    It would have been no use. People have been extradited back to the US from Canada, and you can't hide your identity for a lifetime. And in some states of the US at least, there is an offence of fleeing justice.

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Lot

    Too late. Now Chauvin has more immediate problems, like where is he getting his next meal?

    https://scontent-mia3-2.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/100379218_10219306616633925_110395971065610240_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=o8VQJSncSuEAX-NGf4E&_nc_ht=scontent-mia3-2.xx&oh=1e1991686489590f4f097cb8aaf1ba15&oe=5EF6A410

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @notsaying
    @Lot

    I don't think running up to Canada would have done him any good. I think he would have been found if he had managed to get over the border.

    I have to say I am glad that more people don't make a run for it. The kind of people who get themselves into big trouble with violent crime typically don't have many resources in their lives. That works against them successfully getting away from and hiding from the cops. Cell phones and ATMs and computers and traffic monitoring makes it harder to do, too.

  25. Anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @BenKenobi
    I wonder if the MPD will spend 10,000+ hours combing over CCTV footage to track down and charge rioters like the VPD after the 2011 Vancouver hockey riot. I won't hold my breath (I can still breathe :p)

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/majority-of-cases-resolved-after-2011-stanley-cup-riot-in-vancouver-1.2416684

    Replies: @Anon

    @ I won’t hold my breath (I can still breathe :p)

    What’s wrong with you Americans?!? That was a horrible way to die. The whole scene of the three policemen kneeling on top of the man was shocking. The whole world can believe their lyin’ eyes, and you can’t? Whatever the “dindu” was or did, two wrongs don’t make a right.

    100 looters won’t justify that policeman putting his weight on the black fellow’s neck, either.

    • LOL: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    @Anon

    He's a Canuck.

    , @HammerJack
    @Anon

    Devils advocate: it does sometimes take three officers to subdue a crazed and/or drugged negro. And they are often both.

    But of course this doesn't excuse the attempted asphyxiation. What I don't get, though , is that I thought we had a tacit or explicit agreement (depending on the jurisdiction) not to arrest negroes for crimes below $1000 or so.

    And while Minneapolis may not yet have that law on its books, it most certainly leans that way and they've surely had these discussions.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @International Jew

    , @Federalist
    @Anon


    What’s wrong with you Americans?!? That was a horrible way to die. The whole scene of the three policemen kneeling on top of the man was shocking. The whole world can believe their lyin’ eyes, and you can’t?
     
    I don't know how many of My Fellow Americans I can speak for. The way I see it is that what the cop did was objectively wrong.

    But I just don't give a shit anymore. I've seen formerly nice cities, neighborhoods, and communities (including places where my parents and grandparents grew up) reduced to hellish war zones. They've ruined our schools. They steal from us. They commit violent crimes against us. Now they're burning and pillaging. They cost us a fortune. No matter how much free crap we give them, it's never enough. To top it off, we get blamed for their violence, low intelligence, and poor impulse control because racism.

    So, while I don't really disagree with what you're saying, I also can't be bothered to care about some thug who was killed by the police.

    Replies: @Wilkey

  26. @Anon
    The medical examiner found no indication of death by strangulation or asphyxiation.

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2020/may/29/george-floyd-died-police-restraint-combined-health/


    “Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease,” said the complaint from the Hennepin County Attorney. “The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.”

     

    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn't killed with "restraint."

    I'll predict that the cop will be acquitted unless the findings of this medical examination are withdrawn, or the officer is "Leo Franked." (Of course, Leo Frank wasn't Leo Frankded, but you get the idea).

    Replies: @Anonymous, @TheMassageIsTheMedium, @Twinkie, @Jonathan Mason

    I don’t see how the medical examiner could possibly have ruled out positional asphyxiation.

    Is he really saying that he thinks the guy would have died even if he had not been arrested?

    It looks like this report is a whitewash.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
    • Replies: @Muggles
    @Jonathan Mason

    >>I don’t see how the medical examiner could possibly have ruled out positional asphyxiation.

    Is he really saying that he thinks the guy would have died even if he had not been arrested?

    It looks like this report is a whitewash.<<

    No, it looks like you don't agree with the facts. You have a pre-digested conclusion in mind. Do you think any public official in that position, in this high visibility event, would rule out asphyxiation if there were any evidence for that? People who do these jobs aren't stupid. They are highly trained and fully aware that in subsequent trials/civil suits their findings will be reviewed with the proverbial fine toothed comb.

    Things are not always the way they appear on videos. There are usually clear physical signs of asphyxiation, such as petechial hemorrhaging in the eyes. More likely cause is heart attack due to stress, extreme BP elevation. The underlying condition was the "cause" of death. The arrest procedure, which seems extreme under the circumstances, was a contributing factor.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

  27. Anon[392] • Disclaimer says:

    The White House is surrounded by protesters.
    This would look incredibly weak to China, Russia, India, and everybody else.

    The media whips up a mob into a frenzy, and they dont protect the country from them. Who in the world would ally with the USA over China. If we didnt have nukes and 16 carrier groups, no one would repsect us.

  28. Yep, not much can top Detroit in ‘67! Lameasses!!!

  29. I met Mike Myers in a Starbucks, so I guess that’s ambience. He was with his fiancé, and I was with mine. The four of us happened to go in the door together in New Canaan, Connecticut. There were no other customers.

    Standing next to Mike, waiting for coffee while our women both went to the ladies’ room (that’s what ladies do, you know) I saw what it is like to be a hot-at-the-time celebrity (2001): The two teen girl baristas couldn’t contain themselves. They were giggling to each other and staring at Mike. Or was it me? Maybe they were amazed by me!

    Mike is now divorced, and I am still married. I win.

    • Replies: @Mike Tre
    @Buzz Mohawk

    How does he drink coffee through a hockey mask?

    , @ScarletNumber
    @Buzz Mohawk

    According to Wikipedia, Myers was married to his first wife at the time of your anecdote. She was the daughter of the inspiration of Coffee Talk. He has been married to Mrs. Myers II since 2010.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  30. @Lot
    @notsaying

    Derek Chauvin should have fled to the Canadian wilderness when he had a chance. It is not a good sign when angry mobs and the mayor both demand your prosecution. I don’t think would have even been illegal before he was charged. A beard plus a corona mask is a good disguise.

    It’s surprising more people facing a likely life sentence don’t do this.

    Lion gave this unheeded advice to Weinstein:

    https://lionoftheblogosphere.wordpress.com/2020/02/24/harvey-weinstein-should-have-read-my-blog-3/

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Almost Missouri, @notsaying

    It would have been no use. People have been extradited back to the US from Canada, and you can’t hide your identity for a lifetime. And in some states of the US at least, there is an offence of fleeing justice.

    • Agree: notsaying
  31. @Anon
    @BenKenobi

    @ I won’t hold my breath (I can still breathe :p)

    What’s wrong with you Americans?!? That was a horrible way to die. The whole scene of the three policemen kneeling on top of the man was shocking. The whole world can believe their lyin’ eyes, and you can’t? Whatever the “dindu” was or did, two wrongs don’t make a right.

    100 looters won’t justify that policeman putting his weight on the black fellow’s neck, either.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @HammerJack, @Federalist

    He’s a Canuck.

  32. @Twinkie
    @Anon


    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn’t killed with “restraint.”
     
    That's not what it says. It says "The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police" and the other listed factors contributed to his death - the restraint is explicitly stated as a contributing cause by the coroner.

    I am known to be pretty pro-police around these parts. But from the video footage (which of course is rarely the whole picture), what that officer did was completely contrary to normal police procedure for apprehension of suspects. You DON'T put a knee, a shin, a baton, or a forearm or any kind of a hard object and press on the throat or the neck that long (8+ minutes), especially on a non-responsive person (2+ minutes) - precisely because even when there is no strangulation (blood choke) or asphyxiation, there could be strokes or heart attacks. And that goes double for those with preexisting health issues or on medications.

    That's why martial arts practitioners and competitors (Judo, BJJ, catch-wrestling, etc.) are required to immediately release any neck/carotid artery-compressing strangulation technique upon the opponent going limp or the referee intervening. Competitors age 12 and under in Judo are not allowed to do strangulations in competitions, because they lack the sensitivity to realize their opponents are out and also because children are particularly vulnerable to neck injuries and disruption of blood to the brain. Similarly, in youth BJJ competitions, referees typically intervene and call the match before a contestant loses consciousness in the event of a choke/strangulation.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Hippopotamusdrome, @International Jew, @Neuday

    Have to agree. The cop should have known better, particularly since knowing better in this specific instance was an explicit part of his training.

    This doesn’t mean there aren’t extenuating circumstances–there usually are–nor does it mean this cop will be treated fairly. Especially with half the nation braying for his blood.

    But even as someone concerned with the rights of white people (all people, as ‘wrong’ as that is to say), I don’t think I’ll be dying on this particular hill.

  33. @Anon
    @BenKenobi

    @ I won’t hold my breath (I can still breathe :p)

    What’s wrong with you Americans?!? That was a horrible way to die. The whole scene of the three policemen kneeling on top of the man was shocking. The whole world can believe their lyin’ eyes, and you can’t? Whatever the “dindu” was or did, two wrongs don’t make a right.

    100 looters won’t justify that policeman putting his weight on the black fellow’s neck, either.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @HammerJack, @Federalist

    Devils advocate: it does sometimes take three officers to subdue a crazed and/or drugged negro. And they are often both.

    But of course this doesn’t excuse the attempted asphyxiation. What I don’t get, though , is that I thought we had a tacit or explicit agreement (depending on the jurisdiction) not to arrest negroes for crimes below $1000 or so.

    And while Minneapolis may not yet have that law on its books, it most certainly leans that way and they’ve surely had these discussions.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @HammerJack

    Kersey had the story of a St Louis cop or EMT who revived a black dirtbag from a potentially fatal OD -- and the guy killed him on the spot.

    , @International Jew
    @HammerJack


    I thought we had a tacit or explicit agreement (depending on the jurisdiction) not to arrest negroes for crimes below $1000 or so.
     
    Counterfeiting is considered a very serious crime. It's not merely stealing, it's stealing from the government.
  34. @Buzz Mohawk
    I met Mike Myers in a Starbucks, so I guess that's ambience. He was with his fiancé, and I was with mine. The four of us happened to go in the door together in New Canaan, Connecticut. There were no other customers.

    Standing next to Mike, waiting for coffee while our women both went to the ladies' room (that's what ladies do, you know) I saw what it is like to be a hot-at-the-time celebrity (2001): The two teen girl baristas couldn't contain themselves. They were giggling to each other and staring at Mike. Or was it me? Maybe they were amazed by me!

    Mike is now divorced, and I am still married. I win.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @ScarletNumber

    How does he drink coffee through a hockey mask?

  35. Anon[580] • Disclaimer says:

    Apple can permabrick its looted phones, but they still tend to end up on eBay, ripping off the buyer who calls tech support only to learn he’s bought hot merchandise. I’m not sure how it works with laptops: You do seem to need to be online to start a new Mac for the first time. And I suppose that the App Store would block you, restricting the software you could run to what was preinstalled (no updates ever) plus those rare third-party apps that are installed manually by the owner.

    It will be interesting to see if the gradual shithole-ification of America results in more products designed from the ground up to be “brickable.” Big LCD televisions could require online activation I would think. The Nissan we just bought came with a free year of some sort of online information system and assistance, which I assume would also help in theft tracking. Even expensive jeans and athletic shoes: put an RFID chip (or three) in there in a way that requires vandalization of the product to remove or damage. And get enought buy-in from enough retail chains to have then set off alarms if hot goods enter their stores. The “what’s in it for me” problem would have to be solved, and angry negros in your store would probably not be desired, so maybe that idea is a loser.

  36. @Buzz Mohawk
    I met Mike Myers in a Starbucks, so I guess that's ambience. He was with his fiancé, and I was with mine. The four of us happened to go in the door together in New Canaan, Connecticut. There were no other customers.

    Standing next to Mike, waiting for coffee while our women both went to the ladies' room (that's what ladies do, you know) I saw what it is like to be a hot-at-the-time celebrity (2001): The two teen girl baristas couldn't contain themselves. They were giggling to each other and staring at Mike. Or was it me? Maybe they were amazed by me!

    Mike is now divorced, and I am still married. I win.

    Replies: @Mike Tre, @ScarletNumber

    According to Wikipedia, Myers was married to his first wife at the time of your anecdote. She was the daughter of the inspiration of Coffee Talk. He has been married to Mrs. Myers II since 2010.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @ScarletNumber

    Aah. I didn't know they were married then, because I didn't see her in media with him until after that. Suddenly they started showing up together on TV interviews, or at least I began noticing them. Shows you what I know. Thanks.

  37. Is this Steve Goes Ghetto? He holds up a score card for the looters like its America’s Got Talent? A new game show where the contestants have ten minutes to grab what they can from a set of stores and whoever has the highest dollar-value haul wins?

  38. @Twinkie
    @Anon


    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn’t killed with “restraint.”
     
    That's not what it says. It says "The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police" and the other listed factors contributed to his death - the restraint is explicitly stated as a contributing cause by the coroner.

    I am known to be pretty pro-police around these parts. But from the video footage (which of course is rarely the whole picture), what that officer did was completely contrary to normal police procedure for apprehension of suspects. You DON'T put a knee, a shin, a baton, or a forearm or any kind of a hard object and press on the throat or the neck that long (8+ minutes), especially on a non-responsive person (2+ minutes) - precisely because even when there is no strangulation (blood choke) or asphyxiation, there could be strokes or heart attacks. And that goes double for those with preexisting health issues or on medications.

    That's why martial arts practitioners and competitors (Judo, BJJ, catch-wrestling, etc.) are required to immediately release any neck/carotid artery-compressing strangulation technique upon the opponent going limp or the referee intervening. Competitors age 12 and under in Judo are not allowed to do strangulations in competitions, because they lack the sensitivity to realize their opponents are out and also because children are particularly vulnerable to neck injuries and disruption of blood to the brain. Similarly, in youth BJJ competitions, referees typically intervene and call the match before a contestant loses consciousness in the event of a choke/strangulation.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Hippopotamusdrome, @International Jew, @Neuday

    LOL. What was he supposed to do?

    Cop: Your under arrest.

    Perp: No, I’m not. *walks away”

    Cop: Well, OK. Bye. Have a nice day.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Hippopotamusdrome


    LOL. What was he supposed to do?
     
    Are you a moron? The suspect was already handcuffed and lying face down on the street.

    Stop being an idiot and search "force continuum" on the internet.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

  39. @James Speaks
    @notsaying


    I wonder how much longer this will last — and to how many more places it will spread.
     
    I wonder how effective COVID-19 transmission will be amongst these mobs of blue citizens?

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Known Fact, @notsaying

    Zero, of course. Didn’t see any octogenarians smashing windows open with their oxygen tanks.

  40. @Dave Pinsen
    What's the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store? But how would you use one of the products without Apple knowing and tracking you down?

    Replies: @snorlax, @Kronos, @Wilkey

    How about a gun store? But that can be risky…

    (I couldn’t find the English version, but guy robs a gun store instead of the next door jewelry store by mistake…) “1000 Ways to Die” was a great TV show.

  41. If I’m not from a traditionally oppressed background can I still help myself to a free television?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @BigTony


    If I’m not from a traditionally oppressed background can I still help myself to a free television?
     
    Certainly. Just be like Shaun King and self-identify as black.
  42. @Anonymous
    @Anon

    Shortness of breath, difficulty breathing are one of the symptoms of a heart attack. Trauma or force on the body can cause internal blood clots that then trigger heart attacks.

    The police officer looked to be 175 to 200 lbs. That weight concentrated on the knees can be enough force to trigger cardiac arrest.

    Replies: @BigTony

    Stress of conflict can cause a heart attack, but cops can’t give on the spot cardiovascular exams, so there’sno way of knowing that. Chocking is apparent and intentional after a short time.

    The video looks like a chocking to me, but I understand things can be different from my original perception.

    The hardest is job is making sure this cop gets a fair trial.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @BigTony



    The video looks like a chocking to me

     

    https://pictshare.net/owmimy.jpg
  43. Baltimore Protests: Experts Caution Against Using Milk, Antacid to Wash Out Pepper Spray
    People in Baltimore have been seen using milky liquids to wash out pepper spray.

    https://abcnews.go.com/Health/baltimore-protests-experts-caution-milk-antacid-wash-pepper/story?id=30653488

  44. Anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Starbucks charges you a lot of money for ambiance, not for the cost of goods sold.
     
    You've got a funny idea of ambience.

    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/06/a5/2a/e0/waiting-line.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Known Fact, @Barnard, @Mr. Anon

    Nah, he used the French spelling to be sarcastic
    https://www.grammarly.com/blog/ambience-ambiance/

  45. @Twinkie
    @Anon


    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn’t killed with “restraint.”
     
    That's not what it says. It says "The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police" and the other listed factors contributed to his death - the restraint is explicitly stated as a contributing cause by the coroner.

    I am known to be pretty pro-police around these parts. But from the video footage (which of course is rarely the whole picture), what that officer did was completely contrary to normal police procedure for apprehension of suspects. You DON'T put a knee, a shin, a baton, or a forearm or any kind of a hard object and press on the throat or the neck that long (8+ minutes), especially on a non-responsive person (2+ minutes) - precisely because even when there is no strangulation (blood choke) or asphyxiation, there could be strokes or heart attacks. And that goes double for those with preexisting health issues or on medications.

    That's why martial arts practitioners and competitors (Judo, BJJ, catch-wrestling, etc.) are required to immediately release any neck/carotid artery-compressing strangulation technique upon the opponent going limp or the referee intervening. Competitors age 12 and under in Judo are not allowed to do strangulations in competitions, because they lack the sensitivity to realize their opponents are out and also because children are particularly vulnerable to neck injuries and disruption of blood to the brain. Similarly, in youth BJJ competitions, referees typically intervene and call the match before a contestant loses consciousness in the event of a choke/strangulation.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Hippopotamusdrome, @International Jew, @Neuday

    But from the video footage (which of course is rarely the whole picture), what that officer did was completely contrary to normal police procedure

    If it was contrary to procedure, why didn’t his three colleagues say anything? Why would he do it, for that matter, knowing he was being filmed?

    I’ll grant you it looks pretty brutal, but before I believe it was contrary to procedure, I’d want to hear that from a real policeman (and one who didn’t have to worry about getting doxxed and fired).

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @International Jew


    If it was contrary to procedure, why didn’t his three colleagues say anything? Why would he do it, for that matter, knowing he was being filmed?
     
    I don't know how accurate the reports are, but there are reports that state that one of the officers suggested turning over the suspect to his side (because lying face down on a pavement with someone on your neck puts a great deal of pressure on the chest/heart) and that another officer checked the suspect's pulse and found none.

    People do all sorts of things even on film... cops are human. They make mistakes, they get angry, they have a bad day and take it out on someone. It doesn't happen all the time or even often, but it does happen occasionally. And even when one makes a mistake, the natural camaraderie/group-think and the particular stresses of police work make it difficult for another officer to speak up and contradict.

    I used to train Judo and BJJ with a bunch of urban police officers/LEOs from patrol, SWAT, narcotics, port authority, and the FBI. Most were older guys and quite calm in demeanor and level-headed, but we had one young guy (who was not a pleasant training partner and constantly bickered with the rest of us) who was called Taser Ted (and other sundry related nicknames), because he would habitually and constantly use the Taser without evern trying to de-escalate confrontations with belligerent suspects. The senior student in the group was a firearms trainer for the local PD in his 50's and he would try to counsel him not to behave this way all the time, that his career won't go anywhere, at minimum, and, at worst, might get him fired and perhaps even prosecuted for hurting someone seriously or even killing a person. That guy would not listen.
  46. @Buzz Mohawk

    Starbucks charges you a lot of money for ambiance, not for the cost of goods sold.
     
    You've got a funny idea of ambience.

    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/06/a5/2a/e0/waiting-line.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Known Fact, @Barnard, @Mr. Anon

    I go there for the ambiance. Meaning, mostly for the smell of coffee. McDonald’s coffee is almost as good IMO but only if you get it takeout because inside you’re smelling fried food smells. And as you know, taste is in part smell.

    One Starbucks near me got ruined when a fried chicken joint opened next door and their ventilation systems were somehow connected.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @International Jew

    Hey, I thought you were a hot dog now. I couldn't find you at the grocery store for Memorial Day. Sold out. Had to settle for an inferior brand.

    Replies: @International Jew

    , @fish
    @International Jew

    Yeah.....what gives H. National?

  47. @ScarletNumber
    @Buzz Mohawk

    According to Wikipedia, Myers was married to his first wife at the time of your anecdote. She was the daughter of the inspiration of Coffee Talk. He has been married to Mrs. Myers II since 2010.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Aah. I didn’t know they were married then, because I didn’t see her in media with him until after that. Suddenly they started showing up together on TV interviews, or at least I began noticing them. Shows you what I know. Thanks.

  48. @Altai_2
    @snorlax

    Too bad they burned down the local Pawn Shop. (I mean for the looters. The kind of person who runs a Pawn Shop in the ghetto is the kind of person I want to have crippling losses) Most likely if they or anyone they know doesn't want it, they'll try and get rid of it through a local fench or sell it online.

    I saw a few videos where some guys had brought out the cash box from a cash register (Or cash strong boxes from elsewhere) and were attempting to smash them open on the pavement. They seemed to take a real beating without being deformed.

    Replies: @Neuday

    I saw a few videos where some guys had brought out the cash box from a cash register (Or cash strong boxes from elsewhere) and were attempting to smash them open on the pavement. They seemed to take a real beating without being deformed.

    Using a tool is White Supremacy.

  49. @Twinkie
    @Anon


    The guy had a heart attack or stroke. He wasn’t killed with “restraint.”
     
    That's not what it says. It says "The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police" and the other listed factors contributed to his death - the restraint is explicitly stated as a contributing cause by the coroner.

    I am known to be pretty pro-police around these parts. But from the video footage (which of course is rarely the whole picture), what that officer did was completely contrary to normal police procedure for apprehension of suspects. You DON'T put a knee, a shin, a baton, or a forearm or any kind of a hard object and press on the throat or the neck that long (8+ minutes), especially on a non-responsive person (2+ minutes) - precisely because even when there is no strangulation (blood choke) or asphyxiation, there could be strokes or heart attacks. And that goes double for those with preexisting health issues or on medications.

    That's why martial arts practitioners and competitors (Judo, BJJ, catch-wrestling, etc.) are required to immediately release any neck/carotid artery-compressing strangulation technique upon the opponent going limp or the referee intervening. Competitors age 12 and under in Judo are not allowed to do strangulations in competitions, because they lack the sensitivity to realize their opponents are out and also because children are particularly vulnerable to neck injuries and disruption of blood to the brain. Similarly, in youth BJJ competitions, referees typically intervene and call the match before a contestant loses consciousness in the event of a choke/strangulation.

    Replies: @HammerJack, @Hippopotamusdrome, @International Jew, @Neuday

    Repost from a commenter at Vox Day:

    The BBC has a little section “How did George Floyd die?” that they’ve put in multiple stories (e.g., https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52857334 ). The last paragraph is, “The Minnesota police handbook states that officers trained on how to compress a detainee’s neck without applying direct pressure to the airway can use a knee under its use-of-force policy. This is regarded as a non-deadly-force option.”

    That is, the officer involved had training from the state and had been told it was a safe technique. Personally, I can’t figure out when it would be a useful technique; it pretty much requires the target to be restrained. But given that George Floyd wasn’t strangled, Chauvin apparently performed it correctly.

    I don’t know how long the technique will remain approved in Minnesota, and I’m really not sure how legally relevant the extra training and handbook are, but I don’t see any American jury convicting a cop for third degree murder (“without intent to effect the death of any person, causes the death of another by perpetrating an act eminently dangerous to others and evincing a depraved mind, without regard for human life”) by using an explicitly approved technique that the state actually provided for.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Neuday

    The linked article states:


    The Minnesota police handbook states that officers trained on how to compress a detainee's neck without applying direct pressure to the airway can use a knee under its use-of-force policy. This is regarded as a non-deadly-force option.
     
    I doubt the reporter writing this knew what he was talking about.

    First of all, there is no such thing as "non-deadly-force option." There is no such thing as "non-lethal force." All force is potentially lethal in degrees. Professionals in force options call things such as pepper spray, Taser, etc. as "less lethal" options, not "non-lethal."

    Second, most large police departments do not allow use of hard objects (batons, especially) putting pressure on the neck. While it IS possible to restrain (and indeed render unconscious) safely a suspect with neck (carotid artery) compression, this requires very good sensitivity that hard objects make very difficult. Even highly trained people have trouble doing it under extreme stress. Those with little training are liable to use too much force and harm seriously or even kill those under such restraint.

    Even when such a technique is allowed (say, Gable-gripping a highly resistant suspect around the neck in order to restrain him), it is not to be used for a prolonged period of time and is supposed to be discontinued immediatley upon achieving compliance or another means of restraint. Using the knee or shin is not recommended especially for a longer duration, because, again, due to the lower sensitity as well as the fact that the entire body weight rests on the knee or shin.

    What is particularly damning in this case is that the officer in question held the suspect in this position for over 8 minutes. And even more shockingly, the suspect was unresponsive for close to 3 of minutes (and witnesses were yelling at the officer that he was unresponsive). There is simply no excuse for holding a suspect down by compressing his neck with one's knee/shin when the suspect is already handcuffed and lying face down on a pavement and is unresponsive.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  50. @James Speaks
    And the ambience now is so raw, so real, so Mau Mau.

    Replies: @SunBakedSuburb

    “so Mau Mau”

    Having lived and traveled in Europe for a few years, I was smug in my belief that the most supine white people in the world lived in the western European countries. No. American whites cannot be accused of being too civilized or cultured; so the reason why their country has been taken from them and turned into a sociological petri-dish for totalitarian technocrats and billionaires is because they have become addicted to leisure, sports-consumerism, and dog-love. The genetic lines that produced the builders, statesmen, frontiersmen, and Indian-killers have long been tapped-out. Congratulations white America: you live in a cesspool.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    @SunBakedSuburb


    and dog-love
     
    Haven't you heard, Dog is Lov. Or maybe Dog is my copilot.

    As for the loss of genetic fortitude, like DesCartes just before he disappeared, I. Think. Not.
    The patience and future time orientation that characterizes white America, and is mischaracterized as a weakness in the face of danger, played out well during the previous three months. Whites (and Asians), when permitted to do so (for example, not needing to ride a subway), managed to self isolate and reduce the spread of the coronavirus. Blacks en masse adopted the lemming strategy b/c "it's just to much work to practice self restraint."

    Now, the release of frustration we see enacted via riots further demonstrates the inability of the darker gene to plan for the future. Whites, of course, are noticing even if they pretend not to notice. Still waiting for somene to say, "The natives are revolting."

    The police in NY proactively prevent the spread of jungle behavior; police in Minneapolis retreat just as all goodwhites must retreat, but from time to time the lemming population has to be self-culled. Goodwhites are doing that but blacks' collective behavior seems to be a desperate plea for assistance.

  51. @International Jew
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I go there for the ambiance. Meaning, mostly for the smell of coffee. McDonald's coffee is almost as good IMO but only if you get it takeout because inside you're smelling fried food smells. And as you know, taste is in part smell.

    One Starbucks near me got ruined when a fried chicken joint opened next door and their ventilation systems were somehow connected.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @fish

    Hey, I thought you were a hot dog now. I couldn’t find you at the grocery store for Memorial Day. Sold out. Had to settle for an inferior brand.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Not voluntary. Some kind of technical problem at unz.com.

    I explained in more detail elsewhere. I you have any ideas for me, please let me know.

    Replies: @Henry Ford, @Buzz Mohawk

  52. @HammerJack
    @Anon

    Devils advocate: it does sometimes take three officers to subdue a crazed and/or drugged negro. And they are often both.

    But of course this doesn't excuse the attempted asphyxiation. What I don't get, though , is that I thought we had a tacit or explicit agreement (depending on the jurisdiction) not to arrest negroes for crimes below $1000 or so.

    And while Minneapolis may not yet have that law on its books, it most certainly leans that way and they've surely had these discussions.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @International Jew

    Kersey had the story of a St Louis cop or EMT who revived a black dirtbag from a potentially fatal OD — and the guy killed him on the spot.

  53. @Buzz Mohawk

    Starbucks charges you a lot of money for ambiance, not for the cost of goods sold.
     
    You've got a funny idea of ambience.

    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/06/a5/2a/e0/waiting-line.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Known Fact, @Barnard, @Mr. Anon

    If they go after Dunkins there’s gonna be trouble

  54. @Buzz Mohawk

    Starbucks charges you a lot of money for ambiance, not for the cost of goods sold.
     
    You've got a funny idea of ambience.

    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/06/a5/2a/e0/waiting-line.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Known Fact, @Barnard, @Mr. Anon

    C’mon, people, don’t you get it? Starbucks charges you a lot of money for ambiance, not for the cost of goods sold.

    Yes, I have read that nationally Starbucks does 65% of their business through the drive up window. The people who walk in and take it to go are also not experiencing the ambiance. I am not a coffee drinker so I have no dog in this argument, but it is hard for a lot of coffee snobs to believe that a lot of people like the coffee at Starbucks. Maybe they are just falling for the marketing a herd mentality takes over, but it is true.

  55. @James Speaks
    @notsaying


    I wonder how much longer this will last — and to how many more places it will spread.
     
    I wonder how effective COVID-19 transmission will be amongst these mobs of blue citizens?

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Known Fact, @notsaying

    At least it’s going to be much harder for public officials to keep a straight face as they plead with law-abiding residents to limit the number of participants at social events

  56. Losing control of the country is Game Over for the Trump Presidency and Repube control of the Senate. Restoring civil order may very well be the same. Maybe it is simply Game Over for the USA.

    Sad!

    BTW, did anyone get any of those snazzy Minneapolis Starbucks coffee mugs? Those are collectors’ items.

  57. @Lot
    @notsaying

    Derek Chauvin should have fled to the Canadian wilderness when he had a chance. It is not a good sign when angry mobs and the mayor both demand your prosecution. I don’t think would have even been illegal before he was charged. A beard plus a corona mask is a good disguise.

    It’s surprising more people facing a likely life sentence don’t do this.

    Lion gave this unheeded advice to Weinstein:

    https://lionoftheblogosphere.wordpress.com/2020/02/24/harvey-weinstein-should-have-read-my-blog-3/

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Almost Missouri, @notsaying

    • Replies: @International Jew
    @Almost Missouri

    Appalling. And they still whine about lynching.

  58. Whoa, whoa, Steve! Next you’ll be asking why people go through Starbucks drive-through windows!

  59. @International Jew
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I go there for the ambiance. Meaning, mostly for the smell of coffee. McDonald's coffee is almost as good IMO but only if you get it takeout because inside you're smelling fried food smells. And as you know, taste is in part smell.

    One Starbucks near me got ruined when a fried chicken joint opened next door and their ventilation systems were somehow connected.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @fish

    Yeah…..what gives H. National?

  60. @Angular momentum
    Rioters breaking into a Starbucks, is that even illegal? How long before Starbucks apologizes and begs the rioters for forgiveness?

    Replies: @fish

    I imagine Howard Schultz is having Starbucks One warmed up as this is being typed in preparation for the flight down!

  61. @Buzz Mohawk

    Starbucks charges you a lot of money for ambiance, not for the cost of goods sold.
     
    You've got a funny idea of ambience.

    https://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/06/a5/2a/e0/waiting-line.jpg

    Replies: @Anonymous, @International Jew, @Known Fact, @Barnard, @Mr. Anon

    You’ve got a funny idea of ambience.

    Yeah, the ambience of corporate-sourced “world music” and tattooed, greasy-looking hipsters making your latte. Not to mention the piss-bums and needle-junkies who are there to use the lavatories.

    Ambience.

  62. “…looting the Starbucks on Sixth Street…coming back out to show off their to the TV cameras their ill-gotten gains, such as a quart of milk.“

    Looting the whitest place ever and taking the whitest thing as a trophy? Maybe not much there in the way of ambience, but the symbolism fairly screams. Although our precious looters likely cannot hear it.

  63. @Anon
    @BenKenobi

    @ I won’t hold my breath (I can still breathe :p)

    What’s wrong with you Americans?!? That was a horrible way to die. The whole scene of the three policemen kneeling on top of the man was shocking. The whole world can believe their lyin’ eyes, and you can’t? Whatever the “dindu” was or did, two wrongs don’t make a right.

    100 looters won’t justify that policeman putting his weight on the black fellow’s neck, either.

    Replies: @Redneck farmer, @HammerJack, @Federalist

    What’s wrong with you Americans?!? That was a horrible way to die. The whole scene of the three policemen kneeling on top of the man was shocking. The whole world can believe their lyin’ eyes, and you can’t?

    I don’t know how many of My Fellow Americans I can speak for. The way I see it is that what the cop did was objectively wrong.

    But I just don’t give a shit anymore. I’ve seen formerly nice cities, neighborhoods, and communities (including places where my parents and grandparents grew up) reduced to hellish war zones. They’ve ruined our schools. They steal from us. They commit violent crimes against us. Now they’re burning and pillaging. They cost us a fortune. No matter how much free crap we give them, it’s never enough. To top it off, we get blamed for their violence, low intelligence, and poor impulse control because racism.

    So, while I don’t really disagree with what you’re saying, I also can’t be bothered to care about some thug who was killed by the police.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    @Federalist


    I don’t know how many of My Fellow Americans I can speak for. The way I see it is that what the cop did was objectively wrong. But I just don’t give a shit anymore. I’ve seen formerly nice cities, neighborhoods, and communities (including places where my parents and grandparents grew up) reduced to hellish war zones.
     
    I kind of feel the same way about that father and son in Georgia. Objectively, it's just plane wrong to point a firearm at someone you merely suspect of committing some minor property crime. Legally, there is no justification for it.

    But as I've detailed in another thread, I've seen a town I once lived in rapidly go from solidly safe and middle class to crime-ridden in a matter of a few short years. I had no connection to the place, and moved away before it got bad. But if what those two men did stemmed from frustration at watching bad elements move in on their town, it is totally understandable. Not everyone has the money to live in a gated community, and not everyone is so detached from their community that they can just pack up and leave. And even if you do leave they always follow you. Always.
  64. @SunBakedSuburb
    @James Speaks

    "so Mau Mau"

    Having lived and traveled in Europe for a few years, I was smug in my belief that the most supine white people in the world lived in the western European countries. No. American whites cannot be accused of being too civilized or cultured; so the reason why their country has been taken from them and turned into a sociological petri-dish for totalitarian technocrats and billionaires is because they have become addicted to leisure, sports-consumerism, and dog-love. The genetic lines that produced the builders, statesmen, frontiersmen, and Indian-killers have long been tapped-out. Congratulations white America: you live in a cesspool.

    Replies: @James Speaks

    and dog-love

    Haven’t you heard, Dog is Lov. Or maybe Dog is my copilot.

    As for the loss of genetic fortitude, like DesCartes just before he disappeared, I. Think. Not.
    The patience and future time orientation that characterizes white America, and is mischaracterized as a weakness in the face of danger, played out well during the previous three months. Whites (and Asians), when permitted to do so (for example, not needing to ride a subway), managed to self isolate and reduce the spread of the coronavirus. Blacks en masse adopted the lemming strategy b/c “it’s just to much work to practice self restraint.”

    Now, the release of frustration we see enacted via riots further demonstrates the inability of the darker gene to plan for the future. Whites, of course, are noticing even if they pretend not to notice. Still waiting for somene to say, “The natives are revolting.”

    The police in NY proactively prevent the spread of jungle behavior; police in Minneapolis retreat just as all goodwhites must retreat, but from time to time the lemming population has to be self-culled. Goodwhites are doing that but blacks’ collective behavior seems to be a desperate plea for assistance.

  65. @Dave Pinsen
    What's the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store? But how would you use one of the products without Apple knowing and tracking you down?

    Replies: @snorlax, @Kronos, @Wilkey

    What’s the highest value goods you could loot, the Apple Store? But how would you use one of the products without Apple knowing and tracking you down?

    Does Apple build stores anywhere close to where these people live?

  66. @Federalist
    @Anon


    What’s wrong with you Americans?!? That was a horrible way to die. The whole scene of the three policemen kneeling on top of the man was shocking. The whole world can believe their lyin’ eyes, and you can’t?
     
    I don't know how many of My Fellow Americans I can speak for. The way I see it is that what the cop did was objectively wrong.

    But I just don't give a shit anymore. I've seen formerly nice cities, neighborhoods, and communities (including places where my parents and grandparents grew up) reduced to hellish war zones. They've ruined our schools. They steal from us. They commit violent crimes against us. Now they're burning and pillaging. They cost us a fortune. No matter how much free crap we give them, it's never enough. To top it off, we get blamed for their violence, low intelligence, and poor impulse control because racism.

    So, while I don't really disagree with what you're saying, I also can't be bothered to care about some thug who was killed by the police.

    Replies: @Wilkey

    I don’t know how many of My Fellow Americans I can speak for. The way I see it is that what the cop did was objectively wrong. But I just don’t give a shit anymore. I’ve seen formerly nice cities, neighborhoods, and communities (including places where my parents and grandparents grew up) reduced to hellish war zones.

    I kind of feel the same way about that father and son in Georgia. Objectively, it’s just plane wrong to point a firearm at someone you merely suspect of committing some minor property crime. Legally, there is no justification for it.

    But as I’ve detailed in another thread, I’ve seen a town I once lived in rapidly go from solidly safe and middle class to crime-ridden in a matter of a few short years. I had no connection to the place, and moved away before it got bad. But if what those two men did stemmed from frustration at watching bad elements move in on their town, it is totally understandable. Not everyone has the money to live in a gated community, and not everyone is so detached from their community that they can just pack up and leave. And even if you do leave they always follow you. Always.

  67. @BigTony
    If I'm not from a traditionally oppressed background can I still help myself to a free television?

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    If I’m not from a traditionally oppressed background can I still help myself to a free television?

    Certainly. Just be like Shaun King and self-identify as black.

  68. @Jonathan Mason
    @Anon

    I don't see how the medical examiner could possibly have ruled out positional asphyxiation.

    Is he really saying that he thinks the guy would have died even if he had not been arrested?

    It looks like this report is a whitewash.

    Replies: @Muggles

    >>I don’t see how the medical examiner could possibly have ruled out positional asphyxiation.

    Is he really saying that he thinks the guy would have died even if he had not been arrested?

    It looks like this report is a whitewash.<<

    No, it looks like you don't agree with the facts. You have a pre-digested conclusion in mind. Do you think any public official in that position, in this high visibility event, would rule out asphyxiation if there were any evidence for that? People who do these jobs aren't stupid. They are highly trained and fully aware that in subsequent trials/civil suits their findings will be reviewed with the proverbial fine toothed comb.

    Things are not always the way they appear on videos. There are usually clear physical signs of asphyxiation, such as petechial hemorrhaging in the eyes. More likely cause is heart attack due to stress, extreme BP elevation. The underlying condition was the "cause" of death. The arrest procedure, which seems extreme under the circumstances, was a contributing factor.

    • Agree: Twinkie
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    @Muggles

    Thanks for your input. Medical examiner has now revised the original report, based on what I said.

  69. @Lot
    @notsaying

    Derek Chauvin should have fled to the Canadian wilderness when he had a chance. It is not a good sign when angry mobs and the mayor both demand your prosecution. I don’t think would have even been illegal before he was charged. A beard plus a corona mask is a good disguise.

    It’s surprising more people facing a likely life sentence don’t do this.

    Lion gave this unheeded advice to Weinstein:

    https://lionoftheblogosphere.wordpress.com/2020/02/24/harvey-weinstein-should-have-read-my-blog-3/

    Replies: @Rob McX, @Almost Missouri, @notsaying

    I don’t think running up to Canada would have done him any good. I think he would have been found if he had managed to get over the border.

    I have to say I am glad that more people don’t make a run for it. The kind of people who get themselves into big trouble with violent crime typically don’t have many resources in their lives. That works against them successfully getting away from and hiding from the cops. Cell phones and ATMs and computers and traffic monitoring makes it harder to do, too.

  70. @James Speaks
    @notsaying


    I wonder how much longer this will last — and to how many more places it will spread.
     
    I wonder how effective COVID-19 transmission will be amongst these mobs of blue citizens?

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome, @Known Fact, @notsaying

    That’s a good question. Being outside is in their favor. Being close together, breathing hard and shouting works against them.

    It would be funny in a nonfunny way if an outbreak did happen because of any of the protests.

  71. @BenKenobi
    @notsaying

    I'm surprised he didn't flee the country before charges could be laid. I would be on a beach in Thailand by now.

    Replies: @notsaying

    Do you really think he had a chance to get away? Don’t you think his house was watched?

  72. anon[282] • Disclaimer says:
    @TheMassageIsTheMedium
    @Anon

    Very interesting. I expect to see zero mention of this in the mainstream media, along with the fact that Floyd was a convicted criminal who had held a woman at gunpoint as they robbed her house.

    Also, wasn't this similar to the case with the fat Antifa girl who died after that guy ran her over with his car after he was attacked by a mob? But he was still sent away to prison.

    Replies: @anon

    >Also, wasn’t this similar to the case with the fat Antifa girl who died after that guy ran her over with his car after he was attacked by a mob? But he was still sent away to prison.

    You’ve been participating in too many forums in which the way to gain social cred is to situate oneself near the top of a runaway feedback loop based on who can pose as the most hardcore.

  73. @Buzz Mohawk
    @International Jew

    Hey, I thought you were a hot dog now. I couldn't find you at the grocery store for Memorial Day. Sold out. Had to settle for an inferior brand.

    Replies: @International Jew

    Not voluntary. Some kind of technical problem at unz.com.

    I explained in more detail elsewhere. I you have any ideas for me, please let me know.

    • Replies: @Henry Ford
    @International Jew

    I explained in more detail elsewhere.

    I know about you, all about you. Yes, indeed! As you young people say, I wrote the book. Literally!

    I you have any ideas for me, please let me know.

    Don't get me started!

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    @International Jew

    Have you tried using a different email address with H.N., along with all the other different things, I.P. address, etc., you mentioned in your other comment?

  74. @HammerJack
    @Anon

    Devils advocate: it does sometimes take three officers to subdue a crazed and/or drugged negro. And they are often both.

    But of course this doesn't excuse the attempted asphyxiation. What I don't get, though , is that I thought we had a tacit or explicit agreement (depending on the jurisdiction) not to arrest negroes for crimes below $1000 or so.

    And while Minneapolis may not yet have that law on its books, it most certainly leans that way and they've surely had these discussions.

    Replies: @Known Fact, @International Jew

    I thought we had a tacit or explicit agreement (depending on the jurisdiction) not to arrest negroes for crimes below $1000 or so.

    Counterfeiting is considered a very serious crime. It’s not merely stealing, it’s stealing from the government.

  75. @Almost Missouri
    @Lot

    Too late. Now Chauvin has more immediate problems, like where is he getting his next meal?

    https://scontent-mia3-2.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/100379218_10219306616633925_110395971065610240_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=o8VQJSncSuEAX-NGf4E&_nc_ht=scontent-mia3-2.xx&oh=1e1991686489590f4f097cb8aaf1ba15&oe=5EF6A410

    Replies: @International Jew

    Appalling. And they still whine about lynching.

  76. @International Jew
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Not voluntary. Some kind of technical problem at unz.com.

    I explained in more detail elsewhere. I you have any ideas for me, please let me know.

    Replies: @Henry Ford, @Buzz Mohawk

    I explained in more detail elsewhere.

    I know about you, all about you. Yes, indeed! As you young people say, I wrote the book. Literally!

    I you have any ideas for me, please let me know.

    Don’t get me started!

  77. @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Twinkie

    LOL. What was he supposed to do?

    Cop: Your under arrest.

    Perp: No, I'm not. *walks away"

    Cop: Well, OK. Bye. Have a nice day.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    LOL. What was he supposed to do?

    Are you a moron? The suspect was already handcuffed and lying face down on the street.

    Stop being an idiot and search “force continuum” on the internet.

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    @Twinkie

    A handcuffed 6'7 bouncer high on drugs can still get up and run away. If he trips and hurts himself while squirming to get up the cops are liable for the injury and also police brutality. If he gets up and goes bezerk and has to be shot, cops are liable, also riots. Best to keep him immobilized to prevent possibility of this.

  78. @International Jew
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Not voluntary. Some kind of technical problem at unz.com.

    I explained in more detail elsewhere. I you have any ideas for me, please let me know.

    Replies: @Henry Ford, @Buzz Mohawk

    Have you tried using a different email address with H.N., along with all the other different things, I.P. address, etc., you mentioned in your other comment?

  79. @International Jew
    @Twinkie


    But from the video footage (which of course is rarely the whole picture), what that officer did was completely contrary to normal police procedure
     
    If it was contrary to procedure, why didn't his three colleagues say anything? Why would he do it, for that matter, knowing he was being filmed?

    I'll grant you it looks pretty brutal, but before I believe it was contrary to procedure, I'd want to hear that from a real policeman (and one who didn't have to worry about getting doxxed and fired).

    Replies: @Twinkie

    If it was contrary to procedure, why didn’t his three colleagues say anything? Why would he do it, for that matter, knowing he was being filmed?

    I don’t know how accurate the reports are, but there are reports that state that one of the officers suggested turning over the suspect to his side (because lying face down on a pavement with someone on your neck puts a great deal of pressure on the chest/heart) and that another officer checked the suspect’s pulse and found none.

    People do all sorts of things even on film… cops are human. They make mistakes, they get angry, they have a bad day and take it out on someone. It doesn’t happen all the time or even often, but it does happen occasionally. And even when one makes a mistake, the natural camaraderie/group-think and the particular stresses of police work make it difficult for another officer to speak up and contradict.

    I used to train Judo and BJJ with a bunch of urban police officers/LEOs from patrol, SWAT, narcotics, port authority, and the FBI. Most were older guys and quite calm in demeanor and level-headed, but we had one young guy (who was not a pleasant training partner and constantly bickered with the rest of us) who was called Taser Ted (and other sundry related nicknames), because he would habitually and constantly use the Taser without evern trying to de-escalate confrontations with belligerent suspects. The senior student in the group was a firearms trainer for the local PD in his 50’s and he would try to counsel him not to behave this way all the time, that his career won’t go anywhere, at minimum, and, at worst, might get him fired and perhaps even prosecuted for hurting someone seriously or even killing a person. That guy would not listen.

  80. @Neuday
    @Twinkie

    Repost from a commenter at Vox Day:

    The BBC has a little section “How did George Floyd die?” that they’ve put in multiple stories (e.g., https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52857334 ). The last paragraph is, “The Minnesota police handbook states that officers trained on how to compress a detainee's neck without applying direct pressure to the airway can use a knee under its use-of-force policy. This is regarded as a non-deadly-force option.”

    That is, the officer involved had training from the state and had been told it was a safe technique. Personally, I can’t figure out when it would be a useful technique; it pretty much requires the target to be restrained. But given that George Floyd wasn’t strangled, Chauvin apparently performed it correctly.

    I don’t know how long the technique will remain approved in Minnesota, and I’m really not sure how legally relevant the extra training and handbook are, but I don’t see any American jury convicting a cop for third degree murder (“without intent to effect the death of any person, causes the death of another by perpetrating an act eminently dangerous to others and evincing a depraved mind, without regard for human life”) by using an explicitly approved technique that the state actually provided for.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    The linked article states:

    The Minnesota police handbook states that officers trained on how to compress a detainee’s neck without applying direct pressure to the airway can use a knee under its use-of-force policy. This is regarded as a non-deadly-force option.

    I doubt the reporter writing this knew what he was talking about.

    First of all, there is no such thing as “non-deadly-force option.” There is no such thing as “non-lethal force.” All force is potentially lethal in degrees. Professionals in force options call things such as pepper spray, Taser, etc. as “less lethal” options, not “non-lethal.”

    Second, most large police departments do not allow use of hard objects (batons, especially) putting pressure on the neck. While it IS possible to restrain (and indeed render unconscious) safely a suspect with neck (carotid artery) compression, this requires very good sensitivity that hard objects make very difficult. Even highly trained people have trouble doing it under extreme stress. Those with little training are liable to use too much force and harm seriously or even kill those under such restraint.

    Even when such a technique is allowed (say, Gable-gripping a highly resistant suspect around the neck in order to restrain him), it is not to be used for a prolonged period of time and is supposed to be discontinued immediatley upon achieving compliance or another means of restraint. Using the knee or shin is not recommended especially for a longer duration, because, again, due to the lower sensitity as well as the fact that the entire body weight rests on the knee or shin.

    What is particularly damning in this case is that the officer in question held the suspect in this position for over 8 minutes. And even more shockingly, the suspect was unresponsive for close to 3 of minutes (and witnesses were yelling at the officer that he was unresponsive). There is simply no excuse for holding a suspect down by compressing his neck with one’s knee/shin when the suspect is already handcuffed and lying face down on a pavement and is unresponsive.

    • Thanks: ic1000
    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Using the knee or shin is not recommended especially for a longer duration, because, again, due to the lower sensitity as well as the fact that the entire body weight rests on the knee or shin.

    What is particularly damning in this case is that the officer in question held the suspect in this position for over 8 minutes. And even more shockingly, the suspect was unresponsive for close to 3 of minutes (and witnesses were yelling at the officer that he was unresponsive). There is simply no excuse for holding a suspect down by compressing his neck with one’s knee/shin when the suspect is already handcuffed and lying face down on a pavement and is unresponsive.
     
    We really have no idea how much pressure was being placed on the deceased's neck. Based on the autopsy, my guess is practically zero. The cop is basically kneeling, and he's got two knees, one of which was on the ground. If the knee positioned near the deceased's neck was applying serious pressure, I suspect the autopsy would have reflected the fact that he directly caused the guy's death. IMO, the cause of death was stress from being arrested combined with his cardiovascular problems (possibly caused in part by prior drug use) plus alcohol and/or drugs. The positioning of the knee near the guy's neck was presumably just in case he acted up.

    The Democratic politicians in power want this guy to fry because that's what black voters want, and the examiner won't be in any doubt as to their inclinations. The fact that the autopsy came up with such weak sauce suggests that the cop had nothing to do with the deceased's death. It's possibly that the only way the guy's death could have been prevented is if the cops hadn't detained him that day.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  81. @Twinkie
    @Neuday

    The linked article states:


    The Minnesota police handbook states that officers trained on how to compress a detainee's neck without applying direct pressure to the airway can use a knee under its use-of-force policy. This is regarded as a non-deadly-force option.
     
    I doubt the reporter writing this knew what he was talking about.

    First of all, there is no such thing as "non-deadly-force option." There is no such thing as "non-lethal force." All force is potentially lethal in degrees. Professionals in force options call things such as pepper spray, Taser, etc. as "less lethal" options, not "non-lethal."

    Second, most large police departments do not allow use of hard objects (batons, especially) putting pressure on the neck. While it IS possible to restrain (and indeed render unconscious) safely a suspect with neck (carotid artery) compression, this requires very good sensitivity that hard objects make very difficult. Even highly trained people have trouble doing it under extreme stress. Those with little training are liable to use too much force and harm seriously or even kill those under such restraint.

    Even when such a technique is allowed (say, Gable-gripping a highly resistant suspect around the neck in order to restrain him), it is not to be used for a prolonged period of time and is supposed to be discontinued immediatley upon achieving compliance or another means of restraint. Using the knee or shin is not recommended especially for a longer duration, because, again, due to the lower sensitity as well as the fact that the entire body weight rests on the knee or shin.

    What is particularly damning in this case is that the officer in question held the suspect in this position for over 8 minutes. And even more shockingly, the suspect was unresponsive for close to 3 of minutes (and witnesses were yelling at the officer that he was unresponsive). There is simply no excuse for holding a suspect down by compressing his neck with one's knee/shin when the suspect is already handcuffed and lying face down on a pavement and is unresponsive.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Using the knee or shin is not recommended especially for a longer duration, because, again, due to the lower sensitity as well as the fact that the entire body weight rests on the knee or shin.

    What is particularly damning in this case is that the officer in question held the suspect in this position for over 8 minutes. And even more shockingly, the suspect was unresponsive for close to 3 of minutes (and witnesses were yelling at the officer that he was unresponsive). There is simply no excuse for holding a suspect down by compressing his neck with one’s knee/shin when the suspect is already handcuffed and lying face down on a pavement and is unresponsive.

    We really have no idea how much pressure was being placed on the deceased’s neck. Based on the autopsy, my guess is practically zero. The cop is basically kneeling, and he’s got two knees, one of which was on the ground. If the knee positioned near the deceased’s neck was applying serious pressure, I suspect the autopsy would have reflected the fact that he directly caused the guy’s death. IMO, the cause of death was stress from being arrested combined with his cardiovascular problems (possibly caused in part by prior drug use) plus alcohol and/or drugs. The positioning of the knee near the guy’s neck was presumably just in case he acted up.

    The Democratic politicians in power want this guy to fry because that’s what black voters want, and the examiner won’t be in any doubt as to their inclinations. The fact that the autopsy came up with such weak sauce suggests that the cop had nothing to do with the deceased’s death. It’s possibly that the only way the guy’s death could have been prevented is if the cops hadn’t detained him that day.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Johann Ricke


    We really have no idea how much pressure was being placed on the deceased’s neck. Based on the autopsy, my guess is practically zero. The cop is basically kneeling, and he’s got two knees, one of which was on the ground.
     
    Do me a favor. Lie face down and have another person kneel down on your neck. Now, ask the person to put no pressure on the neck (in other words, put all the weight on the supporting knee or foot on the ground). Ask the person to try to hold you down in this manner. Your simple bucking or sideway movement will tilt the person and his knee off your neck. If there was no pressure on that knee in contact with the suspect, there was no restraint. He is basically basing down on his knee/foot on the ground and giving you elevation to “sweep” (to use a BJJ terminology) him.

    If you are unwilling to risk your own neck for this experiment, perform it yourself on some sort of a cylindrical object about the size of a human neck and have another person move it.


    If the knee positioned near the deceased’s neck was applying serious pressure, I suspect the autopsy would have reflected the fact that he directly caused the guy’s death.
     
    Asphyxiation typically requires a wrapping type of pressure and strangulation/blood choke requires pressure on the carotid arteries, which are located on the front sides of the neck (blades of a V shape). In general, simple downward pressure is unlikely to cause either.

    IMO, the cause of death was stress from being arrested combined with his cardiovascular problems (possibly caused in part by prior drug use) plus alcohol and/or drugs.
     
    We don’t know what the details of the coroner’s report say. However, I will hazard an informed speculation based on the brief statement that lists the health conditions, intoxicants, and restraint as contributing causes as well as my own knowledge of restraint techniques, chokes, and their health effects. My guess is that the stress of the restraint and the fact that he was being held down (by the neck) face down put considerable pressure on his chest and exacerbated his existing cardiovascular conditions (also possibly worsened by intoxicants), causing elevated blood pressure and a heart attack. Another, less likely, possibility is that there was pressure on the carotid artery and this caused a disruption of blood supply to the brain and caused a stroke.

    When you learn how to apply a Gable-grip or rear naked choke (Hadaka-Jime in Judo), one of the first safety precautions taught to the student is that, if the Uke (the receiver of the technique) is rendered unconscious from the choke while face/chest down (back-mounted by the Tori, the performer of the technique), the Tori should immediately release the hold, turn over the Uke (so as not to put pressure on his chest) and perform resuscitation techniques to restore blood supply to the brain. The absolutely worst thing to do that can lead to serious harm or death is to not release the grip and/or continue to back mount him while he is face/chest down, unconscious.

    Even though pressure on the neck with a hard object (or a knee/shin, etc.) is not recommended, there are instances where such a restraint might be necessary to restrain a wildly misbehaving suspect. HOWEVER, in such an instance, the pressure must be of short duration and must be released immediately upon compliance or another restraint being applied (handcuffs/shackles/hog-tie) and the suspect should be seated on his behind or at least turned sideways. If the suspect has to be placed face down for any duration, there must not be any pressure on his back.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  82. @BigTony
    @Anonymous

    Stress of conflict can cause a heart attack, but cops can't give on the spot cardiovascular exams, so there'sno way of knowing that. Chocking is apparent and intentional after a short time.

    The video looks like a chocking to me, but I understand things can be different from my original perception.

    The hardest is job is making sure this cop gets a fair trial.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

    The video looks like a chocking to me

  83. @Twinkie
    @Hippopotamusdrome


    LOL. What was he supposed to do?
     
    Are you a moron? The suspect was already handcuffed and lying face down on the street.

    Stop being an idiot and search "force continuum" on the internet.

    Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome

    A handcuffed 6’7 bouncer high on drugs can still get up and run away. If he trips and hurts himself while squirming to get up the cops are liable for the injury and also police brutality. If he gets up and goes bezerk and has to be shot, cops are liable, also riots. Best to keep him immobilized to prevent possibility of this.

  84. @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Using the knee or shin is not recommended especially for a longer duration, because, again, due to the lower sensitity as well as the fact that the entire body weight rests on the knee or shin.

    What is particularly damning in this case is that the officer in question held the suspect in this position for over 8 minutes. And even more shockingly, the suspect was unresponsive for close to 3 of minutes (and witnesses were yelling at the officer that he was unresponsive). There is simply no excuse for holding a suspect down by compressing his neck with one’s knee/shin when the suspect is already handcuffed and lying face down on a pavement and is unresponsive.
     
    We really have no idea how much pressure was being placed on the deceased's neck. Based on the autopsy, my guess is practically zero. The cop is basically kneeling, and he's got two knees, one of which was on the ground. If the knee positioned near the deceased's neck was applying serious pressure, I suspect the autopsy would have reflected the fact that he directly caused the guy's death. IMO, the cause of death was stress from being arrested combined with his cardiovascular problems (possibly caused in part by prior drug use) plus alcohol and/or drugs. The positioning of the knee near the guy's neck was presumably just in case he acted up.

    The Democratic politicians in power want this guy to fry because that's what black voters want, and the examiner won't be in any doubt as to their inclinations. The fact that the autopsy came up with such weak sauce suggests that the cop had nothing to do with the deceased's death. It's possibly that the only way the guy's death could have been prevented is if the cops hadn't detained him that day.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    We really have no idea how much pressure was being placed on the deceased’s neck. Based on the autopsy, my guess is practically zero. The cop is basically kneeling, and he’s got two knees, one of which was on the ground.

    Do me a favor. Lie face down and have another person kneel down on your neck. Now, ask the person to put no pressure on the neck (in other words, put all the weight on the supporting knee or foot on the ground). Ask the person to try to hold you down in this manner. Your simple bucking or sideway movement will tilt the person and his knee off your neck. If there was no pressure on that knee in contact with the suspect, there was no restraint. He is basically basing down on his knee/foot on the ground and giving you elevation to “sweep” (to use a BJJ terminology) him.

    If you are unwilling to risk your own neck for this experiment, perform it yourself on some sort of a cylindrical object about the size of a human neck and have another person move it.

    If the knee positioned near the deceased’s neck was applying serious pressure, I suspect the autopsy would have reflected the fact that he directly caused the guy’s death.

    Asphyxiation typically requires a wrapping type of pressure and strangulation/blood choke requires pressure on the carotid arteries, which are located on the front sides of the neck (blades of a V shape). In general, simple downward pressure is unlikely to cause either.

    IMO, the cause of death was stress from being arrested combined with his cardiovascular problems (possibly caused in part by prior drug use) plus alcohol and/or drugs.

    We don’t know what the details of the coroner’s report say. However, I will hazard an informed speculation based on the brief statement that lists the health conditions, intoxicants, and restraint as contributing causes as well as my own knowledge of restraint techniques, chokes, and their health effects. My guess is that the stress of the restraint and the fact that he was being held down (by the neck) face down put considerable pressure on his chest and exacerbated his existing cardiovascular conditions (also possibly worsened by intoxicants), causing elevated blood pressure and a heart attack. Another, less likely, possibility is that there was pressure on the carotid artery and this caused a disruption of blood supply to the brain and caused a stroke.

    When you learn how to apply a Gable-grip or rear naked choke (Hadaka-Jime in Judo), one of the first safety precautions taught to the student is that, if the Uke (the receiver of the technique) is rendered unconscious from the choke while face/chest down (back-mounted by the Tori, the performer of the technique), the Tori should immediately release the hold, turn over the Uke (so as not to put pressure on his chest) and perform resuscitation techniques to restore blood supply to the brain. The absolutely worst thing to do that can lead to serious harm or death is to not release the grip and/or continue to back mount him while he is face/chest down, unconscious.

    Even though pressure on the neck with a hard object (or a knee/shin, etc.) is not recommended, there are instances where such a restraint might be necessary to restrain a wildly misbehaving suspect. HOWEVER, in such an instance, the pressure must be of short duration and must be released immediately upon compliance or another restraint being applied (handcuffs/shackles/hog-tie) and the suspect should be seated on his behind or at least turned sideways. If the suspect has to be placed face down for any duration, there must not be any pressure on his back.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Do me a favor. Lie face down and have another person kneel down on your neck. Now, ask the person to put no pressure on the neck (in other words, put all the weight on the supporting knee or foot on the ground). Ask the person to try to hold you down in this manner. Your simple bucking or sideway movement will tilt the person and his knee off your neck. If there was no pressure on that knee in contact with the suspect, there was no restraint. He is basically basing down on his knee/foot on the ground and giving you elevation to “sweep” (to use a BJJ terminology) him.

    If you are unwilling to risk your own neck for this experiment, perform it yourself on some sort of a cylindrical object about the size of a human neck and have another person move it.
     

    That's exactly my point. The guy was handcuffed with his hands *behind* his back. He might act up a little, but he's got no leverage to do any of these maneuvers. How many average people have the expertise to do a leg sweep with their hands restrained behind them? That's why the cop would feel confident enough to essentially have one knee at the ready in case of violent movement. A guy lying on the the ground with his hands cuffed behind him will have difficulty getting up, let alone perform esoteric moves known mainly to martial arts experts. Then there were the other two cops in charge of restraining the deceased's mid torso and legs. There was no reason for the cop to have serious pressure on the guy's neck and this fact is reflected on the examiner's autopsy, which cleared the cop of having done so, despite serious pressure on the examiner to hand the cop over bound and trussed for prosecutors as a sacrificial lamb to appease the mob of Democratic voters.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  85. @Twinkie
    @Johann Ricke


    We really have no idea how much pressure was being placed on the deceased’s neck. Based on the autopsy, my guess is practically zero. The cop is basically kneeling, and he’s got two knees, one of which was on the ground.
     
    Do me a favor. Lie face down and have another person kneel down on your neck. Now, ask the person to put no pressure on the neck (in other words, put all the weight on the supporting knee or foot on the ground). Ask the person to try to hold you down in this manner. Your simple bucking or sideway movement will tilt the person and his knee off your neck. If there was no pressure on that knee in contact with the suspect, there was no restraint. He is basically basing down on his knee/foot on the ground and giving you elevation to “sweep” (to use a BJJ terminology) him.

    If you are unwilling to risk your own neck for this experiment, perform it yourself on some sort of a cylindrical object about the size of a human neck and have another person move it.


    If the knee positioned near the deceased’s neck was applying serious pressure, I suspect the autopsy would have reflected the fact that he directly caused the guy’s death.
     
    Asphyxiation typically requires a wrapping type of pressure and strangulation/blood choke requires pressure on the carotid arteries, which are located on the front sides of the neck (blades of a V shape). In general, simple downward pressure is unlikely to cause either.

    IMO, the cause of death was stress from being arrested combined with his cardiovascular problems (possibly caused in part by prior drug use) plus alcohol and/or drugs.
     
    We don’t know what the details of the coroner’s report say. However, I will hazard an informed speculation based on the brief statement that lists the health conditions, intoxicants, and restraint as contributing causes as well as my own knowledge of restraint techniques, chokes, and their health effects. My guess is that the stress of the restraint and the fact that he was being held down (by the neck) face down put considerable pressure on his chest and exacerbated his existing cardiovascular conditions (also possibly worsened by intoxicants), causing elevated blood pressure and a heart attack. Another, less likely, possibility is that there was pressure on the carotid artery and this caused a disruption of blood supply to the brain and caused a stroke.

    When you learn how to apply a Gable-grip or rear naked choke (Hadaka-Jime in Judo), one of the first safety precautions taught to the student is that, if the Uke (the receiver of the technique) is rendered unconscious from the choke while face/chest down (back-mounted by the Tori, the performer of the technique), the Tori should immediately release the hold, turn over the Uke (so as not to put pressure on his chest) and perform resuscitation techniques to restore blood supply to the brain. The absolutely worst thing to do that can lead to serious harm or death is to not release the grip and/or continue to back mount him while he is face/chest down, unconscious.

    Even though pressure on the neck with a hard object (or a knee/shin, etc.) is not recommended, there are instances where such a restraint might be necessary to restrain a wildly misbehaving suspect. HOWEVER, in such an instance, the pressure must be of short duration and must be released immediately upon compliance or another restraint being applied (handcuffs/shackles/hog-tie) and the suspect should be seated on his behind or at least turned sideways. If the suspect has to be placed face down for any duration, there must not be any pressure on his back.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Do me a favor. Lie face down and have another person kneel down on your neck. Now, ask the person to put no pressure on the neck (in other words, put all the weight on the supporting knee or foot on the ground). Ask the person to try to hold you down in this manner. Your simple bucking or sideway movement will tilt the person and his knee off your neck. If there was no pressure on that knee in contact with the suspect, there was no restraint. He is basically basing down on his knee/foot on the ground and giving you elevation to “sweep” (to use a BJJ terminology) him.

    If you are unwilling to risk your own neck for this experiment, perform it yourself on some sort of a cylindrical object about the size of a human neck and have another person move it.

    That’s exactly my point. The guy was handcuffed with his hands *behind* his back. He might act up a little, but he’s got no leverage to do any of these maneuvers. How many average people have the expertise to do a leg sweep with their hands restrained behind them? That’s why the cop would feel confident enough to essentially have one knee at the ready in case of violent movement. A guy lying on the the ground with his hands cuffed behind him will have difficulty getting up, let alone perform esoteric moves known mainly to martial arts experts. Then there were the other two cops in charge of restraining the deceased’s mid torso and legs. There was no reason for the cop to have serious pressure on the guy’s neck and this fact is reflected on the examiner’s autopsy, which cleared the cop of having done so, despite serious pressure on the examiner to hand the cop over bound and trussed for prosecutors as a sacrificial lamb to appease the mob of Democratic voters.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Johann Ricke

    Nope. If all his weight is on his grounded knee and there is no pressure at all on the neck-side knee, a simple rolling to the side or bucking will tilt you off. No fancy grappling move necessary. Basing on only one knee is inherently unstable.

    Just try the experiment (with hands tied back).

    It is highly unlikely the officer had no pressure on that knee. Virtually impossible.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  86. @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Do me a favor. Lie face down and have another person kneel down on your neck. Now, ask the person to put no pressure on the neck (in other words, put all the weight on the supporting knee or foot on the ground). Ask the person to try to hold you down in this manner. Your simple bucking or sideway movement will tilt the person and his knee off your neck. If there was no pressure on that knee in contact with the suspect, there was no restraint. He is basically basing down on his knee/foot on the ground and giving you elevation to “sweep” (to use a BJJ terminology) him.

    If you are unwilling to risk your own neck for this experiment, perform it yourself on some sort of a cylindrical object about the size of a human neck and have another person move it.
     

    That's exactly my point. The guy was handcuffed with his hands *behind* his back. He might act up a little, but he's got no leverage to do any of these maneuvers. How many average people have the expertise to do a leg sweep with their hands restrained behind them? That's why the cop would feel confident enough to essentially have one knee at the ready in case of violent movement. A guy lying on the the ground with his hands cuffed behind him will have difficulty getting up, let alone perform esoteric moves known mainly to martial arts experts. Then there were the other two cops in charge of restraining the deceased's mid torso and legs. There was no reason for the cop to have serious pressure on the guy's neck and this fact is reflected on the examiner's autopsy, which cleared the cop of having done so, despite serious pressure on the examiner to hand the cop over bound and trussed for prosecutors as a sacrificial lamb to appease the mob of Democratic voters.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Nope. If all his weight is on his grounded knee and there is no pressure at all on the neck-side knee, a simple rolling to the side or bucking will tilt you off. No fancy grappling move necessary. Basing on only one knee is inherently unstable.

    Just try the experiment (with hands tied back).

    It is highly unlikely the officer had no pressure on that knee. Virtually impossible.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Nope. If all his weight is on his grounded knee and there is no pressure at all on the neck-side knee, a simple rolling to the side or bucking will tilt you off. No fancy grappling move necessary. Basing on only one knee is inherently unstable.

    Just try the experiment (with hands tied back).

    It is highly unlikely the officer had no pressure on that knee. Virtually impossible.

     

    We'll have to agree to disagree. One way or another, we'll find out at trial, when both prosecution and defense will go at it. With Nation of Islam apostate Keith Ellison in charge of the prosecution, it would not surprise me if Chauvin's lawyer got him off with back pay and damages.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  87. @Twinkie
    @Johann Ricke

    Nope. If all his weight is on his grounded knee and there is no pressure at all on the neck-side knee, a simple rolling to the side or bucking will tilt you off. No fancy grappling move necessary. Basing on only one knee is inherently unstable.

    Just try the experiment (with hands tied back).

    It is highly unlikely the officer had no pressure on that knee. Virtually impossible.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Nope. If all his weight is on his grounded knee and there is no pressure at all on the neck-side knee, a simple rolling to the side or bucking will tilt you off. No fancy grappling move necessary. Basing on only one knee is inherently unstable.

    Just try the experiment (with hands tied back).

    It is highly unlikely the officer had no pressure on that knee. Virtually impossible.

    We’ll have to agree to disagree. One way or another, we’ll find out at trial, when both prosecution and defense will go at it. With Nation of Islam apostate Keith Ellison in charge of the prosecution, it would not surprise me if Chauvin’s lawyer got him off with back pay and damages.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Johann Ricke

    Pause at 1:15 and tell me there is no pressure.

    https://youtu.be/ZWzkgKPZWcw

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  88. @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Nope. If all his weight is on his grounded knee and there is no pressure at all on the neck-side knee, a simple rolling to the side or bucking will tilt you off. No fancy grappling move necessary. Basing on only one knee is inherently unstable.

    Just try the experiment (with hands tied back).

    It is highly unlikely the officer had no pressure on that knee. Virtually impossible.

     

    We'll have to agree to disagree. One way or another, we'll find out at trial, when both prosecution and defense will go at it. With Nation of Islam apostate Keith Ellison in charge of the prosecution, it would not surprise me if Chauvin's lawyer got him off with back pay and damages.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Pause at 1:15 and tell me there is no pressure.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @Twinkie


    Pause at 1:15 and tell me there is no pressure.
     
    On further examination, you're right. Mea culpa. Chauvin's back was straight and his upper body was over the left knee pressing down on the deceased's throat. If he had placed his weight on his right knee (i.e. the one not nearest to the deceased's throat), his upper body would be leaning back.
  89. @Muggles
    @Jonathan Mason

    >>I don’t see how the medical examiner could possibly have ruled out positional asphyxiation.

    Is he really saying that he thinks the guy would have died even if he had not been arrested?

    It looks like this report is a whitewash.<<

    No, it looks like you don't agree with the facts. You have a pre-digested conclusion in mind. Do you think any public official in that position, in this high visibility event, would rule out asphyxiation if there were any evidence for that? People who do these jobs aren't stupid. They are highly trained and fully aware that in subsequent trials/civil suits their findings will be reviewed with the proverbial fine toothed comb.

    Things are not always the way they appear on videos. There are usually clear physical signs of asphyxiation, such as petechial hemorrhaging in the eyes. More likely cause is heart attack due to stress, extreme BP elevation. The underlying condition was the "cause" of death. The arrest procedure, which seems extreme under the circumstances, was a contributing factor.

    Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Thanks for your input. Medical examiner has now revised the original report, based on what I said.

  90. @Twinkie
    @Johann Ricke

    Pause at 1:15 and tell me there is no pressure.

    https://youtu.be/ZWzkgKPZWcw

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    Pause at 1:15 and tell me there is no pressure.

    On further examination, you’re right. Mea culpa. Chauvin’s back was straight and his upper body was over the left knee pressing down on the deceased’s throat. If he had placed his weight on his right knee (i.e. the one not nearest to the deceased’s throat), his upper body would be leaning back.

    • Thanks: Twinkie

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