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From the New York Times:

Hong Kong Protesters Love Pepe the Frog. No, They’re Not Alt-Right.

To much of the world, the cartoon frog is a hate symbol. To Hong Kong protesters, he’s something entirely different: one of them.

By Daniel Victor, Aug. 19, 2019

HONG KONG — Ask the Anti-Defamation League, and they will tell you Pepe the Frog is a hate symbol, a cheerleader of racism and anti-Semitism, a friend of alt-right extremists. The sad, green frog is widely viewed as toxic across the world, a signal of a sinister and dangerous worldview.

So it can be a bit jarring to see Pepe in his new role: a pro-democracy freedom fighter in the Hong Kong protests, siding with the people in their struggle against an authoritarian state. The protesters here hold signs with his image, use stickers of him in messaging apps and discussion forums, and even spray paint his face on walls.

Meanwhile, the Chinese Communist Party is also out to get Peppa the Pig. From the Daily Mail:

Stop censoring Peppa Pig! Protesters picket the Chinese consulate after communist party deletes 30,000 videos of the kids’ favourite because she’s a ‘subversive icon’

Protesters flocked to the consulate in Sydney on Wednesday to fight the ban

The show was banned when the main character became a ‘subversive icon’
Peppa Pig became associated with young people who were ‘anti-mainstream’

By KATE DARVALL FOR DAILY MAIL AUSTRALIA

PUBLISHED: 01:30 EDT, 9 May 2018 | UPDATED: 15:15 EDT, 9 May 2018

 
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  1. “To much of the world, the cartoon frog is a hate symbol.”

    To much of the world, the cartoon frog is a goof intended to get febrile leftists to freak out about a cartoon frog.

    • Replies: @guest
  2. So it can be a bit jarring to see Pepe in his new role: a pro-democracy freedom fighter in the Hong Kong protests, siding with the people in their struggle against an authoritarian state.

    Ah, so he’s being used in Hong Kong the same way he’s being used in America — as a symbol of the struggle against an authoritarian state.

  3. So it can be a bit jarring to see Pepe in his new role: a pro-democracy freedom fighter in the Hong Kong protests, siding with the people in their struggle against an authoritarian state. The protesters here hold signs with his image, use stickers of him in messaging apps and discussion forums, and even spray paint his face on walls

    So we use him here exactly the same way the Hong Kong protesters use him there. This says everything you need to know about the Anti-Defamation League.

  4. Just wait until the New York Times discovers what they are doing with the swastika in that stretch of the woods.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  5. When I post a first comment it disappears.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  6. Yet another comment disappearing.

    • Replies: @Uilleam Yr Alban
    , @El Dato
  7. Aft says:

    To much of the world, the cartoon frog is a hate symbol.

    Correction: “To journalists and left-wing activists (pardon the redundancy)”

  8. Lex says:

    On the other hand Zwarte Piet is very racist. That’s why you need professional Stalkers with degrees in Grievance & Victimhood studies on retainer.

  9. J.Ross says:

    To much of the world, the cartoon frog is a hate symbol.

    The world. Seven billion people on five continents. Pow, shhhhmkk, the world. This is Soviet-level journalying. This is reminiscent of the classic New Yorker cover in which a cartoon map of Manhattan represents it as most of the United States. Pepe represented and represents dissent, chaos, and the underdog, which is exactly how he is being used in Hong Kong, and probably why he was adopted. It’s almost like Hong Kongers don’t worship the ADL. However, the NYT does illustrate in this example that the practice of defaming a political opponent with these accusations is apparently universal.

    • Agree: BenKenobi
  10. Self-awareness in negative numbers.

  11. I should not be helping the CCP without getting a check, but there are several ways by which China could use propaganda against these protesters. Paint the Hong Kong protesters as evil nationalists who oppose globalization. Point out that China wants to literally tear down the wall (fence actually) that separates China proper from Honk Kong so that there can be a free flow of people and goods because in the end, no person is illegal. Condemn the Hong Kong protesters for their Hong Kong privilege as they are trying to preserve their higher standard of living and higher wages from the greater equity that will certainly come to the province as it becomes fully integrated with the Mainland. China should point out that Hong Kong’s much vaunted legal system is a vestige of White Colonialism that we all must commit ourselves to dismantling. By clinging to the inherent Whiteness of their legal system and Hong Kong identity, the protesters are literally internalizing White Supremacy.

    • Agree: Malcolm X-Lax
    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Twinkie
    , @Bill P
  12. Richard S says:

    By Daniel Victor, Aug. 19, 2019

    HONG KONG — Ask the Anti-Defamation League, and

    Let me stop you right there Dan

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  13. > ask the ADL

    The most NYT sentence ever.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  14. BenKenobi says:

    Ask the Anti-Defamation League

    Not off to a good start, danny-boy.

  15. Richard S says:
    @Clifford Brown

    “Trust me, I’m a reporter for the New York Times..”

  16. @Clifford Brown

    That pic is in the Duden illustrating Backpfeifengesicht.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  17. Fredrik says:

    Only reason they’re not seen as alt-right is because they’re not white.

    I doubt anyone in Hong Kong is using Pepe any other way than anyone in Los Angeles or Stockholm would.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  18. Tiny Duck says:

    I think that Hong Kong people have been nterslised colonislism sncd grt should submitbton chbese rule

  19. If Pepe the Frog is “toxic”, isn’t he then, technically, a toad?

  20. So, Trumpism has spread to the disaffected chattels of the Chinese Communist Party.

    What is Trumpism? Mass ridicule of your owners, in favor of standing up for yourself. The more absurd the ridicule, the better.

    Trumpism could not have happened without the democratization of free expression brought on by the Internet. That’s why society’s ownership class is trying to suppress online free expression. This is most obvious with international capital’s thus-far-succesful silencing of Europe’s indigenous peasantry.

    • Agree: sayless
  21. @J.Ross

    This is reminiscent of the classic New Yorker cover in which a cartoon map of Manhattan represents it as most of the United States.

    Bingo. Our cosmopolites are provincial. This fact is part of our upside-down America.

  22. MEH 0910 says:
    @Tiny Duck

    nterslised colonislism sncd grt should submitbton chbese rule

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  23. @Fredrik

    White ppl like Pepe = Nazi hate criminals

    Chinese ppl like Pepe = Freedom Fighters

    Who? Whom?

  24. @International Jew

    If Pepe the Frog is “toxic”, isn’t he then, technically, a toad?

    Not all toads are poisonous. That is an invidious stereotype!

  25. Anonymous[187] • Disclaimer says:

    He is a friendly cartoon frog that’s memorable and easy to draw. Sometimes he feels good. Sometimes he feels bad.

  26. @Clifford Brown

    It’s time to go ahead and reinstate physiognomy as an entirely legitimate discipline

  27. Alfa158 says:
    @Tiny Duck

    Well, at least that doesn’t make any less than when you comment under the handle M Krauthammar.

  28. Alfa158 says:

    The alt-right stopped using Pepe two years ago and moved on to other memes.
    Ace job of journalistic background research there, Dan.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @bored identity
  29. Wildfetus says:

    Hello my baby,
    Hello my honey,
    Hello my ragtime gal…

  30. guest says:

    “To much of the world”

    I think they mean the less than one-percent of the world they care about. Mostly friends and listeners of the same podcasts.

  31. Anon[263] • Disclaimer says:

    Hey Steve did you hear Apple is putting 6 Billion into new original programming?

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-08-19/streaming-wars-apple-spend-over-6-billion-original-shows

    Think any of these shows might be good/worth watching?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  32. Anon[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Um, the same architects behind this movement are the same people behind Middle East wars and color revolutions.

    https://jewishstandard.timesofisrael.com/jews-in-hong-kong-join-protests/

    JewishStandard: Jews in Hong Kong join protests

    …For some longtime Jewish residents, however, the steady stream of post-1997 changes have been simultaneously depressing and alarming — and a cause for them to join the protests.

    “Hong Kong has become our home,” said Eli Bitan, an entrepreneur in the financial and real estate sector who has lived in the city for more than 25 years. “The issue of loss of universal suffrage was the starting point for me to get involved.”

    Shani Brownstein, a former toy manufacturer and now a certified life coach living in Hong Kong, acknowledges that although Westerners may not seem as concerned by the changing political landscape, inside the Jewish community there are people who have actively supported the protestors.

    If nothing else the Chinese are getting a lesson.

    https://www.jns.org/opinion/why-jews-should-care-about-the-hong-kong-democracy-protests/

    Jewish News Syndicate: Why Jews should care about the Hong Kong democracy protests

    …Why should the Jewish community care particularly about these protests? There are many good reasons, not least the tradition of humanitarianism and human-rights activism among American Jews.

    https://townhall.com/tipsheet/yuichirokakutani/2019/08/15/us-leaders-rallies-behind-hong-kong-protesters-warn-beijing-against-crackdown-n2551683

    US Politicians Rally Behind Hong Kong Protesters, Warn Beijing Against Crackdown

  33. guest says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Yes, Hillary was epically trolled during her pre-election victory lap. But it’s also a meme, and a versatile one at that, indicating melancholy or sardonicism. Not “hate,” whatever that is. There are plenty of characters to draw upon for wrath.

  34. guest says:
    @contriturated anon

    Democracy dies in darkness, blah blah blah.

  35. Anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    • Replies: @guest
    , @J.Ross
  36. Mr. Anon says:

    Ask the Anti-Defamation League, and they will tell you Pepe the Frog is a hate symbol, a cheerleader of racism and anti-Semitism, a friend of alt-right extremists. The sad, green frog is widely viewed as toxic across the world editorial board rooms of the New York Times and The Atlantic Monthly, a signal of a sinister and dangerous worldview hysterical kvetching by journalists who all seem to have something in common.

  37. JohnnyD says:

    Reading this article makes me wonder if China’s government studies organizations like the ADL and SPLC…

  38. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Richard S

    https://jewishstandard.timesofisrael.com/jews-in-hong-kong-join-protests/

    Jewish Standard: Jews in Hong Kong join protest

    …For some longtime Jewish residents, however, the steady stream of post-1997 changes have been simultaneously depressing and alarming — and a cause for them to join the protests.

    “Hong Kong has become our home,” said Eli Bitan, an entrepreneur in the financial and real estate sector who has lived in the city for more than 25 years. “The issue of loss of universal suffrage was the starting point for me to get involved.”

    Shani Brownstein, a former toy manufacturer and now a certified life coach living in Hong Kong, acknowledges that although Westerners may not seem as concerned by the changing political landscape, inside the Jewish community there are people who have actively supported the protestors.

  39. Most of the protesters in Hong Kong are good little leftists (they dislike Trump and would have voted for Hillary if given the opportunity), and if they weren’t so insular and disinterested in everything beyond the city’s boundaries would find Pepe offensive. The low ranking male who wrote this article actually stumbles onto that truth via “Emily” (“After she learned [the ADL-approved opinion about Pepe], she wondered if maybe she and other protesters ought to stop handing out posters with his image at the airport.”]

    The only reason the NYT is covering the Hong Kong protests is because the protesters remind them enough of the Left in America fighting Trump to make it Newsworthy.

    The irony is the real source of Hong Kong protester anger, which they can’t bring themselves to articulate because it bumps up against Liberal Democracy’s prime directive, is a foreign invasion from the Mainland, which will in fifty years lead to the loss of local Hong Kong/Cantonese culture.

    I have no sympathy for Hong Kong. The Mainlanders are doing to Hong Kong what the Hong Kongese have done to Vancouver, Sydney and Auckland. And when the Mainland finally takes control, whether next year or in 2047, hordes of Hong Kong Freedom Fighters will be applying for asylum in places they have inexorably made unlivable. They can go to Hell. We don’t want them.

    China is right to put up a wall to keep liberal democracy at bay. Hong Kong should have been handed back lock, stock and barrel in 1997. Integrated with the Greater Bay Area, it would have prospered and provided better jobs, housing and opportunities for younger people. Instead, locals are controlled by oligarchs who bowed and scraped to China when it suited , while ensuring locals remained poor, poorly housed, and without any hope of change.

    Until the protesters really do take up Pepe and all for which he stands, the theater in Hong Kong will continue to be nothing more than Pokemon Go with Teargas.

  40. Twinkie says:
    @Clifford Brown

    That’s brilliant. The Chicoms should put you on a retainer.

  41. Twinkie says:
    @International Jew

    If Pepe the Frog is “toxic”, isn’t he then, technically, a toad?

    I condemn your toxic speciesism.

  42. istevefan says:
    @Clifford Brown

    The Red Swastika Society

    Although it seems to have been suppressed during the Maoist rule in mainland China, the Red Swastika Society continues today as a religious organisation focused on charity. It has branches in areas of the Chinese diaspora, with headquarters in Taiwan. Besides charity work, the Red Swastika runs two schools in Hong Kong (Tuen Mun and Tai Po) and one in Singapore (Red Swastika School).

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
  43. Glaivester says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    By the way, the interesting story about Australia banning an episode of Peppa is that the episode “Mr. Skinny Legs” where Peppa learns not be afraid of spiders is considered dangerous for children because Australia has the most poisonous spiders in the world, so fear is entirely appropriate.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @ben tillman
  44. istevefan says:
    @J.Ross

    To much of the world, the cartoon frog is a hate symbol.

    Even if you assumed 100 percent of the US population thought this, it would only represent about 4 to 5 percent of the global population. And given a good chunk of the US population does not think this, that number is even smaller. Outside of the USA, who even knows or cares about the frog?

    What I find odd is that these liberal elites frequently virtue signal their worldly travels and their ability to speak a few phrases of another language for use on those trips. They assume they are worldly, and we are provincial who will never travel beyond the borders of our nation. Yet time again they are the ones who show they are the provincial ones by assuming their world is the world, and their views are shared by a global majority.

    Most of us hayseeds are smart enough to know when we don’t know and don’t pretend to speak for others.

    • Agree: GermanReader2
  45. anon[369] • Disclaimer says:

    Winnie the Pooh also gets censored as a Xi Jinping nickname. The meme started a few years when he looked stubby walking next to a svelte Obama. It’s actually pretty funny.

  46. @International Jew

    He’s typing with one hand, if you get my drift.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  47. @Thulean Friend

    And here’s the most NYT portrait ever, Current-Year Division.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  48. @International Jew

    Toads are a social construct. They are all frogs when you are a boy.

    • Replies: @Peterike
  49. jim jones says:

    The Hong Kongers miss the good old days:

  50. @istevefan

    It is a ubiquitous symbol in Hong Kong.

  51. eah says:

  52. Lot says:
    @Alfa158

    “The alt-right stopped using Pepe two years ago and moved on to other memes.“

  53. Bill P says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Uh, they’re already doing that.

  54. @Alfa158

    Victor’s only job is to remind y’all that The Hate™ is a social construct enforced by universal joorisdiction.

  55. El Dato says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    First comments are always delayed a bit. It’s probably to deter “first” posts or aggressive state-controlled unauthentic accounts.

    Meanwhile, at Jake Dorsey’s burning open-doors barn:

    Twitter bans ‘state media’ from advertising… and guess who decides how they are defined

  56. El Dato says:
    @Glaivester

    That’s why mammals fear spiders in the first place.

    It’s not because they look like hairy sex organs, sorry Mr. Freud.

    • Replies: @guest
  57. El Dato says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Hong Kong Protesters Love Pepe the Frog. No, They’re Not Alt-Right.

    How do you know, Baizuo?

    The usual problem: someone at the NYT is writing really about his view of the world, not about reality.

  58. Bill P says:

    There’s this western/oriental fusion culture going on that’s kind of a mystery to guys over 40 or so. My kids are into it, to the point of laughing like I’m some old crank when I deride it, which I consider my patriotic duty.

    However, looking far into the future, given the “world’s most important graph” and all that, it seems to me that if we’re going to save the world from some global Heart of Darkness scenario, the oriental and occidental are going to have to merge their civilizations to some extent.

    That’s why Hong Kong is so important. The terms under which the west and the east begin a process of co-assimilation are extremely important, and rule of law is a hill worth dying on. Honestly, I didn’t think the Hong Kong people had it in them, but I stand corrected and impressed. Hopefully, the mainlanders do, too.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Reg Cæsar
    , @guest
  59. File this one under “feels good man.”

    But the mark of the serious movement is a toad, not a frog!

  60. RobUK says:

    The sad, green frog is widely viewed as toxic across the world, a signal of a sinister and dangerous worldview.

    Really, it isn’t. The New York Times could call 1,000 people in the world, at random, and they’d be lucky to get two who even knew what it was, let alone what it represented.

    The author of this piece is insane.

  61. Cortes says:

    How Pepe messes with people’s heads:

  62. How can anyone not like a character based on Don Knotts? Here he is in another beloved role prior to Pépé ….

  63. So, what does Thomas Friedman think about this?

  64. Kronos says:

    Peppe the Pig is subversive cultural trash from the West Comrade! We Chinese communists must be forever watchful for such degenerate mind pollution that might corrupt the youth!

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  65. AlexT says:

    The fact that the NYT is making excuses for them means that the HK protests are just another US sponsored color revolution. I hope the PLA flattens the whole city.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  66. So it can be a bit jarring to see Pepe in his new role: a pro-democracy freedom fighter in the Hong Kong protests, siding with the people in their struggle against an authoritarian state.

    That’s not a “new role”. That’s the same role he plays for the “alt-right”, as others have pointed out above.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  67. @Glaivester

    I don’t care where you live. Fear of spiders is appropriate. It can be overdone, but Type 1 vs. Type 2 — what’s more costly?

  68. @J.Ross

    “The world. Seven billion people on five continents. Pow, shhhhmkk, the world“

    Dana Carney as Mickey Rooney on SNL. Nice pull.

  69. @Anon

    As Herman J. Mankiewicz telegraphed robert Benchley 95 years ago: “Millions Are To Be Grabbed Out Here, and Your Only Competition Is Idiots”

    So let’s crowdsource an iSteve show that Apple would drop some of that $6 billion on.

    • Replies: @mmack
  70. I always wonder why the British turned the whole of Hong Kong back over to the Chinese. The island of Hong Kong and the tip of the Kowloon peninsula were flat out ceded to the British after the Opium wars. It was the bulk of the Kowloon peninsula (which has always been less urbanized than the rest of HK) which was the subject of the 99-year lease that the PRC simply let expire in 1997. The British were under no obligation to give the rest of HK back, no more than they would be obligated to give Gibraltar back to the Spanish.

  71. Jack D says:
    @AlexT

    This is very convenient. You don’t have to do any thinking anymore. Just read the NY Times. Whatever they are fer, you are agin’.

    I read in the history books that the US once had its own color revolution, sponsored by the French. King George’s mistake was that he didn’t flatten Boston.

    • Replies: @AlexT
  72. @Reg Cæsar

    I had to look up “backpfeifengesicht” . . . hilarious!

    “Betriebsblind” would seem appropriate for anyone writing for the NYT.

  73. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    Chinese censors bruh.

    – Peppa

  74. Jack D says:
    @contriturated anon

    NY Times is too clueless to understand how anyone could ever see Hillary and the Dems in the CPC role. EVERYONE knows that they are the “good guys” and anyone who opposes them is “toxic” and racist and evil – it’s frickin’ obvious. This is an assumption that is surely shared by all good people everywhere and not just by sociology professors living on the Upper West Side (to the extent that sociology professors can still afford to live on the UWS). In their heads, they are the ones fighting against “the Establishment” so how could they BE the Establishment now?

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  75. mmack says:
    @Steve Sailer

    At 8 PM Eastern on AppleTV, iNotice with your host Steve Sailer. Tonight’s guest: Raj Chetty.

    Ok, set up a GoFundMe Page Steve.

  76. Mr. Anon says:

    I remember the handover of HK to the Chinese in 1997. Lots of pagentry and publicly professed good-will accompanying Britain’s (latest) selling out of one of it’s client peoples. Perhaps people who know something about China could enlighten the rest of us: what did the Hong Kong Chinese think of the whole deal at the time? Fer? Agin? Happy? Sad?

    • Replies: @Aguynamedme
    , @J.Ross
  77. “Meanwhile, the Chinese Communist Party is also out to get Peppa the Pig”

    And 2019 is the Year of the Pig in China.

  78. @Jack D

    The most important audience for The NY Times is a group of very powerful people who ARE the establishment. This includes owners and advertisers as well as the most well-heeled subscribers.

    When was the last time The NY Times did an expose on Carlos Slim? And how long were they able to ignore Epstein?

    The two biggest con jobs in modern America have been the wealthy establishment restricting debate for the Left and the Right.

    The alt-right posters on this forum are very perceptive as to the ways the oligarchs fool the Woke Left.

    Most of the alt-right posters on this forum, up to and including Steve, are quite blind to the ways the oligarchs fool the alt-right. But whenever I bring up specific examples I get flamed, so it is a lost cause, although Jared Taylor seems to be catching on to the great consternation of the oligarchs.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  79. J1234 says:

    To much of the world, the cartoon frog is a hate symbol. To Hong Kong protesters, he’s something entirely different

    Very good, progressive journalist. Now, apply that really simple concept to the confederate flag.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/27/us/university-mississippi-lowers-state-flag-confederate-emblem.html

  80. TWS says:
    @Tiny Duck

    Not only was it authentic frontier gibberish but it expressed the courage little seen in this day and age.

  81. @Uilleam Yr Alban

    A term in that article, cryptic coloration, could be potentially useful for us.

    • Agree: Uilleam Yr Alban
  82. @International Jew

    If Pepe the Frog is “toxic”, isn’t he then, technically, a toad?

    Careful. Australians banned an arachnophile episode of Peppa Pig on such grounds. We don’t want Silicon Valley pulling the same stunt on Pepe.

  83. Jack D says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    The oligarchs are no threat to America (unless they are Russian oligarchs). The REAL threat to America is cartoon frogs and 13 year old boy Nazis. These may seem like marginal characters to you but you stamp out the embers of the brush fire while they are still small and controllable. If you wait until it’s a raging forest fire it’s too late.

    • LOL: Paleo Liberal
  84. Jack D says:
    @Bill P

    Hopefully, the mainlanders do, too.

    For the most part they don’t. The Party sure doesn’t – they regard Western democracy with utter contempt. They don’t see it as a role model for the future at all. They are waiting out the clock on one country/two systems and will assimilate HK into China as soon as legally possible (or sooner if things continue to go south there). They are only being restrained by the fact that they want HK to be the model for how they will retake Taiwan without having to invade.

    I’m not even sure that the Party is wrong. It’s hard to see how a national of 1.4 billion can really operate effectively as a democracy. India is not encouraging. It may be that the alternative to the rule of the Party is some sort of right wing Han nationalism in which groups like the Uighurs and the Tibetans would get treated even WORSE.

    As for the masses on the mainland, most of them don’t get to see the full picture from behind the Great Firewall. The masses are very nationalistic, sometimes even out in front of the Party on nationalist questions. They see the HKers as a bunch of spoiled ingrates – they don’t know how good they have it already and they want it even better? To them, HKers are like that kid in India who supposedly drove his brand new BMW into the river because a BMW was not good enough for him – he really wanted a Jaguar.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @J.Ross
  85. @Bill P

    Speaking of “mainlanders”, and tropical creatures for that matter, tomorrow marks sixty years of Hawaiian statehood. But I see little evidence of celebration. (We should celebrate– six full decades with no new states!)

    It seems there is some tension between Hawaiians and Hawai’ians:

    https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/us/hawaii-statehood-day

    Mainlander, by the way, was much more insulting than haole to a white gradeschooler in Honolulu in the early days of statehood.

    Now there’s a timely topic for Steve!

    • Replies: @El Dato
  86. El Dato says:
    @Anon

    Ben Cohen writes:

    What that means, potentially, is that Hong Kong is expendable. As we look back at episodes in our own history when Jews were similarly disregarded in the wider calculations of power politics, the present is as good a time as any to tell the American president that the future peace of the world may, just may, be hanging on the shoulders of those brave folks in Hong Kong.

    What does he mean by that?

  87. El Dato says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Looks like a musical with Luke Skywalker singing as he services dew collectors.

  88. @MEH 0910

    What’s his “safe quack”?

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  89. El Dato says:

    According to Wikipedia, Peppa Pig is not particularly suppressed in China, indeed it brings in the Moolah. What’s going on?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peppa_Pig#Peppa_in_China

    Despite the above controversy, the series and character remain popular within mainstream Chinese culture, as two Peppa Pig theme parks are set to open in Beijing and Shanghai in 2019. In early 2019, to celebrate the Year of the Pig, the 81-minute animation/live-action film Peppa Pig Celebrates Chinese New Year was released in China. Before the film’s release, a five-minute live-action promotional trailer went viral on social media in China, garnering a billion views and being re-posted by numerous state media outlets. The film opened on 6 February 2019, and made US$14 million in the first three days.

    But then

    Protesters flocked to the consulate in Sydney on Wednesday to fight the ban

    Yeah, it’s gonna be like, Peppa Maidan!

  90. My favorite episode of Peppa Pig is the one in which Mummy Pig does a sponsored parachute jump to raise funds to repair the leaky roof of the local elementary school, where Madame Gazelle is the head teacher, however Daddy Pig also goes up in the plane with her for moral support and falls out of the plane without a ‘chute.

    Mummy Pig then jumps after him in free fall and catches him, opens her parachute and holds onto him, only letting him go close to the ground, where he crashes through the same school roof that has just been repaired (on credit, presumably). Fortunately no one is hurt.

    I can see why the Chinese would find the idea of parent fund raising for schools via parachute jumps very subversive and threatening to the state.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    , @Reg Cæsar
  91. @Anon

    “Shani Brownstein, a former toy manufacturer and now a certified life coach”

    I was about to ask how one becomes a life coach, but more to the point, How does one become a life coach certifier? Quis certificat ipsos certificatores?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  92. Anon[339] • Disclaimer says:

    “Hate” and “hate symbol” is only 1984 code for any position and any of its representations that go against the interests of the groups that hate White people.

    If Pepe the Frog is a hate symbol, then so is the Star of David and the Menorah. The latter two being nationalist symbols that represent the political self-interest of Jews.

  93. @Mr. Anon

    80% were opposed to Chinese rule because they knew this would happen, but the media was just giddy about it.

  94. Twinkie says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    What’s his “safe quack”?

    Quack.

  95. Twinkie says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Daddy Pig also goes up in the plane with her for moral support and falls out of the plane without a ‘chute.

    This is my kind of a show!

    Fortunately no one is hurt.

    Oh. Never mind.

  96. “All the news that’s fit to print”. Why is this news?

    Must be a slow news day at the NYT.

    Or the Gray Lady is going senile.

  97. El Dato says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    As long as the recent outbreak of newfound stupidity about voodoo hallowed ancestral aboriginal dreamstate lands on top of volcanoes doesn’t snowball and new observatories can be built, they can do whatever.

  98. El Dato says:

    Yep. I knew it. Someone thought about it before me.

  99. anon[154] • Disclaimer says:

    “To much of the world, the cartoon frog is a hate symbol.”

    Not really, no. Just goes to show you how out of touch these people are. The only people who really think a cartoon frog (or the okay hand gesture) are hate symbols are the employees of the Huffington Post, MSNBC, the Washington Post, and Rolling Stone magazine who spend most of their day perusing the Daily Stormer to get their daily dopamine rush of hate. And I’m not exaggerating, either. If you follow that website, you’ll notice a startling correlation between what is said there and what appears in those sources and many others: the Betsy Ross flag scandal*, the OKAY hand gesture**, the NPC meme, Pepe the Frog, lean to code, etc. I’ve seen many employees directly respond to its provocations on Twitter. Why are they reading that website?

    A salient example is when Rolling Stone a few weeks ago floated a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump, the most pro-Israel president in American history by miles, was signalling neo-Nazis by giving an OKAY hand gesture at a rally. Reality: he was mocking AOC who did the same thing weeks prior in a congressional hearing. But, of course, Rolling Stone didn’t know that because their employees assumed that since they read the Daily Stormer, then Donald Trump must also. Granted, the site is indeed pretty racist, parody or not, but what excuse do these “journalists” have for reading it and reporting its content as fact?

    *That was their website banner for a while. That’s why the story blew up after Kapernick’s comments.

    **MSNBC got a young white male fired from the Coast Guard for mocking them on live television with an OKAY hand gesture, demonstrating once again the dangers of media consolidation.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  100. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    Democracy is garbage, it’s even fake here, but it is objectively disturbing that Chinese cling to the kind of no-accountability no criticism culture that let Chernobyl happen. If they were smarter they would accept that the Han people can succeed across multiple governments, enabling the maximum possible range of innovation and prosperity, and that’s an evolutionarily good thing.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  101. J.Ross says:
    @Mr. Anon

    The video game most beloved in history without having been played has Bruce Lee averting the handover by killing every single mainlander, with mainlanders distinguishable because they spit everywhere.

  102. do these people realize that 1 million Pepes are posted every day on twitch.tv? and that it’s a core meme of video game culture?

  103. guest says:
    @Anonymous

    We had our chance to install a non-psychotic regime in China in the 1940s, and again when we were at war in the 50s. Why bother now?

  104. guest says:
    @El Dato

    “That’s Herr Doktor Freud to you! [snorts line of coke].”

  105. guest says:
    @Bill P

    Yes, the Ice People vs. Sun People thing. But honestly I don’t think we need them, and they produce their own “peril,” if you know what I mean.

    Asian culture among Western youth mostly boils down to food, some fashion, Manga, and anime. I am always surprised to find such a large portion of book stores devoted to that stuff, but they have pictures and people don’t read anymore. I have seen movies from Japan, Korea, China, etc., and to me they’re just foreign movies I either enjoy it don’t. Can’t imagine plunging in like it’s my source of oxygen.

    The one thing that really confuses me is straight guys using anime girls as avatars online. But whatever. I don’t wanna think about it.

  106. Peterike says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    “Toads are a social construct. They are all frogs when you are a boy.”

    I knew the differences by the time I was five. It’s really simple.

    Frogs: green, smooth, live by water
    Toads: brown, rough, live on land, pee on you when you pick them up.

    Wood Frogs: curious outliers.

    Nothing a five year old can’t grasp.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  107. @Jonathan Mason

    I can see why the Chinese would find the idea of parent fund raising for schools via parachute jumps very subversive and threatening to the state.

    You’re talking about the people who invented the “airplane” torture.

    “Flying”, also known as “Flying an Airplane”

  108. J.Ross says:
    @Anonymous

    We will be punished for not punishing the neocons.

    • Replies: @Alan Mercer
  109. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    In the British sitcom “Peep Show,” Jeremy becomes a Certified Life Coach.

  110. @Peterike

    Some of us were deprived of such early education. Toads must live in magic dirt.

  111. @J.Ross

    So CPC is Roko’s Basilisk.

  112. Jack D says:
    @J.Ross

    If they were smarter they would accept that the Han people can succeed across multiple governments

    I think that was the exact idea behind “one country/two systems”. I’m not sure that Americans could have shown that degree of flexibility – if we were offered Cuba (not that we would want it) with the proviso that they could keep their Communist system for 50 years, I doubt that we could do that deal because our democratic politics would not permit it – whichever party wanted the deal the other party would try to make hay out of it and make it impossible to do it. One of the reasons why Johnson couldn’t get us out of Vietnam is he kept worrying that the Republicans would accuse him of being “soft on Communism”.

    However, at the time they did the HK deal, the assumption was that there would be convergence because the Communists would move closer to democracy and rule of law. That doesn’t seem to be happening and in fact they are going in the other direction.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  113. AlexT says:
    @Jack D

    Wasn’t really up to King George. You are right though, the British should have taken that fight more seriously.

  114. @Kronos

    PiltdownChild1 used to enjoy watching, circa 2001, a predecessor show to Peppa Pig, The Big Knights. Both are by the talented Baker and Davies team. Very British, very sweet, and clever.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  115. Kronos says:
    @PiltdownMan

    I just don’t understand how THIS was possible. I don’t even know WHAT it is. In Middle School (mid-2000s) we ripped on it big time. I don’t know anything about the director but you gotta thing LSD in the English Countryside was involved.

  116. El Dato says:
    @anon

    MSNBC got a young white male fired from the Coast Guard for mocking them on live television with an OKAY hand gesture

    Wasn’t he just cleaning the back of the ear a few meters away in the background image?

    The worst thing is that there are curtain-twitchers scanning shitty MSNBC for possible signs of white supremacism and that the Coast Guard complies to fake pressure from Blue Stupid.

  117. J.Ross says:
    @Jack D

    Maybe that was the ostensible justification but it wasn’t the reason, the reason was “tell the roundeyes something pretty and then do whatever the hell we want with our own land.”

  118. MEH 0910 says:

  119. Yngvar says:

    The sad, green frog is widely viewed as toxic across the world

    Not true at all. Pepe is a symbol of friendship, compassion, hospitality and I-don’t-give-a-fuck all over the planet!

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