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The Heart of Europe's Problem with Islam
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A commenter on the Michel Houellebecq thread replies:

Jaakko Raipala says:
January 29, 2015 at 11:59 pm GMT • 500 Words

Replying to @Whiskey:
“There will be nothing but say, Pakistan writ large all over Europe. Fundamentally European men lack the will to fight and kill to keep what is theirs from about 1.5 billion Muslims who want it — and most European women will happily go along at least they get domination.”

It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense. If history has proven anything at all it has proven that European men certainly do not lack the will to fight and kill. That is why our states keep mainly cracking down on native men, they’re much more afraid of the European man than the Muslim and for a good reason. Unfortunately these things tend to turn into self-fulfilling prophecies and trying to ignore growing problems because you’re scared of the people offering solutions will often just give you a more radical solution in the end.

The root of the conflict is that European ethics restricts fighting and killing to the state monopoly of violence, Islamic ethics does not. If, say, a bunch of Englishmen had attacked Charlie Hebdo for mocking something important to Englishmen (it is a French satirical, after all), it would be expected for the Prime Minister and the Queen to show up on TV to condemn the atrocity and promise action against whichever faction pulled it off. Most Englishmen would be disgusted as Englishmen will never approve of shooting Frenchmen for some English cause outside the context of a European war with European cultural rules of engagement – but then, if such a war were to happen most Englishmen would be perfectly OK with shooting at Frenchmen for the sake of some English cause.

With Islam nothing works like this. No Muslim organization shows up to assume the responsibility for policing extremists. Islamic terrorists hide behind the fact that Islam isn’t organized in a European way of assigning responsibilities. Islam deliberately obfuscates the difference between combatant and civilian. This is all a perfect inverse match for a Europe that’s now phobic about assigning “collective responsibility” to minorities. We are in the uncomfortable situation that we see that a war is being waged and a lot of us would fight in it but the enemy doesn’t act like a European state power.

Our leaders are reluctant to even acknowledge the conflict because they don’t know what to do about it. If no one figures that out in time Western Europe will just fall into a similar situation as much of Eastern Europe with unclear national identities and loyalties and a lot of men who will just choose to fight, damn the consequences. It’s not the end of Europe but it’s the end of nice clear identities that much of Western Europe had finally figured out (only to demonize them because well-being makes people stupid and they start attacking the ideas that made them successful).

Westphalian nationalism was a solution to the Wars of Religion that depopulated some of the more fertile parts of northwestern Europe in 1618-1648.

In turn, excessive French popular nationalism was a problem in Europe from roughly the Revolutionary Era into the 20th Century. But intense French nationalism was already breaking down from about 1930 as the French came to reflect more honestly on the horrible cost they had paid to win the Great War. By May 1940, Europe’s problem was more a lack of French nationalism, which encouraged and enabled German predation.

Today, French nationalism is far less a problem for Europe (there are no disputes with Germany anymore over Alsace and Lorraine) than a solution for how to peaceably preserve Europe from demographic inundation from an Africa that the UN forecasts will have 4 billion people by the end of the century.

But we remain slaves to obsolete prejudices, even when returns on them have diminished to little.

 
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  1. The Heart of Europe’s Problem with Islam

    The heart of anyone’s problem with Islam is Big Mo. He’s kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    • Replies: @matt
    @Reg Cæsar

    The heart of anyone’s problem with Islam is Big Mo. He’s kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    Ah yes, those peaceful followers of Christ and Gautama.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Francis, @TBA, @Karl

  2. Also, if anything like Whiskey says came to pass and Europe’s military-industrial complex declined to the level of Pakistan, Europe would just be quickly taken over by Russia, which has the strongest military-industrial complex in Eurasia.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    "Also, if anything like Whiskey says came to pass and Europe’s military-industrial complex declined to the level of Pakistan, Europe would just be quickly taken over by Russia, which has the strongest military-industrial complex in Eurasia."

    That would of course mean that Orwell's vision of three superstates wll have come true. Europe and North Africa dominated by Russia and Islam (Eurasia), the U.S. and what's left of its allies (Oceania), and of course Eastasia under the thumb of the Chinese.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie

  3. matt says:

    Jaako Raipala writes:

    No Muslim organization shows up to assume the responsibility for policing extremists.

    It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense. There are “Muslim organizations” all over the world that devoted to “policing extremists.” You can find a list of them here. (Have you been following the news on Egypt or Syria?) But the cures tend to be worse than the disease, and if anything, they make the disease worse.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    @matt

    I dont live there and dont know enough to be sure, but the brutal secular dictatorships of Hussein and Assad look to me like a *much* better deal than the media-obsessed crazies of ISIS.

    , @Jaakko Raipala
    @matt

    "It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense. There are “Muslim organizations” all over the world that devoted to “policing extremists.” You can find a list of them here."

    I must have missed the news about the Arab League assuming any responsibility for failing to prevent a terrorist attack in Europe. In fact, what we saw from Islamic states with Charlie Hebdo was once again worse than a failure to conform to European expectations: what we saw was mostly another round of "these attackers are not true Muslims"... denial of any responsibility and refusal to enter dialogue about why the terrorists are Muslim.

    Again, if a group of expatriate Englishmen furious about the French mocking the Queen or whatever had stormed Charlie Hebdo, we would not expect England to respond with "we condemn the attack but these are not true Englishmen and we have no responsibilities here and our biggest worry is the rise of anglophobia as a result of this attack", we would expect them to respond with "something has gone wrong, we need to do our part to fix it and we need to discuss why any of us would do such a thing". To calm Europeans about Islam we'd need to see a lot more Muslims come out and say "yes, this is true Islam, these attackers are motivated by Islam, Islam clearly has a problem and Muslims need to take more responsibility for actions taken in the name of Islam".

    When Western European factions pull off terrorist attacks on other Western Europeans (which happens) we roughly agree on how to assign blame and responsibility to fix things. Remember, of course, that there are various levels of blame from actually detonating a bomb to providing the money for it to not turning in likely bomb-makers operating in your community to publishing propaganda encouraging attacks to passing an ethnic grudge to your kids... our organization of nation-states allows us to assign blame, guilt and responsibilities in a way largely agreed between different societies and that is good prevention as it makes it much harder for extremists to spark conflicts with terrorism since they know their own group is very likely to assign blame the same way as the other group.

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Jim

    , @rod1963
    @matt

    No you are confusing the police states of semi-secular ruling groups such as the Alawites in Syria and Al-Sisi's group in Egypt. They are forced to do this in order to keep the more traditional Muslims at bey and who would otherwise slaughter religious minorities if given the opportunity.

    This happened in Iraq when we gave control of the country to a bunch of Shia who then went off and killed or exiled every Christian, secularist or homosexual they could find.

    Traditional Islamic states like Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Turkey either export it(KSA funding Mosques and Salafist fundamentalist Imans), support it via funding(Qatar for ISIS) or provide material support(Turkey helping ISIS logistically with food and medical support for them) to help export it around the world.

    They also have zero tolerance for any open expression of any other religious faith or promoting atheism. It's a good way to get murdered or whipped and imprisoned.

    Beyond that, there is no real condemnation of Jihad against infidels by Muslims. Because that would go against the Koranic injunctions and make anyone who openly opposes Jihad and the imposition of Shariah law a heretic which is punishable by death.

  4. Africa that the UN forecasts will have 4 billion people by the end of the century.

    Contraceptives for Africa, anyone?

    They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @jo s'more


    They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.
     
    I like the way you're thinking, but for that program to be effective the sterilization would actually have to be a sterilization - it'd have to be permanent, not reversible. In that case I think you'd have an extreme uphill struggle trying to pass it off as humane. Not because I believe it isn't humane, but because it'd be an absolute cinch for leftists to tug on people's heartstrings with sob-stories of poor African village girls who took the money at 16 because they were starving and now they can never have families and how horrible* that is and it's all the fault of evil racists and so on.

    To counter that kind of outrage you'd have to offer a princely sum for the sterilization, but then virtually every woman would take up your offer and the accusation would become that you're trying to remove Africans from the earth. The way I see it, if you're going to spend that kind of cash you're better off putting it towards a more 'holistic' demographic management policy that targets a specific TFR (or TFR band - like an inflation band) and sets up an incentive structure (mostly financial, but not solely) to achieve this target and modifies the incentives as required by real world results (much as a central bank modifies interest rates).

    *Even though the same people whining hate families when it's whites having them.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ogunsiron

    , @Jim
    @jo s'more

    Reality will take care of the problem in the same way that it has dealt with similar problems for three and a half billion years.

    , @skep
    @jo s'more

    That's in the practice impossible to implement until you suppress polygamy and the social status of the woman on the one hand, and let genuine homogeneous ethnic state take the place of the actual post-colonization multi ethnic fake state, so usual for transnational groups and other west leading oligarchies.

  5. @Reg Cæsar

    The Heart of Europe's Problem with Islam
     
    The heart of anyone's problem with Islam is Big Mo. He's kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    Replies: @matt

    The heart of anyone’s problem with Islam is Big Mo. He’s kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    Ah yes, those peaceful followers of Christ and Gautama.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @matt

    Incidentally, the reason there are Muslims in Burma in the first place is because the British brought them in during their empire. The Muslims in Burma rape and abuse the Buddhist majority, and the British and the West support the Muslims in Burma against the Buddhist majority, just like they support Muslim minorities in Europe and elsewhere.

    Replies: @matt

    , @Francis
    @matt

    And this is a problem?

    , @TBA
    @matt

    He was expressively referring to the founders, such as they are described by their respective religion's teachings. Mo, that infallible example to emulate, was remarkably militant. And told his coreligionists to be as well.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @gzu

    , @Karl
    @matt

    >> Ah yes, those peaceful followers of [...] Gautama

    The Rakhine People are protecting their homeland from Arabic colonialism.

    It is their inalienable right to do so; and it is their inalienable right to define their own ethnos, as they see fit.

    The Rakhines are willing to fight to protect their homeland. They aren't interested in listening to lectures from western cowards who aren't.

  6. Recent Muslim world dictators such as gadaffi and assad were aggressive about policing fellow Muslims and stopping hebdo style attacks. Muslims living under white western rule are the ones not policed as aggressively

    • Replies: @matt
    @Massimo Heitor

    Assad isn't exactly recent. He still hangin' in there, or that's what the papers tell me. Also, I don't know if you've noticed, but he hasn't exactly been very successful in clamping down on extremist violence. Maybe that says something about the efficacy, or lack thereof, of brutal authoritarian violence?

    Replies: @Vendetta

  7. Russia is poo pooing German reunification.

    Mcaleck:
    well, it was in Sex and the City S3E04 and from the context it’s pretty clear: “Gay, bi, straight. This party was
    a poo-poo platter of sexual orientation.” I guess it’s a kind of mixed food platter or something, only I was hoping somebody can straighten it out.

    BarbaraPA:
    Actually, while I would never spell it “pooh-pooh” unless you were making a pun, I think you’re quite safe when combining it with the word “platter.”

  8. matt says:
    @Massimo Heitor
    Recent Muslim world dictators such as gadaffi and assad were aggressive about policing fellow Muslims and stopping hebdo style attacks. Muslims living under white western rule are the ones not policed as aggressively

    Replies: @matt

    Assad isn’t exactly recent. He still hangin’ in there, or that’s what the papers tell me. Also, I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but he hasn’t exactly been very successful in clamping down on extremist violence. Maybe that says something about the efficacy, or lack thereof, of brutal authoritarian violence?

    • Replies: @Vendetta
    @matt

    Read about Hafez the elder Assad and the way he dealt with Hama....Syria had no problems again with Islamists until the original Assad had passed on.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

  9. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @matt
    @Reg Cæsar

    The heart of anyone’s problem with Islam is Big Mo. He’s kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    Ah yes, those peaceful followers of Christ and Gautama.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Francis, @TBA, @Karl

    Incidentally, the reason there are Muslims in Burma in the first place is because the British brought them in during their empire. The Muslims in Burma rape and abuse the Buddhist majority, and the British and the West support the Muslims in Burma against the Buddhist majority, just like they support Muslim minorities in Europe and elsewhere.

    • Replies: @matt
    @Anonymous

    Incidentally, the reason there are Muslims in Burma in the first place is because the British brought them in during their empire…. the West support the Muslims in Burma against the Buddhist majority…

    Why do iSteve commenters always blame the White Man?

    Replies: @Niccolo Salo, @Bert

  10. I don’t take issue with Raako. I do observe a lack of young men to fight, a willingness to fight, weapons in the hands if young European men, and the support critically of young European women. Men won’t die for feminsts to call them rapists while excusing real Muslim ones.

    Most of the young men in European cities are Muslim, West of the Rhine. (Not so in Dresden, hence Pegida). Most of the young men in Africa, the ME, and Europe combined are Muslim.

    Like Oakland there is no there there for young European men to fight. Like Prester John it no longer exists. Where are the Euro tribes, martial traditions, the rewards for fighting? Abu Hamza al Masri states repeatedly the Koran encourages killing or enslaving the infidel, like a cow in the market his words. There is nothing in the West bc the state eradicated both tribes and power rivals, the Church, the Scouts, everything in one big Kulturkampf.

    Who will fight for Europe? Old men?

    France has what? Nukes and a few sprc ops? Highly trained but few in number.

    • Replies: @skep
    @Whiskey

    France has more and more angry young men against the arrogance of some Muslim young men, but as in England, the judiciary system is against them: the right of self-defense is most of the the time repealed if the defender is a native; however, you understate the ethnic opposition between north African and sub-Saharan immigration.

  11. Merely the inevitable degenerative effects of democratic republicanism. That form of government is wholly incapable of combating the seventh century totalitarian death cult.

  12. @Anonymous
    @matt

    Incidentally, the reason there are Muslims in Burma in the first place is because the British brought them in during their empire. The Muslims in Burma rape and abuse the Buddhist majority, and the British and the West support the Muslims in Burma against the Buddhist majority, just like they support Muslim minorities in Europe and elsewhere.

    Replies: @matt

    Incidentally, the reason there are Muslims in Burma in the first place is because the British brought them in during their empire…. the West support the Muslims in Burma against the Buddhist majority…

    Why do iSteve commenters always blame the White Man?

    • Replies: @Niccolo Salo
    @matt

    Pointing out the disasters of British history is what white men should be doing.

    Replies: @fnn

    , @Bert
    @matt

    He's right, though.

  13. @matt
    @Reg Cæsar

    The heart of anyone’s problem with Islam is Big Mo. He’s kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    Ah yes, those peaceful followers of Christ and Gautama.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Francis, @TBA, @Karl

    And this is a problem?

  14. @matt
    Jaako Raipala writes:

    No Muslim organization shows up to assume the responsibility for policing extremists.

    It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense. There are "Muslim organizations" all over the world that devoted to "policing extremists." You can find a list of them here. (Have you been following the news on Egypt or Syria?) But the cures tend to be worse than the disease, and if anything, they make the disease worse.

    Replies: @NOTA, @Jaakko Raipala, @rod1963

    I dont live there and dont know enough to be sure, but the brutal secular dictatorships of Hussein and Assad look to me like a *much* better deal than the media-obsessed crazies of ISIS.

  15. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:

    OT, but:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/with-shows-like-empire-black-ish-and-cristela-tv-is-more-diverse-than-ever/2015/01/29/0ac38f82-a576-11e4-a2b2-776095f393b2_story.html

    It’s funny. I seem to recall a show about an upper-middle-class black family. Now what happened to the lead actor? I am sure I will remember soon.

    Oh yeah. Bill Cosby. I wonder if they are any thing like that?

  16. @matt
    @Anonymous

    Incidentally, the reason there are Muslims in Burma in the first place is because the British brought them in during their empire…. the West support the Muslims in Burma against the Buddhist majority…

    Why do iSteve commenters always blame the White Man?

    Replies: @Niccolo Salo, @Bert

    Pointing out the disasters of British history is what white men should be doing.

    • Replies: @fnn
    @Niccolo Salo

    Like the early 20th Century British fixation on destroying Germany as a rival economic power. It had the side-effect of destroying Western Civilization.

    This guy puts together a summary of the evidence most of us have already seen:

    https://praiseoffolly.wordpress.com/an-introduction-to-the-origins-of-the-first-world-war/

  17. http://youtu.be/OE-VWDsdkwM?t=1m11s

    Interesting how the whore in Stagecoach was more conservatively dressed than most women today.

    Girls have become a bunch of hussies.

  18. @matt
    Jaako Raipala writes:

    No Muslim organization shows up to assume the responsibility for policing extremists.

    It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense. There are "Muslim organizations" all over the world that devoted to "policing extremists." You can find a list of them here. (Have you been following the news on Egypt or Syria?) But the cures tend to be worse than the disease, and if anything, they make the disease worse.

    Replies: @NOTA, @Jaakko Raipala, @rod1963

    “It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense. There are “Muslim organizations” all over the world that devoted to “policing extremists.” You can find a list of them here.”

    I must have missed the news about the Arab League assuming any responsibility for failing to prevent a terrorist attack in Europe. In fact, what we saw from Islamic states with Charlie Hebdo was once again worse than a failure to conform to European expectations: what we saw was mostly another round of “these attackers are not true Muslims”… denial of any responsibility and refusal to enter dialogue about why the terrorists are Muslim.

    Again, if a group of expatriate Englishmen furious about the French mocking the Queen or whatever had stormed Charlie Hebdo, we would not expect England to respond with “we condemn the attack but these are not true Englishmen and we have no responsibilities here and our biggest worry is the rise of anglophobia as a result of this attack”, we would expect them to respond with “something has gone wrong, we need to do our part to fix it and we need to discuss why any of us would do such a thing”. To calm Europeans about Islam we’d need to see a lot more Muslims come out and say “yes, this is true Islam, these attackers are motivated by Islam, Islam clearly has a problem and Muslims need to take more responsibility for actions taken in the name of Islam”.

    When Western European factions pull off terrorist attacks on other Western Europeans (which happens) we roughly agree on how to assign blame and responsibility to fix things. Remember, of course, that there are various levels of blame from actually detonating a bomb to providing the money for it to not turning in likely bomb-makers operating in your community to publishing propaganda encouraging attacks to passing an ethnic grudge to your kids… our organization of nation-states allows us to assign blame, guilt and responsibilities in a way largely agreed between different societies and that is good prevention as it makes it much harder for extremists to spark conflicts with terrorism since they know their own group is very likely to assign blame the same way as the other group.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Jaakko Raipala


    Again, if a group of expatriate Englishmen furious about the French mocking the Queen or whatever had stormed Charlie Hebdo, we would not expect England to respond with “we condemn the attack but these are not true Englishmen and we have no responsibilities here and our biggest worry is the rise of anglophobia as a result of this attack”,
     
    I think a better example is if a group of militant Catholics gunned down some New York media types for their "blasphemies" (I know, I know, that's all very antisemity of me) I'm pretty sure we'd see the pope rushing to condemn the attacks rather than expressing solemn concerns about a possible anti-Catholic backlash.

    Replies: @gzu

    , @Jim
    @Jaakko Raipala

    The Middle East and Africa are not compsoed of nation states. We have been pretending for a long time that nation states exist there but our pretenses have no effect on reality. The Congo Republic and Iraq are no more real than the former Yugoslavia or the present Ukraine.

    We should put aside our ideological fantasies and deal with the world as it is. But I doubt that we will do that. We will follow our delusions to disaster.

  19. @matt
    @Reg Cæsar

    The heart of anyone’s problem with Islam is Big Mo. He’s kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    Ah yes, those peaceful followers of Christ and Gautama.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Francis, @TBA, @Karl

    He was expressively referring to the founders, such as they are described by their respective religion’s teachings. Mo, that infallible example to emulate, was remarkably militant. And told his coreligionists to be as well.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @TBA


    He was expressively referring to the founders, such as they are described by their respective religion’s teachings.
     
    Violence is a universal phenomenon in our fallen race. It does make a difference, however, whether we view it as a sin or as a sacrament.
    , @gzu
    @TBA

    Do you know, WHY he was militant?

    Replies: @William Badwhite

  20. US strategy: “In 2008, the FBI had a roster of 15,000 paid informants, a tenfold increase since 1975 when the number was 1,500. Some informants receive as much as $100,000 per case. Over the last decade, the FBI has on multiple occasions used these informants to manipulate Muslims into participating in staged terrorist plots that play well on the evening news and justify federal counter-terrorism budgets.” http://www.thenation.com/article/182096/how-one-man-refused-spy-fellow-muslims-fbi-and-then-lost-everything#

    That seems like the Boston informer strategy and all they got for their money was Whitey Bulger and bad cases. False flags might just turn out to be staged plots gone wrong.

    • Replies: @Ex Submarine Officer
    @rustbeltreader


    False flags might just turn out to be staged plots gone wrong.
     
    Exactly in accordance with Hanlon's Law - never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

    Two things that are pretty obvious about government bureaucracy:

    1) They learn by experience/pain avoidance - non-routine challenges, well they often screw them up until they can develop a manual/SOP. And almost by definition, each sting operation is going to have unique factors in the scenario. So a lot of them are going to go wrong.

    They can go wrong lots of ways, and probably the most common failure mode is just fizzling out on the launch pad, the marks don't get seduced or become wary, etc. But once in a while, a credible failure mode is losing control of the sequence, not enough oversight, the marks get rash/show initiative and get out in front of their handlers, some blunder or another, and the sting scenario proceeds further than anticipated.

    You do enough of these things, eventually the tumblers will line up on one of them in a way that allows such an outcome.

    2) Governments are extremely loathe to admit mistakes and are utterly opaque when they put their minds to it, as they also control the means of forcing transparency in societies (courts, bureaucracies, etc). So yeah, sting operation goes too far? I hardly see some FBI middle manager stepping up to the plate to say, yeah, me and my boys let that one get out of hand....

    Add to that a collusive, corporate media and, well, has anyone read Sydney Schanberg's piece about Vietnam POW/MIA's? I read it a while back and recently found it is archived on unz.com. He makes a pretty convincing case, but nobody would touch the story. And it is a story of government engaging in some lesser naughtiness/incompetence/sneakiness, still fairly serious, but not at all with a guiding plan whose outcome was, if Schanberg is correct, leaving American POWs behind to eventually die in SE Asia. Again, I found it credible, more a story of government indifference/incompetence/expediency with a post event coverup rather than an evilly directed plot from the beginning, as has been claimed by various Vietnam POW/MIA activists.

    People search for order and directedness in a universe that is mostly random. A lot of things are driven by this, from religion to belief in the eternal Jewish conspiracy. Even in the cases where the explanation is seemingly hostile to their interests (those wily darn Joos again, which, having to wade through all that all the time is one of the more tedious aspects of reading iSteve comments), I guess having an enemy to focus upon makes one feel empowered and less of a bit of insignificant flotsam in an indifferent universe.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @jack, @Art Deco

    , @countenance
    @rustbeltreader

    Hmm, The Nation magazine. Left wing. Let me guess -- This magazine believes that every "right wing white supremacist neo Nazi" plot is actually emblematic of a vast right wing conspiracy. Meanwhile, Muslims never do anything wrong, just false flags and FBI stings gone wrong all the way.

    That article does not much impress me.

  21. @matt
    Jaako Raipala writes:

    No Muslim organization shows up to assume the responsibility for policing extremists.

    It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense. There are "Muslim organizations" all over the world that devoted to "policing extremists." You can find a list of them here. (Have you been following the news on Egypt or Syria?) But the cures tend to be worse than the disease, and if anything, they make the disease worse.

    Replies: @NOTA, @Jaakko Raipala, @rod1963

    No you are confusing the police states of semi-secular ruling groups such as the Alawites in Syria and Al-Sisi’s group in Egypt. They are forced to do this in order to keep the more traditional Muslims at bey and who would otherwise slaughter religious minorities if given the opportunity.

    This happened in Iraq when we gave control of the country to a bunch of Shia who then went off and killed or exiled every Christian, secularist or homosexual they could find.

    Traditional Islamic states like Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Turkey either export it(KSA funding Mosques and Salafist fundamentalist Imans), support it via funding(Qatar for ISIS) or provide material support(Turkey helping ISIS logistically with food and medical support for them) to help export it around the world.

    They also have zero tolerance for any open expression of any other religious faith or promoting atheism. It’s a good way to get murdered or whipped and imprisoned.

    Beyond that, there is no real condemnation of Jihad against infidels by Muslims. Because that would go against the Koranic injunctions and make anyone who openly opposes Jihad and the imposition of Shariah law a heretic which is punishable by death.

  22. In turn, excessive French popular nationalism was a problem in Europe from roughly the Revolutionary Era into the 20th Century.

    I hate to kick a man when he’s down, but I think that description fits Germans far better than it fits Frenchmen.

    • Replies: @Drogger
    @silviosilver

    Excessive French nationalism brought the peace of Versailles... which humiliated Germany... which gave rise to Hitler...

    Austro-Prussia was a Brother's War of limited importance outside central Europe.

    Germany's (Bismarck's) only big 'bully move' was provoking the Franco-Prussian war. Which Nap 3 was more than happy to oblige (again, excessive French nationalism).

    Germany was big and scary, sure, but played by the rules Russia and the British Empire were enforcing.

    Replies: @Dutch Boy

    , @skep
    @silviosilver

    That's right; above all, the "french popular nationalism" leading to waging war with german countries and Austria was an excuse for hiding the global collapse of the economy and the new "enlightened" society by the french revolutionnary leaders from 1792 until the rule of Napoleon. The wild economic and fiscal deregulation triggered the collapse. The conscription in 1792 triggered revolts in many french provinces, and mainly in Britain and Vendée, where took place an authentic "populicide" (around 120 000 people exterminated with well planned and Convention-approved organization).
    Between the end of the first empire and the 1870 war, where was the nationalism? The republicans in 1870 wanted the war against Prussia to take over Napoleon III, and lost the Lorraine with a nonsensical ongoing war with a tiny army after Sedan. That collapse led to the building of the imperialist German Empire according to Bismark's plans.
    "French popular nationalism" came back thus with the third republic through the brain-washing of the secular republican mandatory school. "French popular nationalism" is every time the fact of the french republican oligarchies. Remember the fact that in 1789, on 600 representants of the Tiers-État, there were just 2 peasants whereas peasantry represented 90 % of the inhabitants of the Kingdom.

  23. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Also, if anything like Whiskey says came to pass and Europe's military-industrial complex declined to the level of Pakistan, Europe would just be quickly taken over by Russia, which has the strongest military-industrial complex in Eurasia.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    “Also, if anything like Whiskey says came to pass and Europe’s military-industrial complex declined to the level of Pakistan, Europe would just be quickly taken over by Russia, which has the strongest military-industrial complex in Eurasia.”

    That would of course mean that Orwell’s vision of three superstates wll have come true. Europe and North Africa dominated by Russia and Islam (Eurasia), the U.S. and what’s left of its allies (Oceania), and of course Eastasia under the thumb of the Chinese.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    In Orwell's vision, Eurasia included Europe but not the Middle East except for Turkey I think. Most of the Middle East was part of the disputed area.

    Replies: @BurplesonAFB

    , @Twinkie
    @Anonymous


    That would of course mean that Orwell’s vision of three superstates wll have come true. Europe and North Africa dominated by Russia and Islam (Eurasia), the U.S. and what’s left of its allies (Oceania), and of course Eastasia under the thumb of the Chinese.
     
    Well, at least we'll have the minor satisfaction of Russians and the Muslims duking it out somewhere else.

    What will the next Sino-Japanese war look like? Will it, again, be fought on the Korean Peninsula (for land battles)?
  24. @Jaakko Raipala
    @matt

    "It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense. There are “Muslim organizations” all over the world that devoted to “policing extremists.” You can find a list of them here."

    I must have missed the news about the Arab League assuming any responsibility for failing to prevent a terrorist attack in Europe. In fact, what we saw from Islamic states with Charlie Hebdo was once again worse than a failure to conform to European expectations: what we saw was mostly another round of "these attackers are not true Muslims"... denial of any responsibility and refusal to enter dialogue about why the terrorists are Muslim.

    Again, if a group of expatriate Englishmen furious about the French mocking the Queen or whatever had stormed Charlie Hebdo, we would not expect England to respond with "we condemn the attack but these are not true Englishmen and we have no responsibilities here and our biggest worry is the rise of anglophobia as a result of this attack", we would expect them to respond with "something has gone wrong, we need to do our part to fix it and we need to discuss why any of us would do such a thing". To calm Europeans about Islam we'd need to see a lot more Muslims come out and say "yes, this is true Islam, these attackers are motivated by Islam, Islam clearly has a problem and Muslims need to take more responsibility for actions taken in the name of Islam".

    When Western European factions pull off terrorist attacks on other Western Europeans (which happens) we roughly agree on how to assign blame and responsibility to fix things. Remember, of course, that there are various levels of blame from actually detonating a bomb to providing the money for it to not turning in likely bomb-makers operating in your community to publishing propaganda encouraging attacks to passing an ethnic grudge to your kids... our organization of nation-states allows us to assign blame, guilt and responsibilities in a way largely agreed between different societies and that is good prevention as it makes it much harder for extremists to spark conflicts with terrorism since they know their own group is very likely to assign blame the same way as the other group.

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Jim

    Again, if a group of expatriate Englishmen furious about the French mocking the Queen or whatever had stormed Charlie Hebdo, we would not expect England to respond with “we condemn the attack but these are not true Englishmen and we have no responsibilities here and our biggest worry is the rise of anglophobia as a result of this attack”,

    I think a better example is if a group of militant Catholics gunned down some New York media types for their “blasphemies” (I know, I know, that’s all very antisemity of me) I’m pretty sure we’d see the pope rushing to condemn the attacks rather than expressing solemn concerns about a possible anti-Catholic backlash.

    • Replies: @gzu
    @silviosilver

    You're full of shit. It wasn't muslims that complaned about a possible backlash, it was western imbeciles.

    And muslims DID denounce these attacks. You just choose to ignore it.

    Replies: @Gato de la Biblioteca

  25. @jo s'more

    Africa that the UN forecasts will have 4 billion people by the end of the century.
     
    Contraceptives for Africa, anyone?

    They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Jim, @skep

    They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.

    I like the way you’re thinking, but for that program to be effective the sterilization would actually have to be a sterilization – it’d have to be permanent, not reversible. In that case I think you’d have an extreme uphill struggle trying to pass it off as humane. Not because I believe it isn’t humane, but because it’d be an absolute cinch for leftists to tug on people’s heartstrings with sob-stories of poor African village girls who took the money at 16 because they were starving and now they can never have families and how horrible* that is and it’s all the fault of evil racists and so on.

    To counter that kind of outrage you’d have to offer a princely sum for the sterilization, but then virtually every woman would take up your offer and the accusation would become that you’re trying to remove Africans from the earth. The way I see it, if you’re going to spend that kind of cash you’re better off putting it towards a more ‘holistic’ demographic management policy that targets a specific TFR (or TFR band – like an inflation band) and sets up an incentive structure (mostly financial, but not solely) to achieve this target and modifies the incentives as required by real world results (much as a central bank modifies interest rates).

    *Even though the same people whining hate families when it’s whites having them.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @silviosilver

    When the great sterilization comes it will be secret, stealthy, and permanent. Probably transmitted by a genetically engineered vector. By the time people realize it has happened it will be too late. I expect a great billionaire benefactor will develop the technology, probably for some universally acclaimed goal like sterilizing feral cats via water or something ... And then it will be unleashed on people.

    , @ogunsiron
    @silviosilver

    They don't mind too much if it's a white gay/transqueer couple/trio/bundle that's having/purchasing the kids.

  26. @silviosilver

    In turn, excessive French popular nationalism was a problem in Europe from roughly the Revolutionary Era into the 20th Century.
     
    I hate to kick a man when he's down, but I think that description fits Germans far better than it fits Frenchmen.

    Replies: @Drogger, @skep

    Excessive French nationalism brought the peace of Versailles… which humiliated Germany… which gave rise to Hitler…

    Austro-Prussia was a Brother’s War of limited importance outside central Europe.

    Germany’s (Bismarck’s) only big ‘bully move’ was provoking the Franco-Prussian war. Which Nap 3 was more than happy to oblige (again, excessive French nationalism).

    Germany was big and scary, sure, but played by the rules Russia and the British Empire were enforcing.

    • Replies: @Dutch Boy
    @Drogger

    In 1940, it was the French and British who declared war on Germany when Hitler's plans were to move east, not west.

  27. @rustbeltreader
    US strategy: "In 2008, the FBI had a roster of 15,000 paid informants, a tenfold increase since 1975 when the number was 1,500. Some informants receive as much as $100,000 per case. Over the last decade, the FBI has on multiple occasions used these informants to manipulate Muslims into participating in staged terrorist plots that play well on the evening news and justify federal counter-terrorism budgets." http://www.thenation.com/article/182096/how-one-man-refused-spy-fellow-muslims-fbi-and-then-lost-everything#

    That seems like the Boston informer strategy and all they got for their money was Whitey Bulger and bad cases. False flags might just turn out to be staged plots gone wrong.

    Replies: @Ex Submarine Officer, @countenance

    False flags might just turn out to be staged plots gone wrong.

    Exactly in accordance with Hanlon’s Law – never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

    Two things that are pretty obvious about government bureaucracy:

    1) They learn by experience/pain avoidance – non-routine challenges, well they often screw them up until they can develop a manual/SOP. And almost by definition, each sting operation is going to have unique factors in the scenario. So a lot of them are going to go wrong.

    They can go wrong lots of ways, and probably the most common failure mode is just fizzling out on the launch pad, the marks don’t get seduced or become wary, etc. But once in a while, a credible failure mode is losing control of the sequence, not enough oversight, the marks get rash/show initiative and get out in front of their handlers, some blunder or another, and the sting scenario proceeds further than anticipated.

    You do enough of these things, eventually the tumblers will line up on one of them in a way that allows such an outcome.

    2) Governments are extremely loathe to admit mistakes and are utterly opaque when they put their minds to it, as they also control the means of forcing transparency in societies (courts, bureaucracies, etc). So yeah, sting operation goes too far? I hardly see some FBI middle manager stepping up to the plate to say, yeah, me and my boys let that one get out of hand….

    Add to that a collusive, corporate media and, well, has anyone read Sydney Schanberg’s piece about Vietnam POW/MIA’s? I read it a while back and recently found it is archived on unz.com. He makes a pretty convincing case, but nobody would touch the story. And it is a story of government engaging in some lesser naughtiness/incompetence/sneakiness, still fairly serious, but not at all with a guiding plan whose outcome was, if Schanberg is correct, leaving American POWs behind to eventually die in SE Asia. Again, I found it credible, more a story of government indifference/incompetence/expediency with a post event coverup rather than an evilly directed plot from the beginning, as has been claimed by various Vietnam POW/MIA activists.

    People search for order and directedness in a universe that is mostly random. A lot of things are driven by this, from religion to belief in the eternal Jewish conspiracy. Even in the cases where the explanation is seemingly hostile to their interests (those wily darn Joos again, which, having to wade through all that all the time is one of the more tedious aspects of reading iSteve comments), I guess having an enemy to focus upon makes one feel empowered and less of a bit of insignificant flotsam in an indifferent universe.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Ex Submarine Officer


    Exactly in accordance with Hanlon’s Law – never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.
     
    Yes, indeed.

    The pattern with government bureaucracies is usually this: incompetence first, cover-up second.

    Generally, when bureaucracies mess things up, it is out of sheer incompetence, not some grand conspiracy by a nefarious cabal. And then the conspiracy of sorts starts when the involved parties try to cover up the screw-up. But that conspiracy of the cover up, rather than the product of a group of "evil geniuses," is usually a group effort by fools joined together by a common desire to preserve themselves.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    , @jack
    @Ex Submarine Officer

    So what's it like in the Israeli Navy? Sunk any Palestinian kayaks, er battleships?

    Replies: @Father O'Hara

    , @Art Deco
    @Ex Submarine Officer

    has anyone read Sydney Schanberg’s piece about Vietnam POW/MIA’s? I read it a while back and recently found it is archived on unz.com. He makes a pretty convincing case, but nobody would touch the story.
    --
    You'd be relying a great deal on the veracity of someone whose job has been 'investigative journalist' and whose signature judgment was obsessive blaming of the Cambodian catastrophe on Henry Kissinger. Suggest maybe 'no one' will 'touch the story' because his peers know him. In any case, caveat lector.

  28. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    "Also, if anything like Whiskey says came to pass and Europe’s military-industrial complex declined to the level of Pakistan, Europe would just be quickly taken over by Russia, which has the strongest military-industrial complex in Eurasia."

    That would of course mean that Orwell's vision of three superstates wll have come true. Europe and North Africa dominated by Russia and Islam (Eurasia), the U.S. and what's left of its allies (Oceania), and of course Eastasia under the thumb of the Chinese.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie

    In Orwell’s vision, Eurasia included Europe but not the Middle East except for Turkey I think. Most of the Middle East was part of the disputed area.

    • Replies: @BurplesonAFB
    @Anonymous

    Well I guess it's a good thing the Middle East is generally peaceful today, or we'd have to conclude that Orwell was right

  29. Jaako Raipala writes:

    “No Muslim organization shows up to assume the responsibility for policing extremists.”

    This is part of what the late Lawrence Auster noted about Western elites and Media. They do no ascribe any sense of moral agency to people and governments in the third world. They are allowed to attack and invade Western countries, and if we complain, then we are considered “evil”.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Name Withheld


    This is part of what the late Lawrence Auster noted about Western elites and Media. They do no ascribe any sense of moral agency to people and governments in the third world.

     

    This was one of the many insights Auster did such a service in laying bare.

    It's pride that drives the Western elite's seeming-veneration of the Other. We are so powerful that only we can be responsible for the sins of the world; we are so magnanimous that we can forgive those sins; we are so generous that we can, and shall, provide for all others' needs . . . .

    This arrogance demeans and enrages the Other by implying he's much less than human, and need not be taken seriously, no matter what he says -- or does.

    Viewed in this light, many 'senseless' events are perfectly, if horribly, intelligible.

    Replies: @Simon in London

  30. … They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.

    When will this policy be applied in “urban” Atlanta, Memphis, St. Louis, and similar cities?

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @David Davenport


    When will this policy be applied in “urban” Atlanta, Memphis, St. Louis, and similar cities?
     
    Maybe 25 years ago, I heard rumors that, in at least one part of the South, doctors who delivered a second baby to a welfare mama would routinely tie her tubes.
  31. Sometimes I wake up, read the news, and think I am in some bizarre, strange, and terrible nightmare.

    While we can debate over what kind of immigrants “work” or not, or what level of immigration is ideal, it defies the most basic forms of logic and self-preservation that Western nations are allowing large numbers of immigrants from those countries and societies that are *overtly hostile.*

    I used to think (and still largely accept the notion) that much of the diversity mantra in the West was largely posturing for pseudo-civil virtue points. But I am beginning to think that, due to self-indoctrination, a lot of Westerners are actually beginning to believe in the posturing and are elevating the idea of diversity-as-the-ultimate-good as Gospel.

    • Replies: @Hacienda
    @Twinkie

    You need to get out to California. It's not the nightmare brown invasion you imagine.

  32. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    "Also, if anything like Whiskey says came to pass and Europe’s military-industrial complex declined to the level of Pakistan, Europe would just be quickly taken over by Russia, which has the strongest military-industrial complex in Eurasia."

    That would of course mean that Orwell's vision of three superstates wll have come true. Europe and North Africa dominated by Russia and Islam (Eurasia), the U.S. and what's left of its allies (Oceania), and of course Eastasia under the thumb of the Chinese.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Twinkie

    That would of course mean that Orwell’s vision of three superstates wll have come true. Europe and North Africa dominated by Russia and Islam (Eurasia), the U.S. and what’s left of its allies (Oceania), and of course Eastasia under the thumb of the Chinese.

    Well, at least we’ll have the minor satisfaction of Russians and the Muslims duking it out somewhere else.

    What will the next Sino-Japanese war look like? Will it, again, be fought on the Korean Peninsula (for land battles)?

  33. Why the fixation on Islam? The UK is over run with many different groups these days. When the commentator Emma West went on her tram rant the only group she mentioned by name was Polish. The only thing special about Muslims is until Ukraine, it was only Muslim countries that were targeted for destruction.

    Remembering things past, Sacco and Vanzetti, the Anarchists bombing of JP Morgan Bank, and others. Then in the 60s you had various communist groups. You also had Blacks like the Black Panthers, but it turns out that the actual Black Panthers were really not as revolutionary as the white establishment imagined, but they were systematically assassinated anyway.

    So the current situation with very mild violence within Europe by Muslims is not new to Europe.

    FWIW, E Michael Jones has a theory that ,historically, resurgences of Islam are due to the Christian West’s lack of control of usury.

    • Replies: @iSteveFan
    @george


    The only thing special about Muslims is until Ukraine, it was only Muslim countries that were targeted for destruction.
     
    What about Serbia?
  34. One good thing about having a lot of commenters is that your mandatory Finnish content comes to you without you having to go out and look for it.

    In my view Finnish content should not be defined narrowly as material about Finland and the Finns. Finnish content can also consist of anything that is being discussed by a Finn, as is the case here.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jeff W.

    Perkele!!

  35. @matt
    @Anonymous

    Incidentally, the reason there are Muslims in Burma in the first place is because the British brought them in during their empire…. the West support the Muslims in Burma against the Buddhist majority…

    Why do iSteve commenters always blame the White Man?

    Replies: @Niccolo Salo, @Bert

    He’s right, though.

  36. @matt
    @Massimo Heitor

    Assad isn't exactly recent. He still hangin' in there, or that's what the papers tell me. Also, I don't know if you've noticed, but he hasn't exactly been very successful in clamping down on extremist violence. Maybe that says something about the efficacy, or lack thereof, of brutal authoritarian violence?

    Replies: @Vendetta

    Read about Hafez the elder Assad and the way he dealt with Hama….Syria had no problems again with Islamists until the original Assad had passed on.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Vendetta


    Read about Hafez the elder Assad…

     

    Had anyone ever seen Hafez Assad and John Cleese in the same venue at the same time?
  37. @Name Withheld
    Jaako Raipala writes:

    "No Muslim organization shows up to assume the responsibility for policing extremists."

    This is part of what the late Lawrence Auster noted about Western elites and Media. They do no ascribe any sense of moral agency to people and governments in the third world. They are allowed to attack and invade Western countries, and if we complain, then we are considered "evil".

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    This is part of what the late Lawrence Auster noted about Western elites and Media. They do no ascribe any sense of moral agency to people and governments in the third world.

    This was one of the many insights Auster did such a service in laying bare.

    It’s pride that drives the Western elite’s seeming-veneration of the Other. We are so powerful that only we can be responsible for the sins of the world; we are so magnanimous that we can forgive those sins; we are so generous that we can, and shall, provide for all others’ needs . . . .

    This arrogance demeans and enrages the Other by implying he’s much less than human, and need not be taken seriously, no matter what he says — or does.

    Viewed in this light, many ‘senseless’ events are perfectly, if horribly, intelligible.

    • Replies: @Simon in London
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    "This arrogance demeans and enrages the Other by implying he’s much less than human, and need not be taken seriously, no matter what he says — or does."

    Yes, I think this is right. Most of the populations of non-Western countries don't feel this way, but the partially-Westernised ruling elites often do. More importantly the non-Westerners' children growing up in Western societies very much feel this; support for Al Qaeda is much more anti-SWPL than anti-Christian.

  38. @TBA
    @matt

    He was expressively referring to the founders, such as they are described by their respective religion's teachings. Mo, that infallible example to emulate, was remarkably militant. And told his coreligionists to be as well.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @gzu

    He was expressively referring to the founders, such as they are described by their respective religion’s teachings.

    Violence is a universal phenomenon in our fallen race. It does make a difference, however, whether we view it as a sin or as a sacrament.

  39. @Vendetta
    @matt

    Read about Hafez the elder Assad and the way he dealt with Hama....Syria had no problems again with Islamists until the original Assad had passed on.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Read about Hafez the elder Assad…

    Had anyone ever seen Hafez Assad and John Cleese in the same venue at the same time?

  40. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The US doesn’t like secular, nationalist Arab leaders and has done what it can to overthrow them. Hussein, Assad and Khaddafi are some examples. On the other hand the US has supported Muslim jihadis in places like Afghanistan and Syria, arming and training them. It seemed to be in favor of Muslim Brotherhood leader Morsi of Egypt. ISIS members are getting funding and weapons from our close friends and collaborators the oil sheiks; combatants are supposedly going back and forth over the Turkish border for rest and medical care in a NATO country.
    Bush declared Islam to be a “religion of peace” in the wake of 9-11 and Obama has claimed that ISIS really wasn’t truly Muslim in it’s behavior. An American president is going to tell a group calling itself the “Islamic Caliphate” that they aren’t really Islamic. Bush, Obama and other western leaders apparently must fancy themselves to be Islamic scholars since they lecture their western audiences as well as Muslims as to what Islam ‘really is’. What we have is a failure of leadership on the part of the political class who have become harmful to their own countries.

    • Replies: @Hersh
    @anonymous

    Re Bush and other politicians calling Islam a "religion of peace." --- That's done to salve their own consciences for inflicting violence on Muslims, surely. And they know that calling Islam a religion of peace will provoke some percentage of Americans to say nasty things about Islam and Muslims and then those people can be called the "haters" and not themselves.

  41. @Jeff W.
    One good thing about having a lot of commenters is that your mandatory Finnish content comes to you without you having to go out and look for it.

    In my view Finnish content should not be defined narrowly as material about Finland and the Finns. Finnish content can also consist of anything that is being discussed by a Finn, as is the case here.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Perkele!!

  42. @george
    Why the fixation on Islam? The UK is over run with many different groups these days. When the commentator Emma West went on her tram rant the only group she mentioned by name was Polish. The only thing special about Muslims is until Ukraine, it was only Muslim countries that were targeted for destruction.

    Remembering things past, Sacco and Vanzetti, the Anarchists bombing of JP Morgan Bank, and others. Then in the 60s you had various communist groups. You also had Blacks like the Black Panthers, but it turns out that the actual Black Panthers were really not as revolutionary as the white establishment imagined, but they were systematically assassinated anyway.

    So the current situation with very mild violence within Europe by Muslims is not new to Europe.

    FWIW, E Michael Jones has a theory that ,historically, resurgences of Islam are due to the Christian West's lack of control of usury.

    Replies: @iSteveFan

    The only thing special about Muslims is until Ukraine, it was only Muslim countries that were targeted for destruction.

    What about Serbia?

  43. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @silviosilver
    @jo s'more


    They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.
     
    I like the way you're thinking, but for that program to be effective the sterilization would actually have to be a sterilization - it'd have to be permanent, not reversible. In that case I think you'd have an extreme uphill struggle trying to pass it off as humane. Not because I believe it isn't humane, but because it'd be an absolute cinch for leftists to tug on people's heartstrings with sob-stories of poor African village girls who took the money at 16 because they were starving and now they can never have families and how horrible* that is and it's all the fault of evil racists and so on.

    To counter that kind of outrage you'd have to offer a princely sum for the sterilization, but then virtually every woman would take up your offer and the accusation would become that you're trying to remove Africans from the earth. The way I see it, if you're going to spend that kind of cash you're better off putting it towards a more 'holistic' demographic management policy that targets a specific TFR (or TFR band - like an inflation band) and sets up an incentive structure (mostly financial, but not solely) to achieve this target and modifies the incentives as required by real world results (much as a central bank modifies interest rates).

    *Even though the same people whining hate families when it's whites having them.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ogunsiron

    When the great sterilization comes it will be secret, stealthy, and permanent. Probably transmitted by a genetically engineered vector. By the time people realize it has happened it will be too late. I expect a great billionaire benefactor will develop the technology, probably for some universally acclaimed goal like sterilizing feral cats via water or something … And then it will be unleashed on people.

  44. FOUR billion Africans
    T
    H
    I
    N
    K
    about it!!!

    Nothing bigger than a grass hut was ever built south of the Sahara

    • Replies: @anon
    @athEIst

    The sort of people who'd do it to Africans would do it to you too.

    , @skep
    @athEIst

    Please, get learned about the Great Tombouctou and the sahelian empires from 11th century till 17 th.
    What about Rwanda or Burundi in the the early 14 th? The Great Zimbabwe? They sure have a lower IQ than Europeans or Asians but they are not inferiors nor wild animals. Different doesn't mean different: don't compare carrots and potatoes.

  45. A little bit OT . When I lived in Tulsa in the 70’s I knew this Pakistani kid who had overstayed his student visa and so was here illegally. His English was without a trace of an accent and he was working and getting along fine. He was picked up by immigration at some point and right away realized they assumed he was a Mexican . So he kept his mouth shut and they deported him to Mexico which as he said was a helluva lot easier to get back from than Pakistan.

  46. @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    In Orwell's vision, Eurasia included Europe but not the Middle East except for Turkey I think. Most of the Middle East was part of the disputed area.

    Replies: @BurplesonAFB

    Well I guess it’s a good thing the Middle East is generally peaceful today, or we’d have to conclude that Orwell was right

  47. @silviosilver
    @jo s'more


    They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.
     
    I like the way you're thinking, but for that program to be effective the sterilization would actually have to be a sterilization - it'd have to be permanent, not reversible. In that case I think you'd have an extreme uphill struggle trying to pass it off as humane. Not because I believe it isn't humane, but because it'd be an absolute cinch for leftists to tug on people's heartstrings with sob-stories of poor African village girls who took the money at 16 because they were starving and now they can never have families and how horrible* that is and it's all the fault of evil racists and so on.

    To counter that kind of outrage you'd have to offer a princely sum for the sterilization, but then virtually every woman would take up your offer and the accusation would become that you're trying to remove Africans from the earth. The way I see it, if you're going to spend that kind of cash you're better off putting it towards a more 'holistic' demographic management policy that targets a specific TFR (or TFR band - like an inflation band) and sets up an incentive structure (mostly financial, but not solely) to achieve this target and modifies the incentives as required by real world results (much as a central bank modifies interest rates).

    *Even though the same people whining hate families when it's whites having them.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @ogunsiron

    They don’t mind too much if it’s a white gay/transqueer couple/trio/bundle that’s having/purchasing the kids.

  48. @rustbeltreader
    US strategy: "In 2008, the FBI had a roster of 15,000 paid informants, a tenfold increase since 1975 when the number was 1,500. Some informants receive as much as $100,000 per case. Over the last decade, the FBI has on multiple occasions used these informants to manipulate Muslims into participating in staged terrorist plots that play well on the evening news and justify federal counter-terrorism budgets." http://www.thenation.com/article/182096/how-one-man-refused-spy-fellow-muslims-fbi-and-then-lost-everything#

    That seems like the Boston informer strategy and all they got for their money was Whitey Bulger and bad cases. False flags might just turn out to be staged plots gone wrong.

    Replies: @Ex Submarine Officer, @countenance

    Hmm, The Nation magazine. Left wing. Let me guess — This magazine believes that every “right wing white supremacist neo Nazi” plot is actually emblematic of a vast right wing conspiracy. Meanwhile, Muslims never do anything wrong, just false flags and FBI stings gone wrong all the way.

    That article does not much impress me.

  49. Seriously, dude? Nothing bigger than a mud hut?

    • Replies: @Hacienda
    @Earl Lemongrab

    Put some neon signs on that thing, outline in red and you got yourself a pretty good love hotel.

    , @David
    @Earl Lemongrab

    That ugly building wasn't built by Sub-Saharan Africans.

    , @athEIst
    @Earl Lemongrab

    Seriously, dude? Nothing bigger than a mud hut?

    Seriously , dude, what does 12N as a latitude mean to you?

  50. @silviosilver
    @Jaakko Raipala


    Again, if a group of expatriate Englishmen furious about the French mocking the Queen or whatever had stormed Charlie Hebdo, we would not expect England to respond with “we condemn the attack but these are not true Englishmen and we have no responsibilities here and our biggest worry is the rise of anglophobia as a result of this attack”,
     
    I think a better example is if a group of militant Catholics gunned down some New York media types for their "blasphemies" (I know, I know, that's all very antisemity of me) I'm pretty sure we'd see the pope rushing to condemn the attacks rather than expressing solemn concerns about a possible anti-Catholic backlash.

    Replies: @gzu

    You’re full of shit. It wasn’t muslims that complaned about a possible backlash, it was western imbeciles.

    And muslims DID denounce these attacks. You just choose to ignore it.

    • Replies: @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @gzu

    Some Muslims denounced the attacks. Others seem to want more of them. The problem is with the proportions.

    Replies: @skep

  51. @TBA
    @matt

    He was expressively referring to the founders, such as they are described by their respective religion's teachings. Mo, that infallible example to emulate, was remarkably militant. And told his coreligionists to be as well.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @gzu

    Do you know, WHY he was militant?

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    @gzu

    "Do you know, WHY he was militant?"

    Enlighten us as to WHY he was militant. Beyond that he was a bandit I mean.

  52. Gato de la Biblioteca [AKA "Icepick"] says:

    It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense.

    Give Whiskey time!

    If history has proven anything at all it has proven that European men certainly do not lack the will to fight and kill.

    I keep thinking that some day Europeans are going to remember that they’re the most fearsome collection of peoples on Earth. Maybe out-immigration and the wars of the first half of the 20th Century have eliminated the most ardent members of the breed, but I don’t think so.

  53. @gzu
    @silviosilver

    You're full of shit. It wasn't muslims that complaned about a possible backlash, it was western imbeciles.

    And muslims DID denounce these attacks. You just choose to ignore it.

    Replies: @Gato de la Biblioteca

    Some Muslims denounced the attacks. Others seem to want more of them. The problem is with the proportions.

    • Replies: @skep
    @Gato de la Biblioteca

    The officials denounced it. Very clever: it was probably a false flag, as PCR denounced it.

  54. @matt
    @Reg Cæsar

    The heart of anyone’s problem with Islam is Big Mo. He’s kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    Ah yes, those peaceful followers of Christ and Gautama.

    Replies: @Anonymous, @Francis, @TBA, @Karl

    >> Ah yes, those peaceful followers of […] Gautama

    The Rakhine People are protecting their homeland from Arabic colonialism.

    It is their inalienable right to do so; and it is their inalienable right to define their own ethnos, as they see fit.

    The Rakhines are willing to fight to protect their homeland. They aren’t interested in listening to lectures from western cowards who aren’t.

  55. @Ex Submarine Officer
    @rustbeltreader


    False flags might just turn out to be staged plots gone wrong.
     
    Exactly in accordance with Hanlon's Law - never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

    Two things that are pretty obvious about government bureaucracy:

    1) They learn by experience/pain avoidance - non-routine challenges, well they often screw them up until they can develop a manual/SOP. And almost by definition, each sting operation is going to have unique factors in the scenario. So a lot of them are going to go wrong.

    They can go wrong lots of ways, and probably the most common failure mode is just fizzling out on the launch pad, the marks don't get seduced or become wary, etc. But once in a while, a credible failure mode is losing control of the sequence, not enough oversight, the marks get rash/show initiative and get out in front of their handlers, some blunder or another, and the sting scenario proceeds further than anticipated.

    You do enough of these things, eventually the tumblers will line up on one of them in a way that allows such an outcome.

    2) Governments are extremely loathe to admit mistakes and are utterly opaque when they put their minds to it, as they also control the means of forcing transparency in societies (courts, bureaucracies, etc). So yeah, sting operation goes too far? I hardly see some FBI middle manager stepping up to the plate to say, yeah, me and my boys let that one get out of hand....

    Add to that a collusive, corporate media and, well, has anyone read Sydney Schanberg's piece about Vietnam POW/MIA's? I read it a while back and recently found it is archived on unz.com. He makes a pretty convincing case, but nobody would touch the story. And it is a story of government engaging in some lesser naughtiness/incompetence/sneakiness, still fairly serious, but not at all with a guiding plan whose outcome was, if Schanberg is correct, leaving American POWs behind to eventually die in SE Asia. Again, I found it credible, more a story of government indifference/incompetence/expediency with a post event coverup rather than an evilly directed plot from the beginning, as has been claimed by various Vietnam POW/MIA activists.

    People search for order and directedness in a universe that is mostly random. A lot of things are driven by this, from religion to belief in the eternal Jewish conspiracy. Even in the cases where the explanation is seemingly hostile to their interests (those wily darn Joos again, which, having to wade through all that all the time is one of the more tedious aspects of reading iSteve comments), I guess having an enemy to focus upon makes one feel empowered and less of a bit of insignificant flotsam in an indifferent universe.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @jack, @Art Deco

    Exactly in accordance with Hanlon’s Law – never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

    Yes, indeed.

    The pattern with government bureaucracies is usually this: incompetence first, cover-up second.

    Generally, when bureaucracies mess things up, it is out of sheer incompetence, not some grand conspiracy by a nefarious cabal. And then the conspiracy of sorts starts when the involved parties try to cover up the screw-up. But that conspiracy of the cover up, rather than the product of a group of “evil geniuses,” is usually a group effort by fools joined together by a common desire to preserve themselves.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Twinkie

    This is where Kevin MacDonald's "group evolutionary strategy" concept is so useful.

  56. Whether western Europeans will fight without State sanction may be the big question of the 21st century. We know there are a few groups that have fought nationalist terrorist campaigns – the Basques, the Irish Republicans & Ulster Loyalists in Northern Ireland – these groups have fought before and may do so again. There are a few other ethnically distinct areas such as the Bretons in Brittany where I would expect the same to be true. But how about the more fully deracinated indigenous populations of ‘core Europe’ – northern France, southern England, west Germany? Do they have enough cohesion? Will they fight?

    My guess would be that even with the likelier groups such as working class Essex men, they will be very reluctant to abandon the Westphalian State system and enter the misery of non-state warfare. Disaffected core Europeans are more likely to hope that the State is either not really traitorous or that it can somehow be restored to functioning – vote UKIP and restore the golden age.

    Personally I have a foot (& ancestry) in both camps, right now my horror of the prospect of non-state warfare in my homeland is the overwhelming emotion. But I’m not sure what realistic long term alternative there is, other than slavery and annihilation.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @Simon in London


    Whether western Europeans will fight without State sanction may be the big question of the 21st century.
     
    We know they did it on the West Bank as recently as 2008, when the locals kept people from New Orleans from crossing the river into Algiers.
    , @anon
    @Simon in London


    Whether western Europeans will fight without State sanction may be the big question of the 21st century.
     
    I do think that's the crux of it.

    We know there are a few groups that have fought nationalist terrorist campaigns – the Basques, the Irish Republicans & Ulster Loyalists in Northern Ireland – these groups have fought before and may do so again.
     
    And crucially two of those groups didn't accept the legitimacy of the states in question and the third was a reaction.

    @Ben Tillman

    We know they did it on the West Bank as recently as 2008, when the locals kept people from New Orleans from crossing the river into Algiers.
     
    Sure, when the state has broken down.
  57. I don’t know if my earlier comment went through.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    @Zachary Latif

    Unfortunately, I don't see it anywhere. I looked in Spam, but it's not there.

  58. >>> E Michael Jones has a theory that ,historically, resurgences of Islam are due to the Christian West’s lack of control of usury

    If he really believed that, he’s do his own personal banking with an Islamic Bank. They are available everywhere if you look for them.

    If he ===really=== believed that, he would go into loan sharking.

    • Replies: @josh
    @Karl

    Perhaps, but its a collective action problem.

  59. @Zachary Latif
    I don't know if my earlier comment went through.

    Replies: @Steve Sailer

    Unfortunately, I don’t see it anywhere. I looked in Spam, but it’s not there.

  60. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Name Withheld


    This is part of what the late Lawrence Auster noted about Western elites and Media. They do no ascribe any sense of moral agency to people and governments in the third world.

     

    This was one of the many insights Auster did such a service in laying bare.

    It's pride that drives the Western elite's seeming-veneration of the Other. We are so powerful that only we can be responsible for the sins of the world; we are so magnanimous that we can forgive those sins; we are so generous that we can, and shall, provide for all others' needs . . . .

    This arrogance demeans and enrages the Other by implying he's much less than human, and need not be taken seriously, no matter what he says -- or does.

    Viewed in this light, many 'senseless' events are perfectly, if horribly, intelligible.

    Replies: @Simon in London

    “This arrogance demeans and enrages the Other by implying he’s much less than human, and need not be taken seriously, no matter what he says — or does.”

    Yes, I think this is right. Most of the populations of non-Western countries don’t feel this way, but the partially-Westernised ruling elites often do. More importantly the non-Westerners’ children growing up in Western societies very much feel this; support for Al Qaeda is much more anti-SWPL than anti-Christian.

  61. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    You are right again Steve.
    What is really needed is a complete realignment of the European political scene, and a resurgence of unabashed nationalism as part of the political agenda. The old order needs to be swept away entirely.
    There are promising signs. Ukip in the UK is one example, as are the FN in France. In fact virtually all the European states have growing nationalist parties. It’s very likely that at least one of them will actually gain power in the coming decades.

  62. “Westphalian nationalism was a solution to the Wars of Religion that depopulated some of the more fertile parts of northwestern Europe in 1618-1648.”

    The devastation of the 30 Years War also had a great deal to do with nationalism. Much of the fighting was Catholic versus Catholic and Protestant versus Protestant. The misery had even more to do with how the war was fought – with poorly controlled mercenary forces who shifted from side to side and theater to theater, and who relied almost entirely on theft from the peasantry for survival. Religion had little to do with the latter dynamic. Basically, both religion and nationalism played a part in unleashing a war during an era where there was the means to fight on a grander scale, but before states had developed control over their armies. The result was overwhelmingly greater casualties among civilians than soldiers.

    European wars were also endemic to the period between 1648-1789, so Westphalian nationalism did not reduce the frequency of war. What the period was notable for was the professionalism of small armies and less abuse of civilians. This had more to do with the increased central authority of the states, which learned to more effectively control and supply their armies. The armies were the tools of the monarchs, and the armies were led by nobles and aristocrats who were influenced by a combination of Enlightenment ideals, remnants of chivalry, and religious sentiment. The soldiers were often impressed into long-term service and were motivated less by nationalism than by material concerns and unit camaraderie.

    In this environment, wars were waged between states rather than peoples and were more limited in their ferocity. This is admittedly an exaggeration and civilians still suffered during wartime, but in comparison to the eras before and after, it is largely true. After the French Revolution, however, armies become tools of the nation rather than the monarch, and the levee en masse led to mass armies of soldiers motivated by nationalism. This process culminated in the disaster of 1914-1945, when states were able to effectively control their militaries but were also motivated by fanatical mass nationalism.

    • Replies: @Jim
    @David M.

    I've read estimates that the Thirty Years War reduced the population of Germany by 50% and that full economic recovery took about a hundred years.

    , @ic1000
    @David M.

    > Much of the fighting was Catholic versus Catholic and Protestant versus Protestant. The misery had even more to do with how the war was fought – with poorly controlled mercenary forces who shifted from side to side and theater to theater, and who relied almost entirely on theft from the peasantry for survival. Religion had little to do with the latter dynamic.

    This is true enough, but you offer a sophisticated appreciation of the Thirty Years War that might obscure the cause of that conflict from those who don't know much European history (i.e. most people).

    The war began because of Catholic-Protestant conflict within the Holy Roman Empire, especially Germany. The religious element remained important throughout that terrible time.

  63. Oh thanks – must be my bad connection.

    I’ve been reading this Michel Houbelecq all this time on ISteve and didn’t realise that I read his book “possibilty of an island” last year for our science fiction book club.

    It was our “foreign book” that we do every quarter or so but it was ridiculously awful especially considerinrbg the other books we read (Master & Margarita, Carpet makers).

    The protagonist in the book courts controversy by using hijabi Arab women in his pornographic videos (f*cking for Palestine if i recall correctly) but it seems more a commentary on the contemporary “decadence” of the European way of life. The protagonist shows no remorse when his son & ex-wife commits suicide only lusting after a blonde who is his half his age.

    Maybe the translation was off but I just felt that it didn’t do any justice to the sci-fe genre and instead should have just been classified as fiction lite or philosophical rants.

  64. Deracialise immigration policy by insisting that all prospective immigrants be assessed on their individual merits, and with the bar raised very high. Make the case for choosing individuals with high aptitude and good character. Liken a highly selective immigration policy to how employers are supposed to choose among job applicants. Anyone who reads this blog will be aware that the effects of ‘disparate impact’ will soon become apparent, but with part of the selection process assessing traits such as open-mindedness and agreeableness, it may be that opponents of immigration controls will be too embarrassed to raise the issue.

    Many people in the West are uncomfortable with overt displays of racism. What they want are methods of preventing large-scale Third World (and especially Muslim) immigration which can be plausibly presented as non-racist. An example of this was how the Netherlands began producing videos on the ‘Dutch way of life’ which prospective immigrants had to watch. The videos showed men kissing in public and women bathing topless on beaches – if you don’t like this, don’t come here. It’s pretty obvious the sort of people that was intended to deter from applying. Such a tactic is completely insufficient by itself, but it was a clever idea nonetheless. More about the video here on NBC:

    http://goo.gl/cb4WLS

    • Replies: @OhComeOn
    @Joe 90

    It's a nice thought but it doesn't work in reality...especially when you have a hostile elite in charge of defining the bar

    , @ben tillman
    @Joe 90


    Deracialise immigration policy by insisting that all prospective immigrants be assessed on their individual merits, and with the bar raised very high.
     
    That disfavors Whites, so it hardly de-racializes the question.

    Replies: @Joe 90

    , @Dutch Boy
    @Joe 90

    The present Dutch way of life, alas. It would have horrified my Dutch ancestors as much as it would Muslims.

  65. @Joe 90
    Deracialise immigration policy by insisting that all prospective immigrants be assessed on their individual merits, and with the bar raised very high. Make the case for choosing individuals with high aptitude and good character. Liken a highly selective immigration policy to how employers are supposed to choose among job applicants. Anyone who reads this blog will be aware that the effects of 'disparate impact' will soon become apparent, but with part of the selection process assessing traits such as open-mindedness and agreeableness, it may be that opponents of immigration controls will be too embarrassed to raise the issue.

    Many people in the West are uncomfortable with overt displays of racism. What they want are methods of preventing large-scale Third World (and especially Muslim) immigration which can be plausibly presented as non-racist. An example of this was how the Netherlands began producing videos on the 'Dutch way of life' which prospective immigrants had to watch. The videos showed men kissing in public and women bathing topless on beaches - if you don't like this, don't come here. It's pretty obvious the sort of people that was intended to deter from applying. Such a tactic is completely insufficient by itself, but it was a clever idea nonetheless. More about the video here on NBC:

    http://goo.gl/cb4WLS

    Replies: @OhComeOn, @ben tillman, @Dutch Boy

    It’s a nice thought but it doesn’t work in reality…especially when you have a hostile elite in charge of defining the bar

  66. @Niccolo Salo
    @matt

    Pointing out the disasters of British history is what white men should be doing.

    Replies: @fnn

    Like the early 20th Century British fixation on destroying Germany as a rival economic power. It had the side-effect of destroying Western Civilization.

    This guy puts together a summary of the evidence most of us have already seen:

    https://praiseoffolly.wordpress.com/an-introduction-to-the-origins-of-the-first-world-war/

  67. “By May 1940, Europe’s problem was more a lack of French nationalism, which encouraged and enabled German predation.”

    Don’t forget that in September 29 the French declared war on Germany for no good reason at all – by which I mean, for no good reason that was in their national interest. Afterwards they were quite happy to sit behind the Maginot line, expecting Germany either to attack in Flanders, where they would be defeated 1914-18-style, or, being blockaded by England, starve to death without a fight. Well, on the German side, some guys called Manstein, Rommel and Guderian didn’t like those prospects …

  68. @David Davenport
    ... They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.

    When will this policy be applied in "urban" Atlanta, Memphis, St. Louis, and similar cities?

    Replies: @ben tillman

    When will this policy be applied in “urban” Atlanta, Memphis, St. Louis, and similar cities?

    Maybe 25 years ago, I heard rumors that, in at least one part of the South, doctors who delivered a second baby to a welfare mama would routinely tie her tubes.

  69. @Joe 90
    Deracialise immigration policy by insisting that all prospective immigrants be assessed on their individual merits, and with the bar raised very high. Make the case for choosing individuals with high aptitude and good character. Liken a highly selective immigration policy to how employers are supposed to choose among job applicants. Anyone who reads this blog will be aware that the effects of 'disparate impact' will soon become apparent, but with part of the selection process assessing traits such as open-mindedness and agreeableness, it may be that opponents of immigration controls will be too embarrassed to raise the issue.

    Many people in the West are uncomfortable with overt displays of racism. What they want are methods of preventing large-scale Third World (and especially Muslim) immigration which can be plausibly presented as non-racist. An example of this was how the Netherlands began producing videos on the 'Dutch way of life' which prospective immigrants had to watch. The videos showed men kissing in public and women bathing topless on beaches - if you don't like this, don't come here. It's pretty obvious the sort of people that was intended to deter from applying. Such a tactic is completely insufficient by itself, but it was a clever idea nonetheless. More about the video here on NBC:

    http://goo.gl/cb4WLS

    Replies: @OhComeOn, @ben tillman, @Dutch Boy

    Deracialise immigration policy by insisting that all prospective immigrants be assessed on their individual merits, and with the bar raised very high.

    That disfavors Whites, so it hardly de-racializes the question.

    • Replies: @Joe 90
    @ben tillman

    How does it disfavour whites, and relative to whom?

    Replies: @silviosilver

  70. @Simon in London
    Whether western Europeans will fight without State sanction may be the big question of the 21st century. We know there are a few groups that have fought nationalist terrorist campaigns - the Basques, the Irish Republicans & Ulster Loyalists in Northern Ireland - these groups have fought before and may do so again. There are a few other ethnically distinct areas such as the Bretons in Brittany where I would expect the same to be true. But how about the more fully deracinated indigenous populations of 'core Europe' - northern France, southern England, west Germany? Do they have enough cohesion? Will they fight?

    My guess would be that even with the likelier groups such as working class Essex men, they will be very reluctant to abandon the Westphalian State system and enter the misery of non-state warfare. Disaffected core Europeans are more likely to hope that the State is either not really traitorous or that it can somehow be restored to functioning - vote UKIP and restore the golden age.

    Personally I have a foot (& ancestry) in both camps, right now my horror of the prospect of non-state warfare in my homeland is the overwhelming emotion. But I'm not sure what realistic long term alternative there is, other than slavery and annihilation.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @anon

    Whether western Europeans will fight without State sanction may be the big question of the 21st century.

    We know they did it on the West Bank as recently as 2008, when the locals kept people from New Orleans from crossing the river into Algiers.

  71. @Jaakko Raipala
    @matt

    "It would be hard to come up with sillier nonsense. There are “Muslim organizations” all over the world that devoted to “policing extremists.” You can find a list of them here."

    I must have missed the news about the Arab League assuming any responsibility for failing to prevent a terrorist attack in Europe. In fact, what we saw from Islamic states with Charlie Hebdo was once again worse than a failure to conform to European expectations: what we saw was mostly another round of "these attackers are not true Muslims"... denial of any responsibility and refusal to enter dialogue about why the terrorists are Muslim.

    Again, if a group of expatriate Englishmen furious about the French mocking the Queen or whatever had stormed Charlie Hebdo, we would not expect England to respond with "we condemn the attack but these are not true Englishmen and we have no responsibilities here and our biggest worry is the rise of anglophobia as a result of this attack", we would expect them to respond with "something has gone wrong, we need to do our part to fix it and we need to discuss why any of us would do such a thing". To calm Europeans about Islam we'd need to see a lot more Muslims come out and say "yes, this is true Islam, these attackers are motivated by Islam, Islam clearly has a problem and Muslims need to take more responsibility for actions taken in the name of Islam".

    When Western European factions pull off terrorist attacks on other Western Europeans (which happens) we roughly agree on how to assign blame and responsibility to fix things. Remember, of course, that there are various levels of blame from actually detonating a bomb to providing the money for it to not turning in likely bomb-makers operating in your community to publishing propaganda encouraging attacks to passing an ethnic grudge to your kids... our organization of nation-states allows us to assign blame, guilt and responsibilities in a way largely agreed between different societies and that is good prevention as it makes it much harder for extremists to spark conflicts with terrorism since they know their own group is very likely to assign blame the same way as the other group.

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Jim

    The Middle East and Africa are not compsoed of nation states. We have been pretending for a long time that nation states exist there but our pretenses have no effect on reality. The Congo Republic and Iraq are no more real than the former Yugoslavia or the present Ukraine.

    We should put aside our ideological fantasies and deal with the world as it is. But I doubt that we will do that. We will follow our delusions to disaster.

  72. @jo s'more

    Africa that the UN forecasts will have 4 billion people by the end of the century.
     
    Contraceptives for Africa, anyone?

    They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Jim, @skep

    Reality will take care of the problem in the same way that it has dealt with similar problems for three and a half billion years.

  73. @David M.
    "Westphalian nationalism was a solution to the Wars of Religion that depopulated some of the more fertile parts of northwestern Europe in 1618-1648."

    The devastation of the 30 Years War also had a great deal to do with nationalism. Much of the fighting was Catholic versus Catholic and Protestant versus Protestant. The misery had even more to do with how the war was fought - with poorly controlled mercenary forces who shifted from side to side and theater to theater, and who relied almost entirely on theft from the peasantry for survival. Religion had little to do with the latter dynamic. Basically, both religion and nationalism played a part in unleashing a war during an era where there was the means to fight on a grander scale, but before states had developed control over their armies. The result was overwhelmingly greater casualties among civilians than soldiers.

    European wars were also endemic to the period between 1648-1789, so Westphalian nationalism did not reduce the frequency of war. What the period was notable for was the professionalism of small armies and less abuse of civilians. This had more to do with the increased central authority of the states, which learned to more effectively control and supply their armies. The armies were the tools of the monarchs, and the armies were led by nobles and aristocrats who were influenced by a combination of Enlightenment ideals, remnants of chivalry, and religious sentiment. The soldiers were often impressed into long-term service and were motivated less by nationalism than by material concerns and unit camaraderie.

    In this environment, wars were waged between states rather than peoples and were more limited in their ferocity. This is admittedly an exaggeration and civilians still suffered during wartime, but in comparison to the eras before and after, it is largely true. After the French Revolution, however, armies become tools of the nation rather than the monarch, and the levee en masse led to mass armies of soldiers motivated by nationalism. This process culminated in the disaster of 1914-1945, when states were able to effectively control their militaries but were also motivated by fanatical mass nationalism.

    Replies: @Jim, @ic1000

    I’ve read estimates that the Thirty Years War reduced the population of Germany by 50% and that full economic recovery took about a hundred years.

  74. Back in Sweden after 4 years away. You notice the creeping Anglo-American imperialism and the ‘new Swedes’. Swedes overwhelmingly seem to accept that this is the new way for them. I’d heard from family about the prevalence of ‘gypsies’ begging outside of most malls. I must say that they work in miserable conditions and I admire their resilience. Swedes impress with their eye for detail and the way they can organise(but they can be very slow with connecting phones/internet and serving you: “take a number “)Malmo is not a hellhole, the shopping is very good now. Apparently they have outlawed any criticism of immigrants, so Swedes better be careful. I think a guy shook his head at me today when my open door blocked a parking space but I could have been mistaken. I let him off with a stern warning.

  75. @Karl
    >>> E Michael Jones has a theory that ,historically, resurgences of Islam are due to the Christian West's lack of control of usury


    If he really believed that, he's do his own personal banking with an Islamic Bank. They are available everywhere if you look for them.

    If he ===really=== believed that, he would go into loan sharking.

    Replies: @josh

    Perhaps, but its a collective action problem.

  76. I love to read Whiskey’s posts.

  77. @Earl Lemongrab
    Seriously, dude? Nothing bigger than a mud hut?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gondar#mediaviewer/File:Fasilides_Palace_02.jpg

    Replies: @Hacienda, @David, @athEIst

    Put some neon signs on that thing, outline in red and you got yourself a pretty good love hotel.

  78. @Twinkie
    Sometimes I wake up, read the news, and think I am in some bizarre, strange, and terrible nightmare.

    While we can debate over what kind of immigrants "work" or not, or what level of immigration is ideal, it defies the most basic forms of logic and self-preservation that Western nations are allowing large numbers of immigrants from those countries and societies that are *overtly hostile.*

    I used to think (and still largely accept the notion) that much of the diversity mantra in the West was largely posturing for pseudo-civil virtue points. But I am beginning to think that, due to self-indoctrination, a lot of Westerners are actually beginning to believe in the posturing and are elevating the idea of diversity-as-the-ultimate-good as Gospel.

    Replies: @Hacienda

    You need to get out to California. It’s not the nightmare brown invasion you imagine.

  79. We know they did it on the West Bank as recently as 2008, when the locals kept people from New Orleans from crossing the river into Algiers.

    I don’t dispute your core contention, but I always thought any West Bank incidents were wildly overplayed by the media in their usual pattern. I may be wrong, though. A lot of what did or did not happen in Katrina remains, to me at least, fairly murky.

  80. @Earl Lemongrab
    Seriously, dude? Nothing bigger than a mud hut?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gondar#mediaviewer/File:Fasilides_Palace_02.jpg

    Replies: @Hacienda, @David, @athEIst

    That ugly building wasn’t built by Sub-Saharan Africans.

  81. @ben tillman
    @Joe 90


    Deracialise immigration policy by insisting that all prospective immigrants be assessed on their individual merits, and with the bar raised very high.
     
    That disfavors Whites, so it hardly de-racializes the question.

    Replies: @Joe 90

    How does it disfavour whites, and relative to whom?

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Joe 90

    If it's not obvious it's because anti-white values have become part of the air we breath. In brief, non-white immigration racially and culturally displaces and replaces whites. That's bad enough in itself, but the process itself is accompanied by all manner of anti-white discrimination, anti-white hostility and, often enough, anti-white violence. I know it sounds crazy to be worried about the well-being of whites, but hey, whites are people too!

    Replies: @Joe 90

  82. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Simon in London
    Whether western Europeans will fight without State sanction may be the big question of the 21st century. We know there are a few groups that have fought nationalist terrorist campaigns - the Basques, the Irish Republicans & Ulster Loyalists in Northern Ireland - these groups have fought before and may do so again. There are a few other ethnically distinct areas such as the Bretons in Brittany where I would expect the same to be true. But how about the more fully deracinated indigenous populations of 'core Europe' - northern France, southern England, west Germany? Do they have enough cohesion? Will they fight?

    My guess would be that even with the likelier groups such as working class Essex men, they will be very reluctant to abandon the Westphalian State system and enter the misery of non-state warfare. Disaffected core Europeans are more likely to hope that the State is either not really traitorous or that it can somehow be restored to functioning - vote UKIP and restore the golden age.

    Personally I have a foot (& ancestry) in both camps, right now my horror of the prospect of non-state warfare in my homeland is the overwhelming emotion. But I'm not sure what realistic long term alternative there is, other than slavery and annihilation.

    Replies: @ben tillman, @anon

    Whether western Europeans will fight without State sanction may be the big question of the 21st century.

    I do think that’s the crux of it.

    We know there are a few groups that have fought nationalist terrorist campaigns – the Basques, the Irish Republicans & Ulster Loyalists in Northern Ireland – these groups have fought before and may do so again.

    And crucially two of those groups didn’t accept the legitimacy of the states in question and the third was a reaction.

    @Ben Tillman

    We know they did it on the West Bank as recently as 2008, when the locals kept people from New Orleans from crossing the river into Algiers.

    Sure, when the state has broken down.

  83. @athEIst
    FOUR billion Africans
    T
    H
    I
    N
    K
    about it!!!

    Nothing bigger than a grass hut was ever built south of the Sahara

    Replies: @anon, @skep

    The sort of people who’d do it to Africans would do it to you too.

  84. “[Being] scared of the people offering solutions will often just give you a more radical solution in the end.” That is a great quote.

  85. @Drogger
    @silviosilver

    Excessive French nationalism brought the peace of Versailles... which humiliated Germany... which gave rise to Hitler...

    Austro-Prussia was a Brother's War of limited importance outside central Europe.

    Germany's (Bismarck's) only big 'bully move' was provoking the Franco-Prussian war. Which Nap 3 was more than happy to oblige (again, excessive French nationalism).

    Germany was big and scary, sure, but played by the rules Russia and the British Empire were enforcing.

    Replies: @Dutch Boy

    In 1940, it was the French and British who declared war on Germany when Hitler’s plans were to move east, not west.

  86. @Joe 90
    Deracialise immigration policy by insisting that all prospective immigrants be assessed on their individual merits, and with the bar raised very high. Make the case for choosing individuals with high aptitude and good character. Liken a highly selective immigration policy to how employers are supposed to choose among job applicants. Anyone who reads this blog will be aware that the effects of 'disparate impact' will soon become apparent, but with part of the selection process assessing traits such as open-mindedness and agreeableness, it may be that opponents of immigration controls will be too embarrassed to raise the issue.

    Many people in the West are uncomfortable with overt displays of racism. What they want are methods of preventing large-scale Third World (and especially Muslim) immigration which can be plausibly presented as non-racist. An example of this was how the Netherlands began producing videos on the 'Dutch way of life' which prospective immigrants had to watch. The videos showed men kissing in public and women bathing topless on beaches - if you don't like this, don't come here. It's pretty obvious the sort of people that was intended to deter from applying. Such a tactic is completely insufficient by itself, but it was a clever idea nonetheless. More about the video here on NBC:

    http://goo.gl/cb4WLS

    Replies: @OhComeOn, @ben tillman, @Dutch Boy

    The present Dutch way of life, alas. It would have horrified my Dutch ancestors as much as it would Muslims.

  87. @”Wars of Religion”
    That explains why Catholic France was backing Protestant Sweden against the German Catholic allies of Catholic Spain and Austria. And why the fanatically anti Catholic England of Oliver Cromwell had an alliance with Catholic Spain, and went to war against Protestant Holland.

    @”By May 1940, Europe’s problem was more a lack of French nationalism, which encouraged and enabled German predation”

    Germany before WW1 was divided into princely states and different parliaments, which resisted military spending. Germany had far more resources than it brought to bear in the run up to WW1, but the new German constitution after WW1 made it far easier to use the potential strength of Germany. The post WW1 constitution made Germany far more able to exert its strength, and Germany had almost double the men in the call up class of 19-20 year olds in 1940 (concern about growing German population was the origin of France’s encouragement of immigration which started post WW1, at that time from southern Europe). A youth bulge in the population leads to political revolution, and the abundance of youth in military age men leads to a dynamic army with a high tempo attack that sweeps all before it. Revolutionary French army dominance, and Germany’s crushing of France in WW2 are good examples.

    @”French nationalism is far less a problem for Europe (there are no disputes with Germany anymore over Alsace and Lorraine) than a solution for how to peaceably preserve Europe from demographic inundation from an Africa that the UN forecasts will have 4 billion people by the end of the century.

    But we remain slaves to obsolete prejudices, even when returns on them have diminished to little ”

    Right on the nose, I agree very much with that. The Germans are terrified of nuclear power, which they are totally abolishing. They are clearly slaves to an ancient fear of nuked-up superpowers fighting WW3 on German soil.

  88. @gzu
    @TBA

    Do you know, WHY he was militant?

    Replies: @William Badwhite

    “Do you know, WHY he was militant?”

    Enlighten us as to WHY he was militant. Beyond that he was a bandit I mean.

  89. @Whiskey
    I don't take issue with Raako. I do observe a lack of young men to fight, a willingness to fight, weapons in the hands if young European men, and the support critically of young European women. Men won't die for feminsts to call them rapists while excusing real Muslim ones.

    Most of the young men in European cities are Muslim, West of the Rhine. (Not so in Dresden, hence Pegida). Most of the young men in Africa, the ME, and Europe combined are Muslim.

    Like Oakland there is no there there for young European men to fight. Like Prester John it no longer exists. Where are the Euro tribes, martial traditions, the rewards for fighting? Abu Hamza al Masri states repeatedly the Koran encourages killing or enslaving the infidel, like a cow in the market his words. There is nothing in the West bc the state eradicated both tribes and power rivals, the Church, the Scouts, everything in one big Kulturkampf.

    Who will fight for Europe? Old men?

    France has what? Nukes and a few sprc ops? Highly trained but few in number.

    Replies: @skep

    France has more and more angry young men against the arrogance of some Muslim young men, but as in England, the judiciary system is against them: the right of self-defense is most of the the time repealed if the defender is a native; however, you understate the ethnic opposition between north African and sub-Saharan immigration.

  90. How long before we’re back to hearing about “72 virgins” non-stop?

    The renewed religion bashing is an admission of failure after over a decade of wars, who-knows-how-many dead, $trillions disappeared, millions of refugees, vast civilian infrastructure destruction and predictable civil wars.

    Now, the Muslims are supposed to do something about armed gunmen like the ones in Paris. I’ve heard that 50 times in the last month. Is someone going to arm these ordinary Muslims in Europe (and here?) who are called upon to do . . . something? Or are they expected to make themselves the targets of the armed gunmen? Well, they’re not going to do that so if that is the new strategy, there might as well be no strategy.

    The Paris gunmen shouting “Allah Akbar” is less about religion than Bush telling Jacques Chirac about Gog and Magog and that the Iraq War was “willed by God.”

  91. @silviosilver

    In turn, excessive French popular nationalism was a problem in Europe from roughly the Revolutionary Era into the 20th Century.
     
    I hate to kick a man when he's down, but I think that description fits Germans far better than it fits Frenchmen.

    Replies: @Drogger, @skep

    That’s right; above all, the “french popular nationalism” leading to waging war with german countries and Austria was an excuse for hiding the global collapse of the economy and the new “enlightened” society by the french revolutionnary leaders from 1792 until the rule of Napoleon. The wild economic and fiscal deregulation triggered the collapse. The conscription in 1792 triggered revolts in many french provinces, and mainly in Britain and Vendée, where took place an authentic “populicide” (around 120 000 people exterminated with well planned and Convention-approved organization).
    Between the end of the first empire and the 1870 war, where was the nationalism? The republicans in 1870 wanted the war against Prussia to take over Napoleon III, and lost the Lorraine with a nonsensical ongoing war with a tiny army after Sedan. That collapse led to the building of the imperialist German Empire according to Bismark’s plans.
    “French popular nationalism” came back thus with the third republic through the brain-washing of the secular republican mandatory school. “French popular nationalism” is every time the fact of the french republican oligarchies. Remember the fact that in 1789, on 600 representants of the Tiers-État, there were just 2 peasants whereas peasantry represented 90 % of the inhabitants of the Kingdom.

  92. @anonymous
    The US doesn't like secular, nationalist Arab leaders and has done what it can to overthrow them. Hussein, Assad and Khaddafi are some examples. On the other hand the US has supported Muslim jihadis in places like Afghanistan and Syria, arming and training them. It seemed to be in favor of Muslim Brotherhood leader Morsi of Egypt. ISIS members are getting funding and weapons from our close friends and collaborators the oil sheiks; combatants are supposedly going back and forth over the Turkish border for rest and medical care in a NATO country.
    Bush declared Islam to be a "religion of peace" in the wake of 9-11 and Obama has claimed that ISIS really wasn't truly Muslim in it's behavior. An American president is going to tell a group calling itself the "Islamic Caliphate" that they aren't really Islamic. Bush, Obama and other western leaders apparently must fancy themselves to be Islamic scholars since they lecture their western audiences as well as Muslims as to what Islam 'really is'. What we have is a failure of leadership on the part of the political class who have become harmful to their own countries.

    Replies: @Hersh

    Re Bush and other politicians calling Islam a “religion of peace.” — That’s done to salve their own consciences for inflicting violence on Muslims, surely. And they know that calling Islam a religion of peace will provoke some percentage of Americans to say nasty things about Islam and Muslims and then those people can be called the “haters” and not themselves.

  93. @jo s'more

    Africa that the UN forecasts will have 4 billion people by the end of the century.
     
    Contraceptives for Africa, anyone?

    They need a humane version of the one child policy. Basically the woman gets some financial award for being sterilized after the birth of her first baby.

    Replies: @silviosilver, @Jim, @skep

    That’s in the practice impossible to implement until you suppress polygamy and the social status of the woman on the one hand, and let genuine homogeneous ethnic state take the place of the actual post-colonization multi ethnic fake state, so usual for transnational groups and other west leading oligarchies.

  94. @athEIst
    FOUR billion Africans
    T
    H
    I
    N
    K
    about it!!!

    Nothing bigger than a grass hut was ever built south of the Sahara

    Replies: @anon, @skep

    Please, get learned about the Great Tombouctou and the sahelian empires from 11th century till 17 th.
    What about Rwanda or Burundi in the the early 14 th? The Great Zimbabwe? They sure have a lower IQ than Europeans or Asians but they are not inferiors nor wild animals. Different doesn’t mean different: don’t compare carrots and potatoes.

  95. You know….I’m going to pull a Taylor Swift and copyright my commentator name

    I’m getting so many ideas for a line of products!

    Bring on the browning of America!

    Coming to a Sephora near you!

  96. @David M.
    "Westphalian nationalism was a solution to the Wars of Religion that depopulated some of the more fertile parts of northwestern Europe in 1618-1648."

    The devastation of the 30 Years War also had a great deal to do with nationalism. Much of the fighting was Catholic versus Catholic and Protestant versus Protestant. The misery had even more to do with how the war was fought - with poorly controlled mercenary forces who shifted from side to side and theater to theater, and who relied almost entirely on theft from the peasantry for survival. Religion had little to do with the latter dynamic. Basically, both religion and nationalism played a part in unleashing a war during an era where there was the means to fight on a grander scale, but before states had developed control over their armies. The result was overwhelmingly greater casualties among civilians than soldiers.

    European wars were also endemic to the period between 1648-1789, so Westphalian nationalism did not reduce the frequency of war. What the period was notable for was the professionalism of small armies and less abuse of civilians. This had more to do with the increased central authority of the states, which learned to more effectively control and supply their armies. The armies were the tools of the monarchs, and the armies were led by nobles and aristocrats who were influenced by a combination of Enlightenment ideals, remnants of chivalry, and religious sentiment. The soldiers were often impressed into long-term service and were motivated less by nationalism than by material concerns and unit camaraderie.

    In this environment, wars were waged between states rather than peoples and were more limited in their ferocity. This is admittedly an exaggeration and civilians still suffered during wartime, but in comparison to the eras before and after, it is largely true. After the French Revolution, however, armies become tools of the nation rather than the monarch, and the levee en masse led to mass armies of soldiers motivated by nationalism. This process culminated in the disaster of 1914-1945, when states were able to effectively control their militaries but were also motivated by fanatical mass nationalism.

    Replies: @Jim, @ic1000

    > Much of the fighting was Catholic versus Catholic and Protestant versus Protestant. The misery had even more to do with how the war was fought – with poorly controlled mercenary forces who shifted from side to side and theater to theater, and who relied almost entirely on theft from the peasantry for survival. Religion had little to do with the latter dynamic.

    This is true enough, but you offer a sophisticated appreciation of the Thirty Years War that might obscure the cause of that conflict from those who don’t know much European history (i.e. most people).

    The war began because of Catholic-Protestant conflict within the Holy Roman Empire, especially Germany. The religious element remained important throughout that terrible time.

  97. @Gato de la Biblioteca
    @gzu

    Some Muslims denounced the attacks. Others seem to want more of them. The problem is with the proportions.

    Replies: @skep

    The officials denounced it. Very clever: it was probably a false flag, as PCR denounced it.

  98. Jaska Jokunen (or some other Finn) wrote:

    …European men certainly do not lack the will to fight and kill. That is why our states keep mainly cracking down on native men, they’re much more afraid of the European man…

    Is that why, instead of repealing Blair’s ridiculous pistol ban, the Camelegg government merely lifted it for North Koreans and Red Chinamen, for a week, in order to host the Olympics?

    Say, would they do this for bullfighting, as well? I’m sure that’d fill Wembley.

  99. “You’re full of shit. It wasn’t muslims that complaned about a possible backlash, it was western imbeciles.

    And muslims DID denounce these attacks. You just choose to ignore it.”

    You are the one who is full of shit. The Muslim organization CAIR responded that they are worried about the possibility of anti-Muslim hate crimes/backlash occurring after the terrorist attacks in Paris.

  100. “A little bit OT . When I lived in Tulsa in the 70′s I knew this Pakistani kid who had overstayed his student visa and so was here illegally. His English was without a trace of an accent and he was working and getting along fine. He was picked up by immigration at some point and right away realized they assumed he was a Mexican . So he kept his mouth shut and they deported him to Mexico which as he said was a helluva lot easier to get back from than Pakistan.”

    The Pakistani was mistaken for a Mexican. There is some phenotype overlap between Latin Americans and Middle Easterners/South Asians.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jefferson


    There is some phenotype overlap between Latin Americans and Middle Easterners/South Asians.
     
    That might have something to do with the half-millennium the Arabs sat on Spain.

    Ever notice that Hispanophones are the only Christian people that name their sons Jesus? The rest of us would find that a tad blasphemous

    , @Reg Cæsar
    @Jefferson


    The Pakistani was mistaken for a Mexican.
     
    The entire "backlash" from the Sept. 11 attacks consisted of one man in the Southwest with a Spanish surname who murdered a Sikh he mistook for an Arab.

    It would have been more efficient to have hired the Sikh to eliminate real Mohammedans, which I understand they will do with glee.
  101. Islam will be of no relevance in future Europe. Once it is overrun by subsaharan Africans what difference will it make whether one tribe calls himself muslim, the other christian, and the next animist? It makes no difference in subsaharan Africa today, and it will make no difference in the Europe of tomorrow. Or does anybody think there are fundamental differences between Northern Nigeria and the DR Congo?

    Regarding the question how to curb the biggest population explosion in human history which is currently going on in subsaharan Africa a voluntary sterilization of african women will not really do it. It would only be a even bigger motivation for african men to get children with non african women. So if anything this would have to be a proposal to both sexes.


    When I sit in the train, commuting into the city I often dream about that imaginary billionaire who pays for a huge stealth sterilization program…at least we still can dream

  102. “Bush declared Islam to be a “religion of peace” in the wake of 9-11”

    No true right wing Christian Texas Redneck would ever refer to Islam as a religion of peace. Most Texas Rednecks have a similar view of Islam that Chris Kyle had.

    Did you see in the news a group of White Texans protesting outside an Islamic conference in Garland. Sharia law has no place in Southern states which is the heart of Christian America.

    • Replies: @Hersh
    @Jefferson

    Here's Judge Napolitano on Sharia law in Texas
    http://insider.foxnews.com/2015/01/29/islamic-law-dallas-judge-napolitano-explains-how-sharia-court-texas-operates
    Per Judge Napolitano - All religions have their own religious courts in the US. US judges will enforce sharia or any other court or arbitration decision if the parties made an agreement that the sharia (or other) court's decision is final. Its like the litigants on Judge Judy agree to abide by her decision.

    , @Art Deco
    @Jefferson

    No true right wing Christian Texas Redneck would ever refer to Islam as a religion of peace.
    --
    George W. Bush's upbringing consisted of about 10 years in Midland, about 5 years in Houston, and about 7 years in New England, and little or no time in the country, much less in farming or outdoor work. Laura Bush spent her juvenile years in Midland and then to Houston and Austin for school, also with no time in the country. His family's Anglican, hers is Methodist, both were well-to-do when they came of age, and both received all their tertiary schooling at research universities. Why would you expect them to talk like Texas Rednecks, Christian or otherwise?

  103. @Jefferson
    "Bush declared Islam to be a “religion of peace” in the wake of 9-11"

    No true right wing Christian Texas Redneck would ever refer to Islam as a religion of peace. Most Texas Rednecks have a similar view of Islam that Chris Kyle had.

    Did you see in the news a group of White Texans protesting outside an Islamic conference in Garland. Sharia law has no place in Southern states which is the heart of Christian America.

    Replies: @Hersh, @Art Deco

    Here’s Judge Napolitano on Sharia law in Texas
    http://insider.foxnews.com/2015/01/29/islamic-law-dallas-judge-napolitano-explains-how-sharia-court-texas-operates
    Per Judge Napolitano – All religions have their own religious courts in the US. US judges will enforce sharia or any other court or arbitration decision if the parties made an agreement that the sharia (or other) court’s decision is final. Its like the litigants on Judge Judy agree to abide by her decision.

  104. @Ex Submarine Officer
    @rustbeltreader


    False flags might just turn out to be staged plots gone wrong.
     
    Exactly in accordance with Hanlon's Law - never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

    Two things that are pretty obvious about government bureaucracy:

    1) They learn by experience/pain avoidance - non-routine challenges, well they often screw them up until they can develop a manual/SOP. And almost by definition, each sting operation is going to have unique factors in the scenario. So a lot of them are going to go wrong.

    They can go wrong lots of ways, and probably the most common failure mode is just fizzling out on the launch pad, the marks don't get seduced or become wary, etc. But once in a while, a credible failure mode is losing control of the sequence, not enough oversight, the marks get rash/show initiative and get out in front of their handlers, some blunder or another, and the sting scenario proceeds further than anticipated.

    You do enough of these things, eventually the tumblers will line up on one of them in a way that allows such an outcome.

    2) Governments are extremely loathe to admit mistakes and are utterly opaque when they put their minds to it, as they also control the means of forcing transparency in societies (courts, bureaucracies, etc). So yeah, sting operation goes too far? I hardly see some FBI middle manager stepping up to the plate to say, yeah, me and my boys let that one get out of hand....

    Add to that a collusive, corporate media and, well, has anyone read Sydney Schanberg's piece about Vietnam POW/MIA's? I read it a while back and recently found it is archived on unz.com. He makes a pretty convincing case, but nobody would touch the story. And it is a story of government engaging in some lesser naughtiness/incompetence/sneakiness, still fairly serious, but not at all with a guiding plan whose outcome was, if Schanberg is correct, leaving American POWs behind to eventually die in SE Asia. Again, I found it credible, more a story of government indifference/incompetence/expediency with a post event coverup rather than an evilly directed plot from the beginning, as has been claimed by various Vietnam POW/MIA activists.

    People search for order and directedness in a universe that is mostly random. A lot of things are driven by this, from religion to belief in the eternal Jewish conspiracy. Even in the cases where the explanation is seemingly hostile to their interests (those wily darn Joos again, which, having to wade through all that all the time is one of the more tedious aspects of reading iSteve comments), I guess having an enemy to focus upon makes one feel empowered and less of a bit of insignificant flotsam in an indifferent universe.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @jack, @Art Deco

    So what’s it like in the Israeli Navy? Sunk any Palestinian kayaks, er battleships?

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    @jack

    Or American Intel ships?

  105. @Joe 90
    @ben tillman

    How does it disfavour whites, and relative to whom?

    Replies: @silviosilver

    If it’s not obvious it’s because anti-white values have become part of the air we breath. In brief, non-white immigration racially and culturally displaces and replaces whites. That’s bad enough in itself, but the process itself is accompanied by all manner of anti-white discrimination, anti-white hostility and, often enough, anti-white violence. I know it sounds crazy to be worried about the well-being of whites, but hey, whites are people too!

    • Replies: @Joe 90
    @silviosilver

    The point is to find the most effective strategy for promoting strict immigration controls. This may well strike people in the US as a lost cause. But in many European countries that's not the case. Even the UK, which has long had what amounts to a stable two-party system, is now seeing anti-immigration sentiment expressed through the rise of UKIP. Immigration is almost always among the top three issues of concern in opinion polls.

    It is even more pressing for European countries to establish sensible immigration policies than it is for the US. The world's highest fertility rates begin just the other side of the Mediterranean.

  106. @silviosilver
    @Joe 90

    If it's not obvious it's because anti-white values have become part of the air we breath. In brief, non-white immigration racially and culturally displaces and replaces whites. That's bad enough in itself, but the process itself is accompanied by all manner of anti-white discrimination, anti-white hostility and, often enough, anti-white violence. I know it sounds crazy to be worried about the well-being of whites, but hey, whites are people too!

    Replies: @Joe 90

    The point is to find the most effective strategy for promoting strict immigration controls. This may well strike people in the US as a lost cause. But in many European countries that’s not the case. Even the UK, which has long had what amounts to a stable two-party system, is now seeing anti-immigration sentiment expressed through the rise of UKIP. Immigration is almost always among the top three issues of concern in opinion polls.

    It is even more pressing for European countries to establish sensible immigration policies than it is for the US. The world’s highest fertility rates begin just the other side of the Mediterranean.

  107. @Jefferson
    "A little bit OT . When I lived in Tulsa in the 70′s I knew this Pakistani kid who had overstayed his student visa and so was here illegally. His English was without a trace of an accent and he was working and getting along fine. He was picked up by immigration at some point and right away realized they assumed he was a Mexican . So he kept his mouth shut and they deported him to Mexico which as he said was a helluva lot easier to get back from than Pakistan."

    The Pakistani was mistaken for a Mexican. There is some phenotype overlap between Latin Americans and Middle Easterners/South Asians.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    There is some phenotype overlap between Latin Americans and Middle Easterners/South Asians.

    That might have something to do with the half-millennium the Arabs sat on Spain.

    Ever notice that Hispanophones are the only Christian people that name their sons Jesus? The rest of us would find that a tad blasphemous

  108. @jack
    @Ex Submarine Officer

    So what's it like in the Israeli Navy? Sunk any Palestinian kayaks, er battleships?

    Replies: @Father O'Hara

    Or American Intel ships?

  109. @Jefferson
    "A little bit OT . When I lived in Tulsa in the 70′s I knew this Pakistani kid who had overstayed his student visa and so was here illegally. His English was without a trace of an accent and he was working and getting along fine. He was picked up by immigration at some point and right away realized they assumed he was a Mexican . So he kept his mouth shut and they deported him to Mexico which as he said was a helluva lot easier to get back from than Pakistan."

    The Pakistani was mistaken for a Mexican. There is some phenotype overlap between Latin Americans and Middle Easterners/South Asians.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Reg Cæsar

    The Pakistani was mistaken for a Mexican.

    The entire “backlash” from the Sept. 11 attacks consisted of one man in the Southwest with a Spanish surname who murdered a Sikh he mistook for an Arab.

    It would have been more efficient to have hired the Sikh to eliminate real Mohammedans, which I understand they will do with glee.

  110. @Jefferson
    "Bush declared Islam to be a “religion of peace” in the wake of 9-11"

    No true right wing Christian Texas Redneck would ever refer to Islam as a religion of peace. Most Texas Rednecks have a similar view of Islam that Chris Kyle had.

    Did you see in the news a group of White Texans protesting outside an Islamic conference in Garland. Sharia law has no place in Southern states which is the heart of Christian America.

    Replies: @Hersh, @Art Deco

    No true right wing Christian Texas Redneck would ever refer to Islam as a religion of peace.

    George W. Bush’s upbringing consisted of about 10 years in Midland, about 5 years in Houston, and about 7 years in New England, and little or no time in the country, much less in farming or outdoor work. Laura Bush spent her juvenile years in Midland and then to Houston and Austin for school, also with no time in the country. His family’s Anglican, hers is Methodist, both were well-to-do when they came of age, and both received all their tertiary schooling at research universities. Why would you expect them to talk like Texas Rednecks, Christian or otherwise?

  111. @Ex Submarine Officer
    @rustbeltreader


    False flags might just turn out to be staged plots gone wrong.
     
    Exactly in accordance with Hanlon's Law - never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

    Two things that are pretty obvious about government bureaucracy:

    1) They learn by experience/pain avoidance - non-routine challenges, well they often screw them up until they can develop a manual/SOP. And almost by definition, each sting operation is going to have unique factors in the scenario. So a lot of them are going to go wrong.

    They can go wrong lots of ways, and probably the most common failure mode is just fizzling out on the launch pad, the marks don't get seduced or become wary, etc. But once in a while, a credible failure mode is losing control of the sequence, not enough oversight, the marks get rash/show initiative and get out in front of their handlers, some blunder or another, and the sting scenario proceeds further than anticipated.

    You do enough of these things, eventually the tumblers will line up on one of them in a way that allows such an outcome.

    2) Governments are extremely loathe to admit mistakes and are utterly opaque when they put their minds to it, as they also control the means of forcing transparency in societies (courts, bureaucracies, etc). So yeah, sting operation goes too far? I hardly see some FBI middle manager stepping up to the plate to say, yeah, me and my boys let that one get out of hand....

    Add to that a collusive, corporate media and, well, has anyone read Sydney Schanberg's piece about Vietnam POW/MIA's? I read it a while back and recently found it is archived on unz.com. He makes a pretty convincing case, but nobody would touch the story. And it is a story of government engaging in some lesser naughtiness/incompetence/sneakiness, still fairly serious, but not at all with a guiding plan whose outcome was, if Schanberg is correct, leaving American POWs behind to eventually die in SE Asia. Again, I found it credible, more a story of government indifference/incompetence/expediency with a post event coverup rather than an evilly directed plot from the beginning, as has been claimed by various Vietnam POW/MIA activists.

    People search for order and directedness in a universe that is mostly random. A lot of things are driven by this, from religion to belief in the eternal Jewish conspiracy. Even in the cases where the explanation is seemingly hostile to their interests (those wily darn Joos again, which, having to wade through all that all the time is one of the more tedious aspects of reading iSteve comments), I guess having an enemy to focus upon makes one feel empowered and less of a bit of insignificant flotsam in an indifferent universe.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @jack, @Art Deco

    has anyone read Sydney Schanberg’s piece about Vietnam POW/MIA’s? I read it a while back and recently found it is archived on unz.com. He makes a pretty convincing case, but nobody would touch the story.

    You’d be relying a great deal on the veracity of someone whose job has been ‘investigative journalist’ and whose signature judgment was obsessive blaming of the Cambodian catastrophe on Henry Kissinger. Suggest maybe ‘no one’ will ‘touch the story’ because his peers know him. In any case, caveat lector.

  112. @Twinkie
    @Ex Submarine Officer


    Exactly in accordance with Hanlon’s Law – never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.
     
    Yes, indeed.

    The pattern with government bureaucracies is usually this: incompetence first, cover-up second.

    Generally, when bureaucracies mess things up, it is out of sheer incompetence, not some grand conspiracy by a nefarious cabal. And then the conspiracy of sorts starts when the involved parties try to cover up the screw-up. But that conspiracy of the cover up, rather than the product of a group of "evil geniuses," is usually a group effort by fools joined together by a common desire to preserve themselves.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    This is where Kevin MacDonald’s “group evolutionary strategy” concept is so useful.

  113. Reciprocity would be a(n infinitely) better way to frame immigration reform than “deracialization.” Hard reciprocal limits on immigration, using the criteria most favorable to us. E.g., China makes citizens of x American immigrants a year, so we allow only x Chinese immigrants to become citizens per year. This would slow immigration down to a trickle, and it would be the apogee of fairness. We could also correct for standards of living (citizenship in China is worth a small fraction of citizenship in America) and effectively have 0 immigration.

    The heart of anyone’s problem with Islam is Big Mo. He’s kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    Ah yes, those peaceful followers of Christ and Gautama.

    Liberals live for the religious equivalency argument, but it’s stupid. The examples provided by Christ and Mohammed could hardly be more different. Follow Mohammed’s example and you’re a warmonger, slaver, pedophile, and polygamist before we even get into the subtler points.

  114. Since it took twice the time I get to edit a post for the click to edit button to appear…

    Reciprocity would be a better way to frame immigration reform than “deracialization.” Hard reciprocal limits on immigration, using the criteria most favorable to us (absolute numbers or % of host population). E.g., China makes citizens of x American immigrants a year, so we allow only x Chinese immigrants to become citizens per year. This would slow immigration down to a trickle, and it would be the apogee of fairness. We could also correct for standards of living (citizenship in China is worth a small fraction of citizenship in America) and effectively have 0 immigration.

    The heart of anyone’s problem with Islam is Big Mo. He’s kinda hard to turn into Jesus, or Buddha.

    Ah yes, those peaceful followers of Christ and Gautama.

    Liberals live for the religious equivalency argument, but it’s stupid. The examples provided by Christ and Mohammed could hardly be more different. Follow Mohammed’s example and you’re a warmonger, slaver, pedophile, and polygamist before we even get into the subtler points.

    I suppose libs are so invested in religious equivalency in part because in one sense, they are all the same; they’re all equally inferior to liberalism as the ruling religion.

  115. @Earl Lemongrab
    Seriously, dude? Nothing bigger than a mud hut?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gondar#mediaviewer/File:Fasilides_Palace_02.jpg

    Replies: @Hacienda, @David, @athEIst

    Seriously, dude? Nothing bigger than a mud hut?

    Seriously , dude, what does 12N as a latitude mean to you?

  116. what the late Lawrence Auster noted concerning Western elites and Media

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