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The General Giap-Style Master Strategist of These Riots Was the "We Need Our Weaves" Lady
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During a 2016 Black Lives Matter riot that wreaked looting upon the shops of a black slum in Milwaukee, the sister of the man killed by the cops gave a memorable speech:

“Burnin’ down shit ain’t going to help nothin’! Y’all burnin’ down shit we need in our community. Take that shit to the suburbs. Burn that shit down! We need our shit! We need our weaves. I don’t wear it.* But we need it.”

* I.e., I have Good Hair.

But in 2020, the rioters have taken the We Need Our Weaves lady’s strategic insight to heart: why loot the crappy stores on your own street when you can just drive to Santa Monica and steal cool stuff?

 
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  1. Giap had to constantly fight conventionally-thinking leaders on his own side who honestly thought a pitched battle against the USA, with uniforms and lines, would be a good idea. Some of them felt it was necessary as the ritual culmination of the revolution and a symbol of legitimacy. That’s why he wrote that famous pamphlet. It wasn’t to boast to Americans, it was to knock sense into Commie leadership, and illustrates the same tendency to worship precedent discussed in Regis DeBray’s Revolution In The Revolution. In fact the idiots in that fight won, and the battle they finally got was a predictable disaster for them.
    ——-
    Hey, remember when Communist-confected anti-police defamation spiralled into riots and deaths, as Democrats refused to crush crime, and then Steve was all like [“]apoliticals will respond to this and so it’ll decide the election,[“] and Persuasion Man came out of his honeymoonatorium to wittily explain everything? And then we elected Trump. Good times.
    https://postimg.cc/5YRvWbfW

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @J.Ross

    In fact the idiots in that fight won, and the battle they finally got was a predictable disaster for them.

    If it is the smartest guy in the room making the plan, the idiots always have him outnumbered by definition. If the plan requires significantly above average intelligence, he may have his work cut out for him in persuading the others. I am heartened that the other side has bozos who insist on getting their way too, and succeed sometimes.

  2. NBC correspondent says “No police in sight.”

    That’s just how you want it, right?

  3. OT: COVID-19 in scandanavia seems to have hit Somalis harder, although there aren’t many numbers one can find on the topic.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-norway-immigrants/covid-19-takes-unequal-toll-on-immigrants-in-nordic-region-idUSKCN2260XW

  4. Looks like they have a quorum for the Santa Monica KKK AGM.

  5. Is this trivial for insurance? Or will insurance companies charge a lot more to those that were looted? Or will they distribute the loss in higher premiums across the board? Just like states hope they will get bailed out by the Feds?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    Most insurance polices have clauses saying they are not liable for damage caused by "civil insurrections", so many, if not most, of these people are SOL.

  6. Well, people are always complaining about the high-low coalition ganging up on middle america. Now we see the low just went after the high.

    For once middle america gets a break! Not many deplorables in Santa Monica.

    Maybe those nice folks who live in Santa Monica and have nice houses and drive nice cars will stop and think why they get to have such nice stuff. Why it isn’t just instantly taken from them. Why they can trust that the garbage will get picked up, and the electricity will stay on, and food will show up in the grocery store, and contracts will get enforced, etc. So they can pursue their dreams of doing…whatever it is people do in Santa Monica.

    Oh second thought…nah. They won’t learn a thing.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    @SimpleSong

    Great comment, SS. I think they may very well learn something, but only if they see guys with baseball bats or more coming down their very own street... and remembering how proud they were to implement gun control over the years ...

    At some point a different part of the brain kicks in, and it can convince the rest of it that it's been STUPID, STUPID, STUPID for the its whole life till that moment.

  7. It’s 13:30 here in Greater Boston on Sunday 31 May and I’ve just walked away from watching a live television broadcast of rioting, looting, arson, and a bit of the old ultra-violence playing itself out in areas of downtown Boston that are very familiar to me, e.g., Downtown Crossing, Tremont Street, the Boston Common, and Newbury Street. Some months ago I did predict what’s happening right now, although it happened a bit sooner than I expected, erupted spontaneously across the country to a degree that surprised me, and included large contingents of disaffected young Whites, which also surprised me although perhaps it shouldn’t have. All this was an inevitable and generally predictable outcome of the economic and social disruption caused by our ruling class’s stupid and draconian lockdown policies. Anyone, like me, who thought about it could have predicted this outcome as I did.

    Still it was shocking to see areas with which I was intimately familiar, where I am scheduled to go on Tuesday for a dental appointment, reduced to the same mayhem, chaotic violence, and thuggish destruction as we’ve seen erupt often but irregularly since the 1960s.

    But what most stunned, appalled, and disgusted me, as I watched scenes of rioting, looting and arson unfold in downtown Boston was the surreal, 1984-levels of reporting utterly divorced from reality. As I watched police being attacked, stores being vandalized and looted, fires being set, and mobs surging in real-time, tv camera coverage, disembodied reporters’ voices kept using words like “peaceful” and “protest”. They never once used the words like “vandalism”, “violence”, “riot”, “looting”, “arson”, and similar language. Only a mindless doublespeak, Ingsoc robot https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/doublethink could maintain this level of disconnect from reality. It terrifies me that I’ve now observed such doublethink and doublespeak shamelessly operating in the USA.

    • Thanks: Current History
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    How much power do the Irish mobsters have to enforce order if they want to?

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Jus' Sayin'...


    But what most stunned, appalled, and disgusted me, as I watched scenes of rioting, looting and arson unfold in downtown Boston was the surreal, 1984-levels of reporting utterly divorced from reality. As I watched police being attacked, stores being vandalized and looted, fires being set, and mobs surging in real-time, tv camera coverage, disembodied reporters’ voices kept using words like “peaceful” and “protest”. They never once used the words like “vandalism”, “violence”, “riot”, “looting”, “arson”, and similar language. Only a mindless doublespeak, Ingsoc robot https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/doublethink could maintain this level of disconnect from reality. It terrifies me that I’ve now observed such doublethink and doublespeak shamelessly operating in the USA.

     

    Welcome to the club, fellow American.

    I've been feeling the same way for a solid year, reading western media accounts of the 2019 riots here in Hong Kong.

    The best part is, no matter what the rioters in HK did in month after month after month of rioting -- attacking police with Molotov cocktails and piss-bombs, stoning one man to death, setting another on fire, beating the hell out of many, destroying innumerable businesses, shutting down roads and trashing public transport infrastructure -- they never lost their international status as 'protesters'.

    They still haven't -- just the other day I was listening to a Christian podcast absolutely extolling the glories of the brave HK 'protesters', who, at least according to this podcaster, had been facing down the PRC with nothing more than warm feelings of solidarity, and maybe a few hugs and worship songs.

    It's infuriating, but you're going to have to find ways to keep your blood pressure down.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Anonymous

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    This is a good comment and I agree with all of it except


    "erupted spontaneously"
     
    There's pretty good evidence that all the skinny white dudes in black bloc clothing (aka Antifa) leading the violent way are premeditated, coordinated and well funded.

    It seems the fifty year old dream of Charles Manson, the Weather Underground, Bill Ayers, ‎Bernadine Dohrn‎ et al. that white leftists will spark a general race war is finally coming to fruition. And all it took was a few billion dollars of oligarch money.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

  8. It’s almost as if there were shopping lists prepared and waiting for a blow-out discount event, kind of like Black Friday.

    What do you make of reports of pre-placed pallets of bricks appearing on the streets of a number of cities?

  9. anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    On 13 March 1954, Giap launched his offensive.[50] For 54 days, the Viet Minh seized position after position, pushing the French until they occupied only a small area of Dien Bien Phu. Colonel Piroth, the artillery commander, blamed himself for the destruction of French artillery superiority. He told his fellow officers that he had been “completely dishonoured” and committed suicide with a hand grenade.[51] General De Castries, French Commander in Dien Bien Phu, was captured alive in his bunker. The French surrendered on 7 May. Their casualties totaled over 2,200 killed, 5,600 wounded, and 11,721 taken prisoner. The following day the French government announced that it intended to withdraw from Vietnam.

    Giáp’s victory over the French was an important inspiration to anti-colonial campaigners around the world, particularly in French colonies, and most particularly in North Africa, not least because many of the troops fighting on the French side in Indochina were from North Africa.[52][53] The victory at Dien Bien Phu marked the beginning of a new era in the military struggles against colonialism for national liberation and independence movements in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and other colonised countries.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    @anonymous

    https://www.amazon.com/Vietnam-History-Stanley-Karnow/dp/0140265473

    ....a really good read, if you ever get the chance.

    I read it yrs ago and it still comes to mind. Good as a "toilet book".....something to read when you're sitting on the throne....

    Replies: @anon

    , @BenKenobi
    @anonymous


    the beginning of a new era in the military struggles against colonialism for national liberation and independence
     
    White people in the West are now in a fundamentally anti-colonial struggle against their former governments.

    Think about it.
  10. Funny how you’re never more than two degrees of separation from the subject of black people’s hair. It may indeed have some significance that the rest of us don’t comprehend.

  11. Let’s hope they don’t start looting Amazon warehouses, or the surplus revenue that funds the Washington Post might be in jeopardy.

  12. I like the guy’s California Republic flag hoodie. Did you know that bear is extinct?

  13. JimB says:

    All shopping will be done online in the future. Brick and mortar stores will become a thing of the past. Somebody will push a cube containing your groceries out of the back of a high security warehouse and it will slide down rollers onto the top of your car. Thanks to Antifa, BLM, Covid19, the end of cash, and Jeff Bezos, who will soon have half of all the money in the world.

  14. https://www.gulflive.com/news/2020/05/protests-turn-aggressive-again-in-us-sunday-stores-robbed-in-daylight-amid-calls-to-end-police-violence.html

    A local newspaper has an AP wire story about the protests….most of the protesters look white….

    And the riot map….Montana? New Mexico? Salt Lake? Do those areas even have significant black communities?

    Also….thought this was interesting…..the antifa types seem to be doing the burning…..not the brothas….

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/black-organizers-enraged-by-white-agitators-here-to-fck-shit-up-in-george-floyd-protests?ref=scroll

  15. If you are a Democratic congress critter who won by less than 10 percent last time around, you have to be looking at these shenanigans, as young people say these days, and thinking profound thoughts about whether or not the voters will blame you.

    You know that nothing riles the voters more than seeing criminals mistreat people who remind the voters of themselves or their family members, and seeing the criminals in their multitudes getting away with it. An issue that affects a lot more than ten percent of voters.

    What to do?

    We all know what the Democratic Congresscritters want to do. Whether they do what they want or whether they do the right thing is the question. I would never bet on them doing the right thing.

  16. We need our weaves. I don’t wear it. But we need it.

    I believe this is what they refer to as throwing shade.

  17. This is all so surreal and colossally stupid. The USA has so, sooooo many stupid young people that, having China takeover, social credit system and all, is a well deserved, natural development! Sort of unintended social Darwinism.

    Hong Kong protestors, today, on the other hand, are valiantly, rationally, proudly protesting over literally, life and death issues!….American protestors just wanna steal and break shit because, it’s fun and exciting after ” sheltering in place” for months – Americans are so easily bored and turn violent in a heartbeat, white, latino, black, whatever. I have always felt alienated by American youth, even when I was young.

    American young thugs (B & W & L) are narcissistic, entitled, colossally unaware “useless eaters ” (a la’ Yuval H.) These vandals deserve to be subjugated by China. But, hahhahahhahaaa, none of these entitled, belligerant, obnoxious people even know how China reacted to Tiananmen Square! – they don’t read. They do not know history, geography, etc., because they don’t read – just watch TikTok/Youtube/Instragrams…

    Chinese control will be a rude awakening for these ridiculous, violent imbeciles. And, it’s coming.

  18. @anonymous

    On 13 March 1954, Giap launched his offensive.[50] For 54 days, the Viet Minh seized position after position, pushing the French until they occupied only a small area of Dien Bien Phu. Colonel Piroth, the artillery commander, blamed himself for the destruction of French artillery superiority. He told his fellow officers that he had been "completely dishonoured" and committed suicide with a hand grenade.[51] General De Castries, French Commander in Dien Bien Phu, was captured alive in his bunker. The French surrendered on 7 May. Their casualties totaled over 2,200 killed, 5,600 wounded, and 11,721 taken prisoner. The following day the French government announced that it intended to withdraw from Vietnam.

    Giáp's victory over the French was an important inspiration to anti-colonial campaigners around the world, particularly in French colonies, and most particularly in North Africa, not least because many of the troops fighting on the French side in Indochina were from North Africa.[52][53] The victory at Dien Bien Phu marked the beginning of a new era in the military struggles against colonialism for national liberation and independence movements in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and other colonised countries.
     

    Replies: @Neoconned, @BenKenobi

    ….a really good read, if you ever get the chance.

    I read it yrs ago and it still comes to mind. Good as a “toilet book”…..something to read when you’re sitting on the throne….

    • Replies: @anon
    @Neoconned

    I read it yrs ago and it still comes to mind. Good as a “toilet book”

    Uh-oh...you know where that leads?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NygOFsExGMU

  19. @anonymous

    On 13 March 1954, Giap launched his offensive.[50] For 54 days, the Viet Minh seized position after position, pushing the French until they occupied only a small area of Dien Bien Phu. Colonel Piroth, the artillery commander, blamed himself for the destruction of French artillery superiority. He told his fellow officers that he had been "completely dishonoured" and committed suicide with a hand grenade.[51] General De Castries, French Commander in Dien Bien Phu, was captured alive in his bunker. The French surrendered on 7 May. Their casualties totaled over 2,200 killed, 5,600 wounded, and 11,721 taken prisoner. The following day the French government announced that it intended to withdraw from Vietnam.

    Giáp's victory over the French was an important inspiration to anti-colonial campaigners around the world, particularly in French colonies, and most particularly in North Africa, not least because many of the troops fighting on the French side in Indochina were from North Africa.[52][53] The victory at Dien Bien Phu marked the beginning of a new era in the military struggles against colonialism for national liberation and independence movements in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and other colonised countries.
     

    Replies: @Neoconned, @BenKenobi

    the beginning of a new era in the military struggles against colonialism for national liberation and independence

    White people in the West are now in a fundamentally anti-colonial struggle against their former governments.

    Think about it.

    • Agree: Gordo
  20. We need our weaves = Use a weed, rewoven.

  21. Anonymous[112] • Disclaimer says:

    These looters are collecting their urban outfits but look more like rats.

  22. I like the establishment conservatives who imply that rioting is fine as long as they loot White stores.

    We all knew this was coming, I thought it would be when the money runs dry but it looks like it has started early. The Asian century has begun.

    Worth remebering fascism arose to protect ordinary people from having their lives and livelihoods taken from them by communists.

  23. General Giap did well for a history teacher who had no military training. And he lived to be 102 years old.

    He once said that he read The Seven Pillars of Wisdom carefully, for guidance.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    @PiltdownMan

    General Giap did well for a history teacher who had no military training. And he lived to be 102 years old.


    The academic/scholar turned general model doesn't work too often, but when it does it can yield extraordinary results. Aside from Giap, Julius Caesar comes to mind.

    Replies: @nebulafox

  24. You know, it occurs to me that in the past upper class people could sell out their prole brethren without any consequences because of, basically, security by obscurity. They wouldn’t get hit by riots because if blacks decided to riot they didn’t know where the high end stores/neighborhoods were, how to get there, etc. Now, with the internet, they know where the nice stores are, where the nice neighborhoods are, how to get there and back.

  25. @Neoconned
    @anonymous

    https://www.amazon.com/Vietnam-History-Stanley-Karnow/dp/0140265473

    ....a really good read, if you ever get the chance.

    I read it yrs ago and it still comes to mind. Good as a "toilet book".....something to read when you're sitting on the throne....

    Replies: @anon

    I read it yrs ago and it still comes to mind. Good as a “toilet book”

    Uh-oh…you know where that leads?

  26. I can remember CNN praising Ms. Smith’s speech as a wonderful example of appealing to the better angels of our nature. That was accomplished by editing out the ‘take that shit to the suburbs’ part. I can’t recall if they ever ‘fessed up or apologized. Perhaps they did. Her brother, Syville, I think, had been running from the cops and when he tripped and fell a handgun fell from his waistband out onto the ground. Foolishly, he reached out and picked it up and was shot. The sick part is if you slow the footage down you realize he was trying to throw the gun away. As I recall, the gun appears to leave his grasp a split second before the first shot rang out. Of course, there was no way the cop could have ascertained his intentions in real time.

  27. Anonymous[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    Giap had to constantly fight conventionally-thinking leaders on his own side who honestly thought a pitched battle against the USA, with uniforms and lines, would be a good idea. Some of them felt it was necessary as the ritual culmination of the revolution and a symbol of legitimacy. That's why he wrote that famous pamphlet. It wasn't to boast to Americans, it was to knock sense into Commie leadership, and illustrates the same tendency to worship precedent discussed in Regis DeBray's Revolution In The Revolution. In fact the idiots in that fight won, and the battle they finally got was a predictable disaster for them.
    -------
    Hey, remember when Communist-confected anti-police defamation spiralled into riots and deaths, as Democrats refused to crush crime, and then Steve was all like ["]apoliticals will respond to this and so it'll decide the election,["] and Persuasion Man came out of his honeymoonatorium to wittily explain everything? And then we elected Trump. Good times.
    https://postimg.cc/5YRvWbfW

    Replies: @Anonymous

    In fact the idiots in that fight won, and the battle they finally got was a predictable disaster for them.

    If it is the smartest guy in the room making the plan, the idiots always have him outnumbered by definition. If the plan requires significantly above average intelligence, he may have his work cut out for him in persuading the others. I am heartened that the other side has bozos who insist on getting their way too, and succeed sometimes.

  28. “But in 2020, the rioters have taken the We Need Our Weaves lady’s strategic insight to heart: why loot the crappy stores on your own street when you can just drive to Santa Monica and steal cool stuff?”

    Looting the crappy stores in one’s own ‘hood = “Hey! Don’t ya’ll touch that shit! That’s our shit! We NEED our shit! C’mon people!”

    Looting Santa Monica stores (not one’s own ‘hood) = “K, THAT shit there, we can touch. Let’s touch that shit! We NEED that shit! It’s ours now, and we gon’ take it!”

    So shit in both the bad and now the good ‘hoods belong to the rioters, thugs, and looters.

    PS: Perhaps someone in SoCal would know, but would hope that the Korean owned businesses have learned their lesson since the ’92 Riots. And THIS time, they’re not letting them dare touch their shit!

    • Replies: @Antonius
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    That sort of prose could easily earn her advancement.

  29. @Jus' Sayin'...
    It’s 13:30 here in Greater Boston on Sunday 31 May and I’ve just walked away from watching a live television broadcast of rioting, looting, arson, and a bit of the old ultra-violence playing itself out in areas of downtown Boston that are very familiar to me, e.g., Downtown Crossing, Tremont Street, the Boston Common, and Newbury Street. Some months ago I did predict what’s happening right now, although it happened a bit sooner than I expected, erupted spontaneously across the country to a degree that surprised me, and included large contingents of disaffected young Whites, which also surprised me although perhaps it shouldn’t have. All this was an inevitable and generally predictable outcome of the economic and social disruption caused by our ruling class’s stupid and draconian lockdown policies. Anyone, like me, who thought about it could have predicted this outcome as I did.

    Still it was shocking to see areas with which I was intimately familiar, where I am scheduled to go on Tuesday for a dental appointment, reduced to the same mayhem, chaotic violence, and thuggish destruction as we’ve seen erupt often but irregularly since the 1960s.

    But what most stunned, appalled, and disgusted me, as I watched scenes of rioting, looting and arson unfold in downtown Boston was the surreal, 1984-levels of reporting utterly divorced from reality. As I watched police being attacked, stores being vandalized and looted, fires being set, and mobs surging in real-time, tv camera coverage, disembodied reporters’ voices kept using words like “peaceful” and “protest”. They never once used the words like “vandalism”, “violence”, “riot”, “looting”, “arson”, and similar language. Only a mindless doublespeak, Ingsoc robot https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/doublethink could maintain this level of disconnect from reality. It terrifies me that I’ve now observed such doublethink and doublespeak shamelessly operating in the USA.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri

    How much power do the Irish mobsters have to enforce order if they want to?

  30. @Jus' Sayin'...
    It’s 13:30 here in Greater Boston on Sunday 31 May and I’ve just walked away from watching a live television broadcast of rioting, looting, arson, and a bit of the old ultra-violence playing itself out in areas of downtown Boston that are very familiar to me, e.g., Downtown Crossing, Tremont Street, the Boston Common, and Newbury Street. Some months ago I did predict what’s happening right now, although it happened a bit sooner than I expected, erupted spontaneously across the country to a degree that surprised me, and included large contingents of disaffected young Whites, which also surprised me although perhaps it shouldn’t have. All this was an inevitable and generally predictable outcome of the economic and social disruption caused by our ruling class’s stupid and draconian lockdown policies. Anyone, like me, who thought about it could have predicted this outcome as I did.

    Still it was shocking to see areas with which I was intimately familiar, where I am scheduled to go on Tuesday for a dental appointment, reduced to the same mayhem, chaotic violence, and thuggish destruction as we’ve seen erupt often but irregularly since the 1960s.

    But what most stunned, appalled, and disgusted me, as I watched scenes of rioting, looting and arson unfold in downtown Boston was the surreal, 1984-levels of reporting utterly divorced from reality. As I watched police being attacked, stores being vandalized and looted, fires being set, and mobs surging in real-time, tv camera coverage, disembodied reporters’ voices kept using words like “peaceful” and “protest”. They never once used the words like “vandalism”, “violence”, “riot”, “looting”, “arson”, and similar language. Only a mindless doublespeak, Ingsoc robot https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/doublethink could maintain this level of disconnect from reality. It terrifies me that I’ve now observed such doublethink and doublespeak shamelessly operating in the USA.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri

    But what most stunned, appalled, and disgusted me, as I watched scenes of rioting, looting and arson unfold in downtown Boston was the surreal, 1984-levels of reporting utterly divorced from reality. As I watched police being attacked, stores being vandalized and looted, fires being set, and mobs surging in real-time, tv camera coverage, disembodied reporters’ voices kept using words like “peaceful” and “protest”. They never once used the words like “vandalism”, “violence”, “riot”, “looting”, “arson”, and similar language. Only a mindless doublespeak, Ingsoc robot https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/doublethink could maintain this level of disconnect from reality. It terrifies me that I’ve now observed such doublethink and doublespeak shamelessly operating in the USA.

    Welcome to the club, fellow American.

    I’ve been feeling the same way for a solid year, reading western media accounts of the 2019 riots here in Hong Kong.

    The best part is, no matter what the rioters in HK did in month after month after month of rioting — attacking police with Molotov cocktails and piss-bombs, stoning one man to death, setting another on fire, beating the hell out of many, destroying innumerable businesses, shutting down roads and trashing public transport infrastructure — they never lost their international status as ‘protesters’.

    They still haven’t — just the other day I was listening to a Christian podcast absolutely extolling the glories of the brave HK ‘protesters’, who, at least according to this podcaster, had been facing down the PRC with nothing more than warm feelings of solidarity, and maybe a few hugs and worship songs.

    It’s infuriating, but you’re going to have to find ways to keep your blood pressure down.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    So, how are things in HK? I've been dealing with a lot of personal issues offscreen, so I haven't been keeping up with events there.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    , @Anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    They still haven’t — just the other day I was listening to a Christian podcast absolutely extolling the glories of the brave HK ‘protesters’, who, at least according to this podcaster, had been facing down the PRC with nothing more than warm feelings of solidarity, and maybe a few hugs and worship songs.
     
    Are the protestors US funded, do you think? Or do you suspect they might have been sent by the CCP to stir things up so that China has an excuse to drop the hammer on HK once and for all?

    (Also, is Internet access in HK unfettered? Or is it indistinguishable from mainland China's more-or-less intranet? I have always wondered.)

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

  31. @SimpleSong
    Well, people are always complaining about the high-low coalition ganging up on middle america. Now we see the low just went after the high.

    For once middle america gets a break! Not many deplorables in Santa Monica.

    Maybe those nice folks who live in Santa Monica and have nice houses and drive nice cars will stop and think why they get to have such nice stuff. Why it isn't just instantly taken from them. Why they can trust that the garbage will get picked up, and the electricity will stay on, and food will show up in the grocery store, and contracts will get enforced, etc. So they can pursue their dreams of doing...whatever it is people do in Santa Monica.

    Oh second thought...nah. They won't learn a thing.

    Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Great comment, SS. I think they may very well learn something, but only if they see guys with baseball bats or more coming down their very own street… and remembering how proud they were to implement gun control over the years …

    At some point a different part of the brain kicks in, and it can convince the rest of it that it’s been STUPID, STUPID, STUPID for the its whole life till that moment.

  32. @Jus' Sayin'...
    It’s 13:30 here in Greater Boston on Sunday 31 May and I’ve just walked away from watching a live television broadcast of rioting, looting, arson, and a bit of the old ultra-violence playing itself out in areas of downtown Boston that are very familiar to me, e.g., Downtown Crossing, Tremont Street, the Boston Common, and Newbury Street. Some months ago I did predict what’s happening right now, although it happened a bit sooner than I expected, erupted spontaneously across the country to a degree that surprised me, and included large contingents of disaffected young Whites, which also surprised me although perhaps it shouldn’t have. All this was an inevitable and generally predictable outcome of the economic and social disruption caused by our ruling class’s stupid and draconian lockdown policies. Anyone, like me, who thought about it could have predicted this outcome as I did.

    Still it was shocking to see areas with which I was intimately familiar, where I am scheduled to go on Tuesday for a dental appointment, reduced to the same mayhem, chaotic violence, and thuggish destruction as we’ve seen erupt often but irregularly since the 1960s.

    But what most stunned, appalled, and disgusted me, as I watched scenes of rioting, looting and arson unfold in downtown Boston was the surreal, 1984-levels of reporting utterly divorced from reality. As I watched police being attacked, stores being vandalized and looted, fires being set, and mobs surging in real-time, tv camera coverage, disembodied reporters’ voices kept using words like “peaceful” and “protest”. They never once used the words like “vandalism”, “violence”, “riot”, “looting”, “arson”, and similar language. Only a mindless doublespeak, Ingsoc robot https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/doublethink could maintain this level of disconnect from reality. It terrifies me that I’ve now observed such doublethink and doublespeak shamelessly operating in the USA.

    Replies: @JohnnyWalker123, @The Last Real Calvinist, @Almost Missouri

    This is a good comment and I agree with all of it except

    “erupted spontaneously”

    There’s pretty good evidence that all the skinny white dudes in black bloc clothing (aka Antifa) leading the violent way are premeditated, coordinated and well funded.

    It seems the fifty year old dream of Charles Manson, the Weather Underground, Bill Ayers, ‎Bernadine Dohrn‎ et al. that white leftists will spark a general race war is finally coming to fruition. And all it took was a few billion dollars of oligarch money.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Almost Missouri

    A good point. Some financing and organizations certainly played a role in fomenting the riots which are now occurring across the country. As I have written elsewhere:


    What did surprise me was the significant involvement of young Whites in the current social disorders. These rioters seem mostly to be alumni of various George Soros-funded initiatives, e.g., Walk on Wall Street, Black Lives Matter, and the recent plethora of so-called antifa groups. In retrospect I should not have been surprised. These young Whites have been economically screwed for almost two decades. They were exceptionally impacted in negative ways by the current lockdowns. They perceive, correctly, that they do not have a rosy future. They have all the classical reasons for social alienation and revolutionary fervor. Soros should also get credit for wisely investing his money in schemes that he hoped would bring down our society. He is probably gloating at this very moment. He even looks a little like Doctor Evil.
     
  33. why loot the crappy stores on your own street when you can just drive to Santa Monica and steal cool stuff?

    This is brilliant. Typically riots happen far from where most people live, work or shop. That gives many people elsewhere the white privilege of feeling kind of bad for the rioters who mostly torch their own neighborhoods. But take the riots to the nicer parts of town and white liberals aren’t going to feel bad about you – they’re going to learn to hate you. And lots of people are still out of work and have nothing better to do. These riots could continue for a very long time. People are going to very quickly get tired of the party that has pandered to the rioters for the last 60 years, and that has implications for the fall elections.

    Let’s face it: this is the anger and hatred and sense of entitlement that the SJWs have been stoking for a decade or more. It was inevitable. If you’ve been her tried to have a rational, polite and respectful political conversation on Facebook or Twitter (and everyone of you have, I’m sure) you’ll know exactly what I mean.

    • Replies: @Brian Reilly
    @Wilkey

    Wilkey, Using a platform like Twitter® or Facebook® is not "having a conversation". Never was intended to be, never will be. Having a conversation is actually conversing with someone. Spouse, children, neighbors, fellow congregants, co-worker, that guy in front of you in line, a fellow walker on your daily constitutional, the guy at the diner counter next to you. That is conversation.

    Twitter® and Facebook® are specifically designed to prevent real conversation, even make real conversation undesirable or (in a Twitter®-perfect world) impossible. Stay as far away from Twitter® and Facebook® and all of their ilk as you can. They not your friend, not at all.

  34. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Jus' Sayin'...


    But what most stunned, appalled, and disgusted me, as I watched scenes of rioting, looting and arson unfold in downtown Boston was the surreal, 1984-levels of reporting utterly divorced from reality. As I watched police being attacked, stores being vandalized and looted, fires being set, and mobs surging in real-time, tv camera coverage, disembodied reporters’ voices kept using words like “peaceful” and “protest”. They never once used the words like “vandalism”, “violence”, “riot”, “looting”, “arson”, and similar language. Only a mindless doublespeak, Ingsoc robot https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/doublethink could maintain this level of disconnect from reality. It terrifies me that I’ve now observed such doublethink and doublespeak shamelessly operating in the USA.

     

    Welcome to the club, fellow American.

    I've been feeling the same way for a solid year, reading western media accounts of the 2019 riots here in Hong Kong.

    The best part is, no matter what the rioters in HK did in month after month after month of rioting -- attacking police with Molotov cocktails and piss-bombs, stoning one man to death, setting another on fire, beating the hell out of many, destroying innumerable businesses, shutting down roads and trashing public transport infrastructure -- they never lost their international status as 'protesters'.

    They still haven't -- just the other day I was listening to a Christian podcast absolutely extolling the glories of the brave HK 'protesters', who, at least according to this podcaster, had been facing down the PRC with nothing more than warm feelings of solidarity, and maybe a few hugs and worship songs.

    It's infuriating, but you're going to have to find ways to keep your blood pressure down.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Anonymous

    So, how are things in HK? I’ve been dealing with a lot of personal issues offscreen, so I haven’t been keeping up with events there.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @nebulafox


    So, how are things in HK?

     

    There was a push last week for a big wave of 'protesting' all over the city, but not much materialized. It's been pretty quiet in the past few weeks, all in all.

    Most people are edgy about the fallout from the impending national security law, obviously, but the reaction hasn't been as strong as might be expected. I'm wondering if some substantial portion of the population here who may publicly be neutral or who offer soft support for the democrats are secretly relieved. And of course there are lots of people who welcome outright Beijing stepping in.

    The protests-->rioting started just about a year ago here. We had eight months of that, and then COVID-19, and now more threats of public order decay as the virus threat fades. A year's worth of severe social disruption is no joke. I'm hoping there's a genuine desire here to return to some approximation of normal.

    Other than the masking, day-to-day life here is not far off that standard. Restaurants and bars are pretty much back in full swing, my church had a congregation in the building for the first time in a long while yesterday, and malls and other public areas seem as crowded as ever over the weekends.

    I'm (very) cautiously optimistic at the moment.

    How about Singapore?

    Replies: @nebulafox

  35. @nebulafox
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    So, how are things in HK? I've been dealing with a lot of personal issues offscreen, so I haven't been keeping up with events there.

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    So, how are things in HK?

    There was a push last week for a big wave of ‘protesting’ all over the city, but not much materialized. It’s been pretty quiet in the past few weeks, all in all.

    Most people are edgy about the fallout from the impending national security law, obviously, but the reaction hasn’t been as strong as might be expected. I’m wondering if some substantial portion of the population here who may publicly be neutral or who offer soft support for the democrats are secretly relieved. And of course there are lots of people who welcome outright Beijing stepping in.

    The protests–>rioting started just about a year ago here. We had eight months of that, and then COVID-19, and now more threats of public order decay as the virus threat fades. A year’s worth of severe social disruption is no joke. I’m hoping there’s a genuine desire here to return to some approximation of normal.

    Other than the masking, day-to-day life here is not far off that standard. Restaurants and bars are pretty much back in full swing, my church had a congregation in the building for the first time in a long while yesterday, and malls and other public areas seem as crowded as ever over the weekends.

    I’m (very) cautiously optimistic at the moment.

    How about Singapore?

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I'm not shocked. To me, the MSM always played down the very real pockets of pro-PRC or anti-protester sentiment in Hong Kong, especially among tech types who want further integration with the new Silicon Valley in Shenzhen. Knowing that is part of why I advocate being very careful about how the US deals with Hong Kong, even if I'm more bullish against the CPC elsewhere.

    The circuit breaker ends tomorrow and we go into Phase 1 of "reopening". My workplace does not reopen, and neither is my gym, or the library, or even a cafe for sitting down, so nothing practical is changing much. Churches and mosques and temples remain closed, too. If we don't get a dramatic spike in cases, we hope to go to Phase 2 in 2-4 weeks. There have been some people who have been quietly visiting each other's homes-knew a whole bunch of Malays who did that on Eid-and the government seems to tolerate it if it isn't too egregious.

    The overwhelming majority of cases are Bangladeshi and Indian guest workers: the government dropped the ball on them big time initially. In terms of resident cases, Singapore is down to the level of South Korea or Taiwan.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

  36. @Almost Missouri
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    This is a good comment and I agree with all of it except


    "erupted spontaneously"
     
    There's pretty good evidence that all the skinny white dudes in black bloc clothing (aka Antifa) leading the violent way are premeditated, coordinated and well funded.

    It seems the fifty year old dream of Charles Manson, the Weather Underground, Bill Ayers, ‎Bernadine Dohrn‎ et al. that white leftists will spark a general race war is finally coming to fruition. And all it took was a few billion dollars of oligarch money.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    A good point. Some financing and organizations certainly played a role in fomenting the riots which are now occurring across the country. As I have written elsewhere:

    What did surprise me was the significant involvement of young Whites in the current social disorders. These rioters seem mostly to be alumni of various George Soros-funded initiatives, e.g., Walk on Wall Street, Black Lives Matter, and the recent plethora of so-called antifa groups. In retrospect I should not have been surprised. These young Whites have been economically screwed for almost two decades. They were exceptionally impacted in negative ways by the current lockdowns. They perceive, correctly, that they do not have a rosy future. They have all the classical reasons for social alienation and revolutionary fervor. Soros should also get credit for wisely investing his money in schemes that he hoped would bring down our society. He is probably gloating at this very moment. He even looks a little like Doctor Evil.

  37. @The Last Real Calvinist
    @nebulafox


    So, how are things in HK?

     

    There was a push last week for a big wave of 'protesting' all over the city, but not much materialized. It's been pretty quiet in the past few weeks, all in all.

    Most people are edgy about the fallout from the impending national security law, obviously, but the reaction hasn't been as strong as might be expected. I'm wondering if some substantial portion of the population here who may publicly be neutral or who offer soft support for the democrats are secretly relieved. And of course there are lots of people who welcome outright Beijing stepping in.

    The protests-->rioting started just about a year ago here. We had eight months of that, and then COVID-19, and now more threats of public order decay as the virus threat fades. A year's worth of severe social disruption is no joke. I'm hoping there's a genuine desire here to return to some approximation of normal.

    Other than the masking, day-to-day life here is not far off that standard. Restaurants and bars are pretty much back in full swing, my church had a congregation in the building for the first time in a long while yesterday, and malls and other public areas seem as crowded as ever over the weekends.

    I'm (very) cautiously optimistic at the moment.

    How about Singapore?

    Replies: @nebulafox

    I’m not shocked. To me, the MSM always played down the very real pockets of pro-PRC or anti-protester sentiment in Hong Kong, especially among tech types who want further integration with the new Silicon Valley in Shenzhen. Knowing that is part of why I advocate being very careful about how the US deals with Hong Kong, even if I’m more bullish against the CPC elsewhere.

    The circuit breaker ends tomorrow and we go into Phase 1 of “reopening”. My workplace does not reopen, and neither is my gym, or the library, or even a cafe for sitting down, so nothing practical is changing much. Churches and mosques and temples remain closed, too. If we don’t get a dramatic spike in cases, we hope to go to Phase 2 in 2-4 weeks. There have been some people who have been quietly visiting each other’s homes-knew a whole bunch of Malays who did that on Eid-and the government seems to tolerate it if it isn’t too egregious.

    The overwhelming majority of cases are Bangladeshi and Indian guest workers: the government dropped the ball on them big time initially. In terms of resident cases, Singapore is down to the level of South Korea or Taiwan.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    @nebulafox


    To me, the MSM always played down the very real pockets of pro-PRC or anti-protester sentiment in Hong Kong
     
    86% of the seats in the recent were won by anti-Beijing parties, which came as a great shock to Xi Jinping.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_Hong_Kong_local_elections

    The Singapore coverage of the election is likely to be hugely negative, given the nation's interest in badmouthing its biggest competitor in the Far Eastern money laundering biz. There's also the fear of revived political activism arising locally against the Singapore government's 50+ year one-party reign. But the results in the Hong Kong election were a resounding thumbs down against Beijing's hard-edged tactics vis-a-vis the demonstrators, including bans on demonstrations and the frequent use of tear gas against peaceful demonstrators.

    https://qz.com/1755101/beijing-suffers-heavy-defeat-in-hong-kong-district-election/

    The results suggest that the government’s strategy of trying to split the protest movement by trying to divide the movement’s more moderate factions from the “radical” groups, and portraying the populace as a “silent majority” that has been cowed into submission by “violent rioters,” hasn’t been particularly effective. The cohesion of the protest movement is backed up by polls conducted by the Chinese University of Hong Kong showing that over 50% of people (link in Chinese) distrust the police and the government. A majority of respondents also said that they could understand why protesters felt the need to turn to more violent actions in the face of government intransigence. Pro-Beijing candidates, who mostly ran on a platform of ending violence and preserving peace in the city, failed to resonate with voters.

    Some joked that the biggest defeats for the pro-Beijing camp occurred in places that had borne the brunt of the force’s indiscriminate use of tear gas, such as Tai Po, a residential suburb in the New Territories area, and Wong Tai Sin, where residents turned out in droves in their flip-flops and t-shirts to drive away police one evening in August. The pro-democracy camp won all the seats in those two districts.

    Beyond being a referendum on the protest movement, the district council elections do have real impact on politics at a higher level. Hong Kongers do not get to choose their chief executive, who is instead “elected” by an elite committee of 1,200 people, carefully rigged to deliver someone accommodating to Beijing. District councilors get to choose about 120 of the people on that committee. More pro-democracy councilors means more pro-democracy people might get on that selection committee, which will choose the next chief executive in 2022.
     
  38. @Wilkey

    why loot the crappy stores on your own street when you can just drive to Santa Monica and steal cool stuff?
     
    This is brilliant. Typically riots happen far from where most people live, work or shop. That gives many people elsewhere the white privilege of feeling kind of bad for the rioters who mostly torch their own neighborhoods. But take the riots to the nicer parts of town and white liberals aren’t going to feel bad about you - they’re going to learn to hate you. And lots of people are still out of work and have nothing better to do. These riots could continue for a very long time. People are going to very quickly get tired of the party that has pandered to the rioters for the last 60 years, and that has implications for the fall elections.

    Let’s face it: this is the anger and hatred and sense of entitlement that the SJWs have been stoking for a decade or more. It was inevitable. If you’ve been her tried to have a rational, polite and respectful political conversation on Facebook or Twitter (and everyone of you have, I’m sure) you’ll know exactly what I mean.

    Replies: @Brian Reilly

    Wilkey, Using a platform like Twitter® or Facebook® is not “having a conversation”. Never was intended to be, never will be. Having a conversation is actually conversing with someone. Spouse, children, neighbors, fellow congregants, co-worker, that guy in front of you in line, a fellow walker on your daily constitutional, the guy at the diner counter next to you. That is conversation.

    Twitter® and Facebook® are specifically designed to prevent real conversation, even make real conversation undesirable or (in a Twitter®-perfect world) impossible. Stay as far away from Twitter® and Facebook® and all of their ilk as you can. They not your friend, not at all.

  39. @XYZ (no Mr.)
    Is this trivial for insurance? Or will insurance companies charge a lot more to those that were looted? Or will they distribute the loss in higher premiums across the board? Just like states hope they will get bailed out by the Feds?

    Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Most insurance polices have clauses saying they are not liable for damage caused by “civil insurrections”, so many, if not most, of these people are SOL.

  40. @PiltdownMan
    General Giap did well for a history teacher who had no military training. And he lived to be 102 years old.

    He once said that he read The Seven Pillars of Wisdom carefully, for guidance.

    Replies: @kaganovitch

    General Giap did well for a history teacher who had no military training. And he lived to be 102 years old.

    The academic/scholar turned general model doesn’t work too often, but when it does it can yield extraordinary results. Aside from Giap, Julius Caesar comes to mind.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @kaganovitch

    Didn't Caesar win the Grass Crown when he was young, though? I remember in his Plutarch entry that in contrast to Cicero, Caesar specifically disdained training too hard in rhetoric on the grounds that his real efforts should be dedicated to war and administration. His natural talent made him a high second-rank orator. Caesar was more famous as a lawyer and a politician until later in life, but he wasn't non-martially inclined. Giap, similarly, took an interest in military strategy long before military life.

    Another example I can think of: though he was no academic, Sulla lacked any military experience until his 30s. He was basically a declassed wastrel. Once he was in, though, he seemed to absolutely thrive under the pressure and structure. There are a lot of guys like that in the military.

  41. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Jus' Sayin'...


    But what most stunned, appalled, and disgusted me, as I watched scenes of rioting, looting and arson unfold in downtown Boston was the surreal, 1984-levels of reporting utterly divorced from reality. As I watched police being attacked, stores being vandalized and looted, fires being set, and mobs surging in real-time, tv camera coverage, disembodied reporters’ voices kept using words like “peaceful” and “protest”. They never once used the words like “vandalism”, “violence”, “riot”, “looting”, “arson”, and similar language. Only a mindless doublespeak, Ingsoc robot https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/doublethink could maintain this level of disconnect from reality. It terrifies me that I’ve now observed such doublethink and doublespeak shamelessly operating in the USA.

     

    Welcome to the club, fellow American.

    I've been feeling the same way for a solid year, reading western media accounts of the 2019 riots here in Hong Kong.

    The best part is, no matter what the rioters in HK did in month after month after month of rioting -- attacking police with Molotov cocktails and piss-bombs, stoning one man to death, setting another on fire, beating the hell out of many, destroying innumerable businesses, shutting down roads and trashing public transport infrastructure -- they never lost their international status as 'protesters'.

    They still haven't -- just the other day I was listening to a Christian podcast absolutely extolling the glories of the brave HK 'protesters', who, at least according to this podcaster, had been facing down the PRC with nothing more than warm feelings of solidarity, and maybe a few hugs and worship songs.

    It's infuriating, but you're going to have to find ways to keep your blood pressure down.

    Replies: @nebulafox, @Anonymous

    They still haven’t — just the other day I was listening to a Christian podcast absolutely extolling the glories of the brave HK ‘protesters’, who, at least according to this podcaster, had been facing down the PRC with nothing more than warm feelings of solidarity, and maybe a few hugs and worship songs.

    Are the protestors US funded, do you think? Or do you suspect they might have been sent by the CCP to stir things up so that China has an excuse to drop the hammer on HK once and for all?

    (Also, is Internet access in HK unfettered? Or is it indistinguishable from mainland China’s more-or-less intranet? I have always wondered.)

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Anonymous

    Many, many people in HK assume that the rioters here were funded at least in part by the USA. It is pretty hard to deny connections when leading activists such as Joshua Wong are invited to address the US Congress at the absolute height of the rioting, and are then loved up by both Nancy Pelosi and Marco Rubio. Supporting the HK protests seemed to be the single topic both US political parties managed to agree on in 2019.

    Internet access in HK is totally separate from the mainland; it's the same here as in any western country.

    Replies: @Anonymous

  42. @Anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist


    They still haven’t — just the other day I was listening to a Christian podcast absolutely extolling the glories of the brave HK ‘protesters’, who, at least according to this podcaster, had been facing down the PRC with nothing more than warm feelings of solidarity, and maybe a few hugs and worship songs.
     
    Are the protestors US funded, do you think? Or do you suspect they might have been sent by the CCP to stir things up so that China has an excuse to drop the hammer on HK once and for all?

    (Also, is Internet access in HK unfettered? Or is it indistinguishable from mainland China's more-or-less intranet? I have always wondered.)

    Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Many, many people in HK assume that the rioters here were funded at least in part by the USA. It is pretty hard to deny connections when leading activists such as Joshua Wong are invited to address the US Congress at the absolute height of the rioting, and are then loved up by both Nancy Pelosi and Marco Rubio. Supporting the HK protests seemed to be the single topic both US political parties managed to agree on in 2019.

    Internet access in HK is totally separate from the mainland; it’s the same here as in any western country.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Thank you for the reply. I see now just how naïf my second question was: the Americans stand to gain far more from the protests than the mainland Chinese, who already control HK.


    Internet access in HK is totally separate from the mainland; it’s the same here as in any western country.
     
    Do you suppose that's because the Chinese sense that unfettered Internet access is necessary for HK to continue laying the golden eggs? Or is there another circumstance that keeps HK's Internet access open (e.g the British making it a condition of the handover)?
  43. @kaganovitch
    @PiltdownMan

    General Giap did well for a history teacher who had no military training. And he lived to be 102 years old.


    The academic/scholar turned general model doesn't work too often, but when it does it can yield extraordinary results. Aside from Giap, Julius Caesar comes to mind.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    Didn’t Caesar win the Grass Crown when he was young, though? I remember in his Plutarch entry that in contrast to Cicero, Caesar specifically disdained training too hard in rhetoric on the grounds that his real efforts should be dedicated to war and administration. His natural talent made him a high second-rank orator. Caesar was more famous as a lawyer and a politician until later in life, but he wasn’t non-martially inclined. Giap, similarly, took an interest in military strategy long before military life.

    Another example I can think of: though he was no academic, Sulla lacked any military experience until his 30s. He was basically a declassed wastrel. Once he was in, though, he seemed to absolutely thrive under the pressure and structure. There are a lot of guys like that in the military.

  44. Anonymous[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    @Anonymous

    Many, many people in HK assume that the rioters here were funded at least in part by the USA. It is pretty hard to deny connections when leading activists such as Joshua Wong are invited to address the US Congress at the absolute height of the rioting, and are then loved up by both Nancy Pelosi and Marco Rubio. Supporting the HK protests seemed to be the single topic both US political parties managed to agree on in 2019.

    Internet access in HK is totally separate from the mainland; it's the same here as in any western country.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    Thank you for the reply. I see now just how naïf my second question was: the Americans stand to gain far more from the protests than the mainland Chinese, who already control HK.

    Internet access in HK is totally separate from the mainland; it’s the same here as in any western country.

    Do you suppose that’s because the Chinese sense that unfettered Internet access is necessary for HK to continue laying the golden eggs? Or is there another circumstance that keeps HK’s Internet access open (e.g the British making it a condition of the handover)?

  45. @nebulafox
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I'm not shocked. To me, the MSM always played down the very real pockets of pro-PRC or anti-protester sentiment in Hong Kong, especially among tech types who want further integration with the new Silicon Valley in Shenzhen. Knowing that is part of why I advocate being very careful about how the US deals with Hong Kong, even if I'm more bullish against the CPC elsewhere.

    The circuit breaker ends tomorrow and we go into Phase 1 of "reopening". My workplace does not reopen, and neither is my gym, or the library, or even a cafe for sitting down, so nothing practical is changing much. Churches and mosques and temples remain closed, too. If we don't get a dramatic spike in cases, we hope to go to Phase 2 in 2-4 weeks. There have been some people who have been quietly visiting each other's homes-knew a whole bunch of Malays who did that on Eid-and the government seems to tolerate it if it isn't too egregious.

    The overwhelming majority of cases are Bangladeshi and Indian guest workers: the government dropped the ball on them big time initially. In terms of resident cases, Singapore is down to the level of South Korea or Taiwan.

    Replies: @Johann Ricke

    To me, the MSM always played down the very real pockets of pro-PRC or anti-protester sentiment in Hong Kong

    86% of the seats in the recent were won by anti-Beijing parties, which came as a great shock to Xi Jinping.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_Hong_Kong_local_elections

    The Singapore coverage of the election is likely to be hugely negative, given the nation’s interest in badmouthing its biggest competitor in the Far Eastern money laundering biz. There’s also the fear of revived political activism arising locally against the Singapore government’s 50+ year one-party reign. But the results in the Hong Kong election were a resounding thumbs down against Beijing’s hard-edged tactics vis-a-vis the demonstrators, including bans on demonstrations and the frequent use of tear gas against peaceful demonstrators.

    https://qz.com/1755101/beijing-suffers-heavy-defeat-in-hong-kong-district-election/

    The results suggest that the government’s strategy of trying to split the protest movement by trying to divide the movement’s more moderate factions from the “radical” groups, and portraying the populace as a “silent majority” that has been cowed into submission by “violent rioters,” hasn’t been particularly effective. The cohesion of the protest movement is backed up by polls conducted by the Chinese University of Hong Kong showing that over 50% of people (link in Chinese) distrust the police and the government. A majority of respondents also said that they could understand why protesters felt the need to turn to more violent actions in the face of government intransigence. Pro-Beijing candidates, who mostly ran on a platform of ending violence and preserving peace in the city, failed to resonate with voters.

    Some joked that the biggest defeats for the pro-Beijing camp occurred in places that had borne the brunt of the force’s indiscriminate use of tear gas, such as Tai Po, a residential suburb in the New Territories area, and Wong Tai Sin, where residents turned out in droves in their flip-flops and t-shirts to drive away police one evening in August. The pro-democracy camp won all the seats in those two districts.

    Beyond being a referendum on the protest movement, the district council elections do have real impact on politics at a higher level. Hong Kongers do not get to choose their chief executive, who is instead “elected” by an elite committee of 1,200 people, carefully rigged to deliver someone accommodating to Beijing. District councilors get to choose about 120 of the people on that committee. More pro-democracy councilors means more pro-democracy people might get on that selection committee, which will choose the next chief executive in 2022.

  46. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "But in 2020, the rioters have taken the We Need Our Weaves lady’s strategic insight to heart: why loot the crappy stores on your own street when you can just drive to Santa Monica and steal cool stuff?"

    Looting the crappy stores in one's own 'hood = "Hey! Don't ya'll touch that shit! That's our shit! We NEED our shit! C'mon people!"

    Looting Santa Monica stores (not one's own 'hood) = "K, THAT shit there, we can touch. Let's touch that shit! We NEED that shit! It's ours now, and we gon' take it!"

    So shit in both the bad and now the good 'hoods belong to the rioters, thugs, and looters.

    PS: Perhaps someone in SoCal would know, but would hope that the Korean owned businesses have learned their lesson since the '92 Riots. And THIS time, they're not letting them dare touch their shit!

    Replies: @Antonius

    That sort of prose could easily earn her advancement.

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