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Maybe in Kazakhstan you can still get away with this kind of impertinence … But how much longer here in the land of the free and the home of the brave can a white and/or Asian male like this expect to not have a black mark go on his Permanent Record, especially if he happens to smirk?

 
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  1. It’s okay to be.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    @Polymath


    It’s okay to be.
     
    Which quickly devolves to "It's Okay" and--as with so many other things--Monty Python was here first, with the man who began every episode of the Flying Circus with the single word IT'S.

    https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/montypython/images/7/7f/It%27s1.jpg

    Soon, alas, it will be time for us to return to the ocean from whence we came.

    Replies: @Olorin

    , @Dieter Kief
    @Polymath

    "It's ok to be", right Polymath, but beware: "It ain't that easy to be either" (Heidegger) -at least not in our "Time" (this old Meßkirchian*** thinker again).

    *** I was in radiatingly and overwhelmingly May-beautiful Meßkirch yesterday, with its outlook on the Alps, shining from new snow in the most beautiful and soft (a little hazy) white that there is, as far as I know - so - - - Jubilate!

    Replies: @jamie b.

    , @Desiderius
    @Polymath

    Around here we believe in progress. Being isn’t enough. One must be always becoming.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  2. TGGP says: • Website

    This is right out of a Cold War era joke I heard some time back: a man is handing out pamphlets at a train station and is arrested by the Stasi. They find at all the pamphlets are blank and ask the man why he didn’t put anything on them. He responds “Do I really need to say something so obvious?”

  3. Anon7 says:

    Speaking of smirking:

    “Nicholas Sandmann, the kid whose smirking face went viral last month when he and his Kentucky Catholic school friends appeared to surround an Omaha tribe elder during the March for Life protest in Washington D.C., is suing the Washington Post over coverage of that incident.”

    There could be money in smirking.

    • Replies: @Anon
    @Anon7

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/04/10/nick-sandmann-lawsuit-washington-post-files-dismiss-teens-case/3421926002/

    Washington Post files to dismiss Covington Catholic teen's defamation lawsuit

    In


    the motion to dismiss, the Washington Post notes that the label suit only cites early news articles that "included the observations and perspectives of the principal Native American participant in the incident" and others.

    "It was neither false nor defamatory, however, for the Post to report the comments of eyewitnesses, including the only participants who were speaking publicly about the matter on the day that videos of the event went viral on the internet," the motion said.

    "Newspapers are often unable to publish a complete account of events when they first come to light. Stories often develop over time, as more witnesses emerge."

     

    All this may be true, but it's something for the finder of fact, the trial court, to determine after examining the evidence. This is not the stuff of dismissals. We'll see how biased the federal court down there is based on how they treat this.

    I wonder if the Post is playing brinksmanship before settling. A trial, with discovery of all their leftist, sarcastic, SJW millennial writing staff's SMS, social media, email, and so on that has been preserved under the initial evidence preservation order is something the Post doesn't want to happen. I look forward the the release of the video depositions.

    Replies: @Barnard, @J.Ross

  4. Meanwhile……

    After watching this, I had to cleanse my mind with some Edith Wharton…..

  5. Anonymous[307] • Disclaimer says:

    Well, in today’s England, one can get summarily arrested and tried for burning a cardboard shoebox in one’s own backyard, (no, it’s not an anti pollution ordnance run wild), amongst a small party of friends, with the proviso that the said box has a ‘naughty’ word inscribed upon it.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Anonymous

    I remember reading in a work of popular history that in 16th century London, a wax effigy stuck with pins, believed to represent the monarch Elizabeth I , was found secreted in an obscure corner of Lincoln's Inn Fields.

    The discovery of that wax doll produced a state of national crisis and panic, the most exhaustive searches and enquiries were launched to find the culprit.

  6. Reminds me the jokes about communism times in POland (“I have not said anything!” “We both know, what you wanted to say”) and the real happenings by Major Frydrych and his dwarfs.

    https://culture.pl/en/article/the-orange-alternative-there-is-no-freedom-without-dwarfs

    • Replies: @John Derbyshire
    @szopen

    Conversation in the cattle car headed to Siberia.
    "How long are you in for?"
    "25 years."
    "What did you do to get 25 years?"
    "Nothing!"
    "Oh, you're lying. Everyone knows: for nothing, the sentence is only 10 years."

  7. Anonymous[307] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Well, in today's England, one can get summarily arrested and tried for burning a cardboard shoebox in one's own backyard, (no, it's not an anti pollution ordnance run wild), amongst a small party of friends, with the proviso that the said box has a 'naughty' word inscribed upon it.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    I remember reading in a work of popular history that in 16th century London, a wax effigy stuck with pins, believed to represent the monarch Elizabeth I , was found secreted in an obscure corner of Lincoln’s Inn Fields.

    The discovery of that wax doll produced a state of national crisis and panic, the most exhaustive searches and enquiries were launched to find the culprit.

  8. You got me … I’m drawing a blank.

  9. Dina’s quite Asian looking. It’s all clinal: There is no race!

  10. Anon[381] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon7
    Speaking of smirking:

    “Nicholas Sandmann, the kid whose smirking face went viral last month when he and his Kentucky Catholic school friends appeared to surround an Omaha tribe elder during the March for Life protest in Washington D.C., is suing the Washington Post over coverage of that incident.”

    There could be money in smirking.

    Replies: @Anon

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/04/10/nick-sandmann-lawsuit-washington-post-files-dismiss-teens-case/3421926002/

    Washington Post files to dismiss Covington Catholic teen’s defamation lawsuit

    In

    the motion to dismiss, the Washington Post notes that the label suit only cites early news articles that “included the observations and perspectives of the principal Native American participant in the incident” and others.

    “It was neither false nor defamatory, however, for the Post to report the comments of eyewitnesses, including the only participants who were speaking publicly about the matter on the day that videos of the event went viral on the internet,” the motion said.

    “Newspapers are often unable to publish a complete account of events when they first come to light. Stories often develop over time, as more witnesses emerge.”

    All this may be true, but it’s something for the finder of fact, the trial court, to determine after examining the evidence. This is not the stuff of dismissals. We’ll see how biased the federal court down there is based on how they treat this.

    I wonder if the Post is playing brinksmanship before settling. A trial, with discovery of all their leftist, sarcastic, SJW millennial writing staff’s SMS, social media, email, and so on that has been preserved under the initial evidence preservation order is something the Post doesn’t want to happen. I look forward the the release of the video depositions.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    @Anon

    I don't know that they care about the discovery. Is there anything they could say that would shock and offend a liberal Post reader? The initial lawsuit was for such a high dollar amount, I don't know that a settlement is going to happen here either. These people are zealots and think the work they do is holy. Settling to them would be an admission they were wrong in how they treated Sandmann and the other kids. The only way I see a settlement is if the insurance company pushes them for it.

    , @J.Ross
    @Anon

    All mainstream journalism has been doing this very clumsy thing of "finding" people on the street who sound like activists reading off a prepared talking points memo -- which would be fine, if they balanced it with people who don't think that the sun shines out of George Soros, but they never do that outside "investigative" pieces. When they do make a pretension of balance (ie, on This American Life) they find inarticulate morons and jump on every understandable malaprop, or they "summarize" like a cheap defense attorney, or it's to enable a self-confession.
    As in Soviet journalism, thought criminals are allowed to speak to show how wrong they are or to confess their previous crimes. No accurate representation of right-wing ideas will be found.
    Obviously, the court doesn't care about this, and will not make the connection to this larger issue from Sandmann effectively just being the eight millionth victim of this uncriticized process. But the defamation (which really happened after the initial reporting, mooting their fog-of-war defense) would never be possible if journalists had any serious pretense to balance.

  11. A white sheet of paper? Why not just drink milk while making the OK sign, white supremacist!

  12. @Polymath
    It’s okay to be.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Dieter Kief, @Desiderius

    It’s okay to be.

    Which quickly devolves to “It’s Okay” and–as with so many other things–Monty Python was here first, with the man who began every episode of the Flying Circus with the single word IT’S.


    Soon, alas, it will be time for us to return to the ocean from whence we came.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    @Mr McKenna

    Imagine a Terry Gilliam animated foot stomping on everything forever.

    With a burst of comedic flatulence of course.

  13. @Polymath
    It’s okay to be.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Dieter Kief, @Desiderius

    “It’s ok to be”, right Polymath, but beware: “It ain’t that easy to be either” (Heidegger) -at least not in our “Time” (this old Meßkirchian*** thinker again).

    *** I was in radiatingly and overwhelmingly May-beautiful Meßkirch yesterday, with its outlook on the Alps, shining from new snow in the most beautiful and soft (a little hazy) white that there is, as far as I know – so – – – Jubilate!

    • Replies: @jamie b.
    @Dieter Kief

    What???

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

  14. anon[855] • Disclaimer says:

    A poor man’s Minority Report. They arrested the guy pre-crime but lack the ability to see what the crime is, even in the present. Hopefully, Jeff Bezos is on the case. His Amazon company will use advanced deep learning crime-recognition software to figure out what the crime was going to be and how many people would have been hurt in the process. In the future, this will not only be evidence admissible in court, but Amazon’s deepfake news media will report it as fact.

  15. I’ve stood where that guy is standing. I didn’t have a blank placard, though.

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
    @Hunsdon

    Didn't a young fellow, in Almaty or Astana (now Nur-Sultan ;), recently get arrested for putting up a banner that quoted the Kazakh constitution? But those arrested in such incidents are normally released pretty quickly with a stern warning that unsanctioned demonstrations are unwelcome.

    The kid seems to be standing before one of the many Abai/Абай memorials, which are found in most of the major cities. It's interesting to watch as KZ regains -- or reassembles -- its cultural heritage.

  16. This guy is the Yves Klein of protestors. He needs to step it up a little, though, adding a color-revolution hue to tag his grievance. You have anchor your dispute with the Establishment in a color, or the corporate-owned media will either ignore it or re-brand it as something it’s not.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @Endgame Napoleon

    Malevich was a truly radical protester:

    https://static.independent.co.uk/s3fs-public/thumbnails/image/2014/07/15/18/pg-32-mod-art-theiner.jpg
    Black Square (1915) by Kazimir Malevich


    .

    https://www.orthodoxartsjournal.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Malevich-Whtie-on-White.jpg
    Suprematist Composition: White on White (1918)
    by Kazimir Malevich

    Note that the White one is a Suprematist Composition.

  17. Sometimes you get in trouble, not for what you said, but for what you failed to say. So holding a blank sheet could get you into trouble.

    Reminds me of the Polish riot police (zomos) during communism. One day a zomo and his wife went mushroom hunting on their day off. The zomo found a mushroom and addressed it, “Mushroom! You will disclose to me the whereabouts of your comrades!” The mushroom said nothing. The zomo proceeded to take a stick and beat the mushroom to a pulp. His wife walked up and asked why he did that. “I was provoked!” he replied.

  18. He’s there to make himself a meme. He knows thousands of white memers will be photoshopping their slogan onto his placard, and millions will pass those memes along.
    He’s a genius, he says nothing and thereby says everything.
    He’ll be famous.

    • Replies: @donut
    @flayotters

    Pretty good . I'll report any sightings .

  19. It would help me a lot if someone could identify the statue in the background. That might be the clue that unlocks the meaning. Obviously, the young man picked that spot to make his non-statement.

    There is a very Zen like quality to the non-event.

    • Replies: @Fredrik
    @B.B.B.

    The statue looks like Lenin. The visible letter is N written in cyrillic script.

    Btw, the city's real name is Oral. Uralsk is the Russian/Soviet version.

    Replies: @Kibernetika

    , @Kibernetika
    @B.B.B.

    It's Abai, a major figure in Kazakh culture.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abai_Qunanbaiuly

  20. @Anon
    @Anon7

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/04/10/nick-sandmann-lawsuit-washington-post-files-dismiss-teens-case/3421926002/

    Washington Post files to dismiss Covington Catholic teen's defamation lawsuit

    In


    the motion to dismiss, the Washington Post notes that the label suit only cites early news articles that "included the observations and perspectives of the principal Native American participant in the incident" and others.

    "It was neither false nor defamatory, however, for the Post to report the comments of eyewitnesses, including the only participants who were speaking publicly about the matter on the day that videos of the event went viral on the internet," the motion said.

    "Newspapers are often unable to publish a complete account of events when they first come to light. Stories often develop over time, as more witnesses emerge."

     

    All this may be true, but it's something for the finder of fact, the trial court, to determine after examining the evidence. This is not the stuff of dismissals. We'll see how biased the federal court down there is based on how they treat this.

    I wonder if the Post is playing brinksmanship before settling. A trial, with discovery of all their leftist, sarcastic, SJW millennial writing staff's SMS, social media, email, and so on that has been preserved under the initial evidence preservation order is something the Post doesn't want to happen. I look forward the the release of the video depositions.

    Replies: @Barnard, @J.Ross

    I don’t know that they care about the discovery. Is there anything they could say that would shock and offend a liberal Post reader? The initial lawsuit was for such a high dollar amount, I don’t know that a settlement is going to happen here either. These people are zealots and think the work they do is holy. Settling to them would be an admission they were wrong in how they treated Sandmann and the other kids. The only way I see a settlement is if the insurance company pushes them for it.

  21. @szopen
    Reminds me the jokes about communism times in POland ("I have not said anything!" "We both know, what you wanted to say") and the real happenings by Major Frydrych and his dwarfs.

    https://culture.pl/en/article/the-orange-alternative-there-is-no-freedom-without-dwarfs

    Replies: @John Derbyshire

    Conversation in the cattle car headed to Siberia.
    “How long are you in for?”
    “25 years.”
    “What did you do to get 25 years?”
    “Nothing!”
    “Oh, you’re lying. Everyone knows: for nothing, the sentence is only 10 years.”

  22. No doubt he reads iSteve!

  23. The Kazakh (Kazakhstanian?) flag is almost blank:

    It could easily be confused with Somalia’s, which is just the UN’s blue with a lone star.

  24. @Polymath
    It’s okay to be.

    Replies: @Mr McKenna, @Dieter Kief, @Desiderius

    Around here we believe in progress. Being isn’t enough. One must be always becoming.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @Desiderius


    Being isn’t enough. One must be always becoming.
     
    Ich bin, aber ich habe mich nicht. Daher müssen wir werden. (Ernst Bloch - Motto at the beginning of his Collected Works).
    I am. But I don't have me. Therefore we have to become.

    (I hope Jamie B. will not spot this one - it might bother him as well).
  25. While in the “lands of the free” the calls for increased censorship are increasing by the minute in the official media organs, private (MSM) or public (colleges and universities, governments).

  26. @flayotters
    He's there to make himself a meme. He knows thousands of white memers will be photoshopping their slogan onto his placard, and millions will pass those memes along.
    He's a genius, he says nothing and thereby says everything.
    He'll be famous.

    Replies: @donut

    Pretty good . I’ll report any sightings .

  27. @Dieter Kief
    @Polymath

    "It's ok to be", right Polymath, but beware: "It ain't that easy to be either" (Heidegger) -at least not in our "Time" (this old Meßkirchian*** thinker again).

    *** I was in radiatingly and overwhelmingly May-beautiful Meßkirch yesterday, with its outlook on the Alps, shining from new snow in the most beautiful and soft (a little hazy) white that there is, as far as I know - so - - - Jubilate!

    Replies: @jamie b.

    What???

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    @jamie b.

    It's a bit slippery to explain a joke - but here we go: The pretty well known German philosopher Martin Heidegger's most admired and influential book is (aptly) titled Being and Time.

    - In this book, Heidegger makes the point, that philosophy after Platon (= all of the Western philosophy) is flawed, because it does not understand the essence of the crucial foundation of all of our existence - and that is, that time and being are intertwined in such way, that all that had been said about life in the footsteps of Plato (all of traditional metaphysics) is flat out wrong and severely misleading.

    So - seen from Heidegger's standpoint it's pretty safe to say, that it is not really easy to be. - Because of the Being-deception, which constitutes our culture.

    So my answer in Heidegger's footsteps to commenter Polymaths idea, that it'd be ok to be is: This is the illusion of all who ignore Heidegger's philosophical problems.

    Now - I really was in Heidegger's town of birth Meßkirch this week, in Southern Badenia, and had a spectacular view of the freshly snow-covered Eastern Swiss and Western Austrian Alps from there - with this mountain range shining in the mild spring haze in a glowing and radiating white - - - and after hearing this story from Kasachstan and reading about Steve Sailer's grim outlook for people in the US, who in the near future might face the same kind of troubles like the protester in Kazakhstan for bringing up the question of whiteness or - the color white even: I was relieved to see, that at least the Alps at least for the time being -- had not yet been arrested by some kind of PC people around here, where I live.

    Hehe. Everything shines just fine!

  28. @B.B.B.
    It would help me a lot if someone could identify the statue in the background. That might be the clue that unlocks the meaning. Obviously, the young man picked that spot to make his non-statement.

    There is a very Zen like quality to the non-event.

    Replies: @Fredrik, @Kibernetika

    The statue looks like Lenin. The visible letter is N written in cyrillic script.

    Btw, the city’s real name is Oral. Uralsk is the Russian/Soviet version.

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
    @Fredrik

    The statue looks like Lenin. The visible letter is N written in cyrillic script.

    And everything tastes like chicken? ;) Soviet-era Lenin statues wouldn't have him with crossed arms. Rather, he's normally depicted gesticulating with forceful gestures -- much like a speaker at a TED talk (he'd likely give a hell of a TED talk.)

    The visible letter is Й, or "short E." The statue is of Abai/Абай, whose name sounds like A bye to a native English speaker.

    Replies: @Fredrik

  29. We’re releasing you for now, but just remember … we’re keeping an eye on you.

  30. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anon
    @Anon7

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/04/10/nick-sandmann-lawsuit-washington-post-files-dismiss-teens-case/3421926002/

    Washington Post files to dismiss Covington Catholic teen's defamation lawsuit

    In


    the motion to dismiss, the Washington Post notes that the label suit only cites early news articles that "included the observations and perspectives of the principal Native American participant in the incident" and others.

    "It was neither false nor defamatory, however, for the Post to report the comments of eyewitnesses, including the only participants who were speaking publicly about the matter on the day that videos of the event went viral on the internet," the motion said.

    "Newspapers are often unable to publish a complete account of events when they first come to light. Stories often develop over time, as more witnesses emerge."

     

    All this may be true, but it's something for the finder of fact, the trial court, to determine after examining the evidence. This is not the stuff of dismissals. We'll see how biased the federal court down there is based on how they treat this.

    I wonder if the Post is playing brinksmanship before settling. A trial, with discovery of all their leftist, sarcastic, SJW millennial writing staff's SMS, social media, email, and so on that has been preserved under the initial evidence preservation order is something the Post doesn't want to happen. I look forward the the release of the video depositions.

    Replies: @Barnard, @J.Ross

    All mainstream journalism has been doing this very clumsy thing of “finding” people on the street who sound like activists reading off a prepared talking points memo — which would be fine, if they balanced it with people who don’t think that the sun shines out of George Soros, but they never do that outside “investigative” pieces. When they do make a pretension of balance (ie, on This American Life) they find inarticulate morons and jump on every understandable malaprop, or they “summarize” like a cheap defense attorney, or it’s to enable a self-confession.
    As in Soviet journalism, thought criminals are allowed to speak to show how wrong they are or to confess their previous crimes. No accurate representation of right-wing ideas will be found.
    Obviously, the court doesn’t care about this, and will not make the connection to this larger issue from Sandmann effectively just being the eight millionth victim of this uncriticized process. But the defamation (which really happened after the initial reporting, mooting their fog-of-war defense) would never be possible if journalists had any serious pretense to balance.

  31. @Hunsdon
    I've stood where that guy is standing. I didn't have a blank placard, though.

    Replies: @Kibernetika

    Didn’t a young fellow, in Almaty or Astana (now Nur-Sultan ;), recently get arrested for putting up a banner that quoted the Kazakh constitution? But those arrested in such incidents are normally released pretty quickly with a stern warning that unsanctioned demonstrations are unwelcome.

    The kid seems to be standing before one of the many Abai/Абай memorials, which are found in most of the major cities. It’s interesting to watch as KZ regains — or reassembles — its cultural heritage.

  32. @B.B.B.
    It would help me a lot if someone could identify the statue in the background. That might be the clue that unlocks the meaning. Obviously, the young man picked that spot to make his non-statement.

    There is a very Zen like quality to the non-event.

    Replies: @Fredrik, @Kibernetika

    It’s Abai, a major figure in Kazakh culture.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abai_Qunanbaiuly

  33. @Endgame Napoleon
    This guy is the Yves Klein of protestors. He needs to step it up a little, though, adding a color-revolution hue to tag his grievance. You have anchor your dispute with the Establishment in a color, or the corporate-owned media will either ignore it or re-brand it as something it’s not.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bc/IKB_191.jpg/465px-IKB_191.jpg

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Malevich was a truly radical protester:


    Black Square (1915) by Kazimir Malevich

    .


    Suprematist Composition: White on White (1918)
    by Kazimir Malevich

    Note that the White one is a Suprematist Composition.

  34. @Fredrik
    @B.B.B.

    The statue looks like Lenin. The visible letter is N written in cyrillic script.

    Btw, the city's real name is Oral. Uralsk is the Russian/Soviet version.

    Replies: @Kibernetika

    The statue looks like Lenin. The visible letter is N written in cyrillic script.

    And everything tastes like chicken? 😉 Soviet-era Lenin statues wouldn’t have him with crossed arms. Rather, he’s normally depicted gesticulating with forceful gestures — much like a speaker at a TED talk (he’d likely give a hell of a TED talk.)

    The visible letter is Й, or “short E.” The statue is of Abai/Абай, whose name sounds like A bye to a native English speaker.

    • Replies: @Fredrik
    @Kibernetika

    Yeah, you're right. Confirmation bias on my side.

  35. @Kibernetika
    @Fredrik

    The statue looks like Lenin. The visible letter is N written in cyrillic script.

    And everything tastes like chicken? ;) Soviet-era Lenin statues wouldn't have him with crossed arms. Rather, he's normally depicted gesticulating with forceful gestures -- much like a speaker at a TED talk (he'd likely give a hell of a TED talk.)

    The visible letter is Й, or "short E." The statue is of Abai/Абай, whose name sounds like A bye to a native English speaker.

    Replies: @Fredrik

    Yeah, you’re right. Confirmation bias on my side.

  36. @Desiderius
    @Polymath

    Around here we believe in progress. Being isn’t enough. One must be always becoming.

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Being isn’t enough. One must be always becoming.

    Ich bin, aber ich habe mich nicht. Daher müssen wir werden. (Ernst Bloch – Motto at the beginning of his Collected Works).
    I am. But I don’t have me. Therefore we have to become.

    (I hope Jamie B. will not spot this one – it might bother him as well).

  37. @jamie b.
    @Dieter Kief

    What???

    Replies: @Dieter Kief

    It’s a bit slippery to explain a joke – but here we go: The pretty well known German philosopher Martin Heidegger’s most admired and influential book is (aptly) titled Being and Time.

    – In this book, Heidegger makes the point, that philosophy after Platon (= all of the Western philosophy) is flawed, because it does not understand the essence of the crucial foundation of all of our existence – and that is, that time and being are intertwined in such way, that all that had been said about life in the footsteps of Plato (all of traditional metaphysics) is flat out wrong and severely misleading.

    So – seen from Heidegger’s standpoint it’s pretty safe to say, that it is not really easy to be. – Because of the Being-deception, which constitutes our culture.

    So my answer in Heidegger’s footsteps to commenter Polymaths idea, that it’d be ok to be is: This is the illusion of all who ignore Heidegger’s philosophical problems.

    Now – I really was in Heidegger’s town of birth Meßkirch this week, in Southern Badenia, and had a spectacular view of the freshly snow-covered Eastern Swiss and Western Austrian Alps from there – with this mountain range shining in the mild spring haze in a glowing and radiating white – – – and after hearing this story from Kasachstan and reading about Steve Sailer’s grim outlook for people in the US, who in the near future might face the same kind of troubles like the protester in Kazakhstan for bringing up the question of whiteness or – the color white even: I was relieved to see, that at least the Alps at least for the time being — had not yet been arrested by some kind of PC people around here, where I live.

    Hehe. Everything shines just fine!

  38. @Mr McKenna
    @Polymath


    It’s okay to be.
     
    Which quickly devolves to "It's Okay" and--as with so many other things--Monty Python was here first, with the man who began every episode of the Flying Circus with the single word IT'S.

    https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/montypython/images/7/7f/It%27s1.jpg

    Soon, alas, it will be time for us to return to the ocean from whence we came.

    Replies: @Olorin

    Imagine a Terry Gilliam animated foot stomping on everything forever.

    With a burst of comedic flatulence of course.

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